WorldWideScience

Sample records for vibration-rotation interaction effects

  1. Molecular equilibrium structures from experimental rotational constants and calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, F; Jorgensen, P; Olsen, Jeppe

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out of the accuracy of molecular equilibrium geometries obtained from least-squares fits involving experimental rotational constants B(0) and sums of ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants alpha(r)(B). The vibration-rotation interaction constants have been...... calculated for 18 single-configuration dominated molecules containing hydrogen and first-row atoms at various standard levels of ab initio theory. Comparisons with the experimental data and tests for the internal consistency of the calculations show that the equilibrium structures generated using Hartree......-Fock vibration-rotation interaction constants have an accuracy similar to that obtained by a direct minimization of the CCSD(T) energy. The most accurate vibration-rotation interaction constants are those calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ level. The equilibrium bond distances determined from these interaction...

  2. Status on the Global Vibration-Rotation Model in Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyay, B.; Herman, M.; Fayt, A.

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a global model to deal with all vibration-rotation levels in acetylene up to high vibrational excitation energy, typically up to 9000 wavenumbers. It has been applied to a number of isotopologues, considering all known vibration-rotation lines published in the literature, for various purposes such as line assignment and astrophysical applications. Coriolis interaction is now systematically being introduced in the model. Recent results concerning the analysis of hot emission FTIR spectra recorded around 3 microns by R. Georges et al. at the University of Rennes (France) and of CW-CRDS spectra recorded around 1.5 microns by A. Campargue et al. at the University of Grenoble (France) will help illustrate the role of this vibration-rotation coupling in the global polyad scheme. S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, A. Campargue, S. Kassi, A. Liu, L. Wang, G. Di Lonardo, and L. Fusina, Mol. Phys., 106, 2581 (2008). A. Jolly, Y. Benilan, E. Cané, L. Fusina, F. Tamassia, A. Fayt, S. Robert, and M. Herman, J.Q.S.R.T., 109, 2846 (2008).

  3. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the vibration-rotational absorption band ν2 of H2O trapped in an argon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsevich, G.; Doroshenko, I.; Malevich, A..; Shalamberidze, E.; Sapeshko, V.; Pogorelov, V.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    Using two sets of effective rotational constants for the ground (000) and the excited bending (010) vibrational states the calculation of frequencies and intensities of vibration-rotational transitions for J″ = 0 - 2; and J‧ = 0 - 3; was carried out in frame of the model of a rigid asymmetric top for temperatures from 0 to 40 K. The calculation of the intensities of vibration-rotational absorption bands of H2O in an Ar matrix was carried out both for thermodynamic equilibrium and for the case of non-equilibrium population of para- and ortho-states. For the analysis of possible interaction of vibration-rotational and translational motions of a water molecule in an Ar matrix by 3D Schrödinger equation solving using discrete variable representation (DVR) method, calculations of translational frequencies of H2O in a cage formed after one argon atom deleting were carried out. The results of theoretical calculations were compared to experimental data taken from literature.

  4. Vibration-rotation energy pattern in acetylene: 13CH12CH up to 6750 cm-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayt, A; Robert, S; Di Lonardo, G; Fusina, L; Tamassia, F; Herman, M

    2007-03-21

    All known vibration-rotation absorption lines of 13CH12CH accessing levels up to 6750 cm-1 were gathered from the literature. They were fitted simultaneously to J-dependent Hamiltonian matrices exploiting the well known vibrational polyad or cluster block diagonalization, in terms of the pseudo-quantum-numbers Ns=v1+v2+v3 and Nr=5v1+3v2+5v3+v4+v5, and accounting also for l parity and ef symmetry properties. The anharmonic interaction coupling terms known to occur from a pure vibrational fit in this acetylene isotopologue [Robert et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 174302 (2005)] were included in the model. A total of 12 703 transitions accessing 158 different (v1v2v3v4v5,l4l5) vibrational states was fitted with a dimensionless standard deviation of 0.99, leading to the determination of 216 vibration-rotation parameters. The experimental data included very weak vibration-rotation transitions accessing 18 previously unreported states, some of them forming Q branches with very irregular patterns.

  5. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of beryllium monohydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-01-05

    The accurate potential energy surface of beryllium monohydroxide, BeOH, in its ground electronic state X 2A' has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent core-valence basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The higher-order electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects were taken into account. The BeOH molecule was confirmed to be bent at equilibrium, with the BeOH angle of 141.2° and the barrier to linearity of 129 cm-1 . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the BeOH and BeOD isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach and compared with recent experimental data. The results can be useful in a further analysis of high-resolution vibration-rotation spectra of these interesting species. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Direct measurement of additional Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling bands in the millimeter-submillimeter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Three new weak bands of the Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum have been measured in the millimeter wavelength range. These bands were predicted from combination differences based on previously measured bands in the submillimeter region. Two previously reported submillimeter bands were also remeasured with higher frequency resolution. These new measurements allow us to obtain accurate information on the Coriolis interaction between the 101 and 110 states. Here we report these results and the associated improved molecular constants.

  7. Vibration-rotation energy pattern in acetylene: (13)CH(12)CH up to 10 120 cm(-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, S; Amyay, B; Fayt, A; Di Lonardo, G; Fusina, L; Tamassia, F; Herman, M

    2009-11-26

    All 18,219 vibration-rotation absorption lines of (13)CH(12)CH published in the literature, accessing substates up to 9400 cm(-1) and including some newly assigned, were simultaneously fitted to J-dependent Hamiltonian matrices exploiting the well-known vibrational polyad or cluster block-diagonalization, in terms of the pseudo quantum numbers N(s) = v(1) + v(2) + v(3) and N(r) = 5v(1) + 3v(2) + 5v(3) + v(4) + v(5), also accounting for k = l(4) + l(5) parity and e/f symmetry properties. Some 1761 of these lines were excluded from the fit, corresponding either to blended lines, for about 30% of them, or probably to lines perturbed by Coriolis for the remaining ones. The dimensionless standard deviation of the fit is 1.10, and 317 vibration-rotation parameters are determined. These results significantly extend those of a previous report considering levels below only 6750 cm(-1) [Fayt, A.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 114303]. Unexpected problems are reported when inserting in the global fit the information available on higher-energy polyads, extending from 9300 to 10 120 cm(-1). They are tentatively interpreted as resulting from a combination of the relative evolution of the two effective bending frequencies and long-range interpolyad low-order anharmonic resonances. The complete database, made of 18,865 vibration-rotation lines accessing levels up to 10 120 cm(-1), is made available as Supporting Information.

  8. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-05-05

    An accurate potential energy surface of sulfur dioxide, SO2 , in its ground electronic state X∼ 1A1 has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods are compared. The role of the core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects in determining the structure and dynamics of the SO2 molecule is discussed. The vibration-rotation energy levels of the 32 SO2 and 34 SO2 isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach. It was shown that the inclusion of the aforementioned effects was mandatory to attain the "spectroscopic" accuracy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliano, Nick [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm-1 intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d4. Each of the VRT subbands originate from Ka''=0 and terminate in either Ka'=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A' rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the Ka' quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a' symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the v12 acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D2

  10. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm[sup [minus]1] intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d[sub 4]. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K[sub a][double prime]=0 and terminate in either K[sub a][prime]=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A[prime] rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K[sub a][prime] quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a[prime] symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the [nu][sub 12] acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D[sub 2]O-DOH isotopomer.

  11. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-05

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. An analysis of vibration-rotation lines of OH in the solar infrared spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grevesse, N.; Sauval, A.J.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution solar spectra have permitted the measurement with great accuracy of equivalent widths of vibration-rotation lines of OH in the X2Pi state near 3-micron wavelength. Using recent theoretical results for the transition probabilities, a solar oxygen abundance of (8.93 + or - 0.02) is

  13. Vibration-rotation bands of CH in the solar infrared spectrum and the solar carbon abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grevesse, N.; Lambert, D.L.; Sauval, A.J.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Norton, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution solar spectra obtained from the ATMOS Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Spacelab 3 flight on April 29-May 6, 1985) have made it possible to identify and measure a large number of lines of the vibration-rotation fundamental bands of the X2 Pi state of CH. From about 100 lines of the

  14. Vibration-rotation spectroscopic database on acetylene, X ˜ 1 Σg + (12C2H2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyay, B.; Fayt, A.; Herman, M.; Vander Auwera, J.

    2016-06-01

    A complete set of calculated vibration-rotation energies of 12C2H2 ( X ˜ 1 Σg + ) is provided for all vibrational states up to 13 000 cm-1 and some at higher energies, with rotational (J) and vibrational angular momentum (l) quantum numbers such that 0 ≤ J ≤ 100 and 0 ≤ |l| ≤ 20, respectively. The calculation is performed using a global effective Hamiltonian and related spectroscopic constants from the literature [B. Amyay et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 267, 80 (2011)], based on the polyad model. The numerical values of all related polyad matrix elements are also provided. The model and equations for the Hamiltonian matrix elements are gathered. The experimental acetylene database used for determining the parameters is listed.

  15. Ab initio vibration rotation spectra of triterated isotopologues of H3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amit; Nazareth, Jude; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2008-11-01

    Vibration-rotation energy levels for T3+, H 2T +, T 2H +, D 2T + and T 2D + are reported. These were calculated using the high accuracy model of Polyansky and Tennyson (J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 5056) which explicitly allows for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. These levels should be reliable to better than 0.05 cm -1 and can thus be used to make reliable predictions of infrared spectra for the triterated H3+ species.

  16. Vibration-rotation pattern in acetylene. II. Introduction of Coriolis coupling in the global model and analysis of emission spectra of hot acetylene around 3 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyay, Badr; Robert, Séverine; Herman, Michel; Fayt, André; Raghavendra, Balakrishna; Moudens, Audrey; Thiévin, Jonathan; Rowe, Bertrand; Georges, Robert

    2009-09-01

    A high temperature source has been developed and coupled to a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer to record emission spectra of acetylene around 3 μm up to 1455 K under Doppler limited resolution (0.015 cm-1). The ν3-ground state (GS) and ν2+ν4+ν5 (Σu+ and Δu)-GS bands and 76 related hot bands, counting e and f parities separately, are assigned using semiautomatic methods based on a global model to reproduce all related vibration-rotation states. Significantly higher J-values than previously reported are observed for 40 known substates while 37 new e or f vibrational substates, up to about 6000 cm-1, are identified and characterized by vibration-rotation parameters. The 3 811 new or improved data resulting from the analysis are merged into the database presented by Robert et al. [Mol. Phys. 106, 2581 (2008)], now including 15 562 lines accessing vibrational states up to 8600 cm-1. A global model, updated as compared to the one in the previous paper, allows all lines in the database to be simultaneously fitted, successfully. The updates are discussed taking into account, in particular, the systematic inclusion of Coriolis interaction.

  17. Vibration-rotation pattern in acetylene. II. Introduction of Coriolis coupling in the global model and analysis of emission spectra of hot acetylene around 3 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyay, Badr; Robert, Séverine; Herman, Michel; Fayt, André; Raghavendra, Balakrishna; Moudens, Audrey; Thiévin, Jonathan; Rowe, Bertrand; Georges, Robert

    2009-09-21

    A high temperature source has been developed and coupled to a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer to record emission spectra of acetylene around 3 mum up to 1455 K under Doppler limited resolution (0.015 cm(-1)). The nu(3)-ground state (GS) and nu(2)+nu(4)+nu(5) (Sigma(u) (+) and Delta(u))-GS bands and 76 related hot bands, counting e and f parities separately, are assigned using semiautomatic methods based on a global model to reproduce all related vibration-rotation states. Significantly higher J-values than previously reported are observed for 40 known substates while 37 new e or f vibrational substates, up to about 6000 cm(-1), are identified and characterized by vibration-rotation parameters. The 3 811 new or improved data resulting from the analysis are merged into the database presented by Robert et al. [Mol. Phys. 106, 2581 (2008)], now including 15 562 lines accessing vibrational states up to 8600 cm(-1). A global model, updated as compared to the one in the previous paper, allows all lines in the database to be simultaneously fitted, successfully. The updates are discussed taking into account, in particular, the systematic inclusion of Coriolis interaction.

  18. Acetylene, 12C2H2: new CRDS data and global vibration-rotation analysis up to 8600 cm-1

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The absorption spectrum of 12C2H2 has been recorded using cavity ring downringdown spectroscopy and analyzed in the ranges 60006356 cm and 66677015 cm. Fourteen new bands have been identified and additional J-lines were assigned in 10 already known bands. These new data, together with the published vibration-rotation absorption lines of 12C2H2 accessing vibrational states up to 8600 cm have been gathered in a ...

  19. Hierarchies of intramolecular vibration-rotation dynamical processes in acetylene up to 13,000 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Martens, Jonathan; Amyay, Badr; Herman, Michel

    2012-11-01

    The vibration-rotation dynamics of ? acetylene are computed from a spectroscopic Hamiltonian with 468 parameters fit to 19,582 vibration-rotation transitions up to 13,000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. In this energy range, both the bending and the CH stretching vibrations can reach large amplitudes, but the maximum energy remains below the threshold for isomerization to vinylidene. In contrast to the behavior at energies below 5000 cm-1 [Mol. Phys. 108, 1115 (2010)], excitation of single bright states leads, in almost all cases, to computed intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) that is irreversible on the timescales investigated. Hierarchies of IVR processes on timescales ranging from 20 fs to 20 ps result when different bright states are excited. Different parts of the vibrational quantum number space are explored as a result of the four different classes of coupling terms: vibrational l-type resonance, anharmonic resonances, the rotational l-type resonance, and Coriolis couplings. The initial IVR rates are very different depending on whether the bright states are bending states or stretching states, normal modes or local modes, edge states or interior states. However, the rates of the rotationally mediated couplings do not depend substantially on these distinctions.

  20. Infrared vibration-rotation spectra of the ClO radical using tunable diode laser spectroscopy. [ozone destruction in stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Bair, C. H.; Wade, W. R.; Hoell, J. M.; Copeland, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy is used to measure the infrared vibration-rotation spectra of the ClO radical. The radical is generated in a flow system where a Cl2-He mixture passes through a microwave discharge to dissociate the Cl2. An O3-O2 mixture from an ozone generator is injected into the system downstream of the microwave discharge where O3 combines with Cl to form ClO. By adjusting the gas flow rates to yield an excess of Cl atoms, all the ozone is combined. ClO concentration is measured with UV absorption at 2577 and 2772 A and a deuterium lamp as a continuous source. Total cell pressure is 5.5 torr. The diode laser spectrometer is calibrated with ammonia lines as a reference where possible. The frequency of vibration-rotation lines is expressed as a function of rotational quantum number, fundamental vibrational frequency, and the rotational constants of the upper and lower vibrational states.

  1. Symbolic derivation of high-order Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation energies using computer algebra: Application to vibrational-rotational analysis of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, John M. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory is an effective and popular tool for describing low-lying vibrational and rotational states of molecules. This method, in conjunction with ab initio techniques for computation of electronic potential energy surfaces, can be used to calculate first-principles molecular vibrational-rotational energies to successive orders of approximation. Because of mathematical complexities, however, such perturbation calculations are rarely extended beyond the second order of approximation, although recent work by Herbert has provided a formula for the nth-order energy correction. This report extends that work and furnishes the remaining theoretical details (including a general formula for the Rayleigh-Schroedinger expansion coefficients) necessary for calculation of energy corrections to arbitrary order. The commercial computer algebra software Mathematica is employed to perform the prohibitively tedious symbolic manipulations necessary for derivation of generalized energy formulae in terms of universal constants, molecular constants, and quantum numbers. As a pedagogical example, a Hamiltonian operator tailored specifically to diatomic molecules is derived, and the perturbation formulae obtained from this Hamiltonian are evaluated for a number of such molecules. This work provides a foundation for future analyses of polyatomic molecules, since it demonstrates that arbitrary-order perturbation theory can successfully be applied with the aid of commercially available computer algebra software.

  2. Global modeling of vibration-rotation spectra of the acetylene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyulin, O. M.; Perevalov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The global modeling of both line positions and intensities of the acetylene molecule in the 50-9900 cm-1 region has been performed using the effective operators approach. The parameters of the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian have been fitted to the line positions collected from the literature. The used polyad model of effective Hamiltonian takes into account the centrifugal distortion, rotational and vibrational ℓ-doubling terms and both anharmonic and Coriolis resonance interaction operators arising due to the approximate relations between the harmonic frequencies: ω1≈ω3≈5ω4≈5ω5 and ω2≈3ω4≈3ω5. The dimensionless weighted standard deviation of the fit is 2.8. The fitted set of 237 effective Hamiltonian parameters allowed reproducing 24,991 measured line positions of 494 bands with a root mean squares deviation 0.0037 cm-1. The eigenfunctions of the effective Hamiltonian corresponding to the fitted set of parameters were used to fit the observed line intensities collected from the literature for 15 series of transitions: ΔP = 0-13,15, where P=5V1+5V3 +3V2+V4+V5 is the polyad number (Vi are the principal vibrational quantum numbers). The fitted sets of the effective dipole moment parameters reproduce the observed line intensities within their experimental uncertainties 2-20%.

  3. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations of vibrational-rotational free energies and application to isotopic fractionation of hydrated chloride ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-04-23

    We present two enhancements to our methods for calculating vibrational-rotational free energies by Feynman path integrals, namely, a sequential sectioning scheme for efficiently generating random free-particle paths and a stratified sampling scheme that uses the energy of the path centroids. These improved methods are used with three interaction potentials to calculate equilibrium constants for the fractionation behavior of Cl(-) hydration in the presence of a gas-phase mixture of H(2)O, D(2)O, and HDO. Ion cyclotron resonance experiments indicate that the equilibrium constant, K(eq), for the reaction Cl(H(2)O)(-) + D(2)O right harpoon over left harpoon Cl(D(2)O)(-) + H(2)O is 0.76, whereas the three theoretical predictions are 0.946, 0.979, and 1.20. Similarly, the experimental K(eq) for the Cl(H(2)O)(-) + HDO right harpoon over left harpoon Cl(HDO)(-) + H(2)O reaction is 0.64 as compared to theoretical values of 0.972, 0.998, and 1.10. Although Cl(H(2)O)(-) has a large degree of anharmonicity, K(eq) values calculated with the harmonic oscillator rigid rotator (HORR) approximation agree with the accurate treatment to within better than 2% in all cases. Results of a variety of electronic structure calculations, including coupled cluster and multireference configuration interaction calculations, with either the HORR approximation or with anharmonicity estimated via second-order vibrational perturbation theory, all agree well with the equilibrium constants obtained from the analytical surfaces.

  4. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational-rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our "path-by-path" enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P(-6)) to O(P(-12)), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational-rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan-Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300-3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  5. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christophorou, L.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  6. An Analysis of the Torsion-Rotation-Vibration Rotational Spectrum of the Lowest In-Plane Bend and First Excited Torsional State of the C(3V) Internal Rotor C2H5CN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2000-01-01

    C2H5CN (Propionitrile or ethyl cyanide) is a well known interstellar species abundantly observed in hot cores during the onset of star formation. The onset of star formation generally results in elevated temperature, which thermally populates may low lying vibrational states such as the 206/cm in-plane bend and the 212/cm first excited torsional state in C2H5CN. Unfortunately, these two states are strongly coupled through a complex series of torsion-vibration-rotation interactions, which dominate the spectrum. In order to understand the details of these interactions and develop models capable of predicting unmeasured transitions for astronomical observations in C2H5CN and similar molecules, several thousand rotational transitions in the lowest excited in-plane bend and first excited torsional state have been recorded, assigned and analyzed. The analysis reveals very strong a- and b-type Coriolis interactions and a number of other smaller interactions and has a number of important implications for other C3V torsion-rotation-vibration systems. The relative importance and the physical origins of the coupling among the rotational, vibrational and torsional motions will be presented along with a full spectroscopic analysis and supporting astronomical observations.

  7. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), at low vibrational excitation: From high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, David; Miller, Anthony; AMYAY, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), with up to 8,600 cm-1 of vibrational energy This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision (B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thievin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 114301-11431...

  8. Etude détaillée et modélisation globale du spectre de vibration-rotation de 12C2H2

    OpenAIRE

    AMYAY, Badr

    2012-01-01

    Nous avons contribué à l’amélioration du modèle global de 12C2H2. Ce modèle, exploitant la notion de polyade, a pris en compte l’ensemble des données spectrales de vibration-rotation de la littérature concernant des niveaux de vibration jusqu’à 8900 cm-1. Au terme de notre travail, les 18415 raies publiées dans la littérature sont reproduites par le modèle endéans 3 fois leur incertitude expérimentale qui est typiquement de l’ordre voire meilleure que 0,001 cm-1. L’introduction des interactio...

  9. The absorption spectrum of D2O in the region of 0.97 μm: the 3ν1 + ν3 vibrational-rotational band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdyukov, V. I.; Sinitsa, L. N.

    2017-08-01

    The vibrational-rotational absorption spectrum of D2O in the range from 10 120 to 10 450 cm-1 is recorded on a Fourier transform spectrometer with a resolution of 0.05 cm-1. The measurements were performed using a multipass White cell with an optical path length of 24 m. A light-emitting diode with brightness higher than that of other devices was used as a radiation source. The signal-to-noise ratio was about 104. The spectrum is interpreted as consisting of lines of more than 400 transitions. The spectral characteristics of lines (centers, intensities, and half widths) are determined by fitting the Voigt profile parameters to experimental data by the least-squares method. The intensities of lines and the experimental rotational energy levels of the (301) vibrational state of the D2 16O molecule with high rotational quantum numbers are determined for the first time.

  10. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), ? at low vibrational excitation: from high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-04-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), ? with up to 8600 cm-1 of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision [B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114301 (2009)]. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the v 4 + v 5 and v 3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φ d, the IVR lifetime τ IVR , and the recurrence time τ rec. For the two bright states v 3 + 2v 4 and 7v 4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7v 4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states.

  11. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bing-Sui

    2016-01-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation, and through the use of a saddle-point approximation transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero mode fluctuations of the membranes, and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area $S$, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the inter-membrane separation $d$ as $d^{-2}$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but crosses over to $d^{-4}$ scaling for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$, whereas the zero mode part of the steric potential always scales as $d^{-2}$. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude $\\sigma$, which becomes sma...

  12. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  13. Effective resonant interactions via a driving field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Sainz, I [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Saavedra, C [Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2004-11-01

    Effective resonant quantum atom-field interactions are studied. These resonant interactions are induced by the presence of an external classical driving field. An adequate choice for frequencies of the driving field produces nonlinear effective Hamiltonians both for atom-field and for spin-spin interactions. It is shown that the exact numerical evolution for each resonance condition is well described by the corresponding effective Hamiltonian.

  14. Effects of economic interactions on credit risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatchett, J P L [Laboratory for Mathematical Neuroscience, RIKEN BSI, Hirosawa 2-1, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kuehn, R [Department of Mathematics, King' s College London, The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-10

    We study a credit-risk model which captures effects of economic interactions on a firm's default probability. Economic interactions are represented as a functionally defined graph, and the existence of both cooperative and competitive business relations is taken into account. We provide an analytic solution of the model in a limit where the number of business relations of each company is large, but the overall fraction of the economy with which a given company interacts may be small. While the effects of economic interactions are relatively weak in typical (most probable) scenarios, they are pronounced in situations of economic stress, and thus lead to a substantial fattening of the tails of loss distributions in large loan portfolios. This manifests itself in a pronounced enhancement of the value at risk computed for interacting economies in comparison with their non-interacting counterparts.

  15. Implicit vs explicit renormalization and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Arriola, E., E-mail: earriola@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Szpigel, S., E-mail: szpigel@mackenzie.br [Faculdade de Computação e Informática, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (Brazil); Timóteo, V.S., E-mail: varese@ft.unicamp.br [Grupo de Óptica e Modelagem Numérica – GOMNI, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    Effective interactions can be obtained from a renormalization group analysis in two complementary ways. One can either explicitly integrate out higher energy modes or impose given conditions at low energies for a cut-off theory. While the first method is numerically involved, the second one can be solved almost analytically. In both cases we compare the outcoming effective interactions for the two nucleon system as functions of the cut-off scale and find a strikingly wide energy region where both approaches overlap, corresponding to relevant scales in light nuclei Λ≲200 MeV. This amounts to a great simplification in the determination of the effective interaction parameters.

  16. Meissner effect and a stringlike interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar [Keio University, Department of Physics at Hiyoshi, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Choudhury, Ishita Dutta; Lahiri, Amitabha [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Kolkata, Salt Lake (India)

    2017-05-15

    We find that a recently proposed interaction involving the vorticity current of electrons, which radiatively induces a photon mass in 3 + 1 dimensions in the low-energy effective theory, corresponds to confining strings (linear potential) between electrons. (orig.)

  17. Effect of the collective motions of molecules inside a condensed phase on fluctuations in the density of small bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2017-11-01

    An approach to calculating the effects of fluctuations in density that considers the collective motions of molecules in small condensed phases (e.g., droplets, microcrystals, adsorption at microcrystal faces) is proposed. Statistical sums of the vibrational, rotational, and translational motions of molecules are of a collective character expressed in the dependences of these statistical sums on the local configurations of neighboring molecules. This changes their individual contributions to the free energy and modifies fluctuations in density in the inner homogeneous regions of small bodies. Interactions between nearest neighbors are considered in a quasi-chemical approximation that reflects the effects of short-range direct correlations. Expressions for isotherms relating the densities of mixture components to the chemical potentials in a thermostat are obtained, along with equations for pair distribution functions.

  18. Effectiveness of Artistic Interaction through Video Conferencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Duygu Erişti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated Turkish and Canadian primary school students’ ways of expressing their perception of interactive art education through video conferencing and that of cultural interaction through pictorial representations. The qualitative research data were collected in the form of pictures and interviews on interactive art education along with cultural components depicted in pictures. The results obtained were analyzed and interpreted based on the quantitative content analysis method. The research results revealed that the majority of the students explained their viewpoints through the effectiveness of the process. The students highlighted the importance of learning a different culture, learning about a different art technique and recognizing new friends in the process. The synchronization regarding interactive art education through videoconferencing was another important experience reflected by the students. Most of the students indicated that interactive art education through videoconferencing encouraged them to learn and understand about different cultures, helped them develop cultural awareness, attracted their attention and increased their motivation.

  19. Effectiveness of Artistic Interaction through Video Conferencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Duygu Erişti

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated Turkish and Canadian primary school students’ ways of expressing their perception of interactive art education through video conferencing and that of cultural interaction through pictorial representations. The qualitative research data were collected in the form of pictures and interviews on interactive art education along with cultural components depicted in pictures. The results obtained were analyzed and interpreted based on the quantitative content analysis method. The research results revealed that the majority of the students explained their viewpoints through the effectiveness of the process. The students highlighted the importance of learning a different culture, learning about a different art technique and recognizing new friends in the process. The synchronization regarding interactive art education through videoconferencing was another important experience reflected by the students. Most of the students indicated that interactive art education through videoconferencing encouraged them to learn and understand about different cultures, helped them develop cultural awareness, attracted their attention and increased their motivation

  20. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  1. Effect of situation on mother infant interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.J.B.M.; Vreeswijk, C.M.J.M.; van Bakel, H.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that the early parent–infant relationship is of critical importance for children's developmental outcomes. While the effect of different settings on mother–infant interactive behavior is well studied, only few researchers systematically examined the effect of situational variables

  2. Effective Quark Interactions and QCD-Propagators

    OpenAIRE

    Bergerhoff, Bastian; Wetterich, Christof

    1997-01-01

    We compute the momentum dependence of the effective four quark interaction in QCD after integrating out the gluons. Our method is based on a truncation of exact renormalization group equations which should give reasonable results for momenta above the confinement scale. The difference between the four quark interaction and the heavy quark potential can be minimized for an optimal renormalization scheme in Landau gauge. Within the momentum range relevant for quarkonia our results agree with ph...

  3. Modeling of interaction effects in granular systems

    CERN Document Server

    El-Hilo, M; Al-Rsheed, A

    2000-01-01

    Interaction effects on the magnetic behavior of granular solid systems are examined using a numerical model which is capable of predicting the field, temperature and time dependence of magnetization. In this work, interaction effects on the temperature dependence of time viscosity coefficient S(T) and formation of minor hysteresis loops have been studied. The results for the time- and temperature dependence of remanence ratio have showed that the distribution of energy barriers f(DELTA E) obtained depend critically on the strength and nature of interactions. These interactions-based changes in f(DELTA E) can easily give a temperature-independent behavior of S(T) when these changes give a 1/DELTA E behavior to the distribution of energy barriers. Thus, conclusions about macroscopic quantum tunneling must be carefully drawn when the temperature dependence of S(T) is used to probe for MQT effects. For minor hysteresis effects, the result shows that for the non-interacting case, no minor hysteresis loops occur an...

  4. A chiral rhenium complex with predicted high parity violation effects: synthesis, stereochemical characterization by VCD spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Nidal; Roisnel, Thierry; Guy, Laure; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond; Darquié, Benoît; Crassous, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    With their rich electronic, vibrational, rotational and hyperfine structure, molecular systems have the potential to play a decisive role in precision tests of fundamental physics. For example, electroweak nuclear interactions should cause small energy differences between the two enantiomers of chiral molecules, a signature of parity symmetry breaking. Enantioenriched oxorhenium(VII) complexes S-(-)- and R-(+)-3 bearing a chiral 2-methyl-1-thio-propanol ligand have been prepared as potential candidates for probing molecular parity violation effects via high resolution laser spectroscopy of the Re=O stretching. Although the rhenium atom is not a stereogenic centre in itself, experimental vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra revealed a surrounding chiral environment, evidenced by the Re=O bond stretching mode signal. The calculated VCD spectrum of the R enantiomer confirmed the position of the sulfur atom cis to the methyl, as observed in the solid-state X-ray crystallographic structure, and showed the ...

  5. GENOTYPE X ENVIROMENT INTERACTION EFFECTS ON NATIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Southern Africa Rool Crops Research Network (SARRNET), P. 0; Box 30258, Lilongwe 3, Malawi. ABSTRACT. Cassava ... most important staple food crop in sub-Saharan ..... Cali, Colombia. Crossa, J.. H.G. Gauch and Zobel, R.W. 1990. Additive main effects and multiplicative interaction analysis oftwo international maize.

  6. Interaction effects in magnetic oxide nanoparticle systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction effects in magnetic nanoparticle system were studied through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results of simulations were compared with two different magnetic systems, namely, iron oxide polymer nanocomposites prepared by polymerization over core and nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite thin films prepared by ...

  7. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S.; Peru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000 s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Operator representation for effective realistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Dennis; Feldmeier, Hans; Neff, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to derive an operator representation from the partial wave matrix elements of effective realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials. This method allows to employ modern effective interactions, which are mostly given in matrix element representation, also in nuclear many-body methods requiring explicitly the operator representation, for example ''Fermionic Molecular Dynamics'' (FMD). We present results for the operator representation of effective interactions obtained from the Argonne V18 potential with the Uenitary Correlation Operator Method'' (UCOM) and the ''Similarity Renormalization Group'' (SRG). Moreover, the operator representation allows a better insight in the nonlocal structure of the potential: While the UCOM transformed potential only shows a quadratic momentum dependence, the momentum dependence of SRG transformed potentials is beyond such a simple polynomial form.

  9. Grain interaction effects in polycrystalline Cu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorning, C.; Somers, Marcel A.J.; Wert, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Crystal orientation maps for a grain in a deformed Cu polycrystal have been analysed with the goal of understanding the effect of grain interactions on orientation subdivision. The polycrystal was incrementally strained in tension to 5, 8, 15 and 25% extension; a crystal orientation map was measu......Crystal orientation maps for a grain in a deformed Cu polycrystal have been analysed with the goal of understanding the effect of grain interactions on orientation subdivision. The polycrystal was incrementally strained in tension to 5, 8, 15 and 25% extension; a crystal orientation map...... range of Tailor solutions for axisymmetric strain; grain interactions are not required to account for the coarse domain structure. Special orientation domains extend 20-100 µm into the grain at various locations around its periphery. The special orientation domain morphologies include layers along...... boundary segments, lobes that may be further subdivided, and plates. Detailed analysis of the crystal rotations in the special domains provides strong evidence that they result from grain interactions....

  10. Pairing properties of realistic effective interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargano A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the pairing properties of an effective shell-model interaction defined within a model space outside 132Sn and derived by means of perturbation theory from the CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. It turns out that the neutron pairing component of the effective interaction is significantly weaker than the proton one, which accounts for the large pairing gap difference observed in the two-valence identical particle nuclei 134Sn and 134Te. The role of the contribution arising from one particle-one hole excitations in determining the pairing force is discussed and its microscopic structure is also analyzed in terms of the multipole decomposition.

  11. Nature of the effective interaction between dendrimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Taraknath, E-mail: taraknath@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Dasgupta, Chandan, E-mail: cdgupta@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Maiti, Prabal K., E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Physics Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2014-10-14

    We have performed fully atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the effective interaction between two polyamidoamine dendrimers. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we have obtained the potential of mean force (PMF) between the dendrimers and investigated the effects of protonation level and dendrimer size on the PMF. Our results show that the interaction between the dendrimers can be tuned from purely repulsive to partly attractive by changing the protonation level. The PMF profiles are well-fitted by the sum of an exponential and a Gaussian function with the weight of the exponential function dominating over that of the Gaussian function. This observation is in disagreement with the results obtained in previous analytic [C. Likos, M. Schmidt, H. Löwen, M. Ballauff, D. Pötschke, and P. Lindner, Macromolecules 34, 2914 (2001)] and coarse-grained simulation [I. Götze, H. Harreis, and C. Likos, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7761 (2004)] studies which predicted the effective interaction to be Gaussian.

  12. Modality shift effects mimic multisensory interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Vorberg, D.; Greenlee, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    A frequent approach to study interactions of the auditory and the visual system is to measure event-related potentials (ERPs) to auditory, visual, and auditory-visual stimuli (A, V, AV). A nonzero result of the AV - (A + V) comparison indicates that the sensory systems interact at a specific...... processing stage. Two possible biases weaken the conclusions drawn by this approach: first, subtracting two ERPs from one requires that A, V, and AV do not share any common activity. We have shown before (Gondan and Röder in Brain Res 1073-1074:389-397, 2006) that the problem of common activity can...... be avoided using an additional tactile stimulus (T) and evaluating the ERP difference (T + TAV) - (TA + TV). A second possible confound is the modality shift effect (MSE): for example, the auditory N1 is increased if an auditory stimulus follows a visual stimulus, whereas it is smaller if the modality...

  13. Likeability and its effect on outcomes of interpersonal interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, Niels J.; Hartman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions between boundary spanning individuals have a fundamental role in how interorganizational interactions develop. This study examines interpersonal interaction and the effects of likeability on two attributes that are central to many organizations: commodity prices as

  14. Order effect in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Melanie Landvad; Borlund, Pia

    2016-01-01

    of such studies. Due to the limited sample of 20 test participants (Library and Information Science (LIS) students) inference statistics is not applicable; hence conclusions can be drawn from this sample of test participants only. Originality/value – Only few studies in LIS focus on order effect and none from......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report a study of order effect in interactive information retrieval (IIR) studies. The phenomenon of order effect is well-known, and it is the main reason why searches are permuted (counter-balanced) between test participants in IIR studies. However...... the perspective of IIR. Keywords Evaluation, Research methods, Information retrieval, User studies, Searching, Information searches...

  15. Effective interactions for light nuclei: an effective (field theory) approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stetcu, I.; Rotureau, J.; Barrett, B.R.; van Kolck, U.

    2009-01-01

    One of the central open problems in nuclear physics is the construction of effective interactions suitable for many-body calculations. We discuss a recently developed approach to this problem, where one starts with an effective field theory containing only fermion fields and formulated directly in a no-core shell-model space. We present applications to light nuclei and to systems of a few atoms in a harmonic-oscillator trap. Future applications and extensions, as well as challenges, are also ...

  16. Effective interactions for extreme isospin conditions; Interactions effectives pour des conditions extremes d`isospin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabanat, E.

    1995-01-01

    One of the main goal in nuclear physics research is the study of nuclei in extreme conditions of spin and isospin. The more performing tools for theoretical predictions in this field are microscopic methods such as the Hartree-Fock one based on independent particle approximation. The main ingredient for such an approach is the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The actual trend being the study of nuclei more and more far from the stability valley, it is necessary to cast doubt over the validity of usual effective interaction. This work constitute a study on the way one can construct a new interaction allowing some theoretical predictions on nuclei far from the stability. We have thus made a complete study of symmetric infinite nuclear matter and asymmetric one up to pure neutron matter. One shows that the asymmetry coefficient, which was considered until now as fixing isospin properties, is not sufficient to have a correct description of very exotic isospin states. A new type of constraint is shown for fixing this degree of freedom: the neutron matter equation of state. One include this equation of state, taken from a theoretical model giving a good description of radii and masses of neutron stars. One can thus expect to build up new Skyrme interaction with realistic properties of ground state of very neutron-rich nuclei. (author). 63 refs., 68 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  18. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco E. Fontúrbel; Maureen M. Murúa

    2014-01-01

    Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats ...

  19. Non-perturbative effective interactions in the standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, Boris A

    2014-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the nonperturbative dynamics in the Standard Model (SM), the basic theory of all, but gravity, fundamental interactions in nature. The Standard Model is devided into two parts: the Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Electro-weak theory (EWT) are well-defined renormalizable theories in which the perturbation theory is valid. However, for the adequate description of the real physics nonperturbative effects are inevitable. This book describes how these nonperturbative effects may be obtained in the framework of spontaneous generation of effective interactions. The well-known example of such effective interaction is provided by the famous Nambu--Jona-Lasinio effective interaction. Also a spontaneous generation of this interaction in the framework of QCD is described and applied to the method for other effective interactions in QCD and EWT. The method is based on N.N. Bogoliubov conception of compensation equations. As a result we then describe the principle feathures of the Standard...

  20. Effective Interaction in Polarized Two-dimensional Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Takeshi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Lipparini, Enrico

    2004-10-01

    Multiple scattering processes in two-dimensional electron systems with an arbitrary spin polarization are expressed as a spin-dependent effective interaction operator, which allows applications in various two-dimensional electron systems. Effects of the spin polarization on the correlation energy and the pair correlation function are discussed in detail in connection with the polarization-dependence of the effective interaction.

  1. Effect of Interaction between Polymorphisms in Insulin Receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Interaction between Polymorphisms in Insulin Receptor Substrate Genes in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Severe/Acute Hyperglycemia. ... Methods: Testing Haplotype EffectS in Association Studies (THESIAS) software was used to investigate allelic and haplotype interactions between the polymorphisms in ...

  2. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace,

  3. A Proposal for Measuring Interactivity that Brings Learning Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosh Yamamoto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed in this paper that some type of way to measure and visualize interactivity in the multimedia or e-Learning contents is necessary in order to clearly identify interactivity that brings learning effectiveness. Interactivity during learning will arouse students’ intellectual curiosity and motivate them to learn further. Although the interaction in the communication between the teacher and his/her students in a regular classroom is ideal, it is not possible to maintain the equivalence in the multimedia or e-Learning contents. In order to rigorously formalize the field of measuring interactivity as a theory, theoretical constructs such as interactivity, interest, knowledge, and experience are redefined first. Then, the defined “interactivity” is broken down to subcomponents to develop an assessment tool for the interactivity which brings learning effectiveness. In the end, it is proved that the interactivity in learning can be measured.

  4. Geomagnetic Effects of Corotating Interaction Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršnak, Bojan; Dumbović, Mateja; Čalogović, Jaša; Verbanac, Giuliana; Poljanǐć-Beljan, Ivana

    2017-09-01

    We present an analysis of the geoeffectiveness of corotating interaction regions (CIRs), employing the data recorded from 25 January to 5 May 2005 and throughout 2008. These two intervals in the declining phase of Solar Cycle 23 are characterised by a particularly low number of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). We study in detail how four geomagnetic-activity parameters (the Dst, Ap, and AE indices, as well as the Dst time derivative, dDst/dt) are related to three CIR-related solar wind parameters (flow speed, V, magnetic field, B, and the convective electric field based on the southward Geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) magnetic field component, VBs) on a three-hour time resolution. In addition, we quantify statistical relationships between the mentioned geomagnetic indices. It is found that Dst is correlated best to V, with a correlation coefficient of cc≈0.6, whereas there is no correlation between dDst/dt and V. The Ap and AE indices attain peaks about half a day before the maximum of V, with correlation coefficients ranging from cc≈0.6 to cc≈0.7, depending on the sample used. The best correlations of Ap and AE are found with VBs with a delay of 3 h, being characterised by cc≳ 0.6. The Dst derivative dDst/dt is also correlated with VBs, but the correlation is significantly weaker cc≈ 0.4 - 0.5, with a delay of 0 - 3 h, depending on the employed sample. Such low values of correlation coefficients indicate that there are other significant effects that influence the relationship between the considered parameters. The correlation of all studied geomagnetic parameters with B are characterised by considerably lower correlation coefficients, ranging from cc=0.3 in the case of dDst/dt up to cc=0.56 in the case of Ap. It is also shown that peak values of geomagnetic indices depend on the duration of the CIR-related structures. The Dst is closely correlated with Ap and AE (cc=0.7), Dst being delayed for about 3 h. On the other hand, d

  5. Effective interactions and operators in no-core shell model

    OpenAIRE

    Stetcu, I.; Rotureau, J.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions to the nuclear many-body problem rely on effective interactions, and in general effective operators, to take into account effects not included in calculations. These include effects due to the truncation to finite model spaces where a numerical calculation is tractable, as well as physical terms not included in the description in the first place. In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we discuss two approaches to the effective interactions based on (i) unitary transformations ...

  6. Effects of Intergenerational Interaction on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Carmen Requena; Gonzalez, Marta Zubiaur

    2008-01-01

    The world population pyramid has changed shape. However, this does not mean that societies have changed their negative concept of old age. Our study proposes an intergenerational service-learning program with 179 university students and 101 slightly depressed elderly people. The results show that the elderly people who interacted improved in…

  7. Exploring effective interactions through transition charge density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus the combined result leads to desired experimental behaviour of small peak inside and large peak at the surface. ... treating them simultaneously on equal footing. The two-body Hamiltonian H is given by .... probabilities. The realistic interaction for the f–p shell nuclei was constructed by. Kuo and Brown [7] and put to ...

  8. Enhancing Interactive Tutorial Effectiveness through Visual Cueing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamet, Eric; Fernandez, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether learning how to use a web service with an interactive tutorial can be enhanced by cueing. We expected the attentional guidance provided by visual cues to facilitate the selection of information in static screen displays that corresponded to spoken explanations. Unlike most previous studies in this area, we…

  9. Effect of interactions on the conductance of graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzanella, M.; Faccioli, P.; Lipparini, E.

    2010-11-01

    We study the effects of the interaction between electrons and holes on the conductance G of quasi-one-dimensional graphene systems. We first consider as a benchmark the limit in which all interactions are negligible, recovering the predictions of the tight-binding approximation for the spectrum of the system, and the well-known result G=4e2/h for the lowest conductance quantum. Then we consider an exactly solvable field theoretical model in which the electromagnetic interactions are effectively local. Finally, we use the effective-field theory formalism to develop an exactly solvable model in which we also include the effect of nonlocal interactions. We find that such interactions turn the nominally metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon into a semiconductor while the short-range interactions lead to a correction to the G=4e2/h formula.

  10. Effective interaction in two-dimensional electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Takeshi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Lipparini, Enrico

    2004-03-01

    A fully microscopic derivation is proposed for an effective interaction operator between electrons in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), which represents multiple-scattering processes in the medium. The obtained interaction features short-range behaviors between electrons, and is presented in a simple form which allows applications in various systems. Short-range correlation in the 2DEG is discussed in detail in terms of the effective interaction with special emphasis on the nonlocal aspect of the correlation.

  11. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, S.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  12. Stochastic Interactive Processes and the Effect of Context on Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical analysis and computer simulation methods are used to show that interactive models of context effects can exhibit classical context effects if there is variability in the input to the network or the network itself. Interactive models represent hypotheses about information-processing dynamics leading to the global asymptotic behaviors…

  13. Explaining Interaction Effects within and across Levels of Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulf; Cuervo-Cazurra, Alvaro; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Many manuscripts submitted to the Journal of International Business Studies propose an interaction effect in their models in an effort to explain the complexity and contingency of relationships across borders. In this article, we provide guidance on how best to explain the interaction effects...

  14. Interaction effects on hydrodynamic characteristics of twin rudders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Hekkenberg, R.G.

    2016-01-01

    In order to reach the required manoeuvrability, inland vessels often use twin rudders, but the interaction effects are poorly understood. To achieve a proper configuration, this paper applies 2D RANS simulations to analyse the interaction effects on the twin-rudder hydrodynamics. Various twin-rudder

  15. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF COWPEA VARIETY, DOSE AND EXPOSURE TIME ON. BRUCHID .... of cowpea variety as well as its interactive effect with exposure .... RESULTS. Seed morphometrics and characteristics. Table. 1 shows seed morphometrics and characteristics of the cowpea varieties used for this study. KDV.

  16. Evidence for multiple stressor interactions and effects on coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Stephen S; Graham, Nicholas A J; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-03-01

    Concern is growing about the potential effects of interacting multiple stressors, especially as the global climate changes. We provide a comprehensive review of multiple stressor interactions in coral reef ecosystems, which are widely considered to be one of the most sensitive ecosystems to global change. First, we synthesized coral reef studies that examined interactions of two or more stressors, highlighting stressor interactions (where one stressor directly influences another) and potentially synergistic effects on response variables (where two stressors interact to produce an effect that is greater than purely additive). For stressor-stressor interactions, we found 176 studies that examined at least 2 of the 13 stressors of interest. Applying network analysis to analyze relationships between stressors, we found that pathogens were exacerbated by more costressors than any other stressor, with ca. 78% of studies reporting an enhancing effect by another stressor. Sedimentation, storms, and water temperature directly affected the largest number of other stressors. Pathogens, nutrients, and crown-of-thorns starfish were the most-influenced stressors. We found 187 studies that examined the effects of two or more stressors on a third dependent variable. The interaction of irradiance and temperature on corals has been the subject of more research (62 studies, 33% of the total) than any other combination of stressors, with many studies reporting a synergistic effect on coral symbiont photosynthetic performance (n = 19). Second, we performed a quantitative meta-analysis of existing literature on this most-studied interaction (irradiance and temperature). We found that the mean effect size of combined treatments was statistically indistinguishable from a purely additive interaction, although it should be noted that the sample size was relatively small (n = 26). Overall, although in aggregate a large body of literature examines stressor effects on coral reefs and coral

  17. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  18. Screening for interaction effects in gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Liang, Liming; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.; Rice, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait (eQTL) studies are a powerful tool for identifying genetic variants that affect levels of messenger RNA. Since gene expression is controlled by a complex network of gene-regulating factors, one way to identify these factors is to search for interaction effects between genetic variants and mRNA levels of transcription factors (TFs) and their respective target genes. However, identification of interaction effects in gene expression data pose a variety of methodological challenges, and it has become clear that such analyses should be conducted and interpreted with caution. Investigating the validity and interpretability of several interaction tests when screening for eQTL SNPs whose effect on the target gene expression is modified by the expression level of a transcription factor, we characterized two important methodological issues. First, we stress the scale-dependency of interaction effects and highlight that commonly applied transformation of gene expression data can induce or remove interactions, making interpretation of results more challenging. We then demonstrate that, in the setting of moderate to strong interaction effects on the order of what may be reasonably expected for eQTL studies, standard interaction screening can be biased due to heteroscedasticity induced by true interactions. Using simulation and real data analysis, we outline a set of reasonable minimum conditions and sample size requirements for reliable detection of variant-by-environment and variant-by-TF interactions using the heteroscedasticity consistent covariance-based approach. PMID:28301596

  19. An Effective-Hamiltonian Approach to CH5+, Using Ideas from Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk we present the first steps in the design of an effective Hamiltonian for the vibration-rotation energy levels of CH5+. Such a Hamiltonian would allow calculation of energy level patterns anywhere along the path travelled by a hypothetical CH5+ (or CD5+) molecule as it passes through various coupling cases, and might thus provide some hints for assigning the observed high-resolution spectra. The steps discussed here, which have not yet addressed computational problems, focus on mapping the vibration-rotation problem in CH5+ onto the five-electron problem in the boron atom, using ideas and mathematical machinery from Condon and Shortley's book on atomic spectroscopy. The mapping ideas are divided into: (i) a mapping of particles, (ii) a mapping of coordinates (i.e., mathematical degrees of freedom), and (iii) a mapping of quantum mechanical interaction terms. The various coupling cases along the path correspond conceptually to: (i) the analog of a free-rotor limit, where the H atoms see the central C atom but do not see each other, (ii) the low-barrier and high-barrier tunneling regimes, and (iii) the rigid-molecule limit, where the H atoms remain locked in some fixed molecular geometry. Since the mappings considered here often involve significant changes in mathematics, a number of interesting qualitative changes occur in the basic ideas when passing from B to CH5+, particularly in discussions of: (i) antisymmetrization and symmetrization ideas, (ii) n,l,ml,ms or n,l,j,mj quantum numbers, and (iii) Russell-Saunders computations and energy level patterns. Some of the mappings from B to CH5+ to be discussed are as follows. Particles: the atomic nucleus is replaced by the C atom, the electrons are replaced by protons, and the empty space between particles is replaced by an "electron soup." Coordinates: the radial coordinates of the electrons map onto the five local C-H stretching modes, the angular coordinates of the electrons map onto three rotational

  20. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  1. Novel QCD Effects from Initial and Final State Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2007-09-12

    Initial-state and final-state interactions which are conventionally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions. The effects, which arise from gluon exchange between the active and spectator quarks, cause leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering also leads to nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing of nuclear structure functions through multiple scattering reactions in the nuclear target. Factorization-breaking effects are particularly important for hard hadron interactions since both initial-state and final-state interactions appear. Related factorization breaking effects can also appear in exclusive electroproduction reactions and in deeply virtual Compton scattering. None of the effects of initial-state and final-state interactions are incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron computed in isolation.

  2. Effects of Peer Tutoring on Young Children's Social Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaoying; Gelfer, Jeffrey I.; Sileo, Nancy; Filler, John; Perkins, Peggy G.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of peer tutoring on children's social interactions and compared social interaction behaviors between children who are English-language learners (ELL) and children who are primary English speakers (PES). Single-subject withdrawal design (ABA) was applied in this study and classwide peer tutoring was used as the…

  3. Graphical Illustration of Interaction Effects in Binary Choice Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Jason R.V.; Pennings, Joost M.E.; Garcia, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Graphing procedures for evaluating power or interaction terms in binary logit and probit models are illustrated in an application to hog producers' decisions based on transaction cost economics' hypothesised positive effect of the interaction of uncertainty and asset specificity on contract use.

  4. Effectiveness of Interactive Video to Teach CPR Theory and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Ann L.

    This study investigated whether an interactive video system of instruction taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as effectively as traditional instruction. Using standards of the American Heart Association, the study was designed with two randomized groups to be taught either by live instruction or by interactive video. Subjects were 100…

  5. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yi Huang

    Full Text Available When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt/T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration’s period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam. Keywords: The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction, The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics

  6. Climate change effects on predator-prey interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Angela N

    2017-10-01

    Predator-prey interactions can be very important to community structure and function. A growing body of research demonstrates how climate change can modify these species interactions. Climate change can modify predator-prey interactions by affecting species characteristics, and by modifying consumptive and/or non-consumptive predator effects. Current work examines how climate change and predation risk can combine to influence herbivore stoichiometry and feeding ecology. Other recent advances show how climate change can affect chemical signaling of plants and insects, as well as how pollution and other components of the environmental context can modify predator-prey interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, L. H. C.; Ferrari, A. F.; Barone, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in the presence of Lorentz symmetry breaking. We focus on a higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Indeed, we show that the Lorentz violating background considered by us leads to several phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory, such as nontrivial torques on isolated electric dipoles, as well as nontrivial forces and torques between line currents and point like charges, as well as among Dirac strings and other electromagnetic sources.

  8. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, L.H.C.; Ferrari, A.F. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Barone, F.A. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, IFQ, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in the presence of Lorentz symmetry breaking. We focus on a higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Indeed, we show that the Lorentz violating background considered by us leads to several phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory, such as nontrivial torques on isolated electric dipoles, as well as nontrivial forces and torques between line currents and point like charges, as well as among Dirac strings and other electromagnetic sources. (orig.)

  9. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco E. Fontúrbel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats could significantly influence the plant reproductive output and the fauna assemblage associated with. Fragmented habitats may trigger contemporary evolution processes and open new evolutionary opportunities. Interacting parties with a diffuse and asymmetric relationship are less susceptible to local extinction but more prone to evolve towards new interactions or autonomy. However, highly specialized mutualisms are likely to disappear. On the other hand, ecological interactions may mutually modulate their response in fragmented habitats, especially when antagonistic interactions disrupt mutualistic ones. Ecoevolutionary issues of habitat fragmentation have been little explored, but the empiric evidence available suggests that the complex modification of ecological interactions in fragmented habitats might lead to nonanalogous communities on the long term.

  10. Online Chemistry Modules: Interaction and Effective Faculty Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Laura E.; Towns Marcy Hamby; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    2004-01-01

    Computer supported collaborative learning, cooperative learning combined with electronic communication, physical chemistry online modules, use of discussion boards, its advantages and limitations are experimented and discussed. The most important finding is the example of effective online faculty facilitation and interaction.

  11. Effect of Poroelasticity on Hydraulic Fracture Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usui, Tomoya; Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates, by performing finite element-based simulations, the influence of fluid leak-off and poroelasticity on growth of multiple hydraulic fractures that initiate from a single horizontal well. In this research, poroelastic deformation of the matrix is coupled with fluid flow...... in the fractures, and fluid flow in the rock matrix, in three dimensions. Effects of the fluid leakoff and poroelasticity on the propagation of the neighboring fractures are studied by varying the matrix permeability, and the Biot coefficient. Simulation results show that the stress induced by the opening...... of the fractures, and the stress induced by the fluid leak-off, each have the effect of locally altering the magnitudes and orientations of the principal stresses, hence altering the propagation direction of the fractures. The stress induced by the opening of the fractures tends to propagate both of the fractures...

  12. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  13. Membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects of inorganic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malekkhaiat Häffner, Sara; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    .g., in theranostics. In addition, there is considerable current interest in the use of nanomaterials as antimicrobial agents, motivated by increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics. Here, various nanomaterials offer opportunities for triggered functionalites to combat challenging infections...... response. In the present overview, the current understanding of inorganic nanomaterials as antimicrobial agents is outlined, with special focus on the interplay between antimicrobial effects and membrane interactions, and how membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects of such materials depend...

  14. Interactive effects of nutrient additions and predation on infaunal communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, M.H.; Alphin, T.D.; Cahoon, L.; Lindquist, D.; Becker, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient additions represent an important anthropogenic stress on coastal ecosystems. At moderate levels, increased nutrients may lead to increased primary production and, possibly, to increased biomass of consumers although complex trophic interactions may modify or mask these effects. We examined the influence of nutrient additions and interactive effects of trophic interactions (predation) on benthic infaunal composition and abundances through small-scale field experiments in 2 estuaries that differed in ambient nutrient conditions. A blocked experimental design was used that allowed an assessment of direct nutrient effects in the presence and absence of predation by epibenthic predators as well as an assessment of the independent effects of predation. Benthic microalgal production increased with experimental nutrient additions and was greater when infaunal abundances were lower, but there were no significant interactions between these factors. Increased abundances of one infaunal taxa, Laeonereis culveri, as well as the grazer feeding guild were observed with nutrient additions and a number of taxa exhibited higher abundances with predator exclusion. In contrast to results from freshwater systems there were no significant interactive effects between nutrient additions and predator exclusion as was predicted. The infaunal responses observed here emphasize the importance of both bottom-up (nutrient addition and primary producer driven) and top-down (predation) controls in structuring benthic communities. These processes may work at different spatial and temporal scales, and affect different taxa, making observation of potential interactive effects difficult.

  15. Insights into the effect of nanoconfinement on molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Shuangshou; Ye, Jin; Li, Daojin; Liu, Zhen; Wu, Xingcai

    2014-07-01

    Being confined within nanoscale space, substances may exhibit unique physicochemical properties. The effect of nanoconfinement on molecular interactions is of significance, but a sound understanding has not been established yet. Here we present a quantitative study on boronate affinity (covalent) and electrostatic (non-covalent) interactions confined within mesoporous silica. We show that both interactions were enhanced by the confinement and that the enhancement depended on the closeness of the interacting location, as well as on the difference between the pore size and the molecular size. The overall enhancement could reach 3 orders of magnitude.Being confined within nanoscale space, substances may exhibit unique physicochemical properties. The effect of nanoconfinement on molecular interactions is of significance, but a sound understanding has not been established yet. Here we present a quantitative study on boronate affinity (covalent) and electrostatic (non-covalent) interactions confined within mesoporous silica. We show that both interactions were enhanced by the confinement and that the enhancement depended on the closeness of the interacting location, as well as on the difference between the pore size and the molecular size. The overall enhancement could reach 3 orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization data, protein stability test, measurement of adsorption isotherms, data analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01440e

  16. Interaction effects in a microscopic quantum wire model with strong spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G. W.; Ganahl, M.; Schuricht, D.; Evertz, H. G.; Andergassen, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of strong interactions on the spectral properties of quantum wires with strong Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction in a magnetic field, using a combination of matrix product state and bosonization techniques. Quantum wires with strong Rashba SO interaction and magnetic field exhibit a partial gap in one-half of the conducting modes. Such systems have attracted wide-spread experimental and theoretical attention due to their unusual physical properties, among which are spin-dependent transport, or a topological superconducting phase when under the proximity effect of an s-wave superconductor. As a microscopic model for the quantum wire we study an extended Hubbard model with SO interaction and Zeeman field. We obtain spin resolved spectral densities from the real-time evolution of excitations, and calculate the phase diagram. We find that interactions increase the pseudo gap at k = 0 and thus also enhance the Majorana-supporting phase and stabilize the helical spin order. Furthermore, we calculate the optical conductivity and compare it with the low energy spiral Luttinger liquid result, obtained from field theoretical calculations. With interactions, the optical conductivity is dominated by an excotic excitation of a bound soliton-antisoliton pair known as a breather state. We visualize the oscillating motion of the breather state, which could provide the route to their experimental detection in e.g. cold atom experiments.

  17. Impact of nonlinear effective interactions on GFT quantum gravity condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Pithis, Andreas G A; Tomov, Petar

    2016-01-01

    We present the numerical analysis of effectively interacting Group Field Theory (GFT) models in the context of the GFT quantum gravity condensate analogue of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for real Bose-Einstein condensates including combinatorially local interaction terms. Thus we go beyond the usually considered construction for free models. More precisely, considering such interactions in a weak regime, we find solutions for which the expectation value of the number operator N is finite, as in the free case. When tuning the interaction to the strongly nonlinear regime, however, we obtain solutions for which N grows and eventually blows up, which is reminiscent of what one observes for real Bose-Einstein condensates, where a strong interaction regime can only be realized at high density. This behaviour suggests the breakdown of the Bogoliubov ansatz for quantum gravity condensates and the need for non-Fock representations to describe the system when the condensate constituents are strongly correlated. Furthe...

  18. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  19. Effective spin-spin interaction in neutron matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zverev, M.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khafizov, R.U.; Khodel, V.A. [Kurchatov Institute Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shaginyan, V.R. [Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    A set of equations for calculating the effective-interaction matrix R{sup ik}(q, {omega}) and the response function X{sup ik}(q, {omega}) is derived. These equations take into account the spin degrees of freedom of infinite neutron matter. For isotropic neutron matter with the Bethe interaction, the effective spin-spin interaction g(k) is calculated in the local approximation of the functional approach in the density range from {rho} = 0.17 to 25 fm{sup -3}. It is shown that this interaction weakly depends on the density within the range under consideration and that neither ferromagnetic nor antiferromagnetic phase transitions occur in the system. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  1. Spacecraft environments interactions: Protecting against the effects of spacecraft charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, J. L.; Mccollum, M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of the natural space environments on spacecraft design, development, and operation are the topic of a series of NASA Reference Publications currently being developed by the Electromagnetics and Environments Branch, Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center. This primer, second in the series, describes the interactions between a spacecraft and the natural space plasma. Under certain environmental/spacecraft conditions, these interactions result in the phenomenon known as spacecraft charging. It is the focus of this publication to describe the phenomenon of spacecraft charging and its possible adverse effects on spacecraft and to present the key elements of a Spacecraft Charging Effects Protection Plan.

  2. The Effective Interaction between Atoms of Liquid ^{4}He

    CERN Document Server

    Minasyan, V N

    2002-01-01

    A new method of "mixed" representation for the Bose-system is presented. On the basis of this method we have found the effective potential interaction between atoms of ^{4}He, which is formed by the interaction of atoms density oscillations and the interaction between two atoms, represented in the form of S-wave pseudopotential in the model of hard spheres. It is also shown that two types of bosons can be axcited in liquid ^{4}He. This result coincides with the experimental data.

  3. Effect of Soil Types and Phosphorus Fertilizer Interaction on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Soil Types and Phosphorus Fertilizer Interaction on the Growth and Yield of Maize ( Zea mays .L) ... This yield at varying phosphorus levels is an indication that soil types do have an effect on the yield of crops. Since all the soils are used in planting maize one soil type cannot be said to be better than the other, ...

  4. STUDENT-TEACHER INTERACTION AS A DETERMINER OF EFFECTIVE TEACHING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEWIS, EDWIN C.

    THIS STUDY TESTED THE HYPOTHESIS THAT THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A GIVEN TEACHER VARIES FROM ONE STUDENT TO ANOTHER AND THAT THIS DIFFERENCE IN EFFECTIVENESS IS A RESULT OF THE INTERACTION OF THE PERSONALITY PATTERNS OF THE STUDENT AND TEACHER. STUDENTS MAJORING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, AND HOME ECONOMICS WERE THE SUBJECTS. PERSONS…

  5. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  6. Consideration of pavement roughness effects on vehicle-pavement interaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present some of the results of the vehicle-pavement interaction project, mainly in terms of the expected effects of pavement roughness on the moving dynamic effects in pavement analysis and design. Background is provided...

  7. Chiral effective field theories of the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, M.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Effective field theories of the strong interactions based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD provide a model-independent approach to low-energy hadron physics. We give a brief introduction to mesonic and baryonic chiral perturbation theory and discuss a number of applications. We also consider the effective field theory including vector and axial-vector mesons. (authors)

  8. Spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, C.H.; Stoof, H.T.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074851357; Duine, R.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127

    2012-01-01

    We study the spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting, two-component Fermi gas and propose an experiment to measure this effect by relatively displacing spin-up and spin-down atomic clouds in a trap using spin-dependent temperature gradients. We compute the spin-Seebeck coefficient and related

  9. and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage level

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ali

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... interaction effects between dietary levels of EFFSB and extrusion temperatures on performance criteria, pancreas weight, CPK, LDH, ... of the effective heat treatments is extrusion system inclu- ding high temperature ... EFFSB were analyzed for dry matter (DM), ether extract (EE), crude protein (CP), crude ...

  10. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  11. Interactive Effects of Metals and PAHs on Benthic Food Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-30

    complex mixtures of contaminants influence benthic communities at the levels of microorganisms, microalgae , invertebrate grazers, and fish predators...examines the interactive effects of metal (Cu, Cr, Cd, Hg, and Pb ) and diesel-fuel contaminants on the benthic food web of a coastal salt marsh, the specific...diesel and metal contaminants interact to influence the microbial (bacteria and microalgae ), invertebrate, and juvenile fish components of the benthic

  12. Renormalization of effective interactions in a negative charge transfer insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Priyanka; Peil, Oleg E.; Pourovskii, Leonid; Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Parcollet, Olivier; Biermann, Silke; Aryasetiawan, Ferdi; Georges, Antoine

    2017-11-01

    We compute from first principles the effective interaction parameters appropriate for a low-energy description of the rare-earth nickelate LuNiO3 involving the partially occupied eg states only. The calculation uses the constrained random-phase approximation and reveals that the effective on-site Coulomb repulsion is strongly reduced by screening effects involving the oxygen-p and nickel-t2 g states. The long-range component of the effective low-energy interaction is also found to be sizable. As a result, the effective on-site interaction between parallel-spin electrons is reduced down to a small negative value. This validates effective low-energy theories of these materials that were proposed earlier. Electronic structure methods combined with dynamical mean-field theory are used to construct and solve an appropriate low-energy model and explore its phase diagram as a function of the on-site repulsion and Hund's coupling. For the calculated values of these effective interactions, we find that in agreement with experiments, LuNiO3 is a metal without disproportionation of the eg occupancy when considered in its orthorhombic structure, while the monoclinic phase is a disproportionated insulator.

  13. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  14. The Effects of Real-Time Interactive Multimedia Teleradiology System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safadi, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the design of a real-time interactive multimedia teleradiology system and assesses how the system is used by referring physicians in point-of-care situations and supports or hinders aspects of physician-radiologist interaction. We developed a real-time multimedia teleradiology management system that automates the transfer of images and radiologists' reports and surveyed physicians to triangulate the findings and to verify the realism and results of the experiment. The web-based survey was delivered to 150 physicians from a range of specialties. The survey was completed by 72% of physicians. Data showed a correlation between rich interactivity, satisfaction, and effectiveness. The results of our experiments suggest that real-time multimedia teleradiology systems are valued by referring physicians and may have the potential for enhancing their practice and improving patient care and highlight the critical role of multimedia technologies to provide real-time multimode interactivity in current medical care.

  15. A Contribution to Documenting and Validating Dynamic Interaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    . Controlled laboratory tests, employing a vibrating test floor carrying stationary crowds of people, are designed and carried out to investigate the dynamic interaction. The paper describes the tests and the modal identification procedures employed for the assessment of model validity. Besides from aspects......On structures carrying humans (e.g. floors, grandstands in stadia etc.) there may be two different types of crowds present: Active and passive crowds of people. The active crowd, comprising people in motion, may generate dynamic loads causing the structure to vibrate. The passive (stationary) crowd...... and a floor in vertical motion. The mechanism of crowd-structure interaction is not well understood and the primary aim of the paper is to present results of experimental investigations documenting effects of crowd-structure interaction and to exploring the validity of a crowd-structure interaction model...

  16. Effects of an electric field on interaction of aromatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Il Seung; Cho, Woo Jong; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-04-30

    The effect of uniform external electric field on the interactions between small aromatic compounds and an argon atom is investigated using post-HF (MP2, SCS-MP2, and CCSD(T)) and density functional (PBE0-D3, PBE0-TS, and vdW-DF2) methods. The electric field effect is quantified by the difference of interaction energy calculated in the presence and absence of the electric field. All the post-HF methods describe electric field effects accurately although the interaction energy itself is overestimated by MP2. The electric field effect is explained by classical electrostatic models, where the permanent dipole moment from mutual polarization mainly determines its sign. The size of π-conjugated system does not have significant effect on the electric field dependence. We found out that PBE0-based methods give reasonable interaction energies and electric field response in every case, while vdW-DF2 sometimes shows spurious artifact owing to its sensitivity toward the real space electron density. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Interaction Induced Quantum Valley Hall Effect in Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We use pseudo-quantum electrodynamics in order to describe the full electromagnetic interaction of the p electrons in graphene in a consistent 2D formulation. We first consider the effect of this interaction in the vacuum polarization tensor or, equivalently, in the current correlator. This allows us to obtain the T→0 conductivity after a smooth zero-frequency limit is taken in Kubo’s formula. Thereby, we obtain the usual expression for the minimal conductivity plus corrections due to the interaction that bring it closer to the experimental value. We then predict the onset of an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum valley Hall effect below an activation temperature of the order of 2 K. The transverse (Hall valley conductivity is evaluated exactly and shown to coincide with the one in the usual quantum Hall effect. Finally, by considering the effects of pseudo-quantum electrodynamics, we show that the electron self-energy is such that a set of P- and T-symmetric gapped electron energy eigenstates are dynamically generated, in association with the quantum valley Hall effect.

  18. Effects of Interactivity between Audience and Urban Advertisement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Manavirad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, advertisement plays an important and impressive role in our lives and we are witnessing different works in this field. The emergence of new technologies in this field has led to the arrival of a new style of advertising with different interactivity and administrative functions. Interactive advertising is considered as one of the most up to date urban advertising. With regard to the arrival of this new style of advertising and using them in different countries, this research investigates the effectiveness of an advertisement’s interaction with the audiences in urban advertising through a descriptive/analytical approach as well as field study with regard to the type of advertising usage including commercial, promotional, educational, social etc. It is assumed that an interactive advertising confronts the audience with many challenges and makes him from a static and watching audience to an actor and explorer audience. In such advertisements, the audience enters a path with interactivity where the advertisement guides him and audience responses positively to this action; after a simple activity and in some cases, he interacts and communicates with the advertisement just by passing by it. In interactivity advertisements in urban spaces, the artist pays much attention to audience participation for challenges or performing specific activity that will lead to a result. The use of interactive advertising in various forms such as billboards, stands, and advertisements at bus stops and so on has increased in recent years, developed countries, and countries that are more familiar to technologies. These works are considered a new step in the field of urban advertising. This research selects samples of using such creative advertisements, especially in commercial areas in different countries as well as Iran. It considers the producing method, ideation, and effectiveness of each in a specific period as well as their installation and commissioning

  19. Effect of Interaction of Methanol Leaf Extract of Spondias mombin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the effect of interaction between methanol leaf extract of Spondias mombin and amoxicillin on diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC). Methods: Cold methanol extraction of Spondias mombin leaf and its phytochemical screening were carried out. Isolated, characterized and identified strains of ...

  20. Toddler-Caregiver Interaction: The Effect of Temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joanna; Kowalski, Helen

    1999-01-01

    Examined effect of toddler temperament on caregiver-toddler interaction in child care. Found that children classified as difficult attracted significantly more attention, not necessarily positive, from caregivers. Children rated as easy were overlooked more often than others. Children's sociability/withdrawal made little difference to caregiver…

  1. Effects of interacting variables on the release properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The individual and interaction effects of formulation variables on the release of suppositories were investigated using a 23 factorial experimental design. The variables studied were nature of base (B), type of drug (D), and presence of surfactant (S). Method: Suppositories were formulated with theobroma oil and ...

  2. Interactive Distance Learning Effectively Provides Winning Sports Nutrition Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Jennifer; Hoelscher-Day, Sharon; Begeman, Gale; Houtkooper, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Interactive distance-education (n=226) and face-to-face (n=129) continuing education workshops for health care and education professionals on sports nutrition were evaluated immediately and after 6 months. The well-designed distance-education format was as effective and acceptable as face to face and increased sports nutrition knowledge. (SK)

  3. Dimensions of Effective Interactive Learning with Telematics for Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Ron; Reeves, Thomas C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes two forms of telematics, audiographics and live interactive television, that are being used for distance education in Western Australia. Effective telematics teaching is discussed, including collaboration, generative learning, contextual engagement, personal autonomy, and motivation. Recommendations for further research are included.…

  4. INTERACTION EFFECT OF SEASON Senna occid. CORRECTED. L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. K.J. Umar

    micro Kjeldahl method, and difference (NFE) methods. Data was subjected to ANOVA and LSD at 0.05% for means separation. The results for interaction effect were all statistically significant (P<0.05) in the leaves of the two Senna species and were influenced variedly by the treatment factors. Specifically, rainy subseason ...

  5. Determining the Effect of Interactive Invention Instructional Strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physics is the foundation of science and technology. Students‟ achievement in this subject at all levels of Education has been consistently poor. In an attempt to seek solutions to this problem, this study determined the effect of interactive invention strategy on NCE pre-service teachers‟ achievement in physics. The study ...

  6. Effect of alcohol and kolanut interaction on biochemical indices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of alcohol and kolanut interactions on biochemical indices of neuronal gene expression in Wistar albino rats was studied. Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups of five (5) rats per group. The control group (1) received via oral route a placebo (4ml of distilled water). Groups 2 - 6 were treated for a period ...

  7. Effective Electromagnetic Interaction Potential in Flat and Curved Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, José Alexander; Urrutia, Luis F.

    2010-07-01

    We present a summary of the main steps in the construction of the effective relativistic interaction potential between two charged Dirac particles in the presence of a background weak gravitational field, by extending a procedure previously used for electrodynamics in Minkowski space. We consider the full two-body problem and apply the method to the hydrogen atom.

  8. Effect of Melatonin and Caffeine Interaction on Caffeine Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Melatonin and Caffeine Interaction on Caffeine Induced Oxidative Stress and Sleep Disorders. ... wasting and accumulation of xanthurenic acid, which promotes sleep; and could be beneficial in the treatment of hyper cholesterolemia, thereby preventing coronary heart disease, and post menopausal osteoporosis.

  9. Independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, clinical stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is still limited to no evidence on the independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, disease stage, baseline disease severity and other important comorbidities on mortality risk among young children treated for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in South Africa (SA, using the World Health Organization ...

  10. Determining the Effect of Interactive Invention Instructional Strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Students‟ achievement in this subject at all levels of Education has been consistently poor. In an attempt to seek solutions to this problem, this study determined the effect of interactive invention strategy on NCE pre-service teachers‟ achievement in physics. The study adopted a quasi experimental research design with 98.

  11. Effective Student Learning of Fractions with an Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technology, when coupled with reform-based teaching practices, has been shown to be an effective way to support student learning of mathematics. The quality of the technology itself, as well as how it is used, impacts how much students learn. Interactive simulations are dynamic virtual environments similar to virtual manipulatives that…

  12. Additive main effects and multiplicative interaction analysis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotype by environment interaction (G x E) is a major problem in the study of quantitative traits as it complicates the interpretation of genotypes evaluation experiments and makes predications of performance difficult. In order to disentangle the genetic and GxE effects and get meaningful interpretation of the results, ...

  13. Employee interactive quality and perceived value effects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is premised by key variables that are germane in service quality and draws from a synthesis of literature to examine the effects of employee interactive quality and perceived value on satisfaction and future patronage intentions among patrons in commercial health and fitness centres in South Africa. It is located ...

  14. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of dynamical, proton-conducting hydrogen-bonded networks in the protein HCA II. The conformational fluctuations of His-64 is found to contribute crucially to the mechanism of such path formation irrespective of the way electrostatic ...

  15. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    mining step. But at low buffer concentration, a rate limiting contribution24–26 comes from an intermo- lecular exchange of proton(s) between His-64 and bulk solvent or buffer when His-64 has its sidechain pointing ..... date the effect of water re-organization as well as that of electrostatic interactions on the rotation of His-64.

  16. Interaction Effect of Season, Habitat and Leaf Age on Proximate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was subjected to ANOVA and LSD at 0.05% for means separation. The results for interaction effect were all statistically significant (P<0.05) in the leaves of the two Senna species and were influenced variedly by the treatment factors. Specifically, rainy subseason, fadama and upland habitats, young and matured ...

  17. and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage level

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ali

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... interaction effects between dietary levels of EFFSB and extrusion temperatures on performance criteria, pancreas weight, CPK, LDH, AST ... supplement in the poultry diets (Arnold et al., 1971;. Simovic et al., 1972; ... isonitrogenous starter, grower and finisher mash diets formulated according to AVIAGEN ...

  18. Effect of taurine and bile acid supplementation and their interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of taurine and bile acid supplementation and their interaction on performance, serum components, ileal viscosity and carcass characteristics of broiler chickens. ... feed conversion ratio (FCR), fat digestibility, serum cholesterol (Chol), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein (HDL).

  19. Determining the Effect of Interactive Invention Instructional Strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Abstract. Physics is the foundation of science and technology. Students‟ achievement in this subject at all levels of Education has been consistently poor. In an attempt to seek solutions to this problem, this study determined the effect of interactive invention strategy on NCE pre-service teachers‟ achievement in physics.

  20. Effect of alcohol and kolanut interaction on brain sodium pump ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of alcohol - kolanut interaction on Sodium Pump activity in wistar albino rats was studied. Thirty wistar albino rats were divided into six groups of five (5) rats per group and used for the study. The control group (1) received via oral route a placebo (4ml of distilled water). Groups 2 to 6 were treated for a period of 21 days ...

  1. Effective interaction: From nuclear reactions to neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... An equation of state (EoS) for symmetric nuclear matter is constructed using the density-dependent M3Y effective interaction and extended for isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. Theoretically obtained values of symmetric nuclear matter incompressibility, isobaric incompressibility, symmetry energy and its ...

  2. Membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malekkhaiat Häffner, S; Nyström, L; Nordström, R

    2017-01-01

    Membrane interactions are critical for the successful use of inorganic nanoparticles as antimicrobial agents and as carriers of, or co-actives with, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to contribute to an increased understanding of these, we here investigate effects of particle size (42-208 nm...

  3. Effects of Parallel Channel Interactions, Steam Flow, Liquid Subcool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tests were performed to examine the effects of parallel channel interactions, steam flow, liquid subcool and channel heat addition on the delivery of liquid from the upper plenum into the channels and lower plenum of Boiling Water Nuclear Power Reactors during reflood transients. Early liquid delivery into the channels, ...

  4. 40 CFR 610.23 - Operator interaction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator interaction effects. 610.23 Section 610.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Evaluation Criteria for the Preliminary...

  5. Effect of Melatonin and Caffeine Interaction on Caffeine Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chigo Okwuosa

    Summary: Effect of interaction of melatonin and caffeine on caffeine induced oxidative stress and sleep disorders was studied. Fifteen ... nitrogen levels. The brain of each rat was also harvested and processed into whole homogenate, frozen in liquid nitrogen ..... damage to proteins is caused by the oxidation of sulphydryl ...

  6. Charge renormalization for effective interactions of colloids at water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Frydel, D.; Dietrich, S.; Oettel, M.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze theoretically the electrostatic interaction of surface-charged colloids at water interfaces with special attention to the experimentally relevant case of large charge densities on the colloid-water interface. Whereas linear theory predicts an effective dipole potential the strength of which is proportional to the square of the product of charge density and screening length, nonlinear charge renormalization effects change this dependence to a weakly logarithmic one. These results ap...

  7. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  8. Approximation scheme based on effective interactions for stochastic gene regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Since gene regulatory systems contain sometimes only a small number of molecules, these systems are not described well by macroscopic rate equations; a master equation approach is needed for such cases. We develop an approximation scheme for dealing with the stochasticity of the gene regulatory systems. Using an effective interaction concept, original master equations can be reduced to simpler master equations, which can be solved analytically. We apply the approximation scheme to self-regulating systems with monomer or dimer interactions, and a two-gene system with an exclusive switch. The approximation scheme can recover bistability of the exclusive switch adequately.

  9. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornikov, Maxim [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), 142190 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  10. Dynamics of interacting electrons under effect of a Morse potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, J. L. L.; Sales, M. O.; Neto, A. Ranciaro; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2017-05-01

    We consider interacting electrons moving in a nonlinear Morse lattice. We set the initial conditions as follows: electrons were initially localized at the center of the chain and a solitonic deformation was produced by an impulse excitation on the center of the chain. By solving quantum and classical equations for this system numerically, we found that a fraction of electronic wave function was trapped by the solitonic excitation, and trapping specificities depend on the degree of interaction among electrons. Also, there is evidence that the effective electron velocity depends on Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling in a nontrivial way. This association is explained in detail along this work. In addition, we briefly discuss the dependence of our results with the type of initial condition we choose for the electrons and lattice.

  11. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tews, Ingo

    2015-10-12

    The neutron-matter equation of state connects several physical systems over a wide density range, from cold atomic gases in the unitary limit at low densities, to neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate densities, up to neutron stars which reach supranuclear densities in their core. An accurate description of the neutron-matter equation of state is therefore crucial to describe these systems. To calculate the neutron-matter equation of state reliably, precise many-body methods in combination with a systematic theory for nuclear forces are needed. Chiral effective field theory (EFT) is such a theory. It provides a systematic framework for the description of low-energy hadronic interactions and enables calculations with controlled theoretical uncertainties. Chiral EFT makes use of a momentum-space expansion of nuclear forces based on the symmetries of Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. In chiral EFT, the description of nuclear forces can be systematically improved by going to higher orders in the chiral expansion. On the other hand, continuum Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most precise many-body methods available to study strongly interacting systems at finite densities. They treat the Schroedinger equation as a diffusion equation in imaginary time and project out the ground-state wave function of the system starting from a trial wave function by propagating the system in imaginary time. To perform this propagation, continuum QMC methods require as input local interactions. However, chiral EFT, which is naturally formulated in momentum space, contains several sources of nonlocality. In this Thesis, we show how to construct local chiral two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) interactions and discuss results of first QMC calculations for pure neutron systems. We have performed systematic auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for neutron matter using local chiral NN interactions. By

  13. Inferring modulators of genetic interactions with epistatic nested effects models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Holger; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Maps of genetic interactions can dissect functional redundancies in cellular networks. Gene expression profiles as high-dimensional molecular readouts of combinatorial perturbations provide a detailed view of genetic interactions, but can be hard to interpret if different gene sets respond in different ways (called mixed epistasis). Here we test the hypothesis that mixed epistasis between a gene pair can be explained by the action of a third gene that modulates the interaction. We have extended the framework of Nested Effects Models (NEMs), a type of graphical model specifically tailored to analyze high-dimensional gene perturbation data, to incorporate logical functions that describe interactions between regulators on downstream genes and proteins. We benchmark our approach in the controlled setting of a simulation study and show high accuracy in inferring the correct model. In an application to data from deletion mutants of kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae we show that epistatic NEMs can point to modulators of genetic interactions. Our approach is implemented in the R-package ‘epiNEM’ available from https://github.com/cbg-ethz/epiNEM and https://bioconductor.org/packages/epiNEM/. PMID:28406896

  14. Inferring modulators of genetic interactions with epistatic nested effects models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pirkl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Maps of genetic interactions can dissect functional redundancies in cellular networks. Gene expression profiles as high-dimensional molecular readouts of combinatorial perturbations provide a detailed view of genetic interactions, but can be hard to interpret if different gene sets respond in different ways (called mixed epistasis. Here we test the hypothesis that mixed epistasis between a gene pair can be explained by the action of a third gene that modulates the interaction. We have extended the framework of Nested Effects Models (NEMs, a type of graphical model specifically tailored to analyze high-dimensional gene perturbation data, to incorporate logical functions that describe interactions between regulators on downstream genes and proteins. We benchmark our approach in the controlled setting of a simulation study and show high accuracy in inferring the correct model. In an application to data from deletion mutants of kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae we show that epistatic NEMs can point to modulators of genetic interactions. Our approach is implemented in the R-package 'epiNEM' available from https://github.com/cbg-ethz/epiNEM and https://bioconductor.org/packages/epiNEM/.

  15. Interactive and Non-Interactive Pictures in Multimedia Learning Environments: Effects on Learning Outcomes and Learning Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Thorsten; Schnotz, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    New technologies enable flexible combinations of text and interactive or non-interactive pictures. The aim of the present study was to investigate (a) whether adding pictures to texts is generally beneficial for learning or whether it can also have detrimental effects, (b) how interactivity of pictures affects learning, (c) whether the…

  16. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

  17. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1) chemical interaction between drugs, (2) protein interactions between drugs' targets, and (3) target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations. PMID:24083237

  18. Microscopic effective interaction between electrons: Application to sodium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipparini, E.; Serra, Ll.; Takayanagi, K.

    1994-06-01

    The effects of short-range electronic correlations on the properties of sodium clusters are studied using the Brueckner g matrix as an effective interaction which describes the scattering of two electrons in the presence of a many-electron medium. The associated cluster Hamiltonian is solved within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the ground state and the dipole plasmon resonance is studied using the self-consistent random-phase approximation. Effects due to ionic core electrons are considered within the pseudojellium model of metal cluster, which goes beyond jellium by using ionic pseudo-Hamiltonians.

  19. Effects of magnetic interactions in antiferromagnetic ferrihydrite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berquo, Thelma S; Banerjee, Subir K [Institute for Rock Magnetism, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Erbs, Jasmine J; Penn, R Lee [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Lindquist, Anna [Department of Physics, Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter, MN 56082 (United States)], E-mail: berqu013@umn.edu

    2009-04-29

    The effects of magnetic interactions in the magnetic properties of six-line ferrihydrite particles were investigated by studying the behavior of aggregated versus coated particles. Four different coating agents (sugar, alginate, lactate and ascorbate) were employed in order to obtain dispersed particles and prevent particle agglomeration; one sub-sample was allowed to dry with no coating agent. The five sets of ferrihydrite particles were from the same batch and the size was estimated as 3.6 {+-} 0.4 nm in length. Low temperature magnetization, ac susceptibility and Moessbauer spectroscopy data showed contrasting blocking temperatures for uncoated and coated samples with a decrease of T{sub P} from about 50 K to 12 K, respectively. The contributions from magnetic interactions were recognized in magnetic measurements and the effective anisotropy constant for non-interacting ferrihydrite was estimated as (100 {+-} 10) x 10{sup 3} J m{sup -3}. Overall, employing sugar and alginate as coating agents was more successful in preventing particle aggregation and magnetic interactions. In contrast, ascorbate and lactate were unsuitable due to the chemical reaction between the coating agent and ferrihydrite surface.

  20. Superfluid Gap in Neutron Matter from a Microscopic Effective Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhar, Omar; De Rosi, Giulia

    2017-12-01

    Correlated basis function (CBF) perturbation theory and the formalism of cluster expansions have been recently employed to obtain an effective interaction from a nuclear Hamiltonian strongly constrained by phenomenology. We report the results of a study of the superfluid gap in pure neutron matter, associated with the formation of Cooper pairs in the ^1S_0 channel. The calculations have been carried out using an improved version of the CBF effective interaction, in which three-nucleon forces are taken into account using a microscopic model. Our results show that a non-vanishing superfluid gap develops at densities in the range 2 × 10^{-4} ≲ ρ /ρ _0 ≲ 0.1, where ρ _0 = 2.8 × 10^{14} g cm^{-3} is the equilibrium density of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter, corresponding mainly to the neutron-star inner crust.

  1. Towards effective interactive three-dimensional colour postprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, B. C.; Hajjar, J. F.; Abel, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Recommendations for the development of effective three-dimensional, graphical color postprocessing are made. First, the evaluation of large, complex numerical models demands that a postprocessor be highly interactive. A menu of available functions should be provided and these operations should be performed quickly so that a sense of continuity and spontaneity exists during the post-processing session. Second, an agenda for three-dimensional color postprocessing is proposed. A postprocessor must be versatile with respect to application and basic algorithms must be designed so that they are flexible. A complete selection of tools is necessary to allow arbitrary specification of views, extraction of qualitative information, and access to detailed quantitative and problem information. Finally, full use of advanced display hardware is necessary if interactivity is to be maximized and effective postprocessing of today's numerical simulations is to be achieved.

  2. Effective Dynamics of Microorganisms That Interact with Their Own Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, W. Till; Gelimson, Anatolij; Zhao, Kun; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Like ants, some microorganisms are known to leave trails on surfaces to communicate. We explore how trail-mediated self-interaction could affect the behavior of individual microorganisms when diffusive spreading of the trail is negligible on the time scale of the microorganism using a simple phenomenological model for an actively moving particle and a finite-width trail. The effective dynamics of each microorganism takes on the form of a stochastic integral equation with the trail interaction appearing in the form of short-term memory. For a moderate coupling strength below an emergent critical value, the dynamics exhibits effective diffusion in both orientation and position after a phase of superdiffusive reorientation. We report experimental verification of a seemingly counterintuitive perpendicular alignment mechanism that emerges from the model.

  3. Postmaterialism, religiosity and ethnocentrism: Interactive effects on political preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todosijević Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between value orientations and political attitudes are usually analyzed as linear and additive associations. Since values are commonly conceived as lacking independence of each other, particularly in politics where they usually appear in the shape of ‘ideological packages’, the paper examines how values interact when generating their political effects. We investigate the interactive effects between postmaterialism, religiosity and ethnocentrism when they are required to explain ideological and party preferences. The outlined problems are examined using the Dutch Parliamentary Election Studies (DPES data. Results show that political expression of some values (e.g., ethnocentrism is dependent on the level of the other values (e.g., postmaterialism. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 47010

  4. The Global People competency framework: competencies for effective intercultural interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer-Oatey, Helen; Stadler, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    This Competency Framework explains the competencies that are needed for effective intercultural interaction. In contrast to the Life Cycle Model for Intercultural Partnerships (see the Global People Toolbook) which presents the competencies by stage (i.e. key competencies are identified for each stage of a project life cycle), the Competency Framework presents them by clusters. Intercultural competencies can be grouped into four interrelated clusters, according to the aspect of competence the...

  5. Kinematic Effects of Tidal Interaction on Galaxy Rotation Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.; Geller, Margaret J.

    1998-01-01

    We use self-consistent N-body models, in conjunction with models of test particles moving in galaxy potentials, to explore the initial effects of interactions on the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. Using nearly self-consistent disk/bulge/halo galaxy models (Kuijken & Dubinski 1995), we simulate the first pass of galaxies on nearly parabolic orbits; we vary orbit inclinations, galaxy halo masses and impact parameters. For each simulation, we mimic observed rotation curves of the model gala...

  6. Interaction of TEOS with cementitious materials: Chemical and physical effects

    OpenAIRE

    Barberena Fernández, A.M.; Carmona-Quiroga, Paula María; Blanco Varela, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the effectiveness of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a Portland cement mortar consolidant to verify whether it meets the requirements for use in cultural assets. TEOS was found to raise cement mortar strength, lower its porosity and permeability and occasion minimal alteration in its appearance, an indication of its suitability to conserve heritage mortar works. FTIR and 29Si MAS NMR studies supported the notion that TEOS interacts with the hydrated phases of the ce...

  7. The effects of microstructural changes on montmorillonite-microbial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Adrian; Robinson, Claion; Hanson, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Clay minerals are important natural adsorbents of soil organic matter (SOM) and therefore are natural modulators of soil-atmospheric carbon fluxes. Although such effects have been reported, little is known about the spatial distribution of organic matter (OM) on the surfaces of soil minerals and even less is known about the effects of microstructural changes on clay-organo interactions. Here we employ acid hydrolysis to induce varying degrees of microstructural changes to montmorillonite clay mineral as a function of time and combine IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and SEM-EDX as primary techniques to independently provide molecular-level information on the effects these changes on microbial interactions with the mineral. We observed that progressive dissolution of octahedral cations and the simultaneous enrichment of amorphous silica are prominent structural changes induced by hydrolysis, and that the adsorption of microbial-derived components (in particular lipids) on the surfaces of acid-treated clay decreases with increasing acid dissolution time. Although the precise mechanism(s) of interactions remains unclear, we speculate that this adsorption behavior is most likely due to spatial co-variation of microbial-derived OM with octahedral cations in the mineral, acid erosion of biochemically active binding sites, and/or a progressive increase in the hydrophilicity of the mineral surfaces by acid attack over time.

  8. Spectator Interactions in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Richard J

    2002-11-08

    Soft-collinear effective theory is generalized to include soft massless quarks in addition to collinear fields. This extension is necessary for the treatment of interactions with the soft spectator quark in a heavy meson. The power counting of the relevant fields and the construction of the effective Lagrangian are discussed at leading order in {Lambda}/m{sub b}. Several novel effects occur in the matching of full-theory amplitudes onto effective-theory operators containing soft light quarks, such as the appearance of an intermediate mass scale and large non-localities of operators on scales of order 1/{Lambda}. Important examples of effective-theory operators with soft light quarks are studied and their renormalization properties explored. The formalism presented here forms the basis for a systematic analysis of factorization and power corrections for any exclusive B-meson decay into light particles.

  9. Effect of interactive metronome training on children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, R J; Jacokes, L E; Cassily, J F; Greenspan, S I; Tuchman, R F; Stemmer, P J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific intervention, the Interactive Metronome, on selected aspects of motor and cognitive skills in a group of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study included 56 boys who were 6years to 12 years of age and diagnosed before they entered the study as having ADHD. The participants were pretested and randomly assigned to one of three matched groups. A group of 19 participants receiving 15 hr of Interactive Metronome training exercises were compared with a group receiving no intervention and a group receiving training on selected computer video games. A significant pattern of improvement across 53 of 58 variables favoring the Interactive Metronome treatment was found. Additionally, several significant differences were found among the treatment groups and between pretreatment and posttreatment factors on performance in areas of attention, motor control, language processing, reading, and parental reports of improvements in regulation of aggressive behavior. The Interactive Metronome training appears to facilitate a number of capacities, including attention, motor control, and selected academic skills, in boys with ADHD.

  10. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei, E-mail: kwng@ntu.edu.sg; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  11. Effective stochastic generator with site-dependent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamehchi, Masoumeh; Jafarpour, Farhad H.

    2017-11-01

    It is known that the stochastic generators of effective processes associated with the unconditioned dynamics of rare events might consist of non-local interactions; however, it can be shown that there are special cases for which these generators can include local interactions. In this paper, we investigate this possibility by considering systems of classical particles moving on a one-dimensional lattice with open boundaries. The particles might have hard-core interactions similar to the particles in an exclusion process, or there can be many arbitrary particles at a single site in a zero-range process. Assuming that the interactions in the original process are local and site-independent, we will show that under certain constraints on the microscopic reaction rules, the stochastic generator of an unconditioned process can be local but site-dependent. As two examples, the asymmetric zero-temperature Glauber model and the A-model with diffusion are presented and studied under the above-mentioned constraints.

  12. Cascading diversity effects transmitted exclusively by behavioral interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2010-08-01

    Consumer diversity generally increases resource consumption. Consumers can also impact other species by altering their behavior, but it is unclear how such nonconsumptive effects scale with diversity. We independently manipulated predator species richness and the consumptive and nonconsumptive effects of predator communities to measure the role of each factor in protecting Brassica oleracea plants from caterpillar herbivory. Plant biomass was greatest when diverse predator assemblages induced antipredator behaviors in herbivores, an effect not further strengthened when predators could also kill caterpillars. Predators within diverse communities were more likely to forage on plants and to disrupt herbivore feeding, reflecting greater aversion to foraging among conspecific than heterospecific competitors. Predator diversity, therefore, initiated behavioral changes at the predator and then herbivore trophic levels, both to the benefit of plants. Our results indicate that strong, emergent species-richness effects can be transmitted entirely through behavioral interactions, independent of resource consumption.

  13. Effects of threat management interactions on conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Nancy A; Wilson, Kerrie A; Tulloch, Ayesha I T; Rhodes, Jonathan R; Hanson, Jeffrey O; Possingham, Hugh P

    2015-12-01

    Decisions need to be made about which biodiversity management actions are undertaken to mitigate threats and about where these actions are implemented. However, management actions can interact; that is, the cost, benefit, and feasibility of one action can change when another action is undertaken. There is little guidance on how to explicitly and efficiently prioritize management for multiple threats, including deciding where to act. Integrated management could focus on one management action to abate a dominant threat or on a strategy comprising multiple actions to abate multiple threats. Furthermore management could be undertaken at sites that are in close proximity to reduce costs. We used cost-effectiveness analysis to prioritize investments in fire management, controlling invasive predators, and reducing grazing pressure in a bio-diverse region of southeastern Queensland, Australia. We compared outcomes of 5 management approaches based on different assumptions about interactions and quantified how investment needed, benefits expected, and the locations prioritized for implementation differed when interactions were taken into account. Managing for interactions altered decisions about where to invest and in which actions to invest and had the potential to deliver increased investment efficiency. Differences in high priority locations and actions were greatest between the approaches when we made different assumptions about how management actions deliver benefits through threat abatement: either all threats must be managed to conserve species or only one management action may be required. Threatened species management that does not consider interactions between actions may result in misplaced investments or misguided expectations of the effort required to mitigate threats to species. © 2015 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Sachdev, Subir; Swingle, Brian

    2017-07-01

    We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov) exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z >1 .

  15. Effective field theories for van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Nora; Shtabovenko, Vladyslav; Tarrús Castellà, Jaume; Vairo, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Van der Waals interactions between two neutral but polarizable systems at a separation R much larger than the typical size of the systems are at the core of a broad sweep of contemporary problems in settings ranging from atomic, molecular and condensed matter physics to strong interactions and gravity. In this paper, we reexamine the dispersive van der Waals interactions between two hydrogen atoms. The novelty of the analysis resides in the usage of nonrelativistic effective field theories of quantum electrodynamics. In this framework, the van der Waals potential acquires the meaning of a matching coefficient in an effective field theory, dubbed van der Waals effective field theory, suited to describe the low-energy dynamics of an atom pair. It may be computed systematically as a series in R times some typical atomic scale and in the fine-structure constant α . The van der Waals potential gets short-range contributions and radiative corrections, which we compute in dimensional regularization and renormalize here for the first time. Results are given in d space-time dimensions. One can distinguish among different regimes depending on the relative size between 1 /R and the typical atomic bound-state energy, which is of order m α2. Each regime is characterized by a specific hierarchy of scales and a corresponding tower of effective field theories. The short-distance regime is characterized by 1 /R ≫m α2 and the leading-order van der Waals potential is the London potential. We also compute next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order corrections. In the long-distance regime we have 1 /R ≪m α2. In this regime, the van der Waals potential contains contact terms, which are parametrically larger than the Casimir-Polder potential that describes the potential at large distances. In the effective field theory, the Casimir-Polder potential counts as a next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order effect. In the intermediate-distance regime, 1 /R ˜m α2, a significantly more complex

  16. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    When considering the effects of climate change, it has become clear that processes resulting in changes in stratospheric ozone are more complex than previously believed. As a result of this, human health and environmental issues will be longer-lasting and more regionally variable. Like the other Panels, the EEAP produces a detailed report every four years; the most recent was published as a series of seven papers in 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2015, 14, 1-184). In the years in between, the EEAP produces less detailed and shorter Progress Reports of the relevant scientific findings. The most recent of these was for 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2016, 15, 141-147). The present Progress Report for 2016 assesses some of the highlights and new insights with regard to the interactive nature of the direct and indirect effects of UV radiation, atmospheric processes, and climate change. The report is also published in (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7pp90001e). The more detailed Quadrennial Assessment will be made available in 2018. The Parties to the Montreal Protocol are informed by three Panels of experts. One of these is the Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP), which deals with two focal issues. The first focus is the effects on increased UV radiation on human health, animals, plants, biogeochemistry, air quality, and materials. The second focus is on interactions between UV radiation and global climate change and how these may

  17. Gravitational interaction to one loop in effective quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhundov, A. [Universitaet-gesamthochschule Siegen (Germany)]|[Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan). Institute of Physics; Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Shiekh, A. [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1996-10-01

    The authors carry out the first step of a program conceived, in order to build a realistic model, having the particle spectrum of the standard model and renormalized masses, interaction terms and coupling, etc. which include the class of quantum gravity corrections, obtained by handling gravity as an effective theory. This provides an adequate picture at low energies, i.e. much less than the scale of strong gravity (the Planck mass). Hence the results are valid, irrespectively of any proposal for the full quantum gravity as a fundamental theory. The authors consider only non-analytic contributions to the one-loop scattering matrix elements, which provide the dominant quantum effect at long distance. These contributions are finite and independent from the finite value of the renormalization counter terms of the effective Lagrangian. The authors calculate the interaction of two heavy scalar particles, i.e. close to rest, due to the effective quantum gravity to the one loop order and compare with similar results in the literature.

  18. Stigma's Effect on Social Interaction and Social Media Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudewyns, Vanessa; Himelboim, Itai; Hansen, Derek L; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatized topics, such as HIV/STD, likely constrain related information sharing in ways that should be apparent in social interactions both on and off the Internet. Specifically, the authors predicted that the more people perceive an issue as stigmatized, the less likely they are to talk about the issue both privately (with sexual partners and peers) and publicly (on Twitter). Study 1 tested the effect of stigma on conversations at the individual level: The authors asked a group of participants (N = 138) about perceived STD-testing stigma, interactions with a sexual partner, and conversations with peers about STD testing. Study 2 assessed whether health conditions, in the aggregate, were less likely to generate social media activity as a function of current stigmatization. Using 259,758 archived Twitter posts mentioning 13 medical conditions, the authors tested whether level of stigma predicted the volume of relevant social media conversation, controlling for each condition's amount of advocacy and Google search popularity from a user's perspective. Findings supported our hypotheses. Individuals who reported perceiving a given health conditions in more stigmatic ways also reported interacting less with others about that topic; Twitter results showed a similar pattern. Results also suggest a more complex story of influence, as funding from the National Institutes of Health (i.e., each conditions amount of advocacy) associated with the examined health conditions also predicted Twitter activity. Overall, these results indicated that stigma had a similar, dampening effect on face-to-face and Twitter interactions. Findings hold theoretical and practical implications, which are discussed.

  19. Effective realistic interactions for low momentum Hilbert spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Dennis

    2012-12-13

    described method to calculate the operator representation is applied to different effective realistic potentials. In a first application the Argonne V18 potential, transformed by means of the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM), is considered. As second application an operator representation of the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) transformed Argonne potential is obtained. Finally an operator representation of the JISP16 interaction, which is specifically designed for the harmonic oscillator basis, is derived by using the same ansatz as for the SRG transformed Argonne potential.Summing up, there is no general set of operators which can be used to describe all the different effective interactions by just adjusting the particular radial functions. However, it is possible to find a suitable operator representation, even for effective operators that are specifically designed for numerical feasibility and are treating each partial wave separately.

  20. Eddy-Kuroshio Interactions: Local and Remote Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Sen; Mensah, Vigan; Andres, Magdalena; Chang, Ming-Huei; Yang, Yiing Jang

    2017-12-01

    Quasi-geostrophic mesoscale eddies regularly impinge on the Kuroshio in the western North Pacific, but the processes underlying the evolution of these eddy-Kuroshio interactions have not yet been thoroughly investigated in the literature. Here this interaction is examined with results from a semi-idealized three-dimensional numerical model and observations from four pressure-sensor equipped inverted echo sounders (PIESs) in a zonal section east of Taiwan and satellite altimeters. Both the observations and numerical simulations suggest that, during the interaction of a cyclonic eddy with the Kuroshio, the circular eddy is deformed into an elliptic shape with the major axis in the northwest-southeast direction, before being dissipated; the poleward velocity and associated Kuroshio transport decrease and the sea level and pycnocline slopes across the Kuroshio weaken. In contrast, for an anticyclonic eddy during the eddy-Kuroshio interaction, variations in the velocity, sea level, and isopycnal depth are reversed; the circular eddy is also deformed to an ellipse but with the major axis parallel to the Kuroshio. The model results also demonstrate that the velocity field is modified first and consequently the SSH and isopycnal depth evolve during the interaction. Furthermore, due to the combined effect of impingement latitude and realistic topography, some eddy-Kuroshio interactions east of Taiwan are found to have remote effects, both in the Luzon Strait and on the East China Sea shelf northeast of Taiwan.Plain Language SummaryMesoscale eddies are everywhere in the ocean. These ocean swirls of either clockwise or counterclockwise spinning with diameter of about 100-300 km and rounding current speed of about 0.5 m/s, carrying energy and certain type of water mass, move westward and eventually reach the western boundary of each ocean. The evolution of these eddies and the interaction which occurs when they encounter the western boundary current, e.g. the Kuroshio in the

  1. Effects of Peanut Genotypes on Meloidogyne Species Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirunsalee, Anan; Barker, K. R.; Beute, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    A 3-year microplot study was conducted to characterize the interaction between Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 (MA1) and M. hapla (MH), as affected by the five peanut genotypes: Florigiant, NC 7, NC 6, NC Ac 18416, and NC Ac 18016. The interactive effects on infection (total parasitic forms per root unit) and reproduction potentials of each nematode species and crop damage were determined. As a single population, MA1 had greater infection capacity and caused more crop damage than did MH, but both species had similar reproduction potentials. In mixed infestations, MA1 was more competitive than MH, as reflected by incidence of infection. Infection and reproduction potentials, and crop-damage capabilities of the mixed populations were similar to those of MA1 alone. All peanut genotypes were susceptible to infection by both nematodes. NC 6 was less susceptible to damage by MA1 and the mixed populations than other genotypes. A nematode treatment x genotype interaction was detected for root infection and crop damage, but not for population density or reproduction. With high preplant nematode levels (Pi), the populations reached their peak by midseason, whereas those with low Pi peaked after midseason. Crop damage in the second and third years was correlated with Pi level. PMID:19277279

  2. Interactive Effects of Nitrogen and Climate Change on Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, E. M.; Bowman, W. D.; Clark, C. M.; Compton, J. E.; Pardo, L. H.; Soong, J.

    2011-12-01

    example, in certain arid ecosystems of southern California, elevated nitrogen has promoted invasions of annual non-native grasses. At the same time, a period of above-normal precipitation years has exacerbated the grass invasions. Increased grass cover has altered the hydrologic cycle of these areas and increased fire risk, ultimately leading to conversion of the ecosystem from diverse shrublands to less diverse grasslands. In addition to empirical studies, modeling can be used to simulate climate change and nitrogen interactions. The ForSAFE-VEG model, for example, has been used to examine climate change and nitrogen interactions in Rocky Mountain alpine vegetation communities. Results from both empirical studies and modeling indicate that nitrogen and climate change interact to drive losses in biodiversity greater than those caused by either stressor alone. Reducing inputs of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen may be an effective mitigation strategy for protecting biodiversity in the face of climate change.

  3. Perturbation theory of nuclear matter with a microscopic effective interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhar, Omar; Lovato, Alessandro

    2017-11-01

    An updated and improved version of the effective interaction based on the Argonne-Urbana nuclear Hamiltonian, derived using the formalism of correlated basis functions and the cluster expansion technique, is employed to obtain a number of properties of cold nuclear matter at arbitrary neutron excess within the formalism of many-body perturbation theory. The numerical results, including the ground-state energy per nucleon, the symmetry energy, the pressure, the compressibility, and the single-particle spectrum, are discussed in the context of the available empirical information, obtained from measured nuclear properties and heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Perturbative Pions in Effective Field Theory for Nucleon Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehen, Thomas

    2001-12-01

    I discuss pions in effective field theory (EFT) for the nucleon interaction within the power counting scheme proposed by Kaplan-Savage-Wise (KSW). After explaining why KSW power counting demands perturbative treatment of pions, I present results of next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculations of nucleon-nucleon scattering in S-,P-, and D-wave channels. Perturbative treatment of pions fails in spin-triplet channels. The origin of large perturbative corrections is the piece of the spin-tensor force which survives in the chiral limit.

  5. Compressibility and shock wave interaction effects on free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimy, M.; Erwin, D. E.; Elliott, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    Two compressible free shear layers with convective Mach numbers of .51 and .86 were studied as baseline configurations to investigate the effects of compressibility on the turbulence characteristics. These shear layers were then disturbed by the placement of an obstruction in the shear layer in an attempt to enhance the shear layer growth rate. These models produced a curved shock in the supersonic side of the shear layer. The results indicate a significant reduction in turbulence levels with increased compressibility. However, there are not any significant changes due to the bow shock interaction with the shear layer.

  6. Effects of low urea concentrations on protein-water interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luisa A; Povarova, Olga I; Stepanenko, Olga V; Sulatskaya, Anna I; Madeira, Pedro P; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2017-01-01

    Solvent properties of aqueous media (dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were measured in the coexisting phases of Dextran-PEG aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) containing .5 and 2.0 M urea. The differences between the electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the phases in the ATPSs were quantified by analysis of partitioning of the homologous series of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side chains. Furthermore, partitioning of eleven different proteins in the ATPSs was studied. The analysis of protein partition behavior in a set of ATPSs with protective osmolytes (sorbitol, sucrose, trehalose, and TMAO) at the concentration of .5 M, in osmolyte-free ATPS, and in ATPSs with .5 or 2.0 M urea in terms of the solvent properties of the phases was performed. The results show unambiguously that even at the urea concentration of .5 M, this denaturant affects partitioning of all proteins (except concanavalin A) through direct urea-protein interactions and via its effect on the solvent properties of the media. The direct urea-protein interactions seem to prevail over the urea effects on the solvent properties of water at the concentration of .5 M urea and appear to be completely dominant at 2.0 M urea concentration.

  7. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species......’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  8. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure

  9. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  10. The self in social interactions: sensory attenuation of auditory action effects is stronger in interactions with others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Weiss

    Full Text Available The experience of oneself as an agent not only results from interactions with the inanimate environment, but often takes place in a social context. Interactions with other people have been suggested to play a key role in the construal of self-agency. Here, we investigated the influence of social interactions on sensory attenuation of action effects as a marker of pre-reflective self-agency. To this end, we compared the attenuation of the perceived loudness intensity of auditory action effects generated either by oneself or another person in either an individual, non-interactive or interactive action context. In line with previous research, the perceived loudness of self-generated sounds was attenuated compared to sounds generated by another person. Most importantly, this effect was strongly modulated by social interactions between self and other. Sensory attenuation of self- and other-generated sounds was increased in interactive as compared to the respective individual action contexts. This is the first experimental evidence suggesting that pre-reflective self-agency can extend to and is shaped by interactions between individuals.

  11. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aavishkar A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z>1.

  12. Hydrodynamic interactions in metachronal paddling: effects of varying stroke kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaee, Milad; Kasoju, Vishwa; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2017-11-01

    Crustaceans such as shrimp and krill use a drag-based technique for propulsion, in which multiple pairs of limbs are paddled rhythmically from the tail to the head. Each limb is phase-shifted in time relative to its neighbor. Most studies of this type of metachronal swimming have focused on the jet formed in the animal's wake. However, synergistic hydrodynamic interactions between adjacent limbs in metachrony have received minimal attention. We used a dynamically scaled robotic model to experimentally investigate how variations in stroke kinematics impact inter-paddle hydrodynamic interactions and thrust generation. Physical models of limbs were fitted to the robot and paddled with two different motion profiles (MPs)-1) MP1: metachronal power stroke (PS) and metachronal recovery stroke (RS); and 2) MP2: metachronal PS and synchronous RS. Stroke frequency and amplitude were maintained constant across both MPs. Our results show that MP2 produced faster jets in the thrust-generating direction as compared to MP1. The necessity for a pause in MP2 after completion of PS by the paddles leading the motion, prior to executing the synchronous RS, aided in further downstream flow propagation. The effect of using asymmetric stroke kinematics on thrust generated will be discussed.

  13. Hypergravity Effects on Dendritic Cells and Vascular Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellik, L.; Parenti, A.; Ledda, F.; Basile, V.; Romano, G.; Fusi, F.; Monici, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells inducing specific immune responses, are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this inflammatory disease, DCs increase in number, being particularly abundant in the shoulder regions of plaques. Since the exposure to altered gravitational conditions results in a significant impairment of the immune function, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypergravity on both the function of DCs and their interactions with the vascular wall cells. Monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were sorted by CD14+ magnetic beads selection, cultured for 6 days in medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by a further maturation stimulus. DC phenotype, assessed by flow cytometry, showed a high expression of the specific DC markers CD80, CD86, HLA-DR and CD83. The DCs obtained were then exposed to hypergravitational stimuli and their phenotype, cytoskeleton, ability to activate lymphocytes and interaction with vascular wall cells were investigated. The findings showed that the exposure to hypergravity conditions resulted in a significant impairment of DC cytoskeletal organization, without affecting the expression of DC markers. Moreover, an increase in DC adhesion to human vascular smooth muscle cells and in their ability to activate lymphocytes was observed.

  14. Effect of Partial Shear Interaction in Steel Concrete Composite Girders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalibhat, Madhusudan G.; Upadhyay, Akhil

    2017-10-01

    Steel concrete composite (SCC) structural system has been commonly used both in the buildings and in the bridges because of the advantages it associates when compared to its counterparts such as RC and steel structures. A typical SCC girder consists of a concrete element placed over a steel element. The effectiveness of this composite system is characterized by the type of connection that exists between the two connecting elements. More commonly shear stud connectors are used to connect the two elements. If the shear studs are infinitely rigid, then it brings about full composite action, on the contrary there is no composite action if the studs are not used, between the two connecting elements. It has been observed that generally the composite action exists somewhere between the full composite action and the no composite action, and is called the partial composite action or the partial interaction. More often the partial composite action is overlooked during the design of SCC girders, and the girder is designed assuming that there exists full composite action, because of the complexities in the analysis incorporating the partial composite action. This might lead to the serviceability issues in the SCC girders. Keeping this in mind the present work has been carried out to understand the significance of the partial interaction in SCC girders. In the present work, a comparative study has been made between the available analytical model and the numerical model. Numerical modeling is performed by using commercially available tool such as SAP2000. The main objective of this work is to bring out the relative significance of the partial interaction with respect to the full composite action, with the help of parametric study. Here, the parametric study has been carried by considering various design parameters, such as, span length, degree of shear connection, cross section geometry of steel girder and concrete slab. It is observed that there is significant increase in

  15. The Statistical Multifragmentation Model with Skyrme Effective Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B V; Donangelo, R; Lynch, W G; Steiner, A W; Tsang, M B

    2010-01-01

    The Statistical Multifragmentation Model is modified to incorporate Helmholtz free energies calculated in the finite temperature Thomas-Fermi approximation using Skyrme effective interactions. In this formulation, the density of the fragments at the freeze-out configuration corresponds to the equilibrium value obtained in the Thomas-Fermi approximation at the given temperature. The behavior of the nuclear caloric curve, at constant volume, is investigated in the micro-canonical ensemble and a plateau is observed for excitation energies between 8 and 10 MeV per nucleon. A small kink in the caloric curve is found at the onset of this gas transition, indicating the existence of negative heat capacity, even in this case in which the system is constrained to a fixed volume, in contrast to former statistical calculations.

  16. Effect of large-scale social interactions on body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, M Christopher

    2011-03-01

    I estimate models of endogenous social interactions in body weight at the county and state levels. The results show that dispersion in body weight across time and space in the U.S. is not clearly excessive, and that much of this variation can be attributed to observable individual and regional characteristics. Models exploiting variants of methods proposed by Glaeser et al. (2003), fixed effects, instrumental variable and split-sample instrumental variable methods to address endogeneity suggest that there are not large social multipliers on body weight outcomes. The evidence suggests there may be small multipliers on BMI, obesity, and morbid obesity. There is no evidence that underweight is subject to a social multiplier. The results are sensitive to specification. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Super Efimov effect of resonantly interacting fermions in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yusuke; Moroz, Sergej; Son, Dam Thanh

    2013-06-07

    We study a system of spinless fermions in two dimensions with a short-range interaction fine-tuned to a p-wave resonance. We show that three such fermions form an infinite tower of bound states of orbital angular momentum ℓ=±1 and their binding energies obey a universal doubly exponential scaling E(3)((n))∝exp(-2e(3πn/4+θ)) at large n. This "super Efimov effect" is found by a renormalization group analysis and confirmed by solving the bound state problem. We also provide an indication that there are ℓ=±2 four-body resonances associated with every three-body bound state at E(4)((n))∝exp(-2e(3πn/4+θ-0.188)). These universal few-body states may be observed in ultracold atom experiments and should be taken into account in future many-body studies of the system.

  18. Effects of Early Separation, Interactive Deficits and Experimental Manipulations on Mother-Infant Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    Filmed were interactions in a variety of situations of approximately 150 infants from three groups: a preterm respiratory distress syndrome group, a postterm postmature group, and a normal term group. Videotapes were made of interactions involving the infant, mother, father or sibling, a raggedy ann doll, and a mirror. Among findings were that the…

  19. Differential Effects of Sexual Composition and Interactional Context on Interaction Patterns in Dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, B. Aubrey

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the impact of sexual composition and competitive/cooperative orientation on interaction patterns in same-sex and mixed-sex dyads. Found that the competitive or cooperative orientation of the interactants exerts a far greater impact on the communication behavior of dyads than does their sexual composition. (PD)

  20. Interactive telemedicine: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rachas, Antoine; Farmer, Andrew J; Inzitari, Marco; Shepperd, Sasha

    2015-09-07

    Telemedicine (TM) is the use of telecommunication systems to deliver health care at a distance. It has the potential to improve patient health outcomes, access to health care and reduce healthcare costs. As TM applications continue to evolve it is important to understand the impact TM might have on patients, healthcare professionals and the organisation of care. To assess the effectiveness, acceptability and costs of interactive TM as an alternative to, or in addition to, usual care (i.e. face-to-face care, or telephone consultation). We searched the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group's specialised register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, five other databases and two trials registers to June 2013, together with reference checking, citation searching, handsearching and contact with study authors to identify additional studies. We considered randomised controlled trials of interactive TM that involved direct patient-provider interaction and was delivered in addition to, or substituting for, usual care compared with usual care alone, to participants with any clinical condition. We excluded telephone only interventions and wholly automatic self-management TM interventions. For each condition, we pooled outcome data that were sufficiently homogenous using fixed effect meta-analysis. We reported risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes. We included 93 eligible trials (N = 22,047 participants), which evaluated the effectiveness of interactive TM delivered in addition to (32% of studies), as an alternative to (57% of studies), or partly substituted for usual care (11%) as compared to usual care alone.The included studies recruited patients with the following clinical conditions: cardiovascular disease (36), diabetes (21), respiratory conditions (9), mental health or substance abuse conditions (7), conditions requiring a specialist consultation (6), co morbidities (3

  1. An effective attractive electron-electron interaction and high-Tc superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howson, M.A.; Porter, J.; Morgan, G.J. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Leeds (UK))

    1991-01-15

    The repulsive Coulomb interaction is usually seen as opposing the attractive phonon mediated interaction giving rise to superconductivity. Here we show how the vertex part for electron-electron scattering can lead to an effective attractive Coulomb interaction. We then solve the Eliashberg equations with this effective vertex correction and calculate Tc for a model density of states as we vary the strength of the interaction and the effective mass of the electrons. (orig.).

  2. Effects of Visual Priming on Taste-Odor Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beilen, Marije; Bult, Harold; Renken, Remco; Stieger, Markus; Thumfart, Stefan; Cornelissen, Frans; Kooijman, Valesca

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of visual characteristics other than colour on flavor perception, and the complex interactions between more than two sensory modalities. This study focused on the effects of recognizability of visual (texture) information on flavor perception of odorized sweet beverages. Participants rated the perceived sweetness of odorized sucrose solutions in the presence or absence of either a congruent or incongruent visual context. Odors were qualitatively reminiscent of sweet foods (strawberry and caramel) or not (savoury). Visual context was either an image of the same sweet foods (figurative context) or a visual texture derived from this product (non-figurative context). Textures were created using a texture synthesis method that preserved perceived food qualities while removing object information. Odor-taste combinations were rated sweeter within a figurative than a non-figurative context. This behaviour was exhibited for all odor-taste combinations, even in trials without images, indicating sustained priming by figurative visual context. A non-figurative context showed a transient sweetening effect. Sweetness was generally enhanced most by the strawberry odor. We conclude that the degree of recognizability of visual information (figurative versus non-figurative), influences flavor perception differently. Our results suggest that this visual context priming is mediated by separate sustained and transient processes that are differently evoked by figurative and non-figurative visual contexts. These components operate independent of the congruency of the image-odor-taste combinations. PMID:21969852

  3. Effects of visual priming on taste-odor interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available Little is known about the influence of visual characteristics other than colour on flavor perception, and the complex interactions between more than two sensory modalities. This study focused on the effects of recognizability of visual (texture information on flavor perception of odorized sweet beverages. Participants rated the perceived sweetness of odorized sucrose solutions in the presence or absence of either a congruent or incongruent visual context. Odors were qualitatively reminiscent of sweet foods (strawberry and caramel or not (savoury. Visual context was either an image of the same sweet foods (figurative context or a visual texture derived from this product (non-figurative context. Textures were created using a texture synthesis method that preserved perceived food qualities while removing object information. Odor-taste combinations were rated sweeter within a figurative than a non-figurative context. This behaviour was exhibited for all odor-taste combinations, even in trials without images, indicating sustained priming by figurative visual context. A non-figurative context showed a transient sweetening effect. Sweetness was generally enhanced most by the strawberry odor. We conclude that the degree of recognizability of visual information (figurative versus non-figurative, influences flavor perception differently. Our results suggest that this visual context priming is mediated by separate sustained and transient processes that are differently evoked by figurative and non-figurative visual contexts. These components operate independent of the congruency of the image-odor-taste combinations.

  4. Effects of visual and verbal interaction on unintentional interpersonal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael J; Marsh, Kerry L; Schmidt, R C

    2005-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that people's movements can become unintentionally coordinated during interpersonal interaction. The current study sought to uncover the degree to which visual and verbal (conversation) interaction constrains and organizes the rhythmic limb movements of coactors. Two experiments were conducted in which pairs of participants completed an interpersonal puzzle task while swinging handheld pendulums with instructions that minimized intentional coordination but facilitated either visual or verbal interaction. Cross-spectral analysis revealed a higher degree of coordination for conditions in which the pairs were visually coupled. In contrast, verbal interaction alone was not found to provide a sufficient medium for unintentional coordination to occur, nor did it enhance the unintentional coordination that emerged during visual interaction. The results raise questions concerning differences between visual and verbal informational linkages during interaction and how these differences may affect interpersonal movement production and its coordination.

  5. Restriction of Variance Interaction Effects and Their Importance for International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortina, Jose M.; Köhler, Tine; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A recent Journal of International Business Studies editorial on interaction effects within and across levels highlighted the importance of and difficulty associated with justifying and reporting of such interaction effects. The purpose of this editorial is to describe a type of interaction hypoth...

  6. New parameterizations of the Gogny effective nuclear interaction; Nouvelles parametrisations de l'interaction nucleaire effective de Gogny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappert, F

    2007-06-15

    The effective interaction between nucleons is the basic input to microscopic calculations in nuclear structure. One of the forms used since the 1970's is the phenomenological effective force proposed by D. Gogny. This force gives excellent results in nuclei at the mean-field approximation. The presence of contact terms does not allow, however, to use it for the description of beyond mean-field correlations present in nuclei. In this work, we investigate some extensions of the Gogny force, and especially a generalization in which the zero range density dependent term has been replaced by a finite range term. The parameters occurring in the analytical form of the force have been adjusted on symmetric infinite nuclear matter and neutron matter properties, and on some selected observables for stable nuclei, especially those related to pairing correlations. We present the method to include this kind of force in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and we analyze the results obtained for various nuclei. The new versions of the Gogny force allow us to reproduce nuclear structure properties with improved accuracy as compared to the former version. (author)

  7. Evolving effective behaviours to interact with tag-based populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Osman; Crawford, Chad; Sen, Sandip

    2015-07-01

    Tags and other characteristics, externally perceptible features that are consistent among groups of animals or humans, can be used by others to determine appropriate response strategies in societies. This usage of tags can be extended to artificial environments, where agents can significantly reduce cognitive effort spent on appropriate strategy choice and behaviour selection by reusing strategies for interacting with new partners based on their tags. Strategy selection mechanisms developed based on this idea have successfully evolved stable cooperation in games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game but relies upon payoff sharing and matching methods that limit the applicability of the tag framework. Our goal is to develop a general classification and behaviour selection approach based on the tag framework. We propose and evaluate alternative tag matching and adaptation schemes for a new, incoming individual to select appropriate behaviour against any population member of an existing, stable society. Our proposed approach allows agents to evolve both the optimal tag for the environment as well as appropriate strategies for existing agent groups. We show that these mechanisms will allow for robust selection of optimal strategies by agents entering a stable society and analyse the various environments where this approach is effective.

  8. Effects of azadirachtin on Rhodnius prolixus: immunity and trypanosoma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Azambuja

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of azadirachtin, a tetranortriterpenoid from the neem tree Aradirachta indica J. on both immunity and Trypanosoma cruzi interaction within Rhodniusprolixus and other triatomines, were presented Given through a blood meal, azadirachtin affected the immune reactivity as shown by a significant reduction in numbers of hemocytes and consequently nodule formation follwing challenge with Enterobacter cloacae ß12, reduction in ability to produce antibacterial activities in the hemolymph when injected with bacteria, and decreased ability to destroy the infection caused by inoculation of E. cloacae cells. A single dose of azadirachtin was able to block the development of T. cruzi in R. prolixus if given through the meal at different intervals, together with, before or after parasite infection. Similary, these results were observed with different triatomine species and different strains of T. cruzi. Azadirachtin induced a permanent resistance of the vector against reinfection with T. cruzi. The significance of these data is discussed in relation to the general mode of azadirachtin action in insects.

  9. Interactional effect of cerium and manganese on NO catalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanli; Huang, Yufen; Zhang, Hailong; Lan, Li; Zhao, Ming; Gong, Maochu; Chen, Yaoqiang; Wang, Jianli

    2017-04-01

    To preferably catalyze the oxidation of NO to NO 2 in diesel after-treatment system, a series of CeO 2 -MnO x composite oxides was supported on silica-alumina material by the co-impregnation method. The maximum conversion of NO of the catalyst with a Ce/Mn weight ratio of 5:5 was improved by around 40%, compared to the supported manganese-only or cerium-only sample. And its maximum reaction rate was 0.056 μmol g -1  s -1 at 250 °C at the gas hourly space velocity of 30,000 h -1 . The experimental results suggested that Ce-Mn solid solution was formed, which could modulate the valence state of cerium and manganese and exhibit great redox properties. Moreover, the strong interaction between ceria and manganese resulted in the largest desorption amount of strong chemical oxygen and oxygen vacancies, leading to the maximum O α area ratio of 62.26% from the O 1s result. These effective oxygen species could be continually transferred to the surface, leading to the best NO catalytic activity of 5Ce5Mn/SA catalyst. Graphical abstract.

  10. Sleep and environmental context: interactive effects for memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Musgrove, Hazel; Lewis, Penelope A

    2011-09-01

    Sleep after learning is often beneficial for memory. Reinstating an environmental context that was present at learning during subsequent retrieval also leads to superior declarative memory performance. This study examined how post-learning sleep, relative to wakefulness, impacts upon context-dependent memory effects. Thirty-two participants encoded word lists in each of two rooms (contexts), which were different in terms of size, odour and background music. Immediately after learning and following a night of sleep or a day of wakefulness, memory for all previously studied words was tested using a category-cued recall task in room one or two alone. Accordingly, a comparison could be made between words retrieved in an environmental context which was the same as, or different to, that of the learning phase. Memory performance was assessed by the difference between the number of words remembered at immediate and delayed retrieval. A 2 × 2 × 2 mixed ANOVA revealed an interaction between retrieval context (same/different to learning) and retention interval (sleep/wakefulness), which was driven by superior memory after sleep than after wake when learning and retrieval took place in different environmental contexts. Our findings suggest a sleep-related reduction in the extent to which context impacts upon retrieval. As such, these data provide initial support for the possibility that sleep dependent processes may promote a decontextualisation of recently formed declarative representations.

  11. Influencing Academic Motivation: The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Jach, Elizabeth A.; Hanson, Jana M.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, we examined the influence of student-faculty interactions on student academic motivation over 4 years of college. Results suggest that several forms of student-faculty interaction, such as quality of faculty contact, frequency of faculty contact, research with faculty, personal…

  12. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and cultural…

  13. The Conditional Effects of Interracial Interactions on College Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing racial diversity among American college students and society, it is critical to promote meaningful interracial interactions during college. Although a burgeoning literature demonstrates the link between interracial interactions and an array of student outcomes, some important issues have been largely overlooked. Most research…

  14. Postural effects on hemodynamic response to interpersonal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldstein, S R; Neumann, S A; Merrill, J A

    1998-05-01

    Laboratory studies of stress-induced cardiovascular reactivity have been conducted predominantly with participants in a seated posture. This procedure may contribute to limited laboratory-field generalization of cardiovascular response. The present study examined hemodynamic adjustments underlying pressor responses, in addition to heart rate and systolic time intervals, during seated and standing role-played, interpersonal interaction in 60 young adults. Irrespective of gender or race, blood pressure responses to the seated and standing interactions were comparable. However, seated interactions yielded a significantly greater increase in heart rate, shortened preejection period and decreased stroke index as compared to standing. Alternatively, interacting while standing yielded a significantly increased left ventricular ejection time and total peripheral resistance in comparison to sitting. These results suggest that hemodynamic adjustments during stressful interpersonal interaction vary as a function of posture, with somewhat greater cardiac influences apparent while seated and a more pronounced vascular response while standing.

  15. Human-Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective Human-Computer Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    editing. fraphical interaction (Report No. CW’-CS-R8718). Human Computer Interaction 1(3), 223-274. Washington, DC National Aeronautics and Space...Co - * r LLcOPY Research Product 90-31 j LL Human- Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective Human- Computer Dialogue DTIC...5600 62785A 790 1304 C2 LE (include Security Classification) i- Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective i- Computer

  16. Behavioral effects of ketamine and toxic interactions with psychostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Keiichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anesthetic drug ketamine (KT has been reported to be an abused drug and fatal cases have been observed in polydrug users. In the present study, considering the possibility of KT-enhanced toxic effects of other drugs, and KT-induced promotion of an overdose without making the subject aware of the danger due to the attenuation of several painful subjective symptoms, the intraperitoneal (i.p. KT-induced alterations in behaviors and toxic interactions with popular co-abused drugs, the psychostimulants cocaine (COC and methamphetamine (MA, were examined in ICR mice. Results A single dose of KT caused hyperlocomotion in a low (30 mg/kg, i.p. dose group, and hypolocomotion followed by hyperlocomotion in a high (100 mg/kg, i.p. dose group. However, no behavioral alterations derived from enhanced stress-related depression or anxiety were observed in the forced swimming or the elevated plus-maze test. A single non-fatal dose of COC (30 mg/kg, i.p. or MA (4 mg/kg, i.p. caused hyperlocomotion, stress-related depression in swimming behaviors in the forced swimming test, and anxiety-related behavioral changes (preference for closed arms in the elevated plus-maze test. For the COC (30 mg/kg or MA (4 mg/kg groups of mice simultaneously co-treated with KT, the psychostimulant-induced hyperlocomotion was suppressed by the high dose KT, and the psychostimulant-induced behavioral alterations in the above tests were reversed by both low and high doses of KT. For the toxic dose COC (70 mg/kg, i.p.- or MA (15 mg/kg, i.p.-only group, mortality and severe seizures were observed in some animals. In the toxic dose psychostimulant-KT groups, KT attenuated the severity of seizures dose-dependently. Nevertheless, the mortality rate was significantly increased by co-treatment with the high dose KT. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that, in spite of the absence of stress-related depressive and anxiety-related behavioral alterations following a single

  17. Effect of solute interactions in columbium /Nb/ on creep strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. J.; Metcalfe, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The creep strength of 17 ternary columbium (Nb)-base alloys was determined using an abbreviated measuring technique, and the results were analyzed to identify the contributions of solute interactions to creep strength. Isostrength creep diagrams and an interaction strengthening parameter, ST, were used to present and analyze data. It was shown that the isostrength creep diagram can be used to estimate the creep strength of untested alloys and to identify compositions with the most economical use of alloy elements. Positive values of ST were found for most alloys, showing that interaction strengthening makes an important contribution to the creep strength of these ternary alloys.

  18. In Vitro Anti/Pro-oxidant Activities of R. ferruginea Extract and Its Effect on Glioma Cell Viability: Correlation with Phenolic Compound Content and Effects on Membrane Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Desirée Magalhães; Rocha, Camila Valesca Jardim; da Silveira, Elita Ferreira; Marinho, Marcelo Augusto Germani; Rodrigues, Marisa Raquel; Silva, Nichole Osti; da Silva Ferreira, Ailton; de Moura, Neusa Fernandes; Darelli, Gabriel Jorge Sagrera; Braganhol, Elizandra; Horn, Ana Paula; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2018-02-08

    Rapanea ferruginea antioxidant and antitumoral properties were not explored before in literature. This study aimed to investigate these biological activities for the R. ferruginea leaf extract and correlate them with its phenolic content and influence in biological membrane dynamics. Thus, in this study, anti/pro-oxidative properties of R. ferruginea leaf extract by in vitro DPPH and TBARS assays, with respect to the free radical reducing potential and to its activity regarding membrane free radical-induced peroxidation, respectively. Furthermore, preliminary tests related to the extract effect on in vitro glioma cell viability were also performed. In parallel, the phenolic content was detected by HPLC-DAD and included syringic and trans-cinnamic acids, quercetrin, catechin, quercetin, and gallic acid. In an attempt to correlate the biological activity of R. ferruginea extract and its effect on membrane dynamics, the molecular interaction between the extract and a liposomal model with natural-sourced phospholipids was investigated. Location and changes in vibrational, rotational, and translational lipid motions, as well as in the phase state of liposomes, induced by R. ferruginea extract, were monitored by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, and UV-visible spectroscopy. In its free form, the extract showed promising in vitro antioxidant properties. Free-form extract (at 1000µ g/mL) exposure reduced glioma cell in vitro viability in 40%, as evidenced by MTT tests. Pro-oxidant behavior was observed when the extract was loaded into liposomes. A 70.8% cell viability reduction was achieved with 500 µg/mL of liposome-loaded extract. The compounds of R. ferruginea extract ordered liposome interface and disorder edits a polar region. Phenolic content, as well as membrane interaction and modulation may have an important role in the oxidative and antitumoral activities of the R. ferruginea leaf extract.

  19. Interacting effects of insects and flooding on wood decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Ulyshen

    Full Text Available Saproxylic arthropods are thought to play an important role in wood decomposition but very few efforts have been made to quantify their contributions to the process and the factors controlling their activities are not well understood. In the current study, mesh exclusion bags were used to quantify how arthropods affect loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. decomposition rates in both seasonally flooded and unflooded forests over a 31-month period in the southeastern United States. Wood specific gravity (based on initial wood volume was significantly lower in bolts placed in unflooded forests and for those unprotected from insects. Approximately 20.5% and 13.7% of specific gravity loss after 31 months was attributable to insect activity in flooded and unflooded forests, respectively. Importantly, minimal between-treatment differences in water content and the results from a novel test carried out separately suggest the mesh bags had no significant impact on wood mass loss beyond the exclusion of insects. Subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae: Reticulitermes spp. were 5-6 times more active below-ground in unflooded forests compared to flooded forests based on wooden monitoring stakes. They were also slightly more active above-ground in unflooded forests but these differences were not statistically significant. Similarly, seasonal flooding had no detectable effect on above-ground beetle (Coleoptera richness or abundance. Although seasonal flooding strongly reduced Reticulitermes activity below-ground, it can be concluded from an insignificant interaction between forest type and exclusion treatment that reduced above-ground decomposition rates in seasonally flooded forests were due largely to suppressed microbial activity at those locations. The findings from this study indicate that southeastern U.S. arthropod communities accelerate above-ground wood decomposition significantly and to a similar extent in both flooded and unflooded forests

  20. Self-interaction effects on charge-transfer collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Quashie, Edwin E; Andrade, Xavier; Correa, Alfredo A

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the role of the self-interaction error in the simulation of collisions using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Ehrenfest dynamics. We compare many different approximations of the exchange and correlation potential, using as a test system the collision of $\\mathrm{H^+ + CH_4}$ at $30~\\mathrm{eV}$. We find that semi-local approximations, like PBE, and even hybrid functionals, like B3LYP, produce qualitatively incorrect predictions for the scattering of the proton. This discrepancy appears because the self-interaction error allows the electrons to jump too easily to the proton, leading to radically different forces with respect to the non-self-interacting case. From our results, we conclude that using a functional that is self-interaction free is essential to properly describe charge-transfer collisions between ions and molecules in TDDFT.

  1. SHARING SCIENCE: CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE SCIENTIST-TEACHER INTERACTIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nancy J. Pelaez; Barbara L. Gonzalez

    2002-01-01

    .... Conducted under the auspices of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a symposium examined several programs where professional scientists interact with classroom teachers to improve science education...

  2. Effects of magnetoelastic interactions in conductive plates and shells

    CERN Document Server

    Baghdasaryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    This monograph investigates the stability and vibrations of conductive, perfectly conductive and superconductive thin bodies in electromagnetic fields. It introduces the main principles and obtains basic equations and relations describing interconnected mechanical and electromagnetic processes in deformable electroconductive bodies placed in an external inhomogeneous magnetic field and under the influence of various types of force interactions. Basic equations and relations are addressed in the nonlinear formulation. A special emphasis is put on the mechanical interaction of superconducting thin bodies plates with magnetic field.

  3. Quadratic fermionic interactions yield effective Hamiltonians for adiabatic quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Michael J.; O'Leary, Dianne P.

    2008-01-01

    Polynomially-large ground-state energy gaps are rare in many-body quantum systems, but useful for adiabatic quantum computing. We show analytically that the gap is generically polynomially-large for quadratic fermionic Hamiltonians. We then prove that adiabatic quantum computing can realize the ground states of Hamiltonians with certain random interactions, as well as the ground states of one, two, and three-dimensional fermionic interaction lattices, in polynomial time. Finally, we use the J...

  4. UNDRESSING INTERACTIONS: the effect of interactions on performance in multi-project settings

    OpenAIRE

    Zabrovskaya, Evgenia; Laur, Inesa

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary companies work in complex environment comprising many simultaneous running projects, i.e. multi-project settings. To a large extend those projects are interdependent and are multi-professionally constituted of representatives from customers, suppliers, other business partners and researchers from academia. The success of projects, particularly in the multi-project setting, is dependent of the collaboration and interaction among those actors involved. The aim of this article is to...

  5. Effective interactions and prospects for a resolution of the fundamental cosmological problems in the quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, B A

    2015-01-01

    A possible effective interaction in the quantum gravity is considered. The compensation equation for a spontaneous generation of this interaction is shown to have a non-trivial solution. Would be consequences of a possible existence of effective interactions in the gravity theory are discussed. An example of running gravitational coupling is presented, which corresponds to a description of effects, which nowadays are prescribed to a dark mater and to a dark energy.

  6. Spatial Interactions in Multiple-Use Forestry and Substitution and Wealth Effects for the Single Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen K. Swallow; David N. Wear

    1993-01-01

    Forestry models often ignore spatial relationships between forest stands. This paper isolates the effects of stand interactions in muitiple-use forestry through a straightforward extension of the single-stand model. Effects of stand interactions decompose into wealth and substitution effects and may cause time-varying patterns of resource use for a forest...

  7. The effects of whole-class interactive instruction with single display groupware for triangles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caballero, D.; van Riesen, Siswa; Alvarez, S.; Nussbaum, M.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Alario-Hoyos, C.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-class interactive instruction is an instructional approach in which all of the students in a class create knowledge together in an interactive way, mediated by the teacher. The current mixed-method study compared the effects of a specific implementation of whole-class interactive instruction,

  8. Interactive Technology in the Classroom: An Exploratory Look at Its Use and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline K.; Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interactive Technology can help professors enhance communication, attitudes, and interest in the classroom. This paper describes Interactive Technology, how professors can use it, and preliminary findings of its effectiveness. These findings suggest that the use of Interactive Technology can enhance students' attitudes.…

  9. Effect of Interactions between Harvester Ants on Forager Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Arauco-Aliaga, Roxana P.; Crow, Sam; Gordon, Deborah M.; Goldman, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Harvester ant colonies adjust their foraging activity to day-to-day changes in food availability and hour-to-hour changes in environmental conditions. This collective behavior is regulated through interactions, in the form of brief antennal contacts, between outgoing foragers and returning foragers with food. Here we consider how an ant, waiting in the entrance chamber just inside the nest entrance, uses its accumulated experience of interactions to decide whether to leave the nest to forage. Using videos of field observations, we tracked the interactions and foraging decisions of ants in the entrance chamber. Outgoing foragers tended to interact with returning foragers at higher rates than ants that returned to the deeper nest and did not forage. To provide a mechanistic framework for interpreting these results, we develop a decision model in which ants make decisions based upon a noisy accumulation of individual contacts with returning foragers. The model can reproduce core trends and realistic distributions for individual ant interaction statistics, and suggests possible mechanisms by which foraging activity may be regulated at an individual ant level. PMID:28758093

  10. Effective user guidance in online interactive semantic segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jens; Bendszus, Martin; Debus, Jürgen; Heiland, Sabine; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2017-03-01

    With the recent success of machine learning based solutions for automatic image parsing, the availability of reference image annotations for algorithm training is one of the major bottlenecks in medical image segmentation. We are interested in interactive semantic segmentation methods that can be used in an online fashion to generate expert segmentations. These can be used to train automated segmentation techniques or, from an application perspective, for quick and accurate tumor progression monitoring. Using simulated user interactions in a MRI glioblastoma segmentation task, we show that if the user possesses knowledge of the correct segmentation it is significantly (p improvement compared to completely random annotations anywhere in falsely classified regions for small tumor regions such as the necrotic tumor core (mean Dice +0.151 after 20 it.) and non-enhancing abnormalities (mean Dice +0.069 after 20 it.). These findings provide important insights for the development of efficient interactive segmentation systems and user interfaces.

  11. Effect of Hydrodynamic Interactions on Reaction Rates in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Naomi; Stone, Howard A

    2017-07-25

    The Brownian motion of two particles in three dimensions serves as a model for predicting the diffusion-limited reaction rate, as first discussed by von Smoluchowski. Deutch and Felderhof extended the calculation to account for hydrodynamic interactions between the particles and the target, which results in a reduction of the rate coefficient by about half. Many chemical reactions take place in quasi-two-dimensional systems, such as on the membrane or surface of a cell. We perform a Smoluchowski-like calculation in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, i.e., a membrane surrounded by fluid, and account for hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. We show that rate coefficients are reduced relative to the case of no interactions. The reduction is more pronounced than the three-dimensional case due to the long-range nature of two-dimensional flows. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of interlamellar interactions on shear induced multilamellar vesicle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Y.; Bradbury, R.; Kugizaki, S.; Weigandt, K.; Melnichenko, Y. B.; Sadakane, K.; Yamada, N. L.; Endo, H.; Nagao, M.; Seto, H.

    2017-07-01

    Shear-induced multilamellar vesicle (MLV) formation has been studied by coupling the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique with neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy. A 10% mass fraction of the nonionic surfactant pentaethylene glycol dodecyl ether (C12E5) in water was selected as a model system for studying weak inter-lamellar interactions. These interactions are controlled either by adding an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or an antagonistic salt, rubidium tetraphenylborate. Increasing the charge density in the bilayer induces an enhanced ordering of the lamellar structure. The charge density dependence of the membrane bending modulus was determined by NSE and showed an increasing trend with charge. This behavior is well explained by a classical theoretical model. By considering the Caillé parameters calculated from the SANS data, the layer compressibility modulus B ¯ is estimated and the nature of the dominant inter-lamellar interaction is determined. Shear flow induces MLV formation around a shear rate of 10 s-1, when a small amount of charge is included in the membrane. The flow-induced layer undulations are in-phase between neighboring layers when the inter-lamellar interaction is sufficiently strong. Under these conditions, MLV formation can occur without significantly changing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, in the case of weak inter-lamellar interactions, the flow-induced undulations are not in-phase, and greater steric repulsion leads to an increase in the inter-lamellar spacing with shear rate. In this case, MLV formation occurs as the amplitude of the undulations gets larger and the steric interaction leads to in-phase undulations between neighboring membranes.

  13. Modular Interactive Tiles for Rehabilitation – Evidence and Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2010-01-01

    We developed modular interactive tiles to be used for playful physiotherapy, which is supposed to motivate patients to engage in and perform physical rehabilitation exercises. We report on evidence for elderly training. We tested the modular interactive tiles for an extensive period of time (4...... years) in daily use in a hospital rehabilitation unit e.g. for cardiac patients. Also, the tiles were tested for performing physical rehabilitation of stroke patients both in hospital, rehabilitation centre and in their private home. In all test cases qualitative feedback indicate that the patients find...

  14. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna

    2015-01-01

    excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.......BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...

  15. The Tri-Trophic Interactions Hypothesis: Interactive Effects of Host Plant Quality, Diet Breadth and Natural Enemies on Herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Kailen A.; Pratt, Riley T.; Singer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Several influential hypotheses in plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions consider the interactive effects of plant quality, herbivore diet breadth, and predation on herbivore performance. Yet individually and collectively, these hypotheses fail to address the simultaneous influence of all three factors. Here we review existing hypotheses, and propose the tri-trophic interactions (TTI) hypothesis to consolidate and integrate their predictions. The TTI hypothesis predicts that dietary specialist herbivores (as compared to generalists) should escape predators and be competitively dominant due to faster growth rates, and that such differences should be greater on low quality (as compared to high quality) host plants. To provide a preliminary test of these predictions, we conducted an empirical study comparing the effects of plant (Baccharis salicifolia) quality and predators between a specialist (Uroleucon macolai) and a generalist (Aphis gossypii) aphid herbivore. Consistent with predictions, these three factors interactively determine herbivore performance in ways not addressed by existing hypotheses. Compared to the specialist, the generalist was less fecund, competitively inferior, and more sensitive to low plant quality. Correspondingly, predator effects were contingent upon plant quality only for the generalist. Contrary to predictions, predator effects were weaker for the generalist and on low-quality plants, likely due to density-dependent benefits provided to the generalist by mutualist ants. Because the TTI hypothesis predicts the superior performance of specialists, mutualist ants may be critical to A. gossypii persistence under competition from U. macolai. In summary, the integrative nature of the TTI hypothesis offers novel insight into the determinants of plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions and the coexistence of specialist and generalist herbivores. PMID:22509298

  16. The tri-trophic interactions hypothesis: interactive effects of host plant quality, diet breadth and natural enemies on herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailen A Mooney

    Full Text Available Several influential hypotheses in plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions consider the interactive effects of plant quality, herbivore diet breadth, and predation on herbivore performance. Yet individually and collectively, these hypotheses fail to address the simultaneous influence of all three factors. Here we review existing hypotheses, and propose the tri-trophic interactions (TTI hypothesis to consolidate and integrate their predictions. The TTI hypothesis predicts that dietary specialist herbivores (as compared to generalists should escape predators and be competitively dominant due to faster growth rates, and that such differences should be greater on low quality (as compared to high quality host plants. To provide a preliminary test of these predictions, we conducted an empirical study comparing the effects of plant (Baccharis salicifolia quality and predators between a specialist (Uroleucon macolai and a generalist (Aphis gossypii aphid herbivore. Consistent with predictions, these three factors interactively determine herbivore performance in ways not addressed by existing hypotheses. Compared to the specialist, the generalist was less fecund, competitively inferior, and more sensitive to low plant quality. Correspondingly, predator effects were contingent upon plant quality only for the generalist. Contrary to predictions, predator effects were weaker for the generalist and on low-quality plants, likely due to density-dependent benefits provided to the generalist by mutualist ants. Because the TTI hypothesis predicts the superior performance of specialists, mutualist ants may be critical to A. gossypii persistence under competition from U. macolai. In summary, the integrative nature of the TTI hypothesis offers novel insight into the determinants of plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions and the coexistence of specialist and generalist herbivores.

  17. The Impact of (In)effective Listening on Interpersonal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2015-01-01

    On average, people spend between 45% and 70% of their day listening to others (Johnson, 1996). Despite the frequency with which people engage in this activity, its importance in interpersonal interactions may go overlooked. Individuals can typically identify that listening is a valued communication skill (Bambacas & Patrickson, 2008; Papa,…

  18. Effect of interactions, disorder and magnetic field in the Hubbard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are included or whether we get something new. We have previously studied the ... Though it treats interactions within mean field, this method includes disorder ef- fects exactly and has the virtue of being able to ... 2d MOSFETs [15–17] which give a clear indication of a transition from an insulating behavior (with dρ/dT < 0) to ...

  19. Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work deals with modeling and examining the GxE interaction pattern of the multi-environment trials of 43 genotypes and eight environments from Southern Ethiopia coffee (Coffea Arabica L.) collections using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with four replications. The work further attempts to predict yield ...

  20. Effects of electron–phonon interaction and impurity on optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-10

    Feb 10, 2017 ... Abstract. We have investigated the influence of electron–phonon (e–p) interaction and hydrogenic donor impu- rity simultaneously on energy difference, binding energy, the linear, nonlinear and total refractive index changes and absorption coefficients of a hexagonal-shaped quantum wire. For this goal ...

  1. Interactive Global Illumination Effects Using Deterministically Directed Layered Depth Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund, F. P.; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A layered depth map is an extension of the well-known depth map used in rasterization. Multiple layered depth maps can be used as a coarse scene representation. We develop two global illumination methods which use said scene representation. The first is an interactive ambient occlusion method...

  2. Effects of nonlocal dispersive interactions on self-trapping excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yu.B.; Mingaleev, S.F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1997-01-01

    A one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) model with the power dependence r(-s) on the distance r of the dispersive interactions is proposed. The stationary states psi(n) of the system are studied both analytically and numerically. Two types of stationary states are investigated: on...

  3. Skype Synchronous Interaction Effectiveness in a Quantitative Management Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2012-01-01

    An experiment compared asynchronous versus synchronous instruction in an online quantitative course. Mann-Whitney U-tests, correlation, analysis of variance, t tests, and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) were utilized to test the hypothesis that more high-quality online experiential learning interactions would increase grade.…

  4. Effect of Interaction of Methanol Leaf Extract of Spondias mombin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR reactions were performed following previously used protocol [14]) using the primers in Table 1. A reaction tube ... existing protocol [15] using the primers in Table. 1. A final volume of 30 μL was used which contain 5 μL of the .... use of the activity index concept showed an interaction across a wide range of concentration.

  5. Interaction Effects in Cross-National Studies of Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Todd V.; Sabers, Darrell L.

    1995-01-01

    The Bateria Woodcock Psico-Educativa en Espanol was administered to urban children in grades 1, 3, 5, 8, and 11 in Spain, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Peru. Spain consistently ranked highest on all achievement clusters (subject areas). For the other countries, interactions of cluster by grade level preclude any interpretation of main…

  6. The Effect of Integrating Interactive Whiteboards on Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheila Denise

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that instructional technology improves academic achievement, there is little research about the integration of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) during Success For All (SFA) reading instruction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in reading achievement between third…

  7. Effects of electron–phonon interaction and impurity on optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The refractive index changes and absorption coefficients increase and shift towards lower energies by enhancing a 1 with central impurity. In the presence of central impurity, the absorption coefficients and refractive index changes enhance and shift toward higher energies when e–p interaction is considered.

  8. The Effectiveness of Intensive Interaction, A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nick; Bodicoat, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intensive Interaction is an approach used for communicating with people with profound and multiple intellectual disabilities [PMID] or autism. It has gained increased recognition as a helpful technique, but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. Method: Computerized and hand searches of the literature were conducted using…

  9. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from ...

  10. Retardation Effects and Virtual Annihilation Interactions in Relativistic Three-body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Razavi, Mohsen; Asgary, Somayeh

    2018-01-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism of quantum field theory and the variational methods in a reformulated model have been used to investigate the influence of retardation effects or virtual annihilation interactions in relativistic three-body wave equations for scalar two particles and one antiparticle interacting via a massive or massless mediating scalar field. The results show that the inclusion of virtual annihilation interactions or retardation effects can have noticeable consequence on the three-body binding energy at strong coupling.

  11. Exploring the Mediating Effect of E-social Capital Between Community Members Interaction and Consumer Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explored the effect of instrumental interaction and relational interaction on consumer engagement (community engagement and brand engagement among community members. The mediating effect of E-social capital was investigated as well. The research results showed that: both instrumental interaction and interpersonal interaction promote the formation of E-social capital (online trust and online reciprocity; online trust plays a partial mediating role between community interaction (instrumental interaction, relational interaction and community engagement, but the influence of online reciprocity on community engagement is not significant; community engagement leads to brand engagement. The findings enrich the theories of brand community and consumer engagement and contribute to the virtual community management.

  12. Effect of Suddenly Turning on Interactions in the Luttinger Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalilla, M. A.

    2006-10-01

    The evolution of correlations in the exactly solvable Luttinger model (a model of interacting fermions in one dimension) after a suddenly switched-on interaction is analytically studied. When the model is defined on a finite-size ring, zero-temperature correlations are periodic in time. However, in the thermodynamic limit, the system relaxes algebraically towards a stationary state which is well described, at least for some simple correlation functions, by the generalized Gibbs ensemble recently introduced by Rigol et al. (cond-mat/0604476). The critical exponent that characterizes the decay of the one-particle correlation function is different from the known equilibrium exponents. Experiments for which these results can be relevant are also discussed.

  13. COMT and Cognition: Main Effects and Interaction with Educational Attainment

    OpenAIRE

    Enoch, M.-A.; Waheed, J. F.; Harris, C R; Albaugh, B.; Goldman, D.

    2008-01-01

    Studies in children have shown that the genetic influence on cognition is positively correlated with socioeconomic status. COMT Val158Met, a common, functional polymorphism, has been implicated in executive cognition and working memory. Imaging studies have shown that the variant Met allele is associated with more efficient pre-frontal cortical processing and better attention but also emotional vulnerability to stress. We hypothesized that COMT Val158Met genotype would interact with years of ...

  14. Adiabatic Interactions of Manakov Solitons -- Effects of Cross-modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdjikov, V. S.; Todorov, M. D.; Kyuldjiev, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of the Manakov soliton trains perturbed by cross-modulation in the adiabatic approximation. The multisoliton interactions in the adiabatic approximation are modeled by a generalized Complex Toda chain (GCTC). The cross-modulation requires special treating for the evolution of the polarization vectors of the solitons. The numerical predictions of the Manakov system are compared with the perturbed GCTC. For certain set of initial parameters GCTC describes ...

  15. Genetic Interactions with Prenatal Social Environment: Effects on Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Dalton; Rauscher, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies report gene-environment interactions, suggesting that specific alleles have different effects on social outcomes depending on environment. In all these studies, however, environmental conditions are potentially endogenous to unmeasured genetic characteristics. That is, it could be that the observed interaction effects actually…

  16. Teaching Presence in Computer Conferencing Learning Environments: Effects on Interaction, Cognition and Learning Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huahui; Sullivan, Kirk P. H.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study examined how the level and nature of teaching presence impacted two online forum discussions from three dimensions: participation and interaction, cognitive presence, and knowledge development via assimilating peer messages. Effects on participation and interaction were graphically depicted. Effects on cognitive presence and…

  17. The effect of the interaction of various oil types with different culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The effect of the interaction of various oil types with different culture media on biomass production of ... The results revealed that the interaction of the various oils with the different culture media produced a highly significant effect (p<0.01) on ..... morphological innovation. Am. J. Bot. 81(4): 466-478. Jefferson PG, Coulman ...

  18. Assessing the Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Language Delayed Children: A Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkus, Gila; Tilley, Ciara; Thomas, Catherine; Hockey, Hannah; Kennedy, Anna; Arnold, Tina; Thorburn, Blair; Jones, Katie; Patel, Bhavika; Pimenta, Claire; Shah, Rena; Tweedie, Fiona; O'Brien, Felicity; Leahy, Ruth; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We investigated the effects of PCIT as…

  19. Quantifying the molecular origins of opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Vagenende

    Full Text Available Although the nature of solvent-protein interactions is generally weak and non-specific, addition of cosolvents such as denaturants and osmolytes strengthens protein-protein interactions for some proteins, whereas it weakens protein-protein interactions for others. This is exemplified by the puzzling observation that addition of glycerol oppositely affects the association constants of two antibodies, D1.3 and D44.1, with lysozyme. To resolve this conundrum, we develop a methodology based on the thermodynamic principles of preferential interaction theory and the quantitative characterization of local protein solvation from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that changes of preferential solvent interactions at the protein-protein interface quantitatively account for the opposite effects of glycerol on the antibody-antigen association constants. Detailed characterization of local protein solvation in the free and associated protein states reveals how opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions depend on the extent of dewetting of the protein-protein contact region and on structural changes that alter cooperative solvent-protein interactions at the periphery of the protein-protein interface. These results demonstrate the direct relationship between macroscopic solvent effects on protein-protein interactions and atom-scale solvent-protein interactions, and establish a general methodology for predicting and understanding solvent effects on protein-protein interactions in diverse biological environments.

  20. NMR Study on the Interaction of Trehalose with Lactose and Its Effect on the Hydrogen Bond Interaction in Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morssing Vilén

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose, a well-known stress-protector of biomolecules, has been investigated for its effect on the mobility, hydration and hydrogen bond interaction of lactose using diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and NMR of hydroxy protons. In ternary mixtures of trehalose, lactose and water, the two sugars have the same rate of diffusion. The chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, vicinal coupling constants and ROE of the hydroxy protons in trehalose, lactose and sucrose were measured for the disaccharides alone in water/acetone-d6 solutions as well as in mixtures. The data indicated that addition of trehalose did not change significantly the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction between GlcOH3 and GalO5' in lactose. Small upfield shifts were however measured for all hydroxy protons when the sugar concentration was increased. The chemical shift of the GlcOH3 signal in lactose showed less change, attributed to the spatial proximity to GalO5'. Chemical exchange between hydroxy protons of lactose and trehalose was observed in the ROESY NMR spectra. Similar effects were observed with sucrose indicating no specific effect of trehalose at the concentrations investigated (73 to 763 mg/mL and suggesting that it is the concentration of hydroxy groups more than the type of sugars which is guiding intermolecular interactions.

  1. Effects of administered alcohol on intimate partner interactions in a conflict resolution paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Maria; Crane, Cory A; Quigley, Brian M; Levitt, Ash; Leonard, Kenneth E

    2014-03-01

    Although couples' alcohol use has been associated with intimate partner aggression and poorer marital functioning, few studies have examined the proximal effects of alcohol on couple interactions. The current experimental study examined the effects of alcohol, administered independently to male and female intimate partners, on positive and negative interaction behaviors within a naturalistic conflict resolution paradigm. Married and cohabiting couples (n = 152) were recruited from the community and each partner randomly assigned to receive either alcohol (target dose: .08 mg/kg) or no alcohol. They engaged in two 15-minute interactions regarding current disagreements in their relationship, one before and one after beverage administration. Videotaped interactions were coded by trained observers using the Rapid Marital Interaction Coding System, and positive and negative interaction behaviors were analyzed using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Participants displayed decreased negativity and increased positivity following alcohol consumption when their partners were sober but no differences in negativity or positivity when their partners also consumed alcohol. There were no gender differences. Although participants with a history of perpetrating intimate partner aggression displayed more negativity, prior aggression did not interact with beverage condition. The immediate effects of alcohol consumption on couple interaction behaviors appeared more positive than negative. Contrary to hypotheses, congruent partner drinking had neither particularly positive nor particularly negative effects. These unique findings represent a rare glimpse into the immediate consequences of alcohol consumption on couple interaction and stand in contrast to its delayed or long-term effects.

  2. The Effect of Personality on Collaborative Task Performance and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givney, Sinéad Mc; Smeaton, Alan F.; Lee, Hyowon

    Collocated, multi-user technologies, which support group-work are becoming increasingly popular. Examples include MERL’s Diamondtouch and Microsoft’s Surface, both of which have evolved from research prototypes to commercial products. Many applications have been developed for such technologies which support the work and entertainment needs of small groups of people. None of these applications however, have been studied in terms of the interactions and performances of their users with regards to their personality. In this paper, we address this research gap by conducting a series of user studies involving dyads working on a number of multi-user applications on the DiamondTouch tabletop device.

  3. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Junghans, Marion [Swiss Center for Applied Ecotoxicology Eawag-EPFL, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  4. Dipolar interaction and demagnetizing effects in magnetic nanoparticle dispersions: Introducing the mean-field interacting superparamagnet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F. H.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; Arciniegas, M. L.; Pasquevich, G. A.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2017-04-01

    Aiming to analyze relevant aspects of interacting magnetic nanoparticle systems (frequently called interacting superparamagnets), a model is built from magnetic dipolar interaction and demagnetizing mean-field concepts. By making reasonable simplifying approximations, a simple and useful expression for effective demagnetizing factors is achieved, which allows the analysis of uniform and nonuniform spatial distributions of nanoparticles, in particular the occurrence of clustering. This expression is a function of demagnetizing factors associated with specimen shape and clusters shape, and of the mean distances between near neighbor nanoparticles and between clusters, relative to the characteristic sizes of each of these two types of objects, respectively. The model explains effects of magnetic dipolar interactions, such as the observation of apparent nanoparticle magnetic moments smaller than real ones and approaching to zero as temperature decreases. It is shown that by performing a minimum set of experimental determinations along principal directions of geometrically well-defined specimens, model application allows retrieval of nanoparticle intrinsic properties, like mean volume, magnetic moment, and susceptibility in the absence of interactions. It also permits the estimation of mean interparticle and intercluster relative distances, as well as mean values of demagnetizing factors associated with clusters shape. An expression for average magnetic dipolar energy per nanoparticle is also derived, which is a function of specimen effective demagnetizing factor and magnetization. Experimental test of the model was performed by analysis of results reported in the literature and of original results reported here. The first case corresponds to oleic-acid-coated 8-nm magnetite particles dispersed in PEGDA-600 polymer, and the second one to polyacrilic-acid-coated 13-nm magnetite particles dispersed in PVA solutions from which ferrogels were later produced by a physical

  5. Infants' monitoring of social interactions: the effect of emotional cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Szilvia; Alink, Lenneke R A; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2014-04-01

    Relying on information about the emotional state of others is vital for a proper monitoring and representation of social interactions. We tested the impact of vocal emotional cues on 12-month-old infants' monitoring of animated movies that involved the separation of a smaller and a larger oval shape. The separation was accompanied by the sound of either a crying or a laughing baby and was followed either by the return of the larger figure to, or its further separation from, the smaller figure. Eye tracking showed that infants' monitoring pattern was influenced by the type of emotional signal during both the separation phase and the response phase of the animations: During the separation phase infants fixated longer at the larger figure if the separation was accompanied by a crying sound than if laughter could be heard. In the response phase, the influence of the emotional signal depended on the type of response. Infants overall looked more often at the animations during the crying than the laughter sound but only when the larger figure did not return to the smaller figure. These results suggest that infants are able to integrate vocal emotional cues in their representation of observed interactions. Our findings are also discussed in relation to the source of negativity bias in infants' information processing.

  6. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Stenstrup Holm

    Full Text Available PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein.The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000 and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer.The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.

  7. Clinical handover as an interactive event: informational and interactional communication strategies in effective shift-change handovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggins, Suzanne; Slade, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Clinical handover -- the transfer between clinicians of responsibility and accountability for patients and their care (AMA 2006) -- is a pivotal and high-risk communicative event in hospital practice. Studies focusing on critical incidents, mortality, risk and patient harm in hospitals have highlighted ineffective communication -- including incomplete and unstructured clinical handovers -- as a major contributing factor (NSW Health 2005; ACSQHC 2010). In Australia, as internationally, Health Departments and hospital management have responded by introducing standardised handover communication protocols. This paper problematises one such protocol - the ISBAR tool - and argues that the narrow understanding of communication on which such protocols are based may seriously constrain their ability to shape effective handovers. Based on analysis of audio-recorded shift-change clinical handovers between medical staff we argue that handover communication must be conceptualised as inherently interactive and that attempts to describe, model and teach handover practice must recognise both informational and interactive communication strategies. By comparing the communicative performance of participants in authentic handover events we identify communication strategies that are more and less likely to lead to an effective handover and demonstrate the importance of focusing close up on communication to improve the quality and safety of healthcare interactions.

  8. Nonstationary coherent optical effects caused by pulse propagation through acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocegueda, M.; Hernandez, E.; Stepanov, S.; Agruzov, P.; Shamray, A.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental observations of nonstationary coherent optical phenomena, i.e., optical nutation, free induction, and photon echo, in the acetylene (12C2H2) filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) are reported. The presented results were obtained for the acetylene vibration-rotational transition P9 at wavelength 1530.37 nm at room temperature under a gas pressure of acetylene molecules' presence inside the effective PCF modal area and by intermolecule collisions. An accelerated attenuation of the optical nutation oscillations is explained by a random orientation of acetylene molecules.

  9. Genetic dissection reveals effects of interaction between high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The glutenin and waxy loci of wheat are important determinants of dough quality. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of high-molecular-weight glutenin (HMW-GS) and waxy alleles on dough-mixing properties. Molecular mapping was used to investigate these effects on Mixograph properties in a population of ...

  10. Main and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extrusion temperatures did not have significant effect on feed intake (FI), body weight gain (WG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of chickens during each and whole period, but the inclusion rate of EFFSB had significant (P<0.05) effect on FI and WG. The FI and WG of chickens fed diet contained 15% EFFSB was ...

  11. Tritrophic Interactions: Microbe-Mediated Plant Effects on Insect Herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Ikkei; Rosa, Cristina; Tan, Ching-Wen; Felton, Gary W

    2017-08-04

    It is becoming abundantly clear that the microbes associated with plants and insects can profoundly influence plant-insect interactions. Here, we focus on recent findings and propose directions for future research that involve microbe-induced changes to plant defenses and nutritive quality as well as the consequences of these changes for the behavior and fitness of insect herbivores. Insect (herbivore and parasitoid)-associated microbes can favor or improve insect fitness by suppressing plant defenses and detoxifying defensive phytochemicals. Phytopathogens can influence or manipulate insect behavior and fitness by altering plant quality and defense. Plant-beneficial microbes can promote plant growth and influence plant nutritional and phytochemical composition that can positively or negatively influence insect fitness. Lastly, we suggest that entomopathogens have the potential to influence plant defenses directly as endophytes or indirectly by altering insect physiology.

  12. Coulomb interaction effect in tilted Weyl fermion in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    Weyl fermions with tilted linear dispersions characterized by several different velocities appear in some systems including the quasi-two-dimensional organic semiconductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 and three-dimensional WTe2. The Coulomb interaction between electrons modifies the velocities in an essential way in the low energy limit, where the logarithmic corrections dominate. Taking into account the coupling to both the transverse and longitudinal electromagnetic fields, we derive the renormalization group equations for the velocities of the tilted Weyl fermions in two dimensions, and found that they increase as the energy decreases and eventually hit the velocity of light c to result in the Cherenkov radiation. Especially, the system restores the isotropic Weyl cone even when the bare Weyl cone is strongly tilted and the velocity of electrons becomes negative in certain directions.

  13. Modification of land-atmosphere interactions by CO2 effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, Leo; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Increased CO2 modifies the seasonality of the water cycle through stomatal regulation and increased leaf area. As a result, the water saved during the growing season through higher water use efficiency mitigates summer dryness and the impact of potential heat waves. Land-atmosphere interactions and CO2 fertilization together synergistically contribute to increased summer transpiration. This, in turn, alters the surface energy budget and decreases sensible heat flux, mitigating air temperature rise. Accurate representation of the response to higher CO2 levels, and of the coupling between the carbon and water cycles are therefore critical to forecasting seasonal climate, water cycle dynamics and to enhance the accuracy of extreme event prediction under future climate.

  14. Depletion interactions effected by different variants of fd virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    July, Christoph; Lang, Peter R

    2010-12-21

    The depletion interaction between a probe sphere and a flat wall induced by fd virus is investigated by means of total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM). The viruses serve as a model system for monodisperse, rod-like colloids. We find that the experimental potentials are well described by the first-order density approximation up to an fd content of several overlap concentrations. This is in accordance with higher order density theory as confirmed by numerical calculations. Since the first-order analytical description still holds for all measurements, this exemplifies that higher order terms of the theory are unimportant for our system. Comparing the potentials induced by wild-type fd to those induced by a more rigid fd variant, it can be shown that the influence of the virus stiffness is beyond our experimental resolution and plays only a negligible role for the measured depletion potentials.

  15. Van der Waals and resonance interactions between accelerated atoms in vacuum and the Unruh effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuca, M.; Marino, J.; Noto, A.; Passante, R.; Rizzuto, L.; Spagnolo, S.; Zhou, W.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss different physical effects related to the uniform acceleration of atoms in vacuum, in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. We first investigate the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder dispersion and resonance interactions between two uniformly accelerated atoms in vacuum. We show that the atomic acceleration significantly affects the van der Waals force, yielding a different scaling of the interaction with the interatomic distance and an explicit time dependence of the interaction energy. We argue how these results could allow for an indirect detection of the Unruh effect through dispersion interactions between atoms. We then consider the resonance interaction between two accelerated atoms, prepared in a correlated Bell-type state, and interacting with the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state, separating vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions, both in the free-space and in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plate. We show that nonthermal effects of acceleration manifest in the resonance interaction, yielding a change of the distance dependence of the resonance interaction energy. This suggests that the equivalence between temperature and acceleration does not apply to all radiative properties of accelerated atoms. To further explore this aspect, we evaluate the resonance interaction between two atoms in non inertial motion in the coaccelerated (Rindler) frame and show that in this case the assumption of an Unruh temperature for the field is not required for a complete equivalence of locally inertial and coaccelerated points of views.

  16. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calcula...

  17. Early Exposures to Ecogenomics: Effects of Priming and Web Site Interactivity Among Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Mark J.W.; Koolstra, Cees M.; Willems, J.T.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of public introductions to emerging technologies, this study examined effects of priming and Web site interactivity on adolescents’ attitude development and information processing. In a four (priming) by three (interactivity levels) experiment, participants (N = 273) were required to

  18. Contributions of Work-Related Stress and Emotional Intelligence to Teacher Engagement: Additive and Interactive Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Mérida-López; Natalio Extremera; Lourdes Rey

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the additive and interactive effects of role stress and emotional intelligence for predicting engagement among 288 teachers. Emotional intelligence and engagement were positively associated. Role ambiguity and role conflict showed negative associations with vigor and dedication scores. The interaction of role ambiguity and emotional intelligence was significant in explaining engagement dimensions. Similar results were found considering overall teacher engagement. Emotional...

  19. The Effect of Interactivity with a Music Video Game on Second Language Vocabulary Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    deHaan, Jonathan; Reed, W. Michael; Kuwada, Katsuko

    2010-01-01

    Video games are potential sources of second language input; however, the medium's fundamental characteristic, interactivity, has not been thoroughly examined in terms of its effect on learning outcomes. This experimental study investigated to what degree, if at all, video game interactivity would help or hinder the noticing and recall of second…

  20. Short-Term Psychological Effects of Interactive Video Game Technology Exercise on Mood and Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William D.; Newton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Recent interest in interactive video game technology (IVGT) has spurred the notion that exercise from this technology may have meaningful physiological and psychological benefits for children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the short-term psychological effects of interactive video game exercise in young adults and whether…

  1. Floral biology and the effects of plant-pollinator interaction on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive biology and patterns of plant-pollinator interaction are fundamental to gene flow, diversity and evolutionary success of plants. Consequently, we examined the magnitude of insect-plant interaction based on the dynamics of breeding systems and floral biology and their effects on pollination intensity, fruit and ...

  2. Combined and interactive effects of global climatee change and toxicants on popuylations and communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moe, S.R.; Schamphelaere, de K.A.C.; Clements, W.H.; Sorensen, T.; Brink, van den P.J.; Liess, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator-prey interactions). A challenge for

  3. Effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) in a Preschool Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Gershenson, Rachel A.; Farahmand, Farahnaz K.; Thaxter, Peter J.; Behling, Steven; Budd, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    This research addressed the need for trained child care staff to support optimal early social-emotional development in urban, low-income, ethnic minority children. We evaluated effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), an approach adapted from Eyberg's Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). TCIT focuses on increasing preschool…

  4. Measuring Effective Teacher-Student Interactions from a Student Perspective: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Jason T.; Stuhlman, Megan; Schweig, Jonathan; Martínez, José Felipe; Ruzek, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This study applies multi-level analysis to student reports of effective teacher-student interactions in 50 upper elementary school classrooms (N = 594 fourth- and fifth-grade students). Observational studies suggest that teacher-student interactions fall into three domains: Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support.…

  5. Autonomic nervous system mediated effects of food intake. Interaction between gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Orshoven, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis focused on the autonomic nervous system mediated interactions between the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems in response to food intake and on potential consequences of failure of these interactions. The effects of food intake on cardiovascular

  6. The Unintended Effects of Interactive Objects and Labels in the Science Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Leslie J.; Velez, Lisanne; Goudy, David; Dunbar, Kevin N.

    2009-01-01

    What effects do different setups of museum exhibits have on visitors' conversations and interactions? The study reported here is an investigation of the role that labels and associated materials play in visitors' conversations and interactions at a heat camera exhibit. After we introduced a label to help visitors explore the insulating properties…

  7. The Effects of Using Interactive Teaching Programs on Preschool Children's Literacy Development: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahwaji, Nahla M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a case study that investigates the effects of using interactive teaching programs on literacy development for preschool children. The significant of this study comes from the lack of studies associated with using interactive teaching programs for preschool children in Saudi Arabia. Data are presented from analyzing…

  8. Effects of Alcohol on Women's Risky Sexual Decision Making during Social Interactions in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki, Tina

    2011-01-01

    This experiment examined the effects of alcohol on women's sexual decision making during a laboratory social interaction with a potential dating partner. Participants completed an assessment of sex-related alcohol expectancies, were randomly assigned to consume alcohol, no alcohol, or a placebo, and then interacted with a male confederate.…

  9. The Effects of an Intervention in Writing with Digital Interactive Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcic, Svjetlana; Johnstone, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention in writing with digital interactive books. To improve the writing skills of seventh- and eighth-grade students with a learning disability in reading, we conducted a quasi-experimental study in which the students read interactive digital books (i-books), took notes, wrote summaries, and acted as…

  10. The effect of the interaction of various spawn grains and oil types on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed that the interaction of the different spawn grains with the various oil types produced a highly significant effect (p<0.01) on the stipe length, dry weight, and stipe and pileus diameters of Lentinus squarrosulus. The interactions of corn x coconut and corn x butterfat, respectively produced stipe lengths that ...

  11. Stability analysis of predator-prey interaction with a crowding effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mathematical modeling of species interactions usually relies on competition models. However, it is known that species interactions may exhibit more complicated patterns with a crowding effect and this can be particularly important in benign environments. In this paper we discuss competition models with a crowding ...

  12. Effect of frequency variation on electromagnetic pulse interaction with charges and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of frequency variation (chirp) in an electromagnetic (EM) pulse on the pulse interaction with a charged particle and plasma is studied. Various types of chirp and pulse envelopes are considered. In vacuum, a charged particle receives a kick in the polarization direction after interaction

  13. A study of the effectiveness of an interactive computer classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, J L; Vanderboom, C; Knight, M; Walsh, K; Briggs, R; Grekin, K

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the use of an interactive computer classroom (ICC) compared with a traditional lecture/discussion format (LD) for a nursing management course taught from fall semester 1994 through fall semester 1996. The ICC was structured around a group systems support software, a tool previously used in business settings for group decision-making activities. Structured learning activities allowed all students to participate simultaneously and anonymously. Data were collected during the second and final semesters of the study. The outcomes included academic performance, measured by course exams; class participation, measured by direct observation; and attendance records. The control group was a concurrent management course taught with the same objectives and evaluated by identical examinations. The examination scores and the frequency of class participation of the ICC group were significantly higher than those measures of the LD group. There was no significant difference in class attendance. Evaluation forms with open-ended questions were completed by the ICC students and revealed that the students believed that the process enhanced application and understanding. The negative aspects of the ICC experience were the need for increased preparation time for faculty and the students' lack of tolerance when technical difficulties caused delays.

  14. Effect of proguanil interaction on bioavailability of cloxacillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, C P; Iwheye, G B; Olaniyi, A A

    2002-12-01

    To investigate a potential drug-drug interaction between proguanil (PG) and cloxacillin (Clox). Seven healthy adult volunteers received a single oral dose of Clox plus coadministration of single oral doses of PG and Clox in a simple cross-over manner after a wash-out period of 1 week. Total urine voided was collected at predetermined time intervals over 12 h. Amount of Clox in urine was determined by a reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography method. The mean maximum excretion rate [(dDu/dt)max] of Clox when taken alone was 16.13 +/- 2.92 mg/h at tmax of 1.86 +/- 01.07 hours, whereas in the presence of PG, it was 7.72 +/- 3.24 mg/h at tmax of 2.43 +/- 00.98 hours (P 0.05). These pharmacokinetic values indicate slowed and diminished absorption (bioavailability) of Clox when concurrently administered with PG. The clinical implication is unknown. However, concomitant administration of the two drugs during antibacterial therapy should be done with caution so as to avoid subtherapeutic levels of Clox, which can lead to treatment failure and facilitate drug resistance.

  15. Cross-frequency interactions in the precedence effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn-Cunningham, B G; Zurek, P M; Durlach, N I; Clifton, R K

    1995-07-01

    This paper concerns the extent to which the precedence effect is observed when leading and lagging sounds occupy different spectral regions. Subjects, listening under headphones, were asked to match the intracranial lateral position of an acoustic pointer to that of a test stimulus composed of two binaural noise bursts with asynchronous onsets, parametrically varied frequency content, and different interaural delays. The precedence effect was measured by the degree to which the interaural delay of the matching pointer was independent of the interaural delay of the lagging noise burst in the test stimulus. The results, like those of Blauert and Divenyi [Acustica 66, 267-274 (1988)], show an asymmetric frequency effect in which the lateralization influence of a lagging high-frequency burst is almost completely suppressed by a leading low-frequency burst, whereas a lagging low-frequency burst is weighted equally with a leading high-frequency burst. This asymmetry is shown to be the result of an inherent low-frequency dominance that is seen even with simultaneous bursts. When this dominance is removed (by attenuating the low-frequency burst) the precedence effect operates with roughly equal strength both upward and downward in frequency. Within the scope of the current study (with lateralization achieved through the use of interaural time differences alone, stimuli from only two frequency bands, and only three subjects performing in all experiments), these results suggest that the precedence effect arises from a fairly central processing stage in which information is combined across frequency.

  16. Global Change Effects on Plant-Soil Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Marie

    are able to determine effects of global change on the plant-soil system. By extraction and microscopy of nematode communities, we are able to characterize the trophic structure of a significant part of the rhizosphere community. The work compiled for this dissertation is based on field experiments...... (Paper III). Furthermore, by way of meta-analysis, the role of organisms in global change effects on ecosystem function is modelled (Paper IV). Among CO2, warming and summer drought, CO2 is the factor most consistently impacting soil organisms. CO2 increases abundance of microorganisms and nematodes...... effects. Furthermore, the plant functional type (shrub or grass) is more strongly determining the rhizosphere community structure than any global change factor. Frequent burning of prairie vegetation changes the soil community to an extent that alters the decomposition rate. Together, these results...

  17. Hull-Propeller Interaction and Its Effect on Propeller Cavitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regener, Pelle Bo

    , which presumably does not reflect the differences between the propellers sufficiently. Obtaining effective wake fields using the hybrid RANS-BEM approach at model and full scale also provides the opportunity to investigate the behind-ship cavitation performance of propellers with comparably low...... computational effort. The boundary element method for propeller analysis includes a partially nonlinear cavitation model, which is able to predict partial sheet cavitation and supercavitation. The cavitation behaviour of the conventional propeller and the Kappel propeller from the earlier simulations...... a major effect on propeller cavitation, signifying the importance of using the correct inflow, i.e. the effective wake field when evaluating propeller cavitation performance....

  18. Effects of second neighbor interactions on skyrmion lattices in chiral magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E A S; Silva, R L; Silva, R C; Pereira, A R

    2017-05-24

    In this paper we investigate the influences of the second neighbor interactions on a skyrmion lattice in two-dimensional chiral magnets. Such a system contains the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya for the spin interactions and therefore, we analyse three situations: firstly, the second neighbor interaction is present only in the exchange coupling; secondly, it is present only in the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya coupling. Finally, the second neighbor interactions are present in both exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya couplings. We show that such effects cause important modifications to the helical and skyrmion phases when an external magnetic field is applied.

  19. Ecotoxicological effects on zooplankton-phytoplankton interactions in eutrophied waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, M.C.T.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the cascade effects of reduced grazing of algae by daphnids in eutrophic waters due to toxic stress. Daphnids (and other zoöplankton) play a critical role in the pelagic foodweb by balancing the top-down control over the lower trophic levels (their foodsource, i.e. algae) and

  20. Interaction and enhancement of the toxic effects of sodium arsenite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LA) in wistar rats. Sodium arsenite (2.5mg/kg bd.wt) and lead acetate (14mg/kg bd.wt) were fed to rats by gavage for fourteen consecutive days alone or simultaneously. Control rats were fed with distilled water. Clastogenic effects were ...

  1. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, J.T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which

  2. Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple crop physiological model was employed to study the yield basis and environmental effects on 31cowpea genotypes of early, medium and late maturities. The tests were carried out at four sites in northern Ghana between 1992 and 1994. Genotypic variations observed for pod yields (Y), reproductive duration (RD), ...

  3. Interactive effect of dietary protein level and zilpaterol hydrochloride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bonsmara type steers were used to determine the effect of dietary zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) in combination with different dietary crude protein (CP) levels (100, 120 and 140 g CP/kg) on growth performance and meat quality. Treatment groups (T) consisted of 12 steers each. T1 – 100 g CP/kg + 0.15 mg ZH/kg live weight ...

  4. Effect of Soil Types and Phosphorus Fertilizer Interaction on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pot experiment was conducted to examine the effect of soil types and phosphorus fertilizer application on maize (variety DMR-L-SR) growth and yield in the rain forest zone of Nigeria. This was done at the Teaching and Research Farm, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso. The experimental treatments ...

  5. Situational and Personality Factors: Interactive Effects on Attitude - Active Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Stan L.; Warner, Lyle G.

    1975-01-01

    An examination of the combined effect of a situational factor, disclosure, and two personality variables, "need for approval" and "inner-other directedness" on attitude - action relationships with respect to marijuana related attitudes and behavior of college students. Subjects with different personality characteristics were found to respond…

  6. Strange two-baryon interactions using chiral effective field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder, H.

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed the leading order strangeness S = −1,−2 baryon-baryon potential in a chiral effective field theory approach. The chiral potential consists of one-pseudoscalar-meson exchanges and non-derivative four-baryon contact terms. The potential, derived using SU(3)f symmetry constraints,

  7. Interactive storybook-based intervention effects on kindergartners' language development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druten-Frietman, L.J.G. van; Strating, H.T.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners'

  8. Interactive effect of dietary protein level and zilpaterol hydrochloride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    muscle hypertrophy (via reduced protein degradation) with decreased meat tenderness. However, all BAA ... Since ZH reduces DMI, improves growth rate and has an anabolic effect on muscle protein, the question arises whether ..... Bovine skeletal muscle calpastatin: cloning, sequence analysis, and steady-state mRNA ...

  9. Vitamin D-Prostaglandin Interactions and Effects on Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    chloramphenicol ace- at 1300 x g), supernatants were incubated overnight at 4°C, tyltransferase (CAT) under the control of the Herpes virus with the polyclonal...measure of drug Stamey TA, Feldman D. Antiproliferative effects of 18. Badawi AF. The role of prostaglandin synthesis in synergism . Pain 2002;98:163-8

  10. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: interactions between opioids and other drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Kalso, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are increasingly used to manage not only acute but also chronic pain and heroine addiction. These patients usually receive many other medications that can interfere with the effects of opioids and vice versa. Patients often need combinations of drugs for their pain management, for treating opioid-related adverse effects or for other indications including depression and anxiety. Several antibiotics can also have interactions with opioids. It is important to understand what potential interactions exist between opioids and other drugs. Drug interactions can occur due to pharmacokinetic interactions including effects of absorption, metabolic pathways, drug transport through membranes and protein binding. Our knowledge of the metabolism of opioids has significantly increased over the last years and it is now possible to appreciate the role CYP enzymes, mainly CYP 2D6 and 3A4/5, in the metabolism of many commonly used opioids like codeine and oxycodone. Our knowledge regarding the role of the transporter proteins in drug interactions related to opioids is unfortunately meagre. Opioids inhibit the gastrointestinal system and can thus change the absorption of other drugs. Opioids can have synergistic or additive interactions with other drugs that have analgesic or sedative effects. Endogenous opioids control many physiological functions and exogenous opioids can have effects on all important transmitter systems (cholinergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic). The literature in this field is mainly based on case reports. Interindividual differences play an important role. Other potential interactions include prolongation of the QT-interval and lowering of the threshold for convulsions.

  11. Analytical theory of effective interactions in binary colloidal systems of soft particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, M; Góra, P F

    2014-09-01

    While density functional theory with integral equations techniques are very efficient tools in the numerical analysis of complex fluids, analytical insight into the phenomenon of effective interactions is still limited. In this paper, we propose a theory of binary systems that results in a relatively simple analytical expression combining arbitrary microscopic potentials into effective interaction. The derivation is based on translating a many-particle Hamiltonian including particle-depletant and depletant-depletant interactions into the occupation field language, which turns the partition function into multiple Gaussian integrals, regardless of what microscopic potentials are chosen. As a result, we calculate the effective Hamiltonian and discuss when our formula is a dominant contribution to the effective interactions. Our theory allows us to analytically reproduce several important characteristics of systems under scrutiny. In particular, we analyze the following: the effective attraction as a demixing factor in the binary systems of Gaussian particles, the screening of charged spheres by ions, which proves equivalent to Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, effective interactions in the binary mixtures of Yukawa particles, and the system of particles consisting of both a repulsive core and an attractive/repulsive Yukawa interaction tail. For this last case, we reproduce the "attraction-through-repulsion" and "repulsion-through-attraction" effects previously observed in simulations.

  12. Effect of cytokines on tumour cell-endothelial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M C; Bereta, M; Bereta, J

    1997-01-01

    The adherence of tumour cells to microvascular endothelium is believed to be a necessary step in their migration to sites of metastasis. It has been proposed that this process occurs when cell surface molecules on tumour cells bind to complementary sites on endothelial cells. The expression of these endothelial-derived cell adhesion molecules appears to be modulated by cytokines, a broad class of protein mediators which play important roles in immune and inflammatory reactions. It has been found by ourselves and others that exposure of endothelium to some cytokines augments the adhesion of inflammatory cells as well as tumour cells in in vitro assays. We used a murine model consisting of P815 mastocytoma cells and microvascular endothelium and found that pretreatment of endothelial monolayers with TNF-alpha, IL-1, LPS or PMA augmented the number of tumour cells that attach in a dose-dependent fashion. FACS analysis showed that the change in binding was due to an increase in the expression of VCAM-1 on the surface of the endothelial cell. Methylxanthines (caffeine and theophylline) as well as "classical" calcium-mobilizing agents (ionomycin and thapsigargin) inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 in MME. We also studied the possible mechanisms of TNF-alpha signal transduction in endothelial cells. We examined the involvement of protein kinases in the TNF-alpha effect. Although we found that inhibitors of PKC could inhibit the TNF-alpha effect, our studies suggest that the "classical" PKC pathway is not completely responsible for signaling since TNF-alpha did not cause translocation of PKC to the cell membrane and its effect could not be completely mimicked by PMA. We also studied the effect of TGF-beta on the binding of tumour cells to endothelium. Exposure of endothelium to TGF-beta led to the inhibition of both basal and TNF-alpha enhanced binding of P815 cells. Inhibitors of G-proteins do not abolish TGF-beta action, and PKC and PKA activators elicit an opposite

  13. Seismic Analysis of Intake Towers Considering Multiple-Support Excitation and Soil-Structure Interaction Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vidot, Aidcer

    2004-01-01

    .... The other effect examined is the soil-structure interaction. First, a direct approach based on a finite element model of the tower, bridge, and dam with the earthquake motion applied at the bedrock is used...

  14. Interactivity effects in social media marketing on brand engagement: an investigation of underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although, SNS advertising spending increases, research on SNS campaigning is still underexposed. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of SNS campaign interactivity on the receivers brand engagement, taking four underlying mechanisms into account (brand identification, campaign

  15. The Effect of Interactivity with a Music Video Game on Second Language Vocabulary Recall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    deHaan, Jonathan; Reed, W. Michael; Kuwada, Katsuko

    2010-01-01

    Video games are potential sources of second language input; however, the medium’s fundamental characteristic, interactivity, has not been thoroughly examined in terms of its effect on learning outcomes...

  16. Interactions of phenolic compounds with globular proteins and their effects on food-related functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.

    2005-01-01

    In order to modulate the functional properties of food proteins, the interactions between globular proteins and the monomeric phenolic, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA, chlorogenic acid), and the oligomeric phenolics, procyanidins, were characterized and investigated for their effect on protein functional

  17. Supramolecular Organic Photochemistry: Control of Covalent Bond Formation through Noncovalent Supramolecular Interactions and Magnetic Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicholas J. Turro

    2002-01-01

    ...) and hard-matter hosts (porous solids) are discussed with an emphasis on how noncovalent interactions, which are at the heart of supramolecular chemistry, can be systematically exploited to control the catalytic and magnetic effects...

  18. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  19. Losartan and its interaction with copper(II): biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Susana B; Ferrer, Evelina G; Naso, Luciana; Barrio, Daniel A; Lezama, Luis; Rojo, Teófilo; Williams, Patricia A M

    2007-10-01

    Losartan, the potassium salt of 2-n-butyl-4-chloro-5-hydroxymethyl-1-[(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl)methyl]imidazol, is an efficient antihypertensive drug. The vibrational FTIR and Raman spectra of Losartan (its anionic and protonated forms) are discussed. In addition, the copper(II) complex of Losartan was obtained and characterized as a microcrystalline powder. The metal center is bound to the ligand through the nitrogen atoms of the tetrazolate moiety as determined by vibrational spectroscopy. The compound is a dimer with the metal centers in a tetragonal distorted environment but the presence of a monomeric impurity has been determined by EPR spectroscopy. The antioxidant properties of the complex (superoxide dismutase mimetic activity) and its effect on the proliferation and morphology of two osteoblast-like cells in culture are reported. The new compound exerted more toxic effects on tumoral cells than the copper(II) ion and Losartan.

  20. Interaction Effects of Selected Pesticides on Soil Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah, B. Vineela; Mohiddin, M. Jaffer; Madhuri, R. Jaya

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory studies were conducted to resolute the effects of imidacloprid (insecticide) and triadimefon (fungicide) singly and in combination on enzymatic activities of soil microorganisms in tomato cultivated soils at different concentrations of 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 kg/ha. The rate of amylase activity was stimulated by the application of pesticides at field rate. High dosage decreased the activity of amylase. Decline in the activity of cellulase was observed at all concentrations than contro...

  1. Spatial layout and face-to-face interaction in offices—a study of the mechanisms of spatial effects on face-to-face interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbub Rashid; Kevin Kampschroer; Jean Wineman; Craig Zimring

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report a study that uses space-syntax theories and techniques to develop a model explaining how spatial layouts, through their effects on movement and visible copresence, may affect face-to-face interaction in offices. Though several previous space-syntax studies have shown that spatial layouts have significant effects on movement and face-to-face interaction in offices, none has investigated the relations among movement, visible copresence, and face-to-face interaction in of...

  2. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, Johan T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2017-06-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which drastically changes the outcome of a droplet-droplet collision. However, the effect of viscosity on the droplet collision regime boundaries demarcating coalescence and reflexive and stretching separation is still not entirely understood and a general model for collision outcome boundaries is not available. In this work, the effect of viscosity on the droplet-droplet collision outcome is studied using direct numerical simulations employing the volume of fluid method. The role of viscous energy dissipation is analysed in collisions of droplets with different sizes and different physical properties. From the simulations results, a general phenomenological model depending on the capillary number (Ca, accounting for viscosity), the impact parameter (B), the Weber number (We), and the size ratio (Δ) is proposed.

  3. Investigating the Effects of Encumbrance on One-and Two-handed Interactions with Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Alexander; Brewster, Stephen; Williamson, John

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of encumbrance (carrying typical objects such as shopping bags during interaction) and walking on target acquisition on a touchscreen mobile phone. Users often hold objects and use mobile devices at the same time and we examined the impact encumbrance has on one- and two- handed interactions. Three common input postures were evaluated: two-handed index finger, one-handed preferred thumb and two-handed both thumbs, to assess the effects on performance ...

  4. Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the impurity binding energy in a quantum wire

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yueh-Nan; Chuu, Der-San; Lin, Yuh-Kae

    2003-01-01

    The effect of electron-optical phonon interaction on the hydrogenic impurity binding energy in a cylindrical quantum wire is studied. By using Landau and Pekar variational method, the hamiltonian is separated into two parts which contain phonon variable and electron variable respectively. A perturbative-variational technique is then employed to construct the trial wavefunction for the electron part. The effect of confined electron-optical phonon interaction on the binding energies of the grou...

  5. Detecting treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered data with generalized linear mixed-effects model trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, M; Smits, N; Zeileis, A; Hothorn, T; Kelderman, H

    2017-10-25

    Identification of subgroups of patients for whom treatment A is more effective than treatment B, and vice versa, is of key importance to the development of personalized medicine. Tree-based algorithms are helpful tools for the detection of such interactions, but none of the available algorithms allow for taking into account clustered or nested dataset structures, which are particularly common in psychological research. Therefore, we propose the generalized linear mixed-effects model tree (GLMM tree) algorithm, which allows for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions, while accounting for the clustered structure of a dataset. The algorithm uses model-based recursive partitioning to detect treatment-subgroup interactions, and a GLMM to estimate the random-effects parameters. In a simulation study, GLMM trees show higher accuracy in recovering treatment-subgroup interactions, higher predictive accuracy, and lower type II error rates than linear-model-based recursive partitioning and mixed-effects regression trees. Also, GLMM trees show somewhat higher predictive accuracy than linear mixed-effects models with pre-specified interaction effects, on average. We illustrate the application of GLMM trees on an individual patient-level data meta-analysis on treatments for depression. We conclude that GLMM trees are a promising exploratory tool for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered datasets.

  6. Electron-electron interactions in the chemical bond:``1/3” Effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The prominent ``1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron-electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effect ...

  7. Effects of acidic precipitation on host-parasite interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, D.S.

    1974-01-01

    During the past decade, the average acidity of rain and snow increased by 1-2 pH units in many parts of Europe and North America. Little is known of the effects of acid rain resulting from dissolution of sulfur dioxide on biological systems. The effects of simulated sulfuric acid rain on four host-pathogen system were studied. Plants were exposed in greenhouse and field to simulated rain of pH 3.2 or pH 6.0 in amounts and intervals common to weather patterns of the eastern United States. Simulated acid rain resulted in: (1) an 86% inhibition in telia production of Cronartium fusiforme on willow oak (Quercus phellos); (2) a 66% inhibition in the production of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne hapla) on field grown kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris Red Kidney); (3) a 20% decrease in the severity of Uromyces phaseoli infection of field grown kidney beans; and (4) either stimulated or inhibited development of halo blight on kidney bean (caused by Pseudomonas phaseolicola) depending upon the segment of the disease cycle in which the stress occurred: (a) simulated acid rain before inoculation stimulated disease development; (b) suspension of inoculum in acid rain decreased inoculum potential; and (c) acid rain after infection inhibited disease development. Results suggest that the pH of rain is a new environmental parameter of concern to plant pathologists.

  8. Dimensional Effects on Densities of States and Interactions in Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We consider electrons in the presence of interfaces with different effective electron mass, and electromagnetic fields in the presence of a high-permittivity interface in bulk material. The equations of motion for these dimensionally hybrid systems yield analytic expressions for Green’s functions and electromagnetic potentials that interpolate between the two-dimensional logarithmic potential at short distance, and the three-dimensional r−1 potential at large distance. This also yields results for electron densities of states which interpolate between the well-known two-dimensional and three-dimensional formulas. The transition length scales for interfaces of thickness L are found to be of order Lm/2m* for an interface in which electrons move with effective mass m*, and for a dielectric thin film with permittivity in a bulk of permittivity . We can easily test the merits of the formalism by comparing the calculated electromagnetic potential with the infinite series solutions from image charges. This confirms that the dimensionally hybrid models are excellent approximations for distances r ≳ L/2.

  9. Retrospective analysis of main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human complex traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brasch-Andersen Charlotte

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology of multifactorial human diseases involves complex interactions between numerous environmental factors and alleles of many genes. Efficient statistical tools are demanded in identifying the genetic and environmental variants that affect the risk of disease development. This paper introduces a retrospective polytomous logistic regression model to measure both the main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human discrete and continuous complex traits. In this model, combinations of genotypes at two interacting loci or of environmental exposure and genotypes at one locus are treated as nominal outcomes of which the proportions are modeled as a function of the disease trait assigning both main and interaction effects and with no assumption of normality in the trait distribution. Performance of our method in detecting interaction effect is compared with that of the case-only model. Results Results from our simulation study indicate that our retrospective model exhibits high power in capturing even relatively small effect with reasonable sample sizes. Application of our method to data from an association study on the catalase -262C/T promoter polymorphism and aging phenotypes detected significant main and interaction effects for age-group and allele T on individual's cognitive functioning and produced consistent results in estimating the interaction effect as compared with the popular case-only model. Conclusion The retrospective polytomous logistic regression model can be used as a convenient tool for assessing both main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human multifactorial diseases involving genetic and non-genetic factors as well as categorical or continuous traits.

  10. Meta-analysis of the effects of forest fragmentation on interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Laurance, William F; Larrinaga, Asier R; Santamaria, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Forest fragmentation dramatically alters species persistence and distribution and affects many ecological interactions among species. Recent studies suggest that mutualisms, such as pollination and seed dispersal, are more sensitive to the negative effects of forest fragmentation than antagonisms, such as predation or herbivory. We applied meta-analytical techniques to evaluate this hypothesis and quantified the relative contributions of different components of the fragmentation process (decreases in fragment size, edge effects, increased isolation, and habitat degradation) to the overall effect. The effects of fragmentation on mutualisms were primarily driven by habitat degradation, edge effects, and fragment isolation, and, as predicted, they were consistently more negative on mutualisms than on antagonisms. For the most studied interaction type, seed dispersal, only certain components of fragmentation had significant (edge effects) or marginally significant (fragment size) effects. Seed size modulated the effect of fragmentation: species with large seeds showed stronger negative impacts of fragmentation via reduced dispersal rates. Our results reveal that different components of the habitat fragmentation process have varying impacts on key mutualisms. We also conclude that antagonistic interactions have been understudied in fragmented landscapes, most of the research has concentrated on particular types of mutualistic interactions such as seed dispersal, and that available studies of interspecific interactions have a strong geographical bias (arising mostly from studies carried out in Brazil, Chile, and the United States). © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Nonlocal plasticity effects on interaction of different size voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2004-01-01

    A nonlocal elastic-plastic material model is used to show that the rate of void growth is significantly reduced when the voids are small enough to be comparable with a characteristic material length. For a very small void in the material between much larger voids the competition between an increa......A nonlocal elastic-plastic material model is used to show that the rate of void growth is significantly reduced when the voids are small enough to be comparable with a characteristic material length. For a very small void in the material between much larger voids the competition between...... an increased growth rate due to the stress concentrations around the larger voids and a reduced growth rate due to the nonlocal effects is studied. The analyses are based on an axisymmetric unit cell model with special boundary conditions, which allow for a relatively simple investigation of a full three...

  12. Classroom Interaction in Effective and Ineffective Schools: Preliminary Results from Phase III of the Louisiana School Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfield, Samuel; Teddlie, Charles; Suarez, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    A major focus in Phase III of the Louisiana School Effectiveness Study is on the relationship between classroom interaction patterns and school effectiveness. This paper presents observations on similarities and differences between prior teacher and school effectiveness studies, the LSES-III methodology, and preliminary results from one of the…

  13. The effects of incomplete protein interaction data on structural and evolutionary inferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Silva, E; Thorne, T; Ingram, P

    2006-01-01

    of the inherent noise in protein interaction data. The effects of the incomplete nature of network data become very noticeable, especially for so-called network motifs. We also consider the effect of incomplete network data on functional and evolutionary inferences. Conclusion Crucially, when only small, partial......Background Present protein interaction network data sets include only interactions among subsets of the proteins in an organism. Previously this has been ignored, but in principle any global network analysis that only looks at partial data may be biased. Here we demonstrate the need to consider...... network sampling properties explicitly and from the outset in any analysis. Results Here we study how properties of the yeast protein interaction network are affected by random and non-random sampling schemes using a range of different network statistics. Effects are shown to be independent...

  14. Assessing the effectiveness of interactive media in improving drowsy driver safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Leila; Nass, Clifford

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the possibility of using interactive media to help drowsy drivers wake up, thereby enabling them to drive more safely. Many studies have investigated the negative impacts of driver drowsiness and distraction in cars, separately. However, none has studied the potentially positive effects of slightly interactive media for rousing drowsy drivers to help them drive more safely. In a 2 (drowsy vs. nondrowsy drivers) x 2 (passive vs. slightly interactive voice-based media) x 2 (monotonous vs. varied driving courses) study, participants (N = 79) used a driving simulator while interacting with a language-learning system that was either passive (i.e., drivers merely listen to phrases in another language) or slightly interactive (i.e., drivers verbally repeat those phrases). (a) Drowsy drivers preferred and drove more safely with slightly interactive media, as compared with passive media. (b) Interactive media did not harm nondrowsy driver safety. (c) Drivers drove more safely on varied driving courses than on monotonous ones. Slightly interactive media hold the potential to improve the performance of drowsy drivers on the primary task of driving safely. Applications include the design of interactive systems that increase user alertness, safety, and engagement on primary tasks, as opposed to systems that take attentional resources away from the primary task of driving.

  15. Effects of copper on invertebrate-sediment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunting, E R; Mulder, C; Kraak, M H S; Breure, A M; Admiraal, W

    2013-09-01

    Toxicants potentially decouple links between biodiversity and ecosystem processes. This study aimed to evaluate how toxicants affect invertebrate bioturbation and decomposition. Effects of copper on functionally distinct macrofaunal species (Asellus aquaticus and Tubifex spp.), decomposition (release of dissolved organic carbon, DOC) and Average Metabolic Response (AMR) and Community Metabolic Diversity (CMD) of bacteria were determined in 5-day microcosm experiments. Bioturbation was assessed as sediment redox potential (Eh) profiles. Concentration-response curves of the functional parameters DOC, and the faunal mediated AMR and CMD in the presence of Tubifex spp. depended on Tubifex spp. survival, i.e. similar EC50 values for both endpoints. In contrast, functional parameters in the presence of A. aquaticus were more sensitive than survival. Sediment Eh-profiles showed that reduced decomposition was caused by reduced sediment reworking by A. aquaticus at sub-lethal copper concentrations. These observations hint at a decoupling of invertebrate community structure and ecosystem functioning upon stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. COMT-by-Sex Interaction Effect on Psychosis Proneness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Castro-Catala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizotypy phenotypes in the general population share etiopathogenic mechanisms and risk factors with schizophrenia, supporting the notion of psychosis as a continuum ranging from nonclinical to clinical deviance. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is a candidate susceptibility gene for schizophrenia that is involved in the regulation of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. Several recent studies have reported a sex difference in the impact of COMT genotype on psychiatric and cognitive phenotypes and personality traits. The present study investigated the association of COMT Val158Met (rs4680 with psychometric positive and negative schizotypy and psychotic experiences in a sample of 808 nonclinical young adults. The main finding was that sex moderates the association of COMT genotype with the negative dimension of both schizotypy and psychotic experiences. Male subjects carrying the Val allele tended to score higher on the negative dimension of both trait and symptom-like measures. The results from the present study are consistent with recent work suggesting an association between negative schizotypy and diminished prefrontal dopamine availability. They support the idea that a biological differentiation underlies the positive and negative schizotypy dimensions. Additionally, these findings contribute to the growing literature on sex-specific effects of COMT on the predisposition to psychiatric disorders and personality traits.

  17. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Meskhidze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD, and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl-a] and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between −0.2 and −0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AODdiff is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AODdiff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.

  18. Origin of Substituent Effects in Edge-to-Face Aryl-Aryl Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N

    2009-01-01

    Substituent effects in the edge-to-face configuration of the benzene dimer have been studied using modern density functional theory. An accurate interaction potential energy curve has been computed for the unsubstituted dimer using ab initio methods with large basis sets. The recommended binding energy for the edge-to-face benzene dimer is 2.31 kcal mol(-1), estimated at the counterpoise-corrected CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. For both edge-ring and face-ring-substituted dimers, interaction energies correlate with sigma(m) for the substituents, indicating that substituent effects can be understood qualitatively in terms of simple electrostatic effects, although in the latter case dispersion results in some scatter in the data. In contrast to prevailing models of substituent effects in benzene dimers, polarization of the pi-system of the substituted ring does not induce substituent effects. For edge-ring-substituted dimers, substituent effects arise from differential electrostatic interactions between the hydrogens on the substituted ring and the pi-cloud of the face ring and direct interactions of the substituents with the unsubstituted ring. For face-ring-substituted dimers, substituent effects arise from direct electrostatic and dispersion interactions of the substituents with the edge ring. Substituents with sigma(m) > 0.12 favor edge ring substitution while for sigma(m) face ring is preferred.

  19. A Meta-analysis of the Effectiveness of Interactive Middle School Cannabis Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lize, Steven E; Iachini, Aidyn L; Tang, Weizhou; Tucker, Joshua; Seay, Kristen D; Clone, Stephanie; DeHart, Dana; Browne, Teri

    2017-01-01

    This meta-analysis examines the effectiveness of interactive middle school-based drug prevention programs on adolescent cannabis use in North America, as well as program characteristics that could moderate these effects. Interactive programs, compared to more didactic, lecture style programs, involve participants in skill-building activities and focus on interaction among participants. A systematic literature search was conducted for English-language studies from January 1998 to March 2014. Studies included evaluations using random assignment or a quasi-experimental design of interactive school-based substance use prevention programs delivered to adolescents (aged 12-14) in North American middle schools (grades 6-8). Data were extracted using a coding protocol. The outcomes of interest were post-treatment cannabis use, intent to use, and refusal skills compared across intervention and control groups. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated from continuous measures, and dichotomous measures were converted to the d index. A total of 30 studies yielding 23 independent samples were included. The random effects pooled effect size for cannabis use (k = 21) was small ([Formula: see text]= -0.07, p skills (k = 3) were not significant. Moderator analyses indicated significant differences in program effectiveness between instructor types, with teachers found to be most effective ([Formula: see text]= -0.08, p = 0.02). The findings provide further support for the use of interactive school-based programs to prevent cannabis use among middle school students in North America.

  20. Effective interaction for Ca-40 (p, p') at Ep=318 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. J. Kelly; P. Boberg; A. E. Feldman; B. S. Flanders; M. A. Khandaker; S. D. Hyman; H. Seifert; P. Karen; B. E. Norum; P. Welch; S. Nanda; A. Saha

    1991-12-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for the excitation by 318 MeV protons of states of 40Ca below 7.2 MeV. The data for those normal-parity excitations for which transition densities are available from electroexcitation measurements are analyzed in terms of medium modifications to the nucleon-nucleon interaction. We find that the empirical effective interaction previously fitted to 16O(p,p’) data at the same energy predicts 40Ca(p,p’) very well. Density-dependent modifications of the effective interaction fitted to data for 40Ca or 16O, either independently or simultaneously, are virtually identical. The density dependence of the empirical interaction is considerably stronger than that of interactions based upon nonrelativistic nuclear matter theory and persists to lower density. The most significant differences are that the empirical interaction has a stronger repulsive core and that absorption is enhanced at high density, contrary to expectations based upon Pauli blocking. We also find substantial suppression of the spin-orbit interaction at low density and enhancement at high density. Nevertheless, the independence of the effective interaction from the target supports the concept of local nuclear matter density. We also find that optical potentials based upon the empirical effective interaction are very similar to Schrödinger-equivalent potentials based upon a relativistic impulse approximation model, suggesting that the empirical density dependence is similar to the equivalent density dependence that arises from elimination of lower components from Dirac wave functions. Finally, the results are compared with global optical potentials from Dirac phenomenology.

  1. Ordinary Social Interaction and the Main Effect Between Perceived Support and Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Brian; Vander Molen, Randy J; Fles, Elizabeth; Andrews, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Relational regulation theory hypothesizes that (a) the main effect between perceived support and mental health primarily reflects ordinary social interaction rather than conversations about stress and how to cope with it, and (b) the extent to which a provider regulates a recipient's mental health primarily reflects the recipient's personal taste (i.e., is relational), rather than the provider's objective supportiveness. In three round-robin studies, participants rated each other on supportiveness and the quality of ordinary social interaction, as well as their own affect when interacting with each other. Samples included marines about to deploy to Afghanistan (N = 100; 150 dyads), students sharing apartments (N = 64; 96 dyads), and strangers (N = 48; 72 dyads). Perceived support and ordinary social interaction were primarily relational, and most of perceived support's main effect on positive affect was redundant with ordinary social interaction. The main effect between perceived support and affect emerged among strangers after brief text conversations, and these links were partially verified by independent observers. Findings for negative affect were less consistent with theory. Ordinary social interaction appears to be able to explain much of the main effect between perceived support and positive affect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The interaction between constituent year and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingröver, C; Wattie, N; Baker, J; Helsen, W F; Schorer, J

    2017-06-01

    The current state of research on relative age effects in basketball shows an uneven picture. These mixed results might be caused by the interaction of constituent year and within-year effects. Our aim was to examine constituent and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball. The sample (n = 4400) included players competing in the JBBL (Under-16 first division) and the NBBL (Under-19 first division) from 2011/2012 until 2013/2014. A multi-way frequency analysis revealed an interaction of constituent year effects and within-1-year effects for the JBBL, χ2 (6, 2590) = 12.76, P < 0.05. NBBL data showed significant constituent year effects, χ2 (2, n = 1810) = 25.32, P < 0.01, and within-1-year effects for all three age bands but no interaction. The interaction between constituent year and within-1-year effects in the JBBL showed reduced within-1-year effects with increasing age. Once players enter the system in the JBBL, relatively younger players seem less likely to drop out of the system. Results offer new insight regarding how the regulations of this talent development system may influence athletes' opportunities to enter the system and their likelihood of staying at the highest levels of competition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. How to Augment the Learning Impact of Computer Simulations? The Designs and Effects of Interactivity and Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Two investigations were conducted in this study. In the first experiment, the effects of two types of interactivity with a computer simulation were compared: experimentation versus observation interactivity. Experimentation interactivity allows students to use simulations to conduct virtual experiments, whereas observation interactivity allows…

  4. Effects of smoking on heart rate, anxiety, and feelings of success during social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, D G; Spielberger, C D

    1987-12-01

    The effects of smoking on heart rate (HR) and emotional processes during social interactions were assessed in 12 smokers. Smoking was associated with less anxiety and with enhanced feelings of being successful both in changing the opinions of others and in expressing one's own point of view. These findings are consistent with others in the literature. The increase in HR during social interactions in which the participants smoked was similar in magnitude to the HR increase associated with speaking versus listening during conversation. The effects of smoking and social interaction on HR appeared to be additive. Smoking during the social interaction increased HR only about half as much as is typically reported for smokers seated quietly in nonsocial situations.

  5. How abusive supervisors influence employees' voice and silence: the effects of interactional justice and organizational attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Jiang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    In this research we investigated the influence of abusive supervision on employees' prosocial voice and silence, as well as clarified the roles of interactional justice (as a mediator) and organizational attribution (as a moderator). Moreover, we examined a mediated moderating model stipulating that interactional justice mediated the moderating effect of organizational attribution on the focal relationship. A scenario experiment was employed in Study 1, and after analyzing data from 196 employees, we found that abusive supervision influenced employees' prosocial voice and silence via interactional justice. In Study 2, data were collected from 379 employees in two waves separated by 1 week. The results not only replicated the findings of Study 1 but also indicated that organizational attribution buffered the abusive supervision-voice and silence relationship, and that interactional justice mediated this moderating effect.

  6. The Unique and Interactive Effects of Parent and School Bonds on Adolescent Delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatine, Elaina; Lippold, Melissa; Kainz, Kirsten

    2017-11-01

    Parent and school bonds are protective against delinquency. This study used longitudinal data and multilevel Poisson regression models (MLM) to examine unique and interactive associations of parent and school bonds on youth delinquency in a sample of rural adolescents (n = 945; 84% White). We investigated whether youth sex or transitioning to a new middle school moderated the linkages between parent and school bonds and later delinquency. Results indicated reduced delinquency was associated with positive parent and school relationships. Parent and school bonds interacted such that linkages between parent bonding and youth delinquency were stronger when youth also had high school bonding - suggesting an additive effect. However, interactive effects were only found when youth remained in the same school and became nonsignificant if they transitioned to a new school. Findings support prior evidence that parent and school bonds - and their interaction - play a unique role in reducing delinquency.

  7. Long-term Utilization of Interaction by Young EFL Learners: The Effects of Strategy Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdi Hajmalek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of research within the interactionist framework seems to be consensually pointing to the beneficial effects of interaction in SLA. However, few studies have investigated the role of training in providing and perceiving interactional feedback, especially among young learners. This study probed the effects of training prior to engagement in interaction in case of young learners acquiring polar questions in an EFL context. Sixty learners aged 9-14 in three intact groups were exposed to instruction followed by peer interaction in case of the experimental groups while the control group simply received traditional teacher-fronted practice. Also, while one treatment group received prior training in interactional feedback strategies, the other group did not. The pre-test, immediate post-test, and delayed post-test were administered. The results of mixed between-within subjects ANOVA (SPANOVA showed that engaging in interaction, regardless of any prior training, could significantly improve learners’ immediate mastery over the target form. However, in the long run, only the group trained in feedback strategies could maintain its superiority over the control group. The findings suggest that although engaging in peer interaction can be beneficial for young learners, sustained interlanguage development can result only if learners are trained in feedback strategies.

  8. Tuning the Casimir-Polder interaction via magneto-optical effects in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysne, T.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Oliver, D.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Farina, C.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the dispersive Casimir-Polder interaction between a rubidium atom and a suspended graphene sheet subjected to an external magnetic field B . We demonstrate that this concrete physical system allows for an unprecedented control of dispersive interactions at micro- and nanoscales. Indeed, we show that the application of an external magnetic field can induce an 80 % reduction in the Casimir-Polder energy relative to its value without the field. We also show that sharp discontinuities emerge in the Casimir-Polder interaction energy for certain values of the applied magnetic field at low temperatures. Moreover, for sufficiently large distances, these discontinuities show up as a plateau-like pattern with a quantized Casimir-Polder interaction energy, in a phenomenon that can be explained in terms of the quantum Hall effect. In addition, we point out the importance of thermal effects in the Casimir-Polder interaction, which we show must be taken into account even for considerably short distances. In this case, the discontinuities in the atom-graphene dispersive interaction do not occur, which by no means prevents the tuning of the interaction in ˜50 % by the application of the external magnetic field.

  9. The interventional effects of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions and interpersonal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoli; Shi, Wendian; Han, Xiangxiang; Wang, Nana; Zhang, Ni; Wang, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions, intragroup interactions, and complex understanding of others. A total of 50 freshmen not receiving any training in meditation intervention were randomly divided into the meditation group (25 subjects) and the control group (25 subjects). The meditation group was implemented with group meditation intervention for 4 weeks, three times a week, about 30 minutes each time. The results revealed that the effect sizes in interpersonal interaction and complex understanding of others in the meditation group were both above 0.8, indicating strong effects. It was concluded that loving-kindness meditation can effectively improve positive emotions, interpersonal interactions, and complex understanding of others in college students. PMID:26060402

  10. The interventional effects of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions and interpersonal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoli; Shi, Wendian; Han, Xiangxiang; Wang, Nana; Zhang, Ni; Wang, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions, intragroup interactions, and complex understanding of others. A total of 50 freshmen not receiving any training in meditation intervention were randomly divided into the meditation group (25 subjects) and the control group (25 subjects). The meditation group was implemented with group meditation intervention for 4 weeks, three times a week, about 30 minutes each time. The results revealed that the effect sizes in interpersonal interaction and complex understanding of others in the meditation group were both above 0.8, indicating strong effects. It was concluded that loving-kindness meditation can effectively improve positive emotions, interpersonal interactions, and complex understanding of others in college students.

  11. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Cross Sections for Interactions of Hydrogen and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction energies for N2-He and N2-H2 are calculated by accurate ab initio methods. The virial coefficient and differential scattering cross section for N2-H2 are calculated; the theoretical results are compared with experimental data. The transport collision integrals for N2-H2 and N2-N2 interactions are calculated and tabulated; the results yield transport coefficients that compare well with measured data. Transport coefficients are found to be determined accurately from the interaction energies for a specific configuration of the molecule formed from the interaction partners. Comparisons with results of measurement and accurate calculations demonstrate that the transport properties of complex molecular interactions can be determined rapidly and fairly accurately from the interaction energies of simpler system using combination rules for the short-range parameters of effective interaction energies and the coefficients for the long-range forces. The coefficients for a two-parameter temperature expansion of diffusion and viscosity are tabulated for a realistic universal potential energy that is based primarily on the results of very accurate calculations of the He-He interaction energy.

  12. Variable effects of nicotine, anabasine, and their interactions on parasitized bumble bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Lukas P.; Adler, Lynn S.; Irwin, Rebecca E.; Palmer-Young, Evan C.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary metabolites in floral nectar have been shown to reduce parasite load in two common bumble bee species. Previous studies on the effects of nectar secondary metabolites on parasitized bees have focused on single compounds in isolation; however, in nature, bees are simultaneously exposed to multiple compounds. We tested for interactions between the effects of two alkaloids found in the nectar of Nicotiana spp. plants, nicotine and anabasine, on parasite load and mortality in bumble bees ( Bombus impatiens) infected with the intestinal parasite Crithidia bombi. Adult worker bees inoculated with C. bombi were fed nicotine and anabasine diet treatments in a factorial design, resulting in four nectar treatment combinations:  2 ppm nicotine, 5 ppm anabasine, 2ppm nicotine and 5 ppm anabasine together, or a control alkaloid-free solution. We conducted the experiment twice: first, with bees incubated under variable environmental conditions (‘Variable’; temperatures varied from 10-35°C with ambient lighting); and second, under carefully controlled environmental conditions (‘Stable’; 27°C incubator, constant darkness). In ‘Variable’, each alkaloid alone significantly decreased parasite loads, but this effect was not realized with the alkaloids in combination, suggesting an antagonistic interaction. Nicotine but not anabasine significantly increased mortality, and the two compounds had no interactive effects on mortality. In ‘Stable’, nicotine significantly increased parasite loads, the opposite of its effect in ‘Variable’. While not significant, the relationship between anabasine and parasite loads was also positive. Interactive effects between the two alkaloids on parasite load were non-significant, but the pattern of antagonistic interaction was similar to that in the variable experiment. Neither alkaloid, nor their interaction, significantly affected mortality under controlled conditions. Our results do not indicate synergy between Nicotiana

  13. Resilience of palm populations to disturbance is determined by interactive effects of fire, herbivory and harvest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandle, Lisa; Ticktin, Tamara; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the interactive effects of multiple forms of disturbance - natural or anthropogenic - on plant population dynamics. This limits our ability to understand the drivers of these dynamics and effectively manage plant populations in the face of changing disturbance regimes. Fire,

  14. Effects of nutrients and shade on tree-grass interactions in an East African savanna.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, F.; Kroon, de H.; Prins, H.H.T.; Berendse, F.

    2001-01-01

    Savanna trees have a multitude of positive and negative effects on understorey grass production. but little is known about how these effects interact. We report on a fertilization and shading experiment carried out in a Tanzanian tropical city savanna around Acacia tortilis trees. In two years of

  15. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  16. The Effects of Online Interactive Games on High School Students' Achievement and Motivation in History Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Cheng; Wei, Yu Che; Hung, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies demonstrate that Digital Game Based Learning (DGBL) can foster learning effect. The purpose of this study is to survey whether the online game in junior high school students can encourage learning effect in Taiwan's History. So, the research applied Interactive Game-based Learning System (IGLS) to junior high history teaching as an…

  17. Modulation of Additive and Interactive Effects in Lexical Decision by Trial History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Additive and interactive effects of word frequency, stimulus quality, and semantic priming have been used to test theoretical claims about the cognitive architecture of word-reading processes. Additive effects among these factors have been taken as evidence for discrete-stage models of word reading. We present evidence from linear mixed-model…

  18. The Effects of Persistence and Small Group Interaction during Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Compared the effects of grouping sixth grade students with different levels of persistence on their ability to learn in cooperative learning groups while working at the computer. Reports results that indicated that average persisters interacted more than either high or low persisters and discusses implications for forming effective cooperative…

  19. Electron–electron interactions in the chemical bond: “1/3” Effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The prominent “1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of two- dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron–electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall ...

  20. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND 03 ON RICE AND FLACCA TOMATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    All atmospheric concentrations of both carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (03) are increasing, with potentially dramatic effects on plants. This study was conducted to determine interactive effects of CO2 and 03 on rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR 74) and a 'wilty' mutant of tomato (Lyco...

  1. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: progress report, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) is one of three Panels that regularly informs the Parties (countries) to the Montreal Protocol on the effects of ozone depletion and the consequences of climate change interactions with respect to human health, animals, plants, bi...

  2. The interactive effect of salinity and urea on growth, some related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interactive effects of Nacl and urea was investigated on growth, relative metabolites as well as antioxidant enzymes of Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. Lower salt concentration (100 mM NaCl) have no effect on dry weight and pigment content of chlorella sp. while, they decreased by increasing salt concentrations ...

  3. Optimum designs versus orthogonal arrays for main effects and two-factor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, E.D.

    2010-01-01

    Designs with full estimation capacity permit estimation of all main effects and all two-factor interactions. By allowing correlation among the effects, the run size of such designs can be smaller than required for a resolution of 5. To construct a design, one can either use commercial software for

  4. Interacting effects of landscape context and habitat quality on flower visiting insects in agricultural landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, D.; Langevelde, van F.

    2006-01-01

    Landscape context and habitat quality may have pronounced effects on the diversity of flower visiting insects. We investigated whether the effects of landscape context and habitat quality on flower visiting insects interact in agricultural landscapes in the Netherlands. Landscape context was

  5. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF OZONE DEPLETION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of ozone depletion on global biogeochemical cycles, via increased UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface, have continued to be documented over the past 4 years. In this report we also document various effects of UV-B that interact with global climate change because the...

  6. E-Learning as an Effective Interactive Pedagogy in The Teaching of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, I propose the use of E-learning as an effective interactive pedagogical tool in the teaching of Art Education in Nigeria. Discussions on how the electronic media may be effectively utilized in the teaching of art as well as on art education and E-learning were made within the context of this discourse. Electronic ...

  7. Pets as therapy: effects on social interaction in long-stay psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, P L; Malpus, Z

    Many studies have suggested that health and social benefits may be derived from pet ownership or visitation upon interaction levels within severely mentally ill populations. The study featured in this article aimed to examine further this relationship while attempting to control for the effects of an extraneous variable (the human dog handler) using an A-B-C-A reversal design. The article concludes that the presence of a pet does, indeed, promote social interactions within a long-stay psychiatric population.

  8. The Effect of Interactivity with a Music Video Game on Second Language Vocabulary Recall

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan DeHaan; W. Michael Reed; Katsuko Kuwada

    2010-01-01

    Video games are potential sources of second language input; however, the medium’s fundamental characteristic, interactivity, has not been thoroughly examined in terms of its effect on learning outcomes. This experimental study investigated to what degree, if at all, video game interactivity would help or hinder the noticing and recall of second language vocabulary. Eighty randomly-selected Japanese university undergraduates were paired based on similar English language and game proficiencies....

  9. Effects of interaction of breed by pen and cage position on hen day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This were subjected to a two way Analysis of variance to determine the effect of breed by pen and cage interaction on hen-day performance.Mean hen day lay of Haco black by pen interaction was not significantly (P>0.01) different in pen L1 and L3, while that in pen L2 was low and significantly (P<.05) different from that in ...

  10. Experimental investigation of interaction effects in foam-filled thin-walled aluminum tubes

    OpenAIRE

    GÜDEN, Mustafa; Toksoy, Ahmet Kaan; Kavi, Halit

    2006-01-01

    The interaction coefficients of polystyrene foam filling of thin-walled aluminum cylindrical tubes were investigated experimentally through compression testing of partially foam-filled tubes with and without adhesive. The experimental load-displacement curves and observation of the crushed sections of filled tubes have shown that partial foam filling reduced the fold length and hence increased the average crushing loads of tubes, proving the interaction effect between tube wall and filler. Th...

  11. Interactive effects of nanoparticles with other contaminants in aquatic organisms: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, L; Ciacci, C; Balbi, T

    2015-10-01

    The increasing production and use of nanoparticles (NPs) will lead to their release into the aquatic environment, posing a potential threat to the health of aquatic organisms. Both in the water phase and in the sediments NPs could mix and interact with other pollutants, such as organic xenobiotics and heavy metals, leading to possible changes in their bioavailability/bioconcentration/toxicity. However, whether these interactive effects may lead to increased harmful effects in marine organisms is largely unknown. In this work, available data mainly obtained on carbon based NPs and n-TiO2, as examples of widespread NPs, in aquatic organisms are reviewed. Moreover, data are summarized on the interactive effects of n-TiO2 with 2,3,7,8-TCDD and Cd(2+), chosen as examples of common and persistent organic and inorganic contaminants, respectively, in the model marine bivalve Mytilus. The results reveal complex and often unexpected interactive responses of NPs with other pollutants, depending on type of contaminant and the endpoint measured, as well as differences in bioaccumulation. The results are discussed in relation with data obtained in freshwater organisms. Overall, information available so far indicate that interactive effects of NPs with other contaminants do not necessarily lead to increased toxicity or harmful effects in aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interactions and effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on microorganisms involved in biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Avilés, Pabel; Díaz Barriga-Castro, Enrique; Palma-Tirado, Lourdes; Cuevas-Rodríguez, Germán

    2017-10-01

    To clarify the toxicological effects of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on microorganisms with environmental relevance, it is necessary to understand their interactions. In this work, they were studied the effects and the morphological interactions of two metal oxide NPs (ZnO and TiO2 ) with microorganisms, during aerobic treatment of wastewater. The effects were evaluated according to nutrient removal from wastewater, while morphological interactions were determined by three different techniques such as TEM, HAADF-STEM, as well as an elemental mapping. According to results about effects of both NPs, they inhibited the removal of organic matter and ammonia nitrogen, and enhanced the orthophosphate removal. Related to morphological interactions, the electron-dense material of both NPs was mainly observed bounded to cell membrane. In tests with ZnO NPs, it was also observed electron-dense material internalized in microorganisms without physical damage in cell membrane. The elemental mapping was useful to determine that the electron-dense material corresponded to Zn and Ti. Both interactions, internalization and attachment of NPs on cell membrane of microorganisms may trigger the negative effect in the removal of organic matter and nitrogen. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Contrasting effects of elevated temperature and invertebrate grazing regulate multispecies interactions between decomposer fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Donald A'Bear

    Full Text Available Predicting the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on species interactions and ecosystem processes is among the primary aims of community ecologists. The composition of saprotrophic fungal communities is a consequence of competitive mycelial interactions, and a major determinant of woodland decomposition and nutrient cycling rates. Elevation of atmospheric temperature is predicted to drive changes in fungal community development. Top-down regulation of mycelial growth is an important determinant of, and moderator of temperature-driven changes to, two-species interaction outcomes. This study explores the interactive effects of a 4 °C temperature increase and soil invertebrate (collembola or woodlice grazing on multispecies interactions between cord-forming basidiomycete fungi emerging from colonised beech (Fagus sylvatica wood blocks. The fungal dominance hierarchy at ambient temperature (16 °C; Phanerochaete velutina > Resinicium bicolor > Hypholoma fasciculare was altered by elevated temperature (20 °C; R. bicolor > P. velutina > H. fasciculare in ungrazed systems. Warming promoted the competitive ability of the fungal species (R. bicolor that was preferentially grazed by all invertebrate species. As a consequence, grazing prevented the effect of temperature on fungal community development and maintained a multispecies assemblage. Decomposition of fungal-colonised wood was stimulated by warming, with implications for increased CO2 efflux from woodland soil. Analogous to aboveground plant communities, increasing complexity of biotic and abiotic interactions appears to be important in buffering climate change effects on soil decomposers.

  14. Group composition effects on aggressive interpack interactions of gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Kira A.; MacNulty, Daniel R.; Stahler, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Mech, L. David

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of characteristics that promote group success during intraspecific encounters is key to understanding the adaptive advantages of sociality for many group-living species. In addition, some individuals in a group may be more likely than others to influence intergroup conflicts, a relatively neglected idea in research on social animals. Here we use observations of aggressive interactions between wolf (Canis lupus) packs over an extended period and use pack characteristics to determine which groups had an advantage over their opponents. During 16 years of observation in Yellowstone National Park from 1995 to 2010, we documented 121 interpack aggressive interactions. We recorded pack sizes, compositions, and spatial orientation related to residency to determine their effects on the outcomes of interactions between packs. Relative pack size (RPS) improved the odds of a pack displacing its opponent. However, pack composition moderated the effect of RPS as packs with relatively more old members (>6.0 years old) or adult males had higher odds of winning despite a numerical disadvantage. The location of the interaction with respect to pack territories had no effect on the outcome of interpack interactions. Although the importance of RPS in successful territorial defense suggests the evolution and maintenance of group living may be at least partly due to larger packs’ success during interpack interactions, group composition is also an important factor, highlighting that some individuals are more valuable than others during interpack conflicts.

  15. Gender differences of social interactions and their effects on subjective well-being among Japanese elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Hideki; Hougham, Gavin W

    2014-01-01

    Gender differences of social interactions and their effects on subjective well-being among Japanese elders over three years were examined. Repeated measurements of 498 elders over a three-year survey interval were obtained from a baseline mail survey and two- and three-year follow-up surveys. Outcomes were analyzed using Hierarchical Linear Modeling. Male elders were more likely to have a spouse and work at paid jobs, while female elders were likely to have more frequent contacts with their child/children and more interactions with friends. As the elders aged over three years, life satisfaction decreased, while depression did not show any significant overall trend. There were no beneficial effects of social interactions on change in well-being, although social participation, interaction with friends, and conversation with spouse were beneficially related to baseline levels of both depressive tendency and life satisfaction. Among female elders only, the number of children had beneficial effects on life satisfaction. There are modest gender differences of the impact of social interactions on the well-being of Japanese elders, and the number of children seems to be more important as potential sources of support for female rather than male elders. Spousal conversation and non-obligatory social interaction such as unpaid social activities and friendship seem to be important for both male and female elders in Japan. These findings suggest that social relations among Japanese elders may be moving away from more gender dependent patterns seen in the past.

  16. Studying the physical basis of global warming: thermal effects of the interaction between radiation and matter and greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    We present a teaching module dealing with the thermal effects of interaction between radiation and matter, the infrared emission of bodies and the greenhouse effect devoted to university level and teacher education. The module stresses the dependence of the optical properties of materials (transparency, absorptivity and emissivity) on radiation frequency, as a result of interaction between matter and radiation. Multiple experiences are suggested to favour a progressive construction of knowledge on the physical aspects necessary to understand the greenhouse effect and global warming. Some results obtained with university students are briefly reported.

  17. Experimental Tests of Normative Group Influence and Representation Effects in Computer-Mediated Communication: When Interacting Via Computers Differs from Interacting With Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Nass, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Presents two experiments to address the questions of if and how normative social influence operates in anonymous computer-mediated communication and human-computer interaction. Finds that the perception of interaction partner (human vs. computer) moderated the group conformity effect such that the undergraduate student subjects expressed greater…

  18. Studying the Physical Basis of Global Warming: Thermal Effects of the Interaction between Radiation and Matter and Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    We present a teaching module dealing with the thermal effects of interaction between radiation and matter, the infrared emission of bodies and the greenhouse effect devoted to university level and teacher education. The module stresses the dependence of the optical properties of materials (transparency, absorptivity and emissivity) on radiation…

  19. Synergistic effect of the interaction between naproxen and citral on inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Mario I; González-García, Martha P; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Aguilar-Robles, Paulina

    2010-12-15

    The combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with herbs having analgesic effects can increase their antinociceptive activity and limit their side effects. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects on inflammation and gastric injury in rats resulting from the interaction between naproxen and citral. Naproxen, citral, or fixed-dose naproxen-citral combinations were administered orally and their anti-inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) and gastric damage were assessed in rats. The pharmacological interaction type was evaluated by the isobolographic analysis. Naproxen, citral, or combinations of naproxen and citral produced anti-inflammatory effects. The sole administration of naproxen produced significant gastric damage, but this effect was not obtained with either citral or combinations. ED(30) values were estimated for the individual drugs, and isobolograms were constructed. The derived theoretical ED(30) for the anti-inflammatory effect was 504.4 mg/kg; this was significantly higher than the observed experimental value (190.6 mg/kg). These results indicate that a synergistic interaction underlies the anti-inflammatory effect. The data suggests that the naproxen-citral combination can interact and to produce minor gastric damage and may have therapeutic advantages for the clinical treatment of inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Interactive effects of environmental stress and inbreeding on reproductive traits in a wild bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, A B; Arcese, P; Hochachka, W M; Reid, J M; Keller, L F

    2006-11-01

    1. Conservation biologists are concerned about the interactive effects of environmental stress and inbreeding because such interactions could affect the dynamics and extinction risk of small and isolated populations, but few studies have tested for these interactions in nature. 2. We used data from the long-term population study of song sparrows Melospiza melodia on Mandarte Island to examine the joint effects of inbreeding and environmental stress on four fitness traits that are known to be affected by the inbreeding level of adult birds: hatching success, laying date, male mating success and fledgling survival. 3. We found that inbreeding depression interacted with environmental stress to reduce hatching success in the nests of inbred females during periods of rain. 4. For laying date, we found equivocal support for an interaction between parental inbreeding and environmental stress. In this case, however, inbred females experienced less inbreeding depression in more stressful, cooler years. 5. For two other traits, we found no evidence that the strength of inbreeding depression varied with environmental stress. First, mated males fathered fewer nests per season if inbred or if the ratio of males to females in the population was high, but inbreeding depression did not depend on sex ratio. Second, fledglings survived poorly during rainy periods and if their father was inbred, but the effects of paternal inbreeding and rain did not interact. 6. Thus, even for a single species, interactions between the inbreeding level and environmental stress may not occur in all traits affected by inbreeding depression, and interactions that do occur will not always act synergistically to further decrease fitness.

  1. Effect of Finite-Range Interactions on Rapidly Rotating Ultracold Bosonic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Nobukuni

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the effects of the finite-range interactions of six rotating ultracold bosonic atoms using a Gaussian-type interatomic interaction model. The model is analyzed numerically by exact diagonalization within the Lowest Landau Level (LLL) approximation and semiclassical approximation. The result of exact diagonalization shows that the ground-state angular momentum changes discretely with increasing angular velocity. For the short-range limit, the ground-state angular momentum and wavefunctions agree with those of the delta interaction evaluated by Bertsch and Papenbrock [https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.63.023616" xlink:type="simple">Phys. Rev. A 63, 023616 (2001)]. Different from the delta interaction, the ground-state angular momenta higher than 30, i.e., N(N - 1), are observed at a high angular frequency as a result of the finite-range two-body interactions. For the intermediate-range interaction, the sequence of ground-state angular momenta increases in steps of five, which was not found in previous works on the Gaussian interaction. For the long-range limit of Gaussian interaction, we find that the ground-state angular momenta increase in steps of six. These steps of the ground-state angular momentum according to the width of the Gaussian interactions are explained by semiclassical and classical analysis based on the rovibrating molecule picture. The increments of the ground-state angular momentum of five and six are explained by the semiclassical quantization condition of the rotational and vibrational modes of fivefold and sixfold molecules, respectively. Our analysis based on the classical model also confirms that the fivefold molecule picture is more stable than the sixfold molecule picture in the intermediate range of the Gaussian interaction. These results suggest that the Gaussian interaction model can be used to emulate and characterize interactions by their width as the model can reproduce various rotational states including the ground

  2. Cavity-photon contribution to the effective interaction of electrons in parallel quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Sitek, Anna [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Abdullah, Nzar Rauf [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Science Education, School of Science, University of Sulaimani, Kurdistan Region (Iraq); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, Miaoli (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University (Iceland)

    2016-05-15

    A single cavity photon mode is expected to modify the Coulomb interaction of an electron system in the cavity. Here we investigate this phenomena in a parallel double quantum dot system. We explore properties of the closed system and the system after it has been opened up for electron transport. We show how results for both cases support the idea that the effective electron-electron interaction becomes more repulsive in the presence of a cavity photon field. This can be understood in terms of the cavity photons dressing the polarization terms in the effective mutual electron interaction leading to nontrivial delocalization or polarization of the charge in the double parallel dot potential. In addition, we find that the effective repulsion of the electrons can be reduced by quadrupolar collective oscillations excited by an external classical dipole electric field. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Interactive Effects of Neurocognitive Impairment and Substance Use on Antiretroviral Non-adherence in HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S.; Sayegh, Philip; Kim, Michelle S.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    While numerous studies have established the adverse independent effects of clinical conditions including neurocognitive dysfunction, psychiatric illness, and substance abuse/dependence on medication adherence among HIV-infected adults, fewer have studied their interactive effects. The current study examined this issue among 204 HIV-infected participants based upon current neurocognitive functioning and DSM-IV-diagnosed psychiatric illness and current substance abuse or dependence. Results confirmed that participants with any of these risk factors demonstrated poorer adherence than individuals with no risk factors. A neurocognitive status × substance abuse/dependence interaction was also identified such that participants with impaired neurocognition and a co-occurring substance abuse/dependence diagnosis demonstrated the poorest adherence. Results confirm the deleterious impact of these risk factors in isolation and also identify a specific interactive effect for individuals with comorbid neurocognitive impairment and a substance abuse/dependence disorder. Findings highlight the need for interventions that simultaneously address these problems. PMID:25589442

  4. Distinguishability and chiral stability in solution: Effects of decoherence and intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Heekyung [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7 (Canada); Wardlaw, David M., E-mail: dwardlaw@mun.ca [Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1C 5S7 (Canada); Frolov, Alexei M., E-mail: afrolov@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6H 5B7 (Canada)

    2014-05-28

    We examine the effect of decoherence and intermolecular interactions (chiral discrimination energies) on the chiral stability and the distinguishability of initially pure versus mixed states in an open chiral system. Under a two-level approximation for a system, intermolecular interactions are introduced by a mean-field theory, and interaction between a system and an environment is modeled by a continuous measurement of a population difference between the two chiral states. The resultant equations are explored for various parameters, with emphasis on the combined effects of the initial condition of the system, the chiral discrimination energies, and the decoherence in determining: the distinguishability as measured by a population difference between the initially pure and mixed states, and the decoherence process; the chiral stability as measured by the purity decay; and the stationary state of the system at times long relative to the time scales of the system dynamics and of the environmental effects.

  5. Cooperative and diminutive effects of pnicogen bonds and cation-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingzhong; Zhuo, Hongying; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Jianbo; Li, Wenzuo; Loffredo, Robert E

    2014-02-24

    The interplay between pnicogen bonds and cation-π interactions has been investigated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Interesting cooperative and diminutive effects are observed when pnicogen bonds and cation-π interactions coexist in the same complex. These effects have been analyzed in terms of the structural, energetic, and charge-transfer properties of the complexes. The variations in electron density at critical points of the intermolecular bond have been used to analyze bond strengthening or weakening. The nature of the interactions and the mechanisms of cooperative and diminutive effects have been studied by means of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and molecular electrostatic potentials. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Effect modification, interaction and mediation: an overview of theoretical insights for clinical investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corraini P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Priscila Corraini,1 Morten Olsen,1 Lars Pedersen,1 Olaf M Dekkers,1,2 Jan P Vandenbroucke1–3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 3Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK Abstract: We revisited the three interrelated epidemiological concepts of effect modification, interaction and mediation for clinical investigators and examined their applicability when using research databases. The standard methods that are available to assess interaction, effect modification and mediation are explained and exemplified. For each concept, we first give a simple “best-case” example from a randomized controlled trial, followed by a structurally similar example from an observational study using research databases. Our explanation of the examples is based on recent theoretical developments and insights in the context of large health care databases. Terminology is sometimes ambiguous for what constitutes effect modification and interaction. The strong assumptions underlying the assessment of interaction, and particularly mediation, require clinicians and epidemiologists to take extra care when conducting observational studies in the context of health care databases. These strong assumptions may limit the applicability of interaction and mediation assessments, at least until the biases and limitations of these assessments when using large research databases are clarified. Keywords: methods, epidemiology, effect modifiers, stratified analyses, health care administrative claims

  7. Effects of Promotion and Compunction Interventions on Real Intergroup Interactions: Promotion Helps but High Compunction Hurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Katy; Xenias, Dimitrios; Maio, Gregory R

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS  We show the promotion intervention has positive effects during intergroup contact, but that high levels of compunction can have negative effects. Intergroup contact is probably the longest standing and most comprehensively researched intervention to reduce discrimination. It is also part of ordinary social experience, and a key context in which discrimination is played out. In this paper, we explore two additional interventions which are also designed to reduce discrimination, but which have not yet been applied to real intergroup interactions. The promotion intervention encourages participants to relax and enjoy an interaction, while the compunction intervention motivates participants to avoid discrimination. Across two studies, we tested the separate effects of promotion (Study 1) and then compunction (Study 2) on participants' interactions with a confederate whom they believed to have a history of schizophrenia. In Study 1, participants received either a promotion intervention to "relax and have an enjoyable dialogue" or no intervention (control; n = 67). In Study 2, participants completed a Single-Category Implicit Attitude Test before being told that they were high in prejudice (high compunction condition) or low in prejudice (low compunction condition; n = 62). Results indicated that promotion was associated with broadly positive effects: participants reported more positive experience of the interaction (enjoyment and interest in a future interaction), and more positive evaluations of their contact partner (increased friendliness and reduced stereotyping). There were no effects on participants' reported intergroup anxiety. In contrast, high compunction had broadly negative effects: participants reported more negative experiences of the interaction and more negative evaluations of their contact partner (using the same dependent measures outlined above). In addition, participants in the high compunction condition reported increased intergroup

  8. Operator quantum Zeno effect: protecting quantum information with noisy two-qubit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Chao; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2013-03-08

    The time evolution of some quantum states can be slowed down or even stopped under frequent measurements. This is the usual quantum Zeno effect. Here, we report an operator quantum Zeno effect, in which the evolution of some physical observables is slowed down through measurements even though the quantum state changes randomly with time. Based on the operator quantum Zeno effect, we show how we can protect quantum information from decoherence with two-qubit measurements, realizable with noisy two-qubit interactions.

  9. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-12-01

    Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20minutes. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of one minute immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which nonverbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7 to 11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of quality of family interaction and intergenerational transmission of values on sexual permissiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taris, T W; Semin, G R; Bok, I A

    1998-06-01

    Quality of family interaction as a moderator of the relation between mothers and their adolescent children's sexual permissiveness was examined. Mothers were expected to be able to influence their children's sexual standards, but this effect was expected to be stronger when the family interaction was characterized by mutual understanding and respect. This hypothesis was tested by means of multiple-group structural equation modeling, with a sample of 323 adolescent-mother pairs that were representative of the Brighton and Hove (UK) area. The adolescents were 14 to 18 years old. The results supported our hypothesis that intergenerational transmission of values benefits from good mother-child relations. In addition, we found that socioeconomic status was less strongly related to adolescent permissiveness and age was more strongly related in high quality of interaction groups than in low quality of family interaction groups. Implications of the study are discussed.

  11. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions and control within a point absorber array on electrical output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nambiar, Anup J.; Forehand, David I.M.; Kramer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    and farms of WECs. The total power extracted by an array of WECs is influenced by the hydrodynamic interactions between them, especially when the WECs are spaced very closely. By control of the power take-off (PTO) forces and moments acting on the WECs within the array, the hydrodynamic interactions between......-domain, allows the use of constraints on the maximum PTO moment to be applied in order to make the study realistic. In this paper, the effects that PTO control has on the hydrodynamic interactions between the floats and on the total power generated by the device, when placed in a range of irregular sea states......, are studied. It was found that the performance of the three-float device improved as the sophistication of the PTO control strategy and the level of hydrodynamic interactions taken into account in the control problem increased. From among the different control strategies tested in this work, fully...

  12. The effect of peer tutoring on interaction behaviors in inclusive physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavina, Aija; Block, Martin E

    2008-04-01

    This study assessed the effect of peer tutoring on physical, instructional, and social interaction behaviors between elementary school age students with severe and multiple disabilities (SMD) and peers without disabilities. Additional measures addressed the activity time of students with SMD. The study was conducted in inclusive general physical education settings under three instructional support conditions for students with SMD: (a) teacher-directed, (b) peer-mediated, and (c) voluntary peer support. During peer-mediated and voluntary peer support conditions, the instructional and physical interaction behaviors between students with SMD and their peers increased, while social interactions remained low. The activity engagement time data increased for all target students throughout intervention sessions. Interactions between students with SMD and teachers decreased toward the end of intervention.

  13. Dynamic Flow Impacts Cell-Particle Interactions: Sedimentation and Particle Shape Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnmalm, Mattias; Faria, Matthew; Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Caruso, Frank

    2016-10-17

    The interaction of engineered particles with biological systems determines their performance in biomedical applications. Although standard static cell cultures remain the norm for in vitro studies, modern models mimicking aspects of the dynamic in vivo environment have been developed. Herein, we investigate fundamental cell-particle interactions under dynamic flow conditions using a simple and self-contained device together with standard multiwell cell culture plates. We engineer two particle systems and evaluate their cell interactions under dynamic flow, and we compare the results to standard static cell cultures. We find substantial differences between static and dynamic flow conditions and attribute these to particle shape and sedimentation effects. These results demonstrate how standard static assays can be complemented by dynamic flow assays for a more comprehensive understanding of fundamental cell-particle interactions.

  14. Effect of 3D fractal dimension on contact area and asperity interactions in elastoplastic contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeljalil Jourani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Few models are devoted to investigate the effect of 3D fractal dimension Ds on contact area and asperity interactions. These models used statistical approaches or two-dimensional deterministic simulations without considering the asperity interactions and elastic–plastic transition regime. In this study, a complete 3D deterministic model is adopted to simulate the contact between fractal surfaces which are generated using a modified two-variable Weierstrass–Mandelbrot function. This model incorporates the asperity interactions and considers the different deformation modes of surface asperities which range from entirely elastic through elastic-plastic to entirely plastic contact. The simulations reveal that the elastoplastic model is more appropriate to calculate the contact area ratio and pressure field. It is also shown that the influence of the asperity interactions cannot be neglected, especially at lower fractal dimension Ds and higher load.

  15. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Wada, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson’s disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system’s clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson’s disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1) preinteraction condition, (2) interaction condition, and (3) postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation. Trial Registration

  16. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Ken-Ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Wada, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson's disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system's clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson's disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1) preinteraction condition, (2) interaction condition, and (3) postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry

  17. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Uchitomi

    Full Text Available Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson's disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system's clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson's disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1 preinteraction condition, (2 interaction condition, and (3 postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation.UMIN Clinical

  18. Species-Specific Effects on Ecosystem Functioning Can Be Altered by Interspecific Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Clare

    Full Text Available Biological assemblages are constantly undergoing change, with species being introduced, extirpated and experiencing shifts in their densities. Theory and experimentation suggest that the impacts of such change on ecosystem functioning should be predictable based on the biological traits of the species involved. However, interspecific interactions could alter how species affect functioning, with the strength and sign of interactions potentially depending on environmental context (e.g. homogenous vs. heterogeneous conditions and the function considered. Here, we assessed how concurrent changes to the densities of two common marine benthic invertebrates, Corophium volutator and Hediste diversicolor, affected the ecological functions of organic matter consumption and benthic-pelagic nutrient flux. Complementary experiments were conducted within homogenous laboratory microcosms and naturally heterogeneous field plots. When the densities of the species were increased within microcosms, interspecific interactions enhanced effects on organic matter consumption and reduced effects on nutrient flux. Trait-based predictions of how each species would affect functioning were only consistently supported when the density of the other species was low. In field plots, increasing the density of either species had a positive effect on organic matter consumption (with no significant interspecific interactions but no effect on nutrient flux. Our results indicate that species-specific effects on ecosystem functioning can be altered by interspecific interactions, which can be either facilitative (positive or antagonistic (negative depending on the function considered. The impacts of biodiversity change may therefore not be predictable based solely on the biological traits of the species involved. Possible explanations for why interactions were detected in microcosms but not in the field are discussed.

  19. Species-Specific Effects on Ecosystem Functioning Can Be Altered by Interspecific Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, David S; Spencer, Matthew; Robinson, Leonie A; Frid, Christopher L J

    2016-01-01

    Biological assemblages are constantly undergoing change, with species being introduced, extirpated and experiencing shifts in their densities. Theory and experimentation suggest that the impacts of such change on ecosystem functioning should be predictable based on the biological traits of the species involved. However, interspecific interactions could alter how species affect functioning, with the strength and sign of interactions potentially depending on environmental context (e.g. homogenous vs. heterogeneous conditions) and the function considered. Here, we assessed how concurrent changes to the densities of two common marine benthic invertebrates, Corophium volutator and Hediste diversicolor, affected the ecological functions of organic matter consumption and benthic-pelagic nutrient flux. Complementary experiments were conducted within homogenous laboratory microcosms and naturally heterogeneous field plots. When the densities of the species were increased within microcosms, interspecific interactions enhanced effects on organic matter consumption and reduced effects on nutrient flux. Trait-based predictions of how each species would affect functioning were only consistently supported when the density of the other species was low. In field plots, increasing the density of either species had a positive effect on organic matter consumption (with no significant interspecific interactions) but no effect on nutrient flux. Our results indicate that species-specific effects on ecosystem functioning can be altered by interspecific interactions, which can be either facilitative (positive) or antagonistic (negative) depending on the function considered. The impacts of biodiversity change may therefore not be predictable based solely on the biological traits of the species involved. Possible explanations for why interactions were detected in microcosms but not in the field are discussed.

  20. Effect of taurine and potential interactions with caffeine on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    The major impetus behind the rise in energy drink popularity among adults is their ability to heighten mental alertness, improve physical performance and supply energy. However, accompanying the exponential growth in energy drink usage have been recent case reports and analyses from the National Poison Data System, raising questions regarding the safety of energy drinks. Most of the safety concerns have centered on the effect of energy drinks on cardiovascular and central nervous system function. Although the effects of caffeine excess have been widely studied, little information is available on potential interactions between the other active ingredients of energy drinks and caffeine. One of the active ingredients often mentioned as a candidate for interactions with caffeine is the beta-amino acid, taurine. Although taurine is considered a conditionally essential nutrient for humans and is thought to play a key role in several human diseases, clinical studies evaluating the effects of taurine are limited. However, based on this review regarding possible interactions between caffeine and taurine, we conclude that taurine should neutralize several untoward effects of caffeine excess. In agreement with this conclusion, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food published a report in March 2003 summarizing its investigation into potential interactions of the ingredients in energy drinks. At the cardiovascular level, they concluded that "if there are any interactions between caffeine and taurine, taurine might reduce the cardiovascular effects of caffeine." Although these interactions remain to be further examined in humans, the physiological functions of taurine appear to be inconsistent with the adverse cardiovascular symptoms associated with excessive consumption of caffeine-taurine containing beverages.

  1. Effective electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in the Hubbard-Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprea, G. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Di Castro, C. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Grilli, M. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail marco.grilli@roma1.infn.it; Lorenzana, J. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2006-06-12

    We investigate the interplay between the electron-electron and the electron-phonon interaction in the Hubbard-Holstein model. We implement the flow-equation method to investigate within this model the effect of correlation on the electron-phonon effective coupling and, conversely, the effect of phonons in the effective electron-electron interaction. Using this technique we obtain analytical momentum-dependent expressions for the effective couplings and we study their behavior for different physical regimes. In agreement with other works on this subject, we find that the electron-electron attraction mediated by phonons in the presence of Hubbard repulsion is peaked at low transferred momenta. The role of the characteristic energies involved is also analyzed.

  2. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders – an exploratory research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. Results An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks) and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG) to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on ‘Overall development score’, as well as on their ‘Fine motor development’, ‘Cognitive performance’ and ‘Cognitive verbal development’. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. Conclusions This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program. PMID:22537536

  3. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders: an exploratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Emílio; Nunes, Laura; Barros, Alexandra; Maroco, João; Salgueiro, Ana Isabel; Dos Santos, Manuel E

    2012-04-26

    Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks) and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG) to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on 'Overall development score', as well as on their 'Fine motor development', 'Cognitive performance' and 'Cognitive verbal development'. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program.

  4. Latent interaction effects in the theory of planned behaviour applied to quitting smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukkelberg, Silje Sommer; Hagtvet, Knut A; Kovac, Velibor Bobo

    2014-02-01

    This study applies three latent interaction models in the theory of planned behaviour (TPB; Ajzen, 1988, Attitudes, personality, and behavior. Homewood, IL: Dorsey Press; Ajzen, 1991, Organ. Behav. Hum. Decis. Process., 50, 179) to quitting smoking: (1) attitude × perceived behavioural control on intention; (2) subjective norms (SN) × attitude on intention; and (3) perceived behavioural control × intention on quitting behaviour. The data derive from a longitudinal Internet survey of 939 smokers aged 15-74 over a period of 4 months. Latent interaction effects were estimated using the double-mean-centred unconstrained approach (Lin et al., 2010, Struct. Equ. Modeling, 17, 374) in LISREL. Attitude × SN and attitude × perceived behavioural control both showed a significant interaction effect on intention. No significant interaction effect was found for perceived behavioural control × intention on quitting. The latent interaction approach is a useful method for investigating specific conditions between TPB components in the context of quitting behaviour. Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Learning from instructional explanations: effects of prompts based on the active-constructive-interactive framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelle, Julian; Müller, Claudia; Roelle, Detlev; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although instructional explanations are commonly provided when learners are introduced to new content, they often fail because they are not integrated into effective learning activities. The recently introduced active-constructive-interactive framework posits an effectiveness hierarchy in which interactive learning activities are at the top; these are then followed by constructive and active learning activities, respectively. Against this background, we combined instructional explanations with different types of prompts that were designed to elicit these learning activities and tested the central predictions of the active-constructive-interactive framework. In Experiment 1, N = 83 students were randomly assigned to one of four combinations of instructional explanations and prompts. To test the active effective in eliciting interactive learning activities than engaging prompts. In Experiment 2, N = 40 students were randomly assigned to either (1) a reduced explanations and inference prompts or (2) a reduced explanations and inference prompts plus adapted remedial explanations and revision prompts condition. In support of the constructive < interactive learning hypothesis, the learners who received adapted remedial explanations and revision prompts as add-ons to reduced explanations and inference prompts acquired more conceptual knowledge.

  6. The social-devaluation effect: Interactive evaluation deteriorates likeability of objects based on daily relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsunori eAriga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previous research has explored the effects of discussion on optimal and collective group outcomes, it is unclear how an individual's preference for an object is modulated by discussion with others. This study investigated the determinants of likeability ratings under two conditions. In Experiment 1, pairs of participants consisting of friends evaluated various photographic images. Under the interactive condition, the participants discussed their impressions of each image for 30 seconds and then independently rated how much they liked it. Under the non-interactive condition, the participants did not interact with each other but instead only thought about their impressions of each image for 30 seconds before rating its likeability. The results indicate that the exchange of impressions between the participants affected the individual likeability ratings of objects. More specifically, the interactive participants generally rated the images as less likeable than did the non-interactive participants (social-devaluation effect. However, in Experiment 2, the effect was eliminated when the pairs consisted of strangers. These findings suggest that shared information modulates individual preferences but only when a daily relationship exists within a group.

  7. Interactive effects of mycorrhizae and a root hemiparasite on plant community productivity and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Rissmann, Cornelia; Hempel, Stefan; Renker, Carsten; Buscot, François; Prati, Daniel; Auge, Harald

    2009-02-01

    Plant communities can be affected both by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and hemiparasitic plants. However, little is known about the interactive effects of these two biotic factors on the productivity and diversity of plant communities. To address this question, we set up a greenhouse study in which different AMF inocula and a hemiparasitic plant (Rhinanthus minor) were added to experimental grassland communities in a fully factorial design. In addition, single plants of each species in the grassland community were grown with the same treatments to distinguish direct AMF effects from indirect effects via plant competition. We found that AMF changed plant community structure by influencing the plant species differently. At the community level, AMF decreased the productivity by 15-24%, depending on the particular AMF treatment, mainly because two dominant species, Holcus lanatus and Plantago lanceolata, showed a negative mycorrhizal dependency. Concomitantly, plant diversity increased due to AMF inoculation and was highest in the treatment with a combination of two commercial AM strains. AMF had a positive effect on growth of the hemiparasite, and thereby induced a negative impact of the hemiparasite on host plant biomass which was not found in non-inoculated communities. However, the hemiparasite did not increase plant diversity. Our results highlight the importance of interactions with soil microbes for plant community structure and that these indirect effects can vary among AMF treatments. We conclude that mutualistic interactions with AMF, but not antagonistic interactions with a root hemiparasite, promote plant diversity in this grassland community.

  8. Effects of salting-in interactions on macromolecule diffusiophoresis and salt osmotic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Michele S; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-02-03

    Macromolecule diffusiophoresis (i.e., macromolecule migration induced by a salt concentration gradient) in water and salt osmotic diffusion (i.e., salt migration induced by a macromolecule concentration gradient) are two cross-diffusion mechanisms caused by macromolecule-salt interactions. We investigated the effect of salting-in interactions on the behavior of these two cross-diffusion mechanisms. Our results are distinct from those previously obtained in the case of salting-out interactions. Cross-diffusion was experimentally characterized by Rayleigh interferometry at 25 °C. Specifically, multicomponent diffusion coefficients were measured for a neutral polymer, polyethylene glycol (molar mass, 20 kg/mol), in aqueous solutions of three thiocyanate salts (NaSCN, KSCN, and NH₄SCN) as a function of salt concentration at low polymer concentration (0.5% w/w). Our results on salt osmotic diffusion, which were qualitatively different from those previously obtained for salting-out salts, were used to quantitatively characterize the strength of salting-in interactions. The behavior of polymer diffusiophoresis as a function of salt concentration and cation type reveals that polymer chains have an extrinsic negative charge, consistent with anion binding being the cause of salting-in interactions. To quantitatively examine the effect of anion binding on salt osmotic diffusion and polymer diffusiophoresis, we developed a theoretical model based on the linear laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for diffusion, the Scatchard binding model, and particle electrophoresis. This work contributes to the understanding of the multifaceted effects of molecular interactions on cross-diffusion mechanisms, salting-in interactions, and the Hofmeister series.

  9. The effectiveness of an interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics model for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battulga, Bayanmunkh; Konishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoko; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2012-07-09

    Medical students often have difficulty achieving a conceptual understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy, such as bone alignment, muscles, and complex movements, from 2-dimensional (2D) images. To this end, animated and interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) can provide better visual information to users. In medical fields, research on the advantages of 3DCG in medical education is relatively new. To determine the educational effectiveness of interactive 3DCG. We divided 100 participants (27 men, mean (SD) age 17.9 (0.6) years, and 73 women, mean (SD) age 18.1 (1.1) years) from the Health Sciences University of Mongolia (HSUM) into 3DCG (n = 50) and textbook-only (control) (n = 50) groups. The control group used a textbook and 2D images, while the 3DCG group was trained to use the interactive 3DCG shoulder model in addition to a textbook. We conducted a questionnaire survey via an encrypted satellite network between HSUM and Tokushima University. The questionnaire was scored on a 5-point Likert scale from strongly disagree (score 1) to strongly agree (score 5). Interactive 3DCG was effective in undergraduate medical education. Specifically, there was a significant difference in mean (SD) scores between the 3DCG and control groups in their response to questionnaire items regarding content (4.26 (0.69) vs 3.85 (0.68), P = .001) and teaching methods (4.33 (0.65) vs 3.74 (0.79), P < .001), but no significant difference in the Web category. Participants also provided meaningful comments on the advantages of interactive 3DCG. Interactive 3DCG materials have positive effects on medical education when properly integrated into conventional education. In particular, our results suggest that interactive 3DCG is more efficient than textbooks alone in medical education and can motivate students to understand complex anatomical structures.

  10. Shape of the liquid-vapor coexistence curve for temperature and density dependent effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amokrane, S; Bouaskarne, M

    2002-05-01

    The asymmetry of the coexistence curve that is observed in several micellar systems is discussed in relation with the dependence of the effective interaction on temperature and density. Standard results for the diameter of the coexistence curve in the van der Waals theory are generalized so as to deal with this combined dependence. The qualitative trends so deduced are assessed by comparison with coexistence curves of Yukawa fluids computed with integral equation theories. The role of the variables used to plot the coexistence curve and the nonlinear behavior of its diameter beyond the critical region are discussed in relation with the decrease of the interaction strength with density. The possibility of using the asymmetry of the coexistence curve as an indicator of the state dependence of the effective interaction is finally discussed.

  11. Effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) in a preschool setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R; Gershenson, Rachel A; Farahmand, Farahnaz K; Thaxter, Peter J; Behling, Steven; Budd, Karen S

    2009-11-01

    This research addressed the need for trained child care staff to support optimal early social-emotional development in urban, low-income, ethnic minority children. We evaluated effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), an approach adapted from Eyberg's Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). TCIT focuses on increasing preschool teachers' positive attention skills and consistent discipline in order to enhance children's psychosocial functioning and prevent mental health problems. A total of 12 teachers participated in small-group workshop sessions with in vivo coaching on their use of skills in the classroom. A multiple-baseline design across four classrooms (3 teachers each) evaluated effects of training on teacher behaviors during weekly classroom observations. Findings indicated systematic increases in trained skills during intervention, and consumer evaluations showed that the training was rated positively. Our results suggest that TCIT is a promising approach for enhancing positive teacher-child interactions in a preschool setting and should receive further investigation.

  12. High-precision measurement of isotope effects on noncovalent host-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2010-02-03

    The self-assembled supramolecular host [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) can bind cationic guest molecules to both the interior and exterior of the host assembly through noncovalent interactions. Very small equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) have been precisely measured for the association of benzyltrimethylphosphonium isotopologues to the host exterior surface by adapting an NMR titration method originally developed by the Perrin group for measuring isotope effects on acidity constants. Deuteration of the phosphonium methyl groups was found to have a larger EIE than deuteration at the ring and benzyl positions, suggesting subtle differences in the noncovalent interactions between the host exterior and different guest C-H/D bonds. The application of this method to the measurement of EIEs on noncovalent host-guest interactions demonstrates the generality of this NMR technique in precisely measuring relative equilibrium constants.

  13. Neighborhood structure effects on the Dynamic response of soil-structure interaction by harmonic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Dan-guang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For realizing the variation of structural dynamic characteristics due to neighbor structure in buildings group, the surface structure is idealized as an equivalent single degree of freedom system with rigid base whose site consists of a single homogeneous layer. Based on the model, a equivalent method on the equivalent seismic excitation is proposed. Then, the differences of seismic response and equivalent seismic input between soil - structure interaction (SSI system and structure -soil-structure interaction (SSSI system are investigated by harmonic analysis. The numerical results show that dynamic responses would be underestimated in SSSI system when the forcing frequencies are close to the Natural frequency if the effects of neighborhood structure were ignored. Neighborhood structure would make the translational displacement increase and rocking vibration decrease. When establishing an effective seismic input, it is necessary to consider the impact of inertia interaction.

  14. Interaction between drug and placebo effects: a cross-over balanced placebo design trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvi Syed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total effect of a medication is the sum of its drug effect, placebo effect (meaning response, and their possible interaction. Current interpretation of clinical trials' results assumes no interaction. Demonstrating such an interaction has been difficult due to lack of an appropriate study design. Methods 180 adults were randomized to caffeine (300 mg or placebo groups. Each group received the assigned intervention described by the investigators as caffeine or placebo, in a randomized crossover design. 4-hour-area-under-the-curve of energy, sleepiness, nausea (on 100 mm visual analog scales, and systolic blood pressure levels as well as caffeine pharmacokinetics (in 22 volunteers nested in the caffeine group were determined. Caffeine drug, placebo, placebo-plus-interaction, and total effects were estimated by comparing outcomes after, receiving caffeine described as placebo to receiving placebo described as placebo, receiving placebo described as caffeine or placebo, receiving caffeine described as caffeine or placebo, and receiving caffeine described as caffeine to receiving placebo described as placebo, respectively. Results The placebo effect on area-under-the-curve of energy (mean difference and sleepiness (geometric mean ratio was larger than placebo-plus-interaction effect (16.6 [95% CI, 4.1 to 29.0] vs. 8.4 [-4.2 to 21.0] mm*hr and 0.58 [0.39 to 0.86] vs. 0.69 [0.49 to 0.97], respectively, similar in size to drug effect (20.8 [3.8 to 37.8] mm*hr and 0.49 [0.30 to 0.91], respectively, and its combination with the later was larger than total caffeine effect (29.5 [11.9 to 47.1] mm*hr and 0.37 [0.22 to 0.64]. Placebo-plus-interaction effect increased caffeine terminal half-life by 0.40 [0.12 to 0.68] hr (P = 0.007. Conclusions Drug and placebo effects of a medication may be less than additive, which influences the interpretation of clinical trials. The placebo effect may increase active drug terminal half-life, a novel

  15. Colloidal particles at fluid interfaces: Effective interactions, dynamics and a gravitation-like instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleibel, J.; Domínguez, A.; Oettel, M.

    2013-11-01

    Colloidal particles of micrometer size usually become irreversibly trapped at fluid interfaces if they are partially wetted by one phase. This opens the chance to create two-dimensional model systems where the effective interactions between the particles are possibly influenced by the presence of the interface to a great extent. We will review recent developments in the quantitive understanding of these effective interactions with a special emphasis on electrostatics and capillarity. Charged colloids of micrometer size at an interface form effective dipoles whose strength sensitively depends on the double layer structure. We discuss the success of modified Poisson-Boltzmann equations with regard to measured colloidal dipole moments. On the other hand, for somewhat larger particles capillary interactions arise which are long-ranged and analogous to two-dimensional screened Newtonian gravity with the capillary length λ as the screening length. For colloidal diameters of around 10 micrometer, the collective effect of these long-ranged capillary interactions will dominate thermal motion and residual, short-ranged repulsions, and results in an instability towards a collapsed state for a finite patch of particles. Such long-ranged interactions with the associated instability are also of interest in other branches of physics, such as self-gravitating fluids in cosmology, two-dimensional vortex flow in hydrodynamics, and bacterial chemotaxis in biology. Starting from the colloidal case we develop and discuss a dynamical "phase diagram" in the temperature and interaction range variables which appears to be of more general scope and applicable also to other systems.

  16. Individual variability in clinical effect and tolerability of opioid analgesics - Importance of drug interactions and pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhaug, Vigdis; Molden, Espen

    2017-10-17

    As pain is often a comorbid condition, many patients use opioid analgesics in combination with several other drugs. This implies a generally increased risk of drug interactions, which along with inherent pharmacogenetic variability and other factors may cause differences in therapeutic response of opioids. To provide an overview of interactions and pharmacogenetic variability of relevance for individual differences in effect and tolerability of opioid analgesics, which physicians and other healthcare professionals should be aware of in clinical practice. The article was based on unsystematic searches in PubMed to identify literature highlighting the clinical impact of drug interactions and pharmacogenetics as sources of variable response of opioid analgesics. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism is an important process for both clinically relevant interactions and pharmacogenetic variability of several opioids. Concomitant use of CYP inhibitors (e.g. paroxetine, fluoxetine and bupropion) or inducers (e.g. carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin) could counteract the clinical effect or trigger side effects of analgesics in the same manner as genetically determined differences in CYP2D6-mediated metabolism of many opioids. Moreover, combination treatment with drugs that inhibit or induce P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), a blood-brain barrier efflux transporter, may alter the amount ('dose') of opioids distributed to the brain. At the pharmacodynamic level, it is crucial to be aware of the potential risk of interaction causing serotonergic syndrome when combining opioids and serotonergic drugs, in particular antidepressants inhibiting serotonin reuptake (SSRIs and SNRIs). Regarding pharmacogenetics at the receptor level of pain treatment, the knowledge is currently scarce, but an allelic variant of the μ1 opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene has been associated with higher dosage requirement to achieve analgesia. Drug interactions and pharmacogenetic differences may lead to

  17. Interactive Effect of Herbivory and Competition on the Invasive Plant Mikania micrantha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Xiao, Tao; Zhang, Qiong; Dong, Ming

    2013-01-01

    A considerable number of host-specific biological control agents fail to control invasive plants in the field, and exploring the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is important and helpful for the management of invasive plants. Herbivory and competition are two of the most common biotic stressors encountered by invasive plants in their recipient communities. We predicted that the antagonistic interactive effect between herbivory and competition would weaken the effect of herbivory on invasive plants and result in the failure of herbivory to control invasive plants. To examine this prediction, thus, we conducted an experiment in which both invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-jobi were grown together and subjected to herbivory-mimicking defoliation. Both defoliation and competition had significantly negative effects on the growth of the invader. However, the negative effect of 75% respective defoliation on the above- and below-ground biomass of Mikania micrantha was alleviated by presence of Coix lacryma-jobi. The negative effect of competition on the above- and below-ground biomass was equally compensated at 25%, 50% and 100% defoliation and overcompensated at 75% defoliation. The interactive effect was antagonistic and dependent on the defoliation intensity, with the maximum effect at 75% defoliation. The antagonistic interaction between defoliation and competition appears to be able to release the invader from competition, thus facilitating the invasiveness of Mikania, a situation that might make herbivory fail to inhibit the growth of invasive Mikania in the invaded community. PMID:23737942

  18. Interactive effect of herbivory and competition on the invasive plant Mikania micrantha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Li

    Full Text Available A considerable number of host-specific biological control agents fail to control invasive plants in the field, and exploring the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is important and helpful for the management of invasive plants. Herbivory and competition are two of the most common biotic stressors encountered by invasive plants in their recipient communities. We predicted that the antagonistic interactive effect between herbivory and competition would weaken the effect of herbivory on invasive plants and result in the failure of herbivory to control invasive plants. To examine this prediction, thus, we conducted an experiment in which both invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-job i were grown together and subjected to herbivory-mimicking defoliation. Both defoliation and competition had significantly negative effects on the growth of the invader. However, the negative effect of 75% respective defoliation on the above- and below-ground biomass of Mikania micrantha was alleviated by presence of Coix lacryma-jobi. The negative effect of competition on the above- and below-ground biomass was equally compensated at 25%, 50% and 100% defoliation and overcompensated at 75% defoliation. The interactive effect was antagonistic and dependent on the defoliation intensity, with the maximum effect at 75% defoliation. The antagonistic interaction between defoliation and competition appears to be able to release the invader from competition, thus facilitating the invasiveness of Mikania, a situation that might make herbivory fail to inhibit the growth of invasive Mikania in the invaded community.

  19. Interactive effect of herbivory and competition on the invasive plant Mikania micrantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Xiao, Tao; Zhang, Qiong; Dong, Ming

    2013-01-01

    A considerable number of host-specific biological control agents fail to control invasive plants in the field, and exploring the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is important and helpful for the management of invasive plants. Herbivory and competition are two of the most common biotic stressors encountered by invasive plants in their recipient communities. We predicted that the antagonistic interactive effect between herbivory and competition would weaken the effect of herbivory on invasive plants and result in the failure of herbivory to control invasive plants. To examine this prediction, thus, we conducted an experiment in which both invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-job i were grown together and subjected to herbivory-mimicking defoliation. Both defoliation and competition had significantly negative effects on the growth of the invader. However, the negative effect of 75% respective defoliation on the above- and below-ground biomass of Mikania micrantha was alleviated by presence of Coix lacryma-jobi. The negative effect of competition on the above- and below-ground biomass was equally compensated at 25%, 50% and 100% defoliation and overcompensated at 75% defoliation. The interactive effect was antagonistic and dependent on the defoliation intensity, with the maximum effect at 75% defoliation. The antagonistic interaction between defoliation and competition appears to be able to release the invader from competition, thus facilitating the invasiveness of Mikania, a situation that might make herbivory fail to inhibit the growth of invasive Mikania in the invaded community.

  20. Potential effect of cationic liposomes on interactions with oral bacterial cells and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Marika; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Negishi, Yoichi; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although oral infectious diseases have been attributed to bacteria, drug treatments remain ineffective because bacteria and their products exist as biofilms. Cationic liposomes have been suggested to electrostatically interact with the negative charge on the bacterial surface, thereby improving the effects of conventional drug therapies. However, the electrostatic interaction between oral bacteria and cationic liposomes has not yet been examined in detail. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavior of cationic liposomes and Streptococcus mutans in planktonic cells and biofilms. Liposomes with or without cationic lipid were prepared using a reverse-phase evaporation method. The zeta potentials of conventional liposomes (without cationic lipid) and cationic liposomes were -13 and 8 mV, respectively, and both had a mean particle size of approximately 180 nm. We first assessed the interaction between liposomes and planktonic bacterial cells with a flow cytometer. We then used a surface plasmon resonance method to examine the binding of liposomes to biofilms. We confirmed the binding behavior of liposomes with biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The interactions between cationic liposomes and S. mutans cells and biofilms were stronger than those of conventional liposomes. Microscopic observations revealed that many cationic liposomes interacted with the bacterial mass and penetrated the deep layers of biofilms. In this study, we demonstrated that cationic liposomes had higher affinity not only to oral bacterial cells, but also biofilms than conventional liposomes. This electrostatic interaction may be useful as a potential drug delivery system to biofilms.

  1. An ensemble learning approach jointly modeling main and interaction effects in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaogong; Zhang, Shuanglin; Wong, Man-Yu; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sha, Qiuying

    2008-05-01

    Complex diseases are presumed to be the results of interactions of several genes and environmental factors, with each gene only having a small effect on the disease. Thus, the methods that can account for gene-gene interactions to search for a set of marker loci in different genes or across genome and to analyze these loci jointly are critical. In this article, we propose an ensemble learning approach (ELA) to detect a set of loci whose main and interaction effects jointly have a significant association with the trait. In the ELA, we first search for "base learners" and then combine the effects of the base learners by a linear model. Each base learner represents a main effect or an interaction effect. The result of the ELA is easy to interpret. When the ELA is applied to analyze a data set, we can get a final model, an overall P-value of the association test between the set of loci involved in the final model and the trait, and an importance measure for each base learner and each marker involved in the final model. The final model is a linear combination of some base learners. We know which base learner represents a main effect and which one represents an interaction effect. The importance measure of each base learner or marker can tell us the relative importance of the base learner or marker in the final model. We used intensive simulation studies as well as a real data set to evaluate the performance of the ELA. Our simulation studies demonstrated that the ELA is more powerful than the single-marker test in all the simulation scenarios. The ELA also outperformed the other three existing multi-locus methods in almost all cases. In an application to a large-scale case-control study for Type 2 diabetes, the ELA identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms that have a significant multi-locus effect (P-value=0.01), while none of the single nucleotide polymorphisms showed significant marginal effects and none of the two-locus combinations showed significant two

  2. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are o...

  3. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  4. Signatures of medium effects on NN interactions in proton scattering from nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, K.; Dortmans, P.J.; Karataglidis, S.

    1995-11-13

    Effective two nucleon (NN) interactions in the nuclear medium have been defined from an accurate mapping of NN g matrices obtained by solving the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone (BBG) equations for infinite nuclear matter. Those effective interactions have been used in fully microscopic calculations of (nonlocal) effective proton-light nuclei interactions with which we have obtained predictions of the differential cross sections and analysing powers from elastic scattering. Results for incident proton energies of 65 and 200 MeV are considered in particular herein. The relative motion wave functions so found then have been used as the distorted waves in distorted wave approximation (DWA) studies of select inelastic scattering events. The same effective interactions were used as the transition operators in those calculations. The relevant nuclear spectroscopy for the elastic and DWA (p, p`) calculations has been found from full (0+2){Dirac_h}{omega} shell model evaluations of the nuclear structure; wave functions of which give good descriptions for many measured longitudinal, transverse electric and transverse magnetic form factors from electron scattering. 12 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiency in Indonesia : micronutrient interactions and effects of supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, M.A.; Wieringa, F.T.

    2001-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was concerned with vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiency in pregnant and lactating women and in infants. The effects of supplementation withβ-carotene, iron and zinc on micronutrient status, growth, pregnancy outcome and immune function, and interactions

  6. The interactive effects of belongingness and charisma on helping and compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, D.N.; de Hoogh, A.H.B.; Keegan, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    This study tests the main and interactive effects of belongingness and perceived charismatic leadership on 2 forms of organizational citizenship behavior (helping and compliance). In line with expectations, a study of 115 manager-subordinate dyads demonstrates that employees show more helping

  7. Social Presence and Interaction in Learning Environments: The Effect on Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kožuh, Ines; Jeremic, Zoran; Sarjaš, Andrej; Bele, Julija Lapuh; Devedžic, Vladan; Debevc, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    With the increased use of social media there is a growing interest in using social interaction and social presence in education. Despite this phenomenon, no appropriate methodology was found on effective integrating of both concepts into online learning. In this study, we propose integrating two different kinds of learning tools to provide social…

  8. The Effect of Interactive Technology on Informal Learning and Performance in a Social Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    This study is based on a qualitative multiple case study research design using a mixed methods approach to provide insight into the effect of interactive technology on informal learning and performance in a social business setting inhabited by knowledge workers. The central phenomenon examined is the variance in behavioral intention towards…

  9. Explaining the Effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method for Managing Interpersonal Interactions across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Hanako; Pusina, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of intercultural education comes from the limited availability of training efficacy studies. The present study focused on explaining the effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method (CCM) as an intercultural education method for managing interpersonal interactions across cultures between graduate…

  10. Interactive Effects of Menarcheal Status and Dating on Dieting and Disordered Eating among Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauffman, Elizabeth; Steinberg, Laurence

    1996-01-01

    Examined effects of three different aspects of heterosocial activity--mixed-sex activities, dating, and physical involvement with boys--on the diet patterns of adolescent girls. Found interaction between dating and menarcheal status in the prediction of dieting and disordered eating, with dating more strongly linked to dieting and disordered…

  11. Effects of Endosulfan on Predator–Prey Interactions Between Catfish and Schistosoma Host Snails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monde, Concillia; Syampungani, Stephen; Brink, van den Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the pesticide endosulfan on predator–prey interactions between catfish and Schistosoma host snails was assessed in static tank experiments. Hybrid catfish (Clarias gariepinus × C. ngamensis) and Bulinus globosus were subjected to various endosulfan concentrations including an

  12. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  13. Equality versus differentiation: the effects of power dispersion on group interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greer, L.L.; van Kleef, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Power is an inherent characteristic of social interaction, yet research has yet to fully explain what power and power dispersion may mean for conflict resolution in work groups. We found in a field study of 42 organizational work groups and a laboratory study of 40 negotiating dyads that the effects

  14. The Effect of Hydration on the Cation-π Interaction Between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Effect of Hydration on the Cation-π Interaction Between Benzene and Various Cations. VIKASH DHINDHWALa and N SATHYAMURTHYa,b,∗. aDepartment of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali,. SAS Nagar Manauli, Punjab 140 306, India. bDepartment of Chemistry, Indian Institute ...

  15. Responses of plant phenology, growth, defense, and reproduction to interactive effects of warming and insect herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Nathan P; Doublet, Dejeanne; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Burkepile, Deron E; Parker, John D

    2017-07-01

    Climate warming can modify plant reproductive fitness through direct and indirect pathways. Direct effects include temperature-driven impacts on growth, reproduction, and secondary metabolites. Indirect effects may manifest through altered species interactions, including herbivory, although studies comparing the interactive effects of warming and herbivory are few. We used experimental warming combined with herbivore exclusion cages to assess the interactive effects of climate warming and herbivory by Popillia japonica, the Japanese beetle, on flowering phenology, growth, defense, and lifetime reproduction of a biennial herb, Oenothera biennis. Regardless of temperature, herbivory delayed flowering phenology and, surprisingly, led to decreased levels of foliar defenses. At ambient temperatures, plants were able to compensate for herbivory by producing smaller seeds and increasing total seed production, leading to similar investment in seed biomass for plants exposed to and protected from herbivores. At elevated temperatures, plants had elevated total seed production, but herbivory had negligible impacts on flower and fruit production, and total lifetime seed biomass was highest in plants exposed to herbivores in warmed conditions. We speculate that warming induced a stress response in O. biennis resulting from low soil moisture, which in turn led to an increase in seed number at the expense of maternal investment in each seed. Plant-insect interactions might therefore shift appreciably under future climates, and ecologists must consider both temperature and herbivory when attempting to assess the ramifications of climate warming on plant populations. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. SMART in mathematics? Exploring the Effectiveness of Teaching with the Interactive Whiteboard.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabus, Sofie; Haelermans, Carla; Franken, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of in-class level differentiation by making innovative use of an interactive whiteboard (SMARTboard) on math proficiency. Therefore, we evaluate the use of SMARTboard in class, in combination with teacher training, using a randomized field experiment among 199

  17. Effects of Genotype by Environment Interactions on Milk Yield, Energy Balance, and Protein Balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerda, B.; Ouweltjes, W.; Sebek, L.B.J.; Windig, J.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in genetic merit for milk yield are associated with increases in mobilization of body reserves. This study assessed the effects of genotype by environment (GxE) interactions on milk yield and energy and protein balances. Heifers (n = 100) with high or low genetic merit for milk yield were

  18. Interactive Effect of Air-Water Ratio and Temperature on the Air ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High cost of pilot scale studies has led engineers to use simulation to study the factors that affect process performance. This study focuses on the interactive effect of air-water ratio and temperature on the removal of volatile organic compounds from polluted water using packed column air stripper taking benzene as a case ...

  19. Size-effects at a crack-tip interacting with a number of voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    A strain gradient plasticity theory is used to analyse the growth of discretely represented voids in front of a blunting crack tip, in order to study the influence of size effects on two competing mechanisms of crack growth. For a very small void volume fraction the crack tip tends to interact...

  20. The Interaction Effects of Gender, Race, and Marital Status on Faculty Salaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutkoushian, Robert K.; Bellas, Marcia L.; Moore, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Large national surveys of faculty afford analysts the opportunity to examine differences in faculty salary based on combinations of all three dimensions--gender, race/ethnicity, and marital status--as well as the possible interactive effects among them. In this study, the authors used data from the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty…

  1. The Detection and Interpretation of Interaction Effects between Continuous Variables in Multiple Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, James; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Issues in the detection and interpretation of interaction effects between quantitative variables in multiple regression analysis are discussed. Recent discussions associated with problems of multicollinearity are reviewed in the context of the conditional nature of multiple regression with product terms. (TJH)

  2. Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) among Chinese Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty; Yiu, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) among Chinese parents and children in Hong Kong with significant behavior problems. Method: The participants (intervention group, 48; comparison group, 62) completed questionnaires on child behavior problems and parenting stress before and after…

  3. Peer Groups and Substance Use: Examining the Direct and Interactive Effect of Leisure Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic…

  4. Interactive effects of music and prefrontal cortex stimulation in modulating response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Farshad Alizadeh; Acevedo, Nicola; Illipparampil, Rosin; Fehring, Daniel J; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2017-12-22

    Influential hypotheses propose that alterations in emotional state influence decision processes and executive control of behavior. Both music and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of prefrontal cortex affect emotional state, however interactive effects of music and tDCS on executive functions remain unknown. Learning to inhibit inappropriate responses is an important aspect of executive control which is guided by assessing the decision outcomes such as errors. We found that high-tempo music, but not low-tempo music or low-level noise, significantly influenced learning and implementation of inhibitory control. In addition, a brief period of tDCS over prefrontal cortex specifically interacted with high-tempo music and altered its effects on executive functions. Measuring event-related autonomic and arousal response of participants indicated that exposure to task demands and practice led to a decline in arousal response to the decision outcome and high-tempo music enhanced such practice-related processes. However, tDCS specifically moderated the high-tempo music effect on the arousal response to errors and concomitantly restored learning and improvement in executive functions. Here, we show that tDCS and music interactively influence the learning and implementation of inhibitory control. Our findings indicate that alterations in the arousal-emotional response to the decision outcome might underlie these interactive effects.

  5. Towards Understanding the Two Way Interaction Effects of Extraversion and Openness to Experience on Career Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ridhi; Rangnekar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined potential two-way interaction effects of the Big Five personality traits extraversion and openness to experience on career commitment measured in terms of three components of career identity, career resilience, and career planning. Participants included 450 managers from public and private sector organizations in North…

  6. Project-Based Method as an Effective Means of Interdisciplinary Interaction While Teaching a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Irina Alekseevna; Kulbakova, Renata Ivanovna; Svintorzhitskaja, Irina Andreevna; Pilat, Larisa Pavlovna; Zavrumov, Zaur Aslanovich

    2016-01-01

    The article explains how to use a project-based method as an effective means of interdisciplinary interaction when teaching a foreign language on the example of The Institute of service, tourism and design (branch) of the North Caucasus Federal University (Pyatigorsk, Stavropol Territory Russia). The article holds the main objectives of the…

  7. An Essay on Interactive Investigations of the Zeeman Effect in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolsey, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an interactive module created through the Wolfram Demonstrations Project that visualizes the Zeeman effect for the small magnetic field strengths present in the interstellar medium. The paper provides an overview of spectral lines and a few examples of strong and weak Zeeman splitting before discussing the module in depth.…

  8. The effect of nature on social interactions in urban squares (Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the issues that have been considered in the urban space is improving the quality of these spaces. Using nature and its elements can play a role in promoting them and this role can be sought in the relationship between man, nature and identification of nature's effect on artificial environment and their interactions with ...

  9. When environmental factors become stressors: interactive effects of vermetid gastropods and sedimentation on corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Julie A; Gil, Michael A; Osenberg, Craig W

    2017-03-01

    Environmental stressors often interact, but most studies of multiple stressors have focused on combinations of abiotic stressors. Here we examined the potential interaction between a biotic stressor, the vermetid snail Ceraesignum maximum, and an abiotic stressor, high sedimentation, on the growth of reef-building corals. In a field experiment, we subjected juvenile massive Porites corals to four treatments: (i) neither stressor, (ii) sedimentation, (iii) vermetids or (iv) both stressors. Unexpectedly, we found no effect of either stressor in isolation, but a significant decrease in coral growth in the presence of both stressors. Additionally, seven times more sediment remained on corals in the presence (versus absence) of vermetids, likely owing to adhesion of sediments to corals via vermetid mucus. Thus, vermetid snails and high sedimentation can interact to drive deleterious effects on reef-building corals. More generally, our study illustrates that environmental factors can combine to have negative interactive effects even when individual effects are not detectable. Such 'ecological surprises' may be easily overlooked, leading to environmental degradation that cannot be anticipated through the study of isolated factors. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Effects of the Interaction of Caffeine and Water on Voice Performance: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Maria Claudia; Simpson, Kenneth O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this "pilot" investigation was to study the effects of the interaction of caffeine and water intake on voice as evidenced by acoustic and aerodynamic measures, to determine whether ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine and various levels of water intake have an impact on voice. The participants were 48 females ranging in age…

  11. The interventional effects of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions and interpersonal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He X

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli He,1 Wendian Shi,2 Xiangxiang Han,1 Nana Wang,1 Ni Zhang,1 Xiaoli Wang1 1Department of Psychology, Ningxia University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Psychology, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The study aimed to investigate the effects of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions, intragroup interactions, and complex understanding of others. A total of 50 freshmen not receiving any training in meditation intervention were randomly divided into the meditation group (25 subjects and the control group (25 subjects. The meditation group was implemented with group meditation intervention for 4 weeks, three times a week, about 30 minutes each time. The results revealed that the effect sizes in interpersonal interaction and complex understanding of others in the meditation group were both above 0.8, indicating strong effects. It was concluded that loving-kindness meditation can effectively improve positive emotions, interpersonal interactions, and complex understanding of others in college students. Keywords: positive emotions, intergroup interactions, loving-kindness meditation, positive rate, complex understanding of others 

  12. stimulus-organism-response (s-o-r) interaction effects of the sign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STIMULUS-ORGANISM-RESPONSE (S-O-R) INTERACTION EFFECTS OF THE SIGN LEARNING THEORY IN ACHIEVING MOTOR OUTCOMES. ... Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa ... The sign learning theory also holds secrets that could be exploited in accomplishing motor tasks. The several ...

  13. Genotype X Season interaction effects on the mortality rates of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotype X Season interaction effects on the mortality rates of the Nigerian local chicken and its crosses with the barred Plymouth rocks. FUC Mmerole, I Bratte, SI Omeje. Abstract. No Abstract. International Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development Vol. 7(1) 2006: 19-24. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  14. Effects and interactions of myostatin and callipyge mutations. I. Growth and carcass traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives were to document effects of the Texel myostatin mutation (MSTN) on growth, carcass, and meat quality traits and also test whether or not interactions with the callipyge mutation (CLPG) could be detected. Twelve rams heterozygous at both loci on the two different chromosomes were mated to ...

  15. The Effect of Teaching Supported by Interactive Whiteboard on Students' Mathematical Achievements in Lower Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaboylu, Ceren; Demir, Ergül

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of using the interactive whiteboard in mathematics teaching process on the 7th-grade students' achievement. This study was conducted as experimental design. Experimental and control groups were composed of 58 7th-grade students from one school in the 2015-2016 educational year in Ankara. As a…

  16. The Interactive Effects of Marital Conflict and Divorce on Parent-Adult Children's Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyi; Pettit, Gregory S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Bates, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines main effect and interactive models of the relations between marital conflict, divorce, and parent-adult child relationships and gender differences in these relations. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study of a community sample (N = 585). Parental marital conflict and divorce were measured from age 5 through age 17 years.…

  17. Teaching Play Skills to Visually Impaired Preschool Children: Its Effect on Social Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaydin, Latife

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effects that teaching visually impaired (VI) preschool children play skills has on their abilities to initialize and respond to social interactions with their typically developing (TD) peers in a reverse mainstreaming preschool class. The subjects of the study were three female VI students regularly attending…

  18. Assessment of gene-by-sex interaction effect on bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Estrada, Karol; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in various bone phenotypes, including bone mineral density (BMD), is widely observed; however, the extent to which genes explain these sex differences is unclear. To identify variants with different effects by sex, we examined gene-by-sex autosomal interactions genome-wide, and ...

  19. Interactive Effects of Work Group and Organizational Identification on Job Satisfaction and Extra-Role Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dick, Rolf; van Knippenberg, Daan; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Hertel, Guido; Wieseke, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Past research has focused on the differential relationships of organizational and work group identification with attitudes and behavior. However, no systematic effort has been undertaken yet to explore interactive effects "between" these foci of identification. We predicted that in cases of positive overlap of identifications (i.e. high work group…

  20. Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Learning Package in Developing Attitude towards Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulakshmi, P.; Veliappan, A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effectiveness of an interactive multimedia learning package in developing attitude towards Mathematics. After establishing homogeneity with reference to the students' quarterly marks in Mathematics and the scores of intelligence test, they were divided into 21 learners in control group and 21…

  1. The Effects of Variations in Lesson Control and Practice on Learning from Interactive Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannafin, Michael J.; Colamaio, MaryAnne E.

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of variations in lesson control and practice on the learning of facts, procedures, and problem-solving skills during interactive video instruction focuses on a study of graduates and advanced level undergraduates learning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Embedded questioning methods and posttests used are described.…

  2. Interaction of crude oil and manure treatments and its effects on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interaction of crude oil and manure treatments and its effects on the agronomic characteristics of maize (Zea mays l.) M.O Onu, N.C Ohazurike, D.K Madukwe. Abstract. An experiment was conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Imo State, University, Owerri ...

  3. Interactive Whiteboard and Virtual Learning Environment Combined: Effects on Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, I.; Kuiper, E.; Meijer, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of the combined use of an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a virtual learning environment (VLE) on mathematics performance and motivation. Lessons taught with an IWB were made available on the VLE, so that they could be consulted regardless of time and place. Students' mathematics performance was monitored…

  4. Interactive whiteboard and virtual learning environment combined: effects on mathematics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, I.; Kuiper, E.; Meijer, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of the combined use of an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a virtual learning environment (VLE) on mathematics performance and motivation. Lessons taught with an IWB were made available on the VLE, so that they could be consulted regardless of time and place.

  5. Testing the Effectiveness of Interactive Multimedia for Library-User Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Karen; Armstrong, Annie; De Groote, Sandy; Fosmire, Michael; Fuderer, Laura; Garrett, Kelly; Georgas, Helen; Sharp, Linda; Smith, Cheri; Spaly, Michael; Warner, Joni E.

    2005-01-01

    A test of the effectiveness of interactive multimedia Web sites demonstrates that library users' topic knowledge was significantly greater after visiting the sites than before. Library users want more such sites about library services, their majors, and campus life generally. Librarians describe the roles they want to play on multimedia production…

  6. The Interactive Effects of Counselor Gender, Physical Attractiveness and Status on Client Self-Disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunin, Carla C.; Rodin, Miriam J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated client self-disclosure and client perception of counselors. Subjects rated counselors on intelligence and empathy, and while role-playing clients in therapy. Clients disclosed more to male counselors when counselors were high in status or attractiveness. Suggests the effect of counselor gender depends on an interaction with other…

  7. Effect of glassy versus crystalline starting materials on andesite-water interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, R.N. (Stanford Univ., CA); Liou, J.G.; Dickson, F.W.; Campbell, A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Depth- or laterally-zoned zeolite assemblagess as alteration products of volcanic glass are common in hydrothermal, diagenetic, and alkaline lake environments. In order to better understand their occurrences and parageneses, a series of hydrothermal experiments were performed to determine the effect of the presence of glass on alteration assemblages and solution compositions during water-rock interaction.

  8. Interactive effects of dietary crude protein and fermentable carbohydrate levels on odour from pig manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, D.P.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary levels of crude protein (CP) and levels of fermentable carbohydrates (FC) and their interaction on odour emission, odour intensity, odour hedonic tone, and ammonia emission from pig manure, and manure characteristics. An experiment

  9. Specific ion effects on the hydrophobic interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobberschütz, Sören; Pedersen, Morten Rimmen; Hassenkam, Tue

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of aromatic compounds with various ions in aqueous solutions plays a role in a number of fields, as diverse as protein folding and enhanced oil recovery, among others. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of the four electrolytes, KCl, NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2, on the hydrophobic...

  10. Effects of non-ionic surfactants on the interactions between cellulases and tannic acid: a model system for cellulase-poly-phenol interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S N; Bohlin, C; Murphy, L; Borch, K; McFarland, K C; Sweeny, M D; Westh, P

    2011-09-10

    Addition of non-ionic surfactants (NIS) is known to accelerate enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis. The mechanism behind this accelerating effect is still not elucidated but has been hypothesized to originate from favorable NIS-lignin interactions which alleviate non-productive adsorption of cellulases to lignin. In the current work we address this hypothesis using tannic acid (TAN) as a general poly-phenolic model compound (for lignin and soluble phenolics) and measure the mutual interactions of cellulases (CBHI, CBHII, EGI, EGII and BG), TAN and NIS (Triton X-100) using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The experimental results suggest rather strong enzyme-specific interactions with TAN in reasonable agreement with enzyme specific lignin inhibition found in the literature. Enzyme-TAN interactions were disrupted by the presence of NIS by a mechanism of strong TAN-NIS interaction. The presence of NIS also alleviated the inhibitory effect of TAN on cellulase activity. All together the current work provides strong indications that favorable NIS-poly-phenol interactions alleviate non-productive cellulase-poly-phenol interactions and hence may provide a mechanism for the accelerating effect of NIS on lignocellulose hydrolysis. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Geographical Variations in the Interaction of Relative Age Effects in Youth and Adult Elite Soccer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingröver, Christina; Wattie, Nick; Baker, Joseph; Helsen, Werner F.; Schorer, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Selection biases based on the use of cut-off dates and the timing of athletes’ birthdates have been termed relative age effects. These effects have been shown to differentially affect individuals involved in sport. For example, young male soccer players born early in their age group are overrepresented in elite teams while studies in adult soccer indicated potential carry-over effects from talent development systems. This two-study approach focuses on the processes within multi-year age groups in youth and adult elite soccer and on the role of players’ age position within the age band with regard to players’ birth year and birth month. Study 1 tests for an interaction of two different types of relative age effects among data from participants in the last five Under-17 FIFA World Cups (2007–2015). Analyses revealed a significant global within-year effect and varying birthdate distributions were found between confederations. Even stronger effects were found for constituent year effects. For the total sample, a multi-way frequency analysis (MFA) revealed an interaction with a pattern of a stronger within-year effect for the younger year group. This study highlights the need to consider interactions between different types of age effects. The main aim of Study 2 was to test for carry-over effects from previously found constituent year effects among players participating in the 2014 soccer World Cup and, therefore, to test for long-term effects of age grouping structures used during earlier stages of talent development. A secondary purpose of this study was to replicate findings on the existence of within-year effects and to test whether effects vary between continental confederations. No significant interaction between constituent year and within-year effects was shown by the MFA among the World Cup sample and previous findings on varying within-year effects were replicated. Results indicate that long-term effects of age grouping structures in earlier high

  12. Microstructure and rheology of particle stabilized emulsions: Effects of particle shape and inter-particle interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katepalli, Hari; John, Vijay T; Tripathi, Anubhav; Bose, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    Using fumed and spherical silica particles of similar hydrodynamic size, we investigated the effects of particle shape and inter-particle interactions on the formation, stability and rheology of bromohexadecane-in-water Pickering emulsions. The interparticle interactions were varied from repulsive to attractive by modifying the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Optical microscope images revealed smaller droplet sizes for the fumed silica stabilized emulsions. All the emulsions remained stable for several weeks. Cryo-SEM images of the emulsion droplets showed a hexagonally packed single layer of particles at oil-water interfaces in emulsions stabilized with silica spheres, irrespective of the nature of the inter-particle interactions. Thus, entropic, excluded volume interactions dominate the fate of spherical particles at oil-water interfaces. On the other hand, closely packed layers of particles were observed at oil-water interfaces for the fumed silica stabilized emulsions for both attractive and repulsive interparticle interactions. At the high salt concentrations, attractive inter-particles interactions led to aggregation of fumed silica particles, and multiple layers of these particles were then observed on the droplet surfaces. A network of fumed silica particles was also observed between the emulsion droplets, suggesting that enthalpic interactions are responsible for the determining particle configurations at oil-water interfaces as well as in the aqueous phase. Steady shear viscosity measurements over a range of shear stresses, as well as oscillatory shear measurements at 1Hz confirm the presence of a network in fumed silica suspensions and emulsions, and the lack of such a network when spherical particles are used. The fractal structure of fumed silica leads to several contact points and particle interlocking in the water as well as on the bromohexadecane-water interfaces, with corresponding effects on the structure and rheology of the emulsions

  13. Molecular Theory and the Effects of Solute Attractive Forces on Hydrophobic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B; Asthagiri, D; Tan, L; Pratt, L R

    2016-03-03

    The role of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions is studied by coordinated development of theory and simulation results for Ar atoms in water. We present a concise derivation of the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions, a derivation that clarifies the close relation of LMF theory to the EXP approximation applied to this problem long ago. The simulation results show that change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions diminishes the strength of hydrophobic bonds. For the Ar-Ar rdfs considered pointwise, the numerical results for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions are opposite in sign and larger in magnitude than predicted by LMF theory. That comparison is discussed from the point of view of quasichemical theory, and it is suggested that the first reason for this difference is the incomplete evaluation within LMF theory of the hydration energy of the Ar pair. With a recent suggestion for the system-size extrapolation of the required correlation function integrals, the Ar-Ar rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients B2. Those B2's also show that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. With attractive interactions in play, B2 can change from positive to negative values with increasing temperatures. This is consistent with the puzzling suggestions of decades ago that B2 ≈ 0 for intermediate cases of temperature or solute size. In all cases here, B2 becomes more attractive with increasing temperature.

  14. Equilibration in the Nosé–Hoover Isokinetic Ensemble: Effect of Inter-Particle Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamik Gupta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the stationary and dynamic properties of the celebrated Nosé–Hoover dynamics of many-body interacting Hamiltonian systems, with an emphasis on the effect of inter-particle interactions. To this end, we consider a model system with both short- and long-range interactions. The Nosé–Hoover dynamics aim to generate the canonical equilibrium distribution of a system at a desired temperature by employing a set of time-reversible, deterministic equations of motion. A signature of canonical equilibrium is a single-particle momentum distribution that is Gaussian. We find that the equilibrium properties of the system within the Nosé–Hoover dynamics coincides with that within the canonical ensemble. Moreover, starting from out-of-equilibrium initial conditions, the average kinetic energy of the system relaxes to its target value over a size-independent timescale. However, quite surprisingly, our results indicate that under the same conditions and with only long-range interactions present in the system, the momentum distribution relaxes to its Gaussian form in equilibrium over a scale that diverges with the system size. On adding short-range interactions, the relaxation is found to occur over a timescale that has a much weaker dependence on system size. This system-size dependence of the timescale vanishes when only short-range interactions are present in the system. An implication of such an ultra-slow relaxation when only long-range interactions are present in the system is that macroscopic observables other than the average kinetic energy when estimated in the Nosé–Hoover dynamics may take an unusually long time to relax to its canonical equilibrium value. Our work underlines the crucial role that interactions play in deciding the equivalence between Nosé–Hoover and canonical equilibrium.

  15. Shape and size effects in π-π interactions: face-to-face dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoyang

    2011-01-15

    The shape and size effects in π–π interactions of face-to-face dimers are discussed, by taking three typical groups of π-systems with different shapes (wave-linear, WL; ladder-shaped, LS; and regular-hexagonal, RH) and sizes (2 to 216 π-electrons) as samples, and carrying out a series of static scanning forcefield calculations. These effects are: (1) for differently shaped π-systems with a same quantity of π-electrons, the denser π-electrons lead to the stronger π–π interactions; (2) the interaction orientation, such as the interplanar distance, is controlled by not only van der Waals (vdW) but also electrostatic potential, even though the former is much stronger and has more contributions to total interaction energy than the latter. Furthermore, these interplanar distances are in a range determined by only monomer shapes, i.e., 3.6–4.1 Å for WL, 3.5–3.7 Å for LS, and 3.4–3.7 Å for RH; (3) a centroid-centroid distance corresponding to the global lowest vdW potential point of a dimer with two identical monomers is only determined by the monomer shape, i.e., 3.6, 3.5, and 3.4 Å, for WL, LS, and RH, respectively; (4) rotation will change the interaction energy when both two monomers with big sizes and low symmetries, and vice versa.

  16. Effective three-body interactions for bosons in a double-well confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyniecki, Jacek; Li, Xikun; Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Sowiński, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    When describing the low-energy physics of bosons in a double-well potential with a high barrier between the wells and sufficiently weak atom-atom interactions, one can, to a good approximation, ignore the high-energy states and thereby obtain an effective two-mode model. Here we show that the regime in which the two-mode model is valid can be extended by adding an on-site three-body interaction term and a three-body interaction-induced tunneling term to the two-mode Hamiltonian. These terms effectively account for virtual transitions to the higher-energy states. We determine appropriate strengths of the three-body terms by an optimization of the minimal value of the wave-function overlap within a certain time window. Considering different initial states with three or four atoms, we find that the resulting model accurately captures the dynamics of the system for parameters where the two-mode model without the three-body terms is poor. We also investigate the dependence of the strengths of the three-body terms on the barrier height and the atom-atom interaction strength. The optimal three-body interaction strengths depend on the initial state of the system.

  17. The effect of the protein corona on the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvio, Desirè; Maccarini, Marco; Parker, Roger; Mackie, Alan; Fragneto, Giovanna; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca

    2017-10-15

    It is known that nanoparticles (NPs) in a biological fluid are immediately coated by a protein corona (PC), composed of a hard (strongly bounded) and a soft (loosely associated) layers, which represents the real nano-interface interacting with the cellular membrane in vivo. In this regard, supported lipid bilayers (SLB) have extensively been used as relevant model systems for elucidating the interaction between biomembranes and NPs. Herein we show how the presence of a PC on the NP surface changes the interaction between NPs and lipid bilayers with particular care on the effects induced by the NPs on the bilayer structure. In the present work we combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (QCM-D) and Neutron Reflectometry (NR) experimental techniques to elucidate how the NP-membrane interaction is modulated by the presence of proteins in the environment and their effect on the lipid bilayer. Our study showed that the NP-membrane interaction is significantly affected by the presence of proteins and in particular we observed an important role of the soft corona in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of neonatal excitotoxic lesions in ventral thalamus on social interaction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Rainer; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Nullmeier, Sven; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schwegler, Herbert

    2017-03-30

    The role of the thalamus in schizophrenia has increasingly been studied in recent years. Deficits in the ventral thalamus have been described in only few postmortem and neuroimaging studies. We utilised our previously introduced neurodevelopmental animal model, the neonatal excitotoxic lesion of the ventral thalamus of Sprague-Dawley rats (Wolf et al., Pharmacopsychiatry 43:99-109, 22). At postnatal day (PD7), male pubs received bilateral thalamic infusions with ibotenic acid (IBA) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (control). In adulthood, social interaction of two animals not familiar to each other was studied by a computerised video tracking system. This study displays clear lesion effects on social interaction of adult male rats. The significant reduction of total contact time and the significant increase in distance between the animals in the IBA group compared to controls can be interpreted as social withdrawal modelling a negative symptom of schizophrenia. The significant increase of total distance travelled in the IBA group can be hypothesised as agitation modelling a positive symptom of schizophrenia. Using a triple concept of social interaction, the percentage of no social interaction (Non-SI%) was significantly larger, and inversely, the percentage of passive social interaction (SI-passive%) was significantly smaller in the IBA group when compared to controls. In conclusion, on the background of findings in schizophrenic patients, the effects of neonatal ventral thalamic IBA lesions in adult male rats support the hypothesis of face and construct validity as animal model of schizophrenia.

  19. Evidence for large-scale gene-by-smoking interaction effects on pulmonary function.

    OpenAIRE

    Aschard, H; Tobin, MD; Hancock, DB; Skurnik, D.; Sood, A; James, A.; Vernon Smith, A; Manichaikul, AW; Campbell, A; Prins, BP; Hayward, C; Loth, DW; Porteous, DJ; Strachan, DP; Zeggini, E

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Smoking is the strongest environmental risk factor for reduced pulmonary function. The genetic component of various pulmonary traits has also been demonstrated, and at least 26 loci have been reproducibly associated with either FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) or FEV1/FVC (FEV1/forced vital capacity). Although the main effects of smoking and genetic loci are well established, the question of potential gene-by-smoking interaction effect remains unanswered. Th...

  20. Using the design of simulation experiments to failures interactive effects analysis in process: a hypothetical case

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiano Leal; Dagoberto Alves De Almeida; José Arnaldo Barra Montevechi; Fernando Augusto Silva Marins

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a failures interactive effects analysis in a process, by means ofsimulations experiments. The chosen process is a hypothetical system, simulated throughsoftware Promodel®. Two conceptual models are generated, representing the system(mapping process) and the failures considered in system (Fault Tree Analysis). Theseconceptual models are translated in a computerized model, for the analysis of individual andcombined effects on the variable “number of produced pieces”. This exp...

  1. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders – an exploratory research

    OpenAIRE

    Salgueiro, Emílio; Nunes, Laura; Barros, Alexandra; Maroco, João; Salgueiro, Ana Isabel; dos Santos, Manuel E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. Results An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Au...

  2. Effect of three-spin interaction on thermal entanglement in Heisenberg XXZ model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing-Heng; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2017-11-01

    The effect of three-spin interaction k on thermal entanglement between alternate qubits is studied using pairwise concurrence C and energy-level diagram. It is found that k breaks the symmetry about the effect of magnetic field h on C. It shifts a dip structure and gradually effaces a boot structure when | k | | J | . A sudden change in the concurrence occurs around | k | =| J | , h=-k. Similar conclusions about nearest-neighbor qubits are directly given.

  3. The effects of different styles of interaction on the learning of evolutionary theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Akiko

    This study investigated the effects of different styles of social interaction on the learning of advanced biological knowledge. Recent research has increasingly acknowledged the importance of social interaction for promoting learning and cognitive development. However, there has been a controversy about the optimal style of interaction. Some studies have showed the beneficial effects of symmetrical interactions such as an argument between peers, whereas other studies have found the superiority of asymmetrical interactions in which a novice learn with the guidance of an expert. The reason for the contradictory results may be that different styles of interaction enhance different kinds of learning. The present study focused on the three styles of interaction; (1) Conflicting style, in which two novice students with scientifically wrong but conflicting views argue with one another, (2) Guiding style, in which a novice student is led by a more expert student to an understanding of scientifically appropriate knowledge, (3) Mutual Constructive style, in which an expert student and a novice student jointly solve a scientific problem on an equal footing. Sixty college students with non-biology-majors and 30 students with a biology major participated in this experiment to discuss an evolutionary problem in these three styles of interaction, with the former serving as novices and the latter as experts. Analyses of the Pre- and the Posttest performance and discussion processes in the Interaction session revealed the following. First, the Guiding style and the Mutual Constructive style enhanced the acquisition of the scientific evolutionary conceptual framework more effectively than the Conflicting style. However, some students in the Conflicting style also grasped the scientific evolutionary framework, and many students reconstructed their theories of evolution through discussion, even if the frameworks remained scientifically inappropriate. Second, the students who discussed

  4. Interaction between Allee effects caused by organism-environment feedback and by other ecological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lijuan; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Wanxiong; Song, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    Understanding Allee effect has crucial importance for ecological conservation and management because it is strongly related to population extinction. Due to various ecological mechanisms accounting for Allee effect, it is necessary to study the influence of multiple Allee effects on the dynamics and persistence of population. We here focus on organism-environment feedback which can incur strong, weak, and fatal Allee effect (AE-by-OEF), and further examine their interaction with the Allee effects caused by other ecological mechanisms (AE-by-OM). The results show that multiple Allee effects largely increase the extinction risk of population either due to the enlargement of Allee threshold or the change of inherent characteristic of Allee effect, and such an increase will be enhanced dramatically with increasing the strength of individual Allee effects. Our simulations explicitly considering spatial structure also demonstrate that local interaction among habitat patches can greatly mitigate such superimposed Allee effects as well as individual Allee effect. This implies that spatially structurized habitat could play an important role in ecological conservation and management.

  5. Origin of Substituent Effects in Edge-to-Face Aryl-Aryl Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Steven E.; Houk, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Substituent effects in the edge-to-face configuration of the benzene dimer have been studied using modern density functional theory. An accurate interaction potential energy curve has been computed for the unsubstituted dimer using ab initio methods with large basis sets. The recommended binding energy for the edge-to-face benzene dimer is 2.31 kcal mol-1, estimated at the counterpoise-corrected CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. For both edge-ring and face-ring-substituted dimers, interact...

  6. Effect of van der Waals interactions on the structural and elastic properties of black phosphorus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appalakondaiah, S.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Lebègue, S.

    2012-01-01

    (GGA), and with several dispersion corrections to include van der Waals interactions. It is found that the dispersion corrections improve the lattice parameters over LDA and GGA in comparison with experimental results. The calculations reproduce well the experimental trends under pressure and show...... that van der Waals interactions are most important for the crystallographic b axis in the sense that they have the largest effect on the bonding between the phosphorus layers. The elastic constants are calculated and are found to be in good agreement with experimental values. The calculated C22 elastic...

  7. Disruptive effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic memory cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, J.; Cubukcu, M.; Cros, V.; Reyren, N., E-mail: nicolas.reyren@thalesgroup.com [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91767, Palaiseau (France); Khvalkovskiy, A. V. [Samsung Electronics, Semiconductor R& D Center (Grandis), San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, State University, Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Kuteifan, M.; Lomakin, V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); Apalkov, D. [Samsung Electronics, Semiconductor R& D Center (Grandis), San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    In order to increase the thermal stability of a magnetic random access memory cell, materials with high spin-orbit interaction are often introduced in the storage layer. As a side effect, a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) may arise in such systems. Here, we investigate the impact of DMI on the magnetic cell performance, using micromagnetic simulations. We find that DMI strongly promotes non-uniform magnetization states and non-uniform switching modes of the magnetic layer. It appears to be detrimental for both the thermal stability of the cell and its switching current, leading to considerable deterioration of the cell performance even for a moderate DMI amplitude.

  8. Optimizing Noncovalent Interactions Between Lignin and Synthetic Polymers to Develop Effective Compatibilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Nathan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are designed and completed to identify an effective polymeric compatibilizer for lignin polystyrene blends. Copolymers of styrene and vinylphenol are chosen as the structure of the compatibilizer as the VPh unit can readily form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the lignin molecule. Electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and neutron refl ectivity results demonstrate that among these compatibilizers, a copolymer of styrene and VPh with 20% 30% VPh most readily forms intermolecular interactions with the lignin molecule and results in the most well-dispersed blends with lignin. This behavior is explained by invoking the competition of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding and functional group accessibility in forming intermolecular interactions.

  9. Engineering the Dynamics of Effective Spin-Chain Models for Strongly Interacting Atomic Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Petrosyan, D.; Valiente, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional gas of cold atoms with strong contact interactions and construct an effective spin-chain Hamiltonian for a two-component system. The resulting Heisenberg spin model can be engineered by manipulating the shape of the external confining potential of the atomic gas. We...... find that bosonic atoms offer more flexibility for tuning independently the parameters of the spin Hamiltonian through interatomic (intra-species) interaction which is absent for fermions due to the Pauli exclusion principle. Our formalism can have important implications for control and manipulation...

  10. Contributions of Work-Related Stress and Emotional Intelligence to Teacher Engagement: Additive and Interactive Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida-López, Sergio; Extremera, Natalio; Rey, Lourdes

    2017-09-29

    This study examined the additive and interactive effects of role stress and emotional intelligence for predicting engagement among 288 teachers. Emotional intelligence and engagement were positively associated. Role ambiguity and role conflict showed negative associations with vigor and dedication scores. The interaction of role ambiguity and emotional intelligence was significant in explaining engagement dimensions. Similar results were found considering overall teacher engagement. Emotional intelligence boosted engagement when the levels of role ambiguity were higher. Our findings suggest the need for future research examining the impact of job hindrances on the links between emotional intelligence and teachers' occupational well-being indicators. Finally, the implications for emotional intelligence training in education are discussed.

  11. The effects of experimental warming on the timing of a plant-insect herbivore interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark; Sarfraz, Rana M; Myers, Judith H

    2015-05-01

    The phenology of many species is shifting in response to climatic changes, and these shifts are occurring at varying rates across species. This can potentially affect species' interactions and individual fitness. However, few studies have experimentally tested the influence of warming on the timing of species interactions. This is an important gap in the literature given the potential for different direct and indirect effects of temperature via phenological change. Our aim was to test the effects of warming on the western tent caterpillar (Malacosoma californicum pluviale). In addition to the direct effects of warming, we considered the two primary indirect effects mediated by warming-driven changes in its host plant, red alder (Alnus rubra): changes in resource availability due to phenological mismatch (i.e. changes in the relative timing of the interaction), and changes in resource quality associated with leaf maturation. We experimentally warmed egg masses and larvae of the western tent caterpillar placed on branches of red alder in the field. Warming advanced the timing of larval but not leaf emergence. This led to varying degrees of phenological mismatch, with larvae emerging as much as 25 days before to 10 days after the emergence of leaves. Even the earliest-emerging larvae, however, had high survival in the absence of leaves for up to 3 weeks, and they were surprisingly resistant to starvation. In addition, although warming created phenological mismatch that initially slowed the development of larvae that emerged before leaf emergence, it accelerated larval development once leaves were available. Therefore, warming had no net effect on our measures of insect performance. Our results demonstrate that the indirect effects of warming, in creating phenological mismatch, are as important to consider as the direct effects on insect performance. Although future climatic warming might influence plants and insects in different ways, some insects may be well adapted

  12. The Effect of Interactive Instruction in the Astro 101 Classroom: Report on a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Consiglio, D.; Schlingman, W. M.; Gonzaga, V.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted a national research study designed to determine the effect of interactive learning strategies on students' conceptual learning in general education astronomy courses (Astro 101). Nearly 4000 students at 31 institutions, (4-year and 2-year) around the country participated in the study. Our results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies independent of institution type or class size, and after controlling for individual student characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all categories of students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program, and Award No. 0847170, a PAARE grant funding the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  13. Performance Effects of Stakeholder Interaction in Emerging Economies: Evidence from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bandeira-de-Mello

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Firm survival in emerging economies is often related to having access to valuable resources that are in stakeholders‟ hands. However, the literature on strategy in emerging economies provides scant information on the efficiency of acquiring stakeholder resources and its effect on firm performance. We investigated the stakeholder interaction effects on performance of domestic firms competing in an emerging market (Wright, Filatotchev, Hoskisson, & Peng, 2005 from a contractual perspective (Williamson, 1985. We argue that interacting stakeholders in a contractual set yield synergistic governance structures that allow firms more efficient access to external resources. Using a sample of 267 firms in Brazil (secondary data, we explored different patterns in stakeholder contracting with community, government, top management, and employees. A three-stage analysis process was devised: cluster analysis, general linear model estimation and verification tests. Results suggest that stakeholder interaction has a positive impact on firm performance. The conjoint effect of government and community contracts was found to yield superior firm performance as they provide a basic structure for contracting with other interacting stakeholders.

  14. Mutualistic interaction between Salmonella enterica and Aspergillus niger and its effects on Zea mays colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbontín, Roberto; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium inhabits a variety of environments and is able to infect a broad range of hosts. Throughout its life cycle, some hosts can act as intermediates in the path to the infection of others. Aspergillus niger is a ubiquitous fungus that can often be found in soil or associated to plants and microbial consortia. Recently, S. Typhimurium was shown to establish biofilms on the hyphae of A. niger. In this work, we have found that this interaction is stable for weeks without a noticeable negative effect on either organism. Indeed, bacterial growth is promoted upon the establishment of the interaction. Moreover, bacterial biofilms protect the fungus from external insults such as the effects of the anti-fungal agent cycloheximide. Thus, the Salmonella-Aspergillus interaction can be defined as mutualistic. A tripartite gnotobiotic system involving the bacterium, the fungus and a plant revealed that co-colonization has a greater negative effect on plant growth than colonization by either organism in dividually. Strikingly, co-colonization also causes a reduction in plant invasion by S. Typhimurium. This work demonstrates that S. Typhimurium and A. niger establish a mutualistic interaction that alters bacterial colonization of plants and affects plant physiology. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Density-dependent effective baryon–baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.petschauer@ph.tum.de [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Haidenbauer, Johann [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Kaiser, Norbert [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Meißner, Ulf-G. [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Weise, Wolfram [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon–baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon–nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  16. Restoring fish ecological quality in estuaries: Implication of interactive and cumulative effects among anthropogenic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Nils; Borja, Angel; Chust, Guillem; Uriarte, Ainhize; Lepage, Mario

    2016-01-15

    Estuaries are subjected to multiple anthropogenic stressors, which have additive, antagonistic or synergistic effects. Current challenges include the use of large databases of biological monitoring surveys (e.g. the European Water Framework Directive) to help environmental managers prioritizing restoration measures. This study investigated the impact of nine stressor categories on the fish ecological status derived from 90 estuaries of the North East Atlantic countries. We used a random forest model to: 1) detect the dominant stressors and their non-linear effects; 2) evaluate the ecological benefits expected from reducing pressure from stressors; and 3) investigate the interactions among stressors. Results showed that largest restoration benefits were expected when mitigating water pollution and oxygen depletion. Non-additive effects represented half of pairwise interactions among stressors, and antagonisms were the most common. Dredged sediments, flow changes and oxygen depletion were predominantly implicated in non-additive interactions, whereas the remainder stressors often showed additive impacts. The prevalence of interactive impacts reflects a complex scenario for estuaries management; hence, we proposed a step-by-step restoration scheme focusing on the mitigation of stressors providing the maximum of restoration benefits under a multi-stress context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolomics Reveals Cryptic Interactive Effects of Species Interactions and Environmental Stress on Nitrogen and Sulfur Metabolism in Seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Castorani, Max C. N.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication of estuaries and coastal seas is accelerating, increasing light stress on subtidal marine plants and changing their interactions with other species. To date, we have limited understanding of how such variations in environmental and biological stress modify the impact of interactions...... among foundational species and eventually affect ecosystem health. Here, we used metabolomics to assess the impact of light reductions on interactions between the seagrass Zostera marina, an important habitat-forming marine plant, and the abundant and commercially important blue mussel Mytilus edulis....... Plant performance varied with light availability but was unaffected by the presence of mussels. Metabolomic analysis, on the other hand, revealed an interaction between light availability and presence of M. edulis on seagrass metabolism. Under high light, mussels stimulated seagrass nitrogen and energy...

  18. Risk assessment for complex chemical exposure in aquatic systems: the problem of estimating interactive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.S. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Biological Inst.

    1998-12-31

    The traditional, but little used, way of assessing effects of the interaction between known chemicals is to use factorial experimental designs. Such designs allow one to test for less than additive (antagonistic) and greater than additive (synergistic) effects. Whilst synergism can be demonstrated in such experiments the concentrations at which synergistic effects occur are extremely high and are unlikely to occur in nature. Recently developed techniques allow one to measure directly the effects of combined stressors in the field. These biological effect techniques range from tests on individual organisms to tests on communities. At the biochemical level the tests can indicate that the organism has been exposed to certain groups of chemicals (for example cytochrome P-450 enzymes responding to PAHs or metallothioneins responding to heavy metals). At the community level of organisation there are highly sensitive statistical techniques that indicate clearly the combined effect of stressors. The effects of oil exploration and production on benthic communities in the North Sea can be linked to concentrations of chemicals. However, such relationships are correlative and do not necessarily indicate cause and effect. Experiments are needed to test the hypotheses generated concerning the interactive effects of chemicals on the benthic species. The statistical analyses do, however, show which species have been affected and their relative sensitivity to chemical and physical disturbances. Such species are preferable to the traditional `laboratory weeds` usually utilised. (orig.)

  19. Ocean Emission Effects on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: Insights from Two Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Sorooshian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two case studies are discussed that evaluate the effect of ocean emissions on aerosol-cloud interactions. A review of the first case study from the eastern Pacific Ocean shows that simultaneous aircraft and space-borne observations are valuable in detecting links between ocean biota emissions and marine aerosols, but that the effect of the former on cloud microphysics is less clear owing to interference from background anthropogenic pollution and the difficulty with field experiments in obtaining a wide range of aerosol conditions to robustly quantify ocean effects on aerosol-cloud interactions. To address these limitations, a second case was investigated using remote sensing data over the less polluted Southern Ocean region. The results indicate that cloud drop size is reduced more for a fixed increase in aerosol particles during periods of higher ocean chlorophyll A. Potential biases in the results owing to statistical issues in the data analysis are discussed.

  20. Effects of media violence on viewers' aggression in unconstrained social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W; Wong, F Y; Chachere, J G

    1991-05-01

    This article provides a meta-analytic review of the experimental effects of media violence on viewers' aggression in unstructured social interaction. In the reviewed experiments, children or adolescents were exposed to violent or control presentations and their postexposure behavior was coded for aggression during spontaneous social interaction. Exposure to media violence significantly enhanced viewers' aggressive behavior when the findings were aggregated across studies, but the effect was not uniform across investigations. Only suggestive evidence was obtained concerning moderators of the effect: Marginally stronger relations were obtained in those studies using a cross-section of the normal population of children (vs. emotionally disturbed children) and in those studies conducted in laboratory settings (vs. other contexts).