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Sample records for vibrational bands observed

  1. Identical gamma-vibrational bands in {sup 165}Ho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radford, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Janzen, V.P. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The structure of {sup 165}Ho at moderate spins has been investigated by means of Coulomb excitation. Two {gamma}-vibrational bands (K{sup {pi}} = 11/2{sup {minus}} and K{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup {minus}}) are observed, with very nearly identical in-band {gamma}-ray energies. Gamma-ray branching ratios are analyzed to extract information on Coriolis mixing, and the role of the K quantum number in identical bands is discussed.

  2. Observation of dipole bands in 144Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raut, R.; Ganguly, S.; Kshetri, R.; Banerjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Mukherjee, A.; Sahasarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Basu, S.K.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Mukherjee, G.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghughre, S.S.; Krishichayan; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Gangopadhyay, G.; Singh, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    The nucleus 144 Sm (Z=62, N=82), with its proximity to the shell closure and possibilities of particles and holes occupying high j orbitals, following appropriate excitations, is a suitable system for observation of dipole (MR) bands

  3. Laboratory observation of hot bands of H+3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawendi, M.G.; Rehfuss, B.D.; Oka, T.

    1990-01-01

    The (2ν 2 ,l=2 left-arrow ν 2 ), (2ν 2 ,l=0 left-arrow ν 2 ), and (ν 1 +ν 2 left-arrow ν 1 ) hot bands of H + 3 were observed. The vibrationally hot ions were produced in a liquid nitrogen cooled 6 kHz ac discharge using gas mixtures of H 2 and He. The spectra were detected in direct absorption using a newly extended tunable difference frequency spectrometer using both LiNbO 3 and LiIO 3 crystals as nonlinear optical elements. The range of this spectrometer is now ∼5300--∼1900 cm -1 . The positions of the rovibrational transitions compare extremely well with the theoretical predictions of Miller and Tennyson. A vibrational temperature study of the discharge indicates a significant population inversion between the ν 1 and ν 2 levels

  4. Vibration-rotation band intensities in the IR spectra of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El'kin, M.D.; Kosterina, E.K.; Berezin

    1995-01-01

    Using the curvilinear vibrational coordinates for a nuclear subsystem, expressions for the effective dipole-moment operators are derived in order to analyze the vibrational-rotational transitions in the IR spectra of polyatomic rigid molecules. The explicit expressions obtained for the intensities of hot bands allow one to estimate the influence of the vibration-rotation interaction within the framework of the adopted molecular-vibration model. The suggested method is shown to be suitable for Raman spectra analysis. 12 refs

  5. Ground-state and pairing-vibrational bands with equal quadrupole collectivity in 124Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, A. J.; Garrett, P. E.; Allmond, J. M.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bianco, L.; Bildstein, V.; Chagnon-Lessard, S.; Cross, D. S.; Demand, G. A.; Diaz Varela, A.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Laffoley, A. T.; Leach, K. G.; Michetti-Wilson, J.; Orce, J. N.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rand, E. T.; Starosta, K.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Triambak, S.; Wang, Z. M.; Wood, J. L.; Wong, J.; Williams, S. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear structure of 124Xe has been investigated via measurements of the β+/EC decay of 124Cs with the 8 π γ -ray spectrometer at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility. The data collected have enabled branching ratio measurements of weak, low-energy transitions from highly excited states, and the 2+→0+ in-band transitions have been observed. Combining these results with those from a previous Coulomb excitation study, B (E 2 ;23+→02+) =78 (13 ) W.u. and B (E 2 ;24+→03+) =53 (12 ) W.u. were determined. The 03+ state, in particular, is interpreted as the main fragment of the proton-pairing vibrational band identified in a previous 122Te (3He,n )124Xe measurement, and has quadrupole collectivity equal to, within uncertainty, that of the ground-state band.

  6. Complete flexural vibration band gaps in membrane-like lattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Qiu Jing; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of flexural vibration in the periodical membrane-like lattice structure is studied. The band structure calculated with the plane wave expansion method indicates the existence of complete gaps. The frequency response function of a finite periodic structure is simulated with finite element method. Frequency ranges with vibration attenuation are in good agreement with the gaps found in the band structure. Much larger attenuations are found in the complete gaps comparing to those directional ones. The existence of complete flexural vibration gaps in such a lattice structure provides a new idea for vibration control of thin plates

  7. Large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration phenomenon of a foursquare fix-supported flexible plate in a rigid narrow channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lifang, E-mail: liu_lifang1106@yahoo.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Lu Daogang, E-mail: ludaogang@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Li Yang, E-mail: qinxiuyi@sina.com [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Zhang Pan, E-mail: zhangpan@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); Niu Fenglei, E-mail: niufenglei@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > FIV of a foursquare fix-supported flexible plate exposed to axial flow was studied. > Special designed test section and advanced measuring equipments were adopted. > The narrow-band vibration phenomenon with large amplitude was observed. > Line of plate's vibration amplitude and flow rate was investigated. > The phenomenon and the measurement error were analyzed. - Abstract: An experiment was performed to analyze the flow-induced vibration behavior of a foursquare fix-supported flexible plate exposed to the axial flow within a rigid narrow channel. The large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration phenomenon was observed in the experiment when the flow velocity varied with the range of 0-5 m/s. The occurring condition and some characteristics of the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibrations were investigated.

  8. Vibrational effects on surface energies and band gaps in hexagonal and cubic ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, Edgar A.; Needs, Richard J.; Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    Surface energies of hexagonal and cubic water ice are calculated using first-principles quantum mechanical methods, including an accurate description of anharmonic nuclear vibrations. We consider two proton-orderings of the hexagonal and cubic ice basal surfaces and three proton-orderings of hexagonal ice prism surfaces, finding that vibrations reduce the surface energies by more than 10%. We compare our vibrational densities of states to recent sum frequency generation absorption measurements and identify surface proton-orderings of experimental ice samples and the origins of characteristic absorption peaks. We also calculate zero point quantum vibrational corrections to the surface electronic band gaps, which range from −1.2 eV for the cubic ice basal surface up to −1.4 eV for the hexagonal ice prism surface. The vibrational corrections to the surface band gaps are up to 12% smaller than for bulk ice.

  9. Nonsynchronous vibrations observed in a supercritical power transmission shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, M. S.; Zorzi, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    A flexible shaft is prone to a number of vibration phenomena which occur at frequencies other than synchronous with rotational speed. Nonsynchronous vibrations from several sources were observed while running a test rig designed to simulate the operation of a supercritical power transmission shaft. The test rig was run first with very light external damping and then with a higher level of external damping, for comparison. As a result, the effect of external damping on the nonsynchronous vibrations of the test rig was observed. All of these nonsynchronous vibrations were of significant amplitude. Their presence in the vibrations spectra for a supercritical power transmission shaft at various speeds in the operating range indicates that very careful attention to all of the vibration spectra should be made in any supercritical power transmission shafting. This paper presents a review of the analysis performed and a comparison with experimental data. A thorough discussion of the observed nonsynchronous whirl is also provided.

  10. Lock threshold deterioration induced by antenna vibration and signal coupling effects in hypersonic vehicle carrier tracking system of Ka band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congying ZHU

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The envelope of a hypersonic vehicle is affected by severe fluctuating pressure, which causes the airborne antenna to vibrate slightly. This vibration mixes with the transmitted signals and thus introduces additional multiplicative phase noise. Antenna vibration and signal coupling effects as well as their influence on the lock threshold of the hypersonic vehicle carrier tracking system of the Ka band are investigated in this study. A vibration model is initially established to obtain phase noise in consideration of the inherent relationship between vibration displacement and electromagnetic wavelength. An analytical model of the Phase-Locked Loop (PLL, which is widely used in carrier tracking systems, is established. The coupling effects on carrier tracking performance are investigated and quantitatively analyzed by imposing the multiplicative phase noise on the PLL model. Simulation results show that the phase noise presents a Gaussian distribution and is similar to vibration displacement variation. A large standard deviation in vibration displacement exerts a significant effect on the lock threshold. A critical standard deviation is observed in the PLL of Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK and Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK signals. The effect on QPSK signals is more severe than that on BPSK signals. The maximum tolerable standard deviations normalized by the wavelength of the carrier are 0.04 and 0.02 for BPSK and QPSK signals, respectively. With these critical standard deviations, lock thresholds are increased from −12 and −4 dB to 3 and −2 dB, respectively. Keywords: Antenna vibration, Carrier tracking performance, Lock threshold, Phase locked loop, Tracking Telemetry and Command (TT&C signals

  11. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous dampin...

  12. Vibrational bands of luminescent zinc(II)-octaethyl-porphyrin using a polarization-sensitive 'microcopic' multiplex CARS technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; Voroshilov, A.; Voroshilov, Artemy; Kruglik, S.; Kruglik, S.G.; Greve, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive, multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ps-MCARS) has been used to detect the vibrational bands of the highly luminescent zinc(II)-octaethylporphyrin (Zn-OEP). We show here that ps-MCARS can be used to measure the vibrational bands under resonant conditions.

  13. On the dependence of the OH* Meinel emission altitude on vibrational level: SCIAMACHY observations and model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Burrows

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the OH Meinel emissions in the terrestrial nightglow are one of the standard ground-based techniques to retrieve upper mesospheric temperatures. It is often assumed that the emission peak altitudes are not strongly dependent on the vibrational level, although this assumption is not based on convincing experimental evidence. In this study we use Envisat/SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY observations in the near-IR spectral range to retrieve vertical volume emission rate profiles of the OH(3-1, OH(6-2 and OH(8-3 Meinel bands in order to investigate whether systematic differences in emission peak altitudes can be observed between the different OH Meinel bands. The results indicate that the emission peak altitudes are different for the different vibrational levels, with bands originating from higher vibrational levels having higher emission peak altitudes. It is shown that this finding is consistent with the majority of the previously published results. The SCIAMACHY observations yield differences in emission peak altitudes of up to about 4 km between the OH(3-1 and the OH(8-3 band. The observations are complemented by model simulations of the fractional population of the different vibrational levels and of the vibrational level dependence of the emission peak altitude. The model simulations reproduce the observed vibrational level dependence of the emission peak altitude well – both qualitatively and quantitatively – if quenching by atomic oxygen as well as multi-quantum collisional relaxation by O2 is considered. If a linear relationship between emission peak altitude and vibrational level is assumed, then a peak altitude difference of roughly 0.5 km per vibrational level is inferred from both the SCIAMACHY observations and the model simulations.

  14. Band Width of Acoustic Resonance Frequency Relatively Natural Frequency of Fuel Rod Vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin Nicolaevich; Moukhine, V.S.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivets, E.Yu. [MPEI - TU, 14, Krasnokazarmennaya str., Moscow, 111250 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    In flow induced vibrations the fluid flow is the energy source that causes vibration. Acoustic resonance in piping may lead to severe problems due to over-stressing of components or significant losses of efficiency. Steady oscillatory flow in NPP primary loop can be induced by the pulsating flow introduced by reactor circulating pump or may be set up by self-excitation. Dynamic forces generated by the turbulent flow of coolant in reactor cores cause fuel rods (FR) and fuel assembly (FA) to vibrate. Flow-induced FR and FA vibrations can generally be broken into three groups: large amplitude 'resonance type' vibrations, which can cause immediate rod failure or severe damage to the rod and its support structure, middle amplitude 'within bandwidth of resonance frequency type' vibrations responsible for more gradual wear and fatigue at the contact surface between the fuel cladding and rod support and small amplitude vibrations, 'out of bandwidth of resonance frequency type' responsible for permissible wear and fatigue at the contact surface between the fuel cladding and rod support. Ultimately, these vibration types can result in a cladding breach, and therefore must be accounted for in the thermal hydraulic design of FR and FA and reactor internals. In paper the technique of definition of quality factor (Q) of acoustic contour of the coolant is presented. The value of Q defines a range of frequencies of acoustic fluctuations of the coolant within which the resonance of oscillations of the structure and the coolant is realized. Method of evaluation of so called band width (BW) of acoustic resonance frequency is worked out and presented in the paper. BW characterises the range of the frequency of coolant pressure oscillations within which the frequency of coolant pressure oscillations matches the fuel assembly's natural frequency of vibration (its resonance frequency). Paper show the way of detuning acoustic resonance from natural

  15. Flow induced vibrations of the CLIC X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Tessa; Boland, Mark; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent cooling water in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerating structures will inevitably induce some vibrations. The maximum acceptable amplitude of vibrations is small, as vibrations in the accelerating structure could lead to beam jitter and alignment difficulties. A Finite Element Analysis model is needed to identify the conditions under which turbulent instabilities and significant vibrations are induced. Due to the orders of magnitude difference between the fluid motion and the structure’s motion, small vibrations of the structure will not contribute to the turbulence of the cooling fluid. Therefore the resonant conditions of the cooling channels presented in this paper, directly identify the natural frequencies of the accelerating structures to be avoided under normal operating conditions. In this paper a 2D model of the cooling channel is presented finding spots of turbulence being formed from a shear layer instability. This effect is observed through direct visualization and wavelet ana...

  16. Inverse problem of the vibrational band gap of periodically supported beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaona; Shu, Haisheng; Dong, Fuzhen; Zhao, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The researches of periodic structures have a long history with the main contents confined in the field of forward problem. In this paper, the inverse problem is considered and an overall frame is proposed which includes two main stages, i.e., the band gap criterion and its optimization. As a preliminary investigation, the inverse problem of the flexural vibrational band gap of a periodically supported beam is analyzed. According to existing knowledge of its forward problem, the band gap criterion is given in implicit form. Then, two cases with three independent parameters, namely the double supported case and the triple one, are studied in detail and the explicit expressions of the feasible domain are constructed by numerical fitting. Finally, the parameter optimization of the double supported case with three variables is conducted using genetic algorithm aiming for the best mean attenuation within specified frequency band.

  17. Calibration of VIIRS F1 Sensor Fire Detection Band Using lunar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Jeff; Efremova, Boryana; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Fight 1 (Fl) sensor includes a fire detection band at roughly 4 microns. This spectral band has two gain states; fire detection occurs in the low gain state above approximately 345 K. The thermal bands normally utilize an on-board blackbody to provide on-orbit calibration. However, as the maximum temperature of this blackbody is 315 K, the low gain state of the 4 micron band cannot be calibrated in the same manner as the rest of the thermal bands. Regular observations of the moon provide an alternative calibration source. The lunar surface temperature has been recently mapped by the DIVINER sensor on the LRO platform. The periodic on-board high gain calibration along with the DIVINER surface temperatures was used to determine the emissivity and solar reflectance of the lunar surface at 4 microns; these factors and the lunar data are then used to fit the low gain calibration coefficients of the 4 micron band. Furthermore, the emissivity of the lunar surface is well known near 8.5 microns due to the Christiansen feature (an emissivity maximum associated with Si-O stretching vibrations) and the solar reflectance is negligible. Thus, the 8.5 micron band is used for relative calibration with the 4 micron band to de-trend any temporal variations. In addition, the remaining thermal bands are analyzed in a similar fashion, with both calculated emissivities and solar reflectances produced.

  18. Systematics of the K 2·gamma vibrational bands and odd–even ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (RTR) model of Davydov et al [2] it represents an anomalous rotation band. Wilets and ... 4 2 values of 2.0 to 3.33, i.e., from the harmonic vibrator to rotor limit. Gupta et al [14] used the Mallmann plot to illustrate a smooth variation of these R. J 2 ratios as ..... For individual isotopic chains also S(4) falls with increas- ing R. 4 2.

  19. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, J; Decker, V; Hendrickson, L; Markiewicz, T W; Partridge, R; Seryi, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  20. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system

  1. Force illusions and drifts observed during muscle vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Cuadra, Cristian; Latash, Mark L

    2018-01-01

    We explored predictions of a scheme that views position and force perception as a result of measuring proprioceptive signals within a reference frame set by ongoing efferent process. In particular, this hypothesis predicts force illusions caused by muscle vibration and mediated via changes in both afferent and efferent components of kinesthesia. Healthy subjects performed accurate steady force production tasks by pressing with the four fingers of one hand (the task hand) on individual force sensors with and without visual feedback. At various times during the trials, subjects matched the perceived force using the other hand. High-frequency vibration was applied to one or both of the forearms (over the hand and finger extensors). Without visual feedback, subjects showed a drop in the task hand force, which was significantly smaller under the vibration of that forearm. Force production by the matching hand was consistently higher than that of the task hand. Vibrating one of the forearms affected the matching hand in a manner consistent with the perception of higher magnitude of force produced by the vibrated hand. The findings were consistent between the dominant and nondominant hands. The effects of vibration on both force drift and force mismatching suggest that vibration led to shifts in both signals from proprioceptors and the efferent component of perception, the referent coordinate and/or coactivation command. The observations fit the hypothesis on combined perception of kinematic-kinetic variables with little specificity of different groups of peripheral receptors that all contribute to perception of forces and coordinates. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that vibration of hand/finger extensors produces consistent errors in finger force perception. Without visual feedback, finger force drifted to lower values without a drift in the matching force produced by the other hand; hand extensor vibration led to smaller finger force drift. The findings fit the scheme with

  2. Observations of banding in first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David M.; Eicken, Hajo; Frey, Karoline; Shapiro, Lewis H.

    2004-08-01

    Horizontal banding features, alternating dark and bright horizontal bands apparent in ice cores and stratigraphic cross sections have long been observed in first-year sea ice and are frequently associated with bands of high and low brine or gas porosity. Observations on the land-fast ice near Barrow, Alaska, in recent years have revealed particularly striking banding patterns and prompted a study of their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. The banding patterns are quantified from photographs of full-depth sections of the ice, and examples are presented from the Chukchi Sea and Elson Lagoon. Statistics on band spacing are presented, and the growth records for three seasons are employed to estimate their time of formation. These data provide insight into the periodicity of the underlying phenomena. Micrographs are used to examine the microstructural variations associated with various banding features and to quantify the geometry of the constituent brine inclusions associated with high- and low-porosity bands. The micrography revealed that the area fraction of brine inclusions varied by a factor of nearly 3 through the more pronounced high- and low-porosity bands. Vertical micrographs obtained shortly after the materials' removal from the ice sheet showed that significantly larger inclusions form abruptly at the start of the high-porosity bands and frequently terminate abruptly at the end of the band. Crystallographic observations indicated that the high-porosity bands supported the nucleation and growth of crystals having substantially different orientations from the very well aligned columnar structure that characterized the bulk of the sheet.

  3. Deformation bands in porous carbonate grainstones: Field and laboratory observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilona, A.; Baud, P.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rustichelli, A.; Spiers, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent field-based studies documented deformation bands in porous carbonates; these structures accommodate volumetric and/or shear strain by means of pore collapse, grain rotation and/or sliding. Microstructural observations of natural deformation bands in carbonates showed that, at advanced stages

  4. Numerical calculation of acoustic radiation from band-vibrating structures via FEM/FAQP method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Honglin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Finite Element Method (FEM combined with the Frequency Averaged Quadratic Pressure method (FAQP are used to calculate the acoustic radiation of structures excited in the frequency band. The surface particle velocity of stiffened cylindrical shells under frequency band excitation is calculated using finite element software, the normal vibration velocity is converted from the surface particle velocity to calculate the average energy source (frequency averaged across intensity, frequency averaged across pressure and frequency averaged across velocity, and the FAQP method is used to calculate the average sound pressure level within the bandwidth. The average sound pressure levels are then compared with the bandwidth using finite element and boundary element software, and the results show that FEM combined with FAQP is more suitable for high frequencies and can be used to calculate the average sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave band with good stability, presenting an alternative to applying frequency-by-frequency calculation and the average frequency process. The FEM/FAQP method can be used as a prediction method for calculating acoustic radiation while taking the randomness of vibration at medium and high frequencies into consideration.

  5. Proposed colour banded early warning observation charts for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction of a colour banded observation chart should be combined with a clear communication strategy. The process should be used to change the organisational culture to be more proactive in initiating early intervention to reduce the burden of unintended complications. Keywords: Observation chart; Physiology; ...

  6. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Hund, Zachary M.; th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Nihill, Kevin J.; th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Sibener, S. J.; Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M.; Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Benedek, G.

    2015-01-01

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD 3 -Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH 3 -Ge(111) and CH 3 -Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers

  7. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hund, Zachary M.; Nihill, Kevin J.; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57" t" h Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beckman Institute and Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory, 127-72, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Benedek, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Universidad del País Vasco (EHU), 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2015-09-28

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD{sub 3}-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH{sub 3}-Ge(111) and CH{sub 3}-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers.

  8. Whistler Triggered Upper Band Chorus Observed in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Golkowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    VLF radiation from lightning discharges is one of several sources of energy injection into the inner magnetosphere from the Earth. Lightning discharges initially produce a broadband impulse or `sferic' but after propagation in the dispersive magnetosphere this waveform soon becomes quasi narrow band with the characteristic spectrographic form of the whistler. Most of the lightning induced VLF wave energy injected into the magnetosphere will be unducted with a k-vector which becomes increasingly oblique. Although unducted radiation is ubiquitous throughout the inner magnetosphere, it is generally of a low amplitude due to Landau damping and is not expected to produce strong nonlinear phenomena such as triggered emissions and chorus waves. However, VLF wave energy ducted or trapped in field-aligned plasma density enhancements can have relatively large amplitudes due to focusing and also linear cyclotron resonance growth. Therefore high amplitude ducted whistler waves can trigger a number of complex nonlinear phenomena. These include the triggering of VLF emissions and triggering of VLF hiss or chorus. Such phenomena are generally considered to result from nonlinear electron cyclotron phase trapping. Observation of such VLF emissions triggered by natural whistlers have been reported since the 1970s in Antarctica. We present observations of whistlers triggered upper band chorus emission from Alaska. Dispersion analyze of whistlers determine the L-shell range to be 4.5 clear frequency band gap between upper and lower band of the observed chorus emissions. The observations point to ducted chorus generation in the vicinity of the plasmapause boundary.

  9. Research on mechanism of the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration of a flexible flat plate in the rectangular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lifang, E-mail: liu_lifang1106@yahoo.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China); State Nuclear Power Software Development Center, Building 1, Compound No. 29, North Third Ring Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100029 (China); Lu Daogang [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Zhuxinzhuang, Dewai, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The large amplitude and narrow-band vibration experiment was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The added mass theory was used to analyze the test plates' natural vibration characteristics in static water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The occurring condition of the large amplitude and narrow band vibration was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The large amplitude and narrow-band vibration mechanism was investigated. - Abstract: Further experiments and theoretical analysis were performed to investigate mechanism of the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration behavior of a flexible flat plate in a rectangular channel. Test plates with different thicknesses were adopted in the FIV experiments. The natural vibration characteristics of the flexible flat plates in air were tested, and the added mass theory of column was used to analyze the flexible flat plates' natural vibration characteristics in static water. It was found that the natural vibration frequency of a certain test plate in static water is approximately within the main vibration frequency band of the plate when it was induced to vibrate with the large-amplitude and narrow-band in the rectangular channel. It can be concluded that the harmonic between the flowing fluid and the vibrating plate is one of the key reasons to induce the large-amplitude and narrow-band vibration phenomenon. The occurring condition of the phenomenon and some important narrow-band vibration characteristics of a foursquare fix-supported flexible flat plate were investigated.

  10. Estimating Coastal Turbidity using MODIS 250 m Band Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James E.; Moeller, Christopher C.; Gunshor, Mathew M.; Menzel, W. Paul; Walker, Nan D.

    2004-01-01

    Terra MODIS 250 m observations are being applied to a Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) algorithm that is under development for coastal case 2 waters where reflectance is dominated by sediment entrained in major fluvial outflows. An atmospheric correction based on MODIS observations in the 500 m resolution 1.6 and 2.1 micron bands is used to isolate the remote sensing reflectance in the MODIS 25Om resolution 650 and 865 nanometer bands. SSC estimates from remote sensing reflectance are based on accepted inherent optical properties of sediment types known to be prevalent in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coastal zone. We present our findings for the Atchafalaya Bay region of the Louisiana Coast, in the form of processed imagery over the annual cycle. We also apply our algorithm to selected sites worldwide with a goal of extending the utility of our approach to the global direct broadcast community.

  11. NARROW-K-BAND OBSERVATIONS OF THE GJ 1214 SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Gaidos, Eric, E-mail: colonk@hawaii.edu [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    GJ 1214 is a nearby M dwarf star that hosts a transiting super-Earth-size planet, making this system an excellent target for atmospheric studies. Most studies find that the transmission spectrum of GJ 1214b is flat, which favors either a high mean molecular weight or cloudy/hazy hydrogen (H) rich atmosphere model. Photometry at short wavelengths (<0.7 μm) and in the K band can discriminate the most between these different atmosphere models for GJ 1214b, but current observations do not have sufficiently high precision. We present photometry of seven transits of GJ 1214b through a narrow K-band (2.141 μm) filter with the Wide Field Camera on the 3.8 m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. Our photometric precision is typically 1.7 × 10{sup –3} (for a single transit), comparable with other ground-based observations of GJ 1214b. We measure a planet-star radius ratio of 0.1158 ± 0.0013, which, along with other studies, also supports a flat transmission spectrum for GJ 1214b. Since this does not exclude a scenario where GJ 1214b has an H-rich envelope with heavy elements that are sequestered below a cloud/haze layer, we compare K-band observations with models of H{sub 2} collision-induced absorption in an atmosphere for a range of temperatures. While we find no evidence for deviation from a flat spectrum (slope s = 0.0016 ± 0.0038), an H{sub 2}-dominated upper atmosphere (<60 mbar) cannot be excluded. More precise observations at <0.7 μm and in the K band, as well as a uniform analysis of all published data, would be useful for establishing more robust limits on atmosphere models for GJ 1214b.

  12. Observation of symmetry-protected topological band with ultracold fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Zhang, Long; He, Chengdong; Poon, Ting Fung Jeffrey; Hajiyev, Elnur; Zhang, Shanchao; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2018-01-01

    Symmetry plays a fundamental role in understanding complex quantum matter, particularly in classifying topological quantum phases, which have attracted great interests in the recent decade. An outstanding example is the time-reversal invariant topological insulator, a symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase in the symplectic class of the Altland-Zirnbauer classification. We report the observation for ultracold atoms of a noninteracting SPT band in a one-dimensional optical lattice and study quench dynamics between topologically distinct regimes. The observed SPT band can be protected by a magnetic group and a nonlocal chiral symmetry, with the band topology being measured via Bloch states at symmetric momenta. The topology also resides in far-from-equilibrium spin dynamics, which are predicted and observed in experiment to exhibit qualitatively distinct behaviors in quenching to trivial and nontrivial regimes, revealing two fundamental types of spin-relaxation dynamics related to bulk topology. This work opens the way to expanding the scope of SPT physics with ultracold atoms and studying nonequilibrium quantum dynamics in these exotic systems. PMID:29492457

  13. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide: Fermi resonance, conformational substates, or vibrational self-trapping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, P.

    2003-08-01

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy is applied to investigate acetanilide, a molecular crystal consisting of quasi-one-dimensional hydrogen bonded peptide units. The amide-I band exhibits a double peak structure, which has been attributed to different mechanisms including vibrational self-trapping, a Fermi resonance, or the existence of two conformational substates. The 2D-IR spectrum of crystalline acetanilide is compared with that of two different molecular systems: (i) benzoylchloride, which exhibits a strong symmetric Fermi resonance and (ii) N-methylacetamide dissolved in methanol which occurs in two spectroscopically distinguishable conformations. Both 2D-IR spectra differ significantly from that of crystalline acetanilide, proving that these two alternative mechanisms cannot account for the anomalous spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide. On the other hand, vibrational self-trapping of the amide-I band can naturally explain the 2D-IR response.

  14. Multiflash whistlers in ELF-band observed at low latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiflash whistler-like event in the ELF-band, observed during March 1998 at low latitude station Jammu, is reported. The most prominent feature of these events is the multiflash nature along with the decrease in frequency within a very short span of time resembling similar to terrestrial whistlers. The events have a significantly smaller time duration (0.5–3.5 s than those reported earlier from high, mid and low latitudes and also display a diurnal maximum occurring around 09:30 h (IST. There have been similar reportings from other latitudes, but whistlers in the ELF-band with a multiflash nature along with a precursor emission have never been reported. Lightning seems to be the dominant source for the ELF whistlers reported here.

  15. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  16. Hyperfine-resolved transition frequency list of fundamental vibration bands of H35Cl and H37Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuni, Kana; Sera, Hideyuki; Abe, Masashi; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy of the fundamental vibration bands of H35Cl and H37Cl has been carried out from 87.1 to 89.9 THz. We have determined the absolute transition frequencies of the hyperfine-resolved R(0) to R(4) transitions with a typical uncertainty of 10 kHz. We have also yielded six molecular constants for each isotopomer in the vibrational excited state, which reproduce the determined frequencies with a standard deviation of about 10 kHz.

  17. Direct observation of vibrational energy dispersal via methyl torsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adrian M; Tuttle, William D; Whalley, Laura E; Wright, Timothy G

    2018-02-28

    Explicit evidence for the role of methyl rotor levels in promoting energy dispersal is reported. A set of coupled zero-order vibration/vibration-torsion (vibtor) levels in the S 1 state of para -fluorotoluene ( p FT) are investigated. Two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) and two-dimensional zero-kinetic-energy (2D-ZEKE) spectra are reported, and the assignment of the main features in both sets of spectra reveals that the methyl torsion is instrumental in providing a route for coupling between vibrational levels of different symmetry classes. We find that there is very localized, and selective, dissipation of energy via doorway states, and that, in addition to an increase in the density of states, a critical role of the methyl group is a relaxation of symmetry constraints compared to direct vibrational coupling.

  18. Communication: On the competition between adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics in vibrationally mediated ammonia photodissociation in its A band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Changjian [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xiaolei; Yarkony, David R., E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Ma, Jianyi, E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610065 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Non-adiabatic processes play an important role in photochemistry, but the mechanism for conversion of electronic energy to chemical energy is still poorly understood. To explore the possibility of vibrational control of non-adiabatic dynamics in a prototypical photoreaction, namely, the A-band photodissociation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of symmetric or antisymmetric stretch excited NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}) is investigated on recently developed coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces. The experimentally observed H atom kinetic energy distributions are reproduced. However, contrary to previous inferences, the NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1})/NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) branching ratio is found to be small regardless of the initial preparation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), while the internal state distribution of the preeminent fragment, NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}), is found to depend strongly on the initial vibrational excitation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}). The slow H atoms in photodissociation mediated by the antisymmetric stretch fundamental state are due to energy sequestered in the internally excited NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment, rather than in NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1}) as previously proposed. The high internal excitation of the NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment is attributed to the torques exerted on the molecule as it passes through the conical intersection seam to the ground electronic state of NH{sub 3}. Thus in this system, contrary to previous assertions, the control of electronic state branching by selective excitation of ground state vibrational modes is concluded to be ineffective. The juxtaposition of precise quantum mechanical results with complementary results based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories provides significant insights into the non-adiabatic process.

  19. W-band spaceborne radar observations of atmospheric river events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosov, S. Y.

    2010-12-01

    While the main objective of the world first W-band radar aboard the CloudSat satellite is to provide vertically resolved information on clouds, it proved to be a valuable tool for observing precipitation. The CloudSat radar is generally able to resolve precipitating cloud systems in their vertical entirety. Although measurements from the liquid hydrometer layer containing rainfall are strongly attenuated, special retrieval approaches can be used to estimate rainfall parameters. These approaches are based on vertical gradients of observed radar reflectivity factor rather than on absolute estimates of reflectivity. Concurrent independent estimations of ice cloud parameters in the same vertical column allow characterization of precipitating systems and provide information on coupling between clouds and rainfall they produce. The potential of CloudSat for observations atmospheric river events affecting the West Coast of North America is evaluated. It is shown that spaceborne radar measurements can provide high resolution information on the height of the freezing level thus separating areas of rainfall and snowfall. CloudSat precipitation rate estimates complement information from the surface-based radars. Observations of atmospheric rivers at different locations above the ocean and during landfall help to understand evolutions of atmospheric rivers and their structures.

  20. Prototype observation and influencing factors of environmental vibration induced by flood discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to a wide range of field vibration problems caused by flood discharge at the Xiangjiaba Hydropower Station, vibration characteristics and influencing factors were investigated based on prototype observation. The results indicate that field vibrations caused by flood discharge have distinctive characteristics of constancy, low frequency, small amplitude, and randomness with impact, which significantly differ from the common high-frequency vibration characteristics. Field vibrations have a main frequency of about 0.5–3.0 Hz and the characteristics of long propagation distance and large-scale impact. The vibration of a stilling basin slab runs mainly in the vertical direction. The vibration response of the guide wall perpendicular to the flow is significantly stronger than it is in other directions and decreases linearly downstream along the guide wall. The vibration response of the underground turbine floor is mainly caused by the load of unit operation. Urban environmental vibration has particular distribution characteristics and change patterns, and is greatly affected by discharge, scheduling modes, and geological conditions. Along with the increase of the height of residential buildings, vibration responses show a significant amplification effect. The horizontal and vertical vibrations of the 7th floor are, respectively, about 6 times and 1.5 times stronger than the corresponding vibrations of the 1st floor. The vibration of a large-scale chemical plant presents the combined action of flood discharge and working machines. Meanwhile, it is very difficult to reduce the low-frequency environmental vibrations. Optimization of the discharge scheduling mode is one of the effective measures of reducing the flow impact loads at present. Choosing reasonable dam sites is crucial.

  1. Observation of band gaps in the gigahertz range and deaf bands in a hypersonic aluminum nitride phononic crystal slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorisse, M.; Benchabane, S.; Teissier, G.; Billard, C.; Reinhardt, A.; Laude, V.; Defaÿ, E.; Aïd, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the observation of elastic waves propagating in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of air holes drilled in an aluminum nitride membrane. The theoretical band structure indicates the existence of an acoustic band gap centered around 800 MHz with a relative bandwidth of 6.5% that is confirmed by gigahertz optical images of the surface displacement. Further electrical measurements and computation of the transmission reveal a much wider attenuation band that is explained by the deaf character of certain bands resulting from the orthogonality of their polarization with that of the source.

  2. Ab-initio vibrational properties of transition metal chalcopyrite alloys determined as high-efficiency intermediate-band photovoltaic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, P.; Aguilera, I.; Wahnon, P.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present frozen phonon and linear response ab-initio research into the vibrational properties of the CuGaS 2 chalcopyrite and transition metal substituted (CuGaS 2 )M alloys. These systems are potential candidates for developing a novel solar-cell material with enhanced optoelectronic properties based in the implementation of the intermediate-band concept. We have previously carried out ab-initio calculations of the electronic properties of these kinds of chalcopyrite metal alloys showing a narrow transition metal band isolated in the semiconductor band gap. The substitutes used in the present work are the 3d metal elements, Titanium and Chromium. For the theoretical calculations we use standard density functional theory at local density and generalized gradient approximation levels. We found that the optical phonon branches of the transition metal chalcopyrite, are very sensitive to the specific bonding geometry and small changes in the transition metal environment

  3. Alternative measures to observe and record vocal fold vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, HK; McCafferty, G; Coman, W; Carroll, R

    1996-01-01

    Vocal fold vibration patterns form the basis for the production of vocal sound. Over the years much effort has been spend to optimize the ways to visualize and give a description of these patterns. Before video possibilities became available the description of the patterns was Very time-consuming.

  4. Observation of the adsorption and desorption of vibrationally excited molecules on a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Rahinov, Igor; Golibrzuch, Kai; Werdecker, Jörn; Geweke, Jan; Altschäffel, Jan; Kumar, Sumit; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2018-06-01

    The most common mechanism of catalytic surface chemistry is that of Langmuir and Hinshelwood (LH). In the LH mechanism, reactants adsorb, become thermalized with the surface, and subsequently react. The measured vibrational (relaxation) lifetimes of molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces are in the range of a few picoseconds. As a consequence, vibrational promotion of LH chemistry is rarely observed, with the exception of LH reactions occurring via a molecular physisorbed intermediate. Here, we directly detect adsorption and subsequent desorption of vibrationally excited CO molecules from a Au(111) surface. Our results show that CO (v = 1) survives on a Au(111) surface for 1 × 10-10 s. Such long vibrational lifetimes for adsorbates on metal surfaces are unexpected and pose an interesting challenge to the current understanding of vibrational energy dissipation on metal surfaces. They also suggest that vibrational promotion of surface chemistry might be more common than is generally believed.

  5. Observer-based output-feedback control to eliminate torsional drill-string vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromen, T.G.M.; Wouw, van de N.; Doris, A.; Astrid, P.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Torsional stick-slip vibrations decrease the performance and reliability of drilling systems used for the exploration of energy and mineral resources. In this work, we present the design of a nonlinear observer-based output-feedback control strategy to eliminate these vibrations. We apply the

  6. Observer based output-feedback control to eliminate rorsional drill-string vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromen, T.G.M.; van de Wouw, N.; Doris, A.; Astrid, P.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Torsional stick-slip vibrations decrease the performance and reliability of drilling systems used for the exploration of energy and mineral resources. In this work, we present the design of a nonlinear observer-based outputfeedback control strategy to eliminate these vibrations. We apply the

  7. Direct observation of vibrational energy flow in cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoki; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2011-11-10

    Vibrational energy flow in ferric cytochrome c has been examined by picosecond time-resolved anti-Stokes ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) measurements. By taking advantage of the extremely short nonradiative excited state lifetime of heme in the protein (energy of 20000-25000 cm(-1) was optically deposited selectively at the heme site. Subsequent energy relaxation in the protein moiety was investigated by monitoring the anti-Stokes UVRR intensities of the Trp59 residue, which is a single tryptophan residue involved in the protein that is located close to the heme group. It was found from temporal changes of the anti-Stokes UVRR intensities that the energy flow from the heme to Trp59 and the energy release from Trp59 took place with the time constants of 1-3 and ~8 ps, respectively. These data are consistent with the time constants for the vibrational relaxation of the heme and heating of water reported for hemeproteins. The kinetics of the energy flow were not affected by the amount of excess energy deposited at the heme group. These results demonstrate that the present technique is a powerful tool for studying the vibrational energy flow in proteins.

  8. Triply coupled vibrational band gap in a periodic and nonsymmetrical axially loaded thin-walled Bernoulli-Euler beam including the warping effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Fang Jianyu; Cai Li; Han Xiaoyun; Wen Jihong

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of triply coupled vibrations in a periodic, nonsymmetrical and axially loaded thin-walled Bernoulli-Euler beam composed of two kinds of materials is investigated with the transfer matrix method. The cross-section of the beam lacks symmetrical axes, and bending vibrations in the two perpendicular directions are coupled with torsional vibrations. Furthermore, the effect of warping stiffness is included. The band structures of the periodic beam, both including and excluding the warping effect, are obtained. The frequency response function of the finite periodic beam is simulated with the finite element method. These simulations show large vibration-based attenuation in the frequency range of the gap, as expected. By comparing the band structure of the beam with plane wave expansion method calculations that are available in the literature, one finds that including the warping effect leads to a more accurate simulation. The effects of warping stiffness and axial force on the band structure are also discussed.

  9. An observational study of the effect of vibration on the caking of suspensions in oily vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Bork, Olaf; Alawi, Fadil; Nanjan, Karthigeyan; Tucker, Ian G

    2016-11-30

    An oily suspension of penethamate (PNT) that was physically stable on storage, caked solidly during road/air transport. This paper reports on the caking behaviour of PNT oily suspension formulations exposed to vibrations in a lab-based test designed to simulate road/air transport. The lab-test was used to study the effects of container type (glass v PET) and formulation (oil, surfactant type and concentration) on the physical stability of suspension under vibration. Redispersibility of the sediment was lower at longer vibrations times and at higher intensity of vibration. Caking on vibration was strongly influenced by the type of container (caking in glass but not in PET) possibly due to tribo-charging of particles. Caking on vibration was dependent on the formulation: type and concentration of surfactant; type of oil. The physical stability of oily suspensions, and the effect of vibration are two areas which have been largely neglected in the pharmaceutical literature. This paper discusses some potential mechanisms for the observations but studies using fully characterised materials are required. Finally we conclude that static testing of physical stability of oily suspensions is not sufficient and that a vibrational stress test is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A combined Raman spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of fundamental vibrational bands of furfuryl alcohol (2-furanmethanol)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, S.; Berg, Rolf W.

    2006-01-01

    . study of FA in weakly interacting environments. It is the first study of FA vibrational properties based on d. functional theory (DFT/B3LYP), and a recently proposed hybrid approach to the calcn. of fundamental frequencies, which also includes an anharmonic contribution. FA occupies five different...

  11. Observations of the initial stages of colloidal band formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanrong; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Yee, Andrew; Yoda, Minami

    2017-11-01

    A number of studies have shown that particles suspended in a conducting fluid near a wall are subject to wall-normal repulsive ``lift'' forces, even in the absence of interparticle interactions, in a flowing suspension. Evanescent-wave visualizations have shown that colloidal particles in a dilute (volume fractions negative zeta-potentials. Above a minimum ``threshold'' electric field magnitude |Emin | , the particles assemble into dense ``bands'' with cross-sectional dimensions of a few μm and length comparable to that of the channel (i.e., a few cm). The results suggest that the threshold field |Emin | is large enough so that there is a region of ``reverse'' flow, along the direction of the EO flow, near the wall. Visualization of a large segment of the channel (>300 hydraulic diameters) at frame rates as great as 1 kHz is used to determine banding maps for a variety of dilute colloidal suspensions and to investigate the initial stages of band formation over a wide range of flow conditions. Supported by US Army Research Office.

  12. The amide III vibrational circular dichroism band as a probe to detect conformational preferences of alanine dipeptide in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtič, Andreja; Merzel, Franci; Grdadolnik, Jože

    2014-07-01

    The conformational preferences of blocked alanine dipeptide (ADP), Ac-Ala-NHMe, in aqueous solution were studied using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations of three most representative conformations of ADP surrounded by six explicit water molecules immersed in a dielectric continuum have proven high sensitivity of amide III VCD band shape that is characteristic for each conformation of the peptide backbone. The polyproline II (PII ) and αR conformation of ADP are associated with a positive VCD band while β conformation has a negative VCD band in amide III region. Knowing this spectral characteristic of each conformation allows us to assign the experimental amide III VCD spectrum of ADP. Moreover, the amide III region of the VCD spectrum was used to determine the relative populations of conformations of ADP in water. Based on the interpretation of the amide III region of VCD spectrum we have shown that dominant conformation of ADP in water is PII which is stabilized by hydrogen bonded water molecules between CO and NH groups on the peptide backbone. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Vocal-fold vibration of patients with Reinke's edema observed using high-speed digital imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Kaneko, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Takahashi, Haruo

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to assess the vocal-fold vibration of patients with moderate-to-severe Reinke's edema using high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) and videostroboscopy and to confirm HSDI usefulness in examining the vocal folds with Reinke's edema. We examined the vocal folds of seven patients (six severe and one moderate; six females and one male; aged 55-74 years; mean 64.7 years) with Reinke's edema using HSDI and videostroboscopy. The following characteristics were analyzed: glottic closure, mucosal-wave propagation, left-right asymmetry, phase shift, frequency difference, periodicity, and contact of the true vocal fold with the false vocal fold. HSDI revealed complete glottic closure, anterior-posterior phase shift, and obvious contact of at least one side of the edematous true vocal fold with the ipsilateral false vocal fold in all patients. Mucosal-wave propagation increased in six patients and decreased in one. Left-right asymmetry was observed in six patients. Left-right phase shifts and left-right frequency differences were observed in four and two patients, respectively. The vibration was periodic in four patients, quasi-periodic in three, and aperiodic in none. Anterior-posterior frequency differences were not observed for any patient. The vocal-fold vibration always synchronized with strobolights in two patients, while the vibration occasionally and never synchronized in two and three patients, respectively. In one patient whose vibration occasionally synchronized, videostroboscopy could not reveal the slight left-right frequency difference of the vibration. It was often difficult to observe vocal-fold vibration correctly in patients with severe Reinke's edema using videostroboscopy. However, HSDI was useful for examining these patients. Our results suggest that HSDI can be very useful for examining the vocal folds of patients with severe Reinke's edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SKS splitting observed at Romanian broad-band seismic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Marian; Popa, Mihaela; Ghica, Daniela

    2008-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting results are presented for the broad-band stations of the Romanian seismic network. For stations BUC1 and CRAR (located in Moesian Platform), IAS (in East-European Platform), TIRR and CVD (in Central Dobrudja-Black Sea microplate), TIM and DRGR (in Dacia-Tisza plate, including Apuseni Mts.), BURAR, BZS and GZR (in, or very close to the Carpathian Arc), the fast directions ( φ) are around 135°. The mean delay values ( δt) of the slow wave are slightly greater for the stations placed in platform areas ( δt ~ 1.5 s) than for the stations situated in the (proximity) of Carpathians ( δt ~ 1.2 s). For the MLR station located in the South-Western part of Vrancea area, at the Carpathian Bend, the fast direction is 48°, similar to VOIR station (located in Southern Carpathians, 70 km West of MLR). At VRI and PLOR, located in the North-Eastern part of Vrancea, the fast axis is oriented approximately on North-South direction, with a possible dependence of the splitting parameters with back azimuth. At least for some stations, the splitting results are not consistent with vertical coherent lithospheric anisotropy.

  15. Characterization and Simulation of Transient Vibrations Using Band Limited Temporal Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Smallwood

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is described to characterize shocks (transient time histories in terms of the Fourier energy spectrum and the temporal moments of the shock passed through a contiguous set of band pass filters. The product model is then used to generate of a random process as simulations that in the mean will have the same energy and moments as the characterization of the transient event.

  16. Rotational and High-resolution Infrared Spectrum of HC3N: Global Ro-vibrational Analysis and Improved Line Catalog for Astrophysical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Tamassia, Filippo; Laas, Jacob; Giuliano, Barbara M.; Degli Esposti, Claudio; Dore, Luca; Melosso, Mattia; Canè, Elisabetta; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Müller, Holger S. P.; Spahn, Holger; Belloche, Arnaud; Caselli, Paola; Menten, Karl M.; Garrod, Robin T.

    2017-11-01

    HC3N is a ubiquitous molecule in interstellar environments, from external galaxies to Galactic interstellar clouds, star-forming regions, and planetary atmospheres. Observations of its rotational and vibrational transitions provide important information on the physical and chemical structures of the above environments. We present the most complete global analysis of the spectroscopic data of HC3N. We recorded the high-resolution infrared spectrum from 450 to 1350 cm-1, a region dominated by the intense {ν }5 and {ν }6 fundamental bands, located at 660 and 500 cm-1, respectively, and their associated hot bands. Pure rotational transitions in the ground and vibrationally excited states were recorded in the millimeter and submillimeter regions in order to extend the frequency range so far considered in previous investigations. All of the transitions from the literature and from this work involving energy levels lower than 1000 cm-1 were fitted together to an effective Hamiltonian. Because of the presence of various anharmonic resonances, the Hamiltonian includes a number of interaction constants, in addition to the conventional rotational and vibrational l-type resonance terms. The data set contains about 3400 ro-vibrational lines of 13 bands and some 1500 pure rotational lines belonging to 12 vibrational states. More than 120 spectroscopic constants were determined directly from the fit, without any assumption deduced from theoretical calculations or comparisons with similar molecules. An extensive list of highly accurate rest frequencies was produced to assist astronomical searches and data interpretation. These improved data enabled a refined analysis of the ALMA observations toward Sgr B2(N2).

  17. Multi-band Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    A statistical analysis to estimate the probable redshifts of host galaxies using the luminosity function ... shown that fading Optical Transient (OT) is observable over a couple of months from ... 99% confidence level) come from afterglow analysis.

  18. Radio Band Observations of Blazar Variability Margo F. Aller , Hugh ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gle dish monitoring and spatial resolution from VLBA imaging. Such measurements now available in all four ... linear-to-circular mode conversion in a region that is at least partially self- absorbed. Detailed analysis of ... Single dish monitoring observations from Metsähovi, Michigan (hereafter. UMRAO), and recently from the ...

  19. Observations of Terrestrial Nightglow (Meinel Bands) at King

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young-In; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Bang Yong; Kim, Jhoon; Chung, Jong Kyun; Kim, Yong Ha

    1999-12-01

    A Fourier Transform Spectrometer was used to study upper mesospheric thermodynamic by observing the hydroxyl(OH) emission. Rocket-born and satellited-born photometers place the peak emission near 87 μm. The instrument was installed in February 1999 at King Sejong station (62.22 deg S,301.25 deg E), Antarctica and has been in routine operation since then. An intensive operational effort has resulted in a substantial data between April and June, 1999. A harmonic analysis was carried out to examine information on the tidal characteristics. The measured amplitudes of the 12-hour oscillation are in the range of 2.4-3.7 K, which are in resonable agreement with theoretical model outputs. The harmonic analysis also revealed 8-hour oscillation which is not expected from the traditional theoretical studies. In addition, the observed 8-hour oscillations are apparent and sometimes dominate the temperature variation in the upper mesosphere.

  20. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  1. Observation of the v′=8←v=0 vibrational overtone in cold trapped HD +

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.J. Koelemeij; D.W.E. Noom; D. de Jong; M.A. Haddad; W. Ubachs

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe report the observation of the hitherto undetected v′=8←v=0 vibrational overtone in trapped HD+molecular ions, sympathetically cooled by laser-cooled Be+ions. The overtone is excited using 782 nm laser radiation, after which HD+ions in v=8 are photodissociated by the 313 nm laser used

  2. Observations of 40-70 micron bands of ice in IRAS 09371 + 1212 and other stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omont, A.; Forveille, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Glaccum, W. J.; Harvey, P. M.; Likkel, L.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Lisse, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    IRAS 09371 + 1212 is still an absolutely unique object. This M giant star, with circumstellar CO and a spectacular bipolar nebula, displays unique IRAS FIR colors which had been attributed to strong emission in the 40-70-micron bands of ice, as subsequently supported by the observation of a strong 3.1-micron absorption band. The results of the KAO observations have confirmed its unusual nature: the far-infrared bands of ice are by far the strongest known. Its dust temperature, 50 K or less, is by far the lowest known for a late-type circumstellar envelope.

  3. A new hybrid observer based rotor imbalance vibration control via passive autobalancer and active bearing actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, DaeYi; DeSmidt, Hans

    2018-02-01

    Many researchers have explored the use of active bearings, such as non-contact Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB), to control imbalance vibration in rotor systems. Meanwhile, the advantages of a passive Auto-balancer device (ABD) eliminating the imbalance effect of rotor without using other active means have been recently studied. This paper develops a new hybrid imbalance vibration control approach for an ABD-rotor system supported by a normal passive bearing in augmented with an AMB to enhance the balancing and vibration isolation capabilities. Essentially, an ABD consists of several freely moving eccentric balancing masses mounted on the rotor, which, at supercritical operating speeds, act to cancel the rotor's imbalance at steady-state. However, due to the inherent nonlinearity of the ABD, the potential for other, non-synchronous limit-cycle behavior exists resulting in increased rotor vibration. To address this, the algorithm of proposed hybrid control is designed to guarantee globally asymptotic stability of the synchronous balanced condition. This algorithm also incorporates with a "Luenberger-like" observer that continuously estimates the states of a balancer ball circulating around within ABD. In particular, it is shown that the balanced equilibrium can be made globally attractive under the hybrid control strategy, and that the control power levels of AMB are significantly reduced via the addition of the ABD because the control is designed such that it is only switched on for the abnormal operation of ABD and will be disengaged otherwise. Moreover, unlike other imbalance vibration control applications based upon ABD such as rotor speed regulator [21,22], this approach enables the controller to achieve the desirable performance without altering rotor speed once the rotor initially reaches the target speed. These applications are relevant to limited power applications such as in satellite reaction wheels, flywheel energy storage batteries or CD-ROM application.

  4. Spectra and relaxation dynamics of the pseudohalide (PS) vibrational bands for Ru(bpy)2(PS)2 complexes, PS = CN, NCS and N3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, Ryan; Gerardi, Helen K.; Weidinger, Daniel; Brown, Douglas J.; Dressick, Walter J.; Heilweil, Edwin J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Static and transient infrared spectroscopy of pseudohalide bipyridine ruthenium complexes. ► Vibrational energy relaxes faster for the azide than the thiocyanate and cyanide analogs. ► Intramolecular vibrational relaxation is prevalent in cis-Ru(bpy) 2 (N 3 ) 2 . - Abstract: Static and transient infrared spectroscopy were used to investigate cis-Ru(bpy) 2 (N 3 ) 2 (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine), cis-Ru(bpy) 2 (NCS) 2 , and cis-Ru(bpy) 2 (CN) 2 in solution. The NC stretching IR band for cis-Ru(bpy) 2 (NCS) 2 appears at higher frequency (∼2106 cm −1 in DMSO) than for the free NCS − anion while the IR bands for the azide and cyanide complexes are closer to those of the respective free anions. The vibrational energy relaxation (VER) lifetime for the azide complex is found to be much shorter (∼5 ps) than for either the NCS or CN species (both ∼70 ps in DMSO) and the lifetimes resemble those for each corresponding free anion in solution. However, for cis-Ru(bpy) 2 (N 3 ) 2 , it is determined that the transition frequency depends more on the solvent than the VER lifetime implying that intramolecular vibrational relaxation is predominant over solvent energy-extracting interactions. These results are compared to the behavior of other related metal complexes in solution

  5. Infrared Spectra of the 10-μm Bands of 1,2-Difluoroethane and 1,1,2-Trifluoroethane: Vibrationally Mediated Torsional Tunneling in 1,1,2-Trifluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Stephen C.; Miller, C. Cameron; Philips, Laura A.; Andrews, A. M.; Fraser, G. T.; Pate, B. H.; Xu, Li-Hong

    1995-12-01

    The 3-MHz-resolution infrared spectra of the 10-μm bands of thegaucheconformer of 1,2-difluoroethane (HFC152) and theC1-symmetry conformer of 1,1,2-trifluoroethane (HFC143) have been measured using a molecular-beam electric-resonance optothermal spectrometer with a tunable microwave-sideband CO2laser source. For 1,2-difluoroethane, two bands have been studied, the ν17B-symmetry C-F stretch at 1077.3 cm-1and the ν13B-symmetry CH2rock at 896.6 cm-1. Both bands are well fit to a asymmetric-rotor Hamiltonian to better than 0.5 MHz. The ν13band is effectively unperturbed, while the ν17band is weakly perturbed, as shown by the large change in centrifugal distortion constants from the ground state values. Two bands have also been studied for 1,1,2-trifluoroethane, the ν11symmetric CF2stretch at 1077.2 cm-1and the ν13C-C stretch at 905.1 cm-1. One of the two bands, ν11, is unperturbed and fit to near the experimental precision. The ν13vibration, on the other hand, is weakly perturbed by an interaction with a nearby state. This perturbation leads to a doubling or splitting of the lines, due to a perturbation-induced lifting of the degeneracy of the symmetric and antisymmetric tunneling states associated with tunneling between the two equivalentC1forms. For theJ,Kastates studied, the splittings are as large as 37 MHz. Combining this observation with published low-resolution far-infrared measurements of torsional sequence-band and hot-band frequencies and calculations from an empirical torsional potential allows us to identify the perturbing state as ν17+ 6ν18. Here, ν17is the CF2twist and ν18is the torsion. The matrix element responsible for this interaction exchanges eight vibrational quanta!

  6. Highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules in low-pressure inductively-coupled plasmas detected by high sensitivity ultra-broad-band optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Carbone, Emile; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-08-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure O2 (at pressures of 5-80 mTorr and radiofrequency power up to 500 W) were studied by optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range 200-450 nm, showing the presence of highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules (up to vʺ = 18) by Schumann-Runge band absorption. Analysis of the relative band intensities indicates a vibrational temperature up to 10,000 K, but these hot molecules only represent a fraction of the total O2 density. By analysing the (11-0) band at higher spectral resolution the O2 rotational temperature was also determined, and was found to increase with both pressure and power, reaching 900 K at 80 mTorr 500 W. These measurements were achieved using a new high-sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy setup, based on a laser-plasma light source, achromatic optics and an aberration-corrected spectrograph. This setup allows the measurement of weak broadband absorbances due to a baseline variability lower than 2   ×   10-5 across a spectral range of 250 nm.

  7. An Observational Study of Intermediate Band Students' Self-Regulated Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter; Prichard, Stephanie; Sorbo, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate intermediate musicians' self-regulated practice behaviors. Thirty sixth- through eighth-grade students were observed practicing band repertoire individually for 20 min. Practice sessions were coded according to practice frame frequency and duration, length of musical passage selected, most prominent…

  8. The Low Band Observatory (LOBO): Expanding the VLA Low Frequency Commensal System for Continuous, Broad-band, sub-GHz Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Peters, Wendy M.; Brisken, Walter; Hyman, Scott D.; Polisensky, Emil; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are currently commissioning the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) on a subset of JVLA antennas at modest bandwidth. Its bounded scientific goals are to leverage thousands of JVLA on-sky hours per year for ionospheric and transient studies, and to demonstrate the practicality of a prime-focus commensal system on the JVLA. Here we explore the natural expansion of VLITE to a full-antenna, full-bandwidth Low Band Observatory (LOBO) that would follow naturally from a successful VLITE experience. The new Low Band JVLA receivers, coupled with the existing primary focus feeds, can access two frequency bands: 4 band (54 - 86 MHz) and P band (236-492 MHz). The 4 band feeds are newly designed and now undergoing testing. If they prove successful then they can be permanently mounted at the primary focus, unlike their narrow band predecessors. The combination of Low Band receivers and fixed, primary-focus feeds could provide continuous, broad-band data over two complimentary low-frequency bands. The system would also leverage the relatively large fields-of-view of ~10 degrees at 4 band, and ~2.5 degrees at P band, coupling an excellent survey capability with a natural advantage for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss the compelling science case that flows from LOBO's robust imaging and time domain capabilities coupled with thousands of hours of wide-field, JVLA observing time each year. We also touch on the possibility to incorporate Long Wavelength Array (LWA) stations as additional 'dishes' through the LOBO backend, to improve calibration and sensitivity in LOBO's 4 band.

  9. Experimental observation on asymmetric energy flux within the forbidden frequency band in the LC transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Feng; Chen Weizhong; Pan Junting; Xu Wen; Du Sidan

    2012-01-01

    We study the energy flux in a nonlinear electrical transmission line consisting of two coupled segments which are identical in structure and different in parameters. The asymmetry of energy flux caused by nonlinear wave has been observed experimentally in the forbidden band of the line. The experiment shows whether the energy can flow through the transmission line depends on the amplitude of the boundary driving voltages, which can be well explained in the theoretical framework of nonlinear supratransmission. The numerical simulation based on Kirchhoff’s laws further verifies the existence of the asymmetric energy flux in the forbidden band.

  10. Multi-band, multi-epoch observations of the transiting warm Jupiter WASP-80b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Akihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Kawashima, Yui; Ikoma, Masahiro; Kurosaki, Kenji [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Narita, Norio; Nishiyama, Shogo; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Nagayama, Shogo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Onitsuka, Masahiro; Baba, Haruka; Ryu, Tsuguru [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ita, Yoshifusa; Onozato, Hiroki [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Hirano, Teruyuki; Kawauchi, Kiyoe [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Hori, Yasunori [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Nagayama, Takahiro [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Tamura, Motohide [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, and National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Kawai, Nobuyuki, E-mail: afukui@oao.nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Oookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); and others

    2014-08-01

    WASP-80b is a warm Jupiter transiting a bright late-K/early-M dwarf, providing a good opportunity to extend the atmospheric study of hot Jupiters toward the lower temperature regime. We report multi-band, multi-epoch transit observations of WASP-80b by using three ground-based telescopes covering from optical (g', R{sub c}, and I{sub c} bands) to near-infrared (NIR; J, H, and K{sub s} bands) wavelengths. We observe 5 primary transits, each in 3 or 4 different bands simultaneously, obtaining 17 independent transit light curves. Combining them with results from previous works, we find that the observed transmission spectrum is largely consistent with both a solar abundance and thick cloud atmospheric models at a 1.7σ discrepancy level. On the other hand, we find a marginal spectral rise in the optical region compared to the NIR region at the 2.9σ level, which possibly indicates the existence of haze in the atmosphere. We simulate theoretical transmission spectra for a solar abundance but hazy atmosphere, finding that a model with equilibrium temperature of 600 K can explain the observed data well, having a discrepancy level of 1.0σ. We also search for transit timing variations, but find no timing excess larger than 50 s from a linear ephemeris. In addition, we conduct 43 day long photometric monitoring of the host star in the optical bands, finding no significant variation in the stellar brightness. Combined with the fact that no spot-crossing event is observed in the five transits, our results confirm previous findings that the host star appears quiet for spot activities, despite the indications of strong chromospheric activities.

  11. CONSTRAINING THE SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH USING SPLIT-BAND TYPE II RADIO BURST OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, 2nd Block, Koramangala, Bangalore—560034 (India); Gopalswamy, N., E-mail: kishore@iiap.res.in [Code 671, Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We report on low-frequency radio (85–35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  12. Mini-RF S- and X-band Bistatic Observations of the Floor of Cabeus Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Gerald Wesley; Stickle, Angela; Turner, Franklin; Jensen, James; Cahill, Joshua; Mini-RF Team

    2017-10-01

    The Mini-RF instrument aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is a hybrid dual-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and operates in concert with the Arecibo Observatory (AO) and the Goldstone deep space communications complex 34 meter antenna DSS-13 to collect S- and X-band bistatic radar data of the Moon. Bistatic radar data provide a means to probe the near subsurface for the presence of water ice, which exhibits a strong response in the form of a Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE). This effect has been observed in radar data for the icy surfaces of the Galilean satellites, the polar caps of Mars, polar craters on Mercury, and terrestrial ice sheets in Greenland. Previous work using Mini-RF S-band (12.6 cm) bistatic data suggests the presence of a CBOE associated with the floor of the lunar south polar crater Cabeus. The LRO spacecraft has begun its third extended mission. For this phase of operations Mini-RF is leveraging the existing AO architecture to make S-band radar observations of additional polar craters (e.g., Haworth, Shoemaker, Faustini). The purpose of acquiring these data is to determine whether other polar craters exhibit the response observed for Cabeus. Mini-RF has also initiated a new mode of operation that utilizes the X-band (4.2cm) capability of the instrument receiver and a recently commissioned X/C-band transmitter within the Deep Space Network’s (DSN) Goldstone complex to collect bistatic X-band data of the Moon. The purpose of acquiring these data is to constrain the depth/thickness of materials that exhibit a CBOE response - with an emphasis on observing the floor of Cabeus. Recent Mini-RF X-band observations of the floors of the craters Cabeus do not show evidence for a CBOE. This would suggest that the upper ~0.5 meters of the regolith for the floor of Cabeus do not harber water ice in a form detectable at 4.2 cm wavelengths.

  13. Deviant vocal fold vibration as observed during videokymography : the effect on voice quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Festen, J.M.; Mahieu, H.F.

    Videokymographic images of deviant or irregular vocal fold vibration, including diplophonia, the transition from falsetto to modal voice, irregular vibration onset and offset, and phonation following partial laryngectomy were compared with the synchronously recorded acoustic speech signals. A clear

  14. Validity and inter-observer reliability of subjective hand-arm vibration assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, P.; Formanoy, M.; Douwes, M.; Bosch, T.; Kraker, H. de

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mechanical vibrations at work (e.g., due to handling powered tools) is a potential occupational risk as it may cause upper extremity complaints. However, reliable and valid assessment methods for vibration exposure at work are lacking. Measuring hand-arm vibration objectively is often

  15. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  16. A double vacuum, configuration dependent pairing and lack of β-vibrations in transitional nuclei: Band structure of N = 88 to N = 91 Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpey-Schafer, J.F.; Bark, R.A.; Bvumbi, S.P.; Lawrie, E.A.; Lawrie, J.J.; Madiba, T.E.; Majola, S.N.T.; Minkova, A.; Mullins, S.M.; Papka, P.; Roux, D.G.; Timar, J.

    2010-01-01

    We have used the AFRODITE γ-ray spectrometer to measure yrare structures in 152,154,155 Gd using (α,xn) reactions. The measurements on 152,154 Gd have shown that there is no convincing evidence that the lowest excited 0 2 + states are β-vibrations based on the 0 1 + ground state. Rather these levels may be regarded as a 'second vacuum' each with its own γ and octupole vibrations. This is confirmed by the blocking of the coupling of this core 0 2 + state in 154 Gd to the [505]11/2 - single-particle quasi-neutron orbital in 155 Gd. The coupling of this orbital to the 2 + γ-vibration is observed since this coupling is not Pauli-blocked.

  17. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  18. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  19. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xujun Han

    Full Text Available The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL; the other is observation localization (OL. Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects.

  20. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects.

  1. Optical observations of the nearby galaxy IC342 with narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučetić M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of a portion of the nearby spiral galaxy IC342 using narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. These observations were carried out in November 2011 with the 2m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper we report coordinates, diameters, Hα and [SII] fluxes for 203 HII regions detected in two fields of view in IC342 galaxy. The number of detected HII regions is 5 times higher than previously known in these two parts of the galaxy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176005: Emission nebulae: structure and evolution

  2. Observations of the Galaxy NGC 3077 in the Narrow-Band [S II] and Hα Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andjelić M.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of the H I tidal arm near a dwarf galaxy NGC 3077 (member of the M81 galaxy group in the narrow-band [S II] and Hα filters. Observations were carried out in 2011 March with the 2 m RCC telescope at the NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria. Our search for possible supernova remnant candidates (identified as sources with enhanced [S II] emission relative to their Hα emission in this region yielded no sources of this kind. Nevertheless, we found a number of objects with significant Hα emission that probably represent uncatalogued, low brightness H II regions.

  3. Observation of dark-current signals from the S-band structures of the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Decker, F.J.; Seidel, M.; Siemann, R.H.; Whittum, D.

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that the electro-magnetic fields in high-gradient RF structures can cause electron emission from the metallic structure walls. If the emitted electrons are captured and accelerated by the accelerating fields so-called dark-current is induced. Dark-currents have been measured and studied for various RF-structures. In this paper the authors present measurements of RF induced signals for the SLC S-band structures. For nominal gradients of 17 MV/m it is shown that the dark-current can be strong enough to significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the SLC beam wire scanners. They also show results from RF measurements in the dipole band. The measurements are compared to more direct observations of dark-current and it is tried to connect the results to possible effects on the accelerated particle beam

  4. REFIR/BB initial observations in the water vapour rotational band: Results from a field campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, F.; Grieco, G.; Leone, L.; Restieri, R.; Serio, C.; Bianchini, G.; Palchetti, L.; Pellegrini, M.; Cuomo, V.; Masiello, G.; Pavese, G.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the far infrared spectral region 17-50 μm as a remote sensing tool in atmospheric sciences, since this portion of the spectrum contains the characteristic molecular rotational band for water vapour. Much of the Earth energy lost to space is radiated through this spectral region. The Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed Breadboard (REFIR/BB) spectrometer was born because of the quest to make observations in the far infrared. REFIR/BB is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a sampling resolution of 0.5 cm -1 and it was tested for the first time in the field to check its reliability and radiometric performance. The field campaign was held at Toppo di Castelgrande (40 o 49' N, 15 o 27' E, 1258 m a. s. l.), a mountain site in South Italy. The spectral and radiometric performance of the instrument and initial observations are shown in this paper. Comparisons to both (1) BOMEM MR100 Fourier Transform spectrometer observations and (2) line-by-line radiative transfer calculations for selected clear sky are presented and discussed. These comparisons (1) show a very nice agreement between radiance measured by REFIR/BB and by BOMEM MR100 and (2) demonstrate that REFIR/BB accurately observes the very fine spectral structure in the water vapour rotational band

  5. DEEP U BAND AND R IMAGING OF GOODS-SOUTH: OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION AND FIRST RESULTS ,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonino, M.; Cristiani, S.; Vanzella, E.; Dickinson, M.; Reddy, N.; Rosati, P.; Grazian, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Daddi, E.; Cesarsky, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present deep imaging in the U band covering an area of 630 arcmin 2 centered on the southern field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). The data were obtained with the VIMOS instrument at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope. The final images reach a magnitude limit U lim ∼ 29.8 (AB, 1σ, in a 1'' radius aperture), and have good image quality, with full width at half-maximum ∼0.''8. They are significantly deeper than previous U-band images available for the GOODS fields, and better match the sensitivity of other multiwavelength GOODS photometry. The deeper U-band data yield significantly improved photometric redshifts, especially in key redshift ranges such as 2 lim ∼ 29 (AB, 1σ, 1'' radius aperture), and image quality ∼0.''75. We discuss the strategies for the observations and data reduction, and present the first results from the analysis of the co-added images.

  6. A Computer Assisted Procedure of Assignments of Vibration-Rotation Bands of Asymmetric and Symmetric Top Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Štěpán; Behrend, J.; Pracna, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 690, - (2004), s. 105-114 ISSN 0022-2860 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 445; GA ČR GA203/01/1274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : assigments of vibration-rotation spectra * combination differences * Loomis-Wood algorithm Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2004

  7. Synthetic profile analysis of the observed (0,0) Swan band of Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna swamy, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    The time-dependent rotational population distribution for the (0,0) band of the Swan system was carried out. These population distributions are used to calculate the synthetic spectra over the wavelength region 5165-5132 A for comparing with the excellent spectra of Lambert et al. (1990) for Comet Halley. The synthetic spectra for the rotational population distribution corresponding to a time interval of about 8000 sec gives a good fit to the observed spectra over the whole special region. This seems to indicate that the level population does not appear to have reached the steady state values. 16 refs

  8. IR thermographic observation and shear bands plasticity analysis in Fe-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzakher, B.; Benameur, T.; Sidhom, H.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared thermography observation and in situ atomic force microscopy characterization were carried out to investigate the mechanical damage processes at the edge-notch region of large ribbons of Fe 78 Si 10 B 12 metallic glass. An obvious thermoelastic and inelastic degradation phenomenon was observed ahead at the notched region of the specimens, which probably result from free volume accumulation process and shear band activity during plane stress solicitations. Moreover, AFM topographic and frictional analysis of changes in the crack path during stable crack propagation regime revealed a periodic morphology evolution, formation of nanoscale damage cavity in the range of 20-140 nm and a maximum temperature rise ahead of the pre-crack tip was found in the order of 1.5 deg. C. The nanometer scaled shear offset, discreteness and shear bands density were determined. While these key parameters play a role in observing a large plastic zone in front of the crack, however they are unable to explain the distinct intrinsic ductility of some monolithic metallic glasses. A general Mohr-Coulomb-type constitutive description was used to deduce analytic expressions for prediction of the variation of hydrostatic component of the applied stress to the shear stress ratio as function of Poisson's ratio.

  9. Optimizing mesoscopic two-band superconductors for observation of fractional vortex states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piña, Juan C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Núcleo de Tecnologia, CAA, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 55002-970 Caruaru, PE (Brazil); Souza Silva, Clécio C. de, E-mail: clecio@df.ufpe [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Milošević, Milorad V. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Observation of fractional vortices in two-band superconductors of broad size range. • There is a minimal sample size for observing each particular fractional state. • Optimal value for stability of each fractional state is determined. • A suitable magnetic dot enhances stability even further. - Abstract: Using the two-component Ginzburg–Landau model, we investigate the effect of sample size and magnitude and homogeneity of external magnetic field on the stability of fractional vortex states in a mesoscopic two-band superconducting disk. We found that each fractional state has a preferable sample size, for which the range of applied field in which the state is stable is pronouncedly large. Vice versa, there exists an optimal magnitude of applied field for which a large range of possible sample radii will support the considered fractional state. Finally, we show that the stability of fractional states can be enhanced even further by magnetic nanostructuring of the sample, i.e. by suitably chosen geometrical parameters and magnetic moment of a ferromagnetic dot placed on top of the superconducting disk.

  10. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopic studies of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Abbas, J. M.; Dogra, Sukh Dev; Sachdeva, Ritika; Rai, Bimal; Tripathi, S. K.; Prakash, Satya; Sathe, Vasant; Saini, G. S. S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of melatonin recorded with 488 and 632.8 nm excitations in 3600-2700 and 1700-70 cm-1 regions. Further, we optimized molecular structure of the three conformers of melatonin within density functional theory calculations. Vibrational frequencies of all three conformers have also been calculated. Observed vibrational bands have been assigned to different vibrational motions of the molecules on the basis of potential energy distribution calculations and calculated vibrational frequencies. Observed band positions match well with the calculated values after scaling except Nsbnd H stretching mode frequencies. It is found that the observed and calculated frequencies mismatch of Nsbnd H stretching is due to intermolecular interactions between melatonin molecules.

  11. An improved model of radiative transfer for the NLTE problem in the NIR bands of CO2 and CO molecules in the daytime atmosphere of Mars. 2. Population of vibrational states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogibalov, V. P.; Shved, G. M.

    2017-09-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission of the Martian atmosphere in the CO2 bands at 4.3, 2.7, 2.0, 1.6, 1.4, 1.3, 1.2, and 1.05 µm and in the CO bands at 4.7, 2.3, 1.6, and 1.2 µm is mainly generated under nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) conditions for vibrational states, the transitions from which form the specified bands. The paper presents the results of simulations of the population of these states under NLTE for daytime conditions. In the cold high-latitude troposphere, the NLTE takes place much lower than in the troposphere under typical temperature conditions. If the NIR-radiation reflection from the surface is ignored, the population of high vibrational states substantially decreases, at least, in some layer of the lower atmosphere. However, inelastic collisions of CO2 and CO molecules with O atoms produce no considerable influence on the values of populations. The population of vibrational states, the transitions from which form NIR bands, is also almost insensitive to possible large values of the quenching-in-collision rate constants of vibrational states higher than CO2(0001). However, very large errors in the estimates of the population of vibrational states of the CO2 molecule (rather than the CO molecule!) can be caused by the uncertainty in the values of the rate constant of exchange between CO2 molecules by the energy quantum of the asymmetric stretching vibrational mode. For this intermolecular exchange, we recommend a possible way to restrict the vibrational excitation degree of the molecule that is a collision partner and to maintain simultaneously a sufficiently high accuracy in the population estimate.

  12. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  13. Safety and Effectiveness of Vibration Massage by Deep Oscillations: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kraft

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the safety of treatment with vibration massage using a deep oscillation device and the effects on symptom severity and quality of life in patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. Outpatients with FMS performed an observational prospective study with visits 2–4 weeks after the last treatment (control and after further 2 months (follow-up. Patients were treated with 10 sessions of 45 min deep oscillation massage, 2/week. Primary outcome parameters were safety and tolerability (5-level Likert scale (1 = very good (after each treatment session and at control visit. Secondary outcome parameters were symptom severity (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, pain and quality of life (SF-36. Seventy patients (97.1% females were included. At control visit, 41 patients (58.6% reported 63 mild and short-lasting adverse events, mainly worsening of prevalent symptoms such as pain and fatigue. Tolerability was rated as 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.53; 2.07. Symptoms and quality of life were significantly improved at both control and follow-up visits (at least P<0.01. In conclusion, deep oscillation massage is safe and well tolerated in patients with FMS and might improve symptoms and quality of life rather sustained.

  14. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC are associated with

  15. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC

  16. Mixing of ground-state rotational and gamma and beta vibrational bands in the region A>=228

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, R; Sahota, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1983-06-21

    The mixing of beta, gamma and ground-state bands has been investigated through the experimental determination of mixing parameters Zsub(..gamma..) and Zsub(..beta gamma..). These Zsub(..gamma..) values have been compared with the theoretical calculations of this parameter from the solutions of time-dependent HFB equations on the adiabatic and nonadiabatic assumptions. The experimental values are in better agreement with the results obtained under the nonadiabatic assumption, valid for small deviations from the spherical symmetry.

  17. Improvement of the vibration isolation system for TAMA300

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, R

    2002-01-01

    The vibration isolation system for TAMA300 has a vibration isolation ratio large enough to achieve the requirement in the observation band around 300 Hz. At a lower frequency range, it is necessary to reduce the large fluctuation of mirrors for stable operation of the interferometer. With this aim, the mirror suspension systems were modified and an active vibration isolation system using pneumatic actuators was installed. These improvements contributed to the realization of a continuous interferometer lock for more than 24 h.

  18. Field observations of mating behavior in the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (Serpentes: Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Sasa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We observed the mating behavior of the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (a common species of colubrid in the South Pacific of Costa Rica in the pre-montane wet forest of Las Cruces Biological Station (San Vito de Java, Costa Rica. Three S. annulatus were observed during courtship between 10-12 AM in a patch of primary forest. The two males were observed to interact with the female, but not signs of male-male agonistic interactions were observed. Their behavior includes grabbing and holding the female, copula, and biting during the copula. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 647-650. Epub 2006 Jun 01.El comportamiento de apareamiento es descrito para la serpiente Scaphiodontophis annulatus, una especie de colúbrido común en el Pacífico sur de Costa Rica. El comportamiento incluye capturar y sujetar a la hembra, mordiscos durante la cópula y coito. Dos machos fueron observados al interactuar con una sola hembra, pero no se detectó señales de interacciones antagónicas macho-macho.

  19. Strong RFI observed in protected 21 cm band at Zurich observatory, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstein, C.

    2014-03-01

    While testing a new antenna control software tool, the telescope was moved to the most western azimuth position pointing to our own building. While de-accelerating the telescope, the spectrometer showed strong broadband radio frequency interference (RFI) and two single-frequency carriers around 1412 and 1425 MHz, both of which are in the internationally protected band. After lengthy analysis it was found out, that the Webcam AXIS2000 was the source for both the broadband and single-frequency interference. Switching off the Webcam solved the problem immediately. So, for future observations of 21 cm radiation, all nearby electronics has to be switched off. Not only the Webcam but also all unused PCs, printers, networks, monitors etc.

  20. observer-based diagnostics and monitoring of vibrations in nuclear reactor core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siry, S.A K.

    2007-01-01

    analysis and diagnostics of vibration in industrial systems play a significant rule to prevent severe severe damages . drive shaft vibration is a complicated phenomenon composed of two independent forms of vibrations, translational and torsional. translational vibration measurements in case of the reactor core cooling system are introduced. the system under study consists of the three phase induction motor, flywheel, centrifugal pump, and two coupling between motor-flywheel, and flywheel-pump. this system structure is considered to be one where the blades are pegged into the discs fitting into the shafts. a non-linear model to simulate vibration in the reactor core cooling system will be introduced. simulation results of an operating reactor core cooling system using the actual parameters will be presented to validate the accuracy and reliability of the proposed analytical method the accuracy in analyzing the results depends on the system model. the shortcomings of the conventional model will be avoided through the use of that accurate nonlinear model which improve the simulation of the reactor core cooling system

  1. Methodology for Analysing Controllability and Observability of Bladed Disc Coupled Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    to place sensors and actuators so that all vibration levels can be monitored and controlled. Due to the special dynamic characteristics of rotating coupled bladed discs, where disc lateral motion is coupled to blade flexible motion, such analyses become quite complicated. The dynamics is described...... by a time-variant mathematical model, which presents parametric vibration modes and centrifugal stiffening effects resulting in increasing blade natural frequencies. In this framework the objective and contribution of this paper is to present a methodology for analysing the modal controllability...

  2. Comparison of Some Blast Vibration Predictors for Blasting in Underground Drifts and Some Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Vaibhab Pramod; Dey, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Drilling and blasting are the most economical excavation techniques in underground drifts driven through hard rock formation. Burn cut is the most popular drill pattern, used in this case, to achieve longer advance per blast round. The ground vibration generated due to the propagation of blast waves on the detonation of explosive during blasting is the principal cause for structural and rock damage. Thus, ground vibration is a point of concern for the blasting engineers. The ground vibration from a blast is measured using a seismograph placed at the blast monitoring station. The measured vibrations, in terms of peak particle velocity, are related to the maximum charge detonated at one instant and the distance of seismograph from the blast point. The ground vibrations from a number of blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances are monitored. A number of scaling factors of these dependencies (viz. Distance and maximum charge/delay) have been proposed by different researchers, namely, square root, cube root, CMRI, Langefors and Kihlstrom, Ghosh-Daemon, Indian standard etc. Scaling factors of desired type are computed for all the measured blast rounds. Regression analysis is carried out between the scaling factors and peak particle velocities to establish the coefficients of the vibration predictor equation. Then, the developed predictor equation is used for designing the blast henceforth. Director General of Mine Safety, India, specified that ground vibrations from eight to ten blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances should be monitored to develop a predictor equation; however, there is no guideline about the type of scaling factor to be used. Further to this, from the statistical point of view, a regression analysis on a small sample population cannot be accepted without the testing of hypothesis. To show the importance of the above, in this paper, seven scaling factors are considered for blast data set of a hard-rock underground drift using burn

  3. Wide-banded NTC radiation: local to remote observations by the four Cluster satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster multi-point mission offers a unique collection of non-thermal continuum (NTC radio waves observed in the 2–80 kHz frequency range over almost 15 years, from various view points over the radiating plasmasphere. Here we present rather infrequent case events, such as when primary electrostatic sources of such waves are embedded within the plasmapause boundary far from the magnetic equatorial plane. The spectral signature of the emitted electromagnetic waves is structured as a series of wide harmonic bands within the range covered by the step in plasma frequency encountered at the boundary. Developing the concept that the frequency distance df between harmonic bands measures the magnetic field magnitude B at the source (df = Fce, electron gyrofrequency, we analyse three selected events. The first one (studied in Grimald et al., 2008 presents electric field signatures observed by a Cluster constellation of small size (~ 200 to 1000 km spacecraft separation placed in the vicinity of sources. The electric field frequency spectra display frequency peaks placed at frequencies fs = n df (n being an integer, with df of the order of Fce values encountered at the plasmapause by the spacecraft. The second event, taken from the Cluster tilt campaign, leads to a 3-D view of NTC waves ray path orientations and to a localization of a global source region at several Earth radii (RE from Cluster (Décréau et al., 2013. The measured spectra present successive peaks placed at fs ~ (n+ 1/2 df. Next, considering if both situations might be two facets of the same phenomenon, we analyze a third event. The Cluster fleet, configured into a constellation of large size (~ 8000 to 25 000 km spacecraft separation, allows us to observe wide-banded NTC waves at different distances from their sources. Two new findings can be derived from our analysis. First, we point out that a large portion of the plasmasphere boundary layer, covering a large range of magnetic

  4. Observation of large photonic band gaps and defect modes in one-dimensional networked waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Mir, A; Vasseur, J O; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Fettouhi, N; Boudouti, E H E; Dobrzynski, L; Zemmouri, J

    2003-01-01

    The photonic band structures and transmission spectra of serial loop structures (SLSs), made of loops pasted together with segments of finite length, are investigated experimentally and theoretically. These monomode structures, composed of one-dimensional dielectric materials, may exhibit large stop bands where the propagation of electromagnetic waves is forbidden. The width of these band gaps depends on the geometrical and compositional parameters of the structure and may be drastically increased in a tandem geometry made up of several successive SLSs which differ in their physical characteristics. These SLSs may have potential applications as ultrawide-band filters.

  5. CH PLIF and PIV implementation using C-X (0,0) and intra-vibrational band filtered detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammack, Stephen D.; Skiba, Aaron W.; Lee, Tonghun; Carter, Campbell D.

    2018-02-01

    This study demonstrates advancement in a low-pulse energy methylidyne (CH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method that facilitates its application alongside flows seeded for particle image velocimetry (PIV) or other particle scattering based methods, as well as in high scattering environments. The C-X (0,0) R-branch excitation and filtered detection are carefully selected such that the laser line frequency is heavily attenuated by an edge filter while allowing transmission of most of the (0,0) band fluorescence. There are strong OH A-X (0,0) lines in the vicinity, but they can be avoided or utilized through dye laser tuning. As a demonstration of efficacy, PIV is performed simultaneously with the PLIF imaging. Using the edge filter, particle scattering signal is reduced to sub-fluorescence levels, allowing for flame-front analysis. This achievement enables flame-front tracking at high repetition rates (due to the low-pulse energy required) in combination with a scattering method such as PIV or use in high scattering environments such as enclosed combustors or near burner surfaces.

  6. Direct observation of Young’s double-slit interferences in vibrationally resolved photoionization of diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Plésiat, Etienne; Bozek, John D.; Rude, Bruce S.; Decleva, Piero; Martín, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Vibrationally resolved valence-shell photoionization spectra of H2, N2 and CO have been measured in the photon energy range 20–300 eV using third-generation synchrotron radiation. Young’s double-slit interferences lead to oscillations in the corresponding vibrational ratios, showing that the molecules behave as two-center electron-wave emitters and that the associated interferences leave their trace in the angle-integrated photoionization cross section. In contrast to previous work, the oscillations are directly observable in the experiment, thereby removing any possible ambiguity related to the introduction of external parameters or fitting functions. A straightforward extension of an original idea proposed by Cohen and Fano [Cohen HD, Fano U (1966) Phys Rev 150:30] confirms this interpretation and shows that it is also valid for diatomic heteronuclear molecules. Results of accurate theoretical calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings.

  7. B (E2) values of transitions from kπ= 0+→ 2+ vibrational bands in some well deformed heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Varshney, Mani; Gupta, D.K.; Bihari, Chhail; Singh, Yuvraj; Varshney, A.K.; Gupta, K.K

    2009-01-01

    There is simultaneous reduced B (E2) values of low-lying K π= 0 + → 2 + states, indicating a beta vibration like structure as well as the two particle transfer cross-section which suggest a pairing vibration like character and interpreted that low-lying k π= 0 + → 2 + resonance are classical beta vibrations. Recently, similar doubts about the origin of beta vibrations from surface oscillation have also been published

  8. Observations of copolar correlation coefficient through a bright band at vertical incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrnic, D. S.; Raghavan, R.; Chandrasekar, V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of polarimetric measurements at vertical incidence. In particular, the correlation coefficients between linear copolar components are examined, and measurements obtained with the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL)'s and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s polarimetric radars are presented. The data are from two well-defined bright bands. A sharp decrease of the correlation coefficient, confined to a height interval of a few hundred meters, marks the bottom of the bright band.

  9. Microwave and Submillimeter-Wave Measurements of HD 12C 16O in the ν 4, ν 5, and ν 6 Bands: Evidence of Vibrational Induced Rotational Axis Switching ("VIRAS")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Margulès, L.; Demaison, J.; Mäder, H.; Wörmke, S.

    2002-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of HDCO in the 4 1, 5 1, and 6 1 excited vibrational states has been investigated in Lille and Kiel using a sample enriched in deuterium. In Lille, the measurements were performed in the millimeter region (160-600 GHz). The spectra in Kiel were recorded using Fourier transform microwave spectrometers in the regions around 8-18 and 18-26 GHz, employing a rectangular waveguide of length 12 m and a circular waveguide of length 36 m, respectively. These results were combined with the 4 1, 5 1, and 6 1 infrared energy levels which were obtained from a previous analysis of FTS spectra of the ν 4 (CHD bend), ν 5 (CHD rocking), and ν 6 bands (out of plane bend) recorded in the 10-μm region at Giessen (A. Perrin, J.-M. Flaud, M. Smirnov, and M. Lock, J. Mol. Spectrosc.203, 175-187 (2000)). The energy level calculation of the 4 1, 5 1, and 6 1 interacting states accounts for the usual A- and B-type Coriolis resonances in the 5 1⇔6 1 and 4 1⇔6 1 off diagonals blocks. In addition, since the energy levels of the 5 1 and 6 1 states are very strongly resonating, it proved necessary, as in our previous study, to use a { Jx, Jz} nonorthorhombic term in the 5 1 and 6 1v-diagonal blocks of the Hamiltonian matrix in order to reproduce properly the observed microwave transitions and infrared energy levels. Therefore, this work confirms that HDCO is a good example of the vibrational induced rotational axis switching ("VIRAS") effect.

  10. Correlations between Strong Range Spread-F and GPS L-Band Scintillations Observed in Hainan in 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo-Jun, Wang; Jian-Kui, Shi; She-Ping, Shang; Xiao, Wang

    2009-01-01

    Data from the DPS-4 digisonde and the GPS L-band ionospheric scintillation monitor are employed to study the correlations between strong range spread-F (SSF) and GPS L-band scintillations observed in the ionosphere over Hainan Island, China (19.5°N, 109.1°E geogr., dip lat. 9°N) in 2004. The SSF in the ionogram is different from the general range spread-F because it extends in frequency well beyond FoF2 and makes FoF2 difficult to be determined. The observations show that the SSF phenomenon is frequently accompanied by the occurrence of GPS L-band scintillations. The SSF and GPS L-band scintillations occur frequently in the equinoctial months (March, April, September, and October), but rarely in the winter (January, February, November, and December) and summer (May–August); especially, occurrence variations of the SSF and GPS L-band scintillations nearly have a same trend. The SSF and scintillations may be associated with the occurrence of topside plasma bubbles and could be explained by the generalized Rayleigh–Taylor instability

  11. Modeling L-band synthetic aperture radar observations through dielectric changes in soil moisture and vegetation over shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    L-band airborne synthetic aperture radar observations were made over California shrublands to better understand the effects by soil and vegetation parameters on backscatter. Temporal changes in radar backscattering coefficient (s0) of up to 3 dB were highly correlated to surface soil moisture but no...

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: TrES-2b multi-band transit observations (Mislis+, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislis, D.; Schroeter, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Cordes, O.; Reif, K.

    2010-02-01

    The OLT data were taken on 11 April 2009 using a 3Kx3K CCD with a 1x1 FOV and an I-band filter as in our previous observing run (Paper I, Mislis & Schmitt, 2009, Cat. ). The Calar Alto data were taken on 28 May 2009 using BUSCA and the 2.2m telescope. (1 data file).

  13. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  14. Uncertainty quantification of GEOS-5 L-band radiative transfer model parameters using Bayesian inference and SMOS observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lannoy, G.J.M.; Reichle, R.H.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation

  15. First observation of yrast band in odd-odd 162Lu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.H.; Yuan, G.J.; Liu, X.A.

    1996-01-01

    High spin states of the odd-odd 162 Lu nucleus have been studied via 147 Sm( 19 F, 4nγ) 162 Lu reaction at 95MeV beam energy. Level scheme for yrast band based on π[h 11/2 ] υ[i 13/2 ] quasiparticle configuration was established up to I π =(23 - ) for the first time. This band shows the signature inversion in energy before backbending generally appeared in this mass region. It is stressed that the signature splitting in 162 Lu is larger than that in the 160 Tm nucleus. (orig.)

  16. Experimental observation of G banding verifying X-ray workers' chromosome translocation detected by FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuanming; Li Jin; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: FISH is the most effective way of detecting chromosome aberration and many factors affect its accuracy. G-banding is used to verify the results of early X-ray workers' chromosome translocation examined by FISH. Methods: The chromosome translocations of early X-ray workers have been analysed by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and G-banding, yields of translocation treated with statistics. Results: The chromosome aberrations frequencies by tow methods are closely related. Conclusion: FISH is a feasible way to analyse chromosome aberrations of X-ray workers and reconstruct dose

  17. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Parde, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline

    2011-01-01

    The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed ...

  18. Polarimetric C-Band SAR Observations of Sea Ice in the Greenland Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bjørn Bavnehøj; Nghiem, S.V.; Kwok, R.

    1998-01-01

    The fully polarimetric EMISAR acquired C-band radar signatures of sea ice in the Greenland Sea during a campaign in March 1995. The authors present maps of polarimetric signatures over an area containing various kinds of ice and discuss the use of polarimetric SAR for identification of ice types...

  19. Observations of Multi-band Structures in Double Star TC-1 PEACE Electron and HIA Ion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Narasimhan, K.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Grimald, S.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mihaljcic, B.; Kistler, L. M.; Owen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Several authors have reported inner magnetosphere observations of proton distributions confined to narrow energy bands in the range 1 - 25 keV (Smith and Hoffman (1974), etc). These structures have been described as "nose structures", with reference to their appearance in energy-time spectrograms and are also known as "bands" if they occur for extended periods of time. Multi-nose structures have been observed if 2 or more noses appear at the same time (Vallat et al., 2007). Gaps between "noses" (or "bands") have been explained in terms of the competing corotation, convection and magnetic gradient drifts. Charge exchange losses in slow drift paths for steady state scenarios and the role of substorm injections have also been considered (Li et al., 2000; Ebihara et al., 2004). We analyse observations of electron and ion multi-band structures frequently seen in Double-Star TC1 PEACE and HIA data. We present results from statistical surveys conducted using data from the duration of the mission. Furthermore, using a combination of both statistics and simulations, we test previous theories as to possible formation mechanisms and explore other possible explanations.

  20. Comparing and Merging Observation Data from Ka-Band Cloud Radar, C-Band Frequency-Modulated Continuous Wave Radar and Ceilometer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment in South China was undertaken to improve understanding of cloud and precipitation properties. Measurements of the vertical structures of non-precipitating and precipitating clouds were obtained using passive and active remote sensing equipment: a Ka-band cloud radar (CR system, a C-band frequency modulated continuous wave vertical pointing radar (CVPR, a microwave radiometer and a laser ceilometer (CEIL. CR plays a key role in high-level cloud observation, whereas CVPR is important for observing low- and mid-level clouds and heavy precipitation. CEIL helps us diminish the effects of “clear-sky” in the planetary boundary layer. The experiment took place in Longmen, Guangdong Province, China from May to September of 2016. This study focuses on evaluating the ability of the two radars to deliver consistent observation data and develops an algorithm to merge the CR, CVPR and CEIL data. Cloud echo base, thickness, frequency of observed cloud types and reflectivity vertical distributions are analyzed in the radar data. Comparisons between the collocated data sets show that reflectivity biases between the CR three operating modes are less than 2 dB. The averaged difference between CR and CVPR reflectivity can be reduced with attenuation correction to 3.57 dB from the original 4.82 dB. No systemic biases were observed between velocity data collected in the three CR modes and CVPR. The corrected CR reflectivity and velocity data were then merged with the CVPR data and CEIL data to fill in the gaps during the heavy precipitation periods and reduce the effects of Bragg scattering and fog on cloud observations in the boundary layer. Meanwhile, the merging of velocity data with different Nyquist velocities and resolutions diminishes velocity folding to provide fine-grain information about cloud and precipitation dynamics. The three daily periods in which low-level clouds tended to occur were at sunrise, noon and sunset and large

  1. In-Sample Confidence Bands and Out-of-Sample Forecast Bands for Time-Varying Parameters in Observation Driven Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasques, F.; Koopman, S.J.; Lasak, K.A.; Lucas, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the performances of alternative methods for calculating in-sample confidence and out-of-sample forecast bands for time-varying parameters. The in-sample bands reflect parameter uncertainty, while the out-of-sample bands reflect not only parameter uncertainty, but also innovation

  2. Dynamics of isolated magnetic bright points derived from Hinode/SOT G-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, D.; Hanslmeier, A.; Muller, R.; Veronig, A.; Rybák, J.; Muthsam, H.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Small-scale magnetic fields in the solar photosphere can be identified in high-resolution magnetograms or in the G-band as magnetic bright points (MBPs). Rapid motions of these fields can cause magneto-hydrodynamical waves and can also lead to nanoflares by magnetic field braiding and twisting. The MBP velocity distribution is a crucial parameter for estimating the amplitudes of those waves and the amount of energy they can contribute to coronal heating. Aims: The velocity and lifetime distributions of MBPs are derived from solar G-band images of a quiet sun region acquired by the Hinode/SOT instrument with different temporal and spatial sampling rates. Methods: We developed an automatic segmentation, identification and tracking algorithm to analyse G-Band image sequences to obtain the lifetime and velocity distributions of MBPs. The influence of temporal/spatial sampling rates on these distributions is studied and used to correct the obtained lifetimes and velocity distributions for these digitalisation effects. Results: After the correction of algorithm effects, we obtained a mean MBP lifetime of (2.50 ± 0.05) min and mean MBP velocities, depending on smoothing processes, in the range of (1-2) km~s-1. Corrected for temporal sampling effects, we obtained for the effective velocity distribution a Rayleigh function with a coefficient of (1.62 ± 0.05) km~s-1. The x- and y-components of the velocity distributions are Gaussians. The lifetime distribution can be fitted by an exponential function.

  3. Analysis of vibration characteristics of a prestressed concrete cable-stayed bridge using strong motion observation data. Jishin kansoku ni motozuku PC shachokyo no shindo tokusei no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inatomi, T. (Port and Harbour Research Institute, Kanagawa (Japan)); Takeda, T.; Obi, N.; Yamanobe, S. (Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-05-31

    Records of seismic observation were analyzed for the purpose of proving the validity of antiseismic design for a prestressed concrete (PC) cable-stayed bridge. This bridge is a three span continuous PC cable-stayed bridge of 498 m in bridge length, and is constructed on alluvial soft ground. The seismometer used is a servo type accelerometer. The observed frequency and mode of seismic vibration are in good agreement with those in the analysis and hence the validity of modelling of the structure in designing was confirmed. It was also confirmed that the bending vibration and torsional vibration of the main girder are separated as designed. However, some points such as a large difference in the observed vibration and analysed vibration in the mode accompanying rotation of the base are listed as problems to be solved in antiseismic design. In order to investigate the attenuation constant of the upper structure, a seismic wave response analysis was performed and its results were compared with observed ones. When the attenuation constant is assumed to be 2%, agreement of data between analysis and observation is good, and it is considered that the attenuation constant of the upper structure only without the effects of attenuation of energy escape from the base and crack generation in concrete was about 2% in the observed earthquake (maximum acceleration on the ground: 51 Gal). 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Observation of intermediate bands in Eu3+ doped YPO4 host: Li+ ion effect and blue to pink light emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kareem Parchur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the tuning of blue to pink colour generation from Li+ ion co-doped YPO4:5Eu nanoparticles prepared by polyol method at ∼100-120 °C with ethylene glycol (EG as a capping agent. Interaction of EG molecules capped on the surface of the nanoparticles and/or created oxygen vacancies induces formation of intermediate/mid gap bands in the host structure, which is supported by UV-Visible absorption data. Strong blue and pink colors can be observed in the cases of as-prepared and 500 °C annealed samples, respectively. Co-doping of Li+ enhances the emission intensities of intermediate band as well as Eu3+. On annealing as-prepared sample to 500 °C, the intermediate band emission intensity decreases, whereas Eu3+ emission intensity increases suggesting increase of extent of energy transfer from the intermediate band to Eu3+ on annealing. Emission intensity ratio of electric to magnetic dipole transitions of Eu3+ can be varied by changing excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study of as-prepared samples confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and Eu3+ but absence of Eu2+. Dispersed particles in ethanol and polymer film show the strong blue color, suggesting that these materials will be useful as probes in life science and also in light emitting device applications.

  5. Partially Observable Markov Decision Process-Based Transmission Policy over Ka-Band Channels for Space Information Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ka-band and higher Q/V band channels can provide an appealing capacity for the future deep-space communications and Space Information Networks (SIN, which are viewed as a primary solution to satisfy the increasing demands for high data rate services. However, Ka-band channel is much more sensitive to the weather conditions than the conventional communication channels. Moreover, due to the huge distance and long propagation delay in SINs, the transmitter can only obtain delayed Channel State Information (CSI from feedback. In this paper, the noise temperature of time-varying rain attenuation at Ka-band channels is modeled to a two-state Gilbert–Elliot channel, to capture the channel capacity that randomly ranging from good to bad state. An optimal transmission scheme based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP is proposed, and the key thresholds for selecting the optimal transmission method in the SIN communications are derived. Simulation results show that our proposed scheme can effectively improve the throughput.

  6. Oil Slick Observation at Low Incidence Angles in Ku-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilova, M. A.; Karaev, V. Y.; Guo, Jie

    2018-03-01

    On the 20 April 2010 the oil platform Deep Water Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico suffered an explosion during the final phases of drilling an exploratory well. As a result, an oil film covered the sea surface area of several thousand square kilometers. In the present paper the data of the Ku-band Precipitation Radar, which operates at low incidence angles, were used to explore the oil spill event. The two-scale model of the scattering surface was used to describe radar backscatter from the sea surface. The algorithm for retrieval of normalized radar cross section at nadir and the total slope variance of large-scale waves compared to the wavelength of electromagnetic wave (22 mm) was developed for the Precipitation Radar swath. It is shown that measurements at low incidence angles can be used for oil spill detection. This is the first time that the dependence of mean square slope of large-scale waves on wind speed has been obtained for oil slicks from Ku-band data, and compared to mean square slope obtained by Cox and Munk from optical data.

  7. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lopez-Baeza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera. Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity.

  8. The first observations of wide-band interferometers and the spectra of relic gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic backgrounds of relic gravitons of cosmological origin extend from frequencies of the order of the aHz up to the GHz range. Since the temperature and polarization anisotropies constrain the low frequency normalization of the spectra, in the concordance paradigm the strain amplitude corresponding to the frequency window of wide-band interferometers turns out to be, approximately, nine orders of magnitude smaller than the astounding signal recently reported and attributed to a binary black hole merger. The backgrounds of relic gravitons expected from the early Universe are compared with the stochastic foregrounds stemming from the estimated multiplicity of the astrophysical sources. It is suggested that while the astrophysical foregrounds are likely to dominate between few Hz and 10 kHz, relic gravitons with frequencies exceeding 100 kHz represent a potentially uncontaminated signal for the next generation of high-frequency detectors currently under scrutiny.

  9. Partner bands of 126Cs - first observation of chiral electromagnetic selection rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodner, E.; Sankowska, I.; Morek, T.; Rohozinski, S.G.; Droste, Ch.; Srebrny, J.; Pasternak, A.A.; Kisielinski, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Kownacki, J.; Mierzejewski, J.; Krol, A.

    2011-01-01

    The lifetimes of the excited states belonging to the chiral partner bands built on the πh 11/2 xνh 11/2 -1 configuration in 126 Cs have been measured using the DSA technique. For the first time the large set of the experimental transition probabilities is in qualitative agreement with all selection rules predicted for the strong chiral symmetry breaking limit. The selection rules originate from two general features of a chiral nucleus, namely, from the existence of well separated left- and right-handed systems built of three angular momentum vectors and extra symmetries appearing in addition to the chiral symmetry breaking. The B(M1) staggering resulting from these additional symmetries is sensitive to triaxiality of odd-odd nuclei as well as configuration of valence particles.

  10. PAHs and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands. What have we Learned from the New Generation of Laboratory and Observational Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands (UIR bands) and PAH spectral features are now being used as new probes of the ISM. PAHs are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). In the model dealing with the interstellar spectral features, PAHs are present as a mixture of radicals, ions and neutral species. PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge for laboratory astrophysics is to reproduce (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that exist in the emission and/or absorption interstellar zones, An extensive laboratory program has been developed at NASA Ames to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAHs in astrophysical environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space and the interstellar chemistry. In particular, laboratory experiments provide measurements of the spectral characteristics of interstellar PAH analogs from the ultraviolet and visible range to the infrared range for comparison with astronomical data. This paper will focus on the recent progress made in the laboratory to measure the direct absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs in the gas phase in the near-W and visible range in astrophysically relevant environments. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer-sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong V W radiation fields - are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral

  11. Recent results of seismic isolation study in CRIEPI: Tests on seismic isolation elements, vibration tests and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Katsuhiko; Shiojiri, Hiroo; Mazda, Taiji; Ohtori, Yasuki [Abiko Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Aoyagi, Sakae [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan)

    1992-07-01

    Seismic isolation is expected to be effective in raising reliability during earthquake, reducing cost, enlarging and promoting the design standardization of electric power facilities. In Japan, it has been applied to several buildings. However it is considered that more research is needed to verify the reliability and effectiveness of seismic isolation for fast breeder reactors. In the preliminary study of isolation concepts for FBRs the horizontal base isolation of buildings was investigated in detail. The laminated rubber bearings were considered to be most suitable isolation system. Tests on large scale models of rubber bearing and vibration test of base isolation system have been conducted as well as the earthquake response observation of isolated buildings were conducted.

  12. Recent results of seismic isolation study in CRIEPI: Tests on seismic isolation elements, vibration tests and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Katsuhiko; Shiojiri, Hiroo; Mazda, Taiji; Ohtori, Yasuki; Aoyagi, Sakae

    1992-01-01

    Seismic isolation is expected to be effective in raising reliability during earthquake, reducing cost, enlarging and promoting the design standardization of electric power facilities. In Japan, it has been applied to several buildings. However it is considered that more research is needed to verify the reliability and effectiveness of seismic isolation for fast breeder reactors. In the preliminary study of isolation concepts for FBRs the horizontal base isolation of buildings was investigated in detail. The laminated rubber bearings were considered to be most suitable isolation system. Tests on large scale models of rubber bearing and vibration test of base isolation system have been conducted as well as the earthquake response observation of isolated buildings were conducted

  13. Theoretical study of electronic absorption spectroscopy of propadienylidene molecule vis-â-vis the observed diffuse interstellar bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Samala Nagaprasad; Mahapatra, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theoretical study of spectroscopy and dynamics of electronically excited l-C 3 H 2 . ► Construction of ab initio electronic potential energy and diabatic coupling surfaces. ► First principles study of nuclear dynamics on excited electronic states. ► Findings reveal l-C 3 H 2 is a potential molecular carrier of diffuse interstellar bands. ► Electronically excited l-C 3 H 2 decays by ultrafast nonradiative internal conversion. -- Abstract: Observation of broad and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 Å and 5440 Å assigned to the optical absorption spectrum of Y-shaped propadienylidene (H 2 C=C=C:) molecule is theoretically examined in this paper. This molecule apparently absorbs in the same wavelength region as the observed DIBs and was suggested to be a potential carrier of these DIBs. This assignment mostly relied on the experimental data from radioastronomy and laboratory measurements. Motivated by these available experimental data we attempt here a theoretical study and investigate the detailed electronic structure and nuclear dynamics underlying the electronic absorption bands of propadienylidene molecule. Our results show that this molecule indeed absorbs in the wavelength region of the recorded DIBs. Strong nonadiabatic coupling between its energetically low-lying electronic states plays major role, initiates ultrafast internal conversion and contributes to the spectral broadening. Theoretical findings are finally compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and discussed in connection with the recorded DIBs.

  14. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and vibrationally mediated photodissociation of V+(OCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citir, Murat; Altinay, Gokhan; Metz, Ricardo B

    2006-04-20

    Electronic spectra of gas-phase V+(OCO) are measured in the near-infrared from 6050 to 7420 cm(-1) and in the visible from 15,500 to 16,560 cm(-1), using photofragment spectroscopy. The near-IR band is complex, with a 107 cm(-1) progression in the metal-ligand stretch. The visible band shows clearly resolved vibrational progressions in the metal-ligand stretch and rock, and in the OCO bend, as observed by Brucat and co-workers. A vibrational hot band gives the metal-ligand stretch frequency in the ground electronic state nu3'' = 210 cm(-1). The OCO antisymmetric stretch frequency in the ground electronic state (nu1'') is measured by using vibrationally mediated photodissociation. An IR laser vibrationally excites ions to nu1'' = 1. Vibrationally excited ions selectively dissociate following absorption of a second, visible photon at the nu1' = 1 CO2, due to interaction with the metal. Larger blue shifts observed for complexes with fewer ligands agree with trends seen for larger V+(OCO)n clusters.

  15. Spectra and relaxation dynamics of the pseudohalide (PS) vibrational bands for Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PS){sub 2} complexes, PS = CN, NCS and N{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compton, Ryan; Gerardi, Helen K. [Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Weidinger, Daniel [SRA International, 4300 Fair Lakes Court, Fairfax, VA 22033 (United States); Brown, Douglas J. [Chemistry Department, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Dressick, Walter J. [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Owrutsky, Jeffrey C., E-mail: Jeff.Owrutsky@nrl.navy.mil [Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► Static and transient infrared spectroscopy of pseudohalide bipyridine ruthenium complexes. ► Vibrational energy relaxes faster for the azide than the thiocyanate and cyanide analogs. ► Intramolecular vibrational relaxation is prevalent in cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}. - Abstract: Static and transient infrared spectroscopy were used to investigate cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2} (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine), cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}, and cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}(CN){sub 2} in solution. The NC stretching IR band for cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} appears at higher frequency (∼2106 cm{sup −1} in DMSO) than for the free NCS{sup −} anion while the IR bands for the azide and cyanide complexes are closer to those of the respective free anions. The vibrational energy relaxation (VER) lifetime for the azide complex is found to be much shorter (∼5 ps) than for either the NCS or CN species (both ∼70 ps in DMSO) and the lifetimes resemble those for each corresponding free anion in solution. However, for cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}, it is determined that the transition frequency depends more on the solvent than the VER lifetime implying that intramolecular vibrational relaxation is predominant over solvent energy-extracting interactions. These results are compared to the behavior of other related metal complexes in solution.

  16. Broad Band Observations of Gravitationally Lensed Blazar during a Gamma-Ray Outburst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Sitarek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available QSO B0218+357 is a gravitationally lensed blazar located at a cosmological redshift of 0.944. In July 2014 a GeV flare was observed by Fermi-LAT, triggering follow-up observations with the MAGIC telescopes at energies above 100 GeV. The MAGIC observations at the expected time of arrival of the trailing component resulted in the first detection of QSO B0218+357 in Very-High-Energy (VHE, >100 GeV gamma rays. We report here the observed multiwavelength emission during the 2014 flare.

  17. Possibilities of the observation of the discrete spectrum of the water dimer at equilibrium in millimeter-wave band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnov, A.F.; Tretyakov, M.Yu.; Leforestier, C.

    2009-01-01

    Attempts of experimental observations of the water dimer spectrum at equilibrium conditions have lasted for more than 40 years since the dimeric hypothesis for extra absorption, but have not yielded any positive confirmed result. In the present paper a new approach is considered: using a high-resolution millimeter-wave spectrum of the water dimer at equilibrium, calculated by a rigorous fully quantum method, we show the potential existence of discernible spectral series of discrete features of the water dimer, which correspond to J+1 1 symmetry, already observed in cold molecular beam experiments and having, therefore, well-defined positions. The intensity of spectral series and contrast to the remaining continuum-like spectrum of the dimer are calculated and compared with the monomer absorption. The suitability of two types of microwave spectrometers for observing these series is considered. The collisional line-width of millimeter lines of the dimer at equilibrium is estimated and the width of IR dimer bands is discussed. It is pointed out that the large width of IR dimer bands may pose difficulties for their reliable observation and conclusive separation from the rest of absorption in water vapor. This situation contrasts with the suggested approach of dimer detection in millimeter-waves.

  18. Near-infrared Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) by WINERED: CN Red-system Band Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Yasui, Chikako; Izumi, Natsuko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Fukue, Kei; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Otsubo, Shogo; Takenaka, Keiichi; Watase, Ayaka; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya [Laboratory of Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy, Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mizumoto, Misaki, E-mail: yoshiharu.shinnaka@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    Although high-resolution spectra of the CN red-system band are considered useful in cometary sciences, e.g., in the study of isotopic ratios of carbon and nitrogen in cometary volatiles, there have been few reports to date due to the lack of high-resolution ( R  ≡  λ /Δ λ  > 20,000) spectrographs in the near-infrared region around ∼1 μ m. Here, we present the high-resolution emission spectrum of the CN red-system band in comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), acquired by the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph WINERED mounted on the 1.3 m Araki telescope at the Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto, Japan. We applied our fluorescence excitation models for CN, based on modern spectroscopic studies, to the observed spectrum of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) to search for CN isotopologues ({sup 13}C{sup 14}N and {sup 12}C{sup 15}N). We used a CN fluorescence excitation model involving both a “pure” fluorescence excitation model for the outer coma and a “fully collisional” fluorescence excitation model for the inner coma region. Our emission model could reproduce the observed {sup 12}C{sup 14}N red-system band of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy). The derived mixing ratio between the two excitation models was 0.94(+0.02/−0.03):0.06(+0.03/−0.02), corresponding to the radius of the collision-dominant region of ∼800–1600 km from the nucleus. No isotopologues were detected. The observed spectrum is consistent, within error, with previous estimates in comets of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C (∼90) and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N (∼150).

  19. Optical Observations of M81 Galaxy Group in Narrow Band [SII] and H_alpha Filters: Holmberg IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina, B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of the nearby tidal dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX in M81 galaxy group in narrow band [SII] and H$alpha$ filters, carried out in March and November 2008 with the 2m RCC telescope at NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria. Our search for resident supernova remnants (identified as sources with enhanced [SII] emission relative to their H$alpha$ emission in this galaxy yielded no sources of this kind, besides M&H 10-11 or HoIX X-1. Nevertheless, we found a number of objects with significant H$alpha$ emission that probably represent uncatalogued HII regions.

  20. Spectroscopy of 9Be and observation of neutron halo structure in the states of positive parity rotational band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanova A.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross sections of the 9Be + α inelastic scattering at 30 MeV were measured at the tandem of Tsukuba University. All the known states of 9Be up to energies ~ 12 MeV were observed and decomposed into three rotational bands, each of them having a cluster structure consisting of a 8Be core plus a valence neutron in one of the sub-shells: p3/2−, s1/2+ and p1/2−. Existence of a neutron halo in the positive parity states was confirmed.

  1. Bandshapes in vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, F.G.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed account is given of the development of modern bandshape theories since 1965. An investigation into the relative contributions of statistical irreversible relaxation processes is described, for a series of molecules in which gradually the length of one molecular axis is increased. An investigation into the theoretical and experimental investigation of the broadening brought about by the effect of fluctuating intermolecular potentials on the vibrational frequency is also described. The effect of an intermolecular perturbative potential on anharmonic and Morse oscillators is discussed and the results are presented of a computation on the broadening of the vibrational band of some diatomic molecules in a rigid lattice type solvent. The broadening of the OH-stretching vibration in a number of aliphatic alcohols, the vibrational bandshapes of the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration and of the symmetric methyl stretching vibration are investigated. (Auth./ C.F.)

  2. Revealing the Faraday depth structure of radio galaxy NGC 612 with broad-band radio polarimetric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, J. F.; Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X.; O'Sullivan, S. P.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present full-polarization, broad-band observations of the radio galaxy NGC 612 (PKS B0131-637) from 1.3 to 3.1 GHz using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The relatively large angular scale of the radio galaxy makes it a good candidate with which to investigate the polarization mechanisms responsible for the observed Faraday depth structure. By fitting complex polarization models to the polarized spectrum of each pixel, we find that a single polarization component can adequately describe the observed signal for the majority of the radio galaxy. While we cannot definitively rule out internal Faraday rotation, we argue that the bulk of the Faraday rotation is taking place in a thin skin that girts the polarized emission. Using minimum energy estimates, we find an implied total magnetic field strength of 4.2 μG.

  3. Observation of solar radio bursts using swept-frequency radiospectrograph in 20 - 40 MHz band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Oya, Hiroshi.

    1987-01-01

    A new station for the observation of solar decametric radio bursts has been developed at Miyagi Vocational Training College in Tsukidate, Miyagi, Japan. Using the swept frequency radiospectrograph covering a frequency range from 20 MHz to 40 MHz within 200 msec, with bandwidth of 30 kHz, the radio outbursts from the sun have been currently monitored with colored dynamic spectrum display. After July 1982, successful observations provide the data which include all types of solar radio bursts such as type I, II, III, IV and V in the decametric wavelength range. In addition to these typical radio bursts, rising tone bursts with fast drift rate followed by strong type III bursts and a series of bursts repeating rising and falling tone bursts with slow drift rate have been observed. (author)

  4. Impulsive IR-multiphoton dissociation of acrolein: observation of non-statistical product vibrational excitation in CO ( v=1-12) by time resolved IR fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. K.

    2000-10-01

    On IR-multiphoton excitation, vibrationally highly excited acrolein molecules undergo concerted dissociation generating CO and ethylene. The vibrationally excited products, CO and ethylene, are detected immediately following the CO 2 laser pulse by observing IR fluorescence at 4.7 and 3.2 μm, respectively. The nascent CO is formed with significant vibrational excitation, with a Boltzmann population distribution for v=1-12 levels corresponding to T v=12 950±50 K. The average vibrational energy in the product CO is found to be 26 kcal mol -1, in contrast to its statistical share of 5 kcal mol -1, available from the product energy distribution. The nascent vibrationally excited ethylene either dissociates by absorbing further infrared laser photons from the tail of the CO 2 laser pulse or relaxes by collisional deactivation. Ethylene IR-fluorescence excitation spectrum showed a structure in the quasi-continuum, with a facile resonance at 10.53 μm corresponding to the 10P(14) CO 2 laser line, which explains the higher acetylene yield observed at a higher pressure. A hydrogen atom transfer mechanism followed by C-C impulsive break in the acrolein transition state may be responsible for such non-statistical product energy distribution.

  5. Observations of Terrestrial Nightglow (Meinel Bands at King Sejong Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Won

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A Fourier Transform Spectrometer was used to study upper mesospheric thermodynamic by observing the hydroxyl (OH emission. Rocket-born and satellited-born photometers place the peak emission near 87 km. The instrument was installed in February 1999 at King Sejong station (62.22 °S, 301.25 °E, Antarctica and has been in routine operation since then. An intensive operational effort has resulted in a substantial data between April and June, 1999. A harmonic analysis was carried out to examine information on the tidal characteristics. The measured amplitudes of the 12-hour oscillation are in the range of 2.4-3.7 K, which are in resonable agreement with theoretical model outputs. The harmonic analysis also revealed 8-hour oscillation which is not expected from the traditional theoretical studies. In addition, the observed 8-hour oscillations are apparent and sometimes dominate the temperature variation in the upper mesosphere.

  6. Characterization of VHF radar observations associated with equatorial Spread F by narrow-band optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF radars have been extensively used to investigate the structures and dynamics of equatorial Spread F (ESF irregularities. However, unambiguous identification of the nature of the structures in terms of plasma depletion or enhancement requires another technique, as the return echo measured by VHF radar is proportional to the square of the electron density fluctuations. In order to address this issue, co-ordinated radar backscatter and thermospheric airglow intensity measurements were carried out during March 2003 from the MST radar site at Gadanki. Temporal variations of 630.0-nm and 777.4-nm emission intensities reveal small-scale ("micro" and large-scale ("macro" variations during the period of observation. The micro variations are absent on non-ESF nights while the macro variations are present on both ESF and non-ESF nights. In addition to the well-known anti-correlation between the base height of the F-region and the nocturnal variation of thermospheric airglow intensities, the variation of the base height of the F-layer, on occasion, is found to manifest as a bottomside wave-like structure, as seen by VHF radar on an ESF night. The micro variations in the airglow intensities are associated with large-scale irregular plasma structures and found to be in correspondence with the "plume" structures obtained by VHF radar. In addition to the commonly observed depletions with upward movement, the observation unequivocally reveals the presence of plasma enhancements which move downwards. The observation of enhancement in 777.4-nm airglow intensity, which is characterized as plasma enhancement, provides an experimental verification of the earlier prediction based on numerical modeling studies.

  7. Atmospheric monitoring in the millimetre and submillimetre bands for cosmological observations: CASPER2

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petris, M.; De Gregori, S.; Decina, B.; Lamagna, L.; Pardo, J. R.

    2013-02-01

    Cosmological observations from ground at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths are affected by atmospheric absorption and consequent emission. The low- and high-frequency (sky-noise) fluctuations of atmospheric performance necessitate careful observational strategies and/or instrumental technical solutions. Measurements of atmospheric emission spectra are necessary for accurate calibration procedures as well as for site-testing statistics. CASPER2, an instrument designed to explore the 90-450 GHz (3-15 cm-1) spectral region, was developed and had its operation verified in the Alps. A Martin-Puplett interferometer (MPI) operates by comparing sky radiation, coming from a field of view (FOV) of 28 arcmin (full width at half-maximum) and collected by a 62-cm-diameter Pressman-Camichel telescope, with a reference source. The signals at the two output ports of the interferometer are detected by two bolometers cooled to 300 mK inside a wet cryostat. Three different but complementary interferometric techniques can be performed with CASPER2: amplitude modulation (AM), fast-scan (FS) and phase modulation (PM). An altazimuthal mount allows sky pointing, possibly co-aligned with the optical axis of the 2.6-m-diameter telescope of MITO (Millimetre and Infrared Testagrigia Observatory, Italy). The optimal time-scale to average acquired spectra is inferred by Allan variance analysis at five fiducial frequencies. We present the motivation for and design of the atmospheric spectrometer CASPER2. The procedure adopted to calibrate the instrument and the preliminary performance of it are described. Instrument capabilities were checked during the summer observational campaign at MITO in 2010 July by measuring atmospheric emission spectra with the three procedures.

  8. Observations of Terrestrial Nightglow (Meinel Bands) at King Sejong Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Young-In Won; Young-Mon Cho; Bang Yong Lee; Jhoon Kim; Jong Kyun Chung; Yong Ha Kim

    1999-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Spectrometer was used to study upper mesospheric thermodynamic by observing the hydroxyl (OH) emission. Rocket-born and satellited-born photometers place the peak emission near 87 km. The instrument was installed in February 1999 at King Sejong station (62.22 °S, 301.25 °E), Antarctica and has been in routine operation since then. An intensive operational effort has resulted in a substantial data between April and June, 1999. A harmonic analysis was carried out to examine ...

  9. Observation of Whole Flushing Process of a River Sand Bar by a Flood Using X-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takewaka

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Morphological changes during a flood event in July 2010 were observed with X-band marine radar at the mouth of Tenryu River, Shizuoka, Japan. Radar images were collected hourly for more than 72 h from the beginning of the flood and processed into time-averaged images. Changes in the morphology of the area were interpreted from the time-averaged images, revealing that the isolated river dune was washed away by the flood, the width of the river mouth increased gradually, and the river mouth terrace expanded radially. Furthermore, image analysis of the radar images was applied to estimate the migration speed of the brightness pattern, which is assumed to be a proxy of bottom undulation of the river bed. The migration was observed to be faster when the water level gradient between the river channel and sea increased.

  10. Vibrational spectra and ab initio analysis of tert-butyl, trimethylsilyl, and trimethylgermyl derivatives of 3,3-dimethylcyclopropene . VI: Application of observed trends to stannyl derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; De Maré, G. R.; Abramenkov, A. V.; Baird, M. S.; Tverezovsky, V. V.; Nizovtsev, A. V.; Bolesov, I. G.

    2004-09-01

    The effects of substitution of X=C by Si or Ge in X(CH 3) 3 moieties attached to the formal double bond of 3,3-dimethylcyclopropene are examined. Regularities in observed trends of vibrational frequencies implicating the moieties containing the X atom, as the X atomic mass is increased, are extrapolated to X=Sn. The results of this extrapolation made it possible to assign the known experimental vibrational frequencies of 3,3-dimethyl-1-(trimethylstannyl)cyclopropene and 3,3-dimethyl-1,2-bis(trimethylstannyl)cyclopropene.

  11. Vibrational microspectroscopic identification of powdered traditional medicines: Chemical micromorphology of Poria observed by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Sun, Su-qin; Ma, Fang; Zhou, Qun

    2014-07-01

    Microscopic identification using optical microscopes is a simple and effective method to identify powdered traditional medicines made from plants, animals and fungi. Sometimes, the criteria based on physical properties of the microscopic characteristics of drug powder may be ambiguous, which makes the microscopic identification method subjective and empirical to some extent. In this research, the vibrational microspectroscopic identification method is proposed for more explicit discrimination of powdered traditional medicines. The chemical micromorphology, i.e., chemical compositions and related physical morphologies, of the drug powder can be profiled objectively and quantitatively by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy, leading to better understanding about the formation mechanisms of microscopic characteristics and more accurate identification criteria. As an example, the powder of Poria, which is one of the most used traditional Chinese medicines, is studied in this research. Three types of hyphae are classified according to their infrared spectral features in the region from 1200 to 900 cm-1. Different kinds of polysaccharides indicate that these hyphae may be in different stages of the growth. The granular and branched clumps observed by the optical microscope may be formed from the aggregation of the mature hyphae with β-D-glucan reserves. The newfound spherical particles may originate from the exuded droplets in the fresh Poria because they are both composed of α-D-glucan. The results are helpful to understand the development of the hyphae and the formation of active polysaccharides in Poria and to establish accurate microspectroscopic identification criteria.

  12. Uncertainty Quantification of GEOS-5 L-band Radiative Transfer Model Parameters Using Bayesian Inference and SMOS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation opacity and scattering albedo for large-scale applications are difficult to obtain from field studies and often lack an uncertainty estimate. Here, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method is used to determine satellite-scale estimates of RTM parameters and their posterior uncertainty by minimizing the misfit between long-term averages and standard deviations of simulated and observed Tb at a range of incidence angles, at horizontal and vertical polarization, and for morning and evening overpasses. Tb simulations are generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) and confronted with Tb observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The MCMC algorithm suggests that the relative uncertainty of the RTM parameter estimates is typically less than 25 of the maximum a posteriori density (MAP) parameter value. Furthermore, the actual root-mean-square-differences in long-term Tb averages and standard deviations are found consistent with the respective estimated total simulation and observation error standard deviations of m3.1K and s2.4K. It is also shown that the MAP parameter values estimated through MCMC simulation are in close agreement with those obtained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  13. Observation of total electron content and irregularities in electron density using GHz band radiowaves emitted from satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tadahiko; Fujita, Masaharu; Awaka, Jun.

    1978-01-01

    The experiments to investigate the influence of troposphere on millimeter and sub-millimeter wave propagation were carried out, using the engineering test satellite -- 2 (ETS-2) which became the Japanese first stationary satellite and carries the transmitter emitting beacon waves of 1.7, 11.5 and 34.5 GHz coherent each other. By these experiments, it was found that the waves of 1.7 and 11.5 GHz were affected by the ionosphere. The measurement of total electron content using GHz band waves was the first trial in the world, and is capable of grasping its change with higher accuracy than conventional methods. Scintillation of 1.7 GHz is mainly the phenomenon during night, and it was revealed that it has a peak at 22.30 local time and occurred through the radiowave scattering owing to the irregularities of the ionosphere. It is also suggested that some plasma instability is generated in the place where electron density gradient in the ionosphere is large, and the irregularities of fine scale are produced, assuming from GHz band scintillations at the time of magnetic storm. The relations among wave number spectrum, scintillation frequency spectrum and S4 index (statistical quantity to give estimate for scintillation amplitude) can be derived by the weak scattering theory (Simple scattering theory). As seen above, the diagnosis of plasma disturbances in the ionosphere is feasible by the simultaneous observations of total electron content and scintillation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Vibrational microspectroscopic identification of powdered traditional medicines: chemical micromorphology of Poria observed by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Sun, Su-qin; Ma, Fang; Zhou, Qun

    2014-07-15

    Microscopic identification using optical microscopes is a simple and effective method to identify powdered traditional medicines made from plants, animals and fungi. Sometimes, the criteria based on physical properties of the microscopic characteristics of drug powder may be ambiguous, which makes the microscopic identification method subjective and empirical to some extent. In this research, the vibrational microspectroscopic identification method is proposed for more explicit discrimination of powdered traditional medicines. The chemical micromorphology, i.e., chemical compositions and related physical morphologies, of the drug powder can be profiled objectively and quantitatively by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy, leading to better understanding about the formation mechanisms of microscopic characteristics and more accurate identification criteria. As an example, the powder of Poria, which is one of the most used traditional Chinese medicines, is studied in this research. Three types of hyphae are classified according to their infrared spectral features in the region from 1200 to 900 cm(-1). Different kinds of polysaccharides indicate that these hyphae may be in different stages of the growth. The granular and branched clumps observed by the optical microscope may be formed from the aggregation of the mature hyphae with β-D-glucan reserves. The newfound spherical particles may originate from the exuded droplets in the fresh Poria because they are both composed of α-D-glucan. The results are helpful to understand the development of the hyphae and the formation of active polysaccharides in Poria and to establish accurate microspectroscopic identification criteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinear resonance ultrasonic vibrations in Czochralski-silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapenko, S.; Tarasov, I.

    2000-04-01

    A resonance effect of generation of subharmonic acoustic vibrations is observed in as-grown, oxidized, and epitaxial silicon wafers. Ultrasonic vibrations were generated into a standard 200 mm Czochralski-silicon (Cz-Si) wafer using a circular ultrasound transducer with major frequency of the radial vibrations at about 26 kHz. By tuning frequency (f) of the transducer within a resonance curve, we observed a generation of intense f/2 subharmonic acoustic mode assigned as a "whistle." The whistle mode has a threshold amplitude behavior and narrow frequency band. The whistle is attributed to a nonlinear acoustic vibration of a silicon plate. It is demonstrated that characteristics of the whistle mode are sensitive to internal stress and can be used for quality control and in-line diagnostics of oxidized and epitaxial Cz-Si wafers.

  16. Vibrational relaxation dynamics of SD molecules in As2S3: Observation of an anomalous isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, J.R.; Happek, U.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the vibrational relaxation of molecular impurities in crystals and glasses mainly depends on the order of the decay process, with lower order processes leading to more rapid relaxation (a behavior that is known under the term open-quotes gap-lawclose quotes). Here we present measurements that contradict this assumption. Using high intensity psec pulses of the Stanford FEL we measured the relaxation rate of the SD vibrational stretch mode (at a frequency of 1800 cm) by applying a pump-probe technique. We find relaxation rates on the order of 2x10 9 sec -1 , which are a factor of 2 lower than those found for the isotope molecule SH (at a frequency of about 2500 cm - 1 ) in the same host 1 . We recall that the relaxation of the SD vibrational stretch mode is controlled by a lower order process as compared to the SH molecule, which is due to the smaller number of host vibrational quanta to match the energy of the stretch mode; a fact we have confirmed experimentally by temperature dependent relaxation measurements. Thus our remits are in marked contrast to the so-called open-quotes Gap-Lawclose quotes and emphasize the importance of the molecule - host coupling in the relaxation dynamics

  17. THz absorption spectrum of the CO2–H2O complex: Observation and assignment of intermolecular van der Waals vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Wallin Mahler Andersen, Denise

    2014-01-01

    have been assigned and provide crucial observables for benchmark theoretical descriptions of this systems’ flat intermolecular potential energy surface. A (semi)-empirical value for the zero-point energy of 273 ± 15 cm−1 from the class of intermolecular van der Waals vibrations is proposed...... and the combination with high-level quantum chemical calculations provides a value of 726 ± 15 cm−1 for the dissociation energy D0...

  18. Multi-wave band SMM-VLA observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Schmelz, Joan T.; Gonzalez, Raymond D.; Smith, Kermit L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection CME by instruments on the SMM as well as by the VLA and other ground-based observatories on September 30, 1988. The multiwave band data show a gradual slowly changing event which lasted several hours. The microwave burst emission was found to originate in compact moderately circularly polarized sources located near the sites of bright H-alpha and soft X-ray emission. These data are combined with estimates of an electron temperature of 1.5 x 10 to the 7th K and an emission measure of about 2.0 x 10 to the 49th/cu cm obtained from Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra to show that the microwave emission can be attributed to thermal gyrosynchrotron radiation in regions where the magnetic field strength is 425-650 G. The CME acceleration at low altitudes is measured on the basis of ground- and space-based coronagraphs.

  19. FIRST L-BAND INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF A YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT: PROBING THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT OF MWC 419

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragland, S.; Armandroff, T.; Wizinowich, P. L.; Akeson, R. L.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Colavita, M. M.; Traub, W. A.; Vasisht, G.; Danchi, W. C.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Ridgway, S. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present spatially resolved K- and L-band spectra (at spectral resolution R = 230 and R = 60, respectively) of MWC 419, a Herbig Ae/Be star. The data were obtained simultaneously with a new configuration of the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. Our observations are sensitive to the radial distribution of temperature in the inner region of the disk of MWC 419. We fit the visibility data with both simple geometric and more physical disk models. The geometric models (uniform disk and Gaussian) show that the apparent size increases linearly with wavelength in the 2-4 μm wavelength region, suggesting that the disk is extended with a temperature gradient. A model having a power-law temperature gradient with radius simultaneously fits our interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution data from the literature. The slope of the power law is close to that expected from an optically thick disk. Our spectrally dispersed interferometric measurements include the Br γ emission line. The measured disk size at and around Br γ suggests that emitting hydrogen gas is located inside (or within the inner regions) of the dust disk.

  20. First L-Band Interferometric Observations of a Young Stellar Object: Probing the Circumstellar Environment of MWC 419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, S.; Akeson, R. L.; Armandroff, T.; Colavita, M. M.; Danchi, W. C.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Ridgway, S. T.; Traub, W. A.; Vasisht, G.; Wizinowich, P. L.

    2009-09-01

    We present spatially resolved K- and L-band spectra (at spectral resolution R = 230 and R = 60, respectively) of MWC 419, a Herbig Ae/Be star. The data were obtained simultaneously with a new configuration of the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. Our observations are sensitive to the radial distribution of temperature in the inner region of the disk of MWC 419. We fit the visibility data with both simple geometric and more physical disk models. The geometric models (uniform disk and Gaussian) show that the apparent size increases linearly with wavelength in the 2-4 μm wavelength region, suggesting that the disk is extended with a temperature gradient. A model having a power-law temperature gradient with radius simultaneously fits our interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution data from the literature. The slope of the power law is close to that expected from an optically thick disk. Our spectrally dispersed interferometric measurements include the Br γ emission line. The measured disk size at and around Br γ suggests that emitting hydrogen gas is located inside (or within the inner regions) of the dust disk.

  1. Observations of a Cold Front at High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using an X-Band Phased Array Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mahre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While the vertical structure of cold fronts has been studied using various methods, previous research has shown that traditional methods of observing meteorological phenomena (such as pencil-beam radars in PPI/volumetric mode are not well-suited for resolving small-scale cold front phenomena, due to relatively low spatiotemporal resolution. Additionally, non-simultaneous elevation sampling within a vertical cross-section can lead to errors in analysis, as differential vertical advection cannot be distinguished from temporal evolution. In this study, a cold front from 19 September 2015 is analyzed using the Atmospheric Imaging Radar (AIR. The AIR transmits a 20-degree fan beam in elevation, and digital beamforming is used on receive to generate simultaneous receive beams. This mobile, X-band, phased-array radar offers temporal sampling on the order of 1 s (while in RHI mode, range sampling of 30 m (37.5 m native resolution, and continuous, arbitrarily oversampled data in the vertical dimension. Here, 0.5-degree sampling is used in elevation (1-degree native resolution. This study is the first in which a cold front has been studied via imaging radar. The ability of the AIR to obtain simultaneous RHIs at high temporal sampling rates without mechanical steering allows for analysis of features such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and feeder flow.

  2. Observation of a hidden hole-like band approaching the fermi level in K-doped iron selenide superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Hamada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of the study of iron-based superconductors is to identify the common feature that produces the high critical temperature (T c ). In the early days, based on a weak-coupling viewpoint, the nesting between hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) leading to the so-called s± state was considered to be one such key feature. However, this theory has faced a serious challenge ever since the discovery of alkali-metal-doped FeSe (AFS) superconductors, in which only electron-like FSs with a nodeless superconducting gap are observed. Several theories have been proposed, but a consistent understanding is yet to be achieved. Here we show experimentally that a hole-like band exists in K x Fe 2-y Se 2 , which presumably forms a hole-like Fermi surface. The present study suggests that AFS can be categorized in the same group as iron arsenides with both hole- and electron-like FSs present. This result provides a foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. (author)

  3. Comparison of sEMG processing methods during whole-body vibration exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S

    2015-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the influence of surface electromyography (sEMG) processing methods on the quantification of muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises. sEMG activity was recorded while the participants performed squats on the platform with and without WBV. The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum at the vibration frequency and its harmonics were deleted using state-of-the-art methods, i.e. (1) a band-stop filter, (2) a band-pass filter, and (3) spectral linear interpolation. The same filtering methods were applied on the sEMG during the no-vibration trial. The linear interpolation method showed the highest intraclass correlation coefficients (no vibration: 0.999, WBV: 0.757-0.979) with the comparison measure (unfiltered sEMG during the no-vibration trial), followed by the band-stop filter (no vibration: 0.929-0.975, WBV: 0.661-0.938). While both methods introduced a systematic bias (P interpolation method and the band-stop filter was comparable. The band-pass filter was in poor agreement with the other methods (ICC: 0.207-0.697), unless the sEMG(RMS) was corrected for the bias (ICC ⩾ 0.931, %LOA ⩽ 32.3). In conclusion, spectral linear interpolation or a band-stop filter centered at the vibration frequency and its multiple harmonics should be applied to delete the artifacts in the sEMG signals during WBV. With the use of a band-stop filter it is recommended to correct the sEMG(RMS) for the bias as this procedure improved its performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H 2 CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to J max = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm −1 and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments

  5. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-01

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H2CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to Jmax = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm-1 and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  6. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachmenev, Andrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, D–45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2013-11-28

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H{sub 2}CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to J{sub max} = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm{sup −1} and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  7. Observation of an electron band above the Fermi level in FeTe0.55Se0.45 from in-situ surface doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, J.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Ding, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y.-M.; Fedorov, A. V.; Denlinger, J. D.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    We used in-situ potassium (K) evaporation to dope the surface of the iron-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . The systematic study of the bands near the Fermi level confirms that electrons are doped into the system, allowing us to tune the Fermi level of this material and to access otherwise unoccupied electronic states. In particular, we observe an electron band located above the Fermi level before doping that shares similarities with a small three-dimensional pocket observed in the cousin, heavily electron-doped KFe 2−x Se 2 compound.

  8. Simulation study for ground-based Ku-band microwave observations of ozone and hydroxyl in the polar middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Clilverd, Mark; Kosch, Michael; Verronen, Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Commercial satellite TV broadcasting is possible due to remarkable advances in microwave electronics, enabling weak signals transmitted over 36,000 km from geostationary orbit to be received by inexpensive rooftop dishes. The Ku band satellite frequencies (10.70-14.25 GHz) overlap microwave emissions from ozone (O3) at 11.072 GHz and hydroxyl radical (OH) at 13.44 GHz. These important chemical species in the polar middle atmosphere respond strongly to solar variability and, at high latitudes, geomagnetic activity associated with space weather. Atmospheric model calculations predict that energetic electron precipitation (EEP) driven by magnetospheric substorms produces large changes in polar mesospheric O3 and OH. The EEP typically peaks at geomagnetic latitudes ˜65˚ (e.g. Kilpisjärvi, Finland and Syowa station, Antarctica) and evolves rapidly with time eastwards and over the geomagnetic latitude range 60˚ -80˚ (e.g. reaching Halley, Antarctica). During the substorms OH can increase by more than 1000% at 64-84 km. The substorms leave footprints of 5-55% O3 loss lasting many hours of local time, with strong altitude and seasonal dependences. An atmospheric simulation and retrieval study is performed to determine the specification and design requirements for microwave radiometers capable of measuring O3 and OH profiles from Arctic and Antarctic locations using accessible satellite TV receiver technology. The proposed observations are highly applicable to studies of EEP, atmospheric dynamics, planetaryscale circulation, chemical transport, and the representation of these processes in polar and global climate models. They would provide a lowcost, reliable alternative to increasingly sparse satellite measurements, extending long-term data records and also providing "ground truth" calibration data.

  9. Observation of states beyond band termination in 156,157,158Er and strongly deformed structures in 173,174,175Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, M A; Djongolov, M K; Evans, A O

    2006-01-01

    High-spin terminating bands in heavy nuclei were first identified in nuclei around 158 Er 90 . While examples of terminating states have been identified in a number of erbium isotopes, almost nothing is known about the states lying beyond band termination. In the present work, the high-spin structure of 156,157,158 Er has been studied using the Gammasphere spectrometer. The subject of triaxial superdeformation and 'wobbling' modes in Lu nuclei has rightly attracted a great deal of attention. Very recently four strongly or superdeformed (SD) sequences have been observed in 174 Hf, and cranking calculations using the Ultimate Cranker code predict that such structures may have significant triaxial deformation. We have performed two experiments in an attempt to verify the possible triaxial nature of these bands. A lifetime measurement was performed to confirm the large (and similar) deformation of the bands. In addition, a high-statistics, thin-target experiment took place to search for linking transitions between the SD bands, possible wobbling modes, and new SD band structures

  10. The broad-band X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A from a joint NuSTAR/Suzaku observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, 60 Garden St., MS-67, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madejski, G. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Fuerst, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Rivers, E.; Walton, D. J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matt, G.; Marinucci, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Ballantyne, D. R. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Boggs, S. E. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, W. W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We have obtained a deep, simultaneous observation of the bright, nearby Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A with Suzaku and NuSTAR. Through a detailed spectral analysis, we are able to robustly separate the continuum, absorption, and distant reflection components in the spectrum. The absorbing column is found to be modest (∼6×10{sup 21} cm{sup −2} ), and does not introduce any significant curvature in the Fe K band. We are able to place a strong constraint on the presence of a broadened Fe Kα line (E{sub rest}=6.46{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08} keV with σ=0.33{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08} keV and EW=34{sub −7}{sup +8} eV), though we are not able to constrain any of the parameters of a relativistic reflection model. These results highlight the range in broad Fe K line strengths observed in nearby, bright, active galactic nuclei (roughly an order of magnitude), and imply a corresponding range in the physical properties of the inner accretion disk in these sources. We have also updated our previously reported measurement of the high-energy cutoff of the hard X-ray emission using both observatories rather than just NuSTAR alone: E {sub cut} = 186 ± 14 keV. This high-energy cutoff acts as a proxy for the temperature of the coronal electron plasma, enabling us to further separate this parameter from the plasma's optical depth and to update our results for these parameters as well. We derive kT=50{sub −3}{sup +6} keV with τ=2.34{sub −0.11}{sup +0.16} using a spherical geometry, kT = 61 ± 1 keV with τ = 0.68 ± 0.02 for a slab geometry, with both having an equivalent goodness-of-fit.

  11. Vibrational Investigations of Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite with Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Steluta Ciobanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver-doped hydroxyapatite (Ag:HAp was obtained by coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, infrared, and Raman analysis confirmed the development of Ag:HAp with good crystal structure. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed an uniform ellipsoidal morphology with particles from 5 nm to 15 nm. The main vibrational bands characteristic to HAp were identified. The bands assigned to phosphate vibrational group were highlighted in infrared and Raman spectra. The most intense peak Raman spectrum is the narrow band observed at 960 cm−1. In this article Ag:HAp-NPs were also evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against gram-positive, gram-negative, and fungal strains. The specific antimicrobial activity revealed by the qualitative assay demonstrates that our compounds are interacting differently with the microbial targets.

  12. LOCAL BENCHMARKS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF MAJOR-MERGER GALAXIES-SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF A K-BAND SELECTED SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, C. Kevin; Cheng Yiwen; Lu Nanyao; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Cutri, Roc; Domingue, Donovan; Huang Jiasheng; Gao Yu; Sun, W.-H.; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer observations for a sample of close major-merger galaxy pairs (KPAIR sample) selected from cross-matches between the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. The goals are to study the star formation activity in these galaxies and to set a local bench mark for the cosmic evolution of close major mergers. The Spitzer KPAIR sample (27 pairs, 54 galaxies) includes all spectroscopically confirmed spiral-spiral (S+S) and spiral-elliptical (S+E) pairs in a parent sample that is complete for primaries brighter than K = 12.5 mag, projected separations of 5 h -1 kpc ≤ s ≤ 20 h -1 kpc, and mass ratios ≤2.5. The Spitzer data, consisting of images in seven bands (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8, 24, 70, 160 μm), show very diversified IR emission properties. Compared to single spiral galaxies in a control sample, only spiral galaxies in S+S pairs show significantly enhanced specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M), whereas spiral galaxies in S+E pairs do not. Furthermore, the SFR enhancement of spiral galaxies in S+S pairs is highly mass-dependent. Only those with M ∼> 10 10.5 M sun show significant enhancement. Relatively low-mass (M ∼ 10 10 M sun ) spirals in S+S pairs have about the same SFR/M compared to their counterparts in the control sample, while those with 10 11 M sun have on average a ∼3 times higher SFR/M than single spirals. There is evidence for a correlation between the global star formation activities (but not the nuclear activities) of the component galaxies in massive S+S major-merger pairs (the H olmberg effect ) . There is no significant difference in the SFR/M between the primaries and the secondaries, nor between spirals of SEP KPAIR =2.54 x 10 -4 (M sun yr -1 Mpc -3 ).

  13. N-parameter retrievals from L-band microwave observations acquired over a variety of crop fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pardé, M.; Wigneron, J-P.; Waldteufel, P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of studies have shown the feasibility of estimating surface soil moisture from L-band passive microwave measurements. Such measurements should be acquired in the near future by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The SMOS measurements will be done at many incidence angles...

  14. Deep absorption band in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films and solar cells observed by transparent piezoelectric photothermal spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakata, Sho; Atarashi, Akiko [Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Yagi, Masakazu [Kagawa National College of Technology, Mitoyo-shi 769-1192 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) using a transparent piezoelectric photo-thermal (Tr-PPT) method was carried out on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films (both CIGS/Mo/SLG and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG) and solar cells (ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG). Using the Tr-PPT method, the high background absorption in the below gap region observed in both a microphone and a conventional transducer PAS spectra was strongly reduced. This high background absorption came from the CIGS/Mo interface. This result proves that the Tr-PPT PAS is the surface sensitive method. In the below-band region, a bell-shape deep absorption band has been observed at 0.76 eV, in which a full-width at the half-maximum value was 70-120 meV. This deep absorption band was observed for both CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG and ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG structures. The peak energy of the absorption band was independent of the alloy composition for 0.25≤Ga/III≤0.58. Intensity of the PA signal was negatively correlated to the Na concentration at the CIGS film surface. The origin of the 0.76 eV peak is discussed with relation to native defects such as a Cu-vacancy-related defect (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. VIBRONIC PROGRESSIONS IN SEVERAL DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duley, W. W.; Kuzmin, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    A number of vibronic progressions based on low-energy vibrational modes of a large molecule have been found in the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) spectrum of HD 183143. Four active vibrational modes have been identified with energies at 5.18 cm -1 , 21.41 cm -1 , 31.55 cm -1 , and 34.02 cm -1 . The mode at 34.02 cm -1 was previously recognized by Herbig. Four bands are associated with this molecule, with origins at 6862.61 A, 6843.64 A, 6203.14 A, and 5545.11 A (14589.1 cm -1 , 14608.08 cm -1 , 16116.41 cm -1 , and 18028.9 cm -1 , respectively). The progressions are harmonic and combination bands are observed involving all modes. The appearance of harmonic, rather than anharmonic, terms in these vibronic progressions is consistent with torsional motion of pendant rings, suggesting that the carrier is a 'floppy' molecule. Some constraints on the type and size of the molecule producing these bands are discussed.

  16. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  17. Microscopic structure of high-spin vibrational states in superdeformed A=190 nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada); Matsuyanagi, Kenichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Mizutori, Shoujirou [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Microscopic RPA calculations based on the cranked shell model are performed to investigate the quadrupole and octupole correlations for excited superdeformed (SD) bands in even-even A=190 nuclei. The K = 2 octupole vibrations are predicted to be the lowest excitation modes at zero rotational frequency. The Coriolis coupling at finite frequency produces different effects depending on the neutron and proton number of nucleus. The calculations also indicate that some collective excitations may produce moments of inertia almost identical to those of the yrast SD band. An interpretation of the observed excited bands invoking the octupole vibrations is proposed, which suggests those octupole vibrations may be prevalent in even-even SD A=190 nuclei.

  18. Vibration mixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S.A.; Chernov, V.S.; Denisenko, V.V.; Gorodnyanskiy, I.F.; Prokopov, L.I.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1983-01-01

    The vibration mixer is proposed which contains a housing, vibration drive with rod installed in the upper part of the mixing mechanism made in the form of a hollow shaft with blades. In order to improve intensity of mixing and dispersion of the mud, the shaft with the blades is arranged on the rod of the vibrator and is equipped with a cam coupling whose drive disc is attached to the vibration rod. The rod is made helical, while the drive disc of the cam coupling is attached to the helical surface of the rod. In addition, the vibration mixer is equipped with perforated discs installed on the ends of the rods.

  19. Molecular Structures, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Normal-Mode Analysis of M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) Dimetallatetraynes. Observation of Strongly Mixed Metal-Metal and Metal-Ligand Vibrational Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kevin D.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Vance, Michael A.; Dallinger, Richard F.; Wang, Louis C.; Geib, Steven J.; Hopkins, Michael D.

    1998-12-28

    The nature of the skeletal vibrational modes of complexes of the type M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (M = Mo, W; R = H, Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) has been deduced. Metrical data from X-ray crystallographic studies of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (R = Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) and W(2)(C&tbd1;CMe)(4)(PMe(3))(4) reveal that the core bond distances and angles are within normal ranges and do not differ in a statistically significant way as a function of the alkynyl substituent, indicating that their associated force constants should be similarly invariant among these compounds. The crystal structures of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) and Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CBu(t)())(4)(PMe(3))(4) are complicated by 3-fold disorder of the Mo(2) unit within apparently ordered ligand arrays. Resonance-Raman spectra ((1)(delta-->delta) excitation, THF solution) of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) and its isotopomers (PMe(3)-d(9), C&tbd1;CSiMe(3)-d(9), (13)C&tbd1;(13)CSiMe(3)) exhibit resonance-enhanced bands due to a(1)-symmetry fundamentals (nu(a) = 362, nu(b) = 397, nu(c) = 254 cm(-)(1) for the natural-abundance complex) and their overtones and combinations. The frequencies and relative intensities of the fundamentals are highly sensitive to isotopic substitution of the C&tbd1;CSiMe(3) ligands, but are insensitive to deuteration of the PMe(3) ligands. Nonresonance-Raman spectra (FT-Raman, 1064 nm excitation, crystalline samples) for the Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) compounds and for Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (R = H, D, Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) and W(2)(C&tbd1;CMe)(4)(PMe(3))(4) exhibit nu(a), nu(b), and nu(c) and numerous bands due to alkynyl- and phosphine-localized modes, the latter of which are assigned by comparisons to FT-Raman spectra of Mo(2)X(4)L(4) (X = Cl, Br, I; L = PMe(3), PMe(3)-d(9))(4) and Mo(2)Cl(4)(AsMe(3))(4). Valence force-field normal-coordinate calculations on the model compound Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CH)(4)P(4), using core force constants transferred from a calculation

  20. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, P.; Maxwell, T. J.; Sun, Y.-E; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Rihaoui, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f≅20% at f≅0.5THz) transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. The bunch train is generated via a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange technique. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  1. Introduction of building vibration observation data of metropolitan area due to the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake: an Approach of the IT Kyoshin Seismometer for Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, K.; Ito, T.

    2011-12-01

    In the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, many buildings were vibrated greatly also in the Tokyo metropolitan area where is far left from the hypocenter. We have developed the IT Kyoshin(strong motion) Seismometer for Building which is the observation system of the usual weak earthquake ground motion by installing a lot of acceleration sensors in building, and have been setting it up in some buildings of the University of Tokyo. By this February, we have set up IT Kyoshin Seismometers newly in four buildings of the two remote campus of the University of Tokyo. And we have opend to the public of these observed data. In this building vibration observation system, we can get a lot of building vibration observation data of the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. We have made the building shaking to visible from the observation data of each building and the appearance of the shake of each building is shown plainly. Moreover, we can see how the vibration property in the usual building is changed by the large shaking. This analysis of the observation data of the building vibration at the earthquake is useful for the detection of the damaged part in the building by the earthquake and for the reinforcement measures in the weak buildings.

  2. Observation of band bending of metal/high-k Si capacitor with high energy x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and its application to interface dipole measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushima, K.; Okamoto, K.; Tachi, K.; Song, J.; Sato, S.; Kawanago, T.; Tsutsui, K.; Sugii, N.; Ahmet, P.; Hattori, T.; Iwai, H.

    2008-11-01

    Band bendings of Si substrates have been observed using hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. With a capability of collecting photoelectrons generated as deep as 40 nm, the binding energy shift in a core level caused by the potential profile at the surface of the substrate results in a spectrum broadening. The broadening is found to be significant when heavily doped substrates are used owing to its steep potential profile. The surface potential of the substrate can be obtained by deconvolution of the spectrum. This method has been applied to observe the band bending profile of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with high-k gate dielectrics. By comparing the band bending profiles of heavily-doped n+- and p+-Si substrates, the interface dipoles presented at interfaces can be estimated. In the case of W gated La2O3/La-silicate capacitor, an interface dipole to shift the potential of -0.45 V has been estimated at La-silicate/Si interface, which effectively reduces the apparent work function of W. On the other hand, an interface dipole of 0.03-0.07 V has been found to exist at Hf-silicate/SiO2 interface for W gated HfO2/Hf-silicate/SiO2 capacitor.

  3. Raman bands in Ag nanoparticles obtained in extract of Opuntia ficus-indica plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocarando-Chacon, J.-G.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Vargas-Vazquez, D.; Rodríguez Melgarejo, F.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Mani-Gonzalez, P. G.; Leon-Sarabia, E.; Navarro-Badilla, A.; Ramírez-Bon, R.

    2014-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been obtained in an extract of Opuntia ficus-indica plant. The size and distribution of nanoparticles were quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The diameter was estimated to be about 15 nm. In addition, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) peaks of silver were observed in these samples. Three Raman bands have been experimentally detected at 83, 110 and 160 cm-1. The bands at 83 and 110 cm-1 are assigned to the silver-silver Raman modes (skeletal modes) and the Raman mode located at 160 cm-1 has been assigned to breathing modes. Vibrational assignments of Raman modes have been carried out based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum mechanical calculation. Structural and vibrational properties for small Agn clusters with 2≤n≤9 were determined. Calculated Raman modes for small metal clusters have an approximation trend of Raman bands. These Raman bands were obtained experimentally for silver nanoparticles (AgNP).

  4. Ship Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Herman

    1997-01-01

    Methods for calculating natural frequencies for ship hulls and for plates and panels.Evaluation of the risk for inconvenient vibrations on board......Methods for calculating natural frequencies for ship hulls and for plates and panels.Evaluation of the risk for inconvenient vibrations on board...

  5. Coherent lattice vibrations in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadin, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    A recent analysis has shown that the pair wavefunction within the BCS theory may be represented in real-space as a spherical electronic orbital (on the scale of the coherence length ξ 0 ) coupled to a standing-wave lattice vibration with wavevector 2k F and a near-resonant phonon frequency. The present paper extends this picture to a coherent pattern of phonon standing-waves on the macroscopic scale, with electrons forming Bloch waves and an energy gap much like those in the classic band theory of crystals. These parallel planes form a diffractive waveguide permitting electron waves to traveling parallel to the planes, corresponding to lossless supercurrent. A similar picture may be extended to unconventional superconductors such as the cuprates, with an array of standing spin waves rather than phonons. Such coherent lattice vibrations should be universal indicators of the superconducting state, and should be observable below T c using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Further implications of this picture are discussed

  6. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.

    2015-01-01

    on the nanopillars within the high electromagnetic field areas. The adsorption behaviour of folic acid and the band assignment of the main vibrations together with the optimized geometry of folic acid and folic acid in the presence of a cluster of 10 gold atoms were assessed using the density functional theory (B3......LYP(6-31G(d))) and the scalar relativistic effective core potential with a double-zeta basis set (LANL2DZ). The vibrations obtained from the solid-state folic acid and the folic acid on a gold cluster were in accordance with those observed experimentally. The analysis of the main vibrations indicated...

  7. Detection of high-frequency tensile vibrations of a fault during shear rupturing: observations from the 2008 West Bohemia swarm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 3 (2011), s. 1404-1414 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : earthquake dynamics * earthquake source observations * body waves * dynamics and mechanics of faulting Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.420, year: 2011

  8. A new fuzzy-disturbance observer-enhanced sliding controller for vibration control of a train-car suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sy Dzung; Choi, Seung-Bok; Nguyen, Quoc Hung

    2018-05-01

    Semi-active train-car suspensions are always impacted negatively by uncertainty and disturbance (UAD). In order to deal with this, we propose a novel optimal fuzzy disturbance observer-enhanced sliding mode controller (FDO-SMC) for magneto-rheological damper (MRD)-based semi-active train-car suspensions subjected to UAD whose variability rate may be high but bounded. The two main parts of the FDO-SMC are an adaptive sliding mode controller (ad-SMC) and an optimal fuzzy disturbance observer (op-FDO). As the first step, the initial structures of the sliding mode controller (SMC) and disturbance observer (DO) are built. Adaptive update laws for the SMC and DO are then set up synchronously via Lyapunov stability analysis. Subsequently, an optimal fuzzy system (op-FS) is designed to fully implement a parameter constraint mechanism so as to guarantee the system stability converging to the desired state even if the UAD variability rate increases in a given range. As a result, both the ad-SMC and op-FDO are formulated. It is shown from the comparative work with existing controllers that the proposed method provides the best vibration control capability with relatively low consumed power.

  9. Clamped seismic metamaterials: ultra-low frequency stop bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achaoui, Y; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S; Antonakakis, T; Brûlé, S; Craster, R V

    2017-01-01

    The regularity of earthquakes, their destructive power, and the nuisance of ground vibration in urban environments, all motivate designs of defence structures to lessen the impact of seismic and ground vibration waves on buildings. Low frequency waves, in the range 1–10 Hz for earthquakes and up to a few tens of Hz for vibrations generated by human activities, cause a large amount of damage, or inconvenience; depending on the geological conditions they can travel considerable distances and may match the resonant fundamental frequency of buildings. The ultimate aim of any seismic metamaterial, or any other seismic shield, is to protect over this entire range of frequencies; the long wavelengths involved, and low frequency, have meant this has been unachievable to date. Notably this is scalable and the effects also hold for smaller devices in ultrasonics. There are three approaches to obtaining shielding effects: bragg scattering, locally resonant sub-wavelength inclusions and zero-frequency stop-band media. The former two have been explored, but the latter has not and is examined here. Elastic flexural waves, applicable in the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, can be designed to have a broad zero-frequency stop-band using a periodic array of very small clamped circles. Inspired by this experimental and theoretical observation, all be it in a situation far removed from seismic waves, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve elastic surface (Rayleigh) wave reflectors at very large wavelengths in structured soils modelled as a fully elastic layer periodically clamped to bedrock. We identify zero frequency stop-bands that only exist in the limit of columns of concrete clamped at their base to the bedrock. In a realistic configuration of a sedimentary basin 15 m deep we observe a zero frequency stop-band covering a broad frequency range of 0–30 Hz. (paper)

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of the borate mineral kotoite Mg₃(BO₃)₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2013-02-15

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to assess the structure of kotoite a borate mineral of magnesium which is isostructural with jimboite. The mineral is orthorhombic with point group: 2/m 2/m 2/m. The mineral has the potential as a new memory insulator material. The mineral has been characterised by a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum is dominated by a very intense band at 835 cm(-1), assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of tetrahedral boron. Raman bands at 919, 985 and 1015 cm(-1) are attributed to the antisymmetric stretching modes of tetrahedral boron. Kotoite is strictly an hydrous borate mineral. An intense Raman band observed at 3559 cm(-1) is attributed to the stretching vibration of hydroxyl units, more likely to be associated with the borate mineral hydroxyborate. The lack of observation of water bending modes proves the absence of water in the kotoite structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Broadband Vibration Attenuation Using Hybrid Periodic Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asiri

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents both theoretically and experimentally a new kind of a broadband vibration isolator. It is a table-like system formed by four parallel hybrid periodic rods connected between two plates. The rods consist of an assembly of periodic cells, each cell being composed of a short rod and piezoelectric inserts. By actively controlling the piezoelectric elements, it is shown that the periodic rods can efficiently attenuate the propagation of vibration from the upper plate to the lower one within critical frequency bands and consequently minimize the effects of transmission of undesirable vibration and sound radiation. In such a system, longitudinal waves can propagate from the vibration source in the upper plate to the lower one along the rods only within specific frequency bands called the "Pass Bands" and wave propagation is efficiently attenuated within other frequency bands called the "Stop Bands". The spectral width of these bands can be tuned according to the nature of the external excitation. The theory governing the operation of this class of vibration isolator is presented and their tunable filtering characteristics are demonstrated experimentally as functions of their design parameters. This concept can be employed in many applications to control the wave propagation and the force transmission of longitudinal vibrations both in the spectral and spatial domains in an attempt to stop/attenuate the propagation of undesirable disturbances.

  12. Vibration-rotation spectrum of BH X1Σ+ by Fourier transform emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianalto, F. S.; O'Brien, L. C.; Keller, P. C.; Bernath, P. F.

    1988-06-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectrum of the BH X1Σ+ state was observed with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at Kitt Peak. The 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 bands were observed in a microwave discharge of B2H6 in He. Spectroscopic constants of the individual vibrational levels and equilibrium molecular constants were determined. An RKR potential curve was calculated from the equilibrium constants. Alfred P. Sloan Fellow; Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

  13. Near-infrared emission bands of TeH and TeD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, E. H.; Setzer, K. D.; Ramsay, D. A.; Vervloet, M.

    1989-11-01

    High-resolution emission spectra of TeH and TeD have been obtained in the region 4200 to 3600 cm -1 using a Bomem DA3.002 Fourier transform spectrometer. Analyses are given for the 0-0 and 1-1 bands of the X 22Π{1}/{2}-X 12Π{3}/{2} system of TeH and for the 0-0 band of TeD. In addition the 2-0 vibrational overtone bands of 130TeH, 128TeH, and 126TeH are observed and analyzed. Accurate molecular constants are given for the first time.

  14. Urban vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Knudsen, L.; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    In   this   paper   we   describe   a   field   study   conducted   with   a   wearable   vibration   belt   where   we   test   to   determine   the   vibration   intensity   sensitivity   ranges   on   a   large   diverse   group   of   participants   with   evenly   distributed  ages  and...

  15. Observation of snowfall with a low-power FM-CW K-band radar (Micro Rain Radar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneifel, Stefan; Maahn, Maximilian; Peters, Gerhard; Simmer, Clemens

    2011-06-01

    Quantifying snowfall intensity especially under arctic conditions is a challenge because wind and snow drift deteriorate estimates obtained from both ground-based gauges and disdrometers. Ground-based remote sensing with active instruments might be a solution because they can measure well above drifting snow and do not suffer from flow distortions by the instrument. Clear disadvantages are, however, the dependency of e.g. radar returns on snow habit which might lead to similar large uncertainties. Moreover, high sensitivity radars are still far too costly to operate in a network and under harsh conditions. In this paper we compare returns from a low-cost, low-power vertically pointing FM-CW radar (Micro Rain Radar, MRR) operating at 24.1 GHz with returns from a 35.5 GHz cloud radar (MIRA36) for dry snowfall during a 6-month observation period at an Alpine station (Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus, UFS) at 2,650 m height above sea level. The goal was to quantify the potential and limitations of the MRR in relation to what is achievable by a cloud radar. The operational MRR procedures to derive standard radar variables like effective reflectivity factor ( Z e) or the mean Doppler velocity ( W) had to be modified for snowfall since the MRR was originally designed for rain observations. Since the radar returns from snowfall are weaker than from comparable rainfall, the behavior of the MRR close to its detection threshold has been analyzed and a method is proposed to quantify the noise level of the MRR based on clear sky observations. By converting the resulting MRR- Z e into 35.5 GHz equivalent Z e values, a remaining difference below 1 dBz with slightly higher values close to the noise threshold could be obtained. Due to the much higher sensitivity of MIRA36, the transition of the MRR from the true signal to noise can be observed, which agrees well with the independent clear sky noise estimate. The mean Doppler velocity differences between both radars

  16. The broad-band X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A from a joint NuSTAR/Suzaku observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Madejski, G.; Fuerst, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a deep, simultaneous observation of the bright, nearby Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A with Suzaku andNuSTAR. Through a detailed spectral analysis, we are able to robustly separate the continuum, absorption, and distant reflection components in the spectrum. The absorbing column is found...... also updated our previously reported measurement of the high-energy cutoff of the hard X-ray emission using both observatories rather than justNuSTAR alone: Ecut = 186±14 keV. This high-energy cutoff acts as a proxy for the temperature of the coronal electron plasma, enabling us to further separate...

  17. Vibrational emission analysis of the CN molecules in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Bravo, Ángel; Delgado, Tomás; Lucena, Patricia; Laserna, J. Javier, E-mail: laserna@uma.es

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of organic materials is based on the analysis of atomic and ionic emission lines and on a few molecular bands, the most important being the CN violet system and the C{sub 2} Swan system. This paper is focused in molecular emission of LIBS plasmas based on the CN (B{sup 2}Σ–X{sup 2}Σ) band, one of the strongest emissions appearing in all carbon materials when analyzed in air atmosphere. An analysis of this band with sufficient spectral resolution provides a great deal of information on the molecule, which has revealed that valuable information can be obtained from the plume chemistry and dynamics affecting the excitation mechanisms of the molecules. The vibrational emission of this molecular band has been investigated to establish the dependence of this emission on the molecular structure of the materials. The paper shows that excitation/emission phenomena of molecular species observed in the plume depend strongly on the time interval selected and on the irradiance deposited on the sample surface. Precise time resolved LIBS measurements are needed for the observation of distinctive CN emission. For the organic compounds studied, larger differences in the behavior of the vibrational emission occur at early stages after plasma ignition. Since molecular emission is generally more complex than that involving atomic emission, local plasma conditions as well as plume chemistry may induce changes in vibrational emission of molecules. As a consequence, alterations in the distribution of the emissions occur in terms of relative intensities, being sensitive to the molecular structure of every single material. - Highlights: • Vibrational emission of CN species in laser-induced plasmas has been investigated. • Distribution of vibrational emission of CN has been found to be time dependent. • Laser irradiance affects the vibrational distribution of the CN molecules. • Plume chemistry controls the excitation mechanisms of CN

  18. Protonated Nitrous Oxide, NNOH(+): Fundamental Vibrational Frequencies and Spectroscopic Constants from Quartic Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The interstellar presence of protonated nitrous oxide has been suspected for some time. Using established high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques, spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies are provided for the lower energy O-protonated isomer of this cation and its deuterated isotopologue. The vibrationally-averaged B0 and C0 rotational constants are within 6 MHz of their experimental values and the D(subJ) quartic distortion constants agree with experiment to within 3%. The known gas phase O-H stretch of NNOH(+) is 3330.91 cm(exp-1), and the vibrational configuration interaction computed result is 3330.9 cm(exp-1). Other spectroscopic constants are also provided, as are the rest of the fundamental vibrational frequencies for NNOH(+) and its deuterated isotopologue. This high-accuracy data should serve to better inform future observational or experimental studies of the rovibrational bands of protonated nitrous oxide in the ISM and the laboratory.

  19. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  20. Mesoscale kinematics derived from X-band Doppler radar observations of convective versus stratiform precipitation and comparison with GPS radiosonde profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sachin M.; Dhangar, N.; Das, S. K.; Kalapureddy, M. C. R.; Chakravarty, K.; Sonbawne, S.; Konwar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Single Doppler analysis techniques known as velocity azimuth display (VAD) and volume velocity processing (VVP) are used to analyze kinematics of mesoscale flow such as horizontal wind and divergence using X-band Doppler weather radar observations, for selected cases of convective, stratiform, and shallow cloud systems near tropical Indian sites Pune (18.58°N, 73.92°E, above sea level (asl) 560 m) and Mandhardev (18.51°N, 73.85°E, asl 1297 m). The vertical profiles of horizontal wind estimated from radar VVP/VAD methods agree well with GPS radiosonde profiles, with the low-level jet at about 1.5 km during monsoon season well depicted in both. The vertical structure and temporal variability of divergence and reflectivity profiles are indicative of the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of shallow convective, deep convective, and stratiform cloud systems. In shallow convective systems, vertical development of reflectivity profiles is limited below 5 km. In deep convective systems, reflectivity values as large as 55 dBZ were observed above freezing level. The stratiform system shows the presence of a reflectivity bright band (~35 dBZ) near the melting level. The diagnosed vertical profiles of divergence in convective and stratiform systems are distinct. In shallow convective conditions, convergence was seen below 4 km with divergence above. Low-level convergence and upper level divergence are observed in deep convective profiles, while stratiform precipitation has midlevel convergence present between lower level and upper level divergence. The divergence profiles in stratiform precipitation exhibit intense shallow layers of "melting convergence" at 0°C level, near 4.5 km altitude, with a steep gradient on the both sides of the peak. The level of nondivergence in stratiform situations is lower than that in convective situations. These observed vertical structures of divergence are largely indicative of latent heating profiles in the atmosphere, an

  1. Mesoscale spiral vortex embedded within a Lake Michigan snow squall band - High resolution satellite observations and numerical model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Keen, Cecil S.; Hjelmfelt, Mark; Pease, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that Great Lakes snow squall convection occurs in a variety of different modes depending on various factors such as air-water temperature contrast, boundary-layer wind shear, and geostrophic wind direction. An exceptional and often neglected source of data for mesoscale cloud studies is the ultrahigh resolution multispectral data produced by Landsat satellites. On October 19, 1972, a clearly defined spiral vortex was noted in a Landsat-1 image near the southern end of Lake Michigan during an exceptionally early cold air outbreak over a still very warm lake. In a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional Eulerian hydrostatic primitive equation mesoscale model with an initially uniform wind field, a definite analog to the observed vortex was generated. This suggests that intense surface heating can be a principal cause in the development of a low-level mesoscale vortex.

  2. Efficient forced vibration reanalysis method for rotating electric machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Kuroishi, Masakatsu; Nakai, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Rotating electric machines are subject to forced vibration by magnetic force excitation with wide-band frequency spectrum that are dependent on the operating conditions. Therefore, when designing the electric machines, it is inevitable to compute the vibration response of the machines at various operating conditions efficiently and accurately. This paper presents an efficient frequency-domain vibration analysis method for the electric machines. The method enables the efficient re-analysis of the vibration response of electric machines at various operating conditions without the necessity to re-compute the harmonic response by finite element analyses. Theoretical background of the proposed method is provided, which is based on the modal reduction of the magnetic force excitation by a set of amplitude-modulated standing-waves. The method is applied to the forced response vibration of the interior permanent magnet motor at a fixed operating condition. The results computed by the proposed method agree very well with those computed by the conventional harmonic response analysis by the FEA. The proposed method is then applied to the spin-up test condition to demonstrate its applicability to various operating conditions. It is observed that the proposed method can successfully be applied to the spin-up test conditions, and the measured dominant frequency peaks in the frequency response can be well captured by the proposed approach.

  3. Comparison of convective clouds observed by spaceborne W-band radar and simulated by cloud-resolving atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Jason B.

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play an important role in regulating global climate through vertical mass flux, vertical water transport, and radiation. For general circulation models (GCMs) to simulate the global climate realistically, they must simulate DCCs realistically. GCMs have traditionally used cumulus parameterizations (CPs). Much recent research has shown that multiple persistent unrealistic behaviors in GCMs are related to limitations of CPs. Two alternatives to CPs exist: the global cloud-resolving model (GCRM), and the multiscale modeling framework (MMF). Both can directly simulate the coarser features of DCCs because of their multi-kilometer horizontal resolutions, and can simulate large-scale meteorological processes more realistically than GCMs. However, the question of realistic behavior of simulated DCCs remains. How closely do simulated DCCs resemble observed DCCs? In this study I examine the behavior of DCCs in the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) and Superparameterized Community Atmospheric Model (SP-CAM), the latter with both single-moment and double-moment microphysics. I place particular emphasis on the relationship between cloud vertical structure and convective environment. I also emphasize the transition between shallow clouds and mature DCCs. The spatial domains used are the tropical oceans and the contiguous United States (CONUS), the latter of which produces frequent vigorous convection during the summer. CloudSat is used to observe DCCs, and A-Train and reanalysis data are used to represent the large-scale environment in which the clouds form. The CloudSat cloud mask and radar reflectivity profiles for CONUS cumuliform clouds (defined as clouds with a base within the planetary boundary layer) during boreal summer are first averaged and compared. Both NICAM and SP-CAM greatly underestimate the vertical growth of cumuliform clouds. Then they are sorted by three large-scale environmental variables: total preciptable

  4. Formation of bands of ultrafine beryllium particles during rapid solidification of Al-Be alloys: Modeling and direct observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, J.W.; Tanner, L.E.; Smith, P.M.; Wall, M.A.; Aziz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid solidification of dilute hyper-eutectic and monotectic alloys sometimes produces a dispersion of ultrafine randomly-oriented particles that lie in arrays parallel to the advancing solidification front. The authors characterize this effect in Al-Be where Be-rich particles with diameters on the order of 10 nm form in arrays spaced approximately 25 nm apart, and they present a model of macroscopically steady state but microscopically oscillatory motion of the solidification front to explain this unusual microstructure. The proposed mechanism involves; (i) the build-up of rejected solute in a diffusional boundary layer which slows down the growing crystal matrix, (2) the boundary layer composition entering a metastable liquid miscibility gap, (3) homogeneous nucleation of solute rich liquid droplets in the boundary layer, and crystallization of these droplets, and (4) growth of the matrix past the droplets and its reformation into a planar interface. The size of the Be-rich particles is limited by the beryllium supersaturation in the diffusional boundary layer. A numerical model was developed to investigate this solidification mechanism, and the results of the model are in good agreement with experimental observations of rapidly solidified Al-5 at.% Be

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  6. Cluster observations of band-limited Pc 1 waves associated with streaming H+ and O+ ions in the high-altitude plasma mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Kahlstorf, C. R. G.; Murr, D. L.; Posch, J. L.; Keiling, A.; Lavraud, B.; Rème, H.; Lessard, M. R.; Kim, E.-H.; Johnson, J. R.; Dombeck, J.; Grison, B.; Robert, P.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Décréau, P. M. E.

    2012-10-01

    Bursts of band-limited Pc 1 waves (0.2 to ˜1.0 Hz) with normalized frequency f/fH+ ˜ 0.5 have been observed by the Cluster spacecraft during many passes through the high-latitude plasma mantle. These transverse, left-hand polarized waves are associated with regions of H+ and O+ ions streaming away from Earth along magnetic field lines at the same velocity (˜140 km/s). Waves were observed only when H+ fluxes increased by factors of 10-1000 and energies of both ion species increased by factors of up to 10. We present two satellite-ground conjunctions to demonstrate the high latitude localization of these waves and their ability to reach the polar ionosphere and two extended examples of waves and associated ion distribution functions near the southern dusk flank magnetopause. We also present the results of a search for all such events during Cluster's 2002 and 2003 passages through the magnetotail, with orbital precession covering dawn to dusk on Earth's night side (June through December). A total of 46 events (band-limited Pc 1-2 waves accompanied by a sustained population of streaming H+ and O+ ions, separated by at least 12 min) were observed on 29 days. The waves were generally associated with intervals of southward IMF Bz and/or large IMF By (times of active cusp reconnection), and often but not always occurred during the main phase or early recovery phase of magnetic storms. Analysis of selected events shows that the waves are associated with large H+ temperature anisotropy, and that the waves propagate opposite to the direction of the streaming ions. A wave instability analysis using the WHAMP code confirms that the generation of these waves, via the ion cyclotron instability, is basically consistent with known physics. Their extended region of wave growth is likely, however, to reach tailward significantly beyond the Cluster orbit.

  7. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA X-IFU: a scientific assessment of the observational capabilities in the hard X-ray band

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Piro, L.; Argan, A.; Gatti, F.

    2017-12-01

    ATHENA is a large X-ray observatory, planned to be launched by ESA in 2028 towards an L2 orbit. One of the two instruments of the payload is the X-IFU: a cryogenic spectrometer based on a large array of TES microcalorimeters, able to perform integral field spectrography in the 0.2-12 keV band (2.5 eV FWHM at 6 keV). The X-IFU sensitivity is highly degraded by the particle background expected in the L2 orbit, which is induced by primary protons of both galactic and solar origin, and mostly by secondary electrons. To reduce the particle background level and enable the mission science goals, the instrument incorporates a Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector (CryoAC). It is a 4 pixel TES based detector, placed 10 keV). The aim of the study has been to understand if the present detector design can be improved in order to enlarge the X-IFU scientific capability on an energy band wider than the TES array. This is beyond the CryoAC baseline, being this instrument aimed to operate as anticoincidence particle detector and not conceived to perform X-ray observations.

  8. Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives on textile substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.A.T. da; Dias, I.F.L.; Santos, E.P. dos; Martins, A.A.; Duarte, J.L.; Laureto, E.; Reis, G.A. dos; Guimarães, P.S.S.; Cury, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on “dirty” textile substrates of canvas, nylon, canvas with resin, jeans and on glass and the temperature dependence of the optical properties of them was studied by photoluminescence and Raman (300 K) techniques. The temperature dependence of the energy, of the half line width at half height of the purely electronic peak, of the integrated PL intensity and of the Huang-Rhys factor, S=I (01) /I (00) , were obtained directly from the PL spectrum. For an analysis of the vibrational modes involved, Raman measurements were performed on substrates with and without polymers deposited and the results compared with those found in the literature. The films of MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV showed optical properties similar to those films deposited on other substrates such as glass, metals, etc. It was observed an inversion of the first vibrational band in relation to the purely electronic peak with increasing temperature in the films deposited on nylon and canvas. The vibrational modes obtained by Raman were used to compose the simulation of the PL line shape of BDMO-PPV films on canvas and nylon, using a model proposed by Lin [29]. - Highlights: ► MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on dirty textile. ► Their properties were studied by photoluminescence and Raman techniques. ► We observed inversion of first vibrational band in relation to purely electronic peak. ► Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives were studied.

  9. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of ion-implantation-induced defects in fused silica and crystalline quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    Defects produced by implantation of various atomic species in fused and crystalline SiO 2 were studied using infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS) with UV-visible spectroscopy. We observe a new vibrational band at 830 cm -1 which is tentatively associated with the creation of two nonbridging O atoms in SiO 4 units. Numerous chemical effects were also observed, including evidence for chemical incorporation of Li and anomalously large O-vacancy production for Al + , B + and Si + implantation

  10. Band mixing in /sup 160/Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasiza, M L; Singh, K; Sahota, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1982-11-01

    The intensities of the gamma transitions in /sup 160/Dy have been measured precisely by a 45 cc Ge(Li) detector. Unequal quadrupole moments for the ground and gamma vibrational bands have been proposed in order to remove the inconsistencies in the values of band mixing parameter Z sub(gamma) for this doubly even deformed nucleus of /sup 160/Dy.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopic study of poldervaartite CaCa[SiO3(OH)(OH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the mineral poldervaartite CaCa[SiO3(OH)(OH)] which forms a series with its manganese analogue olmiite CaMn[SiO3(OH)](OH) using a range of techniques including scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows the mineral is reasonably pure and contains only calcium and manganese with low amounts of Al and F. Thermogravimetric analysis proves the mineral decomposes at 485 °C with a mass loss of 7.6% compared with the theoretical mass loss of 7.7%. A strong Raman band at 852 cm-1 is assigned to the SiO stretching vibration of the SiO3(OH) units. Two Raman bands at 914 and 953 cm-1 are attributed to the antisymmetric vibrations. Intense prominent peaks observed at 3487, 3502, 3509, 3521 and 3547 cm-1 are assigned to the OH stretching vibration of the SiO3(OH) units. The observation of multiple OH bands supports the concept of the non-equivalence of the OH units. Vibrational spectroscopy enables a detailed assessment of the molecular structure of poldervaartite.

  12. State-to-state time-of-flight measurements of NO scattering from Au(111): direct observation of translation-to-vibration coupling in electronically nonadiabatic energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Altschäffel, Jan; Rahinov, Igor; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Bartels, Christof

    2013-09-12

    Translational motion is believed to be a spectator degree of freedom in electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer between molecules and metal surfaces, but the experimental evidence available to support this view is limited. In this work, we have experimentally determined the translational inelasticity in collisions of NO molecules with a single-crystal Au(111) surface-a system with strong electronic nonadiabaticity. State-to-state molecular beam surface scattering was combined with an IR-UV double resonance scheme to obtain high-resolution time-of-flight data. The measurements include vibrationally elastic collisions (v = 3→3, 2→2) as well as collisions where one or two quanta of molecular vibration are excited (2→3, 2→4) or de-excited (2→1, 3→2, 3→1). In addition, we have carried out comprehensive measurements of the effects of rotational excitation on the translational energy of the scattered molecules. We find that under all conditions of this work, the NO molecules lose a large fraction (∼0.45) of their incidence translational energy to the surface. Those molecules that undergo vibrational excitation (relaxation) during the collision recoil slightly slower (faster) than vibrationally elastically scattered molecules. The amount of translational energy change depends on the surface temperature. The translation-to-rotation coupling, which is well-known for v = 0→0 collisions, is found to be significantly weaker for vibrationally inelastic than elastic channels. Our results clearly show that the spectator view of the translational motion in electronically nonadiabatic vibrational energy transfer between NO and Au(111) is only approximately correct.

  13. Relaxation dynamics and coherent energy exchange in coupled vibration-cavity polaritons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Blake S.; Fears, Kenan P.; Dressick, Walter J.; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Spann, Bryan T.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2016-09-01

    Coherent coupling between an optical transition and confined optical mode have been investigated for electronic-state transitions, however, only very recently have vibrational transitions been considered. Here, we demonstrate both static and dynamic results for vibrational bands strongly coupled to optical cavities. We experimentally and numerically describe strong coupling between a Fabry-Pérot cavity and carbonyl stretch ( 1730 cm 1) in poly-methylmethacrylate and provide evidence that the mixed-states are immune to inhomogeneous broadening. We investigate strong and weak coupling regimes through examination of cavities loaded with varying concentrations of a urethane monomer. Rabi splittings are in excellent agreement with an analytical description using no fitting parameters. Ultrafast pump-probe measurements reveal transient absorption signals over a frequency range well-separated from the vibrational band, as well as drastically modified relaxation rates. We speculate these modified kinetics are a consequence of the energy proximity between the vibration-cavity polariton modes and excited state transitions and that polaritons offer an alternative relaxation path for vibrational excitations. Varying the polariton energies by angle-tuning yields transient results consistent with this hypothesis. Furthermore, Rabi oscillations, or quantum beats, are observed at early times and we see evidence that these coherent vibration-cavity polariton excitations impact excited state population through cavity losses. Together, these results indicate that cavity coupling may be used to influence both excitation and relaxation rates of vibrations. Opening the field of polaritonic coupling to vibrational species promises to be a rich arena amenable to a wide variety of infrared-active bonds that can be studied in steady state and dynamically.

  14. THE POSSIBLE INTERSTELLAR ANION CH2CN–: SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS, VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES, AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.; Crawford, T. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The A 1 B 1 ⇽ X-tilde 1 A' excitation into the dipole-bound state of the cyanomethyl anion (CH 2 CN – ) has been hypothesized as the carrier for one diffuse interstellar band. However, this particular molecular system has not been detected in the interstellar medium even though the related cyanomethyl radical and the isoelectronic ketenimine molecule have been found. In this study, we are employing the use of proven quartic force fields and second-order vibrational perturbation theory to compute accurate spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies for X-tilde 1 A' CH 2 CN – in order to assist in laboratory studies and astronomical observations.

  15. Identification of forbidden vibration-rotation transitions in 15NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Š.; D'Cunha, Romola; Narahari Rao, K.

    1984-07-01

    Forbidden Δk - l = 3 vibration-rotation transitions have been observed in the ν4 band of 15NH3. The analysis of these transitions, together with previously published data on the allowed transitions, has made it possible to determine a set of molecular parameters, including for the first time the rotational constant C as well as the centrifugal distortion constants DK and HKKK, which are necessary for the calculation of energy levels. Some weak forbidden transitions in the ν2 band have also been observed.

  16. Vibrating minds

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Ed Witten is one of the leading scientists in the field of string theory, the theory that describes elementary particles as vibrating strings. This week he leaves CERN after having spent a few months here on sabbatical. His wish is that the LHC will unveil supersymmetry.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  18. Ethylenediammonium dication: H-bonded complexes with terephthalate, chloroacetate, phosphite, selenite and sulfamate anions. Detailed vibrational spectroscopic and theoretical studies of ethylenediammonium terephthalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, M. K.; Drozd, M.

    2012-12-01

    Crystalline complexes between ethylenediammonium dication and terephthalate, chloroacetate, phosphite, selenite and sulfamate anions were obtained by slow evaporation from water solution method. Room temperature powder infrared and Raman measurements were carried out. For ethylenediammonium terephthalate theoretical calculations of structure were performed by two ways: ab-initio HF and semiempirical PM3. In this case the PM3 method gave more accurate structure (closer to X-ray results). The additional PM3 calculations of vibrational spectra were performed. On the basis theoretical approach and earlier vibrational studies of similar compounds the vibrational assignments for observed bands have been proposed. All compounds were checked for second harmonic generation (SHG).

  19. BAND-9 ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE [N II] 122 μm LINE AND FIR CONTINUUM IN TWO HIGH-z GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brisbin, Drew; Stacey, Gordon J. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Nikola, Thomas [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve [California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 301-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, Edith, E-mail: ferkinhoff@mpia.de [LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris and ENS (France)

    2015-06-20

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of two high-redshift systems (SMMJ02399-0136 at z{sub 1} ∼ 2.8 and the Cloverleaf QSO at z{sub 1} ∼ 2.5) in their rest-frame 122 μm continuum (ν{sub sky} ∼ 650 GHz, λ{sub sky} ∼ 450 μm) and [N ii] 122 μm line emission. The continuum observations with a synthesized beam of ∼0.″ 25 resolve both sources and recover the expected flux. The Cloverleaf is resolved into a partial Einstein ring, while SMMJ02399-0136 is unambiguously separated into two components: a point source associated with an active galactic nucleus and an extended region at the location of a previously identified dusty starburst. We detect the [N ii] line in both systems, though significantly weaker than our previous detections made with the first generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer. We show that this discrepancy is mostly explained if the line flux is resolved out due to significantly more extended emission and longer ALMA baselines than expected. Based on the ALMA observations we determine that ≥75% of the total [N ii] line flux in each source is produced via star formation. We use the [N ii] line flux that is recovered by ALMA to constrain the N/H abundance, ionized gas mass, hydrogen- ionizing photon rate, and star formation rate. In SMMJ02399-0136 we discover it contains a significant amount (∼1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) of unobscured star formation in addition to its dusty starburst and argue that SMMJ02399-0136 may be similar to the Antennae Galaxies (Arp 244) locally. In total these observations provide a new look at two well-studied systems while demonstrating the power and challenges of Band-9 ALMA observations of high-z systems.

  20. Band-9 ALMA Observations of the [N II] 122 μm Line and FIR Continuum in Two High-z galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Brisbin, Drew; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.; Sheth, Kartik; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Falgarone, Edith

    2015-06-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of two high-redshift systems (SMMJ02399-0136 at z 1 ˜ 2.8 and the Cloverleaf QSO at z 1 ˜ 2.5) in their rest-frame 122 μm continuum (ν sky ˜ 650 GHz, λ sky ˜ 450 μm) and [N ii] 122 μm line emission. The continuum observations with a synthesized beam of ˜0.″ 25 resolve both sources and recover the expected flux. The Cloverleaf is resolved into a partial Einstein ring, while SMMJ02399-0136 is unambiguously separated into two components: a point source associated with an active galactic nucleus and an extended region at the location of a previously identified dusty starburst. We detect the [N ii] line in both systems, though significantly weaker than our previous detections made with the first generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer. We show that this discrepancy is mostly explained if the line flux is resolved out due to significantly more extended emission and longer ALMA baselines than expected. Based on the ALMA observations we determine that ≥75% of the total [N ii] line flux in each source is produced via star formation. We use the [N ii] line flux that is recovered by ALMA to constrain the N/H abundance, ionized gas mass, hydrogen- ionizing photon rate, and star formation rate. In SMMJ02399-0136 we discover it contains a significant amount (˜1000 M ⊙ yr-1) of unobscured star formation in addition to its dusty starburst and argue that SMMJ02399-0136 may be similar to the Antennae Galaxies (Arp 244) locally. In total these observations provide a new look at two well-studied systems while demonstrating the power and challenges of Band-9 ALMA observations of high-z systems.

  1. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  2. SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of dawsonite NaAl(CO3)(OH)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Sampaio, Ney Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Fernando A. N.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we have studied the mineral dawsonite by using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with EDS and vibrational spectroscopy. Single crystals show an acicular habitus forming aggregates with a rosette shape. The chemical analysis shows a phase composed of C, Al, and Na. Two distinct Raman bands at 1091 and 1068 cm-1 are assigned to the CO32- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands are observed in both the Raman and infrared spectra in the antisymmetric stretching and bending regions showing that the symmetry of the carbonate anion is reduced and in all probability the carbonate anions are not equivalent in the dawsonite structure. Multiple OH deformation vibrations centred upon 950 cm-1 in both the Raman and infrared spectra show that the OH units in the dawsonite structure are non-equivalent. Raman bands observed at 3250, 3283 and 3295 cm-1 are assigned to OH stretching vibrations. The position of these bands indicates strong hydrogen bonding of the OH units in the dawsonite structure. The formation of the mineral dawsonite has the potential to offer a mechanism for the geosequestration of greenhouse gases.

  3. Attenuation and velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Langqiu

    In an anelastic medium, seismic waves are distorted by attenuation and velocity dispersion, which depend on petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks. The effective attenuation and velocity dispersion is a combination of intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering, transmission response, and data acquisition system. Velocity dispersion is usually neglected in seismic data processing partly because of insufficient observations in the exploration seismic frequency band. This thesis investigates the methods of measuring velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band and interprets the velocity dispersion data in terms of petrophysical properties. Broadband, uncorrelated vibrator data are suitable for measuring velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band, and a broad bandwidth optimizes the observability of velocity dispersion. Four methods of measuring velocity dispersion in uncorrelated vibrator VSP data are investigated, which are the sliding window crosscorrelation (SWCC) method, the instantaneous phase method, the spectral decomposition method, and the cross spectrum method. Among them, the SWCC method is a new method and has satisfactory robustness, accuracy, and efficiency. Using the SWCC method, velocity dispersion is measured in the uncorrelated vibrator VSP data from three areas with different geological settings, i.e., Mallik gas hydrate zone, McArthur River uranium mines, and Outokumpu crystalline rocks. The observed velocity dispersion is fitted to a straight line with respect to log frequency for a constant (frequency-independent) Q value. This provides an alternative method for calculating Q. A constant Q value does not directly link to petrophysical properties. A modeling study is implemented for the Mallik and McArthur River data to interpret the velocity dispersion observations in terms of petrophysical properties. The detailed multi-parameter petrophysical reservoir models are built according to

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Role of vibrational spectroscopy in solving problems related to astrobiology will be discussed. Vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for identifying molecules. Theoretical approach used in this work is based on direct computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities from electronic structure codes. One of the applications of this computational technique is possible identification of biological building blocks (amino acids, small peptides, DNA bases) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Identifying small biological molecules in the ISM is very important from the point of view of origin of life. Hybrid (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) theoretical techniques will be discussed that may allow to obtain accurate vibrational spectra of biomolecular building blocks and to create a database of spectroscopic signatures that can assist observations of these molecules in space. Another application of the direct computational spectroscopy technique is to help to design and analyze experimental observations of ice surfaces of one of the Jupiter's moons, Europa, that possibly contains hydrated salts. The presence of hydrated salts on the surface can be an indication of a subsurface ocean and the possible existence of life forms inhabiting such an ocean.

  5. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosome bands into sub-bands analyzed by multicolor banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H; Weise, A; Michel, S; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Heller, A; Kuechler, A; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the nature of chromosome sub-bands in more detail, the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 5 was hybridized to normal metaphase spreads of GTG band levels at approximately 850, approximately 550, approximately 400 and approximately 300. It could be observed that as the chromosomes became shorter, more of the initial 39 MCB pseudo-colors disappeared, ending with 18 MCB pseudo-colored bands at the approximately 300-band level. The hierarchically organized splitting of bands into sub-bands was analyzed by comparing the disappearance or appearance of pseudo-color bands of the four different band levels. The regions to split first are telomere-near, centromere-near and in 5q23-->q31, followed by 5p15, 5p14, and all GTG dark bands in 5q apart from 5q12 and 5q32 and finalized by sub-band building in 5p15.2, 5q21.2-->q21.3, 5q23.1 and 5q34. The direction of band splitting towards the centromere or the telomere could be assigned to each band separately. Pseudo-colors assigned to GTG-light bands were resistant to band splitting. These observations are in concordance with the recently proposed concept of chromosome region-specific protein swelling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. A multitude of rotational bands in {sup 163}Er and their mutual interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosetti, P.; Leoni, S.; Bracco, A. [Univ. of Milan (Italy)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Using the {sup 150}Nd({sup 18}O, 5n){sup 163}Er reaction a multitude of rotational bands have been established with firm spin and parity assignments in {sup 163}Er. In 16 out of {approximately} 23 band crossings E2 cross-band transitions have been observed. The interaction strength varies between {approximately} 1 and {approximately} 50 keV. These interactions sample a variety of the lowest (multi)-quasiparticle configurations. Some of the band configurations, in particular those with high K-values, can be rather well established. Quite complicated changes in the wavefunctions must occur at these crossings, and, to explain the observed interaction strengths, one may have to invoke coupling to various vibrational degrees of freedom, in addition to possible residual neutron-proton interactions.

  7. Seeing the Night in a New Light—VIIRS Day/Night Band Capabilities and Prospects for a Joint Suomi/JPSS-1 Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrig, J. E.; Miller, S. D.; Straka, W. C.; Seaman, C.; Combs, C.; Heidinger, A.; Walther, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Day/Night Band (DNB), a special sensor on board the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) devoted to low-light visible imaging, has representated a kind of `disruptive technology' in terms of how we observe the nocturnal environment. Since its debut on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP), launched in Fall 2011, the DNB has solidified its claim to fame as the most novel addition to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's future polar-oribitng program, represented by the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The first member of which (JPSS-1) is scheduled to launch in Fall of 2017, joining Suomi in its 1330 local time ascending node orbit. JPSS-1 will be displaced by ½ orbit ahead of Suomi, providing roughly 50 min between overpasses. Importantly, JPSS-1 will provide a second DNB observation, enabling the first time-resolved measurements of low-light visible at low and mid-latitudes from this new sensor technology. The DNB provides unprecedented capability to leverage light emissions from natural and artificial nocturnal sources, ranging from moonlight and city lights, ships, fires, lightning flashes, and even atmospheric nightglow. The calibrated DNB observations enable use of moonlight in similar way to daytime visible, allowing for quantitative description of cloud and aerosol optical properties. This presentation updates the community on DNB-related research initiatives. Statistics based on a multi-year collection of data at Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia and White Sands, New Mexico lend confidence to the performance of a lunar irradiance model used to enable nighttime optical property retrievals. Selected examples of notable events, including the devastating Portugal wildfires, emergence of the massive rift in the Larsen C ice shelf, and examples from the growing compilation of atmospheric gravity waves in nightglow, will also be highlighted.

  8. Vascular density of superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma determined by direct observation of resected specimen using narrow band imaging with magnifying endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, D; Iizuka, T; Hoteya, S; Nomura, K; Kuribayashi, Y; Toba, T; Tanaka, M; Yamashita, S; Furuhata, T; Matsui, A; Mitani, T; Inoshita, N; Kaise, M

    2017-11-01

    Observation of the microvasculature using narrow band imaging (NBI) with magnifying endoscopy is useful for diagnosing superficial squamous cell carcinoma. Increased vascular density is indicative of cancer, but not many studies have reported differences between cancerous and noncancerous areas based on an objective comparison. We observed specimens of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using NBI magnification, and determined the vascular density of cancerous and noncancerous areas. A total of 25 lesions of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma that were dissected en bloc by ESD between July 2013 and December 2013 were subjected to NBI magnification. We constructed a device that holds an endoscope and precisely controls the movement along the vertical axis in order to observe submerged specimens by NBI magnification. NBI image files of both cancerous (pathologically determined invasion depth, m1/2) and surrounding noncancerous areas were created and subjected to vascular density assessment by two endoscopists who were blinded to clinical information. The invasion depth was m1/2 in 20, m3/sm1 in four and sm2 in one esophageal cancer lesion. Mean vascular density was significantly increased in cancerous areas (37.6 ± 16.3 vessels/mm2) compared with noncancerous areas (17.6 ± 10.0 vessels/mm2) (P squamous cell carcinoma. The rates of agreement between vascular density values determined by two independent operators were high. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Anomalous ELF phenomena in the Schumann resonance band as observed at Moshiri (Japan in possible association with an earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ELF observation at Moshiri (geographic coordinates: 44.29° N, 142.21° E in Hokkaido, Japan, was used to find anomalous phenomena in the Schumann resonance band, possibly associated with a large earthquake (magnitude of 7.8 in Taiwan on 26 December 2006. The Schumann resonance signal (fundamental (n=1, 8 Hz; 2nd harmonic, 14 Hz, 3rd harmonic, 20 Hz, 4th, 26 Hz etc. is known to be supported by electromagnetic radiation from the global thunderstorms, and the anomaly in this paper is characterized by an increase in intensity at frequencies from the third to fourth Schumann resonance modes mainly in the BEW component with a minor corresponding increase in the BNS component also. Spectral modification takes place only in the interval of 21:00 UT±1 h, which corresponds to the global lightning activity concentrated in America. While distortions were absent in other lightning-active UT intervals, in particular, around 08:00 UT±1 h (Asian thunderstorms and around 15±1 h (African lightning activity. The anomaly occurred on 23 December three days prior to the main shock. The results observed were explained in terms of ELF radio wave perturbation caused by the lower ionospheric depression around the earthquake epicenter. The difference in the path lengths between the direct radio wave from an active global thunderstorm center and the wave scattered from the non-uniformity above Taiwan causes interference at higher resonance modes, which is successful in explaining the observational data.

  10. A particle swarm optimized kernel-based clustering method for crop mapping from multi-temporal polarimetric L-band SAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiminia, Haifa; Homayouni, Saeid; McNairn, Heather; Safari, Abdoreza

    2017-06-01

    Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data, thanks to their specific characteristics such as high resolution, weather and daylight independence, have become a valuable source of information for environment monitoring and management. The discrimination capability of observations acquired by these sensors can be used for land cover classification and mapping. The aim of this paper is to propose an optimized kernel-based C-means clustering algorithm for agriculture crop mapping from multi-temporal PolSAR data. Firstly, several polarimetric features are extracted from preprocessed data. These features are linear polarization intensities, and several statistical and physical based decompositions such as Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden and Yamaguchi techniques. Then, the kernelized version of hard and fuzzy C-means clustering algorithms are applied to these polarimetric features in order to identify crop types. The kernel function, unlike the conventional partitioning clustering algorithms, simplifies the non-spherical and non-linearly patterns of data structure, to be clustered easily. In addition, in order to enhance the results, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to tune the kernel parameters, cluster centers and to optimize features selection. The efficiency of this method was evaluated by using multi-temporal UAVSAR L-band images acquired over an agricultural area near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, during June and July in 2012. The results demonstrate more accurate crop maps using the proposed method when compared to the classical approaches, (e.g. 12% improvement in general). In addition, when the optimization technique is used, greater improvement is observed in crop classification, e.g. 5% in overall. Furthermore, a strong relationship between Freeman-Durden volume scattering component, which is related to canopy structure, and phenological growth stages is observed.

  11. Kinetics of highly vibrationally excited O2(X) molecules in inductively-coupled oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annušová, Adriana; Marinov, Daniil; Booth, Jean-Paul; Sirse, Nishant; Lino da Silva, Mário; Lopez, Bruno; Guerra, Vasco

    2018-04-01

    The high degree of vibrational excitation of O2 ground state molecules recently observed in inductively coupled plasma discharges is investigated experimentally in more detail and interpreted using a detailed self-consistent 0D global kinetic model for oxygen plasmas. Additional experimental results are presented and used to validate the model. The vibrational kinetics considers vibrational levels up to v = 41 and accounts for electron impact excitation and de-excitation (e-V), vibration-to-translation relaxation (V-T) in collisions with O2 molecules and O atoms, vibration-to-vibration energy exchanges (V-V), excitation of electronically excited states, dissociative electron attachment, and electron impact dissociation. Measurements were performed at pressures of 10–80 mTorr (1.33 and 10.67 Pa) and radio frequency (13.56 MHz) powers up to 500 W. The simulation results are compared with the absolute densities in each O2 vibrational level obtained by high sensitivity absorption spectroscopy measurements of the Schumann–Runge bands for O2(X, v = 4–18), O(3 P) atom density measurements by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) calibrated against Xe, and laser photodetachment measurements of the O‑ negative ions. The highly excited O2(X, v) distribution exhibits a shape similar to a Treanor-Gordiets distribution, but its origin lies in electron impact e-V collisions and not in V-V up-pumping, in contrast to what happens in all other molecular gases known to date. The relaxation of vibrational quanta is mainly due to V-T energy-transfer collisions with O atoms and to electron impact dissociation of vibrationally excited molecules, e+O2(X, v)→O(3P)+O(3P).

  12. Origin of the 2.45 eV luminescence band observed in ZnO epitaxial layers grown on c-plane sapphire by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroj, R K; Dhar, S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide epitaxial layers have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique. A structural study shows (0001)-oriented films with good crystalline quality. The temperature and excitation power dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of these layers is studied as a function of various growth parameters, such as the growth temperature, oxygen flow rate and Zn flux, which suggest that the origin of the broad visible luminescence (VL), which peaks at 2.45 eV, is the transition between the conduction band and the Zn vacancy acceptor states. A bound excitonic transition observed at 3.32 eV in low temperature PL has been identified as an exciton bound to the neutral Zn vacancy. Our study also reveals the involvement of two activation processes in the dynamics of VL, which has been explained in terms of the fluctuation of the capture barrier height for the holes trapped in Zn vacancy acceptors. The fluctuation, which might be a result of the inhomogeneous distribution of Zn vacancies, is found to be associated with an average height of 7 and 90 meV, respectively, for the local and global maxima. (paper)

  13. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  14. Multi-variable X-band radar observation and tracking of ash plume from Mt. Etna volcano on November 23, 2013 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Riccci, Matteo; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Marzano, Frank S.

    2015-04-01

    Ground based weather radar observations of volcanic ash clouds are gaining momentum after recent works which demonstrated their potential use either as stand alone tool or in combination with satellite retrievals. From an operational standpoint, radar data have been mainly exploited to derive the height of ash plume and its temporal-spatial development, taking into account the radar limitation of detecting coarse ash particles (from approximately 20 microns to 10 millimeters and above in terms of particle's radius). More sophisticated radar retrievals can include airborne ash concentration, ash fall rate and out-flux rate. Marzano et al. developed several volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR) schemes, even though their practical use is still subject to a robust validation activity. The latter is made particularly difficult due to the lack of field campaigns with multiple observations and the scarce repetition of volcanic events. The radar variable, often used to infer the physical features of actual ash clouds, is the radar reflectivity named ZHH. It is related to ash particle size distribution and it shows a nice power law relationship with ash concentration. This makes ZHH largely used in radar-volcanology studies. However, weather radars are often able to detect Doppler frequency shifts and, more and more, they have a polarization-diversity capability. The former means that wind speed spectrum of the ash cloud is potentially inferable, whereas the latter implies that variables other than ZHH are available. Theoretically, these additional radar variables are linked to the degree of eccentricity of ash particles, their orientation and density as well as the presence of strong turbulence effects. Thus, the opportunity to refine the ash radar estimates so far developed can benefit from the thorough analysis of radar Doppler and polarization diversity. In this work we show a detailed analysis of Doppler shifts and polarization variables measured by the X band radar

  15. Observation of an energy threshold for large ΔE collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine (Evib=31 000-41 000 cm-1) by CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elioff, Michael S.; Wall, Mark C.; Lemoff, Andrew S.; Mullin, Amy S.

    1999-03-01

    Energy dependent studies of the collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine through collisions with CO2 were performed for initial pyrazine energies Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. These studies are presented along with earlier results for pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1. High-resolution transient IR laser absorption of individual CO2 (0000) rotational states (J=56-80) was used to investigate the magnitude and partitioning of energy gain into CO2 rotation and translation, which comprises the high energy tail of the energy transfer distribution function. Highly vibrationally excited pyrazine was prepared by absorption of pulsed UV light at seven wavelengths in the range λ=281-324 nm, followed by radiationless decay to pyrazine's ground electronic state. Nascent CO2 (0000) rotational populations were measured for each UV excitation wavelength and distributions of nascent recoil velocities for individual rotational states of CO2 (0000) were obtained from Doppler-broadened transient linewidth measurements. Measurements of energy transfer rate constants at each UV wavelength yield energy-dependent probabilities for collisions involving large ΔE values. These results reveal that the magnitude of large ΔE collisional energy gain in CO2 (0000) is fairly insensitive to the amount of vibrational energy in pyrazine for Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. A comparison with earlier studies on pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1 indicates that the V→RT energy transfer increases both in magnitude and probability for Evib>36 000 cm-1. Implications of incomplete intramolecular vibrational relaxation, electronic state coupling, and isomerization barriers are discussed in light of these results.

  16. Tool-specific performance of vibration-reducing gloves for attenuating fingers-transmitted vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fingers-transmitted vibration can cause vibration-induced white finger. The effectiveness of vibration-reducing (VR) gloves for reducing hand transmitted vibration to the fingers has not been sufficiently examined. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to examine tool-specific performance of VR gloves for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations in three orthogonal directions (3D) from powered hand tools. METHODS A transfer function method was used to estimate the tool-specific effectiveness of four typical VR gloves. The transfer functions of the VR glove fingers in three directions were either measured in this study or during a previous study using a 3D laser vibrometer. More than seventy vibration spectra of various tools or machines were used in the estimations. RESULTS When assessed based on frequency-weighted acceleration, the gloves provided little vibration reduction. In some cases, the gloves amplified the vibration by more than 10%, especially the neoprene glove. However, the neoprene glove did the best when the assessment was based on unweighted acceleration. The neoprene glove was able to reduce the vibration by 10% or more of the unweighted vibration for 27 out of the 79 tools. If the dominant vibration of a tool handle or workpiece was in the shear direction relative to the fingers, as observed in the operation of needle scalers, hammer chisels, and bucking bars, the gloves did not reduce the vibration but increased it. CONCLUSIONS This study confirmed that the effectiveness for reducing vibration varied with the gloves and the vibration reduction of each glove depended on tool, vibration direction to the fingers, and finger location. VR gloves, including certified anti-vibration gloves do not provide much vibration reduction when judged based on frequency-weighted acceleration. However, some of the VR gloves can provide more than 10% reduction of the unweighted vibration for some tools or workpieces. Tools and gloves can be matched for

  17. Observation of the exciton and Urbach band tail in low-temperature-grown GaAs using four-wave mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, D.; Yildirim, M.; Hacquebard, L.; March, S.; Mathew, R.; Gamouras, A.; Hall, K. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Liu, X.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Four-wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopy reveals clear signatures associated with the exciton, free carrier inter-band transitions, and the Urbach band tail in low-temperature-grown GaAs, providing a direct measure of the effective band gap as well as insight into the influence of disorder on the electronic structure. The ability to detect (and resolve) these contributions, in contrast to linear spectroscopy, is due to an enhanced sensitivity of FWM to the optical joint density of states and to many-body effects. Our experiments demonstrate the power of FWM for studying the near-band-edge optical properties and coherent carrier dynamics in low-temperature-grown semiconductors.

  18. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid

  19. Vibrational Spectral Studies of Gemfibrozil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitta, T. Asenath; Balendiran, G. K.; James, C.

    2008-11-01

    The Fourier Transform Raman and infrared spectra of the crystallized drug molecule 5-(2,5-Dimethylphenoxy)-2,2-dimethylpentanoic acid (Gemfibrozil) have been recorded and analyzed. Quantum chemical computational methods have been employed using Gaussian 03 software package based on Hartree Fock method for theoretically modeling the grown molecule. The optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies have been predicted. Observed vibrational modes have been assigned with the aid of normal coordinate analysis.

  20. Band Saw Blade Crack before and after Comparison and Analysis of Experiments (2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jin-gui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on MJ3310 woodworking band saw machine as the research object, under the no-load and load of Vib system vibration signal acquisition, processing and analysis software of band saw blade transverse vibration test and the signal acquisition and analysis of the collected signals obtained: to determine the transverse vibration displacement 5.66μm ~ 7.86μm and the main vibration frequency between 624 Hz ~ 792 Hz, then saw blade crack at least 3 mm, need timely saw blade, cutting high hardness of wood band saw blade transverse vibration displacement and frequency will increase sharply. Can be generated according to the band saw blade crack before and after the changing rule of the horizontal vibration displacement and frequency of transverse vibration and scope, judgment and replacement time of saw blade saw blade defect types, which can fully rational utilization of saw blade work effectively.

  1. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2017-05-24

    Vibrational spectroscopy has continued use as a powerful tool to characterize ionic liquids since the literature on room temperature molten salts experienced the rapid increase in number of publications in the 1990's. In the past years, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies have provided insights on ionic interactions and the resulting liquid structure in ionic liquids. A large body of information is now available concerning vibrational spectra of ionic liquids made of many different combinations of anions and cations, but reviews on this literature are scarce. This review is an attempt at filling this gap. Some basic care needed while recording IR or Raman spectra of ionic liquids is explained. We have reviewed the conceptual basis of theoretical frameworks which have been used to interpret vibrational spectra of ionic liquids, helping the reader to distinguish the scope of application of different methods of calculation. Vibrational frequencies observed in IR and Raman spectra of ionic liquids based on different anions and cations are discussed and eventual disagreements between different sources are critically reviewed. The aim is that the reader can use this information while assigning vibrational spectra of an ionic liquid containing another particular combination of anions and cations. Different applications of IR and Raman spectroscopies are given for both pure ionic liquids and solutions. Further issues addressed in this review are the intermolecular vibrations that are more directly probed by the low-frequency range of IR and Raman spectra and the applications of vibrational spectroscopy in studying phase transitions of ionic liquids.

  2. METALLICITY AND TEMPERATURE INDICATORS IN M DWARF K-BAND SPECTRA: TESTING NEW AND UPDATED CALIBRATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS OF 133 SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD M DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Ayala, Barbara [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Covey, Kevin R.; Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 122 Sciences Drive, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Muirhead, Philip S., E-mail: babs@amnh.org [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    We present K-band spectra for 133 nearby (d < 33 ps) M dwarfs, including 18 M dwarfs with reliable metallicity estimates (as inferred from an FGK type companion), 11 M dwarf planet hosts, more than 2/3 of the M dwarfs in the northern 8 pc sample, and several M dwarfs from the LSPM catalog. From these spectra, we measure equivalent widths of the Ca and Na lines, and a spectral index quantifying the absorption due to H{sub 2}O opacity (the H{sub 2}O-K2 index). Using empirical spectral type standards and synthetic models, we calibrate the H{sub 2}O-K2 index as an indicator of an M dwarf's spectral type and effective temperature. We also present a revised relationship that estimates the [Fe/H] and [M/H] metallicities of M dwarfs from their Na I, Ca I, and H{sub 2}O-K2 measurements. Comparisons to model atmosphere provide a qualitative validation of our approach, but also reveal an overall offset between the atomic line strengths predicted by models as compared to actual observations. Our metallicity estimates also reproduce expected correlations with Galactic space motions and H{alpha} emission line strengths, and return statistically identical metallicities for M dwarfs within a common multiple system. Finally, we find systematic residuals between our H{sub 2}O-based spectral types and those derived from optical spectral features with previously known sensitivity to stellar metallicity, such as TiO, and identify the CaH1 index as a promising optical index for diagnosing the metallicities of near-solar M dwarfs.

  3. Hot Ground Vibration Tests

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground vibration tests or modal surveys are routinely conducted to support flutter analysis for subsonic and supersonic vehicles. However, vibration testing...

  4. Vibrational Investigations of Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite with Antibacterial Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Le Coustumer, Phillippe; Predoi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Silver-doped hydroxyapatite (Ag:HAp) was obtained by coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared, and Raman analysis confirmed the development of Ag:HAp with good crystal structure. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed an uniform ellipsoidal morphology with particles from 5 nm to 15 nm. The main vibrational bands characteristic to HAp were identified. The bands assigned to phosphate vibrational group were highlighted in infrared and Raman spectra. The...

  5. Picosecond thermometer in the amide I band of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, R.H.; Xie, A.; Meer, L. van der

    2005-01-01

    The amide I and II bands in myoglobin show a heterogeneous temperature dependence, with bands at 6.17 and 6.43 mu m which are more intense at low temperatures. The amide I band temperature dependence is on the long wavelength edge of the band, while the short wavelength side has almost...... can be used to determine the time it takes vibrational energy to flow into the hydration shell. We determine that vibrational energy flow to the hydration shell from the amide I takes approximately 20 ps to occur....

  6. Theory of vibration protection

    CERN Document Server

    Karnovsky, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    This text is an advancement of the theory of vibration protection of mechanical systems with lumped and distributed parameters. The book offers various concepts and methods of solving vibration protection problems, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and the fields of their effective applications. Fundamental approaches of vibration protection, which are considered in this book, are the passive, parametric and optimal active vibration protection. The passive vibration protection is based on vibration isolation, vibration damping and dynamic absorbers. Parametric vibration protection theory is based on the Shchipanov-Luzin invariance principle. Optimal active vibration protection theory is based on the Pontryagin principle and the Krein moment method. The book also contains special topics such as suppression of vibrations at the source of their occurrence and the harmful influence of vibrations on humans. Numerous examples, which illustrate the theoretical ideas of each chapter, ar...

  7. Identification of Bearing Failure Using Signal Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, Irsyadi; Resti, Yulia; Burlian, Firmansyah

    2018-04-01

    Vibration analysis can be used to identify damage to mechanical systems such as journal bearings. Identification of failure can be done by observing the resulting vibration spectrum by measuring the vibration signal occurring in a mechanical system Bearing is one of the engine elements commonly used in mechanical systems. The main purpose of this research is to monitor the bearing condition and to identify bearing failure on a mechanical system by observing the resulting vibration. Data collection techniques based on recordings of sound caused by the vibration of the mechanical system were used in this study, then created a database system based bearing failure due to vibration signal recording sounds on a mechanical system The next step is to group the bearing damage by type based on the databases obtained. The results show the percentage of success in identifying bearing damage is 98 %.

  8. Unjamming a granular hopper by vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, A.; Maza, D.; Garcimartín, A.; Kolb, E.; Lanuza, J.; Clément, E.

    2009-07-01

    We present an experimental study of the outflow of a hopper continuously vibrated by a piezoelectric device. Outpouring of grains can be achieved for apertures much below the usual jamming limit observed for non-vibrated hoppers. Granular flow persists down to the physical limit of one grain diameter, a limit reached for a finite vibration amplitude. For the smaller orifices, we observe an intermittent regime characterized by alternated periods of flow and blockage. Vibrations do not significantly modify the flow rates both in the continuous and the intermittent regime. The analysis of the statistical features of the flowing regime shows that the flow time significantly increases with the vibration amplitude. However, at low vibration amplitude and small orifice sizes, the jamming time distribution displays an anomalous statistics.

  9. Odd - even staggering, a result of γ - band split

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Gupta, D.K.; Singh, Yuvraj; Gupta, K.K.; Bihari, Chhail; Sharma, Aparna; Varshney, A.K.; Varshney, Mani

    2011-01-01

    The structure of low - lying K = 2+ gamma band in even - even nuclei represents quadrupole vibration breaking axial symmetry in unified collective model of Bohr-Mottelson. In the group theoretical approach of the Interacting boson model (IBM) the band structure can belong to one of the three limiting symmetries of U (6) algebra viz. U (5), SU (3) and O (6), corresponding to the anharmonic vibrator, deformed rotor and γ - unstable respectively

  10. Tunneling observation at very low temperature of impurity bands within the gap of the Kondo superconducting system CuFe/Pb(T(K)>T(c))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumoulin, Louis; Le Fur, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    Very low temperature superconducting tunneling experiments on CuFe(12.10 -6 ) backed by superconducting lead show a band of localized states next to the gap edge. There is no quantitative agreement with the perturbative approach of Mueller-Hartmann Zittartz in this system where the Kondo temperature is larger than the superconductive T(c) [fr

  11. Vibration-rotational overtones absorption of solid hydrogens using optoacoustic spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrational-rotational overtones absorption solid hydrogens (H 2 , D 2 , HD) is studied using pulsed laser piezoeletric transducer (PULPIT) optoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. A general downward shift in energy from isolated molecular energies is observed. Studying normal-hydrogen it was observed that the phonon excitations associated with double-molecular transitions are predominantly transverse-optical phonons, whereas the excitations associated with single-molecular transitions are predominantly longitudinal - optical phonons. Multiplet structures were observed for certain double transitions in parahydrogen and orthodeuterium. The HD spectrum, besides presenting the sharp zero-phonon lines and the associated phonon side bands, like H 2 and D 2 , showed also two different features. This observation was common to all the transitions involving pure rotational excitation in H 2 and D 2 , which showed broad linewidths. This, together with some other facts (fluorescence lifetime *approx*10 5 sec; weak internal vibration and lattice coupling), led to the proposition of a mechanism for the fast nonradiative relaxation in solid hydrogens, implied from some observed experimental evidences. This relaxation, due to strong coupling, would happen in two steps: the internal vibration modes would relax to the rotational modes of the molecules, and then this rotational modes would relax to the lattice vibration modes. (Author) [pt

  12. Application of system concept in vibration and noise reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Meiping

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although certain vibration and noise control technologies are maturing, such as vibration absorption, vibration isolation, sound absorption and sound insulation, and new methods for specific frequency bands or special environments have been proposed unceasingly, there is still no guarantee that practical effective vibration and noise reduction can be obtained. An important constraint for vibration and noise reduction is the lack of a system concept, and the integrity and relevance of such practical systems as ship structure have not obtained enough attention. We have tried to use the system engineering theory in guiding vibration and noise reduction, and have already achieved certain effects. Based on the system concept, the noise control of a petroleum pipeline production workshop has been completed satisfactorily, and the abnormal noise source identification of an airplane has been accomplished successfully. We want to share our experience and suggestions to promote the popularization of the system engineering theory in vibration and noise control.

  13. Evidence for octupole softness of the superdeformed shape from band interactions in sup 193,4 Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D.M.; Riley, M.A.; Alderson, A.; Ali, I.; Fallon, P.; Forsyth, P.D.; Hanna, F.; Mullins, S.M.; Roberts, J.W.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.F.; Twin, P.J. (Liverpool Univ. (UK). Oliver Lodge Lab.); Bengtsson, T. (Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematical Physics); Bentley, M.A.; Bruce, A.M.; Simpson, J. (Science and Engineering Research Council, Daresbury (UK). Daresbury Lab.); Nazarewicz, W. (Liverpool Univ. (UK). Oliver Lodge Lab. Politechnika Warszawska (Poland). Inst. Fizyki); Poynter, R.; Regan, P.; Wadsworth, R. (York Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Satula, W. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Teoretycznej); Sletten, G. (Niels Bohr Inst., Roskilde (Denmark). Tandem Accelerator Lab.); Wyss, R. (Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-12-24

    Three superdeformed (SD) bands have been observed in {sup 194}Hg and four (or five ) SD bands in {sup 193}Hg using the {sup 150}Nd+{sup 48}Ca reaction. All bands except for two in {sup 193}Hg show a steady increase in dynamical moment of inertia J{sup (2)} with rotational frequency. The two exceptional bands form a classical pair of strongly interacting bands. It is suggested that the strong interaction between the bands is caused by a softness to octupole deformation. Evidence is found for the existence of dipole transitions connecting bands of opposite signature in {sup 193}Hg. The strengths of these transitions suggest that they are probably E1 supporting the importance of the role of octupole vibrations. These data suggest the wider importance of octupole softness in enhancing E1 transitions in the SD feeding and decay mechanisms. The spectroscopy of the observed SD bands in {sup 193,4}Hg are discussed in detail and attention is drawn to the 'identical' energies of {gamma}-rays in these isotopes with those in lighter isotopes. The similarities in bands relate to the neutron sub-shell closure for SD nuclei at N=112. (orig.).

  14. Thermodynamics of many-band superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelte, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the microscopical properties of the superconducting state of MgCNi 3 , MgB 2 , and some rare earth-transition metal borocarbides are studied by means of measurements of the specific heat. Furthermore the frequency spectrum of the lattice vibrations is estimated. The energy gap of the superconducting state can be determined from the specific heat of the superconducting state, which yields as like as the upper critical mafnetic field H c2 (0) hints on the electron-phonon coupling. From the analysis of these results and the comparison with results from transport measurements as well as the tunnel and point-contact spectroscopy can be concluded, how far the BCS model of superconductivity must be modified in order to be able to describe the superconducting state of the studied compounds. Studies on MgCNi 3 , which lies near a magnetic instability, show that occurring magnetic fluctuations have a bisection of the superconducting transition temperature T C as consequence. The under this aspect relatively high value of T C =7 K is a consequence of strong electron-phonon coupling, which is essentailly carried by nickel vibrations stabilized by carbon. A for the first time observed distinct anomaly in the specific heat of the classical many-band superconductor MgB 2 (here with pure 10 B) at about T c /4=10 K can be understood by means of a two-band model for the case of especially weak coupling between both bands. The analysis of the specific heat of the superconducting phase of the non-magnetic rare earth-nickel borocarbide YNi 2 B 2 C and LuNi 2 B 2 C leads to the conclusion thet visible effects of the many-band electron system are dependent on the mass on the position both of the rare earth and the transition metal. The signal of the superconducting phase transformation visible in the specific heat of the antiferromagnetic HoNi 2 B 2 C is smaller than expected

  15. Linking structure and vibrational mode coupling using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy: A comparison of gauche and trans 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. Cameron; Stone, Stephen C.; Philips, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane in a molecular beam was collected over the 2975-2994 cm-1 spectral region. The spectral region of 2975-2981 cm-1 contains a symmetric C-H stretching vibrational band of the gauche conformer containing the 35Cl isotope. The spectral region of 2985-2994 cm-1 contains three vibrational bands of the trans conformer. Two of the three bands are assigned as an antisymmetric C-H stretch of each of the two different chlorine isotopes. The third band is assigned as a symmetric C-H stretch of the 35Cl isotope. The gauche conformer of 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane showed doublet patterns similar to those previously observed in 1,2-difluoroethane. The model for 1,2-difluoroethane is further refined in the present work. These refinements suggest that the coupling dark state in 1,2-difluoroethane is composed of 1 quantum C-H bend, 1 quantum C-C stretch, and 12 quanta of torsion. For 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane the dark state could not be identified due to a small data set. The trans conformer of 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane showed no evidence of mode coupling in the three vibrational bands. Including 2-fluoroethanol in this series of molecules, the extent of vibrational mode coupling did not correlate with the density of states available for coupling. Therefore, density of states alone is insufficient to explain the observed trend. A correlation was observed between the degree of intramolecular interaction and vibrational mode coupling.

  16. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form.

  17. Thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the boro silicate mineral datolite - CaBSiO4(OH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; Horta, Laura Frota Campos; Lopez, Andres

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the thermal stability and vibrational spectra of datolite CaBSiO4(OH) and relate these properties to the structure of the mineral. The thermal analysis of datolite shows a mass loss of 5.83% over a 700-775 °C temperature range. This mass loss corresponds to 1 water (H2O) molecules pfu. A quantitative chemical analysis using electron probe was undertaken. The Raman spectrum of datolite is characterized by bands at 917 and 1077 cm-1 assigned to the symmetric stretching modes of BO and SiO tetrahedra. A very intense Raman band is observed at 3498 cm-1 assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units in the structure of datolite. BOH out-of-plane vibrations are characterized by the infrared band at 782 cm-1. The vibrational spectra are based upon the structure of datolite based on sheets of four- and eight-membered rings of alternating SiO4 and BO3(OH) tetrahedra with the sheets bonded together by calcium atoms.

  18. The workings of a molecular thermometer: the vibrational excitation of carbon tetrachloride by a solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Polly B; Matus, Kira J M; Stratt, Richard M

    2004-09-15

    An intriguing energy-transfer experiment was recently carried out in methanol/carbon tetrachloride solutions. It turned out to be possible to watch vibrational energy accumulating in three of carbon tetrachloride's modes following initial excitation of O-H and C-H stretches in methanol, in effect making those CCl(4) modes "molecular thermometers" reporting on methanol's relaxation. In this paper, we use the example of a CCl(4) molecule dissolved in liquid argon to examine, on a microscopic level, just how this kind of thermal activation occurs in liquid solutions. The fact that even the lowest CCl(4) mode has a relatively high frequency compared to the intermolecular vibrational band of the solvent means that the only solute-solvent dynamics relevant to the vibrational energy transfer will be extraordinarily local, so much so that it is only the force between the instantaneously most prominent Cl and solvent atoms that will significantly contribute to the vibrational friction. We use this observation, within the context of a classical instantaneous-pair Landau-Teller calculation, to show that energy flows into CCl(4) primarily via one component of the nominally degenerate, lowest frequency, E mode and does so fast enough to make CCl(4) an excellent choice for monitoring methanol relaxation. Remarkably, within this theory, the different symmetries and appearances of the different CCl(4) modes have little bearing on how well they take up energy from their surroundings--it is only how high their vibrational frequencies are relative to the solvent intermolecular vibrational band edge that substantially favors one mode over another.

  19. Vibration of machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Mun Gyu; Na, Sung Su; Baek, Gwang Hyeon; Song, Chul Gi; Han, Sang Bo

    2001-09-01

    This book deals with vibration of machine which gives descriptions of free vibration using SDOF system, forced vibration using SDOF system, vibration of multi-degree of freedom system like introduction and normal form, distribution system such as introduction, free vibration of bar and practice problem, approximate solution like lumped approximations and Raleigh's quotient, engineering by intuition and experience, real problem and experimental method such as technology of signal, fourier transform analysis, frequency analysis and sensor and actuator.

  20. Measurement of food texture by an acoustic vibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Naoki; Taniwaki, Mitsuru; Iwatani, Shin-ichiro; Akimoto, Hidemi

    2011-09-01

    Food texture was measured by a new acoustic vibration method. A piezoelectric sensor sandwiched between a probe and piston was inserted into a food sample by delivery of silicon oil to a cylinder by a pump. Vibration emitted from the food sample on insertion of the probe was monitored by voltage outputs of the sensor. The voltage signals were passed through 19 half octave bands to calculate texture index for each band. The texture index was defined as vibration energy of the probe caused by the food rupture and/or breakage per unit time.

  1. Magnetic structure of deformation-induced shear bands in amorphous Fe{sub 80}B{sub 16}Si{sub 4} observed by magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.W. [Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Hawley, M.E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, (MST-8), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Markiewicz, D.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Spaepen, F.; Barth, E.P. [Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Processing-induced magnetic structures in amorphous metallic alloys are of interest because of their impact on the performance of materials used in electric device applications. Plastic deformation associated with cutting or bending the material to the desired shape occurs through the formation of shear bands. The stress associated with these shear bands induces magnetic domains that can lead to power losses through interaction with the fields and currents involved in normal device operation. These domains have been studied previously using a variety of techniques capable of imaging magnetic domain structures. In an effort to better characterize and understand these issues, we have applied atomic and magnetic force microscopy to these materials to provide three-dimensional nanometer-scale topographic resolution and micrometer-scale magnetic resolution. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Phononic band gap structures as optimal designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use topology optimization to design phononic band gap structures. We consider 2D structures subjected to periodic loading and obtain the distribution of two materials with high contrast in material properties that gives the minimal vibrational response of the structure. Both in...

  3. Enhanced vibration diagnostics using vibration signature analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Shehzad, K.; Zahoor, Y.; Mahmood, A.; Bibi, A.

    2001-01-01

    Symptoms will appear in equipment, as well as in human beings. when 'suffering from sickness. Symptoms of abnormality in equipment are vibration, noise, deformation, temperature, pressure, electric current, crack, wearing, leakage etc. these are called modes of failure. If the mode of failure is vibration then the vibration signature analysis can be effectively used in order to diagnose the machinery problems. Much valuable information is contained within these vibration 'Spectra' or 'Signatures' but is only of use if the analyst can unlock its 'Secrets'. This paper documents a vibration problem in the motor of a centrifugal pump (Type ETA). It focuses mainly on the roll of modern vibration monitoring system in problem analysis. The problem experienced was the motor unstability and noise due to high vibration. Using enhanced vibration signature data, the problem was analyzed. which suggested that the rotor eccentricity was the cause of excessive noise and vibration in the motor. In conclusion, advanced electronic monitoring and diagnostic systems provide powerful information for machine's condition assessment and problem analysis. Appropriate interpretation and use of this information is important for accurate and effective vibration analysis. (author)

  4. The molecular structure of the borate mineral inderite Mg(H4B3O7)(OH) · 5H2O--a vibrational spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; Scholz, Ricardo; Granja, Amanda

    2013-12-01

    We have undertaken a study of the mineral inderite Mg(H4B3O7)(OH) · 5H2O a hydrated hydroxy borate mineral of magnesium using scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. The structure consists of [Formula: see text] soroborate groups and Mg(OH)2(H2O)4 octahedra interconnected into discrete molecules by the sharing of two OH groups. Thermogravimetry shows a mass loss of 47.2% at 137.5 °C, proving the mineral is thermally unstable. Raman bands at 954, 1047 and 1116 cm(-1) are assigned to the trigonal symmetric stretching mode. The two bands at 880 and 916 cm(-1) are attributed to the symmetric stretching mode of the tetrahedral boron. Both the Raman and infrared spectra of inderite show complexity. Raman bands are observed at 3052, 3233, 3330, 3392 attributed to water stretching vibrations and 3459 cm(-1) with sharper bands at 3459, 3530 and 3562 cm(-1) assigned to OH stretching vibrations. Vibrational spectroscopy is used to assess the molecular structure of inderite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. a Study of Radial Vibrations of a Rolling Tyre for TYRE-ROAD Noise Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périsse, J.

    2002-11-01

    Because tyre-road noise represents the main noise source for light vehicles with driving speed above 60 km/h, comprehension of generation mechanism of tyre-road noise has become a subject of major importance. In this paper, tyre-road interaction and radial tyre vibrations are investigated for tyre-road noise characterisation. Experimental measurements are performed on a rolling smooth tyre with test laboratory facilities. Both tread band and sidewall responses of the tyre are measured and compared to each other. High concentration of vibrations is observed in the vicinity of the contact area. Stationary radial deformation and non-stationary vibrations due to road rugosity are studied. Frequency analyses have been performed on the acceleration time signals showing the influence of the rotating speed on the vibrations level and frequency content. Finally, by integrating acceleration signal of the tyre tread over one revolution, stationary radial displacement can be calculated and the true contact length can be estimated. This study provides us with new measurement data for comparison with mathematical modelling. It also gives a physical insight on generation mechanism of tyre radial vibrations.

  6. Analysis of classical guitars' vibrational behavior based on scanning laser vibrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowska, Marzena

    2012-06-01

    One of the main goals in musical acoustics research is to link measurable, physical properties of a musical instrument with subjective assessments of its tone quality. The aim of the research discussed in this paper was to observe the structural vibrations of different class classical guitars in relation to their quality. This work focuses on mid-low-and low-class classical (nylon-stringed) guitars. The main source of guitar body vibrations come from top and back plate vibrations therefore these were the objects of structural mode measurements and analysis. Sixteen classical guitars have been investigated, nine with cedar and seven with spruce top plate. Structural modes of top and back plates have been measured with the aid of a scanning laser vibrometer and the instruments were excited with a chirp signal transferred by bone vibrator. The issues related to excitor selection have been discussed. Correlation and descriptive statistics of top and back plates measurement results have been investigated in relation to guitar quality. The frequency range of 300 Hz to 5 kHz as well as selected narrowed frequency bands have been analyzed for cedar and spruce guitars. Furthermore, the influence of top plate wood type on vibration characteristics have been observed on three pairs of guitars. The instruments were of the same model but different top plate material. Determination and visualization of both guitar plates' modal patterns in relation to frequency are a significant attainment of the research. Scanning laser vibrometer measurements allow particular mode observation and therefore mode identification, as opposed to sound pressure response measurements. When correlating vibration characteristics of top and back plates it appears that Pearson productmoment correlation coefficient is not a parameter that associates with guitar quality. However, for best instruments with cedar top, top-back correlation coefficient has relatively greater value in 1-2 kHz band and lower in

  7. Lattice Vibrations in Chlorobenzenes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, P. A.; Kjems, Jørgen; White, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lattice vibrational dispersion curves for the ``intermolecular'' modes in the triclinic, one molecule per unit cell β phase of p‐C6D4Cl2 and p‐C6H4Cl2 have been obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. The deuterated sample was investigated at 295 and at 90°K and a linear extrapolation to 0°K...... was applied in order to correct for anharmonic effects. Calculations based on the atom‐atom model for van der Waals' interaction and on general potential parameters for the aromatic compounds agree reasonably well with the experimental observations. There is no substantial improvement in fit obtained either...

  8. General vibration monitoring: Utility Building, August 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    This vibration data was generated from measurements made on 8/12/92. The contents are self explanatory. They are baseline measurements and no exceptionally large vibration amplitude or response was observed. These measurements represent baseline measurements, i.e., measurements with no driving forces active, made on the utility building, a service building for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  9. [Occupational standing vibration rate and vibrational diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaukh, N G; Vyshchipan, V F; Haumenko, B S

    2003-12-01

    Occupational standing vibration rate is proposed in evaluating a degree of impairment of an organism activity. It will allow more widely to introduce specification of quality and quantity in assessment of the development of vibrational disease. According out-patient and inpatient obtained data we have established criterial values of functional changes in accordance with accumulated occupational standing vibration rate. The nomogram was worked out for defining a risk of the development of vibrational disease in mine workers. This nomogram more objectively can help in diagnostics of the disease.

  10. Monodeuterated methane in the outer solar system. I. Spectroscopic analysis of the bands at 1.55 and 1.95 microns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, B.L.; de Bergh, C.; Maillard, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of the near-infrared spectrum of monodeuterated methane (CH 3 D) near 6400 cm -1 and 5100 cm -1 is presented as the first of a series of papers dealing with laboratory studies of this molecule and with observational searches for it in outer solar system objects. Three new parallel bands which have locally perturbed upper states connecting with the ground state are identified, and approximate rotational constants are derived. The band centered near 6425 cm -1 and the 9613 A band previously analyzed by Lutz, Danehy, and Ramsay are found to form an apparent vibrational progression with the ν 2 fundamental at 2200 cm -1 , and vibrational assignments of 3ν 2 and 5ν 2 , respectively, are proposed. Detailed comparison of the rotational constants of the states involved is shown to support these assignments

  11. Granular metamaterials for vibration mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantzounis, G.; Serra-Garcia, M.; Homma, K.; Mendoza, J. M.; Daraio, C.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic metamaterials that allow low-frequency band gaps are interesting for many practical engineering applications, where vibration control and sound insulation are necessary. In most prior studies, the mechanical response of these structures has been described using linear continuum approximations. In this work, we experimentally and theoretically address the formation of low-frequency band gaps in locally resonant granular crystals, where the dynamics of the system is governed by discrete equations. We investigate the quasi-linear behavior of such structures. The analysis shows that a stopband can be introduced at about one octave lower frequency than in materials without local resonances. Broadband and multi-frequency stopband characteristics can also be achieved by strategically tailoring the non-uniform local resonance parameters.

  12. Experimental Study on the Measurement of Water Bottom Vibration Induced by Underwater Drilling Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of proper instrumentations and the difficulties in underwater measurements, the studies about water bottom vibration induced by underwater drilling blasting are seldom reported. In order to investigate the propagation and attenuation laws of blasting induced water bottom vibration, a water bottom vibration monitor was developed with consideration of the difficulties in underwater measurements. By means of this equipment, the actual water bottom vibration induced by underwater drilling blasting was measured in a field experiment. It shows that the water bottom vibration monitor could collect vibration signals quite effectively in underwater environments. The followed signal analysis shows that the characteristics of water bottom vibration and land ground vibration induced by the same underwater drilling blasting are quite different due to the different geological environments. The amplitude and frequency band of water bottom vibration both exceed those of land ground vibration. Water bottom vibration is mainly in low-frequency band that induced by blasting impact directly acts on rock. Besides the low-frequency component, land vibration contains another higher frequency band component that induced by followed water hammer wave acts on bank slope.

  13. The dynamics of a shear band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Diana; Capuani, Domenico; Bigoni, Davide

    2018-03-01

    A shear band of finite length, formed inside a ductile material at a certain stage of a continued homogeneous strain, provides a dynamic perturbation to an incident wave field, which strongly influences the dynamics of the material and affects its path to failure. The investigation of this perturbation is presented for a ductile metal, with reference to the incremental mechanics of a material obeying the J2-deformation theory of plasticity (a special form of prestressed, elastic, anisotropic, and incompressible solid). The treatment originates from the derivation of integral representations relating the incremental mechanical fields at every point of the medium to the incremental displacement jump across the shear band faces, generated by an impinging wave. The boundary integral equations (under the plane strain assumption) are numerically approached through a collocation technique, which keeps into account the singularity at the shear band tips and permits the analysis of an incident wave impinging a shear band. It is shown that the presence of the shear band induces a resonance, visible in the incremental displacement field and in the stress intensity factor at the shear band tips, which promotes shear band growth. Moreover, the waves scattered by the shear band are shown to generate a fine texture of vibrations, parallel to the shear band line and propagating at a long distance from it, but leaving a sort of conical shadow zone, which emanates from the tips of the shear band.

  14. INTERPRETATION OF INFRARED VIBRATION-ROTATION SPECTRA OF INTERSTELLAR AND CIRCUMSTELLAR MOLECULES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared vibration-rotation lines can be valuable probes of interstellar and circumstellar molecules, especially symmetric molecules, which have no pure rotational transitions. But most such observations have been interpreted with an isothermal absorbing slab model, which leaves out important radiative transfer and molecular excitation effects. A more realistic non-LTE and non-isothermal radiative transfer model has been constructed. The results of this model are in much better agreement with the observations, including cases where lines in one branch of a vibration-rotation band are in absorption and another in emission. In general, conclusions based on the isothermal absorbing slab model can be very misleading, but the assumption of LTE may not lead to such large errors, particularly if the radiation field temperature is close to the gas temperature.

  15. High-pressure Raman study of vibrational spectra in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masamichi; Kuroda, Noritaka; Nishina, Yuichiro

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effect of pressure on the low-frequency lattice modes and the amide-I (N-CO stretching) vibrational modes in crystalline acetanilide (C6H5NHCOCH3) in the temperature range 80-300 K by means of Raman spectroscopy. The Raman intensity of the 1650-cm-1 band, which appears upon cooling, is enhanced by applying pressure. The energy difference between the amide-I phonon (Ag mode) and the 1650-cm-1 bands does not change appreciably under pressure up to at least 4 GPa. These results are analyzed in terms of the self-trapped model in which a single lattice mode couples with the amide-I excitation by taking into account the effect of pressure on the low-frequency lattice modes and on the dipole-dipole interactions associated with the amide-I vibration. A band is observed at 30 cm-1 below the amide-I phonon band at low temperatures with a pressure above ~2 GPa.

  16. Portable vibration exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  17. General vibration monitoring: Experimental hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    The reported vibration data were generated from measurements made on the experimental hall floor on December 2, 1992. At the time of the measurements, the ESRF hydrolevel was set-up in the Early Assembly Area (EAA) of the experimental hall and was being used to measure static displacement (settlement) of the floor. The vibration measurement area was on and adjacent to the EAA, in the vicinity of the ESRF hydrolevel test which was in progress. This report summarizes the objectives, instrumentation, measurement locations, observations, and conclusions, and provides selected results in the form of RMS vs. time plots, and power spectral densities from which frequency information can be derived. Measured response amplitudes were within the vibration criteria established for the APS

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  19. Vibrational mode frequencies of silica species in SiO2-H2O liquids and glasses from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekermann, Georg; Steele-MacInnis, Matthew; Schmidt, Christian; Jahn, Sandro

    2012-04-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy techniques are commonly used to probe the atomic-scale structure of silica species in aqueous solution and hydrous silica glasses. However, unequivocal assignment of individual spectroscopic features to specific vibrational modes is challenging. In this contribution, we establish a connection between experimentally observed vibrational bands and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) of silica species in solution and in hydrous silica glass. Using the mode-projection approach, we decompose the vibrations of silica species into subspectra resulting from several fundamental structural subunits: The SiO(4) tetrahedron of symmetry T(d), the bridging oxygen (BO) Si-O-Si of symmetry C(2v), the geminal oxygen O-Si-O of symmetry C(2v), the individual Si-OH stretching, and the specific ethane-like symmetric stretching contribution of the H(6)Si(2)O(7) dimer. This allows us to study relevant vibrations of these subunits in any degree of polymerization, from the Q(0) monomer up to the fully polymerized Q(4) tetrahedra. Demonstrating the potential of this approach for supplementing the interpretation of experimental spectra, we compare the calculated frequencies to those extracted from experimental Raman spectra of hydrous silica glasses and silica species in aqueous solution. We discuss observed features such as the double-peaked contribution of the Q(2) tetrahedral symmetric stretch, the individual Si-OH stretching vibrations, the origin of the experimentally observed band at 970 cm(-1) and the ethane-like vibrational contribution of the H(6)Si(2)O(7) dimer at 870 cm(-1).

  20. OH-asterisk (7-5) Meinel band dayglow and nightglow measured by the SME limb scanning near infrared spectrometer - Comparison of the observed seasonal variability with two-dimensional model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Texier, H.; Solomon, S.; Thomas, R. J.; Garcia, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    Seasonal variations of the OH-asterisk (7-5) mesospheric hydroxyl emission at 1.89 microns observed by the SME near-IR spectrometer are compared with the theoretical predictions of a two-dimensional dynamical/chemical model. The good agreement found at low latitudes for both dayglow and nightglow provides support for the model assumption that breaking gravity waves induce seasonal and latitudinal variations in diffusion. The seasonal behavior of atomic hydrogen in the upper mesosphere (related to vertical transport) and/or uncertainties in the OH Meinel band parameters are proposed as possible explanations for the discrepancy noted between model and observational data for the middle latitudes.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of the ν1 + ν4 and 3ν4 bands of the nitrate radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Fujimori, Ryuji; Ishiwata, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectra of the ν1 + ν4 and 3ν4 bands of 14NO3 were observed in the 1414 and 1174 cm-1 regions, respectively, and the corresponding ones of 15NO3 in the 1407 and 1159 cm-1 regions, respectively, and analyzed as E‧-A2‧ bands. The rotational constants of the upper states of 14NO3 are determined to be 0.457584 and 0.46089 cm-1 for ν1 + ν4 and 3ν4, respectively, consistent with the vibrational assignment. Effective Coriolis coupling constants of the ground electronic state are partly explained by vibronic interaction from the B2E‧ state, and a large change (37% decrease) in the value of the ν1 + ν4 state compared with that of the ν4 state is attributed to a mixing with the ν3 + ν4 state (1492 cm-1) through vibrational anharmonicity.

  2. Vibrations and Eigenvalues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We make music by causing strings, membranes, or air columns to vibrate. Engineers design safe structures by control- ling vibrations. I will describe to you a very simple vibrating system and the mathematics needed to analyse it. The ideas were born in the work of Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1736–1813), and I begin by quot-.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of Isoleucine by quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P P; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2014-04-24

    In this work, we reported a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of Isoleucine (2-Amino-3-methylpentanoic acid). The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, corresponding vibrational assignments, thermodynamics properties, NBO analyses, NMR chemical shifts and ultraviolet-visible spectral interpretation of Isoleucine have been studied by performing MP2 and DFT/cc-pVDZ level of theory. The FTIR, FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1) respectively. The UV-visible absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. Computational calculations at MP2 and B3LYP level with basis set of cc-pVDZ is employed in complete assignments of Isoleucine molecule on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using VEDA-4 program. The calculated wavenumbers are compared with the experimental values. The difference between the observed and calculated wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. The formation of hydrogen bond was investigated in terms of the charge density by the NBO calculations. Based on the UV spectra and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands were carried out. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were investigated using theoretical calculations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Band structures in fractal grading porous phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu; Wang, Bin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a new grading porous structure is introduced based on a Sierpinski triangle routine, and wave propagation in this fractal grading porous phononic crystal is investigated. The influences of fractal hierarchy and porosity on the band structures in fractal graidng porous phononic crystals are clarified. Vibration modes of unit cell at absolute band gap edges are given to manifest formation mechanism of absolute band gaps. The results show that absolute band gaps are easy to form in fractal structures comparatively to the normal ones with the same porosity. Structures with higher fractal hierarchies benefit multiple wider absolute band gaps. This work provides useful guidance in design of fractal porous phononic crystals.

  5. New results on the superdeformed {sup 196}Pb nucleus: The decay of the excited bands to the yrast band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouneau, S.; Azaiez, F.; Duprat, J. [IPN, Orsay (France)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The study of the superdeformed (SD) {sup 196}Pb nucleus has been revisited using the EUROGAM phase 2 spectrometer. In addition to the known yrast and two lowest excited SD bands, a third excited SD band has been seen. All of the three excited bands were found to decay to the yrast SD band through, presumably, E1 transitions, allowing relative spin and excitation energy assignments. Comparisons with calculations using the random-phase approximation suggest that all three excited bands can be interpreted as octupole vibrational structures.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral lazulite--(Mg, Fe)Al2(PO4)2·(OH)2 found in the Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Beganovic, Martina; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-04-15

    This research was done on lazulite samples from the Gentil mine, a lithium bearing pegmatite located in the municipality of Mendes Pimentel, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Chemical analysis was carried out by electron microprobe analysis and indicated a magnesium rich phase with partial substitution of iron. Traces of Ca and Mn, (which partially replaced Mg) were found. The calculated chemical formula of the studied sample is: (Mg0.88, Fe0.11)Al1.87(PO4)2.08(OH)2.02. The Raman spectrum of lazulite is dominated by an intense sharp band at 1060 cm(-1) assigned to PO stretching vibrations of of tetrahedral [PO4] clusters presents into the HPO4(2-) units. Two Raman bands at 1102 and 1137 cm(-1) are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The two infrared bands at 997 and 1007 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν1PO4(3-) symmetric stretching modes. The intense bands at 1035, 1054, 1081, 1118 and 1154 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν3PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching modes from both the HOP and tetrahedral [PO4] clusters. A set of Raman bands at 605, 613, 633 and 648 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4, HPO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands observed at 414, 425, 460, and 479 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν2 tetrahedral PO4 clusters, HPO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. The intense Raman band at 3402 and the infrared band at 3403 cm(-1) are assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units. A combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy enabled aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral lazulite to be understood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High-Accuracy Quartic Force Field Calculations for the Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies of 1(exp 1)A' l-C3H(-): A Possible Link to Lines Observed in the Horsehead Nebula PDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Crawford, T. Daniel; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that rotational lines observed in the Horsehead nebula photon-dominated-region (PDR) are probably not caused by l-C3H+, as was originally suggested. In the search for viable alternative candidate carriers, quartic force fields are employed here to provide highly accurate rotational constants, as well as fundamental vibrational frequencies, for another candidate carrier: 1 (sup 1)A' C3H(-). The ab initio computed spectroscopic constants provided in this work are, compared to those necessary to define the observed lines, as accurate as the computed spectroscopic constants for many of the known interstellar anions. Additionally, the computed D-eff for C3H(-) is three times closer to the D deduced from the observed Horsehead nebula lines relative to l-C3H(+). As a result, 1 (sup 1)A' C3H(-). is a more viable candidate for these observed rotational transitions and would be the seventh confirmed interstellar anion detected within the past decade and the first C(sub n)H(-) molecular anion with an odd n.

  8. The observation of valence band change on resistive switching of epitaxial Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} film using removable liquid electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Ku, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-07

    The resistive switching (RS) phenomenon in transition metal oxides (TMOs) has received a great deal of attention for non-volatile memory applications. Various RS mechanisms have been suggested as to explain the observed RS characteristics. Many reports suggest that changes of interface and the role of oxygen vacancies originate in RS phenomena; therefore, in this study, we use a liquid drop of mercury as the top electrode (TE), epitaxial Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (PCMO) (110) film of the perovskite manganite family for RS material, and an Nb-doped (0.7 at. %) SrTiO{sub 3} (100) single crystal as the substrate to observe changes in the interface between the TE and TMOs. The use of removable liquid electrode Hg drop as TE not only enables observation of the RS characteristic as a bipolar RS curve (counterclockwise) but also facilitates analysis of the valence band of the PCMO surface after resistive switching via photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed I-V behaviors of the low and high resistance states (HRS) are explained with an electrochemical migration model in PCMO film where accumulated oxygen vacancies at the interface between the Hg TE and PCMO (110) surface induce the HRS. The interpreted RS mechanism is directly confirmed via valence band spectrum analysis.

  9. Dipole Bands in 196Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-01-01

    High spin states in 196 Hg have been populated in the 198 Pt(α,6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  10. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  11. Anti-vibration gloves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered. © Crown copyright 2014.

  12. Systematic vibration thermodynamic properties of bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G. Y.; Sun, W. G.; Liao, B. T.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the analysis of the maturity and finiteness of vibrational levels of bromine molecule in ground state and evaluating the effect on statistical computation, according to the elementary principles of quantum statistical theorem, using the full set of bromine molecular vibrational levels determined with algebra method, the statistical contribution for bromine systematical macroscopic thermodynamic properties is discussed. Thermodynamic state functions Helmholtz free energy, entropy and observable vibration heat capacity are calculated. The results show that the determination of full set of vibrational levels and maximum vibrational quantum number is the key in the correct statistical analysis of bromine systematical thermodynamic property. Algebra method results are clearly different from data of simple harmonic oscillator and the related algebra method results are no longer analytical but numerical and are superior to simple harmonic oscillator results. Compared with simple harmonic oscillator's heat capacities, the algebra method's heat capacities are more consistent with the experimental data in the given temperature range of 600-2100 K.

  13. Evidence for octupole vibration in the superdeformed well of {sup 190}Hg from eurogam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowell, B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Gammasphere experiments in 1993-94 brought to light the existence of an excited superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 190}Hg with the unusual property of decaying entirely to the lowest (yrast) SD band over 3-4 transitions, rather than to the normally deformed states as is usually the case in the A {approximately} 150 and A {approximately} 190 regions of superdeformation. Although M1 transitions between signature-partner SD bands were previously observed in {sup 193}Hg, no such mechanism was available to explain the situation in the even-even nucleus {sup 190}Hg, whose yrast SD band has no signature partner. The best explanation appears to lie in long-standing theoretical predictions that the SD minimum in the potential energy surface would be quite soft with respect to octupole vibrations. This would lead to enhanced E1 transitions connecting the one-phonon and zero-phonon states. The data and this interpretation were published. A shortcoming of the Gammasphere experiments was that they did not allow the definitive measurement of the energies of the gamma-ray transitions connecting the two bands, due to the very weak population of the excited band ({approximately}0.05% of the {sup 190}Hg channel) and also partly, we believed, to the angular distributions of the transitions, which were peaked near 90 degrees, where Gammasphere had few detectors.

  14. Atmospheric dayglow diagnostics involving the O2(b-X) Atmospheric band emission: Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanger, T. G.; Pejaković, D. A.; Kostko, O.; Matsiev, D.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2017-03-01

    The terrestrial dayglow displays prominent emission features from the 0-0 and 1-1 bands of the O2 Atmospheric band system in the 760-780 nm region. We present an analysis of observations in this wavelength region recorded by the Space Shuttle during the Arizona Airglow Experiment. A major conclusion is that the dominant product of O(1D) + O2 energy transfer is O2(b, v = 1), a result that corroborates our previous laboratory studies. Moreover, critical to the interpretation of dayglow is the possible interference by N2 and N2+ bands in the 760-780 nm region, where the single-most important component is the N2 1PG 3-1 band that overlaps with the O2(b-X) 0-0 band. When present, this background must be accounted for to reveal the O2(b-X) 0-0 and 1-1 bands for altitudes at which the O2 and N2/N2+ emissions coincide. Finally, we exploit the very different collisional behavior of the two lowest O2(b) vibrational levels to outline a remote sensing technique that provides information on Atmospheric composition and temperature from space-based observations of the 0-0 and 1-1 O2 atmospheric bands.

  15. Axisymmetric vibrations of thin shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Norio; Kosawada, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shin

    1983-01-01

    The problem of free vibration of axisymmetric shells of revolution is important in connection with the design of pressure vessels, chemical equipment, aircrafts, structures and so on. In this study, the axisymmetrical vibration of a thin shell of revolution having a constant curvature in meridian direction was analyzed by thin shell theory. First, the Lagrangian during one period of the vibration of a shell of revolution was determined by the primary approximate theory of Love, and the vibration equations and boundary conditions were derived from its stopping condition. The vibration equations were strictly analyzed by using the series solution. The basic equations for the strain and strain energy of a shell were based on those of Novozhilov. As the examples of numerical calculation, the natural frequency and vibration mode of the symmetrical shells of revolution fixed at both ends and supported at both ends were determined, and their characteristics were clarified. The theory and the numerical calculation ore described. Especially in the frequency curves, the waving phenomena were observed frequently, which were not seen in non-axisymmetric vibration, accordingly also the vibration mode changed in complex state on the frequency curves of same order. The numerical calculation was carried out in the large computer center in Tohoku University. (Kako, I.)

  16. Nonlinear Microstructured Material to Reduce Noise and Vibrations at Low Frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavazec, Deborah; Cumunel, Gwendal; Duhamel, Denis; Soize, Christian; Batou, Anas

    2016-01-01

    At low frequencies, for which the wavelengths are wide, the acoustic waves and the mechanical vibrations cannot easily be reduced in the structures at macroscale by using dissipative materials, contrarily to the middle- and high-frequency ranges. The final objective of this work is to reduce the vibrations and the induced noise on a broad low-frequency band by using a microstructured material by inclusions that are randomly arranged in the material matrix. The dynamical regimes of the inclusions will be imposed in the nonlinear domain in order that the energy be effectively pumped over a broad frequency band around the resonance frequency, due to the nonlinearity. The first step of this work is to design and to analyze the efficiency of an inclusion, which is made up of a hollow frame including a point mass centered on a beam. This inclusion is designed in order to exhibit nonlinear geometric effects in the low-frequency band that is observed. For this first step, the objective is to develop the simplest mechanical model that has the capability to roughly predict the experimental results that are measured. The second step, which is not presented in the paper, will consist in developing a more sophisticated nonlinear dynamical model of the inclusion. In this paper, devoted to the first step, it is proved that the nonlinearity induces an attenuation on a broad frequency band around the resonance, contrarily to its linear behavior for which the attenuation is only active in a narrow frequency band around the resonance. We will present the design in terms of geometry, dimension and materials for the inclusion, the experimental manufacturing of this system realized with a 3D printing system, and the experimental measures that have been performed. We compare the prevision given by the stochastic computational model with the measurements. The results obtained exhibit the physical attenuation over a broad low-frequency band, which were expected. (paper)

  17. Conformational and vibrational reassessment of solid paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Ana M.; Azevedo, Celeste; Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.

    2017-08-01

    This work provides an answer to the urge for a more detailed and accurate knowledge of the vibrational spectrum of the widely used analgesic/antipyretic drug commonly known as paracetamol. A comprehensive spectroscopic analysis - including infrared, Raman, and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) - is combined with a computational approach which takes account for the effects of intermolecular interactions in the solid state. This allows a full reassessment of the vibrational assignments for Paracetamol, thus preventing the propagation of incorrect data analysis and misassignments already found in the literature. In particular, the vibrational modes involving the hydrogen-bonded Nsbnd H and Osbnd H groups are correctly reallocated to bands shifted by up to 300 cm- 1 relatively to previous assignments.

  18. Ultrawide low frequency band gap of phononic crystal in nacreous composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, J.; Huang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H.W.; Chen, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The band structure of a nacreous composite material is studied by two proposed models, where an ultrawide low frequency band gap is observed. The first model (tension-shear chain model) with two phases including brick and mortar is investigated to describe the wave propagation in the nacreous composite material, and the dispersion relation is calculated by transfer matrix method and Bloch theorem. The results show that the frequency ranges of the pass bands are quite narrow, because a special tension-shear chain motion in the nacreous composite material is formed by some very slow modes. Furthermore, the second model (two-dimensional finite element model) is presented to investigate its band gap by a multi-level substructure scheme. Our findings will be of great value to the design and synthesis of vibration isolation materials in a wide and low frequency range. Finally, the transmission characteristics are calculated to verify the results. - Highlights: • A Brick-and-Mortar structure is used to discuss wave propagation through nacreous materials. • A 1D Bloch wave solution of nacreous materials with a tension-shear chain model is obtained. • The band structure and transmission characteristics of nacreous materials with the FE model are examined. • An ultrawide low frequency band gap is found in nacreous materials with both theory and FE model

  19. Collision-induced absorption by D2 pairs in the first overtone band at 77, 201 and 298 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Kharma, M.; Gillard, P.G.; Reddy, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of pure D 2 in the first overtone region from 5250 to 7250 cm -1 , recorded at 77, 201 and 298 K, have been analyzed. The observed spectra at 77, 201 and 298 K were modelled by a total of 92, 214 and 267 components respectively of double vibrational transitions at room temperature of the type X 2 (J) +X 0 (J) and X 1 (J) + X 1 (J), where X is O, Q or S transitions. Profile analyses of the spectra were carried out using the Birnbaum-Cohen line-shape function for the individual components of the band, and characteristic line shape parameters were determined from the analysis. The observed and calculated profiles agree well over the whole overtone band, and the agreement is better than 97% in the three cases studied. Binary and ternary absorption coefficients were determined from the integrated absorption of the band. (authors)

  20. Vibrational transition moments of CH4 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Barber, Robert J.; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-01

    New nine-dimensional (9D), ab initio electric dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of methane in its ground electronic state are presented. The DMSs are computed using an explicitly correlated coupled cluster CCSD(T)-F12 method in conjunction with an F12-optimized correlation consistent basis set of the TZ-family. A symmetrized molecular bond representation is used to parameterise these 9D DMSs in terms of sixth-order polynomials. Vibrational transition moments as well as band intensities for a large number of IR-active vibrational bands of 12CH4 are computed by vibrationally averaging the ab initio dipole moment components. The vibrational wavefunctions required for these averages are computed variationally using the program TROVE and a new ‘spectroscopic’ 12CH4 potential energy surface. The new DMSs will be used to produce a hot line list for 12CH4.

  1. The Possible Interstellar Anion CH2CN-: Spectroscopic Constants, Vibrational Frequencies, and Other Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Crawford, T. Daniel; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The A\\ ^1B_1 \\leftarrow \\tilde{X}\\ ^1A^{\\prime } excitation into the dipole-bound state of the cyanomethyl anion (CH2CN-) has been hypothesized as the carrier for one diffuse interstellar band. However, this particular molecular system has not been detected in the interstellar medium even though the related cyanomethyl radical and the isoelectronic ketenimine molecule have been found. In this study, we are employing the use of proven quartic force fields and second-order vibrational perturbation theory to compute accurate spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies for \\tilde{X}\\ ^1A^{\\prime } CH2CN- in order to assist in laboratory studies and astronomical observations.

  2. Structural and vibrational properties of oxcarbazepine, an anticonvulsant substance by using DFT and SCRF calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladetto, María F.; Márquez, María B.; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we have presented a structural and vibrational study on the properties in gas and aqueous solution phases of oxcarbazepine, a polymorphic anticonvulsant substance, combining the available IR and Raman spectra with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Two stable C1 and C2 forms for the title molecule were theoretically determined by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. The integral equation formalism variant polarised continuum model (IEFPCM) was employed to study the solvent effects by means of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method. The vibrational spectra for the two forms of oxcarbazepine were completely assigned together with two dimeric species also observed in the solid phase. The presences of the two C1 and C2 forms together with the two dimeric species are supported by the IR and Raman bands between 1424 and 125 cm-1. Here, the properties for both forms of oxcarbazepine are compared and discussed.

  3. Rotational structure of the five lowest frequency fundamental vibrational states of dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Drumel, Marie-Aline Martin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Sadovskií, Dmitrií A.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the successful extended analysis of the high-frequency (200-700 GHz) part of the gas phase (sub)mm-wave spectra of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The spectrum was recorded at 100 kHz resolution using a solid state subTHz spectrometer. The five lowest energy fundamental vibrational states of DMSO with frequencies below 400 cm-1 were observed as sidebands along with the main 0←0 band. Neglecting the internal rotation of methyls, our rotational Hamiltonian reproduced the spectrum to the subMHz accuracy. We have found that the asymmetric bending state ν23 is the only low frequency fundamental vibrational state with the "anomalous" rotational structure uncovered in Cuisset et al. [1]. dmsomw 2013-09-04 15:03

  4. Relating C-band Microwave and Optical Satellite Observations as A Function of Snow Thickness on First-Year Sea Ice during the Winter to Summer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice and its snow cover have a direct impact on both the Arctic and global climate system through their ability to moderate heat exchange across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface. Snow cover plays a key role in the OSA interface radiation and energy exchange, as it controls the growth and decay of first-year sea ice (FYI). However, meteoric accumulation and redistribution of snow on FYI is highly stochastic over space and time, which makes it poorly understood. Previous studies have estimated local-scale snow thickness distributions using in-situ technique and modelling but it is spatially limited and challenging due to logistic difficulties. Moreover, snow albedo is also critical for determining the surface energy balance of the OSA during the critical summer ablation season. Even then, due to persistent and widespread cloud cover in the Arctic at various spatio-temporal scales, it is difficult and unreliable to remotely measure albedo of snow cover on FYI in the optical spectrum. Previous studies demonstrate that only large-scale sea ice albedo was successfully estimated using optical-satellite sensors. However, space-borne microwave sensors, with their capability of all-weather and 24-hour imaging, can provide enhanced information about snow cover on FYI. Daily spaceborne C-band scatterometer data (ASCAT) and MODIS data are used to investigate the the seasonal co-evolution of the microwave backscatter coefficient and optical albedo as a function of snow thickness on smooth FYI. The research focuses on snow-covered FYI near Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (Fig.1) during the winter to advanced-melt period (April-June, 2014). The ACSAT time series (Fig.2) show distinct increase in scattering at melt onset indicating the first occurrence of melt water in the snow cover. The corresponding albedo exhibits no decrease at this stage. We show how the standard deviation of ASCAT backscatter on FYI during winter can be used as a proxy for surface roughness

  5. Lattice vibration spectra. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, H.D.; Willich, P.

    1977-01-01

    The FIR absorption spectra of pyrite type compounds RuS 2 , RuSsub(2-x)Sesub(x), RuSe 2 , RuTe 2 , OsS 2 , OsSe 2 , and PtP 2 as well as loellingite type phosphides FeP 2 , RuP 2 , and OsP 2 are reported. For RuS 2 , RuSe 2 , RuTe 2 , OsS 2 , and PtP 2 all of the five infrared allowed modes (k = 0) are observed. As a first result of a numerical normal coordinate treatment vibration forms of pyrite structure are communicated. The spectra show that lattice forces of corresponding sulfides, tellurides, and phosphides are about the same strength, but increase strongly by substitution of iron by ruthenium and especially of ruthenium by osmium. The lattice constants of the RuSsub(2-x)Sesub(x) solid solution obey Vegard's rule. (author)

  6. Exotic superdeformed structure in A∼190 nuclei observed using Eurogam2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A.N.; Timar, J.; Bergstroem, M.; Paul, E.S.; Bouneau, S.; Azaiez, F.; Korichi, A.; Nakatsukasa, T.

    1995-01-01

    Dipole transitions between superdeformed rotational bands are only very rarely observed due to the competition from the very strong in-band E2 decays. We have carried out two experiments with the EUROGAM2 γ-ray spectrometer, situated at the Vivitron tandem accelerator at CRN Strasbourg, in September and October 1994. In the first experiment we observe M1 dipole transitions between the signature partner yrast superdeformed bands in 193 Tl. This measurement gives a mean value of (g K -g R ) K/Q o = 0.135 ± 0.010 μ N /eb identifying the bands as belonging to the (642)5/2 single particle orbital. We also observe 5 additional new superdeformed bands in 193 Tl, whose structures are discussed. In the second experiment we observe three transitions, at 911, 865 and 831 keV, which link an excited superdeformed band in 190 Hg to the yrast superdeformed band. The data suggest that these are stretched dipole transitions with E1 multipolarity and strengths of about 10 -3 Wu. This is the first observation of a collective vibration of the superdeformed mean field. We also observe two new superdeformed bands in 190 Hg. (authors). 39 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the SSC site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiltsev, V.D.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Weaver, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The results of underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the tunnel depth of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 1500 Hz is performed. It is found that amplitudes of ambient ground motion are less than requirements for the Collider, but cultural vibrations are unacceptably large and will cause fast growth of transverse emittance of the SSC beams

  8. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 12, Number 2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Structural Analysis lowest few frequencies are required and are more economical than frequency search methods if band- widths of the matrices are large...1973). Inst. Math. Applic., 22, pp 401.410 (1978). 77. Gupta, K.K., "Numerical Analysis of Free Vibrations of Damped Rotating Structures," 66. Pestel ...the program ,.J.G.S. ¢F1 EDITORS RATTLE SPACE DYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN At the 50th Shock and Vibration Symposium in October, Robert Hager presented

  9. Measurements of ground motion and SSC dipole vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.; Weaver, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The results of seismic ground measurements at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site and investigations of vibrational properties of superconducting dipoles for the SSC are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the large frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 2000 Hz is done. Resonant behavior and the dipole-to-ground transform ratio are investigated. The influence of measured vibrations on SSC operations is considered

  10. Rotational and vibrational synthetic spectra of linear parent molecules in comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.

    1987-01-01

    We evaluate and model the excitation conditions of linear parent molecules in cometary atmospheres. The model is valid for most linear molecules without electronic angular momentum. It takes into account collisions and infrared excitation. The molecule rotational population distribution is computed as a function of distance to nucleus. The line intensities of the strongest parallel and perpendicular fundamental vibrational bands, as well as the pure rotational lines, can then be evaluated. This model is applied to several candidate parent molecules, for observing conditions corresponding to available or planned instruments, either ground-based or aboard aircrafts, satellites or space probes

  11. Vibrational spectra and thermal rectification in three-dimensional anharmonic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Jinghua; Li Baowen

    2007-01-01

    We study thermal rectification in a three-dimensional model consisting of two segments of anharmonic lattices. One segment consists of layers of harmonic oscillator arrays coupled to a substrate potential, which is a three-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova model, and the other segment is a three-dimensional Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model. We study the vibrational bands of the two lattices analytically and numerically, and find that, by choosing the system parameters properly, the rectification can be as high as a few thousands, which is high enough to be observed in experiment. Possible experiments in nanostructures are discussed

  12. Vibrational spectra of cholorophylls a and b labeled with 26Mg and 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Kleo, J.; Gilet, R.; Henry, M.; Plus, R.; Leicknam, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    Chlorophyll molecules having their central natural magnesium replaced by 26 Mg and their natural nitrogens by 15 N were obtained by biosynthesis and examined by infrared and resonance Raman spectrometry. These observations provide unequivocal assignments of the molecular vibrational frequencies which involve the magnesium and nitrogen atoms. In particular, in both infrared and resonance Raman spectra, the absence of displacements in bands of frequency higher than 1550 cm -1 indicated the insignificant contributions of C=N stretching modes, which have maximum activity in the 1050 to 1180 cm -1 region. These results also indicate a configuration of chlorophyll in which the magnesium atom is not at a center of symmetry

  13. Vibrational properties of water molecules adsorbed in different zeolitic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crupi, V; Longo, F; Majolino, D; Venuti, V

    2006-01-01

    The perturbation of water 'sorbed' in samples of zeolites of different structural type, genesis, and cation composition (K-, Na-, Mg- and Ca-rich zeolites), namely the CHA framework of a synthetic K-chabazite, the LTA framework of synthetic Na-A and Mg50-A zeolites, and the NAT framework of a natural scolecite, has been studied by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, in the -10 to +80 o C temperature range. The aim was to show how differences in the chemical composition and/or in the topology of the zeolite framework and, in particular, the possibility for the guest water molecules to develop guest-guest and/or host-guest interactions, lead to substantial differences in their vibrational dynamical properties. The spectra, collected in the O-H stretching and H 2 O bending mode regions, are complex, with multiple bands being observed. As far as water in the CHA and LTA frameworks is concerned, whose behaviour is governed by the balance of water-water, water-framework and water-extra-framework cations interactions, the assignment of the resolved components of the O-H stretching band has been discussed by fitting the band shapes into individual components attributed to H 2 O molecules engaged in different degrees of hydrogen bonding. A detailed quantitative picture of the connectivity pattern of water, as a function of temperature and according to the chemical and topological properties of the environment, is furnished. The H 2 O bending vibrational bands give additional information that perfectly agrees with the results obtained from the analysis of the O-H stretching spectral region. In the case of scolecite, a small-pored zeolite where water-water interactions are eliminated, the increased complexity observed in the infrared spectra in the O-H stretching and H 2 O bending regions was explained as due to the hydrogen bonding between the water molecules and the network, and also with the extra-framework cation. Furthermore, these observations have been correlated with the different

  14. EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT OF HAND-TRANSMITTED VIBRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta MARKOVÁ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is the effect of vibrations on selected professionals through questionnaire survey and implementation of experimental vibration measurements on a hand of employee. The observation of vibration effects was chosen in a company, where products are being shaped with pneumatic instruments and there is a risk of an exposure of vibrations on the employees. In experimental part are described and evaluated questionnaire surveys conducted on selected risk factors. The reason is the realization of work with vibrating tools for a longer time, where some parts do wear-out and therefore there is a higher exposure to oscillation.

  15. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gredel, R.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles. 70 references

  16. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  17. Internal vibrations in molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in the understanding of the relative intensities of INS bands (polycrystalline samples) are described together with the observation of a fundamental transition at ca 380 MeV (C-H stretching mode) uncontaminated by overtone or combination bands. Recent work (>100 MeV) on strongly hydrogen bonded complexes (CrOHO and MFHF - ), which have high energy modes exhibiting significant dispersion, is also discussed

  18. Optical observations of the nearby galaxy IC342 with narrow band [SII] and hα filters. II - detection of 16 optically-identified supernova remnant candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučetić M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the detection of 16 optical supernova remnant (SNR candidates in the nearby spiral galaxy IC342. The candidates were detected by applying the [Sii]/Hα ratio criterion on observations made with the 2 m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper, we report the coordinates, diameters, Hα and [S ii] fluxes for 16 SNRs detected in two fields of view in the IC342 galaxy. Also, we estimate the contamination of total Hα flux from SNRs in the observed portion of IC342 to be 1.4%. This would represent the fractional error when the star formation rate (SFR for this galaxy is derived from the total galaxy’s Hα emission.

  19. Experimental chaos in nonlinear vibration isolation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jingjun; Zhu Shijian; He Lin; He Qiwei

    2009-01-01

    The chaotic vibration isolation method was studied thoroughly from an experimental perspective. The nonlinear load-deflection characteristic of the conical coil spring used in the experiment was surveyed. Chaos and subharmonic responses including period-2 and period-6 motions were observed. The line spectrum reduction and the drop of the acceleration vibration level in chaotic state and that in non-chaotic state were compared, respectively. It was concluded from the experiment that the nonlinear vibration isolation system in chaotic state has strong ability in line spectrum reduction.

  20. Transfer vibration through spine

    OpenAIRE

    Benyovszky, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Transfer Vibration through Spine Abstract In the bachelor project we deal with the topic of Transfer Vibration through Spine. The problem of TVS is trying to be solved by the critical review method. We analyse some diagnostic methods and methods of treatment based on this principle. Close attention is paid to the method of Transfer Vibration through Spine that is being currently solved by The Research Institute of Thermomechanics in The Czech Academy of Sciences in cooperation with Faculty of...

  1. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  2. Vibrations of bioionic liquids by ab initio molecular dynamics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Luana; Benassi, Paola; Nardone, Michele; Ramondo, Fabio

    2014-12-26

    Density functional theory and vibrational spectroscopy are used to investigate a class of bioionic liquids consisting of a choline cation and carboxylate anions. Through quantum mechanical studies of motionless ion pairs and molecular dynamics of small portions of the liquid, we have characterized important structural features of the ionic liquid. Hydrogen bonding produces stable ion pairs in the liquid and induces vibrational features of the carboxylate groups comparable with experimental results. Infrared and Raman spectra of liquids have been measured, and main bands have been assigned on the basis of theoretical spectra.

  3. Implausibility of the vibrational theory of olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Eric; Jang, Seogjoo; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Sekharan, Sivakumar; Dethier, Bérénice; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Gundala, Sivaji; Pan, Yi; Li, Shengju; Li, Zhen; Lodge, Stephene N; Ozbil, Mehmet; Jiang, Huihong; Penalba, Sonia F; Batista, Victor S; Zhuang, Hanyi

    2015-05-26

    The vibrational theory of olfaction assumes that electron transfer occurs across odorants at the active sites of odorant receptors (ORs), serving as a sensitive measure of odorant vibrational frequencies, ultimately leading to olfactory perception. A previous study reported that human subjects differentiated hydrogen/deuterium isotopomers (isomers with isotopic atoms) of the musk compound cyclopentadecanone as evidence supporting the theory. Here, we find no evidence for such differentiation at the molecular level. In fact, we find that the human musk-recognizing receptor, OR5AN1, identified using a heterologous OR expression system and robustly responding to cyclopentadecanone and muscone, fails to distinguish isotopomers of these compounds in vitro. Furthermore, the mouse (methylthio)methanethiol-recognizing receptor, MOR244-3, as well as other selected human and mouse ORs, responded similarly to normal, deuterated, and (13)C isotopomers of their respective ligands, paralleling our results with the musk receptor OR5AN1. These findings suggest that the proposed vibration theory does not apply to the human musk receptor OR5AN1, mouse thiol receptor MOR244-3, or other ORs examined. Also, contrary to the vibration theory predictions, muscone-d30 lacks the 1,380- to 1,550-cm(-1) IR bands claimed to be essential for musk odor. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis shows that the proposed electron transfer mechanism of the vibrational frequencies of odorants could be easily suppressed by quantum effects of nonodorant molecular vibrational modes. These and other concerns about electron transfer at ORs, together with our extensive experimental data, argue against the plausibility of the vibration theory.

  4. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, M.V.; Greenberg, R.; Dermott, S.F.; Nicholson, P.D.; Burns, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations. 32 refs

  5. The 3 micron ice band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.; Bult, C.E.P.M. van de

    1984-01-01

    Ever since it was proposed that H 2 O could be a dominant constituent of interstellar grains, its detection, or lack thereof, has played a large role in theories of grains and their evolution. It now appears possible to provide a basic theoretical structure for the evolution of grains in molecular clouds based on current observational evidence and laboratory experiments on the ice band. Both band strengths and shapes can be reasonably predicted by grain models. (U.K.)

  6. TIME-RESOLVED EMISSION FROM BRIGHT HOT PIXELS OF AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED IN THE EUV BAND WITH SDO/AIA AND MULTI-STRANDED LOOP MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajfirouze, E.; Reale, F.; Petralia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 (Italy); Testa, P., E-mail: aastex-help@aas.org [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of small amounts of very hot plasma has been found in active regions and might be an indication of impulsive heating released at spatial scales smaller than the cross-section of a single loop. We investigate the heating and substructure of coronal loops in the core of one such active region by analyzing the light curves in the smallest resolution elements of solar observations in two EUV channels (94 and 335 Å) from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We model the evolution of a bundle of strands heated by a storm of nanoflares by means of a hydrodynamic 0D loop model (EBTEL). The light curves obtained from a random combination of those of single strands are compared to the observed light curves either in a single pixel or in a row of pixels, simultaneously in the two channels, and using two independent methods: an artificial intelligent system (Probabilistic Neural Network) and a simple cross-correlation technique. We explore the space of the parameters to constrain the distribution of the heat pulses, their duration, their spatial size, and, as a feedback on the data, their signatures on the light curves. From both methods the best agreement is obtained for a relatively large population of events (1000) with a short duration (less than 1 minute) and a relatively shallow distribution (power law with index 1.5) in a limited energy range (1.5 decades). The feedback on the data indicates that bumps in the light curves, especially in the 94 Å channel, are signatures of a heating excess that occurred a few minutes before.

  7. Broadband characteristics of vibration energy harvesting using one-dimensional phononic piezoelectric cantilever beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhongsheng; Yang Yongmin; Lu Zhimiao; Luo Yanting

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays broadband vibration energy harvesting using piezoelectric effect has become a research hotspot. The innovation in this paper is the widening of the resonant bandwidth of a piezoelectric harvester based on phononic band gaps, which is called one-dimensional phononic piezoelectric cantilever beams (PPCBs). Broadband characteristics of one-dimensional PPCBs are analyzed deeply and the vibration band gap can be calculated. The effects of different parameters on the vibration band gap are presented by both numerical and finite element simulations. Finally experimental tests are conducted to validate the proposed method. It can be concluded that it is feasible to use the PPCB for broadband vibration energy harvesting and there should be a compromise among related parameters for low-frequency vibrations.

  8. Broadband characteristics of vibration energy harvesting using one-dimensional phononic piezoelectric cantilever beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhongsheng, E-mail: czs_study@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, College of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); Yang Yongmin; Lu Zhimiao; Luo Yanting [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, College of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2013-02-01

    Nowadays broadband vibration energy harvesting using piezoelectric effect has become a research hotspot. The innovation in this paper is the widening of the resonant bandwidth of a piezoelectric harvester based on phononic band gaps, which is called one-dimensional phononic piezoelectric cantilever beams (PPCBs). Broadband characteristics of one-dimensional PPCBs are analyzed deeply and the vibration band gap can be calculated. The effects of different parameters on the vibration band gap are presented by both numerical and finite element simulations. Finally experimental tests are conducted to validate the proposed method. It can be concluded that it is feasible to use the PPCB for broadband vibration energy harvesting and there should be a compromise among related parameters for low-frequency vibrations.

  9. Bevel Gearbox Fault Diagnosis using Vibration Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of vibration measurementanalysis has been proven to be effective for gearbox fault diagnosis. However, the complexity of vibration signals observed from a gearbox makes it difficult to accurately detectfaults in the gearbox. This work is based on a comparative studyof several time-frequency signal processing methods that can be used to extract information from transient vibration signals containing useful diagnostic information. Experiments were performed on a bevel gearbox test rig using vibration measurements obtained from accelerometers. Initially, thediscrete wavelet transform was implementedfor vibration signal analysis to extract the frequency content of signal from the relevant frequency region. Several time-frequency signal processing methods werethen incorporated to extract the fault features of vibration signals and their diagnostic performances were compared. It was shown thatthe Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT could not offer a good time resolution to detect the periodicity of the faulty gear tooth due the difficulty in choosing an appropriate window length to capture the impulse signal. The Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT, on the other hand, was suitable to detection of vibration transients generated by localized fault from a gearbox due to its multi-scale property. However, both methods still require a thorough visual inspection. In contrast, it was shown from the experiments that the diagnostic method using the Cepstrumanalysis could provide a direct indication of the faulty tooth without the need of a thorough visual inspection as required by CWT and STFT.

  10. Dependence of steam generator vibrations on feedwater pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadilek, J.

    1989-01-01

    Vibration sensors are attached to the bottom of the steam generator jacket between the input and output primary circuit collectors. The effective vibration value is recorded daily. Several times higher vibrations were observed at irregular intervals; their causes were sought, and the relation between the steam generator vibrations measured at the bottom of its vessel and the feedwater pressure was established. The source of the vibrations was found to be in the feedwater tract of the steam generator. The feedwater tract is described and its hydraulic characteristics are given. Vibrations were measured on the S02 valve. It is concluded that vibrations can be eliminated by reducing the water pressure before the control valves and by replacing the control valves with ones with more suitable control characteristics. (E.J.). 3 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  11. Flow induced vibrations of piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Axisa, F.

    1977-01-01

    In order to design the supports of piping systems, estimations of the vibrations induced by the fluid conveyed through the pipes are generally needed. For that purpose it is necessary to calculate the model parameters of liquid containing pipes. In most computer codes, fluid effects are accounted for just by adding the fluid mass to the structure. This may lead to serious errors. This paper presents a method to take into account these effects, by solving a coupled mechanical-acoustical problem: the computer code TEDEL of the C.E.A /D.E.M.T. System, based on the finite-elements method, has been extended to calculate simultaneously the pressure fluctuations in the fluid and the vibrations of the pipe. By this way the mechanical-acoustical coupled eigenmodes of any piping system can be obtained. These eigenmodes are used to determine the response of the system to various sources. Equations have been written in the hypohesis that acoustical wave lengths remain large compared to the diameter of the pipe. The method has been checked by an experiment performed on the GASCOGNE loop at D.E.M.T. The piping system under test consists of a tube with four elbows. The circuit is ended at each extremity by a large vessel which performs acoustical isolation by generating modes for the pressure. Excitation of the circuit is caused by a valve located near the downstream vessel. This provides an efficient localised broad band acoustical source. The comparison between the test results and the calculations has shown that the low frequency resonant characteristics of the pipe and the vibrational amplitude at various flow-rates can be correctly predicted

  12. Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, sinusoidal vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lalanne, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Everything engineers need to know about mechanical vibration and shock...in one authoritative reference work! This fully updated and revised 3rd edition addresses the entire field of mechanical vibration and shock as one of the most important types of load and stress applied to structures, machines and components in the real world. Examples include everything from the regular and predictable loads applied to turbines, motors or helicopters by the spinning of their constituent parts to the ability of buildings to withstand damage from wind loads or explosions, and the need for cars to m

  13. Hydroelastic Vibrations of Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Folsø, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    A formula for the necessary hull girder bending stiffness required to avoid serious springing vibrations is derived. The expression takes into account the zero crossing period of the waves, the ship speed and main dimensions. For whipping vibrations the probability of exceedance for the combined...

  14. Surface vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erskine, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review of recent studies which combine measurements of surface vibrational energies with lattice dynamical calculations is presented. These results suggest that surface vibrational spectroscopy offers interesting prospects for use as a molecular-level probe of surface geometry, adsorbate bond distances and molecular orientations

  15. Gearbox vibration diagnostic analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Gearbox Vibration Diagnostic Analyzer installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 500 HP Helicopter Transmission Test Stand to monitor gearbox testing. The vibration of the gearbox is analyzed using diagnostic algorithms to calculate a parameter indicating damaged components.

  16. Hole-vibrational coupling in Pentacene thin films detected by UPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamame, H.; Fukagawa, H.; Honda, H.; Ono, M.; Okudaira, K.K.; Ueno, N.; Kera, S.; Ishii, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text:The hole/electron-vibrational coupling plays a crucial rule in the hole/electron transport in organic devices. In this work, fine structure of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) band in oriented thin films of pentacene on graphite (HOPG) was studied by using high-resolution ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Figure 1 shows the comparison of UPS spectra between pentacene thin films (circles) and gas-phase pentacene (dashed line). We observed a very sharp HOMO band, which consists of at least three components, as observed for Cu-phthalocyanine monolayer on HOPG. It is of note that the relative intensities of fine structures are different between the condensed phase and gas phase, while their energy separations are the same for the two phases (∼ 0.17 eV / 1400 cm -1 ). Furthermore, the relative intensity of fine structures showed remarkable dependence on photoelectron-take-off angle. Judging from these results, the observed fine structures in UPS originate from the hole-vibrational (molecular C-C stretching) coupling in pentacene thin films. At the conference, temperature and thickness dependences of UPS will be discussed

  17. Handbook Of Noise And Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This book is about noise and vibration. The first chapter has explanations of noise such as basic of sound, influence of noise, assessment of noise, measurement of prevention of noise and technology, case of noise measurement and soundproof. The second chapter describes vibration with outline, theory of vibration, interpretation of vibration, measurement for reduction of vibration, case of design of protection against vibration. It deals with related regulation and method of measurement.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic and quantum theoretical study of host-guest interactions in clathrates: I. Hofmann type clathrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR M. PETRUSEVSKI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Hofmann type clatharates are host-guest compounds with the general formula M(NH32M'(CN4·2G, in which M(NH32M'(CN4 is the host lattice and G is benzene, the guest molecule. In previous studies, host-guest interactions have been investigated by analyzing the RT and LNT vibrational (infrared, far infrared and Raman spectra of these clathrates. All the observed changes in the vibrational spectra of these clathrates are referred to a host-guest interaction originating from weak hydrogen bonding between the ammonia hydrogen atoms from the host lattice and the p electron cloud of the guest (benzene molecules. In order to obtain an insight into the relative importance of the local crystalline field vs. the anharmonicity effects on the spectroscopic properties of the guest species upon enclathration, as well as to explain the observed band shifts and splittings, several quantum theoretical approaches are proposed.

  19. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirali, O.; Gruet, S.; Kisiel, Z.; Goubet, M.; Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C 9 H 7 N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν 45 and ν 44 vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm −1 and 178 cm −1 , respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations

  20. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirali, O.; Kisiel, Z.; Goubet, M.; Gruet, S.; Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C9H7N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν45 and ν44 vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm-1 and 178 cm-1, respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations.

  1. Vibration insensitive interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millerd, James; Brock, Neal; Hayes, John; Kimbrough, Brad; North-Morris, Michael; Wyant, James C.

    2017-11-01

    The largest limitation of phase-shifting interferometry for optical testing is the sensitivity to the environment, both vibration and air turbulence. An interferometer using temporal phase-shifting is very sensitive to vibration because the various phase shifted frames of interferometric data are taken at different times and vibration causes the phase shifts between the data frames to be different from what is desired. Vibration effects can be reduced by taking all the phase shifted frames simultaneously and turbulence effects can be reduced by averaging many measurements. There are several techniques for simultaneously obtaining several phase-shifted interferograms and this paper will discuss two such techniques: 1) Simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry on a single detector array (PhaseCam) and 2) Micropolarizer phase-shifting array. The application of these techniques for the testing of large optical components, measurement of vibrational modes, the phasing of segmented optical components, and the measurement of deformations of large diffuse structures is described.

  2. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  3. A Small Fullerene (C{sub 24}) may be the Carrier of the 11.2 μ m Unidentified Infrared Band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, L. S.; Shroll, R. M. [Spectral Sciences, Inc., 4 Fourth Ave., Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Lynch, D. K. [Thule Scientific, P.O. Box 953, Topanga, CA 90290 (United States); Clark, F. O., E-mail: larry@spectral.com, E-mail: rshroll@spectral.com, E-mail: dave@caltech.edu, E-mail: frank.clark@gmail.com [Wopeco Research, 125 South Great Road, Lincoln, MA 01773 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    We analyze the spectrum of the 11.2 μ m unidentified infrared band (UIR) from NGC 7027 and identify a small fullerene (C{sub 24}) as a plausible carrier. The blurring effects of lifetime and vibrational anharmonicity broadening obscure the narrower, intrinsic spectral profiles of the UIR band carriers. We use a spectral deconvolution algorithm to remove the blurring, in order to retrieve the intrinsic profile of the UIR band. The shape of the intrinsic profile—a sharp blue peak and an extended red tail—suggests that the UIR band originates from a molecular vibration–rotation band with a blue band head. The fractional area of the band-head feature indicates a spheroidal molecule, implying a nonpolar molecule and precluding rotational emission. Its rotational temperature should be well approximated by that measured for nonpolar molecular hydrogen, ∼825 K for NGC 7027. Using this temperature, and the inferred spherical symmetry, we perform a spectral fit to the intrinsic profile, which results in a rotational constant implying C{sub 24} as the carrier. We show that the spectroscopic parameters derived for NGC 7027 are consistent with the 11.2 μ m UIR bands observed for other objects. We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the frequencies and infrared intensities of C{sub 24}. The DFT results are used to predict a spectral energy distribution (SED) originating from absorption of a 5 eV photon, and characterized by an effective vibrational temperature of 930 K. The C{sub 24} SED is consistent with the entire UIR spectrum and is the dominant contributor to the 11.2 and 12.7 μ m bands.

  4. Transition dipole-moment of the ν1 +ν3 band of acetylene measured with dual-comb Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Sho; Iwakuni, Kana; Yamada, Koichi M. T.; Inaba, Hajime; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    The ν1 +ν3 vibration band of acetylene (C2H2) in the near infrared region was recorded with a dual-comb Fourier-transform spectrometer. We observed 56 transitions from P (26) to R (29) at six different column densities. The integral line intensity was determined for each recorded absorption line by fitting the line profile to Lambert-Beer's law with a Voigt function. Thanks to the outstanding capability of dual-comb spectroscopy to cover a broad spectrum in a relatively short time with high resolution and high frequency precision, we determined the reliable line strength for each ro-vibrational transition as well as the transition dipole moment for this band.

  5. Response of APS storage ring basemat to ambient vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1992-08-01

    The storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility at Argonne is very sensitive to vibration. Large vibration amplitudes would result in degraded machine performance. Because the storage ring assembly is supported on the storage ring basemat, the dynamics of the basemat are critical to successful operation. Before construction began, a survey of site ground vibration indicated that the site was acceptable from a vibration standpoint. When construction of the linear accelerator (Linac) floor slab and shielding walls was completed, dynamic-response measurements were conducted. The slab/wall system showed attenuation of soilborne vibrations in the horizontal directions, but an amplification (approximately a factor of 1.5) of vertical vibration at a frequency of 7.7 Hz. Vibration response of the slab/wall system at all other frequencies showed attenuation of soilborne vibrations. Dynamic-response measurements were also conducted on an incomplete section of the storage ring basemat. Although this section was not prototypical, results were similar to those of the Linac floor in the horizontal direction, showing large damping and attenuation of horizontal soilborne vibrations. While the basemat followed the soil vibration in the vertical direction, no large amplification was observed. However, measured vertical amplitudes on the basemat were a function of location, indicating a modal response. A series of vibration response measurements was conducted on a completed section of the storage ring basemat/tunnel adjacent and to the west of the Early Assembly Area (EAA) on May 21, 1992, and is the subject of this report

  6. Adaptive active vibration isolation – A control perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landau Ioan Doré

    2015-01-01

    The paper will review a number of recent developments for adaptive feedback compensation of multiple unknown and time-varying narrow band disturbances and for adaptive feedforward compensation of broad band disturbances in the presence of the inherent internal positive feedback caused by the coupling between the compensator system and the measurement of the image of the disturbance. Some experimental results obtained on a relevant active vibration control system will illustrate the performance of the various algorithms presented.

  7. OD bands in the IR spectra of a deuterated soda-lime-silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuker, C.; Brzezinka, K.W.; Gaber, M.; Kohl, A.; Geissler, H. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    IR spectra of a deuterated glass of the composition (in mol%) 16 Na{sub 2}O . 10 CaO . 74 SiO{sub 2} complete earlier spectroscopic studies on water-poor soda-lime-silica glasses. The approved IR spectroscopic method of the deuterium exchange allows a reliable assignment of the hydroxyl bands also in the case of glasses. By spectra comparison the assignment of the IR bands at 3500 and 2800 cm{sup -1} to hydroxyl groups with different hydrogen bonding is verified. The IR band at about 4500 cm{sup -1} is interpreted as both a combination of the stretching vibrations {nu}O-H and {nu}Si-OH and a combination of the stretching vibration {nu}O-H and the deformation vibration {delta}SiOH. The bands at 1763 and 1602 cm{sup -1} are attributed to combination vibrations of the glass network. (orig.)

  8. Vibrational analysis of Fourier transform spectrum of the B u )–X g ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    improved by putting the wave number of band origins in Deslandre table. The vibrational analysis was supported by determining the Franck–Condon factor and r-centroid values. Keywords. Fourier transform spectroscopy; electronic spectrum of selenium dimer; vibrational analysis; Franck–Condon factor; r-centroid values.

  9. Vibrational analysis of Fourier transform spectrum of the B 3− u (0

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... microwave, was recorded on BOMEM DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer at an apodized resolution of 0.035 cm-1. Vibrational constants were improved by putting the wave number of band origins in Deslandre table. The vibrational analysis was supported by determining the Franck–Condon factor and -centroid values.

  10. Infrared spectrum of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO at resolution 0.25 cm−1 and new assignments of bands 2ν9 and ν5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-01-01

    The simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO is important in atmospheric chemistry. It has been detected in the reaction of CH 2 I + O 2 with various spectral methods, including infrared spectroscopy; infrared absorption of CH 2 OO was recorded at resolution 1.0 cm −1 in our laboratory. We have improved our system and recorded the infrared spectrum of CH 2 OO at resolution 0.25 cm −1 with rotational structures partially resolved. Observed vibrational wavenumbers and relative intensities are improved from those of the previous report and agree well with those predicted with quantum-mechanical calculations using the MULTIMODE method on an accurate potential energy surface. Observed rotational structures also agree with the simulated spectra according to theoretical predictions. In addition to derivation of critical vibrational and rotational parameters of the vibrationally excited states to confirm the assignments, the spectrum with improved resolution provides new assignments for bands 2ν 9 at 1234.2 cm −1 and ν 5 at 1213.3 cm −1 ; some hot bands and combination bands are also tentatively assigned

  11. Vibrational polarizabilities of hydrogen-bonded water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vibrational polarizabilities of hydrogen-bonded water are analyzed theoretically. ► Total vibrational polarizability is (at least) comparable to the electronic one. ► Molecular translations contribute to the vibrational polarizability below 300 cm −1 . ► Intermolecular charge fluxes along H bonds are induced by molecular translations. ► The results are discussed in relation to the observed dielectric properties. - Abstract: The vibrational polarizabilities and the related molecular properties of hydrogen-bonded water are analyzed theoretically, taking the case of (water) 30 clusters as an example case. It is shown that some off-diagonal dipole derivatives are large for the translations of incompletely hydrogen-bonded molecules, and this is reasonably explained by the scheme of intermolecular charge fluxes induced along hydrogen bonds. In total, because of these intermolecular charge fluxes, molecular translations give rise to the vibrational polarizability of 2.8–3.3 a 0 3 per molecule, which is as large as about 40% of the electronic polarizability, mainly in the frequency region below 300 cm −1 . Adding the contributions of the molecular rotations (librations) and the translation–rotation cross term, the total polarizability (electronic + vibrational) at ∼100 cm −1 is slightly larger than the double of that at >4000 cm −1 . The relation of these results to some observed time- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of liquid water is briefly discussed

  12. The vibration compensation system for ARGOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, D.; Gaessler, W.; Borelli, J.; Kulas, M.

    2011-09-01

    For every adaptive optics system telescope vibrations can strongly reduce the performance. This is true for the receiver part of the system i.e. the telescope and wave front sensor part as well as for the transmitter part in the case of a laser guide star system. Especially observations in deep fields observed with a laser guide star system without any tip-tilt star will be greatly spoiled by telescope vibrations. The ARGOS GLAO system actually being built for the LBT aims to implement this kind of mode where wave front correction will rely purely on signals from the laser beacons. To remove the vibrations from the uplink path a vibration compensation system will be installed. This system uses accelerometers to measure the vibrations and corrects their effect with a small fast tip-tilt mirror. The controller of the system is built based on the assumption that the vibrations take place at a few distinct frequencies. Here I present a lab set-up of this system and show first results of the performance.

  13. Effect of low-frequency vibrations on speckle interferometry fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, C.S.; Pechersky, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of low-frequency vibrations on speckle correlation fringes have been investigated. The relatively short capture time of the camera in the low-frequency case may yield usable fringe contrast in spite of vibration. It has been shown that the fringes also shift due to the vibration. The study is in agreement with experimental observations of good-contrast correlation fringes even if the object is not on a vibration-isolated table. Some such experimental observations are also presented. copyright 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  14. Studies of interstellar vibrationally-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Snell, R.L.; Erickson, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Several molecules thus far have been detected in the ISM in vibrationally-excited states, including H 2 , SiO, HC 3 N, and CH 3 CN. In order for vibrational-excitation to occur, these species must be present in unusually hot and dense gas and/or where strong infrared radiation is present. In order to do a more thorough investigation of vibrational excitation in the interstellar medium (ISM), studies were done of several mm-wave transitions originating in excited vibrational modes of HCN, an abundant interstellar molecule. Vibrationally-excited HCN was recently detected toward Orion-KL and IRC+10216, using a 12 meter antenna. The J=3-2 rotational transitions were detected in the molecule's lowest vibrational state, the bending mode, which is split into two separate levels, due to l-type doubling. This bending mode lies 1025K above ground state, with an Einstein A coefficient of 3.6/s. The J=3-2 line mode of HCN, which lies 2050K above ground state, was also observed toward IRC+10216, and subsequently in Orion-KL. Further measurements of vibrationally-excited HCN were done using a 14 meter telescope, which include the observations of the (0,1,0) and (0,2,0) modes towards Orion-KL, via their J=3-2 transitions at 265-267 GHz. The spectrum of the J=3-2 line in Orion taken with the 14 meter telescope, is shown, along with a map, which indicates that emission from vibrationally-excited HCN arises from a region probably smaller than the 14 meter telescope's 20 arcsec beam

  15. Simultaneous microwave photonic and phononic band gaps in piezoelectric–piezomagnetic superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zheng-hua [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Jiang, Zheng-Sheng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Tao [Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lei, Da-Jun [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Yan, Wen-Yan, E-mail: yanwenyan88@126.com [School of Software and Communication Engineering, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Qiu, Feng; Huang, Jian-Quan; Deng, Hai-Ming; Yao, Min [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China)

    2016-04-29

    A novel phoxonic crystal using the piezoelectric (PMN-PT) and piezomagnetic (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell (PPSUC) is present, in which dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can be obtained simultaneously. Two categories of phononic band gaps, originating from both the Bragg scattering of acoustic waves in periodic structures at the Brillouin zone boundary and the electromagnetic wave-lattice vibration couplings near the Brillouin zone center, can be observed in the phononic band structures. The general characteristics of the microwave photonic band structures are similar to those of pure piezoelectric or piezomagnetic superlattices, with the major discrepancy being the appearance of nearly dispersionless branches within the microwave photonic band gaps, which show an extremely large group velocity delay. Thus, the properties may also be applied to compact acoustic-microwave devices. - Highlights: • Dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can coexist in the PPSUC. • Two categories of phononic band gaps with different mechanism can be obtained. • Nearly dispersionless branches appear in the microwave photonic band gaps.

  16. Silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ralf

    1997-09-01

    This work gives an overview of silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes. Market perspectives and fields of application are pointed out. The advantage of using silicon micromachining is discussed and estimations of the desired performance, especially for automobiles are given. The general principle of vibrating gyroscopes is explained. Vibrating silicon gyroscopes can be divided into seven classes. for each class the characteristic principle is presented and examples are given. Finally a specific sensor, based on a tuning fork for automotive applications with a sensitivity of 250(mu) V/degrees is described in detail.

  17. System Detects Vibrational Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Sustained vibrations at two critical frequencies trigger diagnostic response or shutdown. Vibration-analyzing electronic system detects instabilities of combustion in rocket engine. Controls pulse-mode firing of engine and identifies vibrations above threshold amplitude at 5.9 and/or 12kHz. Adapted to other detection and/or control schemes involving simultaneous real-time detection of signals above or below preset amplitudes at two or more specified frequencies. Potential applications include rotating machinery and encoders and decoders in security systems.

  18. Coherent vibrational dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful investigation tool for a wide class of materials covering diverse areas in physics, chemistry and biology. The continuous development in the laser field regarding ultrashort pulse generation has led to the possibility of producing light pulses that can follow vibrational motion coupled to the electronic transitions in molecules and solids in real time. Aimed at researchers and graduate students using vibrational spectroscopy, this book provides both introductory chapters as well as more advanced contents reporting on recent progress. It also provides a good starting point for scientists seeking a sound introduction to ultrafast optics and spectroscopic techniques.

  19. High resolution emission Fourier transform infrared spectra of the 4p-5s and 5p-6s bands of ArH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskakov, O I; Civis, S; Kawaguchi, K

    2005-03-15

    In the 2500-8500 cm(-1) region several strong emission bands of (40)ArH were observed by Fourier transform spectroscopy through a dc glow discharge in a mixture of argon and hydrogen. Rotational-electronic transitions of the two previously unstudied 4p-5s and 5p-6s,v = 0-0, bands of (40)ArH were measured and assigned in the 6060 and 3770 cm(-1) regions, respectively. A simultaneous fit of the emission transitions of the 4p-5s and 5p-6s bands and an extended set of transitions of the 6s-4p band observed by Dabrowski, Tokaryk, and Watson [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 189, 95 (1998)] and remeasured in the present work yielded consistent values of the spectroscopic parameters of the electronic states under investigation. In the branch of the 4p-5s band with transitions of type (Q)Q(f(3)e) we observed a narrowing in the linewidths with increasing rotational quantum number N. The rotational dependence of the linewidth is caused by predissociation of the 5s state by the repulsive ground 4s state through homogeneous coupling and changes in overlap integrals of the vibrational wave functions with the rotational level. Analysis was based on the Fermi's golden rule approximation model. In the 4p-5s band region a vibrational sequence ofv(')-v(")=1-1, 2-2, and 3-3 were recorded and a number of transitions belonging to the strongest (Q)Q(f(3)e) form branch of the 1-1 band were analyzed.

  20. Vibration analysis of a hydro generator for different operating regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haţiegan, C.; Pădureanu, I.; Jurcu, M.; Nedeloni, M. D.; Hamat, C. O.; Chioncel, C. P.; Trocaru, S.; Vasile, O.; Bădescu, O.; Micliuc, D.; (Filip Nedeloni, L.; Băra, A.; (Barboni Haţiegan, L.

    2017-01-01

    Based on experimental measurements, this paper presents the vibration analysis of a hydro generator that equips a Kaplan hydraulic turbine of a Hydropower plant in Romania. This analysis means vibrations measurement to different operating regimes of the hydro generator respectively before installing it and into operation, namely putting off load mode (unexcited and excited) respectively putting on load mode. By comparing, through the experimental results obtained before and after the operation of hydro aggregates are observed vibrations improvements.

  1. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 15, Number 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    three revolute clearances is analyzed to illustrate the procedure. STRINGS AND ROPES 83-1574 Longitudinal Vibrations in Violin Strings A.R, Lee and...Strings, Violins , Mutical instruments. Longi- tudinal vibration The observation of longitudinal vibrations In violin strings excited by bowing it...few existing exam - ples is encouraging but inconclusive. Better overall agreement is demonstrated with fairly comprehensive measurements from a

  2. Intruder bands in Z = 51 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFosse, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Recent investigations of h 11/2 proton intruder bands in odd 51 Sb nuclei are reported. In addition to experiments performed at SUNY Stony Brook and Chalk River, data from Early Implementation of GAMMASPHERE (analysis in progress) are presented. In particular, the nuclei 109 Sb and 111 Sb are discussed. Rotational bands based on the πh 11/2 orbital coupled to a 2p2h deformed state of the 50 Sn core have been observed. These bands have been observed to high spin, and in the case of 109 Sb to a rotational frequency of 1.4 MeV, the highest frequency observed in a heavy nucleus. The dynamic moments of inertia in these bands decrease slowly with frequency, suggesting a gradual band termination. The systematics of such bands in 109-119 Sb will be discussed

  3. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  4. CO 2 laser photoacoustic spectra and vibrational modes of heroin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heroin, morphine and narcotine are very large molecules having 50, 40 and 53 atoms respectively. Moderately high resolution photoacoustic (PA) spectra have been recorded in 9.6 m and 10.6 m regions of CO2 laser. It is very difficult to assign the modes of vibrations for PA bands by comparison with conventional low ...

  5. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 4th edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration th...... theory is unchanged in comparison to the 3rd edition. Only a few errors have been corrected.......The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 4th edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration...

  6. Improved Laser Vibration Radar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilaire, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    .... This thesis reconfigured an existing CO2 laboratory laser radar system that is capable of measuring the frequencies of vibration of a simulated target into a more compact and rugged form for field testing...

  7. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S.; S.C. Sommer

    1999-01-01

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B

  8. A vibration sieve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S.A.; Denisenko, V.V.; Dzhalalov, M.G.; Kirichek, F.P.; Pitatel, Yu.A.; Prokopov, L.I.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1982-01-01

    A vibration sieve is proposed which includes a vibration drive, a body and a screen installed on shock absorbers, a device for washing out the screen, and a subassembly for loading the material. To increase the operational reliability and effectiveness of the vibration sieve by improving the cleaning of the screen, the loading subassembly is equipped with a baffle with a lever which is hinged to it. The device for washing out the screen is made in the form of an electromagnet with a connecting rod, a switch and an eccentric, a friction ratchet mechanism and sprinkling systems. Here, the latter are interconnected, using a connecting rod, while the sprinkling system is installed on rollers under the screen. The electromagnetic switch is installed under the lever. The body is made with grooves for installing the sprinkling system. The vibration sieve is equipped with a switch which interacts with the connecting rod. The friction ratchet mechanism is equipped with a lug.

  9. Atomic-Monolayer MoS2 Band-to-Band Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Yann Wen

    2016-09-05

    The experimental observation of band-to-band tunneling in novel tunneling field-effect transistors utilizing a monolayer of MoS2 as the conducting channel is demonstrated. Our results indicate that the strong gate-coupling efficiency enabled by two-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2, results in the direct manifestation of a band-to-band tunneling current and an ambipolar transport.

  10. Analysis of musle fatigue induced by isometric vibration exercise at varying frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mischi, M.; Rabotti, C.; Cardinale, M. (Marco)

    2012-01-01

    An increase in neuromuscular activity, measured by electromyography (EMG), is usually observed during vibration exercise. The underlying mechanisms are however unclear, limiting the possibilities to introduce and exploit vibration training in rehabilitation programs. In this study, a new training

  11. L-band brightness temperature disaggregation for use with S-band and C-band radiometer data for WCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, P.; Shi, J.; Zhao, T.; Cosh, M. H.; Bindlish, R.

    2017-12-01

    There are two passive microwave sensors onboard the Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM), which includes a synthetic aperture radiometer operating at L-S-C bands and a scanning microwave radiometer operating from C- to W-bands. It provides a unique opportunity to disaggregate L-band brightness temperature (soil moisture) with S-band C-bands radiometer data. In this study, passive-only downscaling methodologies are developed and evaluated. Based on the radiative transfer modeling, it was found that the TBs (brightness temperature) between the L-band and S-band exhibit a linear relationship, and there is an exponential relationship between L-band and C-band. We carried out the downscaling results by two methods: (1) downscaling with L-S-C band passive measurements with the same incidence angle from payload IMI; (2) downscaling with L-C band passive measurements with different incidence angle from payloads IMI and PMI. The downscaling method with L-S bands with the same incident angle was first evaluated using SMEX02 data. The RMSE are 2.69 K and 1.52 K for H and V polarization respectively. The downscaling method with L-C bands is developed with different incident angles using SMEX03 data. The RMSE are 2.97 K and 2.68 K for H and V polarization respectively. These results showed that high-resolution L-band brightness temperature and soil moisture products could be generated from the future WCOM passive-only observations.

  12. Power flow prediction in vibrating systems via model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianhui

    This dissertation focuses on power flow prediction in vibrating systems. Reduced order models (ROMs) are built based on rational Krylov model reduction which preserve power flow information in the original systems over a specified frequency band. Stiffness and mass matrices of the ROMs are obtained by projecting the original system matrices onto the subspaces spanned by forced responses. A matrix-free algorithm is designed to construct ROMs directly from the power quantities at selected interpolation frequencies. Strategies for parallel implementation of the algorithm via message passing interface are proposed. The quality of ROMs is iteratively refined according to the error estimate based on residual norms. Band capacity is proposed to provide a priori estimate of the sizes of good quality ROMs. Frequency averaging is recast as ensemble averaging and Cauchy distribution is used to simplify the computation. Besides model reduction for deterministic systems, details of constructing ROMs for parametric and nonparametric random systems are also presented. Case studies have been conducted on testbeds from Harwell-Boeing collections. Input and coupling power flow are computed for the original systems and the ROMs. Good agreement is observed in all cases.

  13. Behavior of Cell on Vibrating Micro Ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of micro ridges on cells cultured at a vibrating scaffold has been studied in vitro. Several parallel lines of micro ridges have been made on a disk of transparent polydimethylsiloxane for a scaffold. To apply the vibration on the cultured cells, a piezoelectric element was attached on the outside surface of the bottom of the scaffold. The piezoelectric element was vibrated by the sinusoidal alternating voltage (Vp-p < 16 V at 1.0 MHz generated by a function generator. Four kinds of cells were used in the test: L929 (fibroblast connective tissue of C3H mouse, Hepa1-6 (mouse hepatoma, C2C12 (mouse myoblast, 3T3-L1 (mouse fat precursor cells. The cells were seeded on the micro pattern at the density of 2000 cells/cm2 in the medium containing 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin/ streptomycin. After the adhesion of cells in several hours, the cells are exposed to the ultrasonic vibration for several hours. The cells were observed with a phase contrast microscope. The experimental results show that the cells adhere, deform and migrate on the scaffold with micro patterns regardless of the ultrasonic vibration. The effects of the vibration and the micro pattern depend on the kind of cells.

  14. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author at the Uni...... and their derivation, thus stimulating them to write interactive and dynamic programs to analyze instability and vibrational modes....

  15. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  16. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lower...

  17. Low frequency torsional vibration gaps in the shaft with locally resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Wang Gang; Cai Li; Qiu Jing

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of torsional wave in the shaft with periodically attached local resonators is studied with the transfer matrix theory and the finite element method. The analytical dispersion relation and the complex band structure of such a structure is presented for the first time, which indicates the existence of low frequency gaps. The effect of shaft material on the vibration attenuation in band gap is investigated. The frequency response function of the shaft with finite periodic locally resonant oscillators is simulated with finite element method, which shows large vibration attenuation in the frequency range of the gap as expected. The low frequency torsional gap in shafts provides a new idea for vibration control

  18. THE POSSIBLE INTERSTELLAR ANION CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}: SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS, VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES, AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Crawford, T. Daniel, E-mail: Ryan.C.Fortenberry@nasa.gov, E-mail: Timothy.J.Lee@nasa.gov [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    The A {sup 1}B{sub 1} Leftwards-Open-Headed-Arrow X-tilde{sup 1}A' excitation into the dipole-bound state of the cyanomethyl anion (CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}) has been hypothesized as the carrier for one diffuse interstellar band. However, this particular molecular system has not been detected in the interstellar medium even though the related cyanomethyl radical and the isoelectronic ketenimine molecule have been found. In this study, we are employing the use of proven quartic force fields and second-order vibrational perturbation theory to compute accurate spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies for X-tilde{sup 1} A' CH{sub 2}CN{sup -} in order to assist in laboratory studies and astronomical observations.

  19. Quantum vibrational polarons: Crystalline acetanilide revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Peter; Edler, Julian

    2006-03-01

    We discuss a refined theoretical description of the peculiar spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide (ACN). Acetanilide is a molecular crystal with quasi-one-dimensional chains of hydrogen-bonded units, which is often regarded as a model system for the vibrational spectroscopy of proteins. In linear spectroscopy, the CO stretching (amide I) band of ACN features a double-peak structure, the lower of which shows a pronounced temperature dependence which has been discussed in the context of polaron theory. In nonlinear spectroscopy, both of these peaks respond distinctly differently. The lower-frequency band exhibits the anharmonicity expected from polaron theory, while the higher-frequency band responds as if it were quasiharmonic. We have recently related the response of the higher-frequency band to that of a free exciton [J. Edler and P. Hamm, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2415 (2002)]. However, as discussed in the present paper, the free exciton is not an eigenstate of the full quantum version of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian, which is commonly used to describe these phenomena. In order to resolve this issue, we present a numerically exact solution of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian in one dimension (1D) and 3D. In 1D, we find that the commonly used displaced oscillator picture remains qualitatively correct, even for relatively large exciton coupling. However, the result is not in agreement with the experiment, as it fails to explain the free-exciton band. In contrast, when taking into account the 3D nature of crystalline acetanilide, certain parameter regimes exist where the displaced oscillator picture breaks down and states appear in the spectrum that indeed exhibit the characteristics of a free exciton. The appearance of these states is a speciality of vibrational polarons, whose source of exciton coupling is transition dipole coupling which is expected to have opposite signs of interchain and intrachain coupling.

  20. Vibrational kinetics in CO electric discharge lasers - Modeling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, A. C.; Hanson, R. K.; Mitchner, M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of CO laser vibrational kinetics is developed, and predicted vibrational distributions are compared with measurements. The experimental distributions were obtained at various flow locations in a transverse CW discharge in supersonic (M = 3) flow. Good qualitative agreement is obtained in the comparisons, including the prediction of a total inversion at low discharge current densities. The major area of discrepancy is an observed loss in vibrational energy downstream of the discharge which is not predicted by the model. This discrepancy may be due to three-dimensional effects in the experiment which are not included in the model. Possible kinetic effects which may contribute to vibrational energy loss are also examined.

  1. Molecular Geometry And Vibrational Spectra of 2'-chloroacetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokce, H.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and the corresponding vibrational assingments of 2'-chloroacetanilide in the ground state have been calculated by using Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The obtained vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lenghts and angles) are in very good agreement with the experimental data. The comparison of the observed and calculated vibrational frequencies assignments of 2'-chloroacetanilide exhibit that the scaled DFT/B3LYP method is superior to be scaled HF method. Furthermore the calculated Infrared and Raman intensities are also reported

  2. Study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhaojun; Li Wei; Chen Yanhong; Wang Lijiang

    1998-01-01

    A study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling is described. Under the experimental conditions of this study it is observed, from reliability testing and the fitting of a life-distribution function, that the lives of micro-drills under ordinary drilling follow the log-normal distribution and the lives of micro-drills under vibrating drilling follow the Weibull distribution. Calculations for reliability analysis show that vibrating drilling can increase the lives of micro-drills and correspondingly reduce the scatter of drill lives. Therefore, vibrating drilling increases the reliability of micro-drills

  3. Effect of deuteration on the vibrational spectra of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Endredi, Henrietta; Varady, Balazs

    2001-01-01

    The stable isotope substitution of organic compounds deforms their vibrational spectra. The modifications of the spectra appear as band shifts and changes in intensities and shapes of the bands. The magnitude of the effect depends on the ratio of the masses of the new and old isotopes and on the atom active position. According to these mentioned reasons large effects can be observed only if hydrogen atoms are substituted. With the effect of the substitution we dealt already in a former lecture. In this lecture we concentrate on the effect of the change of hydrogen to deuterium. We investigate the changes both experimentally and theoretically. There are two possibilities: - the hydrogen atom is in an active position, its interaction with the environment is strong, either it can dissociate or move on the skeleton of the molecule (tautomerism, resonance) and it can build hydrogen bond, (e.g. it is connected to nitrogen and oxygen atoms); - the hydrogen atom is in an indifferent position in the molecule, its interaction with the environment is weak (e.g. it joins carbon atom). When building the hydrogen bond besides the hydrogen donors also acceptors exist, namely, oxygen and nitrogen atoms having non-bonded electron pairs. When comparing the experimental and theoretical (calculated) effects of this type of isotope changes one must take into account that the calculations refer to the isolated molecule while the experimental spectra characterize the compound. The hydrogen bond is a very strong intermolecular interaction and produces tremendous changes in the infrared spectrum of the molecule in comparison to the imagined theoretical spectrum of the molecule. Some bands disappear, appear, or shift and deform drastically. The H/D change diminishes these effects. Of course, these changes entail the shift of several bands. The Raman spectrum is less sensitive to the large dipole moment changes therefore the deuteration effect is there less dramatic. Deuteration of hydrogen

  4. System Ba/sub 2/Znsub(1-x)Cusub(x)UO/sub 6/ - a vibrational spectroscopic proof of the Jahn Teller effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmler-Sack, S; Rother, H J [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1979-01-01

    The ordered perovskites Ba/sub 2/ZnUO/sub 6/ (cubic, space group Fm3m) and Ba/sub 2/CuUO/sub 6/ (tetragonal, space group I/sub 4//mmm) form solid solutions. For small Cu content the lattice symmetry is cubic, with x>=0.25 an increasing tetragonal distortion (c/a ..sqrt..2 > 1) is observed. From the vibrational spectra and in accordance with the factor group analysis the symmetry of the UO/sub 6/ octahedra is for small Cu content Osub(h) and on the Cu-rich side Dsub(4h). In the region of the lattice vibrations (T/sub 2/ field) the lifting of the degeneracy - due to the Jahn Teller effect of Cu/sup 2 +/ - leads to a band separation, which decreases with sinking copper content. Therefore the Jahn Teller effect is easily noticeable with vibrational spectroscopic methods. In the corresponding series with Wsup(VI) the vibrational spectroscopic investigations lead qualitatively to the same results as in the Usup(VI) system. As further examples the stacking polytypes Ba/sub 2/ZnTeO/sub 6/ and Ba/sub 2/CuTeO/sub 6/ are considered. The vibrational spectra show, that the Jahn Teller effect in this lattice, which is strengthened by partial face-sharing of octahedra, is less pronounced than in the perovskites in which only corner-sharing is present.

  5. Interaction of spin and vibrations in transport through single-molecule magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk May

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We study electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM and the interplay of its anisotropic spin with quantized vibrational distortions of the molecule. Based on numerical renormalization group calculations we show that, despite the longitudinal anisotropy barrier and small transverse anisotropy, vibrational fluctuations can induce quantum spin-tunneling (QST and a QST-Kondo effect. The interplay of spin scattering, QST and molecular vibrations can strongly enhance the Kondo effect and induce an anomalous magnetic field dependence of vibrational Kondo side-bands.

  6. Interaction of spin and vibrations in transport through single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Falk; Wegewijs, Maarten R; Hofstetter, Walter

    2011-01-01

    We study electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) and the interplay of its anisotropic spin with quantized vibrational distortions of the molecule. Based on numerical renormalization group calculations we show that, despite the longitudinal anisotropy barrier and small transverse anisotropy, vibrational fluctuations can induce quantum spin-tunneling (QST) and a QST-Kondo effect. The interplay of spin scattering, QST and molecular vibrations can strongly enhance the Kondo effect and induce an anomalous magnetic field dependence of vibrational Kondo side-bands.

  7. Effect of Spindle Parameters of Woodworking Band Saw on the AE Value of Crack Band Saw Blade in Compound Material Processing (1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jin-gui; Jiang, Zhao-fang; Luo, Lai-peng

    2017-04-01

    Taking the MJ3210A motion band saw as the research object, the AE value of the band saw blade vibration was obtained by analyzing the VIBSYS vibration signal acquisition and analysis software system in Beijing, and the change of the AE value of the band saw and the crack was found out. The experimental results show that in the MJ3210A sports car sawing machine, the band saw blade with width of 130 mm is used, and the AE value of the cracked band saw blade is well in the high band saw blade AE value. Under the best working condition of the band saw, the band saw blade AE If the value exceeds 104.7 dB (A) above, it means that the band saw blade has at least one crack length greater than 1.38 mm for the crack defect and the need to replace the band saw blade in time. Different species with saw blade of the AE value is different, white pine wood minimum, the largest oak wood; according to a variety of wood processing AE instrument value to determine the band saw blade crack to the situation; so as to fully rational use of band saw blade, The failure and the degree of development to find a new method.

  8. Control aid for xenon vibration in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekawa, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    In the present invention, the control operation for suppressing xenon vibrations in a reactor is aided for saving forecasting analysis and operator's skills. That is, parameters to be controlled for the suppression of xenon vibrations are power distribution, iodine distribution and xenon distribution. But what can be observed by operaters by the conventional fast overtone method is only the output distribution. In the present invention, the output level of the reactor core is always observed. Then, mathematical processings are conducted for the iodine distribution, the xenon distribution and the power distribution in the reactor core based on the histeresis of the parameters obtained by the measurement using physical constants and reactor design data. The xenon vibration control is aided by displaying the change with time of the distortion in axial direction. Accordingly, operators can always recognize the axial distortion of the power distribution, the iodine distribution and the xenon distribution. (I.S.)

  9. Theoretical Investigation on the Molecular Structure, Vibrational and NMR Spectra of N, N, 4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinar, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the structural properties of N,N,4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide have been studied extensively using Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectrum was calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned based on the scaled theoretical wavenumbers. The 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the compound were calculated using the Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. To investigate the basis set effects, calculations were performed at the 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) levels. Finally, geometric parameters, vibrational bands and isotropic chemical shifts were compared with available experimental data of compound. The fully optimized geometry of the molecule was found to be consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. The observed and calculated frequencies and chemical shifts were found to be in very good agreement. The computed results appear that the basis set has slight effect on the molecular geometry of N,N,4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide

  10. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra of lower diamondoids: A time-dependent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Gallandi, Lukas; Körzdörfer, Thomas; Saalfrank, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Vibrationally resolved lowest-energy bands of the photoelectron spectra (PES) of adamantane, diamantane, and urotropine were simulated by a time-dependent correlation function approach within the harmonic approximation. Geometries and normal modes for neutral and cationic molecules were obtained from B3LYP hybrid density functional theory (DFT). It is shown that the simulated spectra reproduce the experimentally observed vibrational finestructure (or its absence) quite well. Origins of the finestructure are discussed and related to recurrences of autocorrelation functions and dominant vibrations. Remaining quantitative and qualitative errors of the DFT-derived PES spectra refer to (i) an overall redshift by ˜0.5 eV and (ii) the absence of satellites in the high-energy region of the spectra. The former error is shown to be due to the neglect of many-body corrections to ordinary Kohn-Sham methods, while the latter has been argued to be due to electron-nuclear couplings beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation [Gali et al., Nat. Commun. 7, 11327 (2016)].

  11. Identification of the best DFT functionals for a reliable prediction of lignin vibrational properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Soren

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is the most abundant aromatic plant polymer on earth. Useful information on its structure and interactions is gained by vibrational spectroscopy and relies on the quality of band assignments. B3LYP predictions were recently shown to support band assignments. Further progress calls...

  12. The application of infrared synchrotron radiation to the study of interfacial vibrational modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Williams, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation provides an extremely bright broad-band source in the infrared which is ideally suited to the study of surface and interface vibrational modes in the range 50--3,000 cm -1 . Thus it covers the important range of molecule-substrate interactions, as well as overlapping with the more easily accessible near-ir region where molecular internal modes are found. Compared to standard broadband infrared sources such as globars, not only is it 1,000 times brighter, but its emittance matches the phase-space of the electrochemical cell leading to full utilization of this brightness advantage. In addition, the source is more stable even than water-cooled globars in vacuum for both short-term and long-term fluctuations. The authors summarize the properties of synchrotron radiation in the infrared, in particular pointing out the distinct differences between this and the x-ray region. They use experimental data in discussing important issues of signal to noise and address the unique problems and advantages of the synchrotron source. Thus they emphasize the important considerations necessary for developing new facilities. This analysis then leads to a discussion of phase-space matching to electrochemical cells, and to other surfaces in vacuum. Finally they show several examples of the application of infrared synchrotron radiation to surface vibrational spectroscopy. The examples are for metal crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and include CO/Cu(100) and (111) and CO/K/Cu(100). The experiments show how the stability of the synchrotron source allows subtle changes in the background to be observed in addition to the discrete vibrational modes. These changes are due to electronic states induced by the adsorbate. In some cases the authors have seen interferences between these and the discrete vibrational modes, leading to a breakdown of the dipole selection rules, and the observation of additional modes

  13. Vibration transducer calibration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, D. J.

    1980-09-01

    Techniques for the calibration of vibration transducers used in the Aeronautical Quality Assurance Directorate of the British Ministry of Defence are presented. Following a review of the types of measurements necessary in the calibration of vibration transducers, the performance requirements of vibration transducers, which can be used to measure acceleration, velocity or vibration amplitude, are discussed, with particular attention given to the piezoelectric accelerometer. Techniques for the accurate measurement of sinusoidal vibration amplitude in reference-grade transducers are then considered, including the use of a position sensitive photocell and the use of a Michelson laser interferometer. Means of comparing the output of working-grade accelerometers with that of previously calibrated reference-grade devices are then outlined, with attention given to a method employing a capacitance bridge technique and a method to be used at temperatures between -50 and 200 C. Automatic calibration procedures developed to speed up the calibration process are outlined, and future possible extensions of system software are indicated.

  14. Understanding of bridge cable vibrations and the associate flow-field through the full-scale monitoring of vibrations and Wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acampora, Antonio

    This dissertation investigates the conditions that promote rain-wind-induced vibrations of inclined cable on cable-stayed bridges. Rain-wind-induced vibrations are known as the most common type of cable vibrations and capable of severe vibrations. The recent increase in the number of cable stayed...... bridges continuously becoming longer and lighter have resulted in a high number of observations of cable vibrations. A theoretical background for the tool used in this work is presented in terms of cables vibrations mechanisms, aerodynamic damping and system identification techniques. A detailed...... literature review of reported observations of rain-wind-induced cable vibrations of fullscale bridges is shown. The database of observed events on bridges collects information about the conditions that likely develop the phenomenon, together with the means used to suppress or reduce the occurrence of cable...

  15. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...... in the present paper that such an a priori assumption is not necessary since, in general, just the maximization of the gap between two consecutive natural frequencies leads to significant design periodicity. The aim of this paper is to maximize frequency gaps by shape optimization of transversely vibrating...

  16. Recovering Intrinsic Fragmental Vibrations Using the Generalized Subsystem Vibrational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yunwen; Tian, Chuan; Verma, Niraj; Zou, Wenli; Wang, Chao; Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi

    2018-05-08

    Normal vibrational modes are generally delocalized over the molecular system, which makes it difficult to assign certain vibrations to specific fragments or functional groups. We introduce a new approach, the Generalized Subsystem Vibrational Analysis (GSVA), to extract the intrinsic fragmental vibrations of any fragment/subsystem from the whole system via the evaluation of the corresponding effective Hessian matrix. The retention of the curvature information with regard to the potential energy surface for the effective Hessian matrix endows our approach with a concrete physical basis and enables the normal vibrational modes of different molecular systems to be legitimately comparable. Furthermore, the intrinsic fragmental vibrations act as a new link between the Konkoli-Cremer local vibrational modes and the normal vibrational modes.

  17. Vibrations in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, L D; Thorne, G C

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of various mechanical properties of skeletal material using vibration techniques have been reported. The purposes of such investigations include the monitoring of pathogenic disorders such as osteoporosis, the rate and extent of fracture healing, and the status of internal fixations. Early investigations pioneered the application of conventional vibration measurement equipment to biological systems. The more recent advent of the microcomputer has made available to research groups more sophisticated techniques for data acquisition and analysis. The economical advantages of such equipment has led to the development of portable research instrumentation which lends itself to use in a clinical environment. This review article reports on the developments and progression of the various vibrational techniques and theories as applied to musculoskeletal systems.

  18. Vibration and Fluorescence Spectra of Porphyrin- CoredBis(methylol-propionic Acid Dendrimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Minaev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Bis-MPA dendron-coated free-base tetraphenylporphyrin and zinc-tetraphenyl-porphyrin (TPPH2 and TPPZn were studied in comparison with simple porphyrins (H2P, ZnP by theoretical simulation of their infrared, Raman and electronic absorption spectra, as well as fluorescense emission. Infrared and fluorescence spectra of the dendrimers were measured and interpreted along with time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence. The 0-1 emission band of the dendron substituted TPPZn was found to experience a "heavy substitution"-effect. The 0-1 vibronic emission signal is associated with a longer decay time (approx. 7 - 8 ns than the 0-0 emission (approx. 1 - 1.5 ns. The former contributed with more relative emission yield for larger dendron substituents, in agreement with the appearance of steady-state emission spectra showing increased contribution from the 0-1 vibronic fluorescence band at 650 nm. No such substitution effect was observed in the electronic or vibrational spectra of the substituted free-base variant, TPPH2. Vibration spectra of the parent porphyrins (H2P, ZnP, TPPH2 and TPPZn were calculated by density functional theory (DFT using the B3LYP/6-31G** approximation and a detailed analysis of the most active vibration modes was made based on both literature and our own experimental data. Based on the results of theoretical calculations the wide vibronic bands in the visible region were assigned. The vibronic structure also gave a qualitative interpretation of bands in the electronic absorption spectra as well as in fluorescence emission depending on the size of dendrimer substitution. From the results of time-dependent DFT calculations it is suggested that the TPPZn-cored dendrimers indicate strong vibronic interaction and increased Jahn-Teller distortion of the prophyrin core for larger dendrimer generations. Specifically, this leads to the entirely different behaviour of the emission spectra upon substitution of the TPPH2 and TPPZn

  19. Multiple band structure in 156Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyar, A.W.; Der Mateosian, E.; Kistner, O.C.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thieberger, P.

    1976-01-01

    The 142 Nd( 18 O,4n) 156 Er reaction at 90-95 MeV was used to study 156 Er high-spin states to spin 24. In addition to the background ground-state band, two well developed off-spin side bands, one of each parity, were observed. (Auth.)

  20. Reducing vibration transfer from power plants by active methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryukhin, A. V.; Milman, O. O.; Ptakhin, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility of applying the methods of active damping of vibration and pressure pulsations for reducing their transfer from power plants into the environment, the seating, and the industrial premises are considered. The results of experimental works implemented by the authors on the active broadband damping of vibration and dynamic forces after shock-absorption up to 15 dB in the frequency band up to 150 Hz, of water pressure pulsations in the pipeline up to 20 dB in the frequency band up to 600 Hz, and of spatial low-frequency air noise indoors of a diesel generator at discrete frequency up to 20 dB are presented. It is shown that a reduction of vibration transfer through a vibration-isolating junction (expansion joints) of pipelines with liquid is the most complicated and has hardly been developed so far. This problem is essential for vibration isolation of power equipment from the seating and the environment through pipelines with water and steam in the power and transport engineering, shipbuilding, and in oil and gas pipelines in pumping stations. For improving efficiency, reducing the energy consumption, and decreasing the overall dimensions of equipment, it is advisable to combine the work of an active system with passive damping means, the use of which is not always sufficient. The executive component of the systems of active damping should be placed behind the vibration isolators (expansion joints). It is shown that the existence of working medium and connection of vibration with pressure pulsations in existing designs of pipeline expansion joints lead to growth of vibration stiffness of the expansion joint with the environment by two and more orders as compared with the static stiffness and makes difficulties for using the active methods. For active damping of vibration transfer through expansion joints of pipelines with a liquid, it is necessary to develop expansion joint structures with minimal connection of vibrations and pulsations and minimal

  1. Overtone spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch vibration in hydroxylamine (NH2OH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.L.; Luckhaus, D.; Brown, S.S.; Crim, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    We present photoacoustic spectra of the second (3ν OH ), third (4ν OH ), and fourth (5ν OH ) overtone bands of the hydroxyl stretch vibration in hydroxylamine. Asymmetric rotor simulations of the rovibrational contours provide rotational constants and an estimate of the homogeneous linewidth. The fourth overtone band appears anomalously broad relative to the two lower bands, reflecting a sharp increase in the rate of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR). By contrast, the calculated density of states increases smoothly with energy. The homogeneous linewidth of the fourth overtone transition is similar to that measured by Luo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 9194 (1990)] for the predissociative sixth overtone band, supporting the conclusion that the broadening arises from increased (ro)vibrational coupling at an energy between the third and fourth overtone states

  2. Vibrational spectra of aminoacetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, B.; Hansen, E.L.; Nicolaisen, F.M.; Nielsen, O.F.

    1975-01-01

    The preparation of pure, stable aminoacetonitrile(1-amino, 1'-cyanomethane)CH 2 NH 2 CN (1) is described. The Raman spectrum, now complete, and a novel infrared spectrum extending over the 50-3600 cm -1 region are reported. A tentative normal vibration analysis is presented and supported by Raman and infrared data from the spectra of CH 2 NHDCN (2) and CH 2 ND 2 CN (3). The predominance of the trans rotamer may be attributed to intramolecular hydrogen bonding but this is too unimportant to influence the vibrational frequencies of gaseous 1, 2, and 3. However, large gas/liquid frequency shifts occur. (author)

  3. Vibrations and waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kaliski, S

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of wave phenomena in different media with interacting mechanical, electromagnetic and other fields. Equations describing wave propagation in linear and non-linear elastic media are followed by equations of rheological models, models with internal rotational degrees of freedom and non-local interactions. Equations for coupled fields: thermal, elastic, electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and magneto-spin with adequate boundary conditions are also included. Together with its companion volume Vibrations and Waves. Part A: Vibrations this work provides a wealth

  4. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 2nd edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration th...... theory is basically unchanged in comparison to the 1st edition. Only section 4.2 on single input - single output systems and chapter 6 on offshore structures have been modified in order to enhance the clearness....

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic study of terbutaline hemisulphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Raman spectrum of terbutaline hemisulphate is reported for the first time, and molecular assignments are proposed on the basis of ab initio BLYP DFT calculations with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation; these predictions compare favourably with the observed vibrational spectra. Comparison with previously published infrared data explains several spectral features. The results from this study provide data that can be used for the preparative process monitoring of terbutaline hemisulphate, an important β 2 agonist drug in various dosage forms and its interaction with excipients and other components.

  6. Heterogeneous Dynamics of Coupled Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Jansen, Thomas I. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Schoenlein, RW; Corkum, P; DeSilvestri, S; Nelson, KA; Riedle, E

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dynamics of coupled stretch vibrations of a water molecule are revealed by 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. These are caused by non-Gaussian fluctuations of the environment around the individual OH stretch vibrations.

  7. Vibration in car repair work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, J E; Eklund, L; Kihlberg, S; Ostergren, C E

    1987-03-01

    The main objective of the study was to find efficient hand tools which caused only minor vibration loading. Vibration measurements were carried out under standardised working conditions. The time during which car body repairers in seven companies were exposed to vibration was determined. Chisel hammers, impact wrenches, sanders and saws were the types of tools which generated the highest vibration accelerations. The average daily exposure at the different garages ranged from 22 to 70 min. The risk of vibration injury is currently rated as high. The difference between the highest and lowest levels of vibration was considerable in most tool categories. Therefore the choice of tool has a major impact on the magnitude of vibration exposure. The importance of choosing the right tools and working methods is discussed and a counselling service on vibration is proposed.

  8. Vibrational normal modes of diazo-dimedone: A comparative study by Fourier infrared/Raman spectroscopies and conformational analysis by MM/QM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez Soto, C. A.; Ramos, J. M.; Rianelli, R. S.; de Souza, M. C. B. V.; Ferreira, V. F.

    2007-07-01

    The 2-diazo-5,5-dimethyl-cyclohexane-1,3-dione ( 3) was synthesized and the FT-IR/Raman spectra were measured with the purpose of obtain a full assignment of the vibrational modes. Singular aspects concerning the -C dbnd N dbnd N oscillator are discussed in view of two strong bands observed in the region of 2300-2100 cm -1 in both, Infrared and Raman spectra. The density functional theory (DFT) was used to obtain the geometrical structure and for assisting in the vibrational assignment joint to the traditional normal coordinate analysis (NCA). The observed wavenumbers at 2145 (IR), 2144(R) are assigned as the coupled ν(N dbnd N) + ν(C dbnd N) vibrational mode with higher participation of the N dbnd N stretching. A 2188 cm -1 (IR) and at 2186 cm -1 (R) can be assigned as a overtone of one of ν(CC) normal mode or to a combination band of the fundamentals δ(CCH) found at 1169 cm -1 and the δ (CC dbnd N) found at 1017 cm -1 enhanced by Fermi resonance.

  9. Thermo-dynamical contours of electronic-vibrational spectra simulated using the statistical quantum-mechanical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomogaev, Vladimir; Pomogaeva, Anna; Avramov, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Three polycyclic organic molecules in various solvents focused on thermo-dynamical aspects were theoretically investigated using the recently developed statistical quantum mechanical/classical molecular dynamics method for simulating electronic-vibrational spectra. The absorption bands of estradiol...

  10. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foruzande, Hamid Reza; Hajnayeb, Ali; Yaghootian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton's principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  11. Vibration dynamics of single atomic nanocontacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A; Bourahla, B; Tigrine, R

    2007-01-01

    The motivation for this work is to introduce a model for an atomic nanocontact, whereby its mechanical properties can be analysed via the local spectra. The model system consists of two sets of triple parallel semi-infinite atomic chains joined by a single atom in between. We calculate the vibration spectra and the local densities of vibration states, in the harmonic approximation, for the irreducible set of sites that constitute the nanocontact domain. The nanocontact observables are numerically calculated for different cases of elastic hardening and softening, to investigate how the local dynamics can respond to changes in the microscopic environment on the domain. We have also calculated the phonon scattering and coherent conductance at the nanocontact, derived in a Landauer-Buettiker matrix approach. The analysis of the spectra, of the densities of vibration states, and of the phonon conductance, identifies characteristic features and demonstrates the central role of a core subset of sites in the nanocontact domain

  12. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  13. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    at the University of Southern Denmark, it reports on fundamental formulas and makes uses of graphical representation to promote understanding. Thanks to the emphasis put on analytical methods and numerical results, the book is meant to make students and engineers familiar with all fundamental equations...... and their derivation, thus stimulating them to write interactive and dynamic programs to analyze instability and vibrational modes....

  14. Vibrations and Eigenvalues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The vibrating string problem is the source of much mathe- matics and physics. ... ing this science [mechanics],and the art of solving the problems pertaining to it, to .... used tools for finding maxima and minima of functions of several variables.

  15. Heat exchanger vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, D.J.W.

    1977-01-01

    The heat exchangers of various types are common items of plant in the generation and transmission of electricity. The amount of attention given to the flow-induced vibrations of heat exchangers by designers is usually related to the operational history of similar items of plant. Consequently, if a particular design procedure yields items of plant which behave in a satisfactory manner during their operational life, there is little incentive to improve or refine the design procedure. On the other hand, failures of heat exchangers clearly indicate deficiencies in the design procedures or in the data available to the designer. When such failures are attributable to flow-induced vibrations, the identification of the mechanisms involved is a prime importance. Ideally, basic research work provides the background understanding and the techniques necessary to be able to identify the important mechanisms. In practice, the investigation of a flow-induced vibration problem may identify the presence of mechanisms but may not be able to quantify their effects adequately. In these circumstances the need for additional work is established and the objectives of the research programme emerge. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background to the current research programme at C.E.R.L. on heat exchanger vibration

  16. Man-Induced Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1994-01-01

    work has been done on the measurement of the exact load functions and related reponse analysis. A recent work using a spectral description has been performed by Per-Erik Erikson and includes a good literature survey. Bachmann and Ammann give a good overview of vibrations caused by human activity. Other...

  17. Heat exchanger vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, D J.W. [CERL, CEGB, Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1977-12-01

    The heat exchangers of various types are common items of plant in the generation and transmission of electricity. The amount of attention given to the flow-induced vibrations of heat exchangers by designers is usually related to the operational history of similar items of plant. Consequently, if a particular design procedure yields items of plant which behave in a satisfactory manner during their operational life, there is little incentive to improve or refine the design procedure. On the other hand, failures of heat exchangers clearly indicate deficiencies in the design procedures or in the data available to the designer. When such failures are attributable to flow-induced vibrations, the identification of the mechanisms involved is a prime importance. Ideally, basic research work provides the background understanding and the techniques necessary to be able to identify the important mechanisms. In practice, the investigation of a flow-induced vibration problem may identify the presence of mechanisms but may not be able to quantify their effects adequately. In these circumstances the need for additional work is established and the objectives of the research programme emerge. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background to the current research programme at C.E.R.L. on heat exchanger vibration.

  18. Vibrational-rotational temperature measurement of N2 in the lower thermosphere by the rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, J.; Oyama, K.; Suzuki, K.; Iwagami, N.

    The vibrational temperature (Tv), the rotational temperature (Tr) and the density of atmospheric N2 between 100 - 150 km were measured in situ by a sounding rocket S310-30, over Kagoshima, Japan at 10:30 UT on February 6, 2002. The main purpose of this rocket experiment is to study the dynamics and the thermal energy budget in the lower thermosphere. N2 was ionized using an electron gun and the emission of the 1st negative bands of N2+ was measured by a sensitive spectrometer. Tv and Tr were determined by fitting the observed spectrum for the simulated spectrum, and the number density was deduced from the intensities of the spectrum. We will report preliminary results of our measurement and discuss the observed thermal structure that indicates the effect of tides and gravity waves.

  19. General principles of vibrational spectroscopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Atoms in molecules and solids do not remain in fixed relative positions, but vibrate about some mean position. This vibrational motion is quantized and at room temperature, most of the molecules in a given sample are in their lowest vibrational state. Absorption of electromagnetic radiation with

  20. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  1. Ab-initio study of structural, vibrational and optical properties of solid oxidizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G., E-mail: gvsp@uohyd.ernet.in

    2016-09-15

    We report the structural, elastic and vibrational properties of five ionic-molecular solid oxidizers MNO{sub 3} (M = Li, Na, K) and MClO{sub 3} (M = Na, K). By treating long range electron-correlation effects, dispersion corrected method leads to more accurate predictions of structural properties and phase stability of KNO{sub 3} polymorphs. The obtained elastic moduli show soft nature of these materials and are consistent with Ultrasonic Pulse Echo measurements. We made a complete assignment of vibrational modes which are in good accord with available experimental results. From calculated IR and Raman spectra, it is found that the vibrational frequencies show a red-shift from Li → Na → K (Na → K) and N → Cl for nitrates (chlorates) due to increase in mass of metal and non-metal atoms, respectively. The calculated electronic structure using recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential show that the materials are wide band gap insulators with predominant ionic bonding between M{sup +} (metal) and NO{sub 3}{sup −}/ClO{sub 3}{sup −} ions and covalent bonding (N−O and Cl−O) within nitrate and chlorate anionic group. From the calculated optical spectra, we observe that electric-dipole transitions are due to nitrate/chlorate group below 20 eV and cationic transitions occur above 20 eV. The calculated reflectivity spectra are consistent with the available experimental measurements. - Highlights: • Ground state properties with inclusion of dispersion correction method. • Elastic constants and mechanical properties. • Vibrational spectra and their complete assignment. • Raman and IR spectra. • Electronic structure and optical properties using TB-mBJ potential.

  2. Intestinal malrotation and Ladd's bands in a young child | Gaido ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal malrotation and Ladd's bands in a young child. ... East African Medical Journal ... potentially more challenging, as it was not the most typical age for duodenal stenosis due to Ladd's bands, which is often mostly observed earlier in life.

  3. Fluctuation diamagnetism in two-band superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed in iron selenide (FeSe) [Kasahara et al. (unpublished)]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has a two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data on FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach with a Ginzburg-Landau functional. The obtained results indicate that the SCF-induced diamagnetism may be more enhanced than that in a single-band system due to the existence of two distinct fluctuation modes. Such enhancement of diamagnetism unique to a two-band system seems consistent with the large diamagnetism observed in FeSe, though still far from a quantitative agreement.

  4. A vibration powered wireless mote on the Forth Road Bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yu; Yan, Jize; Feng, Tao; Du, Sijun; Fidler, Paul; Soga, Kenichi; Middleton, Campbell; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2015-01-01

    The conventional resonant-approaches to scavenge kinetic energy are typically confined to narrow and single-band frequencies. The vibration energy harvester device reported here combines both direct resonance and parametric resonance in order to enhance the power responsiveness towards more efficient harnessing of real-world ambient vibration. A packaged electromagnetic harvester designed to operate in both of these resonant regimes was tested in situ on the Forth Road Bridge. In the field-site, the harvester, with an operational volume of ∼126 cm 3 , was capable of recovering in excess of 1 mW average raw AC power from the traffic-induced vibrations in the lateral bracing structures underneath the bridge deck. The harvester was integrated off-board with a power conditioning circuit and a wireless mote. Duty- cycled wireless transmissions from the vibration-powered mote was successfully sustained by the recovered ambient energy. This limited duration field test provides the initial validation for realising vibration-powered wireless structural health monitoring systems in real world infrastructure, where the vibration profile is both broadband and intermittent. (paper)

  5. A vibration powered wireless mote on the Forth Road Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Yan, Jize; Feng, Tao; Du, Sijun; Fidler, Paul; Soga, Kenichi; Middleton, Campbell; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional resonant-approaches to scavenge kinetic energy are typically confined to narrow and single-band frequencies. The vibration energy harvester device reported here combines both direct resonance and parametric resonance in order to enhance the power responsiveness towards more efficient harnessing of real-world ambient vibration. A packaged electromagnetic harvester designed to operate in both of these resonant regimes was tested in situ on the Forth Road Bridge. In the field-site, the harvester, with an operational volume of ∼126 cm3, was capable of recovering in excess of 1 mW average raw AC power from the traffic-induced vibrations in the lateral bracing structures underneath the bridge deck. The harvester was integrated off-board with a power conditioning circuit and a wireless mote. Duty- cycled wireless transmissions from the vibration-powered mote was successfully sustained by the recovered ambient energy. This limited duration field test provides the initial validation for realising vibration-powered wireless structural health monitoring systems in real world infrastructure, where the vibration profile is both broadband and intermittent.

  6. [Study on the vibrational spectra and XRD characters of Huanglong jade from Longling County, Yunnan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jing-cheng; Fan, Lu-wei; Xie, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Based on the conventional test methods, the infrared absorption spectrum, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to study the characters of the vibration spectrum and mineral composition of Huanglong jade. The testing results show that Huanglong jade shows typical vibrational spectrum characteristics of quartziferous jade. The main infrared absorption bands at 1162, 1076, 800, 779, 691, 530 and 466 cm(-1) were induced by the asymmetric stretching vibration, symmetrical stretching vibration and bending vibration of Si-O-Si separately. Especially the absorption band near 800 cm(-1) is split, which indicates that Huanglong jade has good crystallinity. In Raman spectrum, the main strong vibration bands at 463 and 355 cm(-1) were attributed to bending vibration of Si-O-Si. XRD test confirmed that Quartz is main mineral composition of Huanglong jade and there is a small amount of hematite in red color samples which induced the red color of Huanglong jade. This is the first report on the infrared, Raman and XRD spectra feature of Huanglong jade. It will provide a scientific basis for the identification, naming and other research for huanglong jade.

  7. Deep K-band Observations of TMC-1 with the Green Bank Telescope: Detection of HC7O, Nondetection of HC11N, and a Search for New Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Kisiel, Z.; McGuire, B. A.; Kuan, Y.-J.

    2017-12-01

    The 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope K-band (KFPA) receiver was used to perform a high-sensitivity search for rotational emission lines from complex organic molecules in the cold interstellar medium toward TMC-1 (cyanopolyyne peak), focussing on the identification of new carbon-chain-bearing species as well as molecules of possible prebiotic relevance. We report a detection of the carbon-chain oxide species HC7O and derive a column density of (7.8+/- 0.9)× {10}11 cm-2. This species is theorized to form as a result of associative electron detachment reactions between oxygen atoms and C7H-, and/or reaction of C6H2 + with CO (followed by dissociative electron recombination). Upper limits are given for the related HC6O, C6O, and C7O molecules. In addition, we obtained the first detections of emission from individual 13C isotopologues of HC7N, and derive abundance ratios HC7N/HCCC13CCCCN = 110 ± 16 and HC7N/HCCCC13CCCN = 96 ± 11, indicative of significant 13C depletion in this species relative to the local interstellar elemental 12C/13C ratio of 60-70. The observed spectral region covered two transitions of HC11N, but emission from this species was not detected, and the corresponding column density upper limit is 7.4× {10}10 {{cm}}-2 (at 95% confidence). This is significantly lower than the value of 2.8× {10}11 {{cm}}-2 previously claimed by Bell et al. and confirms the recent nondetection of HC11N in TMC-1 by Loomis et al. Upper limits were also obtained for the column densities of malononitrile and the nitrogen heterocycles quinoline, isoquinoline, and pyrimidine.

  8. Collision-induced absorption in the region of the ν2 + ν3 band of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Yu. I.

    2018-03-01

    The IR absorption spectra of pure carbon dioxide in the region of the forbidden ν2 + ν3 vibrational transition at 3004 cm-1 have been recorded using a Fourier-transform spectrometer. A multipass-optical cell with the path length of 100 m was used in the study. The data were taken at room temperature of 294.8 K with a resolution of 0.02 cm-1 over the spectral region 2500-3500 cm-1. A sample pressures varied from 207 to 463 kPa (2.04-4.57 atm). The measured binary absorption coefficients provide the band integrated intensity value of (2.39 ± 0.04) ∗ 10-4 cm-2 amagat-2. The result is compared with those from previous works. The observed band profile features are discussed.

  9. Vibrational collapse of boroxol rings in compacted B2O3 glasses: a study of Raman scattering and low temperature specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Giovanni, Jr.; Carini, Giuseppe; D’Angelo, Giovanna; Federico, Mauro; Romano, Valentino

    2018-05-01

    Low and high frequency Raman scattering of B2O3 glasses, compacted under GPa pressures, has been performed to investigate structural changes due to increasing atomic packing. Compacted glasses, annealed at ambient temperature and pressure, experience a time-dependent decrease of the density to a smaller constant value over a period of few months, displaying a permanent plastic deformation. Increasing densification determines a parallel and progressive decrease of the intensity of the Boson peak and the main band at 808 cm‑1, both these modes arising from localized vibrations involving planar boroxol rings (B3O6), the glassy units formed from three basic BO3 triangles. The 808 cm‑1 mode preserves its frequency, while the BP evidences a well-defined frequency increase. The high-frequency multicomponent band between 1200 and 1600 cm‑1 also changes with increasing densification, disclosing a decreasing intensity of the 1260 cm‑1 mode due to oxygen vibrations of BO3 units bridging boroxol rings. This indicates the gradual vibrational collapse of groups formed from rings connected by more complex links than a single bridging oxygen. The observed behaviours suggest that glass compaction causes severe deformation of boroxol rings, determining a decrease of groups which preserve unaltered their vibrational activity. Growing glass densification stiffens the network and leads to a decrease of the excess heat capacity over the Debye prediction below 20 K, which is not accounted for by the hardening of the elastic continuum. By using the low-frequency Raman scattering to determine the temperature dependence of the heat capacity, it has been evaluated the density of low-frequency vibrational states which discloses a significant reduction of excess modes with increasing density.

  10. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Amniotic band sequence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... birth. The baby should be delivered in a medical center that has specialists experienced in caring for babies ... or partial loss of function of a body part. Congenital bands affecting large parts of the body cause the ...

  11. Time-varying output performances of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting under nonstationary random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Kim, Miso; Park, Choon-Su; Youn, Byeng D.

    2018-01-01

    Piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting (PVEH) has received much attention as a potential solution that could ultimately realize self-powered wireless sensor networks. Since most ambient vibrations in nature are inherently random and nonstationary, the output performances of PVEH devices also randomly change with time. However, little attention has been paid to investigating the randomly time-varying electroelastic behaviors of PVEH systems both analytically and experimentally. The objective of this study is thus to make a step forward towards a deep understanding of the time-varying performances of PVEH devices under nonstationary random vibrations. Two typical cases of nonstationary random vibration signals are considered: (1) randomly-varying amplitude (amplitude modulation; AM) and (2) randomly-varying amplitude with randomly-varying instantaneous frequency (amplitude and frequency modulation; AM-FM). In both cases, this study pursues well-balanced correlations of analytical predictions and experimental observations to deduce the relationships between the time-varying output performances of the PVEH device and two primary input parameters, such as a central frequency and an external electrical resistance. We introduce three correlation metrics to quantitatively compare analytical prediction and experimental observation, including the normalized root mean square error, the correlation coefficient, and the weighted integrated factor. Analytical predictions are in an excellent agreement with experimental observations both mechanically and electrically. This study provides insightful guidelines for designing PVEH devices to reliably generate electric power under nonstationary random vibrations.

  12. Experimental Study on the Vibration Control Effect of Long Elastic Sleeper Track in Subways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopei Cai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration effect of urban rail transit has gained attention from both academia and the industry sector. Long Elastic Sleeper Track (LEST is a new structure for vibration reduction which has recently been designed and applied to Chinese subways. However, little research has been devoted to its vibration reduction effect. In this study, field tests were conducted during peak transit hours on Beijing Subway Line 15 to examine the vibration reduction effects of the common ballastless track and LEST on both straight and curved sections. The results demonstrate that although LEST increases the wheel-rail vertical forces, rail vertical displacements, and rail accelerations to some extent, these effects do not threaten subway operational safety, and vibrations of track bed and tunnel wall are positively mitigated. LEST has an obvious vibration reduction effect at frequencies above 40 Hz. In straight track, the vibration of bottom of the tunnel wall measured in one-third octave bands is reduced by 10.52 dB, while the vibration at point on the tunnel wall at 1.5 m height is reduced by 9.60 dB. For the curved track, the vibrations at those two points are reduced by 9.35 dB and 8.44 dB, respectively. This indicates that LEST reduces vibrations slightly more for the straight track than for the curved track.

  13. Vibrational and thermal study of l-methionine nitrate polycrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, F.M.S.; Ribeiro, L.H.L.; Facanha Filho, P.F.; Santos, C.A.S.; Soares, R.A.; Abreu, D.C.; Sousa, J.C.F.; Carvalho, J.O.; Santos, A.O. dos [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), MA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Intensified in studies of nonlinear optical materials has been observed over the past two decades for its wide application in telecommunications, optical modulation and optical signal processing. The goal of this work is the thermal and vibrational study of L-methionine nitrate polycrystalline. The polycrystals were obtained by the method of slow evaporation of solvent at ambient temperature of 25 ° C. The X-ray diffraction was performed to confirm the structure of the material, which has monoclinic structure (space group P21) with four molecules per unit cell structure. Refinement by Rietveld method has been optimized and good quality parameters Rwp = 7.97% , Rp = 5.74 and S = 1.92%. The thermal stability of the material was verified from Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The measures showed a possible phase transition event at about 107°C before the melting point of the material, which took place at about 127°C. Thermogravimetric analysis showed two mass loss events of 61.5% and 30.4%. The vibrational modes of the L-methionine nitrate molecule were identified by Raman spectroscopy in the spectral range between 35cm-1 and 3500 cm-1, the scattering measurements were made from room temperature up to the melting temperature of the material (140 ° C ) in which the disappearance of bands was found in the region of normal modes at 130 ° C, thus demonstrating a irreversible structural phase transition, because the spectrum obtained after returning the sample to ambient temperature is typical of amorphous material. (author)

  14. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  15. Rapid pointwise stabilization of vibrating strings and beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia BARHOUMI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Applying a general construction and using former results on the observability we prove, under rather general assumptions, a rapid pointwise stabilization of vibrating strings and beams.

  16. Universality in the dynamical properties of seismic vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Barat, P.; Mukherjee, Indranil

    2018-02-01

    We have studied the statistical properties of the observed magnitudes of seismic vibration data in discrete time in an attempt to understand the underlying complex dynamical processes. The observed magnitude data are taken from six different geographical locations. All possible magnitudes are considered in the analysis including catastrophic vibrations, foreshocks, aftershocks and commonplace daily vibrations. The probability distribution functions of these data sets obey scaling law and display a certain universality characteristic. To investigate the universality features in the observed data generated by a complex process, we applied Random Matrix Theory (RMT) in the framework of Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE). For all these six places the observed data show a close fit with the predictions of RMT. This reinforces the idea of universality in the dynamical processes generating seismic vibrations.

  17. Finite Element Analysis and Experimental Study on Elbow Vibration Transmission Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-shan, Dai; Zhen-hai, Zhang; Shi-jian, Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Pipeline system vibration is one of the significant factors leading to the vibration and noise of vessel. Elbow is widely used in the pipeline system. However, the researches about vibration of elbow are little, and there is no systematic study. In this research, we firstly analysed the relationship between elbow vibration transmission characteristics and bending radius by ABAQUS finite element simulation. Then, we conducted the further vibration test to observe the vibration transmission characteristics of different elbows which have the same diameter and different bending radius under different flow velocity. The results of simulation calculation and experiment both showed that the vibration acceleration levels of the pipeline system decreased with the increase of bending radius of the elbow, which was beneficial to reduce the transmission of vibration in the pipeline system. The results could be used as reference for further studies and designs for the low noise installation of pipeline system.

  18. Does the chromatic Mach bands effect exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsofe, Avital; Spitzer, Hedva; Einav, Shmuel

    2009-06-30

    The achromatic Mach bands effect is a well-known visual illusion, discovered over a hundred years ago. This effect has been investigated thoroughly, mainly for its brightness aspect. The existence of Chromatic Mach bands, however, has been disputed. In recent years it has been reported that Chromatic Mach bands are not perceived under controlled iso-luminance conditions. However, here we show that a variety of Chromatic Mach bands, consisting of chromatic and achromatic regions, separated by a saturation ramp, can be clearly perceived under iso-luminance and iso-brightness conditions. In this study, observers' eye movements were recorded under iso-brightness conditions. Several observers were tested for their ability to perceive the Chromatic Mach bands effect and its magnitude, across different cardinal and non-cardinal Chromatic Mach bands stimuli. A computational model of color adaptation, which predicted color induction and color constancy, successfully predicts this variation of Chromatic Mach bands. This has been tested by measuring the distance of the data points from the "achromatic point" and by calculating the shift of the data points from predicted complementary lines. The results suggest that the Chromatic Mach bands effect is a specific chromatic induction effect.

  19. Passive and active vibration isolation systems using inerter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alujević, N.; Čakmak, D.; Wolf, H.; Jokić, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on passive and active vibration isolation schemes using inerter elements in a two degree of freedom (DOF) mechanical system. The aim of the work is to discuss basic capabilities and limitations of the vibration control systems at hand using simple and physically transparent models. Broad frequency band dynamic excitation of the source DOF is assumed. The purpose of the isolator system is to prevent vibration transmission to the receiving DOF. The frequency averaged kinetic energy of the receiving mass is used as the metric for vibration isolation quality. It is shown that the use of inerter element in the passive vibration isolation scheme can enhance the isolation effect. In the active case, a feedback disturbance rejection scheme is considered. Here, the error signal is the receiving body absolute velocity which is directly fed to a reactive force actuator between the source and the receiving bodies. In such a scheme, the so-called subcritical vibration isolation problems exist. These problems are characterised by the uncoupled natural frequency of the receiving body larger than the uncoupled natural frequency of the source body. In subcritical vibration isolation problems, the performance of the active control is limited by poor stability margins. This is because the stable feedback gain is restricted in a narrow range between a minimum and a maximum. However, with the inclusion of an inerter in the isolator, one of the two stability margins can be opened. This enables large, theoretically unlimited negative feedback gains and large active damping of the receiving body vibration. A simple expression for the required inertance is derived.

  20. The Far Infrared Spectrum of Thiophosgene: Analysis of the νb{2} Fundamental Band at 500 wn

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Billinghurst, B. E.

    2009-06-01

    Thiophosgene (Cl_2CS) is a model system for studies of vibrational dynamics. Many hundreds of vibrational levels in the ground electronic state have been experimentally observed, allowing a detailed anharmonic force field to be developed including all six vibrational modes. But there have been no previous high resolution studies of this molecule in the infrared, presumably because its mass and multiple isotopic species result in very congested spectra. Here we report a detailed study of the strong νb{2} fundamental band (symmetric C - Cl stretch) based on a spectrum obtained using synchrotron radiation with the Bruker IFS125 FT spectrometer at the Canadian Light Source far infrared beamline. Thiophosgene is an interesting example of an accidentally near-symmetric oblate rotor. Indeed, its inertial axes switch with isotopic substitution: for ^{35}Cl_2CS, the C_{2v} symmetry axis coincides with the a inertial axis, but for ^{37}Cl_2CS, this changes to the b axis. Fortunately for us, the ground state microwave spectrum has been well studied. Even so, it has required the full spectral resolution of the present results, with observed line widths of about 0.0008 wn, to achieve a true line-by-line analysis. [1] For example: P.D. Chowdary, B. Strickler, S. Lee, and M. Gruebele, Chem. Phys. Letters 434, 182 (2007). [2] J.H. Carpenter, D.F. Rimmer, J.G. Smith, and D.H. Whiffen, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 2 71, 1752 (1971).

  1. Vibration of helical springs in cross water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisa, F.; Brunet, G.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present new experimental data on vortex-shedding induced vibration on helical springs subjected to cross-flows. Intense locked-in vibration were observed on the natural modes of axial displacement. A simplified model is tentatively proposed to interpret the experimental data which is based on an analogy with vortex-shedding as observed on straight tube rows

  2. A complete vibrational study on a potential environmental toxicant agent, the 3,3',4,4'-tetrachloroazobenzene combining the FTIR, FTRaman, UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies with DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, María V; Pergomet, Jorgelina L; Carnavale, Gustavo A; Davies, Lilian; Zinczuk, Juan; Brandán, Silvia A

    2015-01-05

    In this study 3,3',4,4'-tetrachloroazobenzene (TCAB) was prepared and then characterized by infrared, Raman, multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopies. The density functional theory (DFT) together with the 6-31G(*) and 6-311++G(**) basis sets were used to study the structures and vibrational properties of the two cis and trans isomers of TCAB. The harmonic vibrational wavenumbers for the optimized geometries were calculated at the same theory levels. A complete assignment of all the observed bands in the vibrational spectra of TCAB was performed combining the DFT calculations with the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. The molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders and frontier orbitals for the two isomers of TCAB were compared and analyzed. The comparison of the theoretical ultraviolet-visible spectrum with the corresponding experimental demonstrates a good concordance while the calculated (1)H and (13)C chemicals shifts are in good conformity with the corresponding experimental NMR spectra of TCAB in solution. The npp(*) transitions for both forms were studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) while the topological properties were calculated by employing Bader's Atoms in the Molecules (AIM) theory. This study shows that the cis and trans isomers exhibit different structural and vibrational properties and absorption bands. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of unstable N-containing compounds: Resolution of ΔK subbands in HNCO+ and vibrational resolution in NCO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Lang, Melanie; Fischer, Ingo; Tang, Xiaofeng; Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Romanzin, Claire; Alcaraz, Christian; Hemberger, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of two unstable nitrogen-containing species, HNCO and NCO, were recorded utilizing vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Both are intermediates in combustion processes and play a role in the removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases. The rovibronic structure of the first band in the TPES of HNCO + was analyzed within the framework of an orbital ionization model, and the resolved structure of the origin band was assigned to ΔK subbands. An ionization energy of 11.602 ± 0.005 eV was determined and the vibrational structure of the cationic ground state was analyzed by a Franck-Condon fit. Low lying electronically excited states of HNCO + were also observed. In a second series of experiments, the NCO radical was generated by flash pyrolysis from chlorine isocyanate. The ionization energy to the X + 3 Σ − ground state was determined to be 11.76 ± 0.02 eV, while for the a +1 Δ state, a value of 12.93 ± 0.02 eV was obtained. Vibrational structure was observed for both states, and bands were assigned by Franck-Condon simulations

  4. Structural Characteristics of Rotate Vector Reducer Free Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For RV reducer widely used in robots, vibration significantly affects its performance. A lumped parameter model is developed to investigate free vibration characteristics without and with gyroscopic effects. The dynamic model considers key factors affecting vibration such as involute and cycloid gear mesh stiffness, crankshaft bending stiffness, and bearing stiffness. For both nongyroscopic and gyroscopic systems, free vibrations are examined and compared with each other. Results reveal the specific structure of vibration modes for both systems, which results from symmetry structure of RV reducer. According to vibration of the central components, vibration modes of two systems can be classified into three types, rotational, translational, and planetary component modes. Different from nongyroscopic system, the eigenvalues with gyroscopic effects are complex-valued and speed-dependent. The eigenvalue for a range of carrier speeds is obtained by numerical simulation. Divergence and flutter instability is observed at speeds adjacent to critical speeds. Furthermore, the work studies effects of key factors, which include crankshaft eccentricity and the number of pins, on eigenvalues. Finally, experiment is performed to verify the effectiveness of the dynamic model. The research of this paper is helpful for the analysis on free vibration and dynamic design of RV reducer.

  5. Franck-Condon fingerprinting of vibration-tunneling spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Eduardo; Sundaradevan, Praveen; Gruebele, Martin

    2013-08-15

    We introduce Franck-Condon fingerprinting as a method for assigning complex vibration-tunneling spectra. The B̃ state of thiophosgene (SCCl2) serves as our prototype. Despite several attempts, assignment of its excitation spectrum has proved difficult because of near-degenerate vibrational frequencies, Fermi resonance between the C-Cl stretching mode and the Cl-C-Cl bending mode, and large tunneling splittings due to the out-of-plane umbrella mode. Hence, the spectrum has never been fitted to an effective Hamiltonian. Our assignment approach replaces precise frequency information with intensity information, eliminating the need for double resonance spectroscopy or combination differences, neither of which have yielded a full assignment thus far. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum of each unknown vibration-tunneling state images its character onto known vibrational progressions in the ground state. By using this Franck-Condon fingerprint, we were able to determine the predominant character of several vibration-tunneling states and assign them; in other cases, the fingerprinting revealed that the states are strongly mixed and cannot be characterized with a simple normal mode assignment. The assigned transitions from vibration-tunneling wave functions that were not too strongly mixed could be fitted within measurement uncertainty by an effective vibration-tunneling Hamiltonian. A fit of all observed vibration-tunneling states will require a full resonance-tunneling Hamiltonian.

  6. Remote monitoring of vibrational information in spider webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, B.; Soler, A.; Siviour, C. R.; Vollrath, F.

    2018-06-01

    Spiders are fascinating model species to study information-acquisition strategies, with the web acting as an extension of the animal's body. Here, we compare the strategies of two orb-weaving spiders that acquire information through vibrations transmitted and filtered in the web. Whereas Araneus diadematus monitors web vibration directly on the web, Zygiella x-notata uses a signal thread to remotely monitor web vibration from a retreat, which gives added protection. We assess the implications of these two information-acquisition strategies on the quality of vibration information transfer, using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure vibrations of real webs and finite element analysis in computer models of webs. We observed that the signal thread imposed no biologically relevant time penalty for vibration propagation. However, loss of energy (attenuation) was a cost associated with remote monitoring via a signal thread. The findings have implications for the biological use of vibrations by spiders, including the mechanisms to locate and discriminate between vibration sources. We show that orb-weaver spiders are fascinating examples of organisms that modify their physical environment to shape their information-acquisition strategy.

  7. Vibration of fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.S.

    1975-06-01

    Several mathematical models have been proposed for calculating fuel rod responses in axial flows based on a single rod consideration. The spacing between fuel rods in liquid metal fast breeder reactors is small; hence fuel rods will interact with one another due to fluid coupling. The objective of this paper is to study the coupled vibration of fuel bundles. To account for the fluid coupling, a computer code, AMASS, is developed to calculate added mass coefficients for a group of circular cylinders based on the potential flow theory. The equations of motion for rod bundles are then derived including hydrodynamic forces, drag forces, fluid pressure, gravity effect, axial tension, and damping. Based on the equations, a method of analysis is presented to study the free and forced vibrations of rod bundles. Finally, the method is applied to a typical LMFBR fuel bundle consisting of seven rods

  8. Shaft Crack Identification Based on Vibration and AE Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiu Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shaft crack is one of the main serious malfunctions that often occur in rotating machinery. However, it is difficult to locate the crack and determine the depth of the crack. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE signal and vibration response are used to diagnose the crack. The wavelet transform is applied to AE signal to decompose into a series of time-domain signals, each of which covers a specific octave frequency band. Then an improved union method based on threshold and cross-correlation method is applied to detect the location of the shaft crack. The finite element method is used to build the model of the cracked rotor, and the crack depth is identified by comparing the vibration response of experiment and simulation. The experimental results show that the AE signal is effective and convenient to locate the shaft crack, and the vibration signal is feasible to determine the depth of shaft crack.

  9. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin; Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational

  10. Band parameters of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene. (paper)

  11. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  12. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  13. Return to Flying Duties Following Centrifuge or Vibration Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Clarke, Jonathan; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In an effort to determine the human performance limits for vibration in spacecraft being developed by NASA, astronauts were evaluated during a simulated launch profile in a centrifuge/vibration environment and separate vibration-only simulation. Current USAF and Army standards for return to flight following centrifuge exposures require 12-24 hours to pass before a crewmember may return to flying duties. There are no standards on vibration exposures and return to flying duties. Based on direct observation and provocative neurological testing of the astronauts, a new standard for return to flying duties following centrifuge and/or vibration exposures was established. Methods: 13 astronaut participants were exposed to simulated launch profiles in a + 3.5 Gx bias centrifuge/vibration environment and separately on a vibration table at the NASA-Ames Research Center. Each subject had complete neurological evaluations pre- and post-exposure for the centrifuge/vibration runs with the NASA neurological function rating scale (NFRS). Subjects who participated in the vibration-only exposures had video oculography performed with provocative maneuvers in addition to the NFRS. NFRS evaluations occurred immediately following each exposure and at 1 hour post-run. Astronauts who remained symptomatic at 1 hour had repeat NFRS performed at 1 hour intervals until the crewmember was asymptomatic. Results: Astronauts in the centrifuge/vibration study averaged a 3-5 point increase in NFRS scores immediately following exposure but returned to baseline 3 hours post-run. Subjects exposed to the vibration-only simulation had a 1-3 point increase following exposure and returned to baseline within 1-2 hours. Pre- and post- vibration exposure video oculography did not reveal any persistent ocular findings with provocative testing 1 hour post-exposure. Discussion: Based on direct observations and objective measurement of neurological function in astronauts following simulated launch

  14. Opening complete band gaps in two dimensional locally resonant phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Locally resonant phononic crystals (LRPCs) which have low frequency band gaps attract a growing attention in both scientific and engineering field recently. Wide complete locally resonant band gaps are the goal for researchers. In this paper, complete band gaps are achieved by carefully designing the geometrical properties of the inclusions in two dimensional LRPCs. The band structures and mechanisms of different types of models are investigated by the finite element method. The translational vibration patterns in both the in-plane and out-of-plane directions contribute to the full band gaps. The frequency response of the finite periodic structures demonstrate the attenuation effects in the complete band gaps. Moreover, it is found that the complete band gaps can be further widened and lowered by increasing the height of the inclusions. The tunable properties by changing the geometrical parameters provide a good way to open wide locally resonant band gaps.

  15. Customized DSP-based vibration measurement for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaWhite, N.E.; Cohn, K.E. [Second Wind Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    As part of its Advanced Distributed Monitoring System (ADMS) project funded by NREL, Second Wind Inc. is developing a new vibration measurement system for use with wind turbines. The system uses low-cost accelerometers originally designed for automobile airbag crash-detection coupled with new software executed on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) device. The system is envisioned as a means to monitor the mechanical {open_quotes}health{close_quotes} of the wind turbine over its lifetime. In addition the system holds promise as a customized emergency vibration detector. The two goals are very different and it is expected that different software programs will be executed for each function. While a fast Fourier transform (FFT) signature under given operating conditions can yield much information regarding turbine condition, the sampling period and processing requirements make it inappropriate for emergency condition monitoring. This paper briefly reviews the development of prototype DSP and accelerometer hardware. More importantly, it reviews our work to design prototype vibration alarm filters. Two-axis accelerometer test data from the experimental FloWind vertical axis wind turbine is analyzed and used as a development guide. Two levels of signal processing are considered. The first uses narrow band pre-processing filters at key fundamental frequencies such as the 1P, 2P and 3P. The total vibration energy in each frequency band is calculated and evaluated as a possible alarm trigger. In the second level of signal processing, the total vibration energy in each frequency band is further decomposed using the two-axis directional information. Directional statistics are calculated to differentiate between linear translations and circular translations. After analyzing the acceleration statistics for normal and unusual operating conditions, the acceleration processing system described could be used in automatic early detection of fault conditions. 9 figs.

  16. Pickin’ up good vibrations

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for the civil engineering work on the HL-LHC, vibration measurements were carried out at the LHC’s Point 1 last month. These measurements will help evaluate how civil engineering work could impact the beam, and will provide crucial details about the site’s geological make-up before construction begins.   A seismic truck at Point 1 generated wave-like vibrations measured by EN/MME. From carrying out R&D to produce state-of-the-art magnets to developing innovative, robust materials capable of withstanding beam impact, the HL-LHC is a multi-faceted project involving many groups and teams across CERN’s departments. It was in this framework that the project management mandated CERN's Mechanical and Materials Engineering (EN/MME) group to measure the propagation of vibrations around Point 1. Their question: can civil engineering work for the HL-LHC – the bulk of which is scheduled for LS2 – begin while the LHC is running? Alth...

  17. Vibrational stability of graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangfan Hu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202. This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC, defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D materials.

  18. Research on Radial Vibration of a Circular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial vibration of the circular plate is presented using wave propagation approach and classical method containing Bessel solution and Hankel solution for calculating the natural frequency theoretically. In cylindrical coordinate system, in order to obtain natural frequency, propagation and reflection matrices are deduced at the boundaries of free-free, fixed-fixed, and fixed-free using wave propagation approach. Furthermore, radial phononic crystal is constructed by connecting two materials periodically for the analysis of band phenomenon. Also, Finite Element Simulation (FEM is adopted to verify the theoretical results. Finally, the radial and piezoelectric effects on the band are also discussed.

  19. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  20. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  1. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...

  2. High resolution infrared and Raman spectra of 13C12CD2: The CD stretching fundamentals and associated combination and hot bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Lonardo, G.; Fusina, L.; Canè, E.; Tamassia, F.; Martínez, R. Z.; Bermejo, D.

    2015-01-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of mono 13 C fully deuterated acetylene, 13 C 12 CD 2 , have been recorded and analysed to obtain detailed information on the C—D stretching fundamentals and associated combination, overtone, and hot bands. Infrared spectra were recorded at an instrumental resolution ranging between 0.006 and 0.01 cm −1 in the region 1800–7800 cm −1 . Sixty new bands involving the ν 1 and ν 3 C—D stretching modes also associated with the ν 4 and ν 5 bending vibrations have been observed and analysed. In total, 5881 transitions have been assigned in the investigated spectral region. In addition, the Q branch of the ν 1 fundamental was recorded using inverse Raman spectroscopy, with an instrumental resolution of about 0.003 cm −1 . The transitions relative to each stretching mode, i.e., the fundamental band, its first overtone, and associated hot and combination bands involving bending states with υ 4 + υ 5 up to 2 were fitted simultaneously. The usual Hamiltonian appropriate to a linear molecule, including vibration and rotation l-type and the Darling–Dennison interaction between υ 4 = 2 and υ 5 = 2 levels associated with the stretching states, was adopted for the analysis. The standard deviation for each global fit is ≤0.0004 cm −1 , of the same order of magnitude of the measurement precision. Slightly improved parameters for the bending and the ν 2 manifold have been also determined. Precise values of spectroscopic parameters deperturbed from the resonance interactions have been obtained. They provide quantitative information on the anharmonic character of the potential energy surface, which can be useful, in addition to those reported in the literature, for the determination of a general anharmonic force field for the molecule. Finally, the obtained values of the Darling–Dennison constants can be valuable for understanding energy flows between independent vibrations

  3. Multi-flexural band gaps in an Euler–Bernoulli beam with lateral local resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting, E-mail: WT323@mail.nwpu.edu.cn [School of Marine Science and Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710072 (China); College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, ACT, 2600 (Australia); Sheng, Mei-Ping [School of Marine Science and Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710072 (China); Qin, Qing-Hua [College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, ACT, 2600 (Australia)

    2016-02-05

    Flexural vibration suppression in an Euler–Bernoulli beam with attached lateral local resonators (LLR) is studied theoretically and numerically. Hamilton's principle and Bloch's theorem are employed to derive the dispersion relation which reveals that two band gaps are generated. Within both band gaps, the flexural waves are partially transformed into longitudinal waves through a four-link-mechanism and totally blocked. The band gaps can be flexibly tuned by changing the geometry parameter of the four-link-mechanism and the spring constants of the resonators. Frequency response function (FRF) from finite element analysis via commercial software of ANSYS shows large flexural wave attenuation within the band gaps and the effect of damping from the LLR substructures which helps smooth and lower the response peaks at the sacrifice of the band gap effect. The existence of the multi-flexural band gaps can be exploited for the design of flexural vibration control of beams. - Highlights: • A metamaterial beam with lateral local resonance is proposed. • The metamaterial beam can generate multi-band gaps for flexural wave suppression. • The substructure can transform the flexural wave into longitudinal wave and absorb the waves. • Damping from different part has different influence on the band gaps. • The design of the metamaterial beam can be used for multi-flexural vibration control.

  4. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirali, O.; Gruet, S. [AILES Beamline, Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, UMR8214 CNRS – Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Kisiel, Z. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Goubet, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR 8523 CNRS - Université Lille 1, Bâtiment P5, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l’Atmosphère, EA-4493, Université du Littoral – Côte d’Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France)

    2015-03-14

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C{sub 9}H{sub 7}N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν{sub 45} and ν{sub 44} vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm{sup −1} and 178 cm{sup −1}, respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations.

  5. Vibrational Spectrum of HMX at CO2 Laser Wavelengths: A Combined DRIFT and LPAS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Puiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational spectrum of solid standard HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine was investigated. Two spectroscopic techniques were adopted for their different sensitivity and resolution. A preliminary survey of the absorption bands of the compound was performed in the 8000–400 cm−1 spectral range by employing the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT technique at room temperature. The high-resolution line spectrum of HMX was obtained in the 9.2–10.8 μm spectral range by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS method, using a line tuneable 10 W stabilised cw CO2 laser light source. By comparing the data collected with the two techniques in the common frequency range, a very good agreement was observed.

  6. Random vibrations theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Wirsching, Paul H; Ortiz, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Random Vibrations: Theory and Practice covers the theory and analysis of mechanical and structural systems undergoing random oscillations due to any number of phenomena— from engine noise, turbulent flow, and acoustic noise to wind, ocean waves, earthquakes, and rough pavement. For systems operating in such environments, a random vibration analysis is essential to the safety and reliability of the system. By far the most comprehensive text available on random vibrations, Random Vibrations: Theory and Practice is designed for readers who are new to the subject as well as those who are familiar with the fundamentals and wish to study a particular topic or use the text as an authoritative reference. It is divided into three major sections: fundamental background, random vibration development and applications to design, and random signal analysis. Introductory chapters cover topics in probability, statistics, and random processes that prepare the reader for the development of the theory of random vibrations a...

  7. VIBRATION ISOLATION SYSTEM PROBABILITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vladimir Alexandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the probability analysis for a vibration isolation system of high-precision equipment, which is extremely sensitive to low-frequency oscillations even of submicron amplitude. The external sources of low-frequency vibrations may include the natural city background or internal low-frequency sources inside buildings (pedestrian activity, HVAC. Taking Gauss distribution into account, the author estimates the probability of the relative displacement of the isolated mass being still lower than the vibration criteria. This problem is being solved in the three dimensional space, evolved by the system parameters, including damping and natural frequency. According to this probability distribution, the chance of exceeding the vibration criteria for a vibration isolation system is evaluated. Optimal system parameters - damping and natural frequency - are being developed, thus the possibility of exceeding vibration criteria VC-E and VC-D is assumed to be less than 0.04.

  8. Hand-arm vibration in orthopaedic surgery: a neglected risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, F; Ferguson, K B; Clarke, J; Hill, K; Macdonald, E B; Macdonald, D J M

    2017-12-30

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome is an occupational disease caused by exposure to hand-arm transmitted vibration. The Health and Safety Executive has set limits for vibration exposure, including an exposure action value (EAV), where steps should be taken to reduce exposure, and an exposure limit value (ELV), beyond which vibrating equipment must not be used for the rest of the working day. To measure hand-arm transmitted vibration among orthopaedic surgeons, who routinely use hand-operated saws. We undertook a cadaveric study measuring vibration associated with a tibial cut using battery-operated saws. Three surgeons undertook three tibial cuts each on cadaveric tibiae. Measurements were taken using a frequency-weighted root mean square acceleration, with the vibration total value calculated as the root of the sums squared in each of the three axes. A mean (SD) vibration magnitude of 1 (0.2) m/s2 in the X-axis, 10.3 (1.9) m/s2 in the Y-axis and 4.2 (1.3) m/s2 in the Z-axis was observed. The weighted root mean squared magnitude of vibration was 11.3 (1.7) m/s2. These results suggest an EAV of 23 min and ELV of 1 h 33 min using this equipment. Our results demonstrate that use of a battery-operated sagittal saw can transmit levels of hand-arm vibration approaching the EAV or ELV through prolonged use. Further study is necessary to quantify this risk and establish whether surveillance is necessary for orthopaedic surgeons. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Ethane in Planetary and Cometary Atmospheres: Transmittance and Fluorescence Models of the nu7 Band at 3.3 Micrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ethane and other hydrocarbon gases have strong rovibrational transitions in the 3.3 micron spectral region owing to C-H, CH2, and CH3 vibrational modes, making this spectral region prime for searching possible biomarker gases in extraterrestrial atmospheres (e.g., Mars, exoplanets) and organic molecules in comets. However, removing ethane spectral signatures from high-resolution terrestrial transmittance spectra has been imperfect because existing quantum mechanical models have been unable to reproduce the observed spectra with sufficient accuracy. To redress this problem, we constructed a line-by-line model for the n7 band of ethane (C2H6) and applied it to compute telluric transmittances and cometary fluorescence efficiencies. Our model considers accurate spectral parameters, vibration-rotation interactions, and a functional characterization of the torsional hot band. We integrated the new band model into an advanced radiative transfer code for synthesizing the terrestrial atmosphere (LBLRTM), achieving excellent agreement with transmittance data recorded against Mars using three different instruments located in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. The retrieved ethane abundances demonstrate the strong hemispheric asymmetry noted in prior surveys of volatile hydrocarbons. We also retrieved sensitive limits for the abundance of ethane on Mars. The most critical validation of the model was obtained by comparing simulations of C2H6 fluorescent emission with spectra of three hydrocarbon-rich comets: C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), 8P/Tuttle, and C/2007 W1 (Boattini). The new model accurately describes the complex emission morphology of the nu7 band at low rotational temperatures and greatly increases the confidence of the retrieved production rates (and rotational temperatures) with respect to previously available fluorescence models.

  10. Study on vibration behaviors of engineered barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikoshiba, Tadashi; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Minowa, Chikahiro [National Research Inst. for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Small engineered barrier model was mode and tested by vibrating with the random wave and the real earthquake wave. The wave observed at Kamaishi (N-S, N-W), Iwate Prefecture, in September 6, 1993, and Kobe (N-S) etc. were used as the real earthquake waves. The trial overpack showed non-linear characteristics (soft spring) by vibrating with the random wave. The pressure and acceleration of trial overpack and constraint container increased with increasing the vibration level of the real earthquake wave. The trial overpack moved the maximum 1.7 mm of displacement and 16 mm subsidence. The results showed both waves rocked the trialpack. (S.Y.)

  11. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies on charge transfer and ionic hydrogen bonding interactions of melaminium benzoate dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagathara, N.; Marchewka, M. K.; Drozd, M.; Gunasekaran, S.; Rajakumar, P. R.; Anbalagan, G.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of melaminium benzoate dihydrate (MBDH) have been grown from aqueous solution by the slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. Crystalline nature of the grown crystal has been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction studies. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of MBDH were obtained by the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory using B3LYP/cam-B3LYP with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral values. The obtained vibrational wavenumbers and optimized geometric parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. UV-Visible spectrum was recorded in the region 200-400 nm and the electronic properties, HOMO-LUMO energies and other related electronic parameters are calculated. The isotropic chemical shifts computed by 1H and 13C NMR analysis also show good agreement with experimental observation. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been performed on MBDH compound to analyze the stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP) has also been performed by DFT/cam-B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Differential scanning calorimetric measurements performed on the powder sample indicate the phase transition point approximately at 368 and 358 K for heating and cooling, respectively.

  12. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  13. Atomic beams probe surface vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    In the last two years, surface scientist have begun trying to obtain the vibrational frequencies of surface atoms in both insulating and metallic crystals from beams of helium atoms. It is the inelastic scattering that researchers use to probe surface vibrations. Inelastic atomic beam scattering has only been used to obtain vibrational frequency spectra from clean surfaces. Several experiments using helium beams are cited. (SC)

  14. The influence of noise and vibration upon creatine kinase activity in blood serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonderko, G; Gabryel, A; Jonderko, K; Konca, A; Marcisz, C; Olak, Z; Szramek-Urbaniak, A

    1982-02-01

    The investigations comprised part of the workers employed in a factory of prefabricated concrete elements. The creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined before and after a day's work in the following groups of workers: These exposed to noise and vibration exceeding the allowed norm; those exposed to noise, performing the same hard physical work as group I and exposed to vibration not exceeding 79dB in particular octave bands, and those practising physical work a group I and II but in environment free from noise and vibration, and a control group of persons not exposed to any of the tested factors (vibration, noise, work). The obtained results indicate that the determination of the CK activity may serve as a test of exposure to vibration and noise.

  15. Warm-Up Activities of Middle and High School Band Directors Participating in State-Level Concert Band Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Justin P.; Hancock, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the warm-ups chosen by concert band directors participating in state-level performance assessments. We observed 29 middle and high school bands and coded the frequency and duration of warm-up activities and behaviors. Results indicated that most bands rehearsed music and played scales, long tones, and…

  16. Magnetorheological elastomer vibration isolation of tunable three-dimensional locally resonant acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Tong, Jie; Wu, Fugen

    2018-03-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are used as cladding in three-dimensional locally resonant acoustic metamaterial (LRAM) cores. The metamaterial units are combined into a vibration isolator. Two types of LRAMs, namely, cubic and spherical kernels, are constructed. The finite element method is used to analyze the elastic band structures, transmittances, and vibration modes of the incident elastic waves. Results show that the central position and width of the LRAM elastic bandgap can be controlled by the application of an external magnetic field; furthermore, they can be adjusted by changing the MRE cladding thickness. These methods contribute to the design of metamaterial MRE vibration isolators.

  17. Decreasing patient identification band errors by standardizing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Susan Chu; Berger, Stephanie; Harris, Yolanda; Gallizzi, Gina; Hayes, Leslie

    2013-04-01

    Patient identification (ID) bands are an essential component in patient ID. Quality improvement methodology has been applied as a model to reduce ID band errors although previous studies have not addressed standardization of ID bands. Our specific aim was to decrease ID band errors by 50% in a 12-month period. The Six Sigma DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) quality improvement model was the framework for this study. ID bands at a tertiary care pediatric hospital were audited from January 2011 to January 2012 with continued audits to June 2012 to confirm the new process was in control. After analysis, the major improvement strategy implemented was standardization of styles of ID bands and labels. Additional interventions included educational initiatives regarding the new ID band processes and disseminating institutional and nursing unit data. A total of 4556 ID bands were audited with a preimprovement ID band error average rate of 9.2%. Significant variation in the ID band process was observed, including styles of ID bands. Interventions were focused on standardization of the ID band and labels. The ID band error rate improved to 5.2% in 9 months (95% confidence interval: 2.5-5.5; P error rates. This decrease in ID band error rates was maintained over the subsequent 8 months.

  18. Structure-dependent vibrational dynamics of Mg(BH 4 ) 2 polymorphs probed with neutron vibrational spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrievska, Mirjana; White, James L.; Zhou, Wei; Stavila, Vitalie; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-dependent vibrational properties of different Mg(BH4)2 polymorphs (..alpha.., ..beta.., ..gamma.., and ..delta.. phases) were investigated with a combination of neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with emphasis placed on the effects of the local structure and orientation of the BH4- anions. DFT simulations closely match the neutron vibrational spectra. The main bands in the low-energy region (20-80 meV) are associated with the BH4- librational modes. The features in the intermediate energy region (80-120 meV) are attributed to overtones and combination bands arising from the lower-energy modes. The features in the high-energy region (120-200 meV) correspond to the BH4- symmetric and asymmetric bending vibrations, of which four peaks located at 140, 142, 160, and 172 meV are especially intense. There are noticeable intensity distribution variations in the vibrational bands for different polymorphs. This is explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of BH4- anions within various structures. An example of the possible identification of products after the hydrogenation of MgB2, using NVS measurements, is presented. These results provide fundamental insights of benefit to researchers currently studying these promising hydrogen-storage materials.

  19. Digital analysis of vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnstedt, H.J.; Walter, G.

    1982-01-01

    Vibrational measurements, e.g. on turbomachinery, can be evaluated rapidly and economically with the aid of a combination of the following instruments: a desk-top computer, a two-channel vector filter and a FFT spectral analyzer. This equipment combination is available within the Allianz Centre for Technology and has also been used for mobile, on-site investigations during the last year. It enables calculation and display of time functions, kinetic shaft orbits, displacement diagrams. Bode plots, polar-coordinate plots, cascade diagrams and histograms. (orig.) [de

  20. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  1. Vibration control, machine diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Changing vibrations announce damage in the form of wear or cracks on components of, e.g., engine rotors, pumps, power plant turbo sets, rounding-up tools, or marine diesel engines. Therefore, machine diagnostics use frequency analyses, system tests, trend analyses as well as expert systems to localize or estimate the causes of these damages and malfunctions. Data acquisistion, including not only sensors, but also reliable and redundant data processing systems and analyzing systems, play an important role. The lectures pertaining to the data base are covered in detail. (DG) [de

  2. A periodic piezoelectric smart structure with the integrated passive/active vibration-reduction performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxi; Niu, Shengkai; Hu, Yuantai

    2017-06-01

    The paper proposes a new piezoelectric smart structure with the integrated passive/active vibration-reduction performances, which is made of a series of periodic structural units. Every structural unit is made of two layers, one is an array of piezoelectric bimorphs (PBs) and one is an array of metal beams (MBs), both are connected as a whole by a metal plate. Analyses show that such a periodic smart structure possesses two aspects of vibration-reduction performance: one comes from its phonon crystal characteristics which can isolate those vibrations with the driving frequency inside the band gap(s). The other one comes from the electromechanical conversion of bent PBs, which is actively aimed at those vibrations with the driving frequency outside the band gap(s). By adjusting external inductance, the equivalent circuit of the proposed structure can be forced into parallel resonance such that most of the vibration energy is converted into electrical energy for dissipation by a resistance. Thus, an external circuit under the parallel resonance state is equivalent to a strong damping to the interrelated vibrating structure, which is just the action mechanism of the active vibration reduction performance of the proposed smart structure.

  3. The Influence of Various Vibration Frequency on Barium Sulfate Scale Formation Of Vibrated Piping System In The Presence Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, N.; Mangestiyono, W.; Muryanto, S.; Jamari, J.; Bayuseno, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of vibrated piping system for BaSO4 scale formation was investigated. The vibration frequency and presence of citric acid were independent variables determining the kinetics, mass deposit and polymorph of the crystals. Correspondingly, induction time and mass of scale were obtained during the experiments. The crystalline scale was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to investigate the morphology and the phase mineral deposits, respectively. This effect indicated that the increase in vibration frequency promoted the increased deposition rate, while the pure barite with a plate-like morphology was produced in the experiments.

  4. A superdeformed band in {sup 142}Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackman, G; Mullins, J M; Kuehner, J A; Prevost, D; Waddington, J C [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Janzen, V P; Radford, D C; Schmeing, N; Ward, D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1992-08-01

    Observation of {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences from the reaction {sup 124}Sn({sup 24}Mg,6n){sup 142}Sm at 145 MeV indicates the existence of a rotational band with dynamic moment of inertia J{sup (2)} similar to that of the superdeformed band in the isotone {sup 143}Eu. This result is consistent with calculations predicting superdeformed structures in N = 80, Z {approx} 64 nuclei. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Causes and proposed resolutions of high vibration in NWTF transfer pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trawinski, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    This Technical Report is intended to communicate the findings from the latest phase of New Waste Transfer Facility (NWTF) transfer pump testing. These tests have identified causes for the high pump vibrations that have been observed during previous phases of transfer pump startup testing, and have led to recommendations for resolving the vibration problem. The paper describes the problem, the test methodology, observations, and recommend actions to correct the vibration problem

  6. Off-axis Modal Active Vibration Control Of Rotational Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babakhani, B.; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.; van Amerongen, J.

    Collocated active vibration control is an effective and robustly stable way of adding damping to the performance limiting vibrations of a plant. Besides the physical parameters of the Active Damping Unit (ADU) containing the collocated actuator and sensor, its location with respect to the

  7. Systematic design of phononic band-gap materials and structures by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Phononic band-gap materials prevent elastic waves in certain frequency ranges from propagating, and they may therefore be used to generate frequency filters, as beam splitters, as sound or vibration protection devices, or as waveguides. In this work we show how topology optimization can be used...... to design and optimize periodic materials and structures exhibiting phononic band gaps. Firstly, we optimize infinitely periodic band-gap materials by maximizing the relative size of the band gaps. Then, finite structures subjected to periodic loading are optimized in order to either minimize the structural...

  8. Hypersonic modulation of light in three-dimensional photonic and phononic band-gap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, A V; Tanaka, Y; Pevtsov, A B; Kaplan, S F; Golubev, V G; Tamura, S; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M

    2008-07-18

    The elastic coupling between the a-SiO2 spheres composing opal films brings forth three-dimensional periodic structures which besides a photonic stop band are predicted to also exhibit complete phononic band gaps. The influence of elastic crystal vibrations on the photonic band structure has been studied by injection of coherent hypersonic wave packets generated in a metal transducer by subpicosecond laser pulses. These studies show that light with energies close to the photonic band gap can be efficiently modulated by hypersonic waves.

  9. New spectroscopic observations in electric discharges through carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    Two types of electric discharges were used: (a) In a supersonic expansion of pure CO gas. (b) In a U-shaped tube immersed in liquid nitrogen where either pure CO or mixtures of CO+He, CO+Ne, CO+NO are introduced. In both cases, the analyzed emissions were exclusively those issuing from the negative glows of the discharges. Fourier Transform spectra were recorded in the 28 000-17 000 cm-1 visible spectral region and also in the 8000-2000 cm-1 infra-red interval. Comparison of the two sets of spectra showed that spectra (a) correspond to excitation of the primary species whereas spectra (b) result from excitation of final compounds produced in the positive column. In the latter case, the main new observations are: (i) Selective excitation of particular upper state vibrational levels in the E 3Σ--a 3Π Herman system. (ii) Appearance of the C1Σ +- B1Σ + (0,0) Rydberg-Rydberg infrared band whereas the associated optical C1Σ +- A1Π Herzberg transition is absent. (iii) "Anomalous" vibrational distribution in the ground state vibration-rotation spectra. All the above observations are concomitant with previously reported IR emissions involving very high rotational levels (up to J=120) in the ground state. To explain them, processes involving dissociative recombinations of dimer cations are suggested.

  10. An expert system for vibration based diagnostics of rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korteniemi, A.

    1990-01-01

    Very often changes in the mechanical condition of the rotating machinery can be observed as changes in its vibration. This paper presents an expert system for vibration-based diagnosis of rotating machines by describing the architecture of the developed prototype system. The importance of modelling the problem solving knowledge as well as the domain knowledge is emphasized by presenting the knowledge in several levels

  11. Vibration Analysis of a Residential Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampaio Regina Augusta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of a study regarding vibration problems in a 17 storey residential building during pile driving in its vicinity. The structural design of the building was checked according to the Brazilian standards NBR6118 and NBR6123, and using commercial finite element software. An experimental analysis was also carried out using low frequency piezo-accelerometers attached to the building structure. Structure vibrations were recorded under ambient conditions. Four monitoring tests were performed on different days. The objective of the first monitoring test was an experimental modal analysis. To obtain de modal parameters, data was processed in the commercial software ARTEMIS employing two methods: the Stochastic Subspace Identification and the Frequency Domain Decomposition. Human comfort was investigated considering the International Standard ISO 2631. The Portuguese standard, NP2074, was also used as a reference, since it aims to limit the adverse effects of vibrations in structures caused by pile driving in the vicinity of the structure. The carried out experimental tests have shown that, according to ISO2301, the measure vibration levels are above the acceptance limits. However, velocity peaks are below the limits established by NP2074. It was concluded that, although the structure has adequate capacity to resist internal forces according to normative criteria, it has low horizontal stiffness, which could be verified by observing the vibration frequencies and mode shapes obtained with the finite element models, and its similarity with the experimental results. Thus, the analyses indicate the occurrence of discomfort by the residents.

  12. Optimizing hydroxyl airglow retrievals from long-slit astronomical spectroscopic observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Franzen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Astronomical spectroscopic observations from ground-based telescopes contain background emission lines from the terrestrial atmosphere's airglow. In the near infrared, this background is composed mainly of emission from Meinel bands of hydroxyl (OH, which is produced in highly excited vibrational states by reduction of ozone near 90 km. This emission contains a wealth of information on the chemical and dynamical state of the Earth's atmosphere. However, observation strategies and data reduction processes are usually optimized to minimize the influence of these features on the astronomical spectrum. Here we discuss a measurement technique to optimize the extraction of the OH airglow signal itself from routine J-, H-, and K-band long-slit astronomical spectroscopic observations. As an example, we use data recorded from a point-source observation by the Nordic Optical Telescope's intermediate-resolution spectrograph, which has a spatial resolution of approximately 100 m at the airglow layer. Emission spectra from the OH vibrational manifold from v′  =  9 down to v′  =  3, with signal-to-noise ratios up to 280, have been extracted from 10.8 s integrations. Rotational temperatures representative of the background atmospheric temperature near 90 km, the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region, can be fitted to the OH rotational lines with an accuracy of around 0.7 K. Using this measurement and analysis technique, we derive a rotational temperature distribution with v′ that agrees with atmospheric model conditions and the preponderance of previous work. We discuss the derived rotational temperatures from the different vibrational bands and highlight the potential for both the archived and future observations, which are at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions, to contribute toward the resolution of long-standing problems in atmospheric physics.

  13. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  14. Origin of Spectral Band Patterns in the Cosmic Unidentified Infrared Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Díaz Leines, Grisell

    2017-10-01

    The cosmic unidentified infrared emission (UIE) band phenomenon is generally considered as indicative of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in space. However, a coherent explanation of emission spectral band patterns depending on astrophysical source is yet to be resolved under this attribution. Meanwhile astronomers have restored the alternative origin as due to amorphous carbon particles, but assigning spectral patterns to specific structural elements of particles is equally challenging. Here we report a physical principle in which inclusion of nonplanar structural defects in aromatic core molecular structures (π domains) induces spectral patterns typical of the phenomenon. We show that defects in model π domains modulate the electronic-vibration coupling that activates the delocalized π -electron contribution to aromatic vibrational modes. The modulation naturally disperses C =C stretch modes in band patterns that readily resemble the UIE bands in the elusive 6 - 9 μ m range. The electron-vibration interaction mechanics governing the defect-induced band patterns underscores the importance of π delocalization in the emergence of UIE bands. We discuss the global UIE band regularity of this range as compatible with an emission from the delocalized s p2 phase, as π domains, confined in disordered carbon mixed-phase aggregates.

  15. Amplitude control of the track-induced self-excited vibration for a maglev system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Danfeng; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun

    2014-09-01

    The Electromagnet Suspension (EMS) maglev train uses controlled electromagnetic forces to achieve suspension, and self-excited vibration may occur due to the flexibility of the track. In this article, the harmonic balance method is applied to investigate the amplitude of the self-excited vibration, and it is found that the amplitude of the vibration depends on the voltage of the power supplier. Based on this observation, a vibration amplitude control method, which controls the amplitude of the vibration by adjusting the voltage of the power supplier, is proposed to attenuate the vibration. A PI controller is designed to control the amplitude of the vibration at a given level. The effectiveness of this method shows a good prospect for its application to commercial maglev systems. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prediction of vibration level in tunnel blasting; Tonneru kusshin happa ni yotte reiki sareru shindo no reberu yosoku ho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, A. [Kumamoto Industries Univ, Kumamoto (Japan); Yamamoto, M. [Asahi Chemical Industry Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, C. [Nishimatsu Construction Co. Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Kaneko, K. [Hokkaido Univ (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    For avoiding the generation of public hazard due to ground vibration causes by blasting in tunneling, it is important to devise a blasting method for ensuring the level of the ground vibration caused thereby under a limit, and an exact predication of ground vibration before blasting is desirable. In this study, the characteristics of the ground vibration caused by tunnel blasting are analyzed, and a summary of amplitude spectra calculating method is described. A theoretical analysis method for predicting the vibration level is proposed based on spectrum-multiplicative method. Vibration caused by multistage blasting in tunneling is most strong and deemed as important. When observing the process of elastic wave motion caused by multistage blasting being measured, the process can be divided into three element processes in frequency area as vibration source spectrum, transmission attenuation spectrum and frequency response function vibrating test, and, with the multiplication of them, the amplitude spectra at an observation portion can be estimated. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Vibrational, NMR and quantum chemical investigations of acetoacetanilde, 2-chloroacetoacetanilide and 2-methylacetoacetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Kalaivani, M; Senthilkumari, S; Mohan, S

    2013-11-01

    The vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compounds acetoacetanilide (AAA), 2-chloroacetoacetanilide (2CAAA) and 2-methylacetoacetanilide (2MAAA) have been performed. Density functional theory studies have been carried out with B3LYP method utilising 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets to determine structural, thermodynamic and vibrational characteristics of the compounds and also to understand the influence of chloro and methyl groups on the characteristic frequencies of amide (CONH) group. Intramolecular hydrogen bond exists in acetoacetanilide and o-substituted acetoacetanilide molecules and the N⋯O distance is found to be around 2.7Å. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecules were determined and the same have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have been determined. In AAA, 2CAAA and 2MAAA molecules, the nN→πCO(∗) interaction between the nitrogen lone pair and the amide CO antibonding orbital gives strong stabilization of 64.75, 62.84 and 64.18kJmol(-1), respectively. The blue shift in amide-II band of 2MAAA is observed by 45-50cm(-1) than that of AAA. The steric effect of ortho methyl group significantly operating on the NH bond properties. The amide-III, the CN stretching mode of methyl and chloro substituted acetoacetanilide compounds are not affected by the substitution while the amide-V band, the NH out of plane bending mode of 2-chloroacetoacetanilide compound is shifted to a higher frequency than that of AAA. The substituent chlorine plays significantly and the blue shift in o-substituted compounds than the parent in the amide-V vibration is observed. The amide-VI, CO out of plane bending modes of 2MAAA and 2CAAA are significantly raised than that of AAA. A blue shift of amide-VI, CO out of plane bending modes of 2MAAA and 2CAAA than AAA is observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  18. Vibrational spectra of ordered perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsmit, A.F.; Hoefdraad, H.E.; Blasse, G.

    1972-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of the molecular M6+O6 (M = Mo, Te, W) group in ordered perovskites of the type Ba2M2+M6+O6 are reported. These groups have symmetry Oh, whereas their site symmetry is also Oh. An assignment of the internal vibrations is presented.

  19. Vibrations and Stability: Solved Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Worked out solutions for exercise problems in J. J. Thomsen 'Vibrations and Stability: Advanced Theory, Analysis, and Tools', Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg, 2003.......Worked out solutions for exercise problems in J. J. Thomsen 'Vibrations and Stability: Advanced Theory, Analysis, and Tools', Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg, 2003....

  20. Study of core support barrel vibration monitoring using ex-core neutron noise analysis and fuzzy logic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Christian

    2015-03-01

    A distinct pattern of phase differences was observed for each of the vibration models. The developed fuzzy logic module demonstrated successful recognition of the vibration frequencies, modes, orders, directions, and phase differences within 0.4 ms for the beam and shell mode vibrations.