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Sample records for viable metabolizing cells

  1. Of energy and survival incognito: a relationship between viable but non-culturable cells formation and inorganic polyphosphate and formate metabolism in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Issmat I; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative food-borne bacterium that can cause mild to serious diseases in humans. A variety of stress conditions including exposure to formic acid, a weak organic acid, can cause C. jejuni to form viable but non-culturable cells (VBNC), which was proposed as a potential survival mechanism. The inability to detect C. jejuni VBNC using standard culturing techniques may increase the risk of exposure to foods contaminated with this pathogen. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms and triggers governing VBNC formation. Here, we discuss novel mechanisms that potentially affect VBNC formation in C. jejuni and emphasize the impact of formic acid on this process. Specifically, we highlight findings that show that impairing inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) metabolism reduces the ability of C. jejuni to form VBNC in a medium containing formic acid. We also discuss the potential effect of poly-P and formate metabolism on energy homeostasis and cognate VBNC formation. The relationship between poly-P metabolism and VBNC formation under acid stress has only recently been identified and may represent a breakthrough in understanding this phenomenon and its impact on food safety.

  2. Lipogenic metabolism: a viable target for prostate cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Liang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells often depend on altered metabolism compared with their normal counterparts. [1],[2],[3],[4] As observed in 1924 by Otto Warburg, cancer cells show preferential glucose consumption by way of aerobic glycolysis while normal cells generally assume mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. [4] Another metabolic hallmark of carcinogenesis is altered lipid metabolism, whereby cancer cells may adopt enhanced de novo lipid production (lipogenesis. [1],[2],[3] Enhanced lipid metabolism is also observed in individuals with metabolic syndromes potentially a consequence of increasing popularity of the Standard American Diet, composed of high levels of saturated fats and carbohydrates. [5] A growing body of epidemiological data indicates a positive correlation between the occurrence of metabolic syndromes, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, type-2 diabetes and associated hyperinsulemia, with the aggressiveness of cancer. [6],[7],[8],[9] Remarkably, it is estimated that for every 1% reduction in saturated fats, replaced by polyunsaturated, there would be a 2%-3% reduction in cardiovascular disease. [10] Thus, it is conceivable that an equally remarkable attenuation in cancer progression might be achieved with such a reduction in lipid accumulation.

  3. Viable Cell Culture Banking for Biodiversity Characterization and Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Oliver A; Onuma, Manabu

    2018-02-15

    Because living cells can be saved for indefinite periods, unprecedented opportunities for characterizing, cataloging, and conserving biological diversity have emerged as advanced cellular and genetic technologies portend new options for preventing species extinction. Crucial to realizing the potential impacts of stem cells and assisted reproductive technologies on biodiversity conservation is the cryobanking of viable cell cultures from diverse species, especially those identified as vulnerable to extinction in the near future. The advent of in vitro cell culture and cryobanking is reviewed here in the context of biodiversity collections of viable cell cultures that represent the progress and limitations of current efforts. The prospects for incorporating collections of frozen viable cell cultures into efforts to characterize the genetic changes that have produced the diversity of species on Earth and contribute to new initiatives in conservation argue strongly for a global network of facilities for establishing and cryobanking collections of viable cells.

  4. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  5. Surface Charge Visualization at Viable Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Momotenko, Dmitry; Voyias, Philip D; Page, Ashley; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-09

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for quantitative nanoscale surface charge mapping of living cells. Utilizing a bias modulated (BM) scheme, in which the potential between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in an electrolyte-filled nanopipette and a QRCE in bulk solution is modulated, it is shown that both the cell topography and the surface charge present at cellular interfaces can be measured simultaneously at high spatial resolution with dynamic potential measurements. Surface charge is elucidated by probing the properties of the diffuse double layer (DDL) at the cellular interface, and the technique is sensitive at both low-ionic strength and under typical physiological (high-ionic strength) conditions. The combination of experiments that incorporate pixel-level self-referencing (calibration) with a robust theoretical model allows for the analysis of local surface charge variations across cellular interfaces, as demonstrated on two important living systems. First, charge mapping at Zea mays root hairs shows that there is a high negative surface charge at the tip of the cell. Second, it is shown that there are distinct surface charge distributions across the surface of human adipocyte cells, whose role is the storage and regulation of lipids in mammalian systems. These are new features, not previously recognized, and their implications for the functioning of these cells are highlighted.

  6. Inkjet printing of viable human dental follicle stem cells

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    Mau Robert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing technology has the potential to be used for seeding of viable cells for tissue engineering approaches. For this reason, a piezoelectrically actuated, drop-on-demand inkjet printing system was applied to deliver viable human dental follicle stem cells (hDFSC of sizes of about 15 μm up to 20 μm in diameter. The purpose of these investigations was to verify the stability of the printing process and to evaluate cell viability post printing. Using a Nanoplotter 2.1 (Gesim, Germany equipped with the piezoelectric printhead NanoTip HV (Gesim, Germany, a concentration of 6.6 ×106 cells ml−1 in DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS could be dispensed. The piezoelectric printhead has a nominal droplet volume of ~ 400 pl and was set to a voltage of 75 V and a pulse of 50 μs while dosing 50 000 droplets over a time of 100 seconds. The volume and trajectory of the droplet were checked by a stroboscope test right before and after the printing process. It was found that the droplet volume decreases significantly by 35% during printing process, while the trajectory of the droplets remains stable with only an insignificant number of degrees deviation from the vertical line. It is highly probable that some cell sedimentations or agglomerations affect the printing performance. The cell viability post printing was assessed by using the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test. The printing process was found to have no significant influence on cell survival. In conclusion, drop-on-demand inkjet printing can be a potent tool for the seeding of viable cells.

  7. Trypan blue dye enters viable cells incubated with the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus.

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    Seav-Ly Tran

    Full Text Available Trypan blue is a dye that has been widely used for selective staining of dead tissues or cells. Here, we show that the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus allows trypan blue staining of macrophage cells, despite the cells remaining viable and metabolically active. These findings suggest that the dye enters viable cells through the pores. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that trypan blue may enter viable cells. Consequently, the use of trypan blue staining as a marker of vital status should be interpreted with caution. The blue coloration does not necessarily indicate cell lysis, but may rather indicate pore formation in the cell membranes and more generally increased membrane permeability.

  8. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  9. The molecularly crowded cytoplasm of bacterialcCells : Dividing cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevors, J. T.; van Elsas, J. D.; Bej, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss the cytoplasm in actively growing bacterial cells contrasted with viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Actively growing bacterial cells contain a more molecularly crowded and organized cytoplasm, and are capable of completing their cell cycle resulting in cell

  10. Non-viable antagonist cells are associated with reduced biocontrol performance by viable cells of the yeast Papiliotrema flavescens against Fusarium head blight of wheat.

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    Microbially-based plant disease control products have achieved commercial market success, but the efficacy of such biocontrol products is sometimes deemed inconsistent. Improper processing of harvested microbial biomass or long-term storage can reduce the proportion of viable cells and necessitate t...

  11. Modelling the number of viable vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus passing through the stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Pielaat, A.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Model the number of viable vegetative cells of B. cereus surviving the gastric passage after experiments in simulated gastric conditions. Materials and Methods: The inactivation of stationary and exponential phase vegetative cells of twelve different strains of Bacillus cereus, both mesophilic

  12. Combining ethidium monoazide treatment with real-time PCR selectively quantifies viable Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blooi, Mark; Martel, An; Vercammen, Francis; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Detection of the lethal amphibian fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis relies on PCR-based techniques. Although highly accurate and sensitive, these methods fail to distinguish between viable and dead cells. In this study a novel approach combining the DNA intercalating dye ethidium monoazide (EMA) and real-time PCR is presented that allows quantification of viable B. dendrobatidis cells without the need for culturing. The developed method is able to suppress real-time PCR signals of heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores by 99.9 % and is able to discriminate viable from heat-killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores in mixed samples. Furthermore, the novel approach was applied to assess the antifungal activity of the veterinary antiseptic F10(®) Antiseptic Solution. This disinfectant killed B. dendrobatidis zoospores effectively within 1 min at concentrations as low as 1:6400. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A simple way to identify non-viable cells within living plant tissue using confocal microscopy

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    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell death is a normal process during plant development. Mutant plants may exhibit misregulation of this process, which can lead to severe growth defects. Simple ways of visualising cell death in living plant tissues can aid the study of plant development and physiology. Results Spectral variants of the fluorescent SYTOX dyes were tested for their usefulness for the detection of non-viable cells within plant embryos and roots using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The dyes were selective for non-viable cells and showed very little background staining in living cells. Simultaneous detection of SYTOX dye and fluorescent protein (e.g. GFP fluorescence was possible. Conclusion The fluorescent SYTOX dyes are useful for an easy and quick first assay of plant cell viability in living plant samples using fluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

  14. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

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    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  15. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, O.; Jager, V.C. de; Geene, R.T.; Alen-Boerrigter, I.J. van; Hazelwood, L.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kleerebezem, M; Smid, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this problem.

  16. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

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    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  17. Discrepancy between myocardial perfusion and fatty acid metabolism following acute myocardial infarction for evaluating the dysfunctional viable myocardium.

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    Biswas, Shankar K; Sarai, Masayoshi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Hishida, Hitoshi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    Following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) the area of myocardial perfusion and metabolism mismatch is designated as dysfunctional viable myocardium. (123)I-beta-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is clinically very useful for evaluating myocardial fatty acid metabolism, and (99)mTc-Tetrofosmin (TF) is a widely used tracer for myocardial perfusion. This study was designed to evaluate the degree of discrepancy between BMIPP and TF at the subacute state of AMI. Fifty-two patients (aged 59 ± 10 years; mean 46 years) with AMI were enrolled, and all of them underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients were classified according to ST-T change and PCI timing. (123)I-beta-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid and TF cardiac scintigraphy were performed on 7 ± 3.5 days of admission using a dual headed gamma camera. Perfusion and fatty acid metabolism defect were scored on a 17 segments model. The mean BMIPP defect score on early and delayed images were 16.67 ± 10.19 and 16.25 ± 10.40, respectively. The mean TF defect score was 10 ± 7.69. Defect score of BMIPP was significantly higher than that of the TF (P TF), and 5 (10%) patients showed matched defect (BMIPP = TF). Mismatched defect score (MMDS) was significantly higher in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) than that of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (P < 0.041; 95% CI 0.11-5.19). At the subacute state of AMI, most of the patients showed perfusion-metabolism mismatch, which represents the dysfunctional viable myocardium, and patients with STEMI showed higher mismatch. Copyright © 2012 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

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    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  19. Desiccation induces viable but Non-Culturable cells in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

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    Vriezen, Jan Ac; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus R

    2012-01-20

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a microorganism commercially used in the production of e.g. Medicago sativa seed inocula. Many inocula are powder-based and production includes a drying step. Although S. meliloti survives drying well, the quality of the inocula is reduced during this process. In this study we determined survival during desiccation of the commercial strains 102F84 and 102F85 as well as the model strain USDA1021.The survival of S. meliloti 1021 was estimated during nine weeks at 22% relative humidity. We found that after an initial rapid decline of colony forming units, the decline slowed to a steady 10-fold reduction in colony forming units every 22 days. In spite of the reduction in colony forming units, the fraction of the population identified as viable (42-54%) based on the Baclight live/dead stain did not change significantly over time. This change in the ability of viable cells to form colonies shows (i) an underestimation of the survival of rhizobial cells using plating methods, and that (ii) in a part of the population desiccation induces a Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC)-like state, which has not been reported before. Resuscitation attempts did not lead to a higher recovery of colony forming units indicating the VBNC state is stable under the conditions tested. This observation has important consequences for the use of rhizobia. Finding methods to resuscitate this fraction may increase the quality of powder-based seed inocula.

  20. Mathematical modelling of the viable epidermis: impact of cell shape and vertical arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Wittum, Rebecca

    2017-12-07

    In-silico methods are valuable tools for understanding the barrier function of the skin. The key benefit is that mathematical modelling allows the interplay between cell shape and function to be elucidated. This study focuses on the viable (living) epidermis. For this region, previous works suggested a diffusion model and an approximation of the cells by hexagonal prisms. The work at hand extends this in three ways. First, the extracellular space is treated with full spatial resolution. This induces a decrease of permeability by about 10%. Second, cells of tetrakaidecahedral shape are considered, in addition to the original hexagonal prisms. For both cell types, the resulting membrane permeabilities are compared. Third, for the first time, the influence of cell stacking in the vertical direction is considered. This is particularly important for the stratum granulosum, where tight junctions are present.

  1. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakovič, Milan; Švitel, Juraj; Bučko, Marek; Filip, Jaroslav; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Gemeiner, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Viable microbial cells are important biocatalysts in the production of fine chemicals and biofuels, in environmental applications and also in emerging applications such as biosensors or medicine. Their increasing significance is driven mainly by the intensive development of high performance recombinant strains supplying multienzyme cascade reaction pathways, and by advances in preservation of the native state and stability of whole-cell biocatalysts throughout their application. In many cases, the stability and performance of whole-cell biocatalysts can be highly improved by controlled immobilization techniques. This review summarizes the current progress in the development of immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts, the immobilization methods as well as in the bioreaction engineering aspects and economical aspects of their biocatalytic applications.

  2. IN-VITRO BIOREDUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM BY VIABLE WHOLE CELLS OF Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Dey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A chromium resistant and reducing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 was isolated from chromite mine overburden dumps of Orissa, India. Viable whole cells of this isolate was capable of completely reducing 100 µM Cr(VI in chemically defined MS medium within 28 h of incubation under batch cultivation. Reduction of chromate increased with increased cell density and was maximum at a density of 1010 cells/ml, but the reduction potential of the suspended cells decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration in the medium. Chromate reducing efficiency was promoted when glycerol and glucose was used as electron donors, while the optimum pH and temperature of Cr(VI reduction was found to be 7.0 and 35°C respectively. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Ni, Co and Cd, but not by Cu and Fe. Similarly, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, N,N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide (DCC, sodium azide and sodium fluoride were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while in presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol (2,4 DNP chromate reduction by SUK 1201 cells remained unaffected.

  3. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Damgaard

    Full Text Available Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC-fraction.Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA.Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013.60 donors (≥50 years old, self-reported medically healthy.Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35% of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53% of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively. Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5% or anaerobic (27.8% species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening.Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended.

  4. Increasing Vero viable cell densities for yellow fever virus production in stirred-tank bioreactors using serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Diogo A; Silva, Marlon V; Gaspar, Luciane P; Castilho, Leda R

    2015-08-20

    In this work, changes in Vero cell cultivation methods have been employed in order to improve cell growth conditions to obtain higher viable cell densities and to increase viral titers. The propagation of the 17DD yellow fever virus (YFV) in Vero cells grown on Cytodex I microcarriers was evaluated in 3-L bioreactor vessels. Prior to the current changes, Vero cells were repeatedly displaying insufficient microcarrier colonization. A modified cultivation process with four changes has resulted in higher cell densities and higher virus titers than previously observed for 17DD YFV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular bone matrices: viable stem cell-containing bone graft substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Cho, Samuel K; Iatridis, James C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell technology have stimulated the development and increased use of allogenic bone grafts containing live mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), also known as cellular bone matrices (CBMs). It is estimated that CBMs comprise greater than 17% of all bone grafts and bone graft substitutes used. To critically evaluate CBMs, specifically their technical specifications, existing published data supporting their use, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, cost, potential pitfalls, and other aspects pertaining to their use. Areview of literature. A series of Ovid, Medline, and Pubmed-National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) searches were performed. Only articles in English journals or published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. Specific technical information on each CBM was obtained by direct communication from the companies marketing the individual products. Five different CBMs are currently available for use in spinal fusion surgery. There is a wide variation between the products with regard to the average donor age at harvest, total cellular concentration, percentage of MSCs, shelf life, and cell viability after defrosting. Three retrospective studies evaluating CBMs and fusion have shown fusion rates ranging from 90.2% to 92.3%, and multiple industry-sponsored trials are underway. No independent studies evaluating spinal fusion rates with the use of CBMs exist. All the commercially available CBMs claim to meet the FDA criteria under Section 361, 21 CFR Part 1271, and are not undergoing FDA premarket review. The CBMs claim to provide viable MSCs and are offered at a premium cost. Numerous challenges exist in regard to MSCs' survival, function, osteoblastic potential, and cytokine production once implanted into the intended host. Cellular bone matrices may be a promising bone augmentation technology in spinal fusion surgery

  6. Metabolic control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalucka, Joanna; Missiaen, Rindert; Georgiadou, Maria; Schoors, Sandra; Lange, Christian; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a metabolically demanding process, requiring the production of large amounts of energy and biomass. Not surprisingly therefore, a cell's decision to initiate division is co-determined by its metabolic status and the availability of nutrients. Emerging evidence reveals that metabolism is not only undergoing substantial changes during the cell cycle, but it is becoming equally clear that metabolism regulates cell cycle progression. Here, we overview the emerging role of those metabolic pathways that have been best characterized to change during or influence cell cycle progression. We then studied how Notch signaling, a key angiogenic pathway that inhibits endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, controls EC metabolism (glycolysis) during the cell cycle.

  7. Combined bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry and Masson trichrome staining: facilitated detection of cell proliferation in viable vs. infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarous, D F; Shou, M; Unger, E F

    1992-09-01

    Cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle can be identified in tissue sections by immunohistochemical localization of the thymidine analogue bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Generally, a single counterstain is used to visualize the underlying tissue; however, interpretation of morphologic detail is often difficult. We have utilized BrdU to localize proliferating cells in myocardium exposed to angiogenic mitogens. To facilitate identification of labelled nuclei in the context of infarcted vs. viable myocardium, BrdU immunohistochemistry was followed by a modified Masson trichrome stain. The time of exposure to the counterstains and the wash protocol were re-revised, permitting clear identification of the labelled brown nuclei against a background of red viable myocardium vs. blue infarct. The combined technique also provides color contrast suitable for computer-based image analysis.

  8. Dysregulated metabolic enzymes and metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, Annapoorna; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2018-01-01

    Tumor cells carry various genetic and metabolic alterations, which directly contribute to their growth and malignancy. Links between metabolism and cancer are multifaceted. Metabolic reprogramming, such as enhanced aerobic glycolysis, mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolic enzymes, and dependence on lipid and glutamine metabolism are key characteristics of cancer cells. Understanding these metabolic alterations is crucial for development of novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategies. In the present review, the broad importance of metabolism in tumor biology is discussed, and the current knowledge on dysregulated metabolic enzymes involved in the vital regulatory steps of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, and lipid, amino acid, and mitochondrial metabolism pathways are reviewed.

  9. Quantitative assessment of viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum strains in single, dual and multi-strain biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Smid, Eddy J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2017-03-06

    Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum are a potential source for contamination and recontamination of food products. Although biofilms have been mostly studied using single species or even single strains, it is conceivable that in a range of environmental settings including food processing areas, biofilms are composed of multiple species with each species represented by multiple strains. In this study six spoilage related L. plantarum strains FBR1-FBR6 and the model strain L. plantarum WCFS1 were characterised in single, dual and multiple strain competition models. A quantitative PCR approach was used with added propidium monoazide (PMA) enabling quantification of intact cells in the biofilm, representing the viable cell fraction that determines the food spoilage risk. Our results show that the performance of individual strains in multi-strain cultures generally correlates with their performance in pure culture, and relative strain abundance in multi-strain biofilms positively correlated with the relative strain abundance in suspended (planktonic) cultures. Performance of individual strains in dual-strain biofilms was highly influenced by the presence of the secondary strain, and in most cases no correlation between the relative contributions of viable planktonic cells and viable cells in the biofilm was noted. The total biofilm quantified by CV staining of the dual and multi-strain biofilms formed was mainly correlated to CV values of the dominant strain obtained in single strain studies. However, the combination of strain FBR5 and strain WCFS1 showed significantly higher CV values compared to the individual performances of both strains indicating that total biofilm formation was higher in this specific condition. Notably, L. plantarum FBR5 was able to outgrow all other strains and showed the highest relative abundance in dual and multi-strain biofilms. All the dual and multi-strain biofilms contained a considerable number of viable cells, representing a potential

  10. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade.

  11. Viable cell yield from active dry yeast products and effects of storage temperature and diluent on yeast cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M L; Bradford, B J

    2011-01-01

    Active dry yeast (ADY) products are commonly fed in the dairy industry, but research regarding quality control for such products is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine yeast viability in field samples relative to manufacturers' guarantees (experiment 1), measure the effects of high-temperature storage on yeast viability (experiment 1), and determine the effect of vitamin-trace mineral (VTM) premix on yeast viability (experiment 2). Commercially available ADY products were acquired in triplicate through normal distribution channels and stored at 4°C upon receipt. Initial samples were evaluated for colony-forming units and compared with product label guarantees. Only 1 of the 6 products sampled in experiment 1 met product guarantees for all 3 samples. To determine effects of storage temperature and duration on viability, ADY samples were stored in an incubator at 40°C with ambient humidity for 1, 2, and 3 mo. High-temperature storage significantly decreased viability over the 3-mo period; approximately 90% of viable cells were lost each month. Three of the 5 products sampled in experiment 2 met product guarantees. Fresh samples of 4 of these 5 ADY products were mixed in duplicate with ground corn (GC) or a VTM premix to achieve a target concentration of 2.2×10(8) cfu/g. For each product, GC and VTM samples were stored at ambient temperature (22°C) and at an elevated temperature (40°C) for 2 wk. No differences in viable yeast count were observed between GC and VTM samples immediately after mixing or after storage at ambient temperature. Yeast viability in GC and VTM samples decreased during storage at an elevated temperature. There also was a significant interaction of diluent and storage temperature; VTM samples had higher cell viability than GC samples when subjected to high-temperature storage. Results suggest that (1) ADY products failed to consistently meet product guarantees; (2) viability of ADY products was greatly diminished during

  12. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  13. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs.

  14. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multi-parametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking of cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor as fragile dinoflagellates, such a...

  15. T cell metabolism and the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbist, Katherine C; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2012-12-01

    As T cells respond to pathogens, they must transition from a quiescent, naïve state, to a rapidly proliferating, active effector state, and back again to a quiescent state as they develop into memory cells. Such transitions place unique metabolic demands on the differentiating cells. T cells meet these demands by altering their metabolic profiles, which are, in turn, regulated by distinct signaling cascades and transcriptional programs. Here, we examine the metabolic profiles of T cells during an acute immune response and discuss the signal and transcriptional regulators of these metabolic changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Salmonella typhimurium Infection and Ofloxacin Treatment on Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism in Caco-2/TC-7 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Posho, Leta; Delbos-Bocage, Laurence; Gueylard, Delphine; Farinotti, Robert; Carbon, Claude

    1998-01-01

    The effects of both Salmonella typhimurium infection and 5 mM ofloxacin treatment on 2 mM glutamine and 5 mM glucose metabolism in the enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC-7 cell line were studied. These cells utilized glutamine (212.07 ± 16.75 [mean ± standard deviation] nmol per h per 106 viable cells) and, to a lesser extent, glucose (139.63 ± 11.52 nmol per h per 106 viable cells). Metabolism of these substrates in Caco-2/TC-7 cells resembled that in rat, pig, or human enterocytes. Infection by S. t...

  17. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success.

  18. A viable electrode material for use in microbial fuel cells for tropical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offei, Felix; Thygesen, Anders; Mensah, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC) since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC) obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction...

  19. Progress in emerging techniques for characterization of immobilized viable whole-cell biocatalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bučko, M.; Vikartovská, A.; Schenkmayerová, A.; Tkáč, J.; Filip, J.; Chorvát Jr., D.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2017), s. 2309-2324 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : bioelectrocatalysis * imaging techniques * immobilized whole- cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * online kinetics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  20. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovič, M.; Švitel, J.; Bučko, M.; Filip, J.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2017), s. 667-683 ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biocatalysis * immobilization methods * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * process economics * reaction engineering Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2016

  1. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-Time PCR Methodology for Selective Detection of Viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells by Targeting Z3276 as a Genetic Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive, specific, and accurate method for the selective detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in foods. A unique open reading frame (ORF), Z3276, was identified as a specific genetic marker for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. We developed a real-time PCR assay with primers and probe targeting ORF Z3276 and confirmed that this assay was sensitive and specific for E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 298). Using this assay, we can detect amounts of genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7 as low as a few CFU equivalents. Moreover, we have developed a new propidium monoazide (PMA)–real-time PCR protocol that allows for the clear differentiation of viable from dead cells. In addition, the protocol was adapted to a 96-well plate format for easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited, in contrast to the virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated viable cells. With beef spiked simultaneously with 8 × 107 dead cells/g and 80 CFU viable cells/g, we were able to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells with an 8-h enrichment. In conclusion, this PMA–real-time PCR assay offers a sensitive and specific means to selectively detect viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in spiked beef. It also has the potential for high-throughput selective detection of viable E. coli O157:H7 cells in other food matrices and, thus, will have an impact on the accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental sources. PMID:22635992

  3. B-Cell Metabolic Remodeling and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Grusdat, Melanie; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    of the current state of the art and describe the main metabolic features of B cells during normal development and oncogenesis, with emphasis on the major B-cell transcriptional and metabolic regulators, including myelocytomatosis virus oncogene cellular homolog (Myc) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α)....

  4. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA......), self-reported medically healthy. RESULTS: Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10...... of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended....

  5. A Viable Electrode Material for Use in Microbial Fuel Cells for Tropical Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Offei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrode materials are critical for microbial fuel cells (MFC since they influence the construction and operational costs. This study introduces a simple and efficient electrode material in the form of palm kernel shell activated carbon (AC obtained in tropical regions. The novel introduction of this material is also targeted at introducing an inexpensive and durable electrode material, which can be produced in rural communities to improve the viability of MFCs. The maximum voltage and power density obtained (under 1000 Ω load using an H-shaped MFC with AC as both anode and cathode electrode material was 0.66 V and 1.74 W/m3, respectively. The power generated by AC was as high as 86% of the value obtained with the extensively used carbon paper. Scanning electron microscopy and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE analysis of AC anode biofilms confirmed that electrogenic bacteria were present on the electrode surface for substrate oxidation and the formation of nanowires.

  6. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    .05). The protective effect of NaCl was reflected by viable-cell counts at a higher concentration of Incimaxx (0.0031%), where the salt-grown population survived better than the population grown without NaCl (P ... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  7. A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2015-08-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 were converted to culturable by coculture with eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, we isolated a factor converting VBNC V. cholerae to culturable (FCVC) from a eukaryotic cell line, HT-29. In this study, we purified FCVC by successive column chromatographies comprising UNO Q-6 anion exchange, Bio-Scale CHT2-1 hydroxyapatite, and Superdex 200 10/300 GL. Homogeneity of the purified FCVC was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. Nano-LC MS/MS analysis showed that the purified FCVC was a human catalase. An experiment of RNAi knockdown of catalase mRNA from HT-29 cells and treatment of the purified FCVC with a catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole confirmed that the FCVC was a catalase. A possible role of the catalase in converting a VBNC V. cholerae to a culturable state in the human intestine is discussed. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Drugs with anti-oxidant properties can interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Niraj; Stenson, Mary; Lawson, Joshua; Abeykoon, Jithma; Patnaik, Mrinal; Wu, Xiaosheng; Witzig, Thomas

    2017-02-27

    Cell viability assays such as Cell Titer Blue and Alamar Blue rely on the reducing property of viable cells to reduce the reagent dye to a product which gives a fluorescent signal. The current manufacture-recommended protocols do not take into account the possibility of the reagent substrate being reduced directly to the fluorescent product by drugs with an anti-oxidant property. After suspecting spurious results while determining the cytotoxic potential of a drug of interest (DOI) with known anti-oxidant property against a renal cell cancer (RCC) cell line, we aimed to establish that drugs with anti-oxidant property can indeed cause false-negative results with the current protocols of these assays by direct reduction of the reagent substrate. We also aimed to counter the same with a simple modification added to the protocol. Through our experiments, we conclusively demonstrate that drugs with anti-oxidant properties can indeed interfere with cell viability measurements by assays that rely on the reducing property of viable cells. A simple modification in the protocol, as elaborated in the manuscript, can prevent spurious results with these otherwise convenient assays.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.18.

  9. Correlated FLIM and PLIM for cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, A.; Breymayer, J.; Kalinina, S.

    2016-03-01

    Correlated imaging of phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetime parameters of metabolic markers is a challenge for direct investigating mechanisms related to cell metabolism and oxygen tension. A large variety of clinical phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial defects accomplished with changes in cell metabolism. In many cases the hypoxic microenvironment of cancer cells shifts metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to anaerobic or aerobic glycolysis, a process known as "Warburg" effect. Also during stem cell differentiation a switch in cell metabolism is observed. A defective mitochondrial function associated with hypoxia has been invoked in many complex disorders such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimers disease, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, tissue inflammation and cancer. Cellular responses to oxygen tension have been studied extensively, optical imaging techniques based on time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to detect the underlying metabolic mechanisms are therefore of prominent interest. They offer the possibility by inspecting fluorescence decay characteristics of intrinsic coenzymes to directly image metabolic pathways. Moreover oxygen tension can be determined by considering the phosphorescence lifetime of a phosphorescent probe. The combination of both fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of coenzymes like NADH and FAD and phosphorescence lifetime (PLIM) of phosphorescent dyes could provide valuable information about correlation of metabolic pathways and oxygen tension.

  10. A Novel Application for Low Frequency Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as an Online Process Monitoring Tool for Viable Cell Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Slouka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available New approaches in process monitoring during industrial fermentations are not only limited to classical pH, dO2 and offgas analysis, but use different in situ and online sensors based on different physical principles to determine biomass, product quality, lysis and far more. One of the very important approaches is the in situ accessibility of viable cell concentration (VCC. This knowledge provides increased efficiency in monitoring and controlling strategies during cultivations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy—EIS—is used to monitor biomass in a fermentation of E. coli BL21(DE3, producing a recombinant protein using a fed batch-based approach. Increases in the double layer capacitance (Cdl, determined at frequencies below 1 kHz, are proportional to the increase of biomass in the batch and fed batch phase, monitored in offline and online modes for different cultivations. A good correlation of Cdl with cell density is found and in order to get an appropriate verification of this method, different state-of-the-art biomass measurements are performed and compared. Since measurements in this frequency range are largely determined by the double layer region between the electrode and media, rather minor interferences with process parameters (aeration, stirring are to be expected. It is shown that impedance spectroscopy at low frequencies is a powerful tool for cultivation monitoring.

  11. A viable foal obtained by equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered from immature follicles of live mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Ho; Norris, Jody D; Velez, Isabel C; Jacobson, Candace C; Hartman, David L; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-03-15

    The presence of heterogenous mitochondria from the host ooplast affects the acceptance of offspring obtained by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This might be avoided by obtaining oocytes from selected females, but is then complicated by low numbers of available oocytes. We examined the efficiency of equine somatic cell nuclear transfer using oocytes recovered by transvaginal aspiration of immature follicles from 11 mares. Use of metaphase I oocytes as cytoplasts and of scriptaid (a histone deacetylase inhibitor) treatment during oocyte activation were evaluated to determine if these approaches would increase blastocyst production. In experiment 1, blastocyst development was 0/14 for metaphase I oocytes and 4/103 (4%) for metaphase II oocytes. Three blastocysts were transferred to recipient mares, resulting in two pregnancies and one live foal, which died shortly after birth. In experiment 2, blastocyst development was 2/47 (4%) for control oocytes and 1/83 (1%) for scriptaid-treated oocytes. No foals were born from two blastocysts transferred in the control group. The blastocyst from the scriptaid treatment resulted in birth of a live foal. In conclusion, this is apparently the first report of production of a viable cloned foal from oocytes collected from immature follicles of live mares, supporting the possibility of cloning using oocytes from selected mares. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic Reprogramming of Stem Cell Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, James G.; Cliff, Tim; Dalton, Stephen; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Summary For many years, stem cell metabolism was viewed as a by product of cell fate status rather than an active regulatory mechanism, however there is now a growing appreciation that metabolic pathways influence epigenetic changes associated with lineage commitment, specification, and self-renewal. Here we review how metabolites generated during glycolytic and oxidative processes are utilized in enzymatic reactions leading to epigenetic modifications and transcriptional regulation. We discuss how “metabolic reprogramming” contributes to global epigenetic changes in the context of naïve and primed pluripotent states, somatic reprogramming, and hematopoietic and skeletal muscle tissue stem cells, and the implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:26637942

  13. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  14. Textbook Errors & Misconceptions in Biology: Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    The idea that errors and misconceptions in biology textbooks are often slow to be discovered and corrected is discussed. Selected errors, misconceptions, and topics of confusion about cell metabolism are described. Fermentation, respiration, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, uniformity of catabolism, and metabolic pathways as models are…

  15. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  16. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  17. T cell metabolic reprogramming and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Maria; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Ruoning

    2015-12-01

    Upon antigen stimulation, small and quiescent naïve T cells undergo an approximately 24h growth phase followed by rapid proliferation. Depending on the nature of the antigen and cytokine milieu, these proliferating T cells differentiate into distinctive functional subgroups that are essential for appropriate immune defense and regulation. T cells undergo a characteristic metabolic rewiring that fulfills the dramatically increased bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands during the transition between resting, activation and differentiation. Beyond this, T cells are distributed throughout the body and are able to function in a wide range of physio-pathological environments, including some with a dramatic metabolic derangement. As such, T cells must quickly respond to and adapt to fluctuations in environmental nutrient levels. We consider such responsiveness and adaptation in terms of metabolic plasticity, that is, an evolutionarilly selected process which allows T cells to illicit robust immune functions in response to either a continuous or disrupted nutrient supply. In this review, we illustrate the relevant metabolic pathways in T cells and discuss the ability of T cells to change their metabolic substrates in response to changes in the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas; Kashuba, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance "aerobic" glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells.

  19. Cell Metabolism Monitoring with MEMS Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabeppu, Osamu; Sakayori, Junichi

    Cells and living tissue slightly but always generate metabolic heat as long as they are alive. Thus, biological activity can be measured through the observation of metabolic heat, which has been developed as “bio-calorimetry”. On the other hand, further improvements in thermal sensing ability can be expected with use of the MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) technology. The purpose of this study is to develop the monitoring technique of the metabolic heat of cells in as small number as possible with the MEMS technology. If the monitoring technique of metabolism of a few cells or even a single cell is made available, it plays very important rolls in bio- and medical- engineering, pharmaceutical sciences, and so on. In this study, a bio-calorimeter with a MEMS thermopile sensor was made, and its performance and metabolism monitoring of Yeast were tested. The thermopile sensor consisted of 350 thin film thermocouples of Cr and Ni strips of 20 μm width on a 150 μm thick glass plate. The thermopile sensor composed a calorimetric cell as a bottom plate with thick aluminum frame. The calorimetric cell was placed in a triple thermostatic chamber which employs a proportional control with a Peltier device and PID control with heater. The calorimeter showed a sensitivity of 0.62 V/W under the condition of including culture solution, time constant of the calorimetric cell of 90 sec, and a noise equivalent power of 60 nW, which corresponds to metabolic heat of 3 × 103 cells of Yeast. In the growth experiments of Yeast, growth thermograms for 105˜107 cells can be measured with reasonable generation times. It was demonstrated that the detectable number of Yeast cells of the MEMS calorimeter is much smaller than that for the traditional bio-calorimeter.

  20. Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads by Novel Two-Step Process for Improved Performance of Viable Whole-Cell Baeyer-Villiger Monoxygenase by Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Krajčovič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel immobilization matrix for the entrapment of viable whole-cell Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase was developed. Viable recombinant Escherichia coli cells overexpressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase were entrapped in polyelectrolyte complex beads prepared by a two-step reaction of oppositely-charged polymers including highly defined cellulose sulphate. Immobilized cells exhibited higher operational stability than free cells during 10 repeated cycles of Baeyer–Villiger biooxidations of rac-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one to the corresponding lactones (1R,5S-3-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one and (1S,5R-2-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one. The morphology of polyelectrolyte complex beads was characterised by environmental scanning electron microscopy; the spatial distribution of polymers in the beads and cell viability were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the texture was characterised by the mechanical resistance measurements.

  1. Enhanced inhibition of murine prostatic carcinoma growth by immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells and CRM197

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiyong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination with xenogeneic and syngeneic endothelial cells is effective for inhibiting tumor growth. Nontoxic diphtheria toxin (CRM197, as an immunogen or as a specific inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, has shown promising antitumor activity. Therefore, immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs combined with CRM197 could have an enhanced antitumor effect. Six-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were vaccinated with viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs combined with 100 μg CRM197, or 100 μg CRM197 alone by ip injections once a week for 4 consecutive weeks. RM-1 cells (5 x 10(5 were inoculated by sc injection as a preventive procedure. During the therapeutic procedure, 6-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were challenged with 1 x 10(5 RM-1 cells, then injected sc with 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs + 100 μg CRM197, and 100 μg CRM197 alone twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Tumor volume and life span were monitored. We also investigated the effects of immunization with HUVECs on the aortic arch wall and on wound healing. Vaccination with or administration of viable HUVECs+CRM197 enhanced the inhibition of RM-1 prostatic carcinoma by 24 and 29%, respectively, and prolonged the life span for 3 and 4 days, respectively, compared with those of only vaccination or administration with viable HUVECs of tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, HUVEC immunization caused some damage to the aortic arch wall but did not have remarkable effects on the rate of wound healing; the wounds healed in approximately 13 days. Treatment with CRM197 in combination with viable HUVECs resulted in a marked enhancement of the antitumor effect in the preventive or therapeutic treatment for prostatic carcinoma in vivo, suggesting a novel combination for anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Glutathione Primes T Cell Metabolism for Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tak W.; Grusdat, Melanie; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR) and expression of NFAT and Myc transcription factors, abrogating the energy utilization and Myc-dependent metabolic reprogramming that allows activated T cells to switch to glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In vivo, T-cell-specific ablation of murine Gclc...

  3. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  4. T cell metabolic reprogramming and plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Slack, Maria; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Ruoning

    2015-01-01

    Upon antigen stimulation, small and quiescent naïve T cells undergo an approximately 24hr growth phase followed by rapid proliferation. Depending on the nature of the antigen and cytokine milieu, these proliferating T cells differentiate into distinctive functional subgroups that are essential for appropriate immune defense and regulation. T cells undergo a characteristic metabolic rewiring that fulfills the dramatically increased bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands during the transition be...

  5. Assessing prognosis and optimizing treatment in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT): results of the sCR2 international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Dunant, A.

    2008-01-01

    malignant cells, and a good International Germ Cell Consensus Classification group at presentation. Patients were assigned to one of three risk groups defined in sCR1: no risk factor (good risk), one risk factor (intermediate risk) and two to three risk factors (poor risk group). The 5-year PFS rate was 92...... with surveillance and treatment only at relapse. CONCLUSION: In patients with postchemotherapy viable NSGCT, a complete resection of residual masses should be rigorously pursued. These data validate the sCR1 prognostic index. Given their excellent outcome, patients in the favorable group may not require......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers...

  6. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Viable Cancer Cells in the Remnant Stomach are a Potential Source of Peritoneal Metastasis after Curative Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Kodama, Hirokazu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Miyake, Toru; Tani, Tohru; Kushima, Ryoji; Tani, Masaji

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying peritoneal metastasis (PM) after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) are not well elucidated. This study assessed whether viable cancer cells, including cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), were present in the remnant stomach immediately before gastrointestinal (GI) tract reconstruction because these could be a source of PM after gastrectomy. Saline fluid used for remnant stomach lumen irrigation before GI reconstruction was prospectively collected from 142 consecutive patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for GC and cytologically examined. Proliferative activity (Ki67 staining) and stemness (expression of the CSC surface markers CD44s or CD44v6) were evaluated in detected cancer cells. Viable cancer cells were detected in 33 (23.2 %) of the 142 remnant stomachs. These cells formed clusters and stained positively for Ki67, indicating proliferation. Cancer cells in remnant stomachs and surface cancer cells in primary GCs from 10 (30.3 %) of these 33 cases also stained positively for CD44s or CD44v6. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, advanced cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.65; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.32-16.4; P = 0.017), tumor size of 40 mm or larger (OR, 3.78; 95 % CI, 1.12-12.8; P = 0.033), and histologic differentiation (OR, 3.10; 95 % CI, 1.30-7.40; P = 0.011) were associated independently with the presence of cancer cells in the remnant stomach. Viable, proliferative, and clustered cancer cells, including CSCs, were found in remnant gastric lumens immediately before GI reconstruction, indicating a possible cellular source of PM after curative gastrectomy for GC. Dissemination of gastric contents into the peritoneal cavity should be avoided during GI reconstruction.

  8. Metabolic regulation of regulatory T cell development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David John Coe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require ATP-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets have been shown to require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses.

  9. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide – Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Hsien Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4–5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable.

  10. Designing primers and evaluation of the efficiency of propidium monoazide - Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for counting the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Wu, Sih-Rong; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Ramireddy, Latha; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Ku; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of using propidium monoazide (PMA) real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to count the viable cells of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius in probiotic products. Based on the internal transcription spacer and 23S rRNA genes, two primer sets specific for these two Lactobacillus species were designed. For a probiotic product, the total deMan Rogosa Sharpe plate count was 8.65±0.69 log CFU/g, while for qPCR, the cell counts of L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 8.39±0.14 log CFU/g and 8.57±0.24 log CFU/g, respectively. Under the same conditions, for its heat-killed product, qPCR counts for L. gasseri and L. salivarius were 6.70±0.16 log cells/g and 7.67±0.20 log cells/g, while PMA-qPCR counts were 5.33±0.18 log cells/g and 5.05±0.23 log cells/g, respectively. For cell dilutions with a viable cell count of 8.5 log CFU/mL for L. gasseri and L. salivarius, after heat killing, the PMA-qPCR count for both Lactobacillus species was near 5.5 log cells/mL. When the PMA-qPCR counts of these cell dilutions were compared before and after heat killing, although some DNA might be lost during the heat killing, significant qPCR signals from dead cells, i.e., about 4-5 log cells/mL, could not be reduced by PMA treatment. Increasing PMA concentrations from 100 μM to 200 μM or light exposure time from 5 minutes to 15 minutes had no or, if any, only minor effect on the reduction of qPCR signals from their dead cells. Thus, to differentiate viable lactic acid bacterial cells from dead cells using the PMA-qPCR method, the efficiency of PMA to reduce the qPCR signals from dead cells should be notable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Cell metabolism, FLIM and PLIM and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, S.; Bisinger, D.; Breymayer, J.; Ruck, A.

    2015-03-01

    Methods of time resolved spectroscopy are applied in biomedicine during diagnosis of various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Fluorescence lifetime measurement provides monitoring of intracellular metabolic enzymes like NADH and FAD, controlling the balance between oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis. The simultaneous monitoring of the different metabolic parameters is still a challenge. Here we present a setup, which is based on two-photon microscopy and multi-dimensional time-correlated single-photoncounting (TCSPC). The presented method allows consecutive NADH and FAD imaging with high specificity and minimal side effects. In addition the setup is useful for simultaneous monitoring of NADH FLIM and intracellular oxygen partial pressure (pO2). With the two-channel FLIM/PLIM system we could show that pO2 is investigated simultaneously with different metabolic parameters in living cells.

  12. Metabolic Regulation of Natural Killer Cell IFN-? Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mah, Annelise Y.; Cooper, Megan A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is critical for a host of cellular functions and provides a source of intracellular energy. It has been recognized recently that metabolism also regulates differentiation and effector functions of immune cells. Although initial work in this field has focused largely on T lymphocytes, recent studies have demonstrated metabolic control of innate immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Here, we review what is known regarding the metabolic requirements for NK cell activation...

  13. Not single but periodic injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells maintain viable cells in knees and inhibit osteoarthritis progression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, N; Muneta, T; Koga, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mizuno, M; Tsuji, K; Mabuchi, Y; Akazawa, C; Kobayashi, E; Matsumoto, K; Futamura, K; Saito, T; Sekiya, I

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of single or repetitive intra-articular injections of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat osteoarthritis (OA) model, and elucidated the behaviors and underlying mechanisms of the stem cells after the injection. One week after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of wild type Lewis rats, one million synovial MSCs were injected into the knee joint every week. Cartilage degeneration was evaluated with safranin-o staining after the first injection. To analyze cell kinetics or MSC properties, luciferase, LacZ, and GFP expressing synovial MSCs were used. To confirm the role of MSCs, species-specific microarray and PCR analyses were performed using human synovial MSCs. Histological analysis for femoral and tibial cartilage showed that a single injection was ineffective but weekly injections had significant chondroprotective effects for 12 weeks. Histological and flow-cytometric analyses of LacZ and GFP expressing synovial MSCs revealed that injected MSCs migrated mainly into the synovium and most of them retained their undifferentiated MSC properties though the migrated cells rapidly decreased. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that MSCs maintained in knees while weekly injection. Species-specific microarray and PCR analyses showed that the human mRNAs on day 1 for 21 genes increased over 50-fold, and increased the expressions of PRG-4, BMP-2, and BMP-6 genes encoding chondroprotective proteins, and TSG-6 encoding an anti-inflammatory one. Not single but periodic injections of synovial MSCs maintained viable cells without losing their MSC properties in knees and inhibited osteoarthritis (OA) progression by secretion of trophic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  15. Metabolic pathways in immune cell activation and quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Erika L; Pearce, Edward J

    2013-04-18

    Studies of immune system metabolism ("immunometabolism") segregate along two paths. The first investigates the effects of immune cells on organs that regulate whole-body metabolism, such as adipose tissue and liver. The second explores the role of metabolic pathways within immune cells and how this regulates immune response outcome. Distinct metabolic pathways diverge and converge at many levels, and, therefore, cells face choices as to how to achieve their metabolic goals. There is interest in fully understanding how and why immune cells commit to particular metabolic fates and in elucidating the immunologic consequences of reaching a metabolic endpoint by one pathway versus another. This is particularly intriguing, given that metabolic commitment is influenced not only by substrate availability but also by signaling pathways elicited by metabolites. Thus, metabolic choices in cells enforce fate and function, and this area will be the subject of this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic features of the cell danger response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviaux, Robert K

    2014-05-01

    The cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis. The resulting metabolic mismatch between available resources and functional capacity produces a cascade of changes in cellular electron flow, oxygen consumption, redox, membrane fluidity, lipid dynamics, bioenergetics, carbon and sulfur resource allocation, protein folding and aggregation, vitamin availability, metal homeostasis, indole, pterin, 1-carbon and polyamine metabolism, and polymer formation. The first wave of danger signals consists of the release of metabolic intermediates like ATP and ADP, Krebs cycle intermediates, oxygen, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and is sustained by purinergic signaling. After the danger has been eliminated or neutralized, a choreographed sequence of anti-inflammatory and regenerative pathways is activated to reverse the CDR and to heal. When the CDR persists abnormally, whole body metabolism and the gut microbiome are disturbed, the collective performance of multiple organ systems is impaired, behavior is changed, and chronic disease results. Metabolic memory of past stress encounters is stored in the form of altered mitochondrial and cellular macromolecule content, resulting in an increase in functional reserve capacity through a process known as mitocellular hormesis. The systemic form of the CDR, and its magnified form, the purinergic life-threat response (PLTR), are under direct control by ancient pathways in the brain that are ultimately coordinated by centers in the brainstem. Chemosensory integration of whole body metabolism occurs in the brainstem and is a prerequisite for normal brain, motor, vestibular, sensory, social, and speech development. An understanding of the CDR permits us to reframe old concepts of pathogenesis for a broad array of chronic, developmental

  17. Bacillus subtilis mutants with knockouts of the genes encoding ribonucleases RNase Y and RNase J1 are viable, with major defects in cell morphology, sporulation, and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, Sabine; Durand, Sylvain; Gilet, Laetitia; Cayet, Nadège; Sachse, Martin; Condon, Ciarán

    2013-05-01

    The genes encoding the ribonucleases RNase J1 and RNase Y have long been considered essential for Bacillus subtilis cell viability, even before there was concrete knowledge of their function as two of the most important enzymes for RNA turnover in this organism. Here we show that this characterization is incorrect and that ΔrnjA and Δrny mutants are both viable. As expected, both strains grow relatively slowly, with doubling times in the hour range in rich medium. Knockout mutants have major defects in their sporulation and competence development programs. Both mutants are hypersensitive to a wide range of antibiotics and have dramatic alterations to their cell morphologies, suggestive of cell envelope defects. Indeed, RNase Y mutants are significantly smaller in diameter than wild-type strains and have a very disordered peptidoglycan layer. Strains lacking RNase J1 form long filaments in tight spirals, reminiscent of mutants of the actin-like proteins (Mre) involved in cell shape determination. Finally, we combined the rnjA and rny mutations with mutations in other components of the degradation machinery and show that many of these strains are also viable. The implications for the two known RNA degradation pathways of B. subtilis are discussed.

  18. Effects of the oral administration of viable and heat-killed Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells to pre-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline D Paiva

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been suggested as an alternative to classical antibiotics in livestock production and bacteriocin-producing bacteria could be added to animal feeds to deliver bacteriocins in the gastrointestinal (GI tract of ruminant and monogastric animals. In this study, viable (V and heat-killed (HK Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells were orally administered to pre-sensitized mice in order to assess the effects of a bacteriocin-producing bacteria on histological parameters and the immune response of the GI tract of monogastric animals. The administration of V and HK S. bovis HC5 cells during 58 days to BALB/c mice did not affect weight gain, but an increase in gut permeability was detected in animals receiving the HK cells. Viable and heat killed cells caused similar morphological alterations in the GI tract of the animals, but the most prominent effects were detected in the small intestine. The oral administration of S. bovis HC5 also influenced cytokine production in the small intestine, and the immune-mediated activity differed between V and HK cells. The relative expression of IL-12 and INF-γ was significantly higher in the small intestine of mice treated with V cells, while an increase in IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α expression was only detected in mice treated with HK cells. Considering that even under a condition of severe challenge (pre-sensitization followed by daily exposure to the same bacterial immunogen the general health of the animals was maintained, it appears that oral administration of S. bovis HC5 cells could be a useful route to deliver bacteriocin in the GI tract of livestock animals.

  19. Eat, breathe, ROS: controlling stem cell fate through metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubli, Dieter A; Sussman, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    Research reveals cardiac regeneration exists at levels previously deemed unattainable. Clinical trials using stem cells demonstrate promising cardiomyogenic and regenerative potential but insufficient contractile recovery. Incomplete understanding of the biology of administered cells likely contributes to inconsistent patient outcomes. Metabolism is a core component of many well-characterized stem cell types, and metabolic changes fundamentally alter stem cell fate from self-renewal to lineage commitment, and vice versa. However, the metabolism of stem cells currently studied for cardiac regeneration remains incompletely understood. Areas covered: Key metabolic features of stem cells are reviewed and unique stem cell metabolic characteristics are discussed. Metabolic changes altering stem cell fate are considered from quiescence and self-renewal to lineage commitment. Key metabolic concepts are applied toward examining cardiac regeneration through stem cell-based approaches, and clinical implications of current cell therapies are evaluated to identify potential areas of improvement. Expert commentary: The metabolism and biology of stem cells used for cardiac therapy remain poorly characterized. A growing appreciation for the fundamental relationship between stem cell functionality and metabolic phenotype is developing. Future studies unraveling links between cardiac stem cell metabolism and regenerative potential may considerably improve treatment strategies and therapeutic outcomes.

  20. A non-aggressive, highly efficient, enzymatic method for dissociation of human brain-tumors and brain-tissues to viable single-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Shapira, Netanel; Ezer, Haim; Gafni, Aviv; Lustgarten, Merav; Alter, Tal; Ben-Horin, Idan; Barzilai, Ori; Shahar, Tal; Kanner, Andrew; Fried, Itzhak; Veshchev, Igor; Grossman, Rachel; Ram, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    Conducting research on the molecular biology, immunology, and physiology of brain tumors (BTs) and primary brain tissues requires the use of viably dissociated single cells. Inadequate methods for tissue dissociation generate considerable loss in the quantity of single cells produced and in the produced cells' viability. Improper dissociation may also demote the quality of data attained in functional and molecular assays due to the presence of large quantities cellular debris containing immune-activatory danger associated molecular patterns, and due to the increased quantities of degraded proteins and RNA. Over 40 resected BTs and non-tumorous brain tissue samples were dissociated into single cells by mechanical dissociation or by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation. The quality of dissociation was compared for all frequently used dissociation enzymes (collagenase, DNase, hyaluronidase, papain, dispase) and for neutral protease (NP) from Clostridium histolyticum. Single-cell-dissociated cell mixtures were evaluated for cellular viability and for the cell-mixture dissociation quality. Dissociation quality was graded by the quantity of subcellular debris, non-dissociated cell clumps, and DNA released from dead cells. Of all enzymes or enzyme combinations examined, NP (an enzyme previously not evaluated on brain tissues) produced dissociated cell mixtures with the highest mean cellular viability: 93 % in gliomas, 85 % in brain metastases, and 89 % in non-tumorous brain tissue. NP also produced cell mixtures with significantly less cellular debris than other enzymes tested. Dissociation using NP was non-aggressive over time-no changes in cell viability or dissociation quality were found when comparing 2-h dissociation at 37 °C to overnight dissociation at ambient temperature. The use of NP allows for the most effective dissociation of viable single cells from human BTs or brain tissue. Its non-aggressive dissociative capacity may enable ambient

  1. Prognostic impact of the number of viable circulating cells with high telomerase activity in gastric cancer patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Inoue, Haruhiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Gohda, Keigo; Sato, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is a useful approach to estimate prognosis, monitor disease progression and measure treatment effects in several types of malignancies. We have previously used OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. GFP-positive cells (GFP+ cells) were counted under a fluorescence microscope. Our results showed that the number of at least 7.735 µm in diameter GFP+ cells (L-GFP+ cells) in the peripheral blood was a significant marker of prognosis in gastric cancer patients. However, tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported to be smaller in size than cells without EMT features; thus, CTCs undergoing EMT may escape detection with this technique. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the relationship between patient outcome and the number of GFP+ cells of any size. We obtained peripheral blood samples from 65 patients with gastric cancer. After infection of OBP-401, GFP+ cells were counted and measured. The relationship between the number of GFP+ cells and surgical outcome was analyzed. The median follow-up period of the surviving patients was 36 months. A significant difference in overall survival was found between patients with 0-5 and patients with ≥6 L-GFP+ cells. No clear relationship was established between the number of small-sized GFP+ cells and patient prognosis. The number of L-GFP+ cells was significantly related to overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. The detection of L-GFP+ cells using OBP-401 may be a useful prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  2. Exploring Metabolic Configurations of Single Cells within Complex Tissue Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anne; Nagy, Csörsz; Knapp, Bernhard; Laengle, Johannes; Ponweiser, Elisabeth; Groeger, Marion; Starkl, Philipp; Bergmann, Michael; Wagner, Oswald; Haschemi, Arvand

    2017-11-07

    Over the past years, plenty of evidence has emerged illustrating how metabolism supports many aspects of cellular function and how metabolic reprogramming can drive cell differentiation and fate. Here, we present a method to assess the metabolic configuration of single cells within their native tissue microenvironment via the visualization and quantification of multiple enzymatic activities measured at saturating substrate conditions combined with subsequent cell type identification. After careful validation of the approach and to demonstrate its potential, we assessed the intracellular metabolic configuration of different human immune cell populations in healthy and tumor colon tissue. Additionally, we analyzed the intercellular metabolic relationship between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in a breast cancer tissue array. This study demonstrates that the determination of metabolic configurations in single cells could be a powerful complementary tool for every researcher interested to study metabolic networks in situ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic Regulation of Natural Killer Cell IFN-γ Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Annelise Y; Cooper, Megan A

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is critical for a host of cellular functions and provides a source of intracellular energy. It has been recognized recently that metabolism also regulates differentiation and effector functions of immune cells. Although initial work in this field has focused largely on T lymphocytes, recent studies have demonstrated metabolic control of innate immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Here, we review what is known regarding the metabolic requirements for NK cell activation, focusing on NK cell production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). NK cells are innate immune lymphocytes that are poised for rapid activation during the early immune response. Although their basal metabolic rates do not change with short-term activation, they exhibit specific metabolic requirements for activation depending upon the stimulus received. These metabolic requirements for NK cell activation are altered by culturing NK cells with interleukin-15, which increases NK cell metabolic rates at baseline and shifts them toward aerobic glycolysis. We discuss the metabolic pathways important for NK cell production of IFN-γ protein and potential mechanisms whereby metabolism regulates NK cell function.

  4. T Cell Metabolic Fitness in Anti-Tumor Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Siska, Peter J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    T cell metabolism plays a central role to support and shape immune responses and may play a key role in anti-tumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through PD-1, to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory...

  5. Binding of CLL subset 4 B-cell receptor immunoglobulins to viable human memory B lymphocytes requires a distinctive IGKV somatic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catera, Rosa; Liu, Yun; Gao, Chao; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Magli, Amanda; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chu, Charles C; Feizi, Ten; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-12

    Amino acid replacement mutations in certain CLL stereotyped B-cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulins (IGs) at defined positions within antigen-binding sites strongly imply antigen selection. Prime examples of this are CLL subset 4 BCR IGs using IGHV4-34/IGHD5-18/IGHJ6 and IGKV2-30/IGKJ2 rearrangements. Conspicuously and unlike most CLL IGs, subset 4 IGs do not bind apoptotic cells. By testing the (auto)antigenic reactivities of subset 4 IGs toward viable lymphoid-lineage cells and specific autoantigens typically bound by IGHV4-34+ IGs, we found IGs from both subset 4 and non-subset 4 IGHV4-34-expressing CLL cases bind naïve B cells. However, only subset 4 IGs react with memory B cells. Furthermore, subset 4 IGs do not bind DNA nor i or I carbohydrate antigens, common targets of IGHV4-34-utilizing antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and cold agglutinin disease, respectively. Notably, we found that subset 4 IG binding to memory B lymphocytes depends on an aspartic acid at position 66 of FR3 in the rearranged IGKV2-30 gene; this amino acid residue is acquired by somatic mutation. Our findings illustrate the importance of positive and negative selection criteria for structural elements in CLL IGs and suggest that autoantigens driving normal B cells to become subset 4 CLL cells differ from those driving IGHV4-34+ B cells in other diseases.

  6. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Mammalian Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic flux analysis has become a standard tool for analyzing metabolism and optimizing bioprocesses. Metabolic flux analysis makes use of a metabolic reaction network in combination with extra-cellular measurements and mass balancing to calculate flux distributions in metabolism. It is a useful

  7. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  8. Pyruvate kinase triggers a metabolic feedback loop that controls redox metabolism in respiring cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bluemlein, Katharina; Mülleder, Michael; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Lehrach, Hans; Jakobs, Cornelis; Breitenbach, Michael; Ralser, Markus

    2011-09-07

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism when respiration is activated. Low PYK activity activated yeast respiration. However, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) did not increase, and cells gained resistance to oxidants. This adaptation was attributable to accumulation of the PYK substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). PEP acted as feedback inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). TPI inhibition stimulated the pentose phosphate pathway, increased antioxidative metabolism, and prevented ROS accumulation. Thus, a metabolic feedback loop, initiated by PYK, mediated by its substrate and acting on TPI, stimulates redox metabolism in respiring cells. Originating from a single catalytic step, this autonomous reconfiguration of central carbon metabolism prevents oxidative stress upon shifts between fermentation and respiration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P

    2014-12-18

    Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to be a major cause of cancer recurrence, respond to these variations. Here, in vitro environmental perturbations designed to mimic different aspects of the in vivo environment were used to characterize how an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived, isogenic cancer stem cells metabolically respond to environmental cues. Mass spectrometry was used to profile metabolite levels in response to in vitro environmental perturbations. Docetaxel, the chemotherapeutic used for this experiment, caused significant metabolic changes in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism in ovarian cancer cells, but had virtually no metabolic effect on isogenic ovarian cancer stem cells. Glucose deprivation, hypoxia, and the combination thereof altered ovarian cancer cell and cancer stem cell metabolism to varying extents for the two cell types. Hypoxia had a much larger effect on ovarian cancer cell metabolism, while glucose deprivation had a greater effect on ovarian cancer stem cell metabolism. Core metabolites and pathways affected by these perturbations were identified, along with pathways that were unique to cell types or perturbations. The metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived isogenic cancer stem cells differ greatly under most conditions, suggesting that these two cell types may behave quite differently in an in vivo tumor microenvironment. While cancer metabolism and cancer stem cells are each promising potential therapeutic targets, such varied behaviors in vivo would need to

  10. A single-cell perspective on non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA) bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manina, Giulia; McKinney, John D

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing and fundamental problem in microbiology is the non-trivial discrimination between live and dead cells. The existence of physically intact and possibly viable bacterial cells that fail to replicate during a more or less protracted period of observation, despite environmental conditions that are ostensibly propitious for growth, has been extensively documented in many different organisms. In clinical settings, non-culturable cells may contribute to non-apparent infections capable of reactivating after months or years of clinical latency, a phenomenon that has been well documented in the specific case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The prevalence of these silent but potentially problematic bacterial reservoirs has been highlighted by classical approaches such as limiting culture dilution till extinction of growing cells, followed by resuscitation of apparently "viable but non-culturable" (VBNC) subpopulations. Although these assays are useful to demonstrate the presence of VBNC cells in a population, they are effectively retrospective and are not well suited to the analysis of non-replicating cells per se. Here, we argue that research on a closely related problem, which we shall refer to as the "non-growing but metabolically active" state, is poised to advance rapidly thanks to the recent development of novel technologies and methods for real-time single-cell analysis. In particular, the combination of fluorescent reporter dyes and strains, microfluidic and microelectromechanical systems, and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy offers tremendous and largely untapped potential for future exploration of the physiology of non-replicating cells.

  11. Metabolic activity of odontoblast-like cells irradiated with blue LED (455 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Leopoldina Fátima Dantas; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Turrioni, Ana Paula Silveira; de-Souza-Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    Blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) are frequently used in dentistry for light activation of resin-based materials; however, their photobiostimulatory effects have not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blue LED (455 nm) on the metabolism of odontoblast-like cells MDPC-23. Energy doses of 2 and 4 J/cm(2) were used at 20 mW/cm(2) fixed power density. MDPC-23 cells were seeded at 10,000 cells/cm(2) density in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) containing 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS). After 12 h, the culture medium was replaced with new DMEM supplemented with 0.5 % of FBS, and the cells were incubated for further 12 h. After that, single irradiation was performed to the culture, under selected parameters. Cell viability evaluations (Alamar Blue Assay, n = 12), number of viable cells (Trypan Blue Assay, n = 12), morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, n = 2), gene expression (n = 6) of alkaline phosphatase (Alp), collagen (Col-1a1), and dental matrix protein (Dmp-1) (quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)) were performed 72 h after irradiation. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, ANOVA, and Tukey tests (p cell viability, while irradiation with 2 J/cm(2) reduced cell metabolism. None of doses affected the number of viable cells compared with the control group. The two energy doses downregulated the expression of Alp; however, expression of Col-1a1 and Dmp-1 had no alteration. Cells presented change in the cytoskeleton only when irradiated with 2 J/cm(2). In conclusion, the blue LED (455 nm) irradiation, under the evaluated parameters, had no biostimulatory effects on MDPC-23 cells.

  12. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  13. Managing Viable Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, Beer's Viable System Model (VSM) is applied to knowledge management. Based on the VSM, domains of knowledge are identified that an organization should possess to maintain its viability. The logic of the VSM is also used to support the diagnosis, design and implementation of the

  14. Determination of Viable Salmonella Typhimurium Cells in Heat Treated Milk By PMA/Real-Time PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Kesmen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Applying different technological processes during the production of food has a lethal effect on the bacteria but DNA of these bacterial strains may cause false positive results when detected by real time PCR technique because they preserve their existence for a certain period of time. To overcome this shortcoming of the real time PCR technique, a new method has been developed in recent years, based on the removal of dead cell DNA from the medium by treatment with Propodium Monoazide (PMA before DNA extraction. In this study, real-time PCR method was combined with PMA application for the detection of live cells of Salmonella Typhimurium in heat treated milk samples. For this purpose, milk samples inoculated with S. Tyhimurium were heat treated at different temperatures (60, 65, 70 and 75°C and times (15, 60, 300, 900 sec and number of live bacteria was determined comparatively by direct real-time PCR, PMA/real-time PCR and conventional cultural method. As a result, unlike the direct real time PCR technique, PMA/real-time PCR method prevents to a certain extent of false positive results from dead cells at all tested temperatures and times but higher results were obtained from PMA/real-time PCR method when compared to conventional cultural results. Therefore, further studies should be carried out to optimize the conditions of the PMA application in order to eliminate the high positive results detected by the PMA / real-time PCR method

  15. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  16. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella in Exponentially Grown Cells by Exposure to a Low-Humidity Environment and Their Resuscitation by Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Yuta; Koike, Atsushi; Tamura-Ueyama, Ai; Amano, Fumio

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne disease that sometimes occurs in massive outbreaks around the world. This pathogen is tolerant of low-humidity conditions. We previously described a method for induction of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and subsequent resuscitation with 0.3 mM sodium pyruvate. Here, we report a new method for the induction of the VBNC state in Salmonella Enteritidis cells, one involving dehydration. Exposure of Salmonella Enteritidis cells to dehydration stress under poor nutritional conditions (0.9% [wt/vol] NaCl) and 10 to 20% relative humidity at room temperature decreased the presence of culturable population to 0.0067%, but respiratory and glucose uptake active populations were maintained at 0.46 and 1.12%, respectively, meaning that approximately 1% may have entered the VBNC state. Furthermore, these VBNC cells could be resuscitated to acquire culturability by incubation with catalase in M9 minimal medium without glucose in a manner dependent on the dose of catalase but not sodium pyruvate. These results suggest that a low-humidity environment could cause Salmonella Enteritidis cells to enter the VBNC state and the cells could then be resuscitated for growth by treatment with catalase, suggesting a potential risk of Salmonella Enteritidis to survive in low water activity foods in the VBNC state and to start regrowth for foodborne illness.

  17. Skeletal and metabolic complications of testicular germ cell tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, Peter-Paul Michiel

    2014-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis were performed to investigate the short and long-term effects of chemotherapy on bone metabolism, fat metabolism and cardiovascular risk in testicular germ cell tumour (GCT) patients. We report a twofold increased prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) in GCT

  18. Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and confers an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key early event in atherosclerosis is endothelial dysfunction. Numerous groups have reported endothelial dysfunction in MetS. However, the measurement of endothelial function is far from optimum. There has been much interest recently in a subtype of progenitor cells, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), that can circulate, proliferate, and dfferentiate into mature endothelial cells. EPCs can be characterized by the assessment of surface markers, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, VEGFR-2 (KDR). The CD34+KDR+ phenotype has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. MetS patients without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases have decreased EPC number and functionality as evidenced by decreased numbers of colony forming units, decreased adhesion and migration, and decreased tubule formation. Strategies that have been shown to upregulate and enhance EPC number and functionality include statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and peroxisome-proliferator-activating-receptor gamma agonists. Mechanisms by which they affect EPC number and functionality need to be studied. Thus, EPC number and/or functionality could emerge as novel cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in MetS. PMID:21941528

  19. From gametogenesis and stem cells to cancer: common metabolic themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandro L; Rodrigues, Ana Sofia; Sousa, Maria Inês; Correia, Marcelo; Perestrelo, Tânia; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-01-01

    Both pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and cancer cells have been described as having similar metabolic pathways, most notably a penchant for favoring glycolysis even under aerobiosis, suggesting common themes that might be explored for both stem cell differentiation and anti-oncogenic purposes. A search of the scientific literature available in the PubMed/Medline was conducted for studies on metabolism and mitochondrial function related to gametogenesis, early development, stem cells and cancers in the reproductive system, notably breast, prostate, ovarian and testicular cancers. Both PSCs and some types of cancer cells, particularly reproductive cancers, were found to obtain energy mostly by glycolysis, often reducing mitochondrial activity and oxidative phosphorylation. This strategy links proliferating cells, allowing for the biosynthesis reactions necessary for cell division. Interventions that affect metabolic pathways, and force cells to change their preferences, can lead to shifts in cell status, increasing either pluripotency or differentiation of stem cells, and causing cancer cells to become more or less aggressive. Interestingly metabolic changes in many cases seemed to lead to cell transformation, not necessarily follow it, suggesting a direct role of metabolic choices in influencing the (epi)genetic program of different cell types. There are uncanny similarities between PSCs and cancer cells at the metabolic level. Furthermore, metabolism may also play a direct role in cell status and targeting metabolic pathways could therefore be a promising strategy for both the control of cancer cell proliferation and the regulation of stem cell physiology, in terms of manipulating stem cells toward relevant phenotypes that may be important for tissue engineering, or making cancer cells become less tumorigenic. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For

  20. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Freezing Nitrogen Ethanol Composite May be a Viable Approach for Cryotherapy of Human Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Jir-You; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Ming-Chau; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been used as adjuvant cryotherapy for treating giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone. However, the liquid phase and ultrafreezing (-196° C) properties increase the risk of damage to the adjacent tissues and may lead to perioperative complications. A novel semisolid cryogen, freezing nitrogen ethanol composite, might mitigate these shortcomings because of less-extreme freezing. We therefore wished to evaluate freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as a coolant to determine its properties in tumor cryoablation. (1) Is freezing nitrogen ethanol composite-mediated freezing effective for tumor cryoablation in an ex vivo model, and if yes, is apoptosis involved in the tumor-killing mechanism? (2) Does freezing nitrogen ethanol composite treatment block neovascularization and neoplastic progression of the grafted GCTs and is it comparable to that of liquid nitrogen in an in vivo chicken model? (3) Can use of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as an adjuvant to curettage result in successful short-term treatment, defined as absence of GCT recurrence at a minimum of 1 year in a small proof-of-concept clinical series? The cryogenic effect on bone tissue mediated by freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen was verified by thermal measurement in a time-course manner. Cryoablation on human GCT tissue was examined ex vivo for effect on morphologic features (cell shrinkage) and DNA fragmentation (apoptosis). The presumed mechanism was investigated by molecular analysis of apoptosis regulatory proteins including caspases 3, 8, and 9 and Bax/Bcl-2. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen treatment on GCT-derived neovascularization and tumor neoplasm. A small group of patients with GCT of bone was treated by curettage and adjuvant freezing nitrogen ethanol composite cryotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. Tumor recurrence and perioperative

  2. Oncogene-directed alterations in cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Malvi, Parmanand; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-07-01

    Oncogenes are key drivers of tumor growth. Although several cancer-driving mechanisms have been identified, the role of oncogenes in shaping metabolic patterns in cancer cells is only beginning to be appreciated. Recent studies show that oncogenes directly regulate critical metabolic enzymes and metabolic signaling pathways. Here, we present evidence for oncogene-directed cancer metabolic regulation and discuss the importance of identifying underlying mechanisms that can be targeted for developing precision cancer therapies.

  3. Alterations in cancer cell metabolism: the Warburg effect and metabolic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Yazdan; Zabihinpour, Zahra; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2015-05-01

    The Warburg effect means higher glucose uptake of cancer cells compared to normal tissues, whereas a smaller fraction of this glucose is employed for oxidative phosphorylation. With the advent of high throughput technologies and computational systems biology, cancer cell metabolism has been reinvestigated over the last decades toward identifying various events underlying "how" and "why" a cancer cell employs aerobic glycolysis. Significant progress has been shaped to revise the Warburg effect. In this study, we have integrated the gene expression of 13 different cancer cells with the genome-scale metabolic network of human (Recon1) based on the E-Flux method, and analyzed them based on constraint-based modeling. Results show that regardless of significant up- and down-regulated metabolic genes, the distribution of metabolic changes is similar in different cancer types. These findings support the theory that the Warburg effect is a consequence of metabolic adaptation in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of raw cow milk in Republic of Macedonia determined through the testing of somatic cell count and total viable count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelovski Ljupco

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cells count and total viable count are criteria used to estimate the compliance of raw cow milk with the Book of rules for demands for safety and hygiene and procedures for official controls of milk and milk products, Official Gazette of RM 157/2007. According to the given demands, raw milk operators are obliged to conduct all procedures and to guarantee that milk is in compliance with the criteria laid down in Book of rules. At the same time, Republic of Macedonia have to fulfill EU criteria laid down in Directive 92/46 (Council directive 92/46/EEC laying down the health rules for the production and placing on the market of raw milk, heat-treated milk and milkbased products for quality of raw milk as part of implementation of community legislation and milk production. The independent laboratory for milk quality control at FVM-Skopje, in frame of its activities in the period February- August 2008 has conducted a study for obtaining preliminary results for the situation with raw milk quality produced in R. of Macedonia for somatic cells counts and total viable count. In the study we analyzed 2065 samples for TVC and 1625 samples for SCC of raw milk samples produced in different parts of the country. From the tested samples only 41,8% fulfill criteria for SCC and 41,45% criteria for TVC lay down in Book of rules for 2008. Assessment of the results in light of Council Directive it is obvious that only 42,7% of the samples for SCC and 10,7% for TVC fulfill the criteria of Council Directive having in mind different requirements vs. Book of rules.

  5. Biologic properties of viable deletion mutants of simian virus 40 (SV40) rescued from the cells of an SV40-induced hamster lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, G T; Carmichael, G

    1983-12-01

    A lymphocytic leukemia induced by the oncogenic DNA simian virus 40 (SV40) in an inbred LSH/SsLak Syrian golden hamster was evoked to produce infectious SV40 by fusion of the leukemia cells with grivet monkey kidney (GMK) cells and by exposure of the leukemia cells to the chemical inducers mitomycin C and cycloheximide. Plaque-purified viable substrains of the rescued SV40 when studied by restriction endonuclease digestion of viral DNA were found to contain small deletions within the Hind III restriction fragment C. These deletions lay near the viral origin of DNA replication. Ten plaque-purified substrains of the rescued virus identified by immunofluorescence as being SV40 were found, when compared to the wild-type SV40, to replicate slowly and to form small plaques. Although these substrains transformed NIH/3T3 cells as efficiently as the wild-type SV40 in tissue culture, they were generally less oncogenic in vivo--7 of the 10 failed to induce tumors. The 3 oncogenic SV40-rescued substrains were not found to exhibit "lymphocytotropism," i.e., the capacity to infect and neoplastically transform preferentially hamster lymphocytes. Thus the hamster lymphocytic leukemia originally induced by the wild-type SV40 was most likely a chance-stochastic event rather than the result of tropism-determinism mediated by the virus, as is usually the case with leukemogenic RNA viruses.

  6. Metabolic reprogramming orchestrates cancer stem cell properties in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao-An; Wang, Chia-Yu; Hsieh, Yi-Tao; Chen, Yann-Jang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumor cells endowed with self-renewal capacity and are considered as an underlying cause of tumor recurrence and metastasis. The metabolic signatures of CSCs and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their stem cell-like properties still remain elusive. We utilized nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) CSCs as a model to dissect their metabolic signatures and found that CSCs underwent metabolic shift and mitochondrial resetting distinguished from their differentiated counterparts. In metabolic shift, CSCs showed a greater reliance on glycolysis for energy supply compared with the parental cells. In mitochondrial resetting, the quantity and function of mitochondria of CSCs were modulated by the biogenesis of the organelles, and the round-shaped mitochondria were distributed in a peri-nuclear manner similar to those seen in the stem cells. In addition, we blocked the glycolytic pathway, increased the ROS levels, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes of CSCs, respectively, and examined the effects of these metabolic factors on CSC properties. Intriguingly, the properties of CSCs were curbed when we redirected the quintessential metabolic reprogramming, which indicates that the plasticity of energy metabolism regulated the balance between acquisition and loss of the stemness status. Taken together, we suggest that metabolic reprogramming is critical for CSCs to sustain self-renewal, deter from differentiation and enhance the antioxidant defense mechanism. Characterization of metabolic reprogramming governing CSC properties is paramount to the design of novel therapeutic strategies through metabolic intervention of CSCs.

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Michael D.; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I.; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E.; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M.; Edelson, Brian T.; Pearce, Edward J.; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B.; Rambold, Angelika S.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2016-01-01

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively

  8. Cell-free metabolic engineering: biomanufacturing beyond the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Quentin M; Karim, Ashty S; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology and microbial metabolic engineering are poised to help meet the growing demand for sustainable, low-cost commodity chemicals and natural products, yet the fraction of biochemicals amenable to commercial production remains limited. Common problems afflicting the current state-of-the-art include low volumetric productivities, build-up of toxic intermediates or products, and byproduct losses via competing pathways. To overcome these limitations, cell-free metabolic engineering (CFME) is expanding the scope of the traditional bioengineering model by using in vitro ensembles of catalytic proteins prepared from purified enzymes or crude lysates of cells for the production of target products. In recent years, the unprecedented level of control and freedom of design, relative to in vivo systems, has inspired the development of engineering foundations for cell-free systems. These efforts have led to activation of long enzymatic pathways (>8 enzymes), near theoretical conversion yields, productivities greater than 100 mg L(-1) h(-1) , reaction scales of >100 L, and new directions in protein purification, spatial organization, and enzyme stability. In the coming years, CFME will offer exciting opportunities to: (i) debug and optimize biosynthetic pathways; (ii) carry out design-build-test iterations without re-engineering organisms; and (iii) perform molecular transformations when bioconversion yields, productivities, or cellular toxicity limit commercial feasibility. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metabolic selection of glycosylation defects in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarema, Kevin J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-01

    Changes in glycosylation are often associated with disease progression, but the genetic and metabolic basis of these events is rarely understood in detail at a molecular level. This report describes a novel metabolism-based approach to the selection of mutants in glycoconjugate biosynthesis that has provided insight into regulatory mechanisms for oligosaccharide expression and metabolic flux. Unnatural intermediates are used to challenge a specific pathway and cell-surface expression of their metabolic products provides a readout of flux in that pathway and a basis for selecting genetic mutants. The approach was applied to the sialic acid metabolic pathway in human cells, yielding novel mutants with phenotypes related to the inborn metabolic defect sialuria and metastatic tumor cells.

  10. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  11. Metabolic profiling of triple-negative breast cancer cells reveals metabolic vulnerabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Nathan J; Castle, Joshua P; Singh, Simar J; Leon, Andre N; Tovar, Elizabeth A; Sanghera, Amandeep; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Filipp, Fabian V; Graveel, Carrie R

    2017-01-01

    Among breast cancers, the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype has the worst prognosis with no approved targeted therapies and only standard chemotherapy as the backbone of systemic therapy. Unique metabolic changes in cancer progression provide innovative therapeutic opportunities. The receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and MET receptor are highly expressed in TNBC, making both promising therapeutic targets. RTK signaling profoundly alters cellular metabolism by increasing glucose consumption and subsequently diverting glucose carbon sources into metabolic pathways necessary to support the tumorigenesis. Therefore, detailed metabolic profiles of TNBC subtypes and their response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors may identify therapeutic sensitivities. We quantified the metabolic profiles of TNBC cell lines representing multiple TNBC subtypes using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. In addition, we subjected MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, Hs578T, and HCC70 cell lines to metabolic flux analysis of basal and maximal glycolytic and mitochondrial oxidative rates. Metabolic pool size and flux measurements were performed in the presence and absence of the MET inhibitor, INC280/capmatinib, and the EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Further, the sensitivities of these cells to modulators of core metabolic pathways were determined. In addition, we annotated a rate-limiting metabolic enzymes library and performed a siRNA screen in combination with MET or EGFR inhibitors to validate synergistic effects. TNBC cell line models displayed significant metabolic heterogeneity with respect to basal and maximal metabolic rates and responses to RTK and metabolic pathway inhibitors. Comprehensive systems biology analysis of metabolic perturbations, combined siRNA and tyrosine kinase inhibitor screens identified a core set of TCA cycle and fatty acid pathways whose perturbation sensitizes TNBC cells to small molecule targeting of receptor tyrosine kinases

  12. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  13. Role of endothelial cell metabolism in vessel sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Katrien; Georgiadou, Maria; Carmeliet, Peter

    2013-11-05

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are quiescent for years but can plastically switch to angiogenesis. Vascular sprouting relies on the coordinated activity of migrating tip cells at the forefront and proliferating stalk cells that elongate the sprout. Past studies have identified genetic signals that control vascular branching. Prominent are VEGF, activating tip cells, and Notch, which stimulates stalk cells. After the branch is formed and perfused, ECs become quiescent phalanx cells. Now, emerging evidence has accumulated indicating that ECs not only adapt their metabolism when switching from quiescence to sprouting but also that metabolism regulates vascular sprouting in parallel to the control by genetic signals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology produces viable pure-line Houbara bustard offspring: potential for repopulating an endangered species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Wernery

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata is a wild seasonal breeding bird populating arid sandy semi-desert habitats in North Africa and the Middle East. Its population has declined drastically during the last two decades and it is classified as vulnerable. Captive breeding programmes have, hitherto, been unsuccessful in reviving population numbers and thus radical technological solutions are essential for the long term survival of this species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology to produce viable Houbara bustard offspring.Embryonic gonadal tissue was dissected from Houbara bustard embryos at eight days post-incubation. Subsequently, Houbara tissue containing gonadal primordial germ cells (gPGCs was injected into White Leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus embryos, producing 83/138 surviving male chimeric embryos, of which 35 chimeric roosters reached sexual maturity after 5 months. The incorporation and differentiation of Houbara gPGCs in chimeric chicken testis were assessed by PCR with Houbara-specific primers and 31.3% (5/16 gonads collected from the injected chicken embryos showed the presence of donor Houbara cells. A total of 302 semen samples from 34 chimeric roosters were analyzed and eight were confirmed as germline chimeras. Semen samples from these eight roosters were used to artificially inseminate three female Houbara bustards. Subsequently, 45 Houbara eggs were obtained and incubated, two of which were fertile. One egg hatched as a male live born Houbara; the other was female but died before hatching. Genotyping confirmed that the male chick was a pure-line Houbara derived from a chimeric rooster.This study demonstrates for the first time that Houbara gPGCs can migrate, differentiate and eventually give rise to functional sperm in the chimeric chicken testis. This approach may provide a promising tool for propagation and conservation of endangered avian

  15. Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell Metabolism in Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duojiao

    2017-01-01

    During an immune response, leukocytes undergo major changes in growth and function that are tightly coupled to dynamic shifts in metabolic processes. Immunometabolism is an emerging field that investigates the interplay between immunological and metabolic processes. The immune system has a key role to play in controlling cancer initiation and progression. Increasing evidence indicates the immunosuppressive nature of the local environment in tumor. In tumor microenvironment, immune cells collectively adapt in a dynamic manner to the metabolic needs of cancer cells, thus prompting tumorigenesis and resistance to treatments. Here, we summarize the latest insights into the metabolic reprogramming of immune cells in tumor microenvironment and their potential roles in tumor progression and metastasis. Manipulating metabolic remodeling and immune responses may provide an exciting new option for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Effects of water-filtered infrared-A and of heat on cell death, inflammation, antioxidative potential and of free radical formation in viable skin--first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Pittermann, Wolfgang; Müller, Werner; Jung, Katinka; Kelleher, Debra K; Herrling, Thomas; Meffert, Peter; Uebelhack, Ralf; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    The effects of water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) and of convective heat on viability, inflammation, inducible free radicals and antioxidative power were investigated in natural and viable skin using the ex vivo Bovine Udder System (BUS) model. Therefore, skin samples from differently treated parts of the udder of a healthy cow were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measurement and by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Neither cell viability, the inflammation status, the radical status or the antioxidative defence systems of the skin were significantly affected by wIRA applied within 30 min by using an irradiance of 1900 W m(-2) which is of relevance for clinical use, but which exceeded the maximum solar IR-A irradiance at the Earth's surface more than 5 times and which resulted in a skin surface temperature of about 45 °C without cooling and of about 37 °C with convective cooling by air ventilation. No significant effects on viability and on inflammation were detected when convective heat was applied alone under equivalent conditions in terms of the resulting skin surface temperatures and exposure time. As compared with untreated skin, free radical formation was almost doubled, whereas the antioxidative power was reduced to about 50% after convective heating to about 45 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transgenic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Bernadette M. Glasheen; Suneet K. Bains; Stephanie L. Long; Rakesh Minocha; Christian Walter; Subhash C. Minocha

    2001-01-01

    The metabolism of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) has become the target of genetic manipulation because of their significance in plant development and possibly stress tolerance. We studied the polyamine metabolism in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra 3 maximowiczii) expressing a...

  18. Correlated oxygen-sensing PLIM, cell metabolism FLIM and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, A. C.; Kalinina, S.; Schäfer, P.; von Einem, B.; von Arnim, C.

    2017-02-01

    Correlated imaging of phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetime parameters of metabolic markers is a challenge for direct investigating mechanisms related to cell metabolism and oxygen tension. A large variety of clinical phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial defects accomplished with changes in cell metabolism. In many cases the hypoxic microenvironment of cancer cells shifts metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to anaerobic or aerobic glycolysis, a process known as "Warburg" effect. Also during stem cell differentiation a switch in cell metabolism is observed. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with hypoxia has been invoked in many complex disorders such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimeŕs disease, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, tissue inflammation and cancer. Cellular responses to oxygen tension have been studied extensively, optical imaging techniques based on time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to detect oxygen concentration and distribution are therefore of prominent interest. Moreover, they offer the possibility by inspecting fluorescence decay characteristics of intrinsic coenzymes to directly image metabolic pathways, whereas oxygen tension can be determined by considering the phosphorescence lifetime of a phosphorescent probe. The combination of both fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of coenzymes like NAD(P)H and FAD and phosphorescence lifetime (PLIM) of phosphorescent dyes could provide valuable information about correlation of metabolic pathways and oxygen tension.

  19. Integrated metabolic modelling reveals cell-type specific epigenetic control points of the macrophage metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Maria Pires; John, Elisabeth; Kaoma, Tony; Heinäniemi, Merja; Nicot, Nathalie; Vallar, Laurent; Bueb, Jean-Luc; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Sauter, Thomas

    2015-10-19

    The reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models from easily and reliably measurable features such as transcriptomics data will be increasingly important in research and medicine. Current reconstruction methods suffer from high computational effort and arbitrary threshold setting. Moreover, understanding the underlying epigenetic regulation might allow the identification of putative intervention points within metabolic networks. Genes under high regulatory load from multiple enhancers or super-enhancers are known key genes for disease and cell identity. However, their role in regulation of metabolism and their placement within the metabolic networks has not been studied. Here we present FASTCORMICS, a fast and robust workflow for the creation of high-quality metabolic models from transcriptomics data. FASTCORMICS is devoid of arbitrary parameter settings and due to its low computational demand allows cross-validation assays. Applying FASTCORMICS, we have generated models for 63 primary human cell types from microarray data, revealing significant differences in their metabolic networks. To understand the cell type-specific regulation of the alternative metabolic pathways we built multiple models during differentiation of primary human monocytes to macrophages and performed ChIP-Seq experiments for histone H3 K27 acetylation (H3K27ac) to map the active enhancers in macrophages. Focusing on the metabolic genes under high regulatory load from multiple enhancers or super-enhancers, we found these genes to show the most cell type-restricted and abundant expression profiles within their respective pathways. Importantly, the high regulatory load genes are associated to reactions enriched for transport reactions and other pathway entry points, suggesting that they are critical regulatory control points for cell type-specific metabolism. By integrating metabolic modelling and epigenomic analysis we have identified high regulatory load as a common feature of metabolic

  20. Non-Invasive Microbial Metabolic Activity Sensing at Single Cell Level by Perfusion of Calcein Acetoxymethyl Ester.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E M Krämer

    Full Text Available Phase contrast microscopy cannot give sufficient information on bacterial metabolic activity, or if a cell is dead, it has the fate to die or it is in a viable but non-growing state. Thus, a reliable sensing of the metabolic activity helps to distinguish different categories of viability. We present a non-invasive instantaneous sensing method using a fluorogenic substrate for online monitoring of esterase activity and calcein efflux changes in growing wild type bacteria. The fluorescent conversion product of calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CAM and its efflux indicates the metabolic activity of cells grown under different conditions at real-time. The dynamic conversion of CAM and the active efflux of fluorescent calcein were analyzed by combining microfluidic single cell cultivation technology and fluorescence time lapse microscopy. Thus, an instantaneous and non-invasive sensing method for apparent esterase activity was created without the requirement of genetic modification or harmful procedures. The metabolic activity sensing method consisting of esterase activity and calcein secretion was demonstrated in two applications. Firstly, growing colonies of our model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum were confronted with intermittent nutrient starvation by interrupting the supply of iron and carbon, respectively. Secondly, bacteria were exposed for one hour to fatal concentrations of antibiotics. Bacteria could be distinguished in growing and non-growing cells with metabolic activity as well as non-growing and non-fluorescent cells with no detectable esterase activity. Microfluidic single cell cultivation combined with high temporal resolution time-lapse microscopy facilitated monitoring metabolic activity of stressed cells and analyzing their descendants in the subsequent recovery phase. Results clearly show that the combination of CAM with a sampling free microfluidic approach is a powerful tool to gain insights in the metabolic activity of growing

  1. Evidence for a metabolic shift of arginine metabolism in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnog, JJB; Jager, EH; van der Dijs, FPL; Duits, AJ; Moshage, H; Muskiet, FD; Muskiet, FAJ

    Over the last few years, a pivotal role has been ascribed to reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability as a contributing factor to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease. We investigated whether arginine metabolism in sickle cell patients is different from healthy controls. Blood samples

  2. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New paradigms for metabolic modeling of human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    review recent work on reconstruction of GEMs for human cell/tissue types and cancer, and the use of GEMs for identification of metabolic changes occurring in response to disease development. We further discuss how GEMs can be used for the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. Finally......Abnormalities in cellular functions are associated with the progression of human diseases, often resulting in metabolic reprogramming. GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs) have enabled studying global metabolic reprogramming in connection with disease development in a systematic manner. Here we......, challenges in integration of cell/tissue models for simulation of whole body functions as well as integration of GEMs with other biological networks for generating complete cell/tissue models are presented....

  4. Metabolic Regulation of a Bacterial Cell System with Emphasis on Escherichia coli Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    It is quite important to understand the overall metabolic regulation mechanism of bacterial cells such as Escherichia coli from both science (such as biochemistry) and engineering (such as metabolic engineering) points of view. Here, an attempt was made to clarify the overall metabolic regulation mechanism by focusing on the roles of global regulators which detect the culture or growth condition and manipulate a set of metabolic pathways by modulating the related gene expressions. For this, it was considered how the cell responds to a variety of culture environments such as carbon (catabolite regulation), nitrogen, and phosphate limitations, as well as the effects of oxygen level, pH (acid shock), temperature (heat shock), and nutrient starvation. PMID:25937963

  5. Pluripotent Stem Cell Metabolism and Mitochondria: Beyond ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmon G. Lees

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is central to embryonic stem cell (ESC pluripotency and differentiation, with distinct profiles apparent under different nutrient milieu, and conditions that maintain alternate cell states. The significance of altered nutrient availability, particularly oxygen, and metabolic pathway activity has been highlighted by extensive studies of their impact on preimplantation embryo development, physiology, and viability. ESC similarly modulate their metabolism in response to altered metabolite levels, with changes in nutrient availability shown to have a lasting impact on derived cell identity through the regulation of the epigenetic landscape. Further, the preferential use of glucose and anaplerotic glutamine metabolism serves to not only support cell growth and proliferation but also minimise reactive oxygen species production. However, the perinuclear localisation of spherical, electron-poor mitochondria in ESC is proposed to sustain ESC nuclear-mitochondrial crosstalk and a mitochondrial-H2O2 presence, to facilitate signalling to support self-renewal through the stabilisation of HIFα, a process that may be favoured under physiological oxygen. The environment in which a cell is grown is therefore a critical regulator and determinant of cell fate, with metabolism, and particularly mitochondria, acting as an interface between the environment and the epigenome.

  6. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Angela S. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roberts, Paul C. [Biomedical Science and Pathobiology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Frisard, Madlyn I. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Hulver, Matthew W., E-mail: hulvermw@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Schmelz, Eva M., E-mail: eschmelz@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L{sub FFLv} (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth.

  7. Metabolic adaptation of Chlamydia trachomatis to mammalian host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlitz, Adrian; Eylert, Eva; Huber, Claudia; Lindner, Buko; Vollmuth, Nadine; Karunakaran, Karthika; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rudel, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic adaptation is a key feature for the virulence of pathogenic intracellular bacteria. Nevertheless, little is known about the pathways in adapting the bacterial metabolism to multiple carbon sources available from the host cell. To analyze the metabolic adaptation of the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, we labeled infected HeLa or Caco-2 cells with 13 C-marked glucose, glutamine, malate or a mix of amino acids as tracers. Comparative GC-MS-based isotopologue analysis of protein-derived amino acids from the host cell and the bacterial fraction showed that C. trachomatis efficiently imported amino acids from the host cell for protein biosynthesis. FT-ICR-MS analyses also demonstrated that label from exogenous 13 C-glucose was efficiently shuffled into chlamydial lipopolysaccharide probably via glucose 6-phosphate of the host cell. Minor fractions of bacterial Ala, Asp, and Glu were made de novo probably using dicarboxylates from the citrate cycle of the host cell. Indeed, exogenous 13 C-malate was efficiently taken up by C. trachomatis and metabolized into fumarate and succinate when the bacteria were kept in axenic medium containing the malate tracer. Together, the data indicate co-substrate usage of intracellular C. trachomatis in a stream-lined bipartite metabolism with host cell-supplied amino acids for protein biosynthesis, host cell-provided glucose 6-phosphate for cell wall biosynthesis, and, to some extent, one or more host cell-derived dicarboxylates, e.g. malate, feeding the partial TCA cycle of the bacterium. The latter flux could also support the biosynthesis of meso-2,6-diaminopimelate required for the formation of chlamydial peptidoglycan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Metabolic regulation and maximal reaction optimization in the central metabolism of a yeast cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati, Gunawan, A. Y.; Hertadi, R.; Sidarto, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    Regulation of fluxes in a metabolic system aims to enhance the production rates of biotechnologically important compounds. Regulation is held via modification the cellular activities of a metabolic system. In this study, we present a metabolic analysis of ethanol fermentation process of a yeast cell in terms of continuous culture scheme. The metabolic regulation is based on the kinetic formulation in combination with metabolic control analysis to indicate the key enzymes which can be modified to enhance ethanol production. The model is used to calculate the intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of the yeast cell. Optimal control is then applied to the kinetic model to find the optimal regulation for the fermentation system. The sensitivity results show that there are external and internal control parameters which are adjusted in enhancing ethanol production. As an external control parameter, glucose supply should be chosen in appropriate way such that the optimal ethanol production can be achieved. For the internal control parameter, we find three enzymes as regulation targets namely acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and alcohol dehydrogenase which reside in the acetaldehyde branch. Among the three enzymes, however, only acetaldehyde dehydrogenase has a significant effect to obtain optimal ethanol production efficiently.

  9. Metabolism of strobilurins by wheat cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Kyung; Williams, Daniel A; Xiong, Quanbo; Thornburgh, Scott

    2013-01-09

    Strobilurin fungicides are a leading class of antifungal chemicals used today in agricultural applications. Although degradation of some strobilurin fungicides has been assessed in plant residues, little information has appeared in the literature concerning the rates of metabolism of these fungicides in plants. In this study, we explored plant metabolism of three strobilurin fungicides, azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl, and trifloxystrobin, using wheat cell suspension cultures. Trifloxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl were completely metabolized within 24 h, whereas the metabolism of azoxystrobin was relatively slow with half-lives up to 48 h depending on specific experimental conditions. Metabolic rates of these fungicides were affected by the amounts of compound and cells added to the media. Structural analysis of metabolites of trifloxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) indicated that trifloxystrobin was first demethylated followed by subsequent hydroxylation, whereas kresoxim-methyl was largely demethylated. In contrast, a number of minor metabolites of azoxystrobin were present suggesting a differential metabolism of strobilurins by wheat cells.

  10. Metabolic signalling in pancreatic beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piipari, K.

    2011-01-01

    The main function of pancreatic beta cells is to maintain correct glucose homeostasis within the body by secretion of insulin in response to increased blood glucose concentration. Beta cell dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Using transgenic mouse models, the work described in this thesis has investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in beta cell function and their role in the regulation of ...

  11. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  12. Metabolic and Kinetic analyses of influenza production in perfusion HEK293 cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohr Verena

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell culture-based production of influenza vaccine remains an attractive alternative to egg-based production. Short response time and high production yields are the key success factors for the broader adoption of cell culture technology for industrial manufacturing of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines. Recently, HEK293SF cells have been successfully used to produce influenza viruses, achieving hemagglutinin (HA and infectious viral particle (IVP titers in the highest ranges reported to date. In the same study, it was suggested that beyond 4 × 106 cells/mL, viral production was limited by a lack of nutrients or an accumulation of toxic products. Results To further improve viral titers at high cell densities, perfusion culture mode was evaluated. Productivities of both perfusion and batch culture modes were compared at an infection cell density of 6 × 106 cells/mL. The metabolism, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and amino acids utilization as well as physiological indicators such as viability and apoptosis were extensively documented for the two modes of culture before and after viral infection to identify potential metabolic limitations. A 3 L bioreactor with a perfusion rate of 0.5 vol/day allowed us to reach maximal titers of 3.3 × 1011 IVP/mL and 4.0 logHA units/mL, corresponding to a total production of 1.0 × 1015 IVP and 7.8 logHA units after 3 days post-infection. Overall, perfusion mode titers were higher by almost one order of magnitude over the batch culture mode of production. This improvement was associated with an activation of the cell metabolism as seen by a 1.5-fold and 4-fold higher consumption rates of glucose and glutamine respectively. A shift in the viral production kinetics was also observed leading to an accumulation of more viable cells with a higher specific production and causing an increase in the total volumetric production of infectious influenza particles. Conclusions These results

  13. Natural Compounds as Regulators of the Cancer Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cerella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though altered metabolism is an “old” physiological mechanism, only recently its targeting became a therapeutically interesting strategy and by now it is considered an emerging hallmark of cancer. Nevertheless, a very poor number of compounds are under investigation as potential modulators of cell metabolism. Candidate agents should display selectivity of action towards cancer cells without side effects. This ideal favorable profile would perfectly overlap the requisites of new anticancer therapies and chemopreventive strategies as well. Nature represents a still largely unexplored source of bioactive molecules with a therapeutic potential. Many of these compounds have already been characterized for their multiple anticancer activities. Many of them are absorbed with the diet and therefore possess a known profile in terms of tolerability and bioavailability compared to newly synthetized chemical compounds. The discovery of important cross-talks between mediators of the most therapeutically targeted aberrancies in cancer (i.e., cell proliferation, survival, and migration and the metabolic machinery allows to predict the possibility that many anticancer activities ascribed to a number of natural compounds may be due, in part, to their ability of modulating metabolic pathways. In this review, we attempt an overview of what is currently known about the potential of natural compounds as modulators of cancer cell metabolism.

  14. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of Arthrospira cell factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpan Klanchui

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Arthrospira are attractive candidates to serve as cell factories for production of many valuable compounds useful for food, feed, fuel and pharmaceutical industries. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocessing, it is a challenge to design and develop efficient Arthrospira cell factories which can certify effective conversion from the raw materials (i.e. CO2 and sun light into desired products. With the current availability of the genome sequences and metabolic models of Arthrospira, the development of Arthrospira factories can now be accelerated by means of systems biology and the metabolic engineering approach. Here, we review recent research involving the use of Arthrospira cell factories for industrial applications, as well as the exploitation of systems biology and the metabolic engineering approach for studying Arthrospira. The current status of genomics and proteomics through the development of the genome-scale metabolic model of Arthrospira, as well as the use of mathematical modeling to simulate the phenotypes resulting from the different metabolic engineering strategies are discussed. At the end, the perspective and future direction on Arthrospira cell factories for industrial biotechnology are presented

  15. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY AND METABOLIC ENGINEERING OF ARTHROSPIRA CELL FACTORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpan Klanchui

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Arthrospira are attractive candidates to serve as cell factories for production of many valuable compounds useful for food, feed, fuel and pharmaceutical industries. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocessing, it is a challenge to design and develop efficient Arthrospira cell factories which can certify effective conversion from the raw materials (i.e. CO2 and sun light into desired products. With the current availability of the genome sequences and metabolic models of Arthrospira, the development of Arthrospira factories can now be accelerated by means of systems biology and the metabolic engineering approach. Here, we review recent research involving the use of Arthrospira cell factories for industrial applications, as well as the exploitation of systems biology and the metabolic engineering approach for studying Arthrospira. The current status of genomics and proteomics through the development of the genome-scale metabolic model of Arthrospira, as well as the use of mathematical modeling to simulate the phenotypes resulting from the different metabolic engineering strategies are discussed. At the end, the perspective and future direction on Arthrospira cell factories for industrial biotechnology are presented.

  16. Natural compounds as regulators of the cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerella, Claudia; Radogna, Flavia; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Even though altered metabolism is an "old" physiological mechanism, only recently its targeting became a therapeutically interesting strategy and by now it is considered an emerging hallmark of cancer. Nevertheless, a very poor number of compounds are under investigation as potential modulators of cell metabolism. Candidate agents should display selectivity of action towards cancer cells without side effects. This ideal favorable profile would perfectly overlap the requisites of new anticancer therapies and chemopreventive strategies as well. Nature represents a still largely unexplored source of bioactive molecules with a therapeutic potential. Many of these compounds have already been characterized for their multiple anticancer activities. Many of them are absorbed with the diet and therefore possess a known profile in terms of tolerability and bioavailability compared to newly synthetized chemical compounds. The discovery of important cross-talks between mediators of the most therapeutically targeted aberrancies in cancer (i.e., cell proliferation, survival, and migration) and the metabolic machinery allows to predict the possibility that many anticancer activities ascribed to a number of natural compounds may be due, in part, to their ability of modulating metabolic pathways. In this review, we attempt an overview of what is currently known about the potential of natural compounds as modulators of cancer cell metabolism.

  17. Glutamine Transport and Mitochondrial Metabolism in Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariafrancesca Scalise

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept that cancer is a metabolic disease is now well acknowledged: many cancer cell types rely mostly on glucose and some amino acids, especially glutamine for energy supply. These findings were corroborated by overexpression of plasma membrane nutrient transporters, such as the glucose transporters (GLUTs and some amino acid transporters such as ASCT2, LAT1, and ATB0,+, which became promising targets for pharmacological intervention. On the basis of their sodium-dependent transport modes, ASCT2 and ATB0+ have the capacity to sustain glutamine need of cancer cells; while LAT1, which is sodium independent will have the role of providing cancer cells with some amino acids with plausible signaling roles. According to the metabolic reprogramming of many types of cancer cells, glucose is mainly catabolized by aerobic glycolysis in tumors, while the fate of Glutamine is completed at mitochondrial level where the enzyme Glutaminase converts Glutamine to Glutamate. Glutamine rewiring in cancer cells is heterogeneous. For example, Glutamate is converted to α-Ketoglutarate giving rise to a truncated form of Krebs cycle. This reprogrammed pathway leads to the production of ATP mainly at substrate level and regeneration of reducing equivalents needed for cells growth, redox balance, and metabolic energy. Few studies on hypothetical mitochondrial transporter for Glutamine are reported and indirect evidences suggested its presence. Pharmacological compounds able to inhibit Glutamine metabolism may represent novel drugs for cancer treatments. Interestingly, well acknowledged targets for drugs are the Glutamine transporters of plasma membrane and the key enzyme Glutaminase.

  18. Where Do All the Phytoplankton Go? Challenges in Keeping Track of Viable Cells in Phytoplankton Communities Using Flow Cytometry and Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L. J.; Fobbe, D. J.; Berges, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities has traditionally focused on differences in growth and related processes among taxa. It is now appreciated that differences in mortality could be equally important in contributing to these dynamics. Studying mortality in communities is difficult, especially on relevant time scales, which could be as short as hours to days. Flow cytometry can potentially provide solutions, because it can allow discrimination of different taxa, and when combined with staining, distinguish live and dead cells. We applied flow cytometry and staining to phytoplankton communities in a model system: a small, well-studied, urban pond in southeastern Wisconsin. Using flow cytometry, it was possible to resolve up to six dominant taxa (most stain also affected other fluorescence channels, requiring compensation. Correlations of numbers of dead cells with environmental factors (e.g. temperature, nutrient concentrations, irradiance) were generally poor, suggesting the greater importance of biotic versus abiotic variables in community mortality dynamics. Ongoing work is focusing on the effects of viral pathogens, grazing and allelopathic interactions using experimental manipulations and individual-based modeling.

  19. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  20. Potential of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 to persist and form viable but non-culturable cells on a food-contact surface subjected to cycles of soiling and chemical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marouani-Gadri, Nesrine; Firmesse, Olivier; Chassaing, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    only, a further increase in this proportion occurred 24 h after the CT, suggesting that some of the surviving viable but non-culturable cells finally died. This study shows that conditions leading to E. coli O157:H7 persistence are not likely to arise when good refrigeration and hygiene practices...... no longer detectable after the first week. However, on 66-hour biofilms with 6.7 log CFU/cm², after initially decreasing, E. coli numbers reached 6.6 log CFU/cm² and 8.3 log viable cells/cm² on the 11th day. When E. coli was cultured with a Comamonas testosteroni previously shown to increase E. coli biofilm...

  1. T-cell Metabolism as a Target to Control Autoreactive T Cells in β-Cell Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Carlotta; Canu, Adriana; Dyczko, Aleksandra; Leone, Serena; Monti, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that bio-energetic metabolism of activated T cells is a potential target to control the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes (T1D). T-cell activation and proliferation is linked to the cell capacity to provide sufficient energy and biosynthesis molecules to support T-cell growth and division. This makes T cells susceptible to metabolic inhibition for the control of the T-cell response. There is a wide therapeutic arsenal of metabolic inhibitors, including novel classes of drugs that have become recently available. With the current knowledge and availability of metabolic inhibitors, we are now in the position to design a metabolic inhibition strategy to determine whether targeting of autoreactive T cells is an effective strategy to control the process of β-cell destruction in T1D.

  2. Natural Killer Cell Activity and Interleukin-12 in Metabolically Healthy versus Metabolically Unhealthy Overweight Individuals

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    Minjoo Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the immune system is involved in the different metabolic circumstances in healthy and unhealthy overweight individuals. We examined the metabolic and immune characteristics of 117 overweight individuals. Subjects were classified as metabolically healthy overweight (MHO, n = 72 or metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUO, n = 45. The immune response was measured by circulating levels of natural killer (NK cell activity and cytokines. Both groups were comparable with regards to age, sex distribution, smoking and drinking status, and body mass index. When compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglyceride, glucose, glucose-related markers, and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. Compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed 39% lower interferon-γ levels (not significant and 41% lower interleukin (IL-12 levels (significant. The MUO group also showed lower NK cell activity at E:T ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 (all Ps < 0.05 than the MHO group. This study indicates that individuals displaying the MUO phenotype present an unfavorable immune system with lower NK cell activities under all assay conditions and lower serum levels of IL-12 than the activities and levels in similarly overweight MHO individuals. This result suggests that the immune system may be altered in overweight individuals who are at risk for overweight/obesity-related comorbidities.

  3. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  4. The metabolic cooperation between cells in solid cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icard, Philippe; Kafara, Perrine; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Schwartz, Laurent; Lincet, Hubert

    2014-08-01

    Cancer cells cooperate with stromal cells and use their environment to promote tumor growth. Energy production depends on nutrient availability and O₂ concentration. Well-oxygenated cells are highly proliferative and reorient the glucose metabolism towards biosynthesis, whereas glutamine oxidation replenishes the TCA cycle coupled with OXPHOS-ATP production. Glucose, glutamine and alanine transformations sustain nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, hypoxic cells slow down their proliferation, enhance glycolysis to produce ATP and reject lactate which is recycled as fuel by normoxic cells. Thus, glucose is spared for biosynthesis and/or for hypoxic cell function. Environmental cells, such as fibroblasts and adipocytes, serve as food donors for cancer cells, which reject waste products (CO₂ , H⁺, ammoniac, polyamines…) promoting EMT, invasion, angiogenesis and proliferation. This metabolic-coupling can be considered as a form of commensalism whereby non-malignant cells support the growth of cancer cells. Understanding these cellular cooperations within tumors may be a source of inspiration to develop new anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cancer cell metabolism regulates extracellular matrix degradation by invadopodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, R. van; Buccione, R.; Willemse, M.P.; Cingir, S.; Wieringa, B.; Attanasio, F.

    2013-01-01

    Transformed cancer cells have an altered metabolism, characterized by a shift towards aerobic glycolysis, referred to as 'the Warburg phenotype'. A change in flux through mitochondrial OXPHOS and cytosolic pathways for ATP production and a gain of capacity for biomass production in order to sustain

  6. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  7. DIVERSITY OF ARSENIC METABOLISM IN CULTURED HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity of arsenic metabolism in cultured human cancer cell lines. Arsenic has been known to cause a variety of malignancies in human. Pentavalent As (As 5+) is reduced to trivalent As (As3+) which is further methylated by arsenic methyltransferase(s) to monomethylarson...

  8. Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Modulating Effects of Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Diers, Anne R.; Hogg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolic phenotype has been recognized as a hallmark of tumor cells for many years, but this aspect of the cancer phenotype has come into greater focus in recent years. NOS2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase of iNOS) has been implicated as a component in many aggressive tumor phenotypes, including melanoma, glioblastoma and breast cancer. Nitric oxide has been well established as a modulator of cellular bioenergetics pathways, in many ways similar to the alteration of cellular metabolism observed in aggressive tumors. In this review we attempt to bring these concepts together with the general hypothesis that one function of NOS2 and NO in cancer is to modulate metabolic processes to facilitate increased tumor aggression. There are many mechanisms by which NO can modulate tumor metabolism, including direct inhibition of respiration, alterations in mitochondrial mass, oxidative inhibition of bioenergetic enzymes, and the stimulation of secondary signaling pathways. Here we review metabolic alterations in the context of cancer cells and discuss the role of NO as a potential mediator of these changes. PMID:25464273

  9. Molecular Imaging Of Metabolic Reprogramming In Mutant IDH Cells

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    Pavithra eViswanath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG. In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an oncometabolite, inhibits key α-KG- dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprogramming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprogramming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH cells and how this reprogramming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an "oncometabolite," inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  11. Reconstruction of metabolic networks from high-throughput metabolite profiling data: in silico analysis of red blood cell metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemenman, Ilya; Escola, G. Sean; Hlavacek, William S.; Unkefer, Pat J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Wall, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the ability of algorithms developed for reverse engineering of transcriptional regulatory networks to reconstruct metabolic networks from high-throughput metabolite profiling data. For this, we generate synthetic metabolic profiles for benchmarking purposes based on a well-established model for red blood cell metabolism. A variety of data sets is generated, accounting for different properties of real metabolic networks, such as experimental noise, metabolite correlations, and t...

  12. Applicaton of speckle dynamics for studies of cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Baharev, A. A.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhailova, J. A.; Novoselova, I. A.; Yakin, D. I.

    2015-05-01

    Previously, a speckle interferometry technique and a device that allows quantitative evaluation of the metabolic activity of cultured cells were theoretically grounded and successfully tested. A speckle time-averaging technique was proposed to separate and study the processes occurring in cells at various velocities. The objective of the present research was comparing the parameters of speckle dynamics used to evaluate cell metabolism and averaged in areas of various size. Areas inside the speckle image of a cell as well as areas of the image plane with various numbers of cells were averaging areas. The target of the research was cells from L-41 culture placed onto a special optical tray with a nutrient solution immediately after defrosting. Time-average value T of digital radiation intensity in the TV camera pixels I (1) and the correlation coefficient of two digital images η (2) were used as speckle field change parameters. The digital images corresponded to a single frame area at two time moments. It is shown that in the area containing hundreds of cells dependence η(t) levels off, which indicate stationarity of random value I~ . Features of η(t) dependences obtained by averaging over large and small cell numbers image are discussed. Using the data obtained, we formulated recommendations on selecting area sizes for averaging physical values to study various processes occurring in cells.

  13. The metabolic advantage of tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Laurent

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract 1- Oncogenes express proteins of "Tyrosine kinase receptor pathways", a receptor family including insulin or IGF-Growth Hormone receptors. Other oncogenes alter the PP2A phosphatase brake over these kinases. 2- Experiments on pancreatectomized animals; treated with pure insulin or total pancreatic extracts, showed that choline in the extract, preserved them from hepatomas. Since choline is a methyle donor, and since methylation regulates PP2A, the choline protection may result from PP2A methylation, which then attenuates kinases. 3- Moreover, kinases activated by the boosted signaling pathway inactivate pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, demethylated PP2A would no longer dephosphorylate these enzymes. A "bottleneck" between glycolysis and the oxidative-citrate cycle interrupts the glycolytic pyruvate supply now provided via proteolysis and alanine transamination. This pyruvate forms lactate (Warburg effect and NAD+ for glycolysis. Lipolysis and fatty acids provide acetyl CoA; the citrate condensation increases, unusual oxaloacetate sources are available. ATP citrate lyase follows, supporting aberrant transaminations with glutaminolysis and tumor lipogenesis. Truncated urea cycles, increased polyamine synthesis, consume the methyl donor SAM favoring carcinogenesis. 4- The decrease of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, elicits epigenic changes (PETEN, P53, IGFBP decrease; hexokinase, fetal-genes-M2, increase 5- IGFBP stops binding the IGF - IGFR complex, it is perhaps no longer inherited by a single mitotic daughter cell; leading to two daughter cells with a mitotic capability. 6- An excess of IGF induces a decrease of the major histocompatibility complex MHC1, Natural killer lymphocytes should eliminate such cells that start the tumor, unless the fever prostaglandin PGE2 or inflammation, inhibit them...

  14. Systems metabolic engineering: the creation of microbial cell factories by rational metabolic design and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that in order to establish sustainable societies, production processes should shift from petrochemical-based processes to bioprocesses. Because bioconversion technologies, in which biomass resources are converted to valuable materials, are preferable to processes dependent on fossil resources, the former should be further developed. The following two approaches can be adopted to improve cellular properties and obtain high productivity and production yield of target products: (1) optimization of cellular metabolic pathways involved in various bioprocesses and (2) creation of stress-tolerant cells that can be active even under severe stress conditions in the bioprocesses. Recent progress in omics analyses has facilitated the analysis of microorganisms based on bioinformatics data for molecular breeding and bioprocess development. Systems metabolic engineering is a new area of study, and it has been defined as a methodology in which metabolic engineering and systems biology are integrated to upgrade the designability of industrially useful microorganisms. This chapter discusses multi-omics analyses and rational design methods for molecular breeding. The first is an example of the rational design of metabolic networks for target production by flux balance analysis using genome-scale metabolic models. Recent progress in the development of genome-scale metabolic models and the application of these models to the design of desirable metabolic networks is also described in this example. The second is an example of evolution engineering with omics analyses for the creation of stress-tolerant microorganisms. Long-term culture experiments to obtain the desired phenotypes and omics analyses to identify the phenotypic changes are described here.

  15. Metabolic Stress and Compromised Identity of Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-01-01

    Beta cell failure is a central feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the molecular underpinnings of the process remain only partly understood. It has been suggested that beta cell failure in T2D involves massive cell death. Other studies ascribe beta cell failure to cell exhaustion, due to chronic oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to cellular dysfunction. More recently it was proposed that beta cells in T2D may lose their differentiated identity, possibly even gaining features of other islet cell types. The loss of beta cell identity appears to be driven by glucotoxicity inhibiting the activity of key beta cell transcription factors including Pdx1, Nkx6.1, MafA and Pax6, thereby silencing beta cell genes and derepressing alternative islet cell genes. The loss of beta cell identity is at least partly reversible upon normalization of glycemia, with implications for the reversibility of T2D, although it is not known if beta cell failure reaches eventually a point of no return. In this review we discuss current evidence for metabolism-driven compromised beta cell identity, key knowledge gaps and opportunities for utility in the treatment of T2D.

  16. Metabolism and the Control of Cell Fate Decisions and Stem Cell Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Although the stem cells of various tissues remain in the quiescent state to maintain their undifferentiated state, they also undergo cell divisions as required, and if necessary, even a single stem cell is able to provide for lifelong tissue homeostasis. Stem cell populations are precisely controlled by the balance between their symmetric and asymmetric divisions, with their division patterns determined by whether the daughter cells involved retain their self-renewal capacities. Recent studies have reported that metabolic pathways and the distribution of mitochondria are regulators of the division balance of stem cells and that metabolic defects can shift division balance toward symmetric commitment, which leads to stem cell exhaustion. It has also been observed that in asymmetric division, old mitochondria, which are central metabolic organelles, are segregated to the daughter cell fated to cell differentiation, whereas in symmetric division, young and old mitochondria are equally distributed between both daughter cells. Thus, metabolism and mitochondrial biology play important roles in stem cell fate decisions. As these decisions directly affect tissue homeostasis, understanding their regulatory mechanisms in the context of cellular metabolism is critical. PMID:27482603

  17. Role of innate lymphoid cells in obesity and metabolic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetang, Jirakrit; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2018-01-01

    The immune system has previously been demonstrated to be associated with the pathophysiological development of metabolic abnormalities. However, the mechanisms linking immunity to metabolic disease remain to be fully elucidated. It has previously been suggested that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) may be involved in the progression of numerous types of metabolic diseases as these cells act as suppressors and promoters for obesity and associated conditions, and are particularly involved in adipose tissue inflammation, which is a major feature of metabolic imbalance. Group 2 ILCs (ILC2s) have been revealed as anti-obese immune regulators by secreting anti-inflammatory cytokines and promoting the polarization of M2 macrophages, whereas group 1 ILCs (ILC1s), including natural killer cells, may promote adipose tissue inflammation via production of interferon-γ, which in turn polarizes macrophages toward the M1 type. The majority of studies to date have demonstrated the pathological association between ILCs and obesity in the context of adipose tissue inflammation, whereas the roles of ILCs in other organs which participate in obesity development have not been fully characterized. Therefore, identifying the roles of all types of ILCs as central components mediating obesity-associated inflammation, is of primary concern, and may lead to the discovery of novel preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:29138853

  18. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A D Smith

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined.MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography.Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U]glucose.This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism.

  19. Metabolism within the specialized guard cells of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloso, Danilo M; Medeiros, David B; Dos Anjos, Letícia; Yoshida, Takuya; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2017-12-01

    Contents 1018 I. 1018 II. 1019 III. 1022 IV. 1025 V. 1026 VI. 1029 1030 References 1030 SUMMARY: Stomata are leaf epidermal structures consisting of two guard cells surrounding a pore. Changes in the aperture of this pore regulate plant water-use efficiency, defined as gain of C by photosynthesis per leaf water transpired. Stomatal aperture is actively regulated by reversible changes in guard cell osmolyte content. Despite the fact that guard cells can photosynthesize on their own, the accumulation of mesophyll-derived metabolites can seemingly act as signals which contribute to the regulation of stomatal movement. It has been shown that malate can act as a signalling molecule and a counter-ion of potassium, a well-established osmolyte that accumulates in the vacuole of guard cells during stomatal opening. By contrast, their efflux from guard cells is an important mechanism during stomatal closure. It has been hypothesized that the breakdown of starch, sucrose and lipids is an important mechanism during stomatal opening, which may be related to ATP production through glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism, and/or accumulation of osmolytes such as sugars and malate. However, experimental evidence supporting this theory is lacking. Here we highlight the particularities of guard cell metabolism and discuss this in the context of the guard cells themselves and their interaction with the mesophyll cells. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Pancreatic tumor cell metabolism: focus on glycolysis and its connected metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Iovanna, Juan Lucio; Vasseur, Sophie

    2014-03-01

    Because of lack of effective treatment, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of death by cancer in Western countries, with a very weak improvement of survival rate over the last 40years. Defeat of numerous conventional therapies to cure this cancer makes urgent to develop new tools usable by clinicians for a better management of the disease. Aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer relies on its own hallmarks: a low vascular network as well as a prominent stromal compartment (desmoplasia), which creates a severe hypoxic environment impeding correct oxygen and nutrients diffusion to the tumoral cells. To survive and proliferate in those conditions, pancreatic cancer cells set up specific metabolic pathways to meet their tremendous energetic and biomass demands. However, as PDAC is a heterogenous tumor, a complex reprogramming of metabolic processes is engaged by cancer cells according to their level of oxygenation and nutrients supply. In this review, we focus on the glycolytic activity of PDAC and the glucose-connected metabolic pathways which contribute to the progression and dissemination of this disease. We also discuss possible therapeutic strategies targeting these pathways in order to cure this disease which still until now is resistant to numerous conventional treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear receptors as regulators of stem cell and cancer stem cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandi, Zoltan; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Nagy, Laszlo

    2013-12-01

    Cellular metabolism is underpinning physiological processes in all cells. These include housekeeping functions as well as specific activities unique to a particular cell type. A growing number of studies in various experimental models indicate that metabolism is tightly connected to embryonic development as well. It is also emerging that metabolic processes have regulatory roles and by changing metabolism, cellular processes and even fates can be influenced. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors, responding to changes in metabolites and are implicated in diverse biological processes such as embryonic development, differentiation, metabolism and cancer. Therefore, NRs are key links between metabolism and cell fate decisions. In this review, we introduce ESRRβ, DAX-1 and LRH-1 as putative regulators of metabolism in pluripotent embryonic stem cells. We also discuss the role of TR4, NGF1β, LXRβ and RARs in stemness. In addition, we summarize our current understanding of the potential roles of NRs in cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phthalate exposure changes the metabolic profile of cardiac muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnack, Nikki Gillum; Swift, Luther M; Kay, Matthew W; Lee, Norman H; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2012-09-01

    Phthalates are common plasticizers present in medical-grade plastics and other everyday products. They can also act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals and have been linked to the rise in metabolic disorders. However, the effect of phthalates on cardiac metabolism remains largely unknown. We examined the effect of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) on the metabolic profile of cardiomyocytes because alterations in metabolic processes can lead to cell dysfunction. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with DEHP at a concentration and duration comparable to clinical exposure (50-100 μg/mL, 72 hr). We assessed the effect of DEHP on gene expression using microarray analysis. Physiological responses were examined via fatty acid utilization, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial mass, and Western blot analysis. Exposure to DEHP led to up-regulation of genes associated with fatty acid transport, esterification, mitochondrial import, and β-oxidation. The functional outcome was an increase in myocyte fatty acid-substrate utilization, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial mass, PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) protein expression, and extracellular acidosis. Treatment with a PPARα agonist (Wy-14643) only partially mimicked the effects observed in DEHP-treated cells. Data suggest that DEHP exposure results in metabolic remodeling of cardiomyocytes, whereby cardiac cells increase their dependence on fatty acids for energy production. This fuel switch may be regulated at both the gene expression and posttranscription levels. Our findings have important clinical implications because chronic dependence on fatty acids is associated with an accumulation in lipid intermediates, lactate, protons, and reactive oxygen species. This dependence can sensitize the heart to ischemic injury and ventricular dysfunction.

  3. Nitrogen metabolism in Lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, P. S.; Towers, G. H.; Lewis, N. G.

    1996-01-01

    The primary metabolic fate of phyenylalanine, following its deamination in plants, is conscription of its carbon skeleton for lignin, suberin, flavonoid, and related metabolite formation. Since this accounts for approximately 30-40% of all organic carbon, an effective means of recycling the liberated ammonium ion must be operative. In order to establish how this occurs, the uptake and metabolism of various 15N-labeled precursors (15N-Phe, 15NH4Cl, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Glu) in lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures was investigated, using a combination of high performance liquid chromatography, 15N NMR, and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analyses. It was found that the ammonium ion released during active phenylpropanoid metabolism was not made available for general amino acid/protein synthesis. Rather it was rapidly recycled back to regenerate phenylalanine, thereby providing an effective means of maintaining active phenylpropanoid metabolism with no additional nitrogen requirement. These results strongly suggest that, in lignifying cells, ammonium ion reassimilation is tightly compartmentalized.

  4. Effects of 3-styrylchromones on metabolic profiles and cell death in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakagami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 4H-1-benzopyran-4-ones (chromones are important naturally-distributing compounds. As compared with flavones, isoflavones and 2-styrylchromones, there are only few papers of 3-styrylchromones that have been published. We have previously reported that among fifteen 3-styrylchromone derivatives, three new synthetic compounds that have OCH3 group at the C-6 position of chromone ring, (E-3-(4-hydroxystyryl-6-methoxy-4H-chromen-4-one (compound 11, (E-6-methoxy-3-(4-methoxystyryl-4H-chromen-4-one (compound 4, (E-6-methoxy-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl-4H-chromen-4-one (compound 6 showed much higher cytotoxicities against four epithelial human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC lines than human normal oral mesenchymal cells. In order to further confirm the tumor specificities of these compounds, we compared their cytotoxicities against both human epithelial malignant and non-malignant cells, and then investigated their effects on fine cell structures and metabolic profiles and cell death in human OSCC cell line HSC-2. Cytotoxicities of compounds 4, 6, 11 were assayed with MTT method. Fine cell structures were observed under transmission electron microscope. Cellular metabolites were extracted with methanol and subjected to CE-TOFMS analysis. Compounds 4, 6, 11 showed much weaker cytotoxicity against human oral keratinocyte and primary human gingival epithelial cells, as compared with HSC-2, confirming their tumor-specificity, whereas doxorubicin and 5-FU were highly cytotoxic to these normal epithelial cells, giving unexpectedly lower tumor-specificity. The most cytotoxic compound 11, induced the mitochondrial vacuolization, autophagy suppression followed by apoptosis induction, and changes in the metabolites involved in amino acid and glycerophospholipid metabolisms. Chemical modification of lead compound 11 may be a potential choice for designing new type of anticancer drugs.

  5. Specific and Complex Reprogramming of Cellular Metabolism in Myeloid Cells during Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienstra, Rinke; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Riksen, Niels P; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G

    2017-07-05

    Renewed interest in immune cell metabolism has led to the emergence of a research field aimed at studying the importance of metabolic processes for an effective immune response. In addition to the adaptive immune system, cells of the myeloid lineage have been shown to undergo robust metabolic changes upon activation. Whereas the specific metabolic requirements of myeloid cells after lipopolysaccharide/TLR4 stimulation have been extensively studied, recent evidence suggested that this model does not represent a metabolic blueprint for activated myeloid cells. Instead, different microbial stimuli, pathogens, or tissue microenvironments lead to specific and complex metabolic rewiring of myeloid cells. Here we present an overview of the metabolic heterogeneity in activated myeloid cells during health and disease. Directions for future research are suggested to ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities. The uniqueness of metabolic signatures accompanying different conditions will require tailor-made interventions to ultimately modulate aberrant myeloid cell activation during disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolic reprogramming in the tumour microenvironment: a hallmark shared by cancer cells and T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Katrina E; Coomber, Brenda L; Bridle, Byram W

    2017-10-01

    Altered metabolism is a hallmark of cancers, including shifting oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and up-regulating glutaminolysis to divert carbon sources into biosynthetic pathways that promote proliferation and survival. Therefore, metabolic inhibitors represent promising anti-cancer drugs. However, T cells must rapidly divide and survive in harsh microenvironments to mediate anti-cancer effects. Metabolic profiles of cancer cells and activated T lymphocytes are similar, raising the risk of metabolic inhibitors impairing the immune system. Immune checkpoint blockade provides an example of how metabolism can be differentially impacted to impair cancer cells but support T cells. Implications for research with metabolic inhibitors are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  8. Cinnamaldehyde induces fat cell-autonomous thermogenesis and metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Juan; Emont, Margo P; Jun, Heejin; Qiao, Xiaona; Liao, Jiling; Kim, Dong-Il; Wu, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is a food compound that has previously been observed to be protective against obesity and hyperglycemia in mouse models. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms behind this protective effect by assessing the cell-autonomous response of primary adipocytes to CA treatment. Primary murine adipocytes were treated with CA and thermogenic and metabolic responses were assessed after both acute and chronic treatments. Human adipose stem cells were differentiated and treated with CA to assess whether the CA-mediated signaling is conserved in humans. CA significantly activated PKA signaling, increased expression levels of thermogenic genes and induced phosphorylation of HSL and PLIN1 in murine primary adipocytes. Inhibition of PKA or p38 MAPK enzymatic activity markedly inhibited the CA-induced thermogenic response. In addition, chronic CA treatment regulates metabolic reprogramming, which was partially diminished in FGF21KO adipocytes. Importantly, both acute and chronic effects of CA were observed in human adipose stem cells isolated from multiple donors of different ethnicities and ages and with a variety of body mass indexes (BMI). CA activates thermogenic and metabolic responses in mouse and human primary subcutaneous adipocytes in a cell-autonomous manner, giving a mechanistic explanation for the anti-obesity effects of CA observed previously and further supporting its potential metabolic benefits on humans. Given the wide usage of cinnamon in the food industry, the notion that this popular food additive, instead of a drug, may activate thermogenesis, could ultimately lead to therapeutic strategies against obesity that are much better adhered to by participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ets-1 regulates energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Verschoor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells predominantly utilize glycolysis for ATP production even in the presence of abundant oxygen, an environment that would normally result in energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Although the molecular mechanism for this metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis has not been fully elucidated, it is likely that mitochondrial damage to the electron transport chain and the resulting increased production of reactive oxygen species are significant driving forces. In this study, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor Ets-1 in the regulation of mitochondrial function and metabolism. Ets-1 was over-expressed using a stably-incorporated tetracycline-inducible expression vector in the ovarian cancer cell line 2008, which does not express detectable basal levels of Ets-1 protein. Microarray analysis of the effects of Ets-1 over-expression in these ovarian cancer cells shows that Ets-1 up-regulates key enzymes involved in glycolysis and associated feeder pathways, fatty acid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In contrast, Ets-1 down-regulates genes involved in the citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, and mitochondrial proteins. At the functional level, we have found that Ets-1 expression is directly correlated with cellular oxygen consumption whereby increased expression causes decreased oxygen consumption. Ets-1 over-expression also caused increased sensitivity to glycolytic inhibitors, as well as growth inhibition in a glucose-depleted culture environment. Collectively our findings demonstrate that Ets-1 is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress in ovarian cancer cells.

  10. Comprehensive Mapping of Pluripotent Stem Cell Metabolism Using Dynamic Genome-Scale Network Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Chandrasekaran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metabolism is an emerging stem cell hallmark tied to cell fate, pluripotency, and self-renewal, yet systems-level understanding of stem cell metabolism has been limited by the lack of genome-scale network models. Here, we develop a systems approach to integrate time-course metabolomics data with a computational model of metabolism to analyze the metabolic state of naive and primed murine pluripotent stem cells. Using this approach, we find that one-carbon metabolism involving phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, folate synthesis, and nucleotide synthesis is a key pathway that differs between the two states, resulting in differential sensitivity to anti-folates. The model also predicts that the pluripotency factor Lin28 regulates this one-carbon metabolic pathway, which we validate using metabolomics data from Lin28-deficient cells. Moreover, we identify and validate metabolic reactions related to S-adenosyl-methionine production that can differentially impact histone methylation in naive and primed cells. Our network-based approach provides a framework for characterizing metabolic changes influencing pluripotency and cell fate. : Chandrasekaran et al. use computational modeling, metabolomics, and metabolic inhibitors to discover metabolic differences between various pluripotent stem cell states and infer their impact on stem cell fate decisions. Keywords: systems biology, stem cell biology, metabolism, genome-scale modeling, pluripotency, histone methylation, naive (ground state, primed state, cell fate, metabolic network

  11. Genome-wide metabolic model to improve understanding of CD4(+) T cell metabolism, immunometabolism and application in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Feifei; Li, Gonghua; Dai, Shaoxing; Huang, Jingfei

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells play a critical role in adaptive immunity and have been well studied in past decades. However, the systematic metabolism features are less clear. Here, we reconstructed the genome-wide metabolic network of naïve CD4(+) T cells, CD4T1670, by integrating transcriptome and metabolism data. We performed simulations for three critical metabolic subsystems (carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and glutaminolysis). The results were consistent with most experimental observations. Furthermore, we found that depletion of either glucose or glutamine did not significantly affect ATP production and biomass, but dramatically unbalanced the metabolic network and increased the release of some inflammation or anti-inflammation related factors, such as lysophosphatidylcholine, leukotriene and hyaluronan. Genome-wide single gene knockout analysis showed that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was essential for T cell activation. We further investigated the role of immunometabolic genes in metabolic network stability, and found that over 25% of them were essential. The results also showed that although PTEN is a well-studied proliferation inhibitor, it was essential for maintaining the stability of CD4 metabolic networks. Finally, we applied CD4T1670 to evaluate the side-effects of certain drugs in preclinical experiments. These results suggested that CD4T1670 would be useful in understanding CD4(+) T cells and drug design systematically.

  12. In Vivo Single-Cell Detection of Metabolic Oscillations in Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Stringari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of bulk measurements in metabolic organs, the circadian clock was shown to play roles in organismal energy homeostasis. However, the relationship between metabolic and circadian oscillations has not been studied in vivo at a single-cell level. Also, it is unknown whether the circadian clock controls metabolism in stem cells. We used a sensitive, noninvasive method to detect metabolic oscillations and circadian phase within epidermal stem cells in live mice at the single-cell level. We observe a higher NADH/NAD+ ratio, reflecting an increased glycolysis/oxidative phosphorylation ratio during the night compared to the day. Furthermore, we demonstrate that single-cell metabolic heterogeneity within the basal cell layer correlates with the circadian clock and that diurnal fluctuations in NADH/NAD+ ratio are Bmal1 dependent. Our data show that, in proliferating stem cells, the circadian clock coordinates activities of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis with DNA synthesis, perhaps as a protective mechanism against genotoxicity.

  13. Vitamin A metabolism in cultured somatic cells from rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzini, Davide; Catizone, Angela; Galdieri, Michela; Ottonello, Simone

    2003-10-01

    Sertoli and peritubular myoid cells, the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubule, support growth and differentiation of developing germ cells. This action strictly depends on the availability of in situ synthesized retinoic acid and we have previously documented the ability of Sertoli, but not peritubular cell extracts, to support the oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid. Using primary cultures of somatic cells treated with a physiological concentration of free retinol, we show here that the same is essentially true also for whole cultured cells. Sertoli cells are capable of producing not only retinoic acid, but are also the major site of retinyl ester (mainly, retinyl palmitate) formation. Compared with retinyl palmitate accumulation, retinoic acid synthesis was both faster and positively influenced by prior exposure to retinol. This increase in retinoic acid synthesis was further augmented by treatment with the retinoic acid catabolic inhibitor liarozole, thus indicating that enhanced synthesis, rather than reduced catabolism, is responsible for such an effect. Myoid cells had a higher capacity to incorporate exogenously supplied retinol, yet retinoic acid synthesis, and even more so retinyl palmitate formation, were considerably lower than in Sertoli cells. Retinoic acid synthesis in myoid cells was not only depressed, but also very little influenced by prior retinol exposure and totally insensitive to liarozole. These data further support the view that myoid cells are involved in retinol uptake from the blood and its transfer to other cells, rather than in metabolic interconversion or long-term storage of vitamin A, two processes that mainly take place in Sertoli cells.

  14. Emerging concepts of T cell metabolism as a target of immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-04-01

    T cells have a pivotal protective role in defense against infection and cancer but also are instrumental in the development of many autoimmune diseases. The regulation of nutrient uptake and utilization in T cells is critically important for the control of their differentiation, and manipulating metabolic pathways in these cells can alter their function and longevity. While the importance of T cell metabolic remodeling in different physiological settings is not fully understood, there is a growing realization that inappropriate metabolic remodeling underlies many aberrant immune responses and that manipulating cellular metabolism can beneficially enhance or temper immunity. Here we comment on the basic metabolic pathways in T cells, followed by a discussion on up-to-date findings about the relationship between metabolism and T cell function and longevity. Furthermore, we expand on potential approaches and applications in which T cells might be manipulated by the reprogramming of metabolic pathways for therapeutic purposes.

  15. A Single Dynamic Metabolic Model Can Describe mAb Producing CHO Cell Batch and Fed-Batch Cultures on Different Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Julien; Chen, Jingkui; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CHO cell culture high productivity relies on optimized culture medium management under fed-batch or perfused chemostat strategies enabling high cell densities. In this work, a dynamic metabolic model for CHO cells was further developed, calibrated and challenged using datasets obtained under four different culture conditions, including two batch and two fed-batch cultures comparing two different culture media. The recombinant CHO-DXB11 cell line producing the EG2-hFc monoclonal antibody was studied. Quantification of extracellular substrates and metabolites concentration, viable cell density, monoclonal antibody concentration and intracellular concentration of metabolite intermediates of glycolysis, pentose-phosphate and TCA cycle, as well as of energetic nucleotides, were obtained for model calibration. Results suggest that a single model structure with a single set of kinetic parameter values is efficient at simulating viable cell behavior in all cases under study, estimating the time course of measured and non-measured intracellular and extracellular metabolites. Model simulations also allowed performing dynamic metabolic flux analysis, showing that the culture media and the fed-batch strategies tested had little impact on flux distribution. This work thus paves the way to an in silico platform allowing to assess the performance of different culture media and fed-batch strategies.

  16. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  17. The impact of metabolism on aging and cell size in single yeast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to determine how metabolism affects yeast aging in single yeast cells using a novel microfluidic device. We first review how cells are able to sense nutrients in their environment and then describe the use of the microfluidic dissection platform that greatly improves our

  18. PET probes for distinct metabolic pathways have different cell specificities during immune responses in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nair-Gill, Evan; Wiltzius, Stephanie M.; Wei, Xiao X.; Cheng, Donghui; Riedinger, Mireille; Radu, Caius G.; Witte, Owen N.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical tools that measure changes in immune cell metabolism would improve the diagnosis and treatment of immune dysfunction. PET, utilizing probes for specific metabolic processes, detects regions of immune activation in vivo. In this study we investigated the immune cell specificity of PET probes for two different metabolic pathways: [18F]–2-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG) for glycolysis and ...

  19. Specific and Complex Reprogramming of Cellular Metabolism in Myeloid Cells during Innate Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, R.; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Riksen, N.P.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Renewed interest in immune cell metabolism has led to the emergence of a research field aimed at studying the importance of metabolic processes for an effective immune response. In addition to the adaptive immune system, cells of the myeloid lineage have been shown to undergo robust metabolic

  20. Specific and Complex Reprogramming of Cellular Metabolism in Myeloid Cells during Innate Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Rinke; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Riksen, Niels P.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2017-01-01

    Renewed interest in immune cell metabolism has led to the emergence of a research field aimed at studying the importance of metabolic processes for an effective immune response. In addition to the adaptive immune system, cells of the myeloid lineage have been shown to undergo robust metabolic

  1. Comparative metabolic pathway analysis with special reference to nucleotide metabolism-related genes in chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Lee, Bo Ram; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Young Min; Han, Jae Yong

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism provides energy and nutrients required for the cellular growth, maintenance, and reproduction. When compared with genomics and proteomics, metabolism studies provide novel findings in terms of cellular functions. In this study, we examined significant and differentially expressed genes in primordial germ cells (PGCs), gonadal stromal cells, and chicken embryonic fibroblasts compared with blastoderms using microarray. All upregulated genes (1001, 1118, and 974, respectively) and downregulated genes (504, 627, and 1317, respectively) in three test samples were categorized into functional groups according to gene ontology. Then all selected genes were tested to examine their involvement in metabolic pathways through Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database using overrepresentation analysis. In our results, most of the upregulated and downregulated genes were involved in at least one subcategory of seven major metabolic pathways. The main objective of this study is to compare the PGC expressed genes and their metabolic pathways with blastoderms, gonadal stromal cells, and chicken embryonic fibroblasts. Among the genes involved in metabolic pathways, a higher number of PGC upregulated genes were identified in retinol metabolism, and a higher number of PGC downregulated genes were identified in sphingolipid metabolism. In terms of the fold change, acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 3 (ACSM3), which is involved in butanoate metabolism, and N-acetyltransferase, pineal gland isozyme NAT-10 (PNAT10), which is involved in energy metabolism, showed higher expression in PGCs. To validate these gene changes, the expression of 12 nucleotide metabolism-related genes in chicken PGCs was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of this study provide new information on the expression of genes associated with metabolism function of PGCs and will facilitate more basic research on animal PGC differentiation and function

  2. Enzymatic isolation of viable human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, H M; Pääkkönen, V; Tjäderhane, L

    2016-05-01

    To improve an enzymatic method previously used for isolation of rat odontoblasts to isolate viable mature human odontoblasts. Collagenase I, collagenase I/hyaluronidase mixture and hyaluronidase were used to extract mature human odontoblasts from the pulp chamber. Detachment of odontoblasts from dentine was determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and to analyse the significance of differences in tubular diameter, and the t-test was used. MTT-reaction was used to analyse cell viability, and nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney post hoc tests were used to analyse the data. Immunofluorescent staining of dentine sialoprotein (DSP), aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) were used to confirm the odontoblastic nature of the cells. MTT-reaction and FESEM demonstrated collagenase I/hyaluronidase resulted in more effective detachment and higher viability than collagenase I alone. Hyaluronidase alone was not able to detach odontoblasts. Immunofluorescence revealed the typical odontoblastic-morphology with one process, and DSP, AQP4 and MMP-20 were detected. Quantitative PCR of DSPP confirmed that the isolated cells expressed this odontoblast-specific gene. The isolation of viable human odontoblasts was successful. The cells demonstrated morphology typical for odontoblasts and expressed characteristic odontoblast-type genes and proteins. This method will enable new approaches, such as apoptosis analysis, for studies using fully differentiated odontoblasts. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Metabolic reprogramming in mutant IDH1 glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Izquierdo-Garcia

    Full Text Available Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH 1 have been reported in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas. IDH1 is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate while mutant IDH1 catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate into 2-hydroxyglutarate. These mutations are associated with the accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate within the tumor and are believed to be one of the earliest events in the development of low-grade gliomas. The goal of this work was to determine whether the IDH1 mutation leads to additional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS-detectable changes in the cellular metabolome.Two genetically engineered cell models were investigated, a U87-based model and an E6/E7/hTERT immortalized normal human astrocyte (NHA-based model. For both models, wild-type IDH1 cells were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector coding for the wild-type IDH1 gene while mutant IDH1 cells were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector coding for the R132H IDH1 mutant gene. Metabolites were extracted from the cells using the dual-phase extraction method and analyzed by 1H-MRS. Principal Component Analysis was used to analyze the MRS data.Principal Component Analysis clearly discriminated between wild-type and mutant IDH1 cells. Analysis of the loading plots revealed significant metabolic changes associated with the IDH1 mutation. Specifically, a significant drop in the concentration of glutamate, lactate and phosphocholine as well as the expected elevation in 2-hydroxyglutarate were observed in mutant IDH1 cells when compared to their wild-type counterparts.The IDH1 mutation leads to several, potentially translatable MRS-detectable metabolic changes beyond the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate.

  4. IRON METABOLISM IN THALASSEMIA AND SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Mariani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two main mechanisms by which iron overload develops in thalassemias: increased iron absorption due to ineffective erythropoiesis and blood transfusions. In nontransfused patients with severe thalassemia, abnormal dietary iron absorption increases body iron burden between 2 and 5 g per year. If regular transfusions are required, this doubles the rate of iron accumulation leading to earlier massive iron overload and iron-related damage. Iron metabolism largely differs between thalassemias and sickle cell disease, but chronic transfusion therapy partially normalize many of the disparities between the diseases, making iron overload an important issue to be considered in the management of patients with sickle cell disease too. The present review summarizes the actual knowledge on the regulatory pathways of iron homeostasis. In particular, the data presented indicate the inextricably link between erythropoiesis and iron metabolism and the key role of hepcidin in coordinating iron procurement according to erythropoietic requirement. The role of erythropoietin, hypoxia, erythroid-dependent soluble factors and iron in regulating hepcidin transcription are discussed as well as differences and similarities in iron homeostasis between thalassemia syndromes and sickle cell disease.

  5. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia A

    2012-02-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg\\/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg\\/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  6. Building Single-Cell Models of Planktonic Metabolism Using PSAMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault-Thompson, K.; Zhang, Y.; Steffensen, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolic networks simulate the metabolic activities of individual cells by integrating omics data with biochemical and physiological measurements. GEMs were applied in the simulation of various photo-, chemo-, and heterotrophic organisms and provide significant insights into the function and evolution of planktonic cells. Despite the quick accumulation of GEMs, challenges remain in assembling the individual cell-based models into community-level models. Among various problems, the lack of consistencies in model representation and model quality checking has hindered the integration of individual GEMs and can lead to erroneous conclusions in the development of new modeling algorithms. Here, we present a Portable System for the Analysis of Metabolic Models (PSAMM). Along with the software a novel format of model representation was developed to enhance the readability of model files and permit the inclusion of heterogeneous, model-specific annotation information. A number of quality checking procedures was also implemented in PSAMM to ensure stoichiometric balance and to identify unused reactions. Using a case study of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, we demonstrated the application of PSAMM in simulating the coupling of carbon utilization and energy production pathways under low-temperature and high-pressure stress. Applying PSAMM, we have also analyzed over 50 GEMs in the current literature and released an updated collection of the models with corrections on a number of common inconsistencies. Overall, PSAMM opens up new opportunities for integrating individual GEMs for the construction and mathematical simulation of community-level models in the scope of entire ecosystems.

  7. Remodeling of oxidative energy metabolism by galactose improves glucose handling and metabolic switching in human skeletal muscle cells.

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    Eili Tranheim Kase

    Full Text Available Cultured human myotubes have a low mitochondrial oxidative potential. This study aims to remodel energy metabolism in myotubes by replacing glucose with galactose during growth and differentiation to ultimately examine the consequences for fatty acid and glucose metabolism. Exposure to galactose showed an increased [(14C]oleic acid oxidation, whereas cellular uptake of oleic acid uptake was unchanged. On the other hand, both cellular uptake and oxidation of [(14C]glucose increased in myotubes exposed to galactose. In the presence of the mitochondrial uncoupler carbonylcyanide p-trifluormethoxy-phenylhydrazone (FCCP the reserve capacity for glucose oxidation was increased in cells grown with galactose. Staining and live imaging of the cells showed that myotubes exposed to galactose had a significant increase in mitochondrial and neutral lipid content. Suppressibility of fatty acid oxidation by acute addition of glucose was increased compared to cells grown in presence of glucose. In summary, we show that cells grown in galactose were more oxidative, had increased oxidative capacity and higher mitochondrial content, and showed an increased glucose handling. Interestingly, cells exposed to galactose showed an increased suppressibility of fatty acid metabolism. Thus, galactose improved glucose metabolism and metabolic switching of myotubes, representing a cell model that may be valuable for metabolic studies related to insulin resistance and disorders involving mitochondrial impairments.

  8. Reconstruction of metabolic networks from high-throughput metabolite profiling data: in silico analysis of red blood cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Escola, G Sean; Hlavacek, William S; Unkefer, Pat J; Unkefer, Clifford J; Wall, Michael E

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the ability of algorithms developed for reverse engineering of transcriptional regulatory networks to reconstruct metabolic networks from high-throughput metabolite profiling data. For benchmarking purposes, we generate synthetic metabolic profiles based on a well-established model for red blood cell metabolism. A variety of data sets are generated, accounting for different properties of real metabolic networks, such as experimental noise, metabolite correlations, and temporal dynamics. These data sets are made available online. We use ARACNE, a mainstream algorithm for reverse engineering of transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data, to predict metabolic interactions from these data sets. We find that the performance of ARACNE on metabolic data is comparable to that on gene expression data.

  9. The binding of rhBMP-2 to the receptors of viable MC3T3-E1 cells and the question of cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemann, M.; Rumpf, H.M.; Bingmann, D.; Jennissen, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologiesche Chemie

    2001-12-01

    The binding of rhBMP-2 to its receptors, the signal transduction cascade and the final responses of bone cells, osteoprogenitor cells and derived cell lines is of high fundamental and clinical interest. In this report concentration-response curves of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 under influence of rhBMP-2 was investigated. The biological response of the cells (corresponding to a down-stream effect of the receptor state-function) was monitored in pilot experiments by the MC3T3-cell alkaline phosphatase-induction test (MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test). It is shown that the MC3T3-cell ALP-induction test is a good tool for measuring biologically active recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) in crude extracts of E. coli as well as in highly purified form. In addition this test is very sensitive to chemically induced structural changes of rhBMP-2 such as those resulting from a radiolabeling of rhBMP-2 by the Bolton-Hunter procedure. The latter procedure reduces the biological activity of rhBMP-2 by a factor of 3-4. The measured concentration-response curves could all be non-linearly fitted to a rectangular hyperbola. The half-maximal saturation, K{sub 0.5}, is found between 30-100 nM rhBMP-2 (= 0.8-2.5 {mu}g/ml). The effect of rhBMP-2 shows a plateau i.e. maximal response at ca. 300-1000 nM rhBMP-2 (= 8-25 {mu}g/ml). The data thus indicate a non-cooperative binding-response behavior. This was unexpected since BMP-2 binds simultaneously to two cooperating receptors of type 1 and type 2. However in the very low concentration range of employed rhBMP-2 a variable response of the cells was measured so that a full exclusion of cooperativity cannot be concluded at the present time. This will be clarified by future experiments. (orig.)

  10. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

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    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  11. Tumor cell metabolism: the marriage of molecular genetics and proteomics with cellular intermediary metabolism; proceed with caution!

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    Franklin Renty B

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic transformations of malignant cells are essential to the development and progression of all cancers. The understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of cancer requires the establishment of the altered genetic/metabolic factors that are essential to the development, growth, and proliferation of the malignant cells. Recognition of this important relationship has resulted in a resurgence of interest in the intermediary metabolism of tumor cells. The role of molecular genetics and proteomics and the application of molecular technology in assessing altered cellular metabolism has become a major area of biomedical research. The contemporary generation of biomedical scientists is exceptionally well trained in all areas of molecular biology and molecular technology, which are now important tools to be applied to the regulation of cellular intermediary metabolism. Simultaneously, the didactic and methodological training associated with the principles and operation of metabolic pathways, enzymology, cellular enzyme activity, and associated biochemical implications has been diminished and often eliminated from the pre- and post-doctoral programs. Interpretations and conclusions of alterations in cellular enzyme activity and associated metabolic pathways based on genetic/proteomic changes can and will result in misrepresentation of important metabolic implications in malignancy and other diseases. It is essential that the genetic/proteomic studies be coupled to biochemical/metabolic cellular events to satisfy the axiom: "genetic transformations and proteomic alterations will have little relevancy to disease processes if the genetic/proteomic alterations are not manifested in altered and impaired cellular and metabolic function". The appropriate marriage of molecular genetics/proteomics with the regulation of cellular intermediary metabolism will provide new revelations and understanding of malignancy that could not be achieved in

  12. Tumor cell metabolism: the marriage of molecular genetics and proteomics with cellular intermediary metabolism; proceed with caution!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B

    2006-11-07

    Metabolic transformations of malignant cells are essential to the development and progression of all cancers. The understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of cancer requires the establishment of the altered genetic/metabolic factors that are essential to the development, growth, and proliferation of the malignant cells. Recognition of this important relationship has resulted in a resurgence of interest in the intermediary metabolism of tumor cells. The role of molecular genetics and proteomics and the application of molecular technology in assessing altered cellular metabolism has become a major area of biomedical research. The contemporary generation of biomedical scientists is exceptionally well trained in all areas of molecular biology and molecular technology, which are now important tools to be applied to the regulation of cellular intermediary metabolism. Simultaneously, the didactic and methodological training associated with the principles and operation of metabolic pathways, enzymology, cellular enzyme activity, and associated biochemical implications has been diminished and often eliminated from the pre- and post-doctoral programs. Interpretations and conclusions of alterations in cellular enzyme activity and associated metabolic pathways based on genetic/proteomic changes can and will result in misrepresentation of important metabolic implications in malignancy and other diseases. It is essential that the genetic/proteomic studies be coupled to biochemical/metabolic cellular events to satisfy the axiom: "genetic transformations and proteomic alterations will have little relevancy to disease processes if the genetic/proteomic alterations are not manifested in altered and impaired cellular and metabolic function". The appropriate marriage of molecular genetics/proteomics with the regulation of cellular intermediary metabolism will provide new revelations and understanding of malignancy that could not be achieved in earlier generations.

  13. Harnessing impaired energy metabolism in cancer cell: small molecule- mediated ways to regulate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govardhan, K Shroff; Ramyasri, Kuna; Kethora, Dirsipam; Ravishekar, Yalagala; Prasenjit, Mitra

    2011-03-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Described first in 1924 by Otto Warburg, a cancer cell undergoes complete metabolic reprogramming to attain nutrient self-sufficiency for proliferation and survival. Interplay between diverse signalling cascades confers this metabolic advantage. In this review we focus on signalling molecules that regulate this altered metabolic paradigm in a cancer cell with emphasis on small molecule mediated intervention for attenuation of growth and progression of tumor.

  14. Preliminary study of cell metabolism, by use of NBT test, determination the intensity of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity

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    Diana BEI

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Otto Warburg, in the early part of the 20th century, originated a hypothesis, that the cause of cancer is primarily a defect in energy metabolism.A decrease in the capacity of mitochondria to reduce NAD(P, together with a decline in the NAD(PH/NAD(P redox couple, uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, lead to depletion of ATP and decrease the cell viability.Nitro-bleu tetrazolium have been used to assay cell proliferation and viability. The method to measure cell proliferation is based on enzymatic cleavage of the tetrazolium salts to a water-soluble formazan dye.Succinate-tetrazolium reductase, is an enzymatic sistem, which belongs to the respiratory chain of the mitochondria and it is active only in viable cells. The reagent diffuses into the cells and it is cleaved to formazan. The absorption change is measured and analysed.Free radicals such as superoxide, can cause a damage in cellular components, but several antioxidants inhibiting the lipid peroxidation and limiting the level of free radicals in cells.In the present study we had in view the proliferation and viability of leukemia cells during antineoplastic treatment along with the alteration of the serum level of malondialdehyde (MDA and ceruloplasmin (CP. With serum level of malondialdehyde we monitored the presence of the lipid peroxidation by the reactive oxygen species, and with the oxidized ceruloplasmin level in blood serum we evidenced the activity of antioxidant system in blood.

  15. Metabolism of [6]-Shogaol in Mice and in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong; Lv, Lishuang; Soroka, Dominique; Warin, Renaud F.; Parks, Tiffany A.; Hu, Yuhui; Zhu, Yingdong; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Ginger has received extensive attention because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor activities. However, the metabolic fate of its major components is still unclear. In the present study, the metabolism of [6]-shogaol, one of the major active components in ginger, was examined for the first time in mice and in cancer cells. Thirteen metabolites were detected and identified, seven of which were purified from fecal samples collected from [6]-shogaol-treated mice. Their structures were elucidated as 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-3-ol (M6), 5-methoxy-1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M7), 3′,4′-dihydroxyphenyl-decan-3-one (M8), 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-ol (M9), 5-methylthio-1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M10), 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M11), and 5-methylthio-1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-ol (M12) on the basis of detailed analysis of their 1H, 13C, and two-dimensional NMR data. The rest of the metabolites were identified as 5-cysteinyl-M6 (M1), 5-cysteinyl-[6]-shogaol (M2), 5-cysteinylglycinyl-M6 (M3), 5-N-acetylcysteinyl-M6 (M4), 5-N-acetylcysteinyl-[6]-shogaol (M5), and 5-glutathiol-[6]-shogaol (M13) by analysis of the MSn (n = 1–3) spectra and comparison to authentic standards. Among the metabolites, M1 through M5, M10, M12, and M13 were identified as the thiol conjugates of [6]-shogaol and its metabolite M6. M9 and M11 were identified as the major metabolites in four different cancer cell lines (HCT-116, HT-29, H-1299, and CL-13), and M13 was detected as a major metabolite in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. We further showed that M9 and M11 are bioactive compounds that can inhibit cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells. Our results suggest that 1) [6]-shogaol is extensively metabolized in these two models, 2) its metabolites are bioactive compounds, and 3) the mercapturic acid pathway is one of the major

  16. Enumeration of viable and non-viable larvated Ascaris eggs with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Maria; Villegas, Eric N; Nelson, Kara L

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to further develop an incubation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for quantifying viable Ascaris eggs by characterizing the detection limit and number of template copies per egg, determining the specificity of the method, and testing the method with viable and inactivated larvated eggs. The number of template copies per cell was determined by amplifying DNA from known numbers of eggs at different development stages; the value was estimated to be 32 copies. The specificity of the method was tested against a panel of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and helminths, and no amplification was found with non-target DNA. Finally, fully larvated eggs were inactivated by four different treatments: 254 nm ultraviolet light, 2,000 ppm NH(3)-N at pH 9, moderate heat (48 °C) and high heat (70 °C). Concentrations of treated eggs were measured by direct microscopy and incubation-qPCR. The qPCR signal decreased following all four treatments, and was in general agreement with the decrease in viable eggs determined by microscopy. The incubation-qPCR method for enumerating viable Ascaris eggs is a promising approach that can produce results faster than direct microscopy, and may have benefits for applications such as assessing biosolids.

  17. Regulatory mechanism of protein metabolic pathway during the differentiation process of chicken male germ cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zuo, Qisheng; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Qingqing; Zhang, Zhentao; Wang, Yingjie; Ahmed, Mahmoud F; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-08-01

    We explored the regulatory mechanism of protein metabolism during the differentiation process of chicken male germ cells and provide a basis for improving the induction system of embryonic stem cell differentiation to male germ cells in vitro. We sequenced the transcriptome of embryonic stem cells, primordial germ cells, and spermatogonial stem cells with RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), bioinformatics analysis methods, and detection of the key genes by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Finally, we found 16 amino acid metabolic pathways enriched in the biological metabolism during the differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to primordial germ cells and 15 amino acid metabolic pathways enriched in the differentiation stage of primordial germ cells to spermatogonial stem cells. We found three pathways, arginine-proline metabolic pathway, tyrosine metabolic pathway, and tryptophan metabolic pathway, significantly enriched in the whole differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to spermatogonial stem cells. Moreover, for these three pathways, we screened key genes such as NOS2, ADC, FAH, and IDO. qRT-PCR results showed that the expression trend of these genes were the same to RNA-Seq. Our findings showed that the three pathways and these key genes play an important role in the differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to male germ cells. These results provide basic information for improving the induction system of embryonic stem cell differentiation to male germ cells in vitro.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates metabolic coupling of omentum-derived adipose stroma to ovarian and endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimian Rizi, Bahar; Caneba, Christine; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Nabiyar, Ahmad W; Liu, Xinran; Chen, Kevin; Klopp, Ann; Nagrath, Deepak

    2015-01-15

    Omental adipose stromal cells (O-ASC) are a multipotent population of mesenchymal stem cells contained in the omentum tissue that promote endometrial and ovarian tumor proliferation, migration, and drug resistance. The mechanistic underpinnings of O-ASCs' role in tumor progression and growth are unclear. Here, we propose a novel nitric oxide (NO)-mediated metabolic coupling between O-ASCs and gynecologic cancer cells in which O-ASCs support NO homeostasis in malignant cells. NO is synthesized endogenously by the conversion of l-arginine into citrulline through nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Through arginine depletion in the media using l-arginase and NOS inhibition in cancer cells using N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), we demonstrate that patient-derived O-ASCs increase NO levels in ovarian and endometrial cancer cells and promote proliferation in these cells. O-ASCs and cancer cell cocultures revealed that cancer cells use O-ASC-secreted arginine and in turn secrete citrulline in the microenvironment. Interestingly, citrulline increased adipogenesis potential of the O-ASCs. Furthermore, we found that O-ASCs increased NO synthesis in cancer cells, leading to decrease in mitochondrial respiration in these cells. Our findings suggest that O-ASCs upregulate glycolysis and reduce oxidative stress in cancer cells by increasing NO levels through paracrine metabolite secretion. Significantly, we found that O-ASC-mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells can be deregulated by altering NO homeostasis. A combined approach of targeting secreted arginine through l-arginase, along with targeting microenvironment-secreted factors using l-NAME, may be a viable therapeutic approach for targeting ovarian and endometrial cancers. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. [Increase in cell metabolism in normal, diploid human glial cells in stationary cell cultures induced by meclofenoxate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Festl, M; Gräter, B; Bayreuther, K

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative biochemical studies were undertaken in order to examine the influence of the accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes on cell metabolic activities of normal diploid human glia cells in a stationary cell culture system. Glia cells accumulate lipofuscin as a function of the duration of the stationary cultivation in vitro. The accumulation of lipofuscin can be decreased by the long-term treatment with the pharmacon meclofenoxate (centrophenoxine, Helfergin). Concomitant with the reduction of the accumulated lipofuscin, meclofenoxate-treated glia cells show enhanced rates of RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose uptake. Most likely, in meclofenoxate-treated normal diploid human glia cells in vitro, the utilisation of glucose is shifted from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway. The data suggest that the meclofenoxate-induced reduction of lipofuscin accumulation has a positive effect on cell metabolic functions and causes a delay of the cellular aging of the human glia cells in vitro.

  20. Metabolic detoxication pathways for sterigmatocystin in primary tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, Odile; Puel, Olivier; Botterel, Françoise; Pean, Michel; Khoufache, Khaled; Costa, Jean-Marc; Delaforge, Marcel; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-11-15

    Human health effects of inhaled mycotoxins remain poorly documented, despite the large amounts present in bioaerosols. Among these mycotoxins, sterigmatocystin is one of the most prevalent. Our aim was to study the metabolism and cellular consequences of sterigmatocystin once it is in contact with the airway epithelium. Metabolites were analyzed first in vitro, using recombinant P450 1A1, 1A2, 2A6, 2A13, and 3A4 enzymes, and subsequently in porcine tracheal epithelial cell (PTEC) primary cultures at an air-liquid interface. Expressed enzymes and PTECs were exposed to sterigmatocystin, uniformly enriched with (13)C to confirm the relationship between sterigmatocystin and metabolites. Induction of the expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes upon sterigmatocystin exposure was examined by real-time quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Incubation of 50 μM sterigmatocystin with recombinant P450 1A1 led to the formation of three metabolites: monohydroxy-sterigmatocystin (M1), dihydroxy-sterigmatocystin (M2), and one glutathione adduct (M3), the latter after the formation of a transient epoxide. Recombinant P450 1A2 also led to M1 and M3. P450 3A4 led to only M3. In PTEC, 1 μM sterigmatocystin metabolism resulted in a glucuro conjugate (M4) mainly excreted at the basal side of cells. If PTEC were treated with β-naphthoflavone prior to sterigmatocystin incubation, two other products were detected, i.e., a sulfo conjugate (M5) and a glucoro conjugate (M6) of hydroxy-sterigmatocystin. Exposure of PTEC for 24 h to 1 μM sterigmatocystin induced an 18-fold increase in the mRNA levels of P450 1A1, without significantly induced 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activity. These data suggest that sterigmatocystin is mainly detoxified and is unable to produce significant amounts of reactive epoxide metabolites in respiratory cells. However, sterigmatocystin increases the P450 1A1 mRNA levels with unknown long-term consequences. These in vitro results obtained in

  1. Human embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells have overlapping and distinct metabolic signatures.

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    Raed Abu Dawud

    Full Text Available While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs have been studied extensively at the levels of the genome, transcriptome, proteome and epigenome our knowledge of their corresponding metabolomes is limited. Here, we present the metabolic signatures of hESCs and hESCs obtained by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Whilst some metabolites are common to both cell types, representing the self-renewal and house-keeping signatures, others were either higher (e.g., octadecenoic acid, glycerol-3-phosphate, 4-hydroxyproline or lower (e.g., glutamic acid, mannitol, malic acid, GABA in hESCs (H9 compared to hECCs (NTERA2, these represent cell type specific signatures. Further, our combined results of GC-MS and microarray based gene expression profiling of undifferentiated and OCT4-depleted hESCs are consistent with the Warburg effect which is increased glycolysis in embryonic cells and tumor cells in the presence of O(2 while oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS is impaired or even shut down. RNAi-based OCT4 knock down mediated differentiation resulted in the activation of the poised OXPHOS machinery by expressing missing key proteins such as NDUFC1, UQCRB and COX, increase in TCA cycle activity and decreased lactate metabolism. These results shed light on the metabolite layer of pluripotent stem cells and could potentially establish novel metabolic markers of self renewal and pluripotency.

  2. Metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis correlates with greater proliferative ability and resistance to metabolic inhibition in CD8 versus CD4 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilin Cao

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes (T cells undergo metabolic reprogramming after activation to provide energy and biosynthetic materials for growth, proliferation and differentiation. Distinct T cell subsets, however, adopt metabolic programs specific to support their needs. As CD4 T cells coordinate adaptive immune responses while CD8 T cells become cytotoxic effectors, we compared activation-induced proliferation and metabolic reprogramming of these subsets. Resting CD4 and CD8 T cells were metabolically similar and used a predominantly oxidative metabolism. Following activation CD8 T cells proliferated more rapidly. Stimulation led both CD4 and CD8 T cells to sharply increase glucose metabolism and adopt aerobic glycolysis as a primary metabolic program. Activated CD4 T cells, however, remained more oxidative and had greater maximal respiratory capacity than activated CD8 T cells. CD4 T cells were also associated with greater levels of ROS and increased mitochondrial content, irrespective of the activation context. CD8 cells were better able, however, to oxidize glutamine as an alternative fuel source. The more glycolytic metabolism of activated CD8 T cells correlated with increased capacity for growth and proliferation, along with reduced sensitivity of cell growth to metabolic inhibition. These specific metabolic programs may promote greater growth and proliferation of CD8 T cells and enhance survival in diverse nutrient conditions.

  3. The Chemically Synthesized Ageladine A-Derivative LysoGlow84 Stains Lysosomes in Viable Mammalian Brain Cells and Specific Structures in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano

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    Thorsten Mordhorst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84. The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms’ anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  4. The chemically synthesized ageladine A-derivative LysoGlow84 stains lysosomes in viable mammalian brain cells and specific structures in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordhorst, Thorsten; Awal, Sushil; Jordan, Sebastian; Petters, Charlotte; Sartoris, Linda; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2015-02-11

    Based on the chemical structure and the known chemical synthesis of the marine sponge alkaloid ageladine A, we synthesized the ageladine A-derivative 4-(naphthalene-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine trifluoroacetate (LysoGlow84). The two-step synthesis started with the Pictet-Spengler reaction of histamine and naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde to a tetrahydropyridine intermediate, which was dehydrogenated with activated manganese (IV) oxide to LysoGlow84. Structure and purity of the synthesized LysoGlow84 were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity emitted by LysoGlow84 depended strongly on the pH of the solvent with highest fluorescence intensity recorded at pH 4. The fluorescence maximum (at 315 nm excitation) was observed at 440 nm. Biocompatibility of LysoGlow84 was investigated using cultured rat brain astrocytes and the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Exposure of the astrocytes for up to 6 h to micromolar concentrations of LysoGlow84 did not compromise cell viability, as demonstrated by several viability assays, but revealed a promising property of this compound for staining of cellular vesicles. Conventional fluorescence microscopy as well as confocal scanning microscopy of LysoGlow84-treated astrocytes revealed co-localization of LysoGlow84 fluorescence with that of LysoTracker® Red DND-99. LysoGlow84 stained unclear structures in Macrostomum lignano, which were identified as lysosomes by co-staining with LysoTracker. Strong fluorescence staining by LysoGlow84 was further observed around the worms' anterior gut and the female genital pore which were not counterstained by LysoTracker Red. Thus, LysoGlow84 is a new promising dye that stains lysosomes and other acidic compartments in cultured cells and in worms.

  5. Re-thinking cell cycle regulators : the cross-talk with metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluis eFajas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of genetically engineered mice deficient for cell cycle regulators, including E2F1, cdk4, or, pRB showed that the major phenotypes are metabolic perturbations. These key cell cycle regulators contribute to lipid synthesis, glucose production, insulin secretion, and glycolytic metabolism and it has been shown how deregulation of those pathways can lead to metabolic perturbations and related metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes. The cyclin-cdk-Rb-E2F1 pathway regulates adipogenesis in addition to its well-described roles in cell cycle regulation and cancer. It was also proved that E2F1 directly participates in the regulation of pancreatic growth and function. Similarly, cyclin D3, cdk4, and cdk9 are also adipogenic factors with strong effects on whole organism metabolism. These examples illustrate the growing notion that cell cycle regulatory proteins can also modulate metabolic processes. Cell cycle regulators are activated by insulin and glucose, even in non-proliferating cells. Most importantly cell cycle regulators trigger the adaptive metabolic switch that normal and cancer cells require in order to proliferate. These changes include increased lipid synthesis, decreased oxidative, and increased glycolytic metabolism. In summary, cell cycle regulators are essential in the control of anabolic, biosynthetic processes, and block at the same time oxidative and catabolic pathways, which are the metabolic hallmarks of cancer.

  6. Targeting metabolic plasticity in breast cancer cells via mitochondrial complex I modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qijin; Biener-Ramanujan, Eva; Yang, Wei; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneity commonly observed in clinical tumors stems both from the genetic diversity as well as from the differential metabolic adaptation of multiple cancer types during their struggle to maintain uncontrolled proliferation and invasion in vivo. This study aims to identify a potential metabolic window of such adaptation in aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. With a multidisciplinary approach using high-resolution imaging, cell metabolism assays, proteomic profiling and animal models of human tumor xenografts and via clinically-relevant pharmacological approach for modulating mitochondrial complex I function in human breast cancer cell lines, we report a novel route to target metabolic plasticity in human breast cancer cells. By a systematic modulation of mitochondrial function and by mitigating metabolic switch phenotype in aggressive human breast cancer cells, we demonstrate that the resulting metabolic adaptation signatures can predictably decrease tumorigenic potential in vivo. Proteomic profiling of the metabolic adaptation in these cells further revealed novel protein-pathway interactograms highlighting the importance of antioxidant machinery in the observed metabolic adaptation. Improved metabolic adaptation potential in aggressive human breast cancer cells contribute to improving mitochondrial function and reducing metabolic switch phenotype-which may be vital for targeting primary tumor growth in vivo.

  7. Cell competition with normal epithelial cells promotes apical extrusion of transformed cells through metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kojiro; Katoh, Hiroto; Kitamoto, Sho; Shirai, Takanobu; Tanaka, Shinya; Kajita, Mihoko; Ishikawa, Susumu; Yamauchi, Hajime; Yako, Yuta; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Hirotaka; Egami, Riku; Sasaki, Ayana; Nishikawa, Atsuko; Kameda, Ikumi; Maruyama, Takeshi; Narumi, Rika; Morita, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Enoki, Ryosuke; Honma, Sato; Imamura, Hiromi; Oshima, Masanobu; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Duchen, Michael R; Nam, Jin-Min; Onodera, Yasuhito; Yoshioka, Shingo; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru; Imajo, Masamichi; Nishida, Eisuke; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Ohba, Yusuke; Sato, Toshiro; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed that newly emerging transformed cells are often apically extruded from epithelial tissues. During this process, normal epithelial cells can recognize and actively eliminate transformed cells, a process called epithelial defence against cancer (EDAC). Here, we show that mitochondrial membrane potential is diminished in RasV12-transformed cells when they are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, glucose uptake is elevated, leading to higher lactate production. The mitochondrial dysfunction is driven by upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), which positively regulates elimination of RasV12-transformed cells. Furthermore, EDAC from the surrounding normal cells, involving filamin, drives the Warburg-effect-like metabolic alteration. Moreover, using a cell-competition mouse model, we demonstrate that PDK-mediated metabolic changes promote the elimination of RasV12-transformed cells from intestinal epithelia. These data indicate that non-cell-autonomous metabolic modulation is a crucial regulator for cell competition, shedding light on the unexplored events at the initial stage of carcinogenesis.

  8. The Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome: the metabolic heart of the cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eIto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The plant cytosol is the major intracellular fluid that acts as the medium for inter-organellar crosstalk and where a plethora of important biological reactions take place. These include its involvement in protein synthesis and degradation, stress response signaling, carbon metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and accumulation of enzymes for defense and detoxification. This central role is highlighted by estimates indicating that the majority of eukaryotic proteins are cytosolic. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of numerous proteomic studies on its different subcellular compartments. However, a detailed study of enriched cytosolic fractions from Arabidopsis cell culture has been performed only recently, with over 1,000 proteins reproducibly identified by mass spectrometry. The number of proteins allocated to the cytosol nearly doubles to 1,802 if a series of targeted proteomic characterizations of complexes is included. Despite this, few groups are currently applying advanced proteomic approaches to this important metabolic space. This review will highlight the current state of the Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome since its initial characterization a few years ago.

  9. NOX4 supports glycolysis and promotes glutamine metabolism in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Wu, Qipeng; Wang, Jing; Yao, Bei; Ma, Lei; Yang, Zhicheng; Li, Juan; Liu, Bing

    2016-12-01

    Our previous studies have confirmed that NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is abundantly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contributes to cancer progression. Nevertheless, the comprehensive mechanisms for NOX4-mediated malignant progression and oxidative resistance of cancer cells remain largely unknown. This study found that NOX4 directed glucose metabolism not only to the glycolysis but also to pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) pathway for production of NADPH in NSCLC cell lines. Besides, we also found that NOX4 promoted glutaminolysis into total GSH synthesis. Specifically, the data showed that ectopic NOX4 expression did not induce apoptosis of NSCLC cells; however, inhibition of GSH production resulted in obvious apoptotic death of NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NOX4-induced glycolysis probably via ROS/PI3K/Akt signaling-dependent c-Myc upregulation. The selective NOX4 inhibitor, GKT137831, significantly inhibited glucose and glutamine metabolic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and itself or combination with 2-DG, a synthetic glycolytic inhibitor, suppressed cancer cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. Elimination of NOX4-derived H 2 O 2 effectively reversed NOX4 overexpression-mediated metabolic effects in NSCLC cells. NOX4 levels were significantly correlated with increased glucose and glutamine metabolism-related genes, as well as Akt phosphorylation and c-Myc expression in primary NSCLC specimens. In conclusion, these results reveal that NOX4 promotes glycolysis, contributing to NSCLC growth, and supports glutaminolysis for oxidative resistance. Therefore, NOX4 may be a promising target to reverse malignant progression of NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  11. Metabolic profiles of planktonic and biofilm cells of Candida orthopsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Regina Helena; Cataldi, Thaís Regiani; Franceschini, Livia Maria; Labate, Mônica Veneziano; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Palma, Mario Sérgio; Soares Mendes-Giannini, Maria José

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to understand which Candida orthopsilosis protein aids fungus adaptation upon its switching from planktonic growth to biofilm. Ion mobility separation within mass spectrometry analysis combination were used. Proteins mapped for different biosynthetic pathways showed that selective ribosome autophagy might occur in biofilms. Glucose, used as a carbon source in the glycolytic flux, changed to glycogen and trehalose. Candida orthopsilosis expresses proteins that combine a variety of mechanisms to provide yeasts with the means to adjust the catalytic properties of enzymes. Adjustment of the enzymes helps modulate the biosynthesis/degradation rates of the available nutrients, in order to control and coordinate the metabolic pathways that enable cells to express an adequate response to nutrient availability.

  12. Dissecting thyroid hormone transport and metabolism in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigena, Nicolás; Alamino, Vanina A; Montesinos, María Del Mar; Nazar, Magalí; Louzada, Ruy A; Wajner, Simone M; Maia, Ana L; Masini-Repiso, Ana M; Carvalho, Denise P; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Pellizas, Claudia G

    2017-02-01

    We reported thyroid hormone (TH) receptor expression in murine dendritic cells (DCs) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3)-dependent stimulation of DC maturation and ability to develop a Th1-type adaptive response. Moreover, an increased DC capacity to promote antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell activity, exploited in a DC-based antitumor vaccination protocol, was revealed. However, putative effects of the main circulating TH, l-thyroxine (T4) and the mechanisms of TH transport and metabolism at DC level, crucial events for TH action at target cell level, were not known. Herein, we show that T4 did not reproduce those registered T3-dependent effects, finding that may reflect a homoeostatic control to prevent unspecific systemic activation of DCs. Besides, DCs express MCT10 and LAT2 TH transporters, and these cells mainly transport T3 with a favored involvement of MCT10 as its inhibition almost prevented T3 saturable uptake mechanism and reduced T3-induced IL-12 production. In turn, DCs express iodothyronine deiodonases type 2 and 3 (D2, D3) and exhibit both enzymatic activities with a prevalence towards TH inactivation. Moreover, T3 increased MCT10 and LAT2 expression and T3 efflux from DCs but not T3 uptake, whereas it induced a robust induction of D3 with a parallel slight reduction in D2. These findings disclose pivotal events involved in the mechanism of action of THs on DCs, providing valuable tools for manipulating the immunogenic potential of these cells. Furthermore, they broaden the knowledge of the TH mechanism of action at the immune system network. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Cell‐to‐cell heterogeneity emerges as consequence of metabolic cooperation in a synthetic yeast community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cells that grow together respond heterogeneously to stress even when they are genetically similar. Metabolism, a key determinant of cellular stress tolerance, may be one source of this phenotypic heterogeneity, however, this relationship is largely unclear. We used self‐establishing metabolically cooperating (SeMeCo) yeast communities, in which metabolic cooperation can be followed on the basis of genotype, as a model to dissect the role of metabolic cooperation in single‐cell heterogeneity. Cells within SeMeCo communities showed to be highly heterogeneous in their stress tolerance, while the survival of each cell under heat or oxidative stress, was strongly determined by its metabolic specialization. This heterogeneity emerged for all metabolite exchange interactions studied (histidine, leucine, uracil, and methionine) as well as oxidant (H2O2, diamide) and heat stress treatments. In contrast, the SeMeCo community collectively showed to be similarly tolerant to stress as wild‐type populations. Moreover, stress heterogeneity did not establish as sole consequence of metabolic genotype (auxotrophic background) of the single cell, but was observed only for cells that cooperated according to their metabolic capacity. We therefore conclude that phenotypic heterogeneity and cell to cell differences in stress tolerance are emergent properties when cells cooperate in metabolism. PMID:27312776

  14. [Nutritional status, metabolic changes and white blood cells in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Thatianne Moreira Silva; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Franceschini, Sylvia C C; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the relationship between the peripheral blood white cells, metabolic changes, and nutritional status of adolescents with and without excess weight and body fat. This cross-sectional study evaluated the body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat (%BF) in 362 adolescents from 15 to 19 years of age, of both sexes. White blood cell count, platelet count, uric acid, fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid profile were measured. The inclusion criteria were agreement to participate in the study and signature of the informed consent. Exclusion criteria were: presence of chronic or infectious disease; use of medications that could cause changes in biochemical tests; pregnancy; participation in weight reduction and weight control programs; use of diuretics and laxatives; or the presence of a pacemaker. The following statistical tests were applied: Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Student's t or Mann-Whitney test, Pearson or Spearman correlation tests, and chi-squared test, considering p<0.05. Overweight was observed in 20.7% of adolescents. The total cholesterol (TC) had a higher percentage of inadequacy (52.2%), followed by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (38.4%). There was a positive correlation between white cells and serum lipids, insulin, body fat, and BMI. Monocytes were negatively correlated with BMI, and rods with BMI, body fat, and insulin. Nutritional status is related to an inflammatory process, and adolescents with excess weight or body fat presented higher amounts of white blood cells. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioactive food components, cancer cell growth limitation and reversal of glycolytic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijer, J.; Bekkenkamp-Grovestein, M.; Venema, D.P.; Dommels, Y.E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cells are resistant to apoptosis and show a shift in energy production from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to cytosolic glycolysis. Apoptosis resistance and metabolic reprogramming are linked in many cancer cells and both processes center on mitochondria. Clearly, mutated cancer

  16. ROS and energy metabolism in cancer cells: alliance for fast growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Won; Lee, Sunmi; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2015-03-01

    In normal cells, the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level is proportional to the activity of mitochondrial electron transport and tightly controlled by endogenous antioxidant system. However, energy metabolism and ROS homeostasis in cancer cells are much different from those in normal cells. For example, a majority of cellular glucose is metabolized through aerobic glycolysis ("Warburg effect") and the pentose phosphate pathway. Cancer cells harbor functional mitochondria, but many mutations in nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes and mitochondrial genome result in the mitochondrial metabolic reprogramming. The other characteristic of cancer cells is to maintain much higher ROS level than normal cells. Ironically, cancer cells overexpress the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase and the ROS-eliminating antioxidant enzymes, both of which enzyme systems share NADPH as a reducing power source. In this article, we review the complex connection between ROS and energy metabolisms in cancer cells.

  17. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E; Geissler, Edward K; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy.

  18. Emerging concepts in immunotherapy – T cell metabolism as a therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Pearce, Erika L.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is the set of biochemical reactions that allows cells to acquire and utilize nutrients needed to sustain life. Accessing nutrients and meeting metabolic demands are necessary for cells to survive, proliferate, and to properly perform their intended functions. During an immune response leukocytes undergo major changes in growth and function that are tightly coupled to dynamic shifts in metabolic processes. Immunometabolism is an emerging field that investigates the interplay between...

  19. Viable Syntax: Rethinking Minimalist Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Safir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hauser et al. (2002 suggest that the human language faculty emerged as a genetic innovation in the form of what is called here a ‘keystone factor’—a single, simple, formal mental capability that, interacting with the pre-existing faculties of hominid ancestors, caused a cascade of effects resulting in the language faculty in modern humans. They take Merge to be the keystone factor, but instead it is posited here that Merge is the pre-existing mechanism of thought made viable by a principle that permits relations interpretable at the interfaces to be mapped onto c-command. The simplified minimalist architecture proposed here respects the keystone factor as closely as possible, but is justified on the basis of linguistic analyses it makes available, including a relativized intervention theory applicable across Case, scope, agreement, selection and linearization, a derivation of the A/A’-distinction from Case theory, and predictions such as why in situ wh-interpretation is island-insensitive, but susceptible to intervention effects.

  20. From genomes to in silico cells via metabolic networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are the focal point of systems biology as they allow the collection of various data types in a form suitable for mathematical analysis. High-quality metabolic networks and metabolic networks with incorporated regulation have been successfully used for the analysis of...

  1. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  2. Experimental design for the optimization of propidium monoazide treatment to quantify viable and non-viable bacteria in piggery effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desneux, Jérémy; Chemaly, Marianne; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-16

    Distinguishing between viable and dead bacteria in animal and urban effluents is a major challenge. Among existing methods, propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR is a promising way to quantify viable cells. However, its efficiency depends on the composition of the effluent, particularly on total suspended solids (TSS)) and on methodological parameters. The aim of this study was evaluate the influence of three methodological factors (concentration of PMA, incubation time and photoactivation time) on the efficiency of PMA-qPCR to quantify viable and dead cells of Listeria monocytogenes used as a microorganism model, in two piggery effluents (manure and lagoon effluent containing 20 and 0.4 TSS g.kg(-1), respectively). An experimental design strategy (Doehlert design and desirability function) was used to identify the experimental conditions to achieve optimal PMA-qPCR results. The quantification of viable cells of L. monocytogenes was mainly influenced by the concentration of PMA in the manure and by the duration of photoactivation in the lagoon effluent. Optimal values differed with the matrix: 55 μM PMA, 5 min incubation and 56 min photoactivation for manure and 20 μM PMA, 20 min incubation and 30 min photoactivation for lagoon effluent. Applied to five manure and four lagoon samples, these conditions resulted in satisfactory quantification of viable and dead cells. PMA-qPCR can be used on undiluted turbid effluent with high levels of TSS, provided preliminary tests are performed to identify the optimal conditions.

  3. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stechow, Louise; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; van de Water, Bob; Peijnenburg, Ad; Danen, Erik; Lommen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES) cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells.

  4. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Kotze, Helen L; Allwood, J William; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J

    2015-10-28

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments.

  5. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  6. Glycogen metabolism in the glucose-sensing and supply-driven β-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lotta E; Nicholas, Lisa M; Filipsson, Karin; Sun, Jiangming; Medina, Anya; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Fex, Malin; Mulder, Hindrik; Spégel, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Glycogen metabolism in β-cells may affect downstream metabolic pathways controlling insulin release. We examined glycogen metabolism in human islets and in the rodent-derived INS-1 832/13 β-cells and found them to express the same isoforms of key enzymes required for glycogen metabolism. Our findings indicate that glycogenesis is insulin-independent but influenced by extracellular glucose concentrations. Levels of glycogen synthase decrease with increasing glucose concentrations, paralleling accumulation of glycogen. We did not find cAMP-elicited glycogenolysis and insulin secretion to be causally related. In conclusion, our results reveal regulated glycogen metabolism in human islets and insulin-secreting cells. Whether glycogen metabolism affects insulin secretion under physiological conditions remains to be determined. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. [Methionine metabolism regulates maintenance and differentiation of human ES/iPS cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2015-05-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are pluripotent and can give rise to all cell types. ES/iPS cells have a unique transcriptional circuit that sustains the pluripotent state. These cells also possess a characteristically high rate of proliferation as well as an abbreviated G1 phase. These unique molecular properties distinguish ES and iPS cells from somatic cells. Mouse ES/iPS cells are in a high-flux metabolic state, with a high dependence on threonine catabolism. However, little is known about amino acid metabolism in human ES/iPS cells. Recently, we reported that human ES/iPS cells require high amounts of methionine (Met) and express high levels of Met metabolism enzymes (Shriaki N, et al: Cell Metabolism, 2014). Met deprivation results in a rapid decrease in intracellular S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM), triggering the activation of p53 signaling, reducing pluripotent marker gene NANOG expression, and poising human ES/iPS cells for differentiation, follow by potentiated differentiation into all three germ layers. However, when exposed to prolonged Met deprivation, the cells went to apoptosis. In this review, we explain the importance of SAM in Met metabolism and its relationship with pluripotency, cell survival, and differentiation of human ES/iPS cells.

  8. The oncogene c-Myc coordinates regulation of metabolic networks to enable rapid cell cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Hockenbery, David M

    2008-04-15

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is rapidly activated by serum and regulates genes involved in metabolism and cell cycle progression. This gene is thereby uniquely poised to coordinate both the metabolic and cell cycle regulatory events required for cell cycle entry. However, this function of Myc has not been evaluated. Using a rat fibroblast model of isogenic cell lines, myc(-/-), myc(+/-), myc(+/+) and myc(-/-) cells with an inducible c-myc transgene (mycER), we show that the Myc protein programs cells to utilize both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to drive cell cycle progression. We demonstrate this coordinate regulation of metabolic networks is essential, as specific inhibitors of these pathways block Myc-induced proliferation. Metabolic events temporally correlated with cell cycle entry include increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial function, pyruvate and lactate production, and ATP generation. Treatment of normal cells with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation recapitulates the myc(-/-) phenotype, resulting in impaired cell cycle entry and reduced metabolism. Combined with a kinetic expression profiling analysis of genes linked to mitochondrial function, our study indicates that Myc's ability to coordinately regulate the mitochondrial metabolic network transcriptome is required for rapid cell cycle entry. This function of Myc may underlie the pervasive presence of Myc in many human cancers.

  9. Steady state peripheral blood provides cells with functional and metabolic characteristics of real hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Antonin; Avalon, Maryse; Lapostolle, Véronique; Ismail, Sadek; Mombled, Margaux; Debeissat, Christelle; Guérinet, Marianne; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski-Lafarge, Marija; Villacreces, Arnaud; Praloran, Vincent; Ivanovic, Zoran; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are located in the bone marrow, also circulate in cord and peripheral blood. Despite high availability, HSCs from steady state peripheral blood (SSPB) are little known and not used for research or cell therapy. We thus aimed to characterize and select HSCs from SSPB by a direct approach with a view to delineating their main functional and metabolic properties and the mechanisms responsible for their maintenance. We chose to work on Side Population (SP) cells which are highly enriched in HSCs in mouse, human bone marrow, and cord blood. However, no SP cells from SSBP have as yet been characterized. Here we showed that SP cells from SSPB exhibited a higher proliferative capacity and generated more clonogenic progenitors than non-SP cells in vitro. Furthermore, xenotransplantation studies on immunodeficient mice demonstrated that SP cells are up to 45 times more enriched in cells with engraftment capacity than non-SP cells. From a cell regulation point of view, we showed that SP activity depended on O2 concentrations close to those found in HSC niches, an effect which is dependent on both hypoxia-induced factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Moreover SP cells displayed a reduced mitochondrial mass and, in particular, a lower mitochondrial activity compared to non-SP cells, while they exhibited a similar level of glucose incorporation. These results provided evidence that SP cells from SSPB displayed properties of very primitive cells and HSC, thus rendering them an interesting model for research and cell therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Human-induced pluripotent stem cell approaches to model inborn and acquired metabolic heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanana, Anita M; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-05-01

    The article provides an overview of advances in the induced pluripotent stem cell field to model cardiomyopathies of inherited inborn errors of metabolism and acquired metabolic syndromes in vitro. Several inborn errors of metabolism have been studied using 'disease in a dish' models, including Pompe disease, Danon disease, Fabry disease, and Barth syndrome. Disease phenotypes of complex metabolic syndromes, such as diabetes mellitus and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency, have also been observed. Differentiation of patient and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has provided the capacity to model deleterious cardiometabolic diseases to understand molecular mechanisms, perform drug screens, and identify novel drug targets.

  11. GOT1-mediated anaplerotic glutamine metabolism regulates chronic acidosis stress in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrego, Jaime; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza; Shukla, Surendra K; King, Ryan J; Dasgupta, Aneesha; Goode, Gennifer; Murthy, Divya; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2017-08-01

    The increased rate of glycolysis and reduced oxidative metabolism are the principal biochemical phenotypes observed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that lead to the development of an acidic tumor microenvironment. The pH of most epithelial cell-derived tumors is reported to be lower than that of plasma. However, little is known regarding the physiology and metabolism of cancer cells enduring chronic acidosis. Here, we cultured PDAC cells in chronic acidosis (pH 6.9-7.0) and observed that cells cultured in low pH had reduced clonogenic capacity. However, our physiological and metabolomics analysis showed that cells in low pH deviate from glycolytic metabolism and rely more on oxidative metabolism. The increased expression of the transaminase enzyme GOT1 fuels oxidative metabolism of cells cultured in low pH by enhancing the non-canonical glutamine metabolic pathway. Survival in low pH is reduced upon depletion of GOT1 due to increased intracellular ROS levels. Thus, GOT1 plays an important role in energy metabolism and ROS balance in chronic acidosis stress. Our studies suggest that targeting anaplerotic glutamine metabolism may serve as an important therapeutic target in PDAC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In situ metabolic profiling of single cells by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Vertes, Akos

    2009-10-15

    Depending on age, phase in the cell cycle, nutrition, and environmental factors, individual cells exhibit large metabolic diversity. To explore metabolic variations in cell populations, laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used for the in situ analysis of individual cells at atmospheric pressure. Single cell ablation was achieved by delivering mid-IR laser pulses through the etched tip of a GeO(2)-based glass fiber. Metabolic analysis was performed from single cells and small cell populations of Allium cepa and Narcissus pseudonarcissus bulb epidermis, as well as single eggs of Lytechinus pictus. Of the 332 peaks detected for A. cepa, 35 were assigned to metabolites with the help of accurate ion masses and tandem MS. The metabolic profiles from single cells of the two plant species included a large variety of oligosaccharides including possibly fructans in A. cepa, and alkaloids, e.g., lycorine in N. pseudonarcissus. Analysis of adjacent individual cells with a difference in pigmentation showed that, in addition to essential metabolites found in both variants, the pigmented cells contained anthocyanidins, other flavonoids, and their glucosides. Analysis of single epidermal cells from different scale leaves in an A. cepa bulb showed metabolic differences corresponding to their age. Our results indicate the feasibility of using LAESI-MS for the in situ analysis of metabolites in single cells with potential applications in studying cell differentiation, changes due to disease states, and response to xenobiotics.

  13. Toxicity and metabolism of 3'-deoxyadenosine N*O1-oxide in mice and Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Karsten Ramløv; Overgaard-Hansen, Kay; Frederiksen, Sune

    1992-01-01

    Medicinsk biokemi, 3'-deoxyadenosine N*O1-oxide, metabolism, Ehrlich ascites cells, toxicity, mice......Medicinsk biokemi, 3'-deoxyadenosine N*O1-oxide, metabolism, Ehrlich ascites cells, toxicity, mice...

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in enterocyte models: T84 cell line vs. Caco-2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguin, Pauline; Schneider, Anne-Catherine; Mignolet, Eric; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2014-02-01

    Human colon carcinoma cell lines such as Caco-2 cells, model of mature enterocytes and T84 cells, model of crypt cells are useful to study interactions between nutrient processing and metabolic functions at intestinal level. Our study aimed at comparing the ability of Caco-2 and T84 cells (1) to incorporate dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), (2) to process them and (3) to sort them into neutral lipids (NL), free fatty acids (FFA) and phospholipids (PL). Caco-2 and T84 cells were exposed to a 7-day long supplementation with PUFA. The amounts of fatty acids accumulated and incorporated into the NL, FFA or PL fractions were higher in Caco-2 than in T84 cells. Caco-2 cells were able to significantly elongate C18 PUFA and C20 PUFA of both n-3 and n-6 families. In contrast, T84 cells were unable to elongate the n-6 fatty acids whereas elongation of n-3 fatty acids was detectable but marginal. Similarly, a Δ6 desaturase activity was observed in Caco-2 but not in T84 cells. In T84 cells, each exogenous fatty acid was predominantly accumulated in the PL fraction. In Caco-2 cells, C20 fatty acids and C18:2n-6 was preferentially accumulated in the PL fraction, while C22 PUFA and C18:3n-3 was preferentially accumulated in the NL fraction. Overall, this study has shown that Caco-2 and T84 cells, as models of intestinal mucosal cells, present large differences in PUFA accumulation capacity, specific elongase and desaturase activities and distribution pattern of exogenous PUFA and of their metabolites in the lipid classes.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells in Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Huang, Ngan F; Quertermous, Thomas; Knowles, Joshua W

    2017-11-01

    Insulin resistance leads to a number of metabolic and cellular abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction that increase the risk of vascular disease. Although it has been particularly challenging to study the genetic determinants that predispose to abnormal function of the endothelium in insulin-resistant states, the possibility of deriving endothelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from individuals with detailed clinical phenotyping, including accurate measurements of insulin resistance accompanied by multilevel omic data (eg, genetic and genomic characterization), has opened new avenues to study this relationship. Unfortunately, several technical barriers have hampered these efforts. In the present review, we summarize the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells for modeling endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and discuss the challenges to overcoming these limitations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Adipocyte Metabolic Pathways Regulated by Diet Control the Female Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Shinya; Armstrong, Alissa R; Sampson, Leesa L; Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    Nutrients affect adult stem cells through complex mechanisms involving multiple organs. Adipocytes are highly sensitive to diet and have key metabolic roles, and obesity increases the risk for many cancers. How diet-regulated adipocyte metabolic pathways influence normal stem cell lineages, however, remains unclear. Drosophila melanogaster has highly conserved adipocyte metabolism and a well-characterized female germline stem cell (GSC) lineage response to diet. Here, we conducted an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to identify diet-regulated adipocyte metabolic pathways that control the female GSC lineage. On a rich (relative to poor) diet, adipocyte Hexokinase-C and metabolic enzymes involved in pyruvate/acetyl-CoA production are upregulated, promoting a shift of glucose metabolism toward macromolecule biosynthesis. Adipocyte-specific knockdown shows that these enzymes support early GSC progeny survival. Further, enzymes catalyzing fatty acid oxidation and phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis in adipocytes promote GSC maintenance, whereas lipid and iron transport from adipocytes controls vitellogenesis and GSC number, respectively. These results show a functional relationship between specific metabolic pathways in adipocytes and distinct processes in the GSC lineage, suggesting the adipocyte metabolism-stem cell link as an important area of investigation in other stem cell systems. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Roles of homocysteine in cell metabolism: old and new functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M; Urdiales, J L; Amores-Sánchez, M I

    2001-07-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia has been suggested as a new, independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This fact has produced a new, increased interest in the study of homocysteine metabolism and its relation to pathogenesis. This emergent area of biomedical research is reviewed here, stressing the biochemical and metabolic basis of the pathogenicity of increased levels of homocysteine.

  18. Metabolic Plasticity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells: Adaptation to Changes in the Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui V. Simões

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 13C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells, leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1 provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2 lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism.

  19. Metabolic changes during B cell differentiation for the production of intestinal IgA antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun

    2017-04-01

    To sustain the bio-energetic demands of growth, proliferation, and effector functions, the metabolism of immune cells changes dramatically in response to immunologic stimuli. In this review, I focus on B cell metabolism, especially regarding the production of intestinal IgA antibody. Accumulating evidence has implicated not only host-derived factors (e.g., cytokines) but also gut environmental factors, including the possible involvement of commensal bacteria and diet, in the control of B cell metabolism during intestinal IgA antibody production. These findings yield new insights into the regulation of immunosurveillance and homeostasis in the gut.

  20. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for polymerase chain ...

  1. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-04-02

    Apr 2, 2003 ... A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for ...

  2. Multiplicity of steady states in glycolysis and shift of metabolic state in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Yongky, Andrew; Grimm, Simon; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Cultured mammalian cells exhibit elevated glycolysis flux and high lactate production. In the industrial bioprocesses for biotherapeutic protein production, glucose is supplemented to the culture medium to sustain continued cell growth resulting in the accumulation of lactate to high levels. In such fed-batch cultures, sometimes a metabolic shift from a state of high glycolysis flux and high lactate production to a state of low glycolysis flux and low lactate production or even lactate consumption is observed. While in other cases with very similar culture conditions, the same cell line and medium, cells continue to produce lactate. A metabolic shift to lactate consumption has been correlated to the productivity of the process. Cultures that exhibited the metabolic shift to lactate consumption had higher titers than those which didn't. However, the cues that trigger the metabolic shift to lactate consumption state (or low lactate production state) are yet to be identified. Metabolic control of cells is tightly linked to growth control through signaling pathways such as the AKT pathway. We have previously shown that the glycolysis of proliferating cells can exhibit bistability with well-segregated high flux and low flux states. Low lactate production (or lactate consumption) is possible only at a low glycolysis flux state. In this study, we use mathematical modeling to demonstrate that lactate inhibition together with AKT regulation on glycolysis enzymes can profoundly influence the bistable behavior, resulting in a complex steady-state topology. The transition from the high flux state to the low flux state can only occur in certain regions of the steady state topology, and therefore the metabolic fate of the cells depends on their metabolic trajectory encountering the region that allows such a metabolic state switch. Insights from such switch behavior present us with new means to control the metabolism of mammalian cells in fed-batch cultures.

  3. Metabolism Regulates Cellular Functions of Bone Marrow-Derived Cells used for Cardiac Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, Anja; Rasper, Tina; Roy Choudhury, Aaheli; Bothur, Sabrina; Rieger, Michael A; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fischer, Ariane; Schürmann, Christoph; Brandes, Ralf P; Tschulena, Ulrich; Steppan, Sonja; Assmus, Birgit; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Zeiher, Andreas M; Seeger, Florian H

    2016-08-01

    Administration of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMC) may increase cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. However, the functional capacity of BMC derived from chronic heart failure (CHF) patients is significantly impaired. As modulation of the energy metabolism allows cells to match the divergent demands of the environment, we examined the regulation of energy metabolism in BMC from patients and healthy controls (HC). The glycolytic capacity of CHF-derived BMC is reduced compared to HC, whereas BMC of metabolically activated bone marrow after acute myocardial infarction reveal increased metabolism. The correlation of metabolic pathways with the functional activity of cells indicates an influence of metabolism on cell function. Reducing glycolysis without profoundly affecting ATP-production reversibly reduces invasion as well as colony forming capacity and abolishes proliferation of CD34(+) CD38(-) lin(-) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Ex vivo inhibition of glycolysis further reduced the pro-angiogenic activity of transplanted cells in a hind limb ischemia model in vivo. In contrast, inhibition of respiration, without affecting total ATP production, leads to a compensatory increase in glycolytic capacity correlating with increased colony forming capacity. Isolated CD34(+) , CXCR4(+) , and CD14(+) cells showed higher glycolytic activity compared to their negative counterparts. Metabolic activity was profoundly modulated by the composition of media used to store or culture BMC. This study provides first evidence that metabolic alterations influence the functional activity of human HSPC and BMC independent of ATP production. Changing the balance between respiration and glycolysis might be useful to improve patient-derived cells for clinical cardiac cell therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:2236-2248. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Synergizing metabolic flux analysis and nucleotide sugar metabolism to understand the control of glycosylation of recombinant protein in CHO cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burleigh, Susan C

    2011-10-18

    Abstract Background The glycosylation of recombinant proteins can be altered by a range of parameters including cellular metabolism, metabolic flux and the efficiency of the glycosylation process. We present an experimental set-up that allows determination of these key processes associated with the control of N-linked glycosylation of recombinant proteins. Results Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were cultivated in shake flasks at 0 mM glutamine and displayed a reduced growth rate, glucose metabolism and a slower decrease in pH, when compared to other glutamine-supplemented cultures. The N-linked glycosylation of recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) was also altered under these conditions; the sialylation, fucosylation and antennarity decreased, while the proportion of neutral structures increased. A continuous culture set-up was subsequently used to understand the control of HCG glycosylation in the presence of varied glutamine concentrations; when glycolytic flux was reduced in the absence of glutamine, the glycosylation changes that were observed in shake flask culture were similarly detected. The intracellular content of UDP-GlcNAc was also reduced, which correlated with a decrease in sialylation and antennarity of the N-linked glycans attached to HCG. Conclusions The use of metabolic flux analysis illustrated a case of steady state multiplicity, where use of the same operating conditions at each steady state resulted in altered flux through glycolysis and the TCA cycle. This study clearly demonstrated that the control of glycoprotein microheterogeneity may be examined by use of a continuous culture system, metabolic flux analysis and assay of intracellular nucleotides. This system advances our knowledge of the relationship between metabolic flux and the glycosylation of biotherapeutics in CHO cells and will be of benefit to the bioprocessing industry.

  5. Non-Neuronal Cells in the Hypothalamic Adaptation to Metabolic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Chowen, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is composed of numerous cell types, neurons have received the vast majority of attention in the attempt to understand how this organ functions. Neurons are indeed fundamental but, in order for them to function correctly, they rely on the surrounding “non-neuronal” cells. These different cell types, which include glia, epithelial cells, pericytes, and endothelia, supply essential substances to neurons, in addition to protecting them from dangerous substances and situations. Moreover, it is now clear that non-neuronal cells can also actively participate in determining neuronal signaling outcomes. Due to the increasing problem of obesity in industrialized countries, investigation of the central control of energy balance has greatly increased in attempts to identify new therapeutic targets. This has led to interesting advances in our understanding of how appetite and systemic metabolism are modulated by non-neuronal cells. For example, not only are nutrients and hormones transported into the brain by non-neuronal cells, but these cells can also metabolize these metabolic factors, thus modifying the signals reaching the neurons. The hypothalamus is the main integrating center of incoming metabolic and hormonal signals and interprets this information in order to control appetite and systemic metabolism. Hence, the factors transported and released from surrounding non-neuronal cells will undoubtedly influence metabolic homeostasis. This review focuses on what is known to date regarding the involvement of different cell types in the transport and metabolism of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus. The possible involvement of non-neuronal cells, in particular glial cells, in physiopathological outcomes of poor dietary habits and excess weight gain are also discussed. PMID:28377744

  6. Energy metabolism in human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Varum

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types present in the adult organism, therefore harboring great potential for the in vitro study of differentiation and for the development of cell-based therapies. Nonetheless their use may prove challenging as incomplete differentiation of these cells might lead to tumoregenicity. Interestingly, many cancer types have been reported to display metabolic modifications with features that might be similar to stem cells. Understanding the metabolic properties of human pluripotent stem cells when compared to their differentiated counterparts can thus be of crucial importance. Furthermore recent data has stressed distinct features of different human pluripotent cells lines, namely when comparing embryo-derived human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs reprogrammed from somatic cells.We compared the energy metabolism of hESCs, IPSCs, and their somatic counterparts. Focusing on mitochondria, we tracked organelle localization and morphology. Furthermore we performed gene expression analysis of several pathways related to the glucose metabolism, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In addition we determined oxygen consumption rates (OCR using a metabolic extracellular flux analyzer, as well as total intracellular ATP levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Finally we explored the expression of key proteins involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism.Our results demonstrate that, although the metabolic signature of IPSCs is not identical to that of hESCs, nonetheless they cluster with hESCs rather than with their somatic counterparts. ATP levels, lactate production and OCR revealed that human pluripotent cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energy demands. Furthermore, our work points to some of the strategies which human pluripotent stem cells may use to maintain high

  7. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hefzi, Hooman; Ang, Kok Siong; Hanscho, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways...... in CHO and associated them with >1,700 genes in the Cricetulus griseus genome. The genome-scale metabolic model based on this reconstruction, iCHO1766, and cell-line-specific models for CHO-K1, CHO-S, and CHO-DG44 cells provide the biochemical basis of growth and recombinant protein production....... The models accurately predict growth phenotypes and known auxotrophies in CHO cells. With the models, we quantify the protein synthesis capacity of CHO cells and demonstrate that common bioprocess treatments, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, inefficiently increase product yield. However, our...

  8. Metabolic cooperation between cancer and non-cancerous stromal cells is pivotal in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Coelho, Filipa; Gouveia-Fernandes, Sofia; Serpa, Jacinta

    2018-02-01

    The way cancer cells adapt to microenvironment is crucial for the success of carcinogenesis, and metabolic fitness is essential for a cancer cell to survive and proliferate in a certain organ/tissue. The metabolic remodeling in a tumor niche is endured not only by cancer cells but also by non-cancerous cells that share the same microenvironment. For this reason, tumor cells and stromal cells constitute a complex network of signal and organic compound transfer that supports cellular viability and proliferation. The intensive dual-address cooperation of all components of a tumor sustains disease progression and metastasis. Herein, we will detail the role of cancer-associated fibroblasts, cancer-associated adipocytes, and inflammatory cells, mainly monocytes/macrophages (tumor-associated macrophages), in the remodeling and metabolic adaptation of tumors.

  9. Ketone isosteres of 2-N-acetamidosugars as substrates for metabolic cell surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, Howard C.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-22

    Novel chemical reactivity can be engendered on cell surfaces by the metabolic incorporation of unnatural sugars into cell surface glycoconjuagtes. 2-N-Acetamido sugars such as GalNAc and GlcNAc are abundant components of cell surface glycoconjugates, and hence attractive targets for metabolic cell surface engineering. Here we report (1) the synthesis of isosteric analogs bearing a ketone group in place of the N-acetamido group, and (2) evaluation of their metabolic incorporation into mammalian cell surface glycans. A ketone isostere of GalNAc was metabolized by CHO cells through the salvage pathway and delivered to O-linked glycoproteins on the cell surface. Its residence at the core position of O-linked glycans is suggested by studies with a-benzyl GalNAc, an inhibitor of O-linked oligosaccharide extension. A mutant CHO cell line lacking endogenous UDP-GalNAc demonstrated enhanced metabolism of the GalNAc analog, suggesting that competition with native intermediates might limits enzymatic transformation in mammalian cells. A ketone isostere of GlcNAc could not be detected on CHO or human cell surfaces after incubation. Thus, the enzymes in the GlcNAc salvage pathway might be less permissive of unnatural substrates than those comprising the GalNAc salvage pathway. Alternatively, high levels of endogenous GlcNAc derivatives might compete with the ketone isostere and prevent its incorporation into oligosaccharides.

  10. Hyperglycemia and anthocyanin inhibit quercetin metabolism in HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high glucose (Glu) milieu promotes generation of reactive oxygen species, which may not only cause cellular damage, but also modulate phase II enzymes that are responsible for the metabolism of flavonoids. Thus, we examined the effect of a high Glu milieu on quercetin (Q) metabolism in HepG2 cells...

  11. Single-cell level based approach to investigate acetate metabolism during batch industrial fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Eriksen, Niels T.

    on the sub-population level. We hypothesized that during the fermentation process, bacterial subpopulation exist, which exhibit different metabolic strategies towards the acetate. In this study, pure culture of Escherichia coli MG1655 was used to investigate in situ acetate metabolism at single-cell level...

  12. Interactions between vertebrate hemoglobins and red cell proteins: Possible roles in regulating cellular metabolism and rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a vital role in vertebrate metabolism. Tissue O2 delivery depends on their O2 transporting properties and rheology, an integral determinant of tissue perfusion. The mechanical characteristics and key metabolic characteristics of RBCs (such as glycolysis rate, pentose...

  13. Metabolism and transport of the citrus flavonoid hesperetin in Caco-2 cell monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, W.; Wel, van der P.A.I.; Rein, M.J.; Barron, D.; Williamson, G.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Metabolism and transport from intestinal cells back into the lumen by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is believed to limit the bioavailability of flavonoids. We studied metabolism and transport of the citrus flavonoid hesperetin, the aglycone of hesperidin, using a two-compartment transwell

  14. Ontogeny of metabolic rate and red blood cell size in eyelid geckos: species follow different paths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Starostová

    Full Text Available While metabolism is a fundamental feature of all organisms, the causes of its scaling with body mass are not yet fully explained. Nevertheless, observations of negative correlations between red blood cell (RBC size and the rate of metabolism suggest that size variation of these cells responsible for oxygen supply may play a crucial role in determining metabolic rate scaling in vertebrates. Based on a prediction derived from the Cell Metabolism Hypothesis, metabolic rate should increase linearly with body mass in species with RBC size invariance, and slower than linearly when RBC size increases with body mass. We found support for that prediction in five species of eyelid geckos (family Eublepharidae with different patterns of RBC size variation during ontogenetic growth. During ontogeny, metabolic rate increases nearly linearly with body mass in those species of eyelid geckos where there is no correlation between RBC size and body mass, whereas non-linearity of metabolic rate scaling is evident in those species with ontogenetic increase of RBC size. Our findings provide evidence that ontogenetic variability in RBC size, possibly correlating with sizes of other cell types, could have important physiological consequences and can contribute to qualitatively different shape of the intraspecific relationship between metabolic rate and body mass.

  15. Treatment of human muscle cells with popular dietary supplements increase mitochondrial function and metabolic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Roger A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a common pathology with increasing incidence, and is associated with increased mortality and healthcare costs. Several treatment options for obesity are currently available ranging from behavioral modifications to pharmaceutical agents. Many popular dietary supplements claim to enhance weight loss by acting as metabolic stimulators, however direct tests of their effect on metabolism have not been performed. Purpose This work identified the effects popular dietary supplements on metabolic rate and mitochondrial biosynthesis in human skeletal muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with popular dietary supplements at varied doses for 24 hours. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α, an important stimulator of mitochondrial biosynthesis, was quantified using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial content was measured using flow cytometry confirmed with confocal microscopy. Glycolytic metabolism was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification rate (ECAR and oxidative metabolism was quantified by measuring oxygen consumption rate (OCR. Total relative metabolism was quantified using WST-1 end point assay. Results Treatment of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells with dietary supplements OxyElite Pro (OEP or Cellucore HD (CHD induced PGC-1α leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content. Glycolytic and oxidative capacities were also significantly increased following treatment with OEP or CHD. Conclusion This is the first work to identify metabolic adaptations in muscle cells following treatment with popular dietary supplements including enhanced mitochondrial biosynthesis, and glycolytic, oxidative and total metabolism.

  16. The effect of formulation on the penetration of coated and uncoated zinc oxide nanoparticles into the viable epidermis of human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Silva, Vânia R; Le Lamer, Marina; Sanchez, Washington Y; Liu, David C; Sanchez, Washington H; Morrow, Isabel; Martin, Darren; Silva, Heron D T; Prow, Tarl W; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    The use of nanoparticulate zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) in sunscreens and other cosmetic products has raised public health concerns. The two key issues are the extent of exposure to ZnO-NP and the likely hazard after the application of ZnO-NP in sunscreen and cosmetic products to humans in vivo. Our aims were to assess exposure by the extent of ZnO-NP penetration into the viable epidermis and hazard by changes in the viable epidermal redox state for a number of topical products. Of particular interest is the role of the particle coating, formulation used, and the presence of any enhancers. Multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (MPT-FLIM) was used to simultaneously observe ZnO-NP penetration and potential metabolic changes within the viable epidermis of human volunteers after topical application of various ZnO-NP products. Coated and uncoated ZnO-NP remained in the superficial layers of the SC and in the skin furrows. We observed limited penetration of coated ZnO-NP dispersed in a water-in-oil emulsion formulation, which was predominantly localized adjacent to the skin furrow. However, the presence of ZnO-NP in the viable epidermis did not alter the metabolic state or morphology of the cells. In summary, our data suggest that some limited penetration of coated and uncoated ZnO-NP may occur into viable stratum granulosum epidermis adjacent to furrows, but that the extent is not sufficient to affect the redox state of those viable cells. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. LLC-PK(1) cells maintained in a new perfusion cell culture system exhibit an improved oxidative metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felder, Edward; Jennings, Paul; Seppi, Thomas; Pfaller, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Cultured renal proximal tubule cells dedifferentiate from an oxidative metabolism to high rates of glycolysis over time. There are many reasons why cells in culture dedifferentiate, not least being a lack of homogenous nutrient supply and poor oxygenation. To this end we have developed a new cell

  18. Metabolic and Signaling Functions of Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, P; Vardaki, I; Occhionero, A; Panaretakis, T

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles have gained tremendous attention in the recent years as a novel mechanism of cell to cell communication. There are several types of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles, exosome, like vesicles, apoptotic bodies that differ mainly in the mechanism of biogenesis and secretion. The most well studied type of extracellular vesicles are the exosomes which are endosome-derived vesicles with a diameter of 50-150nm and enriched in ESCRT proteins including Alix, TSG101, Hsp70, and tetraspanins. It is now well established that exosomes promote tumor growth, alter the tumor microenvironment, facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells in an organotropic manner, modulate immune responses, and mediate resistance to therapy. Exosomes have also been recently implicated in an emerging hallmark of cancer, the cancer cell metabolism. The metabolic state of the cell defines, to a certain extent, both the rate of secretion and the molecular content of tumor-derived exosomes. Furthermore, exosomes have been shown to possess intrinsic metabolic activity since they can synthesize ATP by glycolysis. It follows that exosomes carry a number of metabolic enzymes and metabolites, including lactate, PGE, LDH isoforms, pyruvate, and monocarboxylate transporters. Last but not the least, exosomes are implicated in fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol metabolism and are thought to be crucial for the transcellular metabolism procedure. Uptake of exosomes is thought to alter the intracellular metabolic state of the cell. In summary, we describe the state of the art on the role of metabolism in the secretion, uptake, and the biological effects of exosomes in the metabolism of recipient cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation Changes the Metabolic Profiling of Melanoma Cell Line B16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lige Wu

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy can be an effective way to kill cancer cells using ionizing radiation, but some tumors are resistant to radiation therapy and the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. It is therefore necessary to establish an appropriate working model to study and monitor radiation-mediated cancer therapy. In response to cellular stress, the metabolome is the integrated profiling of changes in all metabolites in cells, which can be used to investigate radiation tolerance mechanisms and identify targets for cancer radiation sensibilization. In this study, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance for untargeted metabolic profiling in radiation-tolerant mouse melanoma cell line B16, we comprehensively investigated changes in metabolites and metabolic network in B16 cells in response to radiation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis indicated the difference in cellular metabolites between the untreated cells and X-ray radiated cells. In radiated cells, the content of alanine, glutamate, glycine and choline was increased, while the content of leucine, lactate, creatine and creatine phosphate was decreased. Enrichment analysis of metabolic pathway showed that the changes in metabolites were related to multiple metabolic pathways including the metabolism of glycine, arginine, taurine, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. Taken together, with cellular metabolome study followed by bioinformatic analysis to profile specific metabolic pathways in response to radiation, we deepened our understanding of radiation-resistant mechanisms and radiation sensibilization in cancer, which may further provide a theoretical and practical basis for personalized cancer therapy.

  20. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  1. BNIP3L/NIX-dependent mitophagy regulates cell differentiation via metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Martínez, Lorena; Boya, Patricia

    2017-06-14

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is the process by which cellular components are degraded and recycled within the lysosome. These components include mitochondria, the selective degradation of which is known as mitophagy. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that constantly adapt their morphology, function, and number to accommodate the metabolic needs of the cell. Extensive metabolic reconfiguration occurs during cell differentiation, when mitochondrial activity increases in most cell types. However, our data demonstrate that during physiological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) development, mitophagy-dependent metabolic reprogramming towards glycolysis regulates numbers of RGCs, which are the first neurons to differentiate in the retina and whose axons form the optic nerve. We show that during retinal development tissue hypoxia triggers HIF1A/HIF-1 stabilization, resulting in increased expression of the mitophagy receptor BNIP3L/NIX. BNIP3L-dependent mitophagy results in a metabolic shift towards glycolysis essential for RGC neurogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that BNIP3L-dependent mitophagy also regulates the polarization of proinflammatory/M1 macrophages, which undergo glycolysis-dependent differentiation during the inflammatory response. Our results uncover a new link between hypoxia, mitophagy, and metabolic reprogramming in the differentiation of several cell types in vivo. These findings may have important implications for neurodegenerative, metabolic and other diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic alterations play a prominent role.

  2. Mitochondrial NDUFS3 regulates the ROS-mediated onset of metabolic switch in transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhane, Sonal; Kanzaki, Hirotaka; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Murali, Ramachandran; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2013-03-15

    Aerobic glycolysis in transformed cells is an unique metabolic phenotype characterized by a hyperactivated glycolytic pathway even in the presence of oxygen. It is not clear if the onset of aerobic glycolysis is regulated by mitochondrial dysfunction and, if so, what the metabolic windows of opportunity available to control this metabolic switch (mitochondrial to glycolytic) landscape are in transformed cells. Here we report a genetically-defined model system based on the gene-silencing of a mitochondrial complex I subunit, NDUFS3, where we demonstrate the onset of metabolic switch in isogenic human embryonic kidney cells by differential expression of NDUFS3. By means of extensive metabolic characterization, we demonstrate that NDUFS3 gene silencing systematically introduces mitochondrial dysfunction thereby leading to the onset of aerobic glycolysis in a manner dependent on NDUFS3 protein levels. Furthermore, we show that the sustained imbalance in free radical dynamics is a necessary condition to sustain the observed metabolic switch in cell lines with the most severe NDUFS3 suppression. Together, our data reveal a novel role for mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFS3 in regulating the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction in living cells, thereby setting a "metabolic threshold" for the observation of aerobic glycolysis phenotype within the confines of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Mitochondrial NDUFS3 regulates the ROS-mediated onset of metabolic switch in transformed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Suhane

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis in transformed cells is an unique metabolic phenotype characterized by a hyperactivated glycolytic pathway even in the presence of oxygen. It is not clear if the onset of aerobic glycolysis is regulated by mitochondrial dysfunction and, if so, what the metabolic windows of opportunity available to control this metabolic switch (mitochondrial to glycolytic landscape are in transformed cells. Here we report a genetically-defined model system based on the gene-silencing of a mitochondrial complex I subunit, NDUFS3, where we demonstrate the onset of metabolic switch in isogenic human embryonic kidney cells by differential expression of NDUFS3. By means of extensive metabolic characterization, we demonstrate that NDUFS3 gene silencing systematically introduces mitochondrial dysfunction thereby leading to the onset of aerobic glycolysis in a manner dependent on NDUFS3 protein levels. Furthermore, we show that the sustained imbalance in free radical dynamics is a necessary condition to sustain the observed metabolic switch in cell lines with the most severe NDUFS3 suppression. Together, our data reveal a novel role for mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFS3 in regulating the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction in living cells, thereby setting a “metabolic threshold” for the observation of aerobic glycolysis phenotype within the confines of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Metabolic Profiling in Association with Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction Following Non-Toxic Cadmium Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Nong, Qingjiao; Mao, Baoyu; Pan, Xue

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the metabolic profile of non-toxic cadmium (Cd)-induced dysfunctional endothelial cells using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs (n = 6 per group) were treated with 0, 1, 5, or 10 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl2) for 48 h. Cell phenotypes, including nitric oxide (NO) production, the inflammatory response, and oxidative stress, were evaluated in Cd-exposed and control HUVECs. Cd-exposed and control HUVECs were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight/mass spectrometry. Compared to control HUVECs, Cd-exposed HUVECs were dysfunctional, exhibiting decreased NO production, a proinflammatory state, and non-significant oxidative stress. Further metabolic profiling revealed 24 significantly-altered metabolites in the dysfunctional endothelial cells. The significantly-altered metabolites were involved in the impaired tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, activated pyruvate metabolism, up-regulated glucogenic amino acid metabolism, and increased pyrimidine metabolism. The current metabolic findings further suggest that the metabolic changes linked to TCA cycle dysfunction, glycosylation of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), and compensatory responses to genomic instability and energy deficiency may be generally associated with dysfunctional phenotypes, characterized by decreased NO production, a proinflammatory state, and non-significant oxidative stress, in endothelial cells following non-toxic Cd exposure. PMID:28872622

  5. UCB Transplant of Inherited Metabolic Diseases With Administration of Intrathecal UCB Derived Oligodendrocyte-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    Adrenoleukodystrophy; Batten Disease; Mucopolysaccharidosis II; Leukodystrophy, Globoid Cell; Leukodystrophy, Metachromatic; Neimann Pick Disease; Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease; Sandhoff Disease; Tay-Sachs Disease; Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn; Alpha-Mannosidosis; Sanfilippo Mucopolysaccharidoses

  6. Energy metabolic pathways control the fate and function of myeloid immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khami, Amir A; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2017-08-01

    The past decade has seen a significant interest in investigating the intracellular metabolism of cells of the immune system. This has increased the realization that immune cells endure metabolic reprogramming upon responding to pathogen-derived or inflammatory signals. More importantly, not only does this metabolic switch provide for the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands but also it, in a highly specific manner, determines the cellular fate and function. In this review, we discuss the metabolic aspects that regulate the differentiation and function of myeloid cells, pivotal for both innate and adaptive immunity. The manipulation of these pathways can alter the function of these cells and therefore, could provide novel therapeutic approaches in cancer and other chronic inflammatory conditions. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. Fullerenols and Fullerene Alter Cell Growth and Metabolisms of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Fullerenes are exciting chemicals having great promise in biomedical applications. The toxicity of these nanoparticles on organism's metabolism remains a longstanding challenge in biomedical science. Toward this objective, we explored the interaction of two commonly used fullerene species, nano-C60 and fullerenols, with bacterial cells and their impact on cell growth and metabolism using Escherichia coli under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results revealed that fullerenol interactions could promote cell growth and affect cellular metabolism significantly. Here we report potent inhibition of the ethanol generation caused by fullerenols. In comparison, nano-C60 interaction can hardly affect ethanol production and other bacterial activities. Enzyme assay studies suggested that the inhibition of ethanol generation was not due to the gene regulation. These data implicated the application of fullerenols could have considerable impact on cell growth, and enzymatic and metabolic performance of Escherichia coli.

  8. From Ancient Pathways to Aging Cells-Connecting Metabolism and Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Christopher D; Campisi, Judith

    2016-06-14

    Cellular senescence is a complex stress response that permanently arrests the proliferation of cells at risk for oncogenic transformation. However, senescent cells can also drive phenotypes associated with aging. Although the senescence-associated growth arrest prevents the development of cancer, and the metabolism of cancer cells has been studied in depth, the metabolic causes and consequences of cellular senescence were largely unexplored until recently. New findings reveal key roles for several aspects of cellular metabolism in the establishment and control of senescent phenotypes. These discoveries have important implications for both cancer and aging. In this review, we highlight some of the recent links between metabolism and phenotypes that are commonly associated with senescent cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding the metabolic basis of drug resistance: Therapeutic induction of the Warburg effect kills cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Ko, Ying-Hui; Goldberg, Allison; Flomenberg, Neal; Wang, Chenguang; Pavlides, Stephanos; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we identified a form of epithelial-stromal metabolic coupling, in which cancer cells induce aerobic glycolysis in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, via oxidative stress, driving autophagy and mitophagy...

  10. A CDK-independent metabolic oscillator orchestrates the budding yeast cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, A.; Niebel, B.; Wit, E.; Heinemann, M.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division is known to be controlled by the cyclin/ CDK machinery. However, eukaryotes have evolved prior to CDKs, and cells can divide in the absence of major cyclin/CDK components. We hypothesized that an autonomous metabolic oscillator provides dynamic triggers for cell cycle

  11. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells : Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, J.B.; Wahl, A.S.; Freund, S.; Genzel, Y.; Reichl, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus

  12. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells....... By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells....... Inactivation of the proteasome in aged cells appeared as a key contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Untargeted metabolomic profiling and functional analyses indicated glucose metabolism impairment in senescent cells, although mitochondrial respiration remained unaffected. A metabolic shift...

  13. Does metabolic reprogramming underpin age-associated changes in T cell phenotype and function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrão, Rita C; Bennett, Stuart J; Brown, James E; Griffiths, Helen R

    2014-06-01

    T cells are required for an effective adaptive immune response. The principal function of T cells is to promote efficient removal of foreign material by identifying and mounting a specific response to nonself. A decline in T cell function in aging is thought to contribute to reduced response to infection and vaccination and an increase in autoimmunity. This may in part be due to the age-related decrease in naïve CD4(+) T cells and increase in antigen-experienced CD4(+) T cells, loss of redox homeostasis, and impaired metabolic switching. Switching between subsets is triggered by the integration of extracellular signals sensed through surface receptors and the activation of discrete intracellular metabolic pathways. This article explores how metabolic programming and loss of redox homeostasis during aging may contribute to age-associated changes in T cell phenotype and function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic reprogramming and apoptosis sensitivity: Defining the contours of a T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Kelsey; Larsen, Sasha E; Snow, Andrew L

    2017-11-01

    An effective adaptive immune response hinges on the rapid clonal expansion of T cells in response to antigen. The sensitivity of these T cells to programmed cell death (i.e. apoptosis) is carefully calibrated at various stages to ensure a robust yet measured reaction that resolves without inflicting unintended damage to host tissues. To meet bioenergetic demands associated with vigorous proliferation, acquisition of effector functions, and memory formation, T cells also undergo dynamic changes in their metabolism at every stage of this response. In this review, we focus on relatively recent studies that illuminate intimate links between metabolic programs and apoptosis sensitivity in T cells. We then examine how these connections ultimately influence T cell survival and function within the metabolically taxing environs of the tumor microenvironment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Intrinsic and TME-induced metabolism adaptations of T cells and impact on their differentiation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soumaya ekouidhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. In this context, multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. This review will discuss different potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. We will also provide a general framework for understanding how tumor microenvironmental metabolism, associated with hypoxic stress, interferes with T-cell priming and expansion. How T cell metabolism drives T cell–mediated immunity and how the manipulation of metabolic programming for therapeutic purposes will be also discussed.

  16. Use of CellNetAnalyzer in biotechnology and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kamp, Axel; Thiele, Sven; Hädicke, Oliver; Klamt, Steffen

    2017-11-10

    Mathematical models of the cellular metabolism have become an essential tool for the optimization of biotechnological processes. They help to obtain a systemic understanding of the metabolic processes in the used microorganisms and to find suitable genetic modifications maximizing the production performance. In particular, methods of stoichiometric and constraint-based modeling are frequently used in the context of metabolic and bioprocess engineering. Since metabolic networks can be complex and comprise hundreds or even thousands of metabolites and reactions, dedicated software tools are required for an efficient analysis. One such software suite is CellNetAnalyzer, a MATLAB package providing, among others, various methods for analyzing stoichiometric and constraint-based metabolic models. CellNetAnalyzer can be used via command-line based operations or via a graphical user interface with embedded network visualizations. Herein we will present key functionalities of CellNetAnalyzer for applications in biotechnology and metabolic engineering and thereby review constraint-based modeling techniques such as metabolic flux analysis, flux balance analysis, flux variability analysis, metabolic pathway analysis (elementary flux modes) and methods for computational strain design. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of metabolism-associated genes and pathways involved in different stages of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Juan; Li, Wen-Xing; Dai, Shao-Xing; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Chen, Bi-Wen; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2018-02-01

    The lack of early diagnostic markers and novel therapeutic targets for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) negatively affects patient prognosis. Cancer metabolism is an attractive area for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis. The present study attempted to identify metabolic changes from the view of the expression of metabolism-associated genes between control samples and those of ccRCC at different disease stages. Data concerning ccRCC gene expression obtained by RNA-sequencing was obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas and data on metabolism-associated genes were extracted using the Recon2 model. Following analysis of differential gene expression, multiple differentially expressed metabolic genes at each tumor-node-metastasis disease stage were identified, compared with control non-disease samples: Metabolic genes (305) were differentially expressed in stage I disease, 323 in stage II disease, 355 in stage III disease and 363 in stage IV disease. Following enrichment analysis for differential metabolic genes, 22 metabolic pathways were identified to be dysregulated in multiple stages of ccRCC. Abnormalities in hormone, vitamin, glucose and lipid metabolism were present in the early stages of the disease, with dysregulation to reactive oxygen species detoxification and amino acid metabolism pathways occurring with advanced disease stages, particularly to valine, leucine, and isoleucine metabolism, which was substantially dysregulated in stage IV disease. The xenobiotic metabolism pathway, associated with multiple cytochrome P450 family genes, was dysregulated in each stage of the disease. This pathway is worthy of substantial attention since it may aid understanding of drug resistance in ccRCC. The results of the present study offer information to aid further research into early diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets of ccRCC.

  18. c-Myc activates multiple metabolic networks to generate substrates for cell-cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, F; Isern, N; Sadilek, M; Jeffrey, M; Hockenbery, D M

    2009-07-09

    Cell proliferation requires the coordinated activity of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways to provide ATP and building blocks for DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Many metabolic pathway genes are targets of the c-myc oncogene and cell-cycle regulator. However, the contribution of c-Myc to the activation of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic networks during cell-cycle entry is unknown. Here, we report the metabolic fates of [U-(13)C] glucose in serum-stimulated myc(-/-) and myc(+/+) fibroblasts by (13)C isotopomer NMR analysis. We demonstrate that endogenous c-myc increased (13)C labeling of ribose sugars, purines and amino acids, indicating partitioning of glucose carbons into C1/folate and pentose phosphate pathways, and increased tricarboxylic acid cycle turnover at the expense of anaplerotic flux. Myc expression also increased global O-linked N-acetylglucosamine protein modification, and inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis selectively reduced growth of Myc-expressing cells, suggesting its importance in Myc-induced proliferation. These data reveal a central organizing function for the Myc oncogene in the metabolism of cycling cells. The pervasive deregulation of this oncogene in human cancers may be explained by its function in directing metabolic networks required for cell proliferation.

  19. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genzel Yvonne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus production capacities. A detailed metabolic characterization of an influenza infected adherent cell line (MDCK was carried out based on extracellular and intracellular measurements of metabolite concentrations. Results For most metabolites the comparison of infected (human influenza A/PR/8/34 and mock-infected cells showed a very similar behavior during the first 10-12 h post infection (pi. Significant changes were observed after about 12 h pi: (1 uptake of extracellular glucose and lactate release into the cell culture supernatant were clearly increased in infected cells compared to mock-infected cells. At the same time (12 h pi intracellular metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were significantly increased. On the contrary, nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of infected cells dropped clearly after 12 h pi. This behaviour was observed for two different human influenza A/PR/8/34 strains at slightly different time points. Conclusions Comparing these results with literature values for the time course of infection with same influenza strains, underline the hypothesis that influenza infection only represents a minor additional burden for host cell metabolism. The metabolic changes observed after12 h pi are most probably caused by the onset of apoptosis in infected cells. The comparison of experimental data from two variants of the A/PR/8/34 virus strain (RKI versus NIBSC with different productivities and infection dynamics showed comparable metabolic patterns but a clearly different timely behavior. Thus, infection dynamics are obviously reflected in host cell metabolism.

  20. Glucose metabolism and metabolic flexibility in cultured skeletal muscle cells is related to exercise status in young male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jenny; S Tangen, Daniel; Wiig, Håvard

    2017-01-01

    deoxyglucose accumulation and fractional glucose oxidation (glucose oxidation relative to glucose uptake), and were also more sensitive to the suppressive action of acutely added oleic acid to the cells. Despite lack of correlation of fibre types between skeletal muscle biopsies and cultured cells, myotubes......We hypothesised that skeletal muscles of healthy young people have a large variation in oxidative capacity and fibre-type composition, and aimed therefore to investigate glucose metabolism in biopsies and myotubes isolated from musculus vastus lateralis from healthy males with varying degrees...

  1. Stem Cell Metabolism in Cancer and Healthy Tissues: Pyruvate in the Limelight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Corbet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal and cancer stem cells (CSCs share the remarkable potential to self-renew and differentiate into many distinct cell types. Although most of the stem cells remain under quiescence to maintain their undifferentiated state, they can also undergo cell divisions as required to regulate tissue homeostasis. There is now a growing evidence that cell fate determination from stem cells implies a fine-tuned regulation of their energy balance and metabolic status. Stem cells can shift their metabolic substrate utilization, between glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, during specification and/or differentiation, as well as in order to adapt their microenvironmental niche. Pyruvate appears as a key metabolite since it is at the crossroads of cytoplasmic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. This Review describes how metabolic reprogramming, focusing on pyruvate utilization, drives the fate of normal and CSCs by modulating their capacity for self-renewal, clonal expansion/differentiation, as well as metastatic potential and treatment resistance in cancer. This Review also explores potential therapeutic strategies to restore or manipulate stem cell function through the use of small molecules targeting the pyruvate metabolism.

  2. Metabolic changes in tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages: A mutual relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netea-Maier, Romana T; Smit, Johannes W A; Netea, Mihai G

    2018-01-28

    In order to adapt to the reduced availability of nutrients and oxygen in the tumor microenvironment and the increased requirements of energy and building blocks necessary for maintaining their high proliferation rate, malignant cells undergo metabolic changes that result in an increased production of lactate, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, prostaglandins and other byproducts of arachidonic acid metabolism that influence both the composition of the inflammatory microenvironment and the function of the tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). In response to cues present in the TME, among which products of altered tumor cell metabolism, TAMs are also required to reprogram their metabolism, with activation of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and altered nitrogen cycle metabolism. These changes result in functional reprogramming of TAMs which includes changes in the production of cytokines and angiogenetic factors, and contribute to the tumor progression and metastasis. Understanding the metabolic changes governing the intricate relationship between the tumor cells and the TAMs represents an essential step towards developing novel therapeutic approaches targeting the metabolic reprogramming of the immune cells to potentiate their tumoricidal potential and to circumvent therapy resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Systems Biology of cancer: Moving toward the Integrative Study of the metabolic alterations in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Erika Hernández Patiño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives in systems biology is to understand the biological mechanisms that give rise to the phenotype of a microorganism by using high-throughput technologies and genome-scale mathematical modeling. The computational modeling of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions is one systemic and quantitative strategy for characterizing the metabolic phenotype associated with human diseases and potentially for designing drugs with optimal clinical effects. The purpose of this short review is to describe how computational modeling, including the specific case of constraint-based modeling, can be used to explore, characterize and predict the metabolic capacities that distinguish the metabolic phenotype of cancer cell lines. As we show herein, this computational framework is far from a pure theoretical description, and to ensure proper biological interpretation, it is necessary to integrate high-throughput data and generate predictions for later experimental assessment. Hence, genome-scale modeling serves as a platform for the following: 1 the integration of data from high-throughput technologies, 2 the assessment of how metabolic activity is related to phenotype in cancer cell lines and 3 the design of new experiments to evaluate the outcomes of the in silico analysis. By combining the functions described above, we show that computational modeling is a useful methodology to construct an integrative, systemic and quantitative scheme for understanding the metabolic profiles of cancer cell lines, a first step to determine the metabolic mechanism by which cancer cells maintain and support their malignant phenotype in human tissues.

  4. Harnessing cancer cell metabolism for theranostic applications using metabolic glycoengineering of sialic acid in breast cancer as a pioneering example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; El-Houseini, Motawa E; Saeui, Christopher T; Mathew, Mohit P; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal cell surface display of sialic acids - a family of unusual 9-carbon sugars - is widely recognized as distinguishing feature of many types of cancer. Sialoglycans, however, typically cannot be identified with sufficiently high reproducibility and sensitivity to serve as clinically accepted biomarkers and similarly, almost all efforts to exploit cancer-specific differences in sialylation signatures for therapy remain in early stage development. In this report we provide an overview of important facets of glycosylation that contribute to cancer in general with a focus on breast cancer as an example of malignant disease characterized by aberrant sialylation. We then describe how cancer cells experience nutrient deprivation during oncogenesis and discuss how the resulting metabolic reprogramming, which endows breast cancer cells with the ability to obtain nutrients during scarcity, constitutes an "Achilles' heel" that we believe can be exploited by metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) strategies to develop new diagnostic methods and therapeutic approaches. In particular, we hypothesize that adaptations made by breast cancer cells that allow them to efficiently scavenge sialic acid during times of nutrient deprivation renders them vulnerable to MGE, which refers to the use of exogenously-supplied, non-natural monosaccharide analogues to modulate targeted aspects of glycosylation in living cells and animals. In specific, once non-natural sialosides are incorporated into the cancer "sialome" they can be exploited as epitopes for immunotherapy or as chemical tags for targeted delivery of imaging or therapeutic agents selectively to tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  6. Pure Quantum Interpretations Are not Viable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, I.

    2011-02-01

    Pure interpretations of quantum theory, which throw away the classical part of the Copenhagen interpretation without adding new structure to its quantum part, are not viable. This is a consequence of a non-uniqueness result for the canonical operators.

  7. Perforin-Positive Dendritic Cells Exhibit an Immuno-regulatory Role in Metabolic Syndrome and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnikov-Klionsky, Yael; Nathansohn-Levi, Bar; Shezen, Elias; Rosen, Chava; Kagan, Sivan; Bar-On, Liat; Jung, Steffen; Shifrut, Eric; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Friedman, Nir; Aharoni, Rina; Arnon, Ruth; Yifa, Oren; Aronovich, Anna; Reisner, Yair

    2015-10-20

    Emerging evidence suggests that immunological mechanisms underlie metabolic control of adipose tissue. Here, we have shown the regulatory impact of a rare subpopulation of dendritic cells, rich in perforin-containing granules (perf-DCs). Using bone marrow transplantation to generate animals selectively lacking perf-DCs, we found that these chimeras progressively gained weight and exhibited features of metabolic syndrome. This phenotype was associated with an altered repertoire of T cells residing in adipose tissue and could be completely prevented by T cell depletion in vivo. A similar impact of perf-DCs on inflammatory T cells was also found in a well-defined model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephlalomyelitis (EAE). Thus, perf-DCs probably represent a regulatory cell subpopulation critical for protection from metabolic syndrome and autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Deep

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa.

  9. Targeting lipid metabolism of cancer cells: A promising therapeutic strategy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuping; Luo, Qing; Halim, Alexander; Song, Guanbin

    2017-08-10

    One of the most important metabolic hallmarks of cancer cells is deregulation of lipid metabolism. In addition, enhancing de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis, increasing lipid uptake and lipolysis have also been considered as means of FA acquisition in cancer cells. FAs are involved in various aspects of tumourigenesis and tumour progression. Therefore, targeting lipid metabolism is a promising therapeutic strategy for human cancer. Recent studies have shown that reprogramming lipid metabolism plays important roles in providing energy, macromolecules for membrane synthesis, and lipid signals during cancer progression. Moreover, accumulation of lipid droplets in cancer cells acts as a pivotal adaptive response to harmful conditions. Here, we provide a brief review of the crucial roles of FA metabolism in cancer development, and place emphasis on FA origin, utilization and storage in cancer cells. Understanding the regulation of lipid metabolism in cancer cells has important implications for exploring a new therapeutic strategy for management and treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of culture media on metabolic profiling of the human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zicheng; Shao, Wei; Gu, Jinping; Hu, Xiaomin; Shi, Yuanzhi; Xu, Wenqi; Huang, Caihua; Lin, Donghai

    2015-07-01

    Cell culture metabolomics has demonstrated significant advantages in cancer research. However, its applications have been impeded by some influencing factors such as culture media, which could significantly affect cellular metabolic profiles and lead to inaccuracy and unreliability of comparative metabolomic analysis of cells. To evaluate the effects of different culture media on cellular metabolic profiling, we performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis of the human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 cultured in both RPMI1640 and DMEM. We found that SGC7901 cultured in the two media exhibited distinct metabolic profiles with obviously different levels of discrepant metabolites, even though they showed almost the same cellular morphology and proliferation rates. When SGC7901 originally cultured in RPMI1640 was gradually acclimated in DMEM, both the metabolic profiles and most of the discrepant metabolite levels gradually converged toward those of the cells originally cultured in DMEM without significantly altered cell proliferation rates. However, several metabolite levels did not show the converging trends. Our results indicate that the effects of culture media on metabolic profiling must be carefully taken into account for comparative metabolomic analysis of cell lines. This work may be of benefit to the development of cell culture metabolomics.

  11. Aberrant LPL Expression, Driven by STAT3, Mediates Free Fatty Acid Metabolism in CLL Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovski, Uri; Grgurevic, Srdana; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Harris, David M; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Ji Yuan; Jain, Preetesh; Wierda, William; Burger, Jan; O'Brien, Susan; Jain, Nitin; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2015-05-01

    While reviewing chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) bone marrow slides, we identified cytoplasmic lipid vacuoles in CLL cells but not in normal B cells. Because lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes hydrolysis of triglycerides into free fatty acids (FFA), is aberrantly expressed in CLL, we investigated whether LPL regulates the oxidative metabolic capacity of CLL cells. We found that unlike normal B cells, CLL cells metabolize FFAs. Because STAT3 is constitutively activated in CLL cells and because we identified putative STAT3 binding sites in the LPL promoter, we sought to determine whether STAT3 drives the aberrant expression of LPL. Transfection of luciferase reporter gene constructs driven by LPL promoter fragments into MM1 cells revealed that STAT3 activates the LPL promoter. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that STAT3 binds to the LPL promoter. Furthermore, transfection of CLL cells with STAT3-shRNA downregulated LPL transcripts and protein levels, confirming that STAT3 activates the LPL gene. Finally, transfection of CLL cells with LPL-siRNAs decreased the capacity of CLL cells to oxidize FFAs and reduced cell viability. Our study suggests that CLL cells adopt their metabolism to oxidize FFA. Activated STAT3 induces LPL, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triglycerides into FFA. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 is likely to prevent the capacity of CLL cells to utilize FFA. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Beyond growth signaling : Paneth cells metabolically support ISCs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dayton, Talya L.; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Single Lgr5 intestinal stem cells (ISCs) can be expanded in vitro into epithelial organoids or "mini-guts", self-organizing cellular structures that recreate the intestinal differentiation program; Paneth cells, which constitute the intestinal stem cell niche, secrete stem cell growth signals, and

  13. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  14. A metabolic biofuel cell: conversion of human leukocyte metabolic activity to electrical currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Gusphyl A; Zhang, Yingze; Cui, X Tracy; Bradberry, Charles W; Sun, Mingui; Sclabassi, Robert J

    2011-05-10

    An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC) for biofuel cell (BFC) applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc) between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient), a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL), and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester) activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  15. Metabolically engineered cells for the production of pinosylvin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A genetically engineered micro-organism having an operative metabolic pathway producing cinnamoyl-CoA and producing pinosylvin therefrom by the action of a stilbene synthase is used for pinosylvin production. Said cinnamic acid may be formed from L-phenylalanine by a L-phenylalanine ammonia lyase...

  16. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis using B-splines to study the effects of temperature shift on CHO cell metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica S. Martínez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flux analysis (MFA is widely used to estimate intracellular fluxes. Conventional MFA, however, is limited to continuous cultures and the mid-exponential growth phase of batch cultures. Dynamic MFA (DMFA has emerged to characterize time-resolved metabolic fluxes for the entire culture period. Here, the linear DMFA approach was extended using B-spline fitting (B-DMFA to estimate mass balanced fluxes. Smoother fits were achieved using reduced number of knots and parameters. Additionally, computation time was greatly reduced using a new heuristic algorithm for knot placement. B-DMFA revealed that Chinese hamster ovary cells shifted from 37 °C to 32 °C maintained a constant IgG volume-specific productivity, whereas the productivity for the controls peaked during mid-exponential growth phase and declined afterward. The observed 42% increase in product titer at 32 °C was explained by a prolonged cell growth with high cell viability, a larger cell volume and a more stable volume-specific productivity.

  17. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-03-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/.

  18. Discrepancies between metabolic activity and DNA content as tool to assess cell proliferation in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Quent, Verena MC; Loessner, Daniela; Friis, Thor; Reichert, Johannes C.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cell proliferation is a critical and frequently studied feature of molecular biology in cancer research. Therefore, various assays are available using different strategies to measure cell proliferation. Metabolic assays such as AlamarBlue, water-soluble tetrazolium salt and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, which were originally developed to determine cell toxicity, are used to assess cell numbers. Additionally, proliferative activity can be determined by...

  19. Metabolic responses of primary and transformed cells to intracellular Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gillmaier

    Full Text Available The metabolic response of host cells, in particular of primary mammalian cells, to bacterial infections is poorly understood. Here, we compare the carbon metabolism of primary mouse macrophages and of established J774A.1 cells upon Listeria monocytogenes infection using (13C-labelled glucose or glutamine as carbon tracers. The (13C-profiles of protein-derived amino acids from labelled host cells and intracellular L. monocytogenes identified active metabolic pathways in the different cell types. In the primary cells, infection with live L. monocytogenes increased glycolytic activity and enhanced flux of pyruvate into the TCA cycle via pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, while in J774A.1 cells the already high glycolytic and glutaminolytic activities hardly changed upon infection. The carbon metabolism of intracellular L. monocytogenes was similar in both host cells. Taken together, the data suggest that efficient listerial replication in the cytosol of the host cells mainly depends on the glycolytic activity of the hosts.

  20. Global Metabolomics Reveals the Metabolic Dysfunction in Ox-LDL Induced Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis (AS is a chronic disorder of large arteries that is a major risk factors of high morbidity and mortality. Oxidative modification LDL is one of the important contributors to atherogenesis. Macrophages take up ox-LDL and convert into foam cells, which is the hallmark of AS. To advance the understanding of the metabolic perturbation involved in ox-LDL induced macrophage-derived foam cells and discover the potential biomarkers of early AS, a global metabolomics approach was applied based on UHPLC-QTOF/MS. Multivariate statistical analyses identified five metabolites (25-azacholesterol, anandamide, glycocholate, oleoyl ethanolamide, and 3-oxo-4, 6-choladienoate for distinguishing foamy macrophages from controls. Among the six main metabolic pathways, the unsaturated fatty acid, especially arachidonic acid metabolism, contributed importantly to early AS. A new biomarker, anandamide (AEA, whose synthesis and metabolism in macrophages are disturbed by overloaded ox-LDL, results in metabolic obstruction. This study is the first to investigate the metabolic disturbance in macrophage-derived foam cells induced by ox-LDL and screen potential biomarkers and metabolic pathways associated with early AS. Our findings provide a new insight in the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and also help to identify novel targets for the intervention of AS.

  1. Different functions of AKT1 and AKT2 in molecular pathways, cell migration and metabolism in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara; Mortensen, Anja C; Haglöf, Jakob; Engskog, Mikael K R; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt; Glimelius, Bengt; Stenerlöw, Bo; Nestor, Marika

    2017-01-01

    AKT is a central protein in many cellular pathways such as cell survival, proliferation, glucose uptake, metabolism, angiogenesis, as well as radiation and drug response. The three isoforms of AKT (AKT1, AKT2 and AKT3) are proposed to have different physiological functions, properties and expression patterns in a cell type-dependent manner. As of yet, not much is known about the influence of the different AKT isoforms in the genome and their effects in the metabolism of colorectal cancer cells. In the present study, DLD-1 isogenic AKT1, AKT2 and AKT1/2 knockout colon cancer cell lines were used as a model system in conjunction with the parental cell line in order to further elucidate the differences between the AKT isoforms and how they are involved in various cellular pathways. This was done using genome wide expression analyses, metabolic profiling and cell migration assays. In conclusion, downregulation of genes in the cell adhesion, extracellular matrix and Notch-pathways and upregulation of apoptosis and metastasis inhibitory genes in the p53-pathway, confirm that the knockout of both AKT1 and AKT2 will attenuate metastasis and tumor cell growth. This was verified with a reduction in migration rate in the AKT1 KO and AKT2 KO and most explicitly in the AKT1/2 KO. Furthermore, the knockout of AKT1, AKT2 or both, resulted in a reduction in lactate and alanine, suggesting that the metabolism of carbohydrates and glutathione was impaired. This was further verified in gene expression analyses, showing downregulation of genes involved in glucose metabolism. Additionally, both AKT1 KO and AKT2 KO demonstrated an impaired fatty acid metabolism. However, genes were upregulated in the Wnt and cell proliferation pathways, which could oppose this effect. AKT inhibition should therefore be combined with other effectors to attain the best effect.

  2. Investigation of the selenium metabolism in cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Stürup, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different selenium species for their ability to induce cell death in different cancer cell lines, while investigating the underlying chemistry by speciation analysis. A prostate cancer cell line (PC-3), a colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and a leukaemia cell line...... (Jurkat E6-1) were incubated with five selenium compounds representing inorganic as well as organic Se compounds in different oxidation states. Selenomethionine (SeMet), Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), methylseleninic acid (MeSeA), selenite and selenate in the concentration range 5-100 mu M were...... incubated with cells for 24 h and the induction of cell death was measured using flow cytometry. The amounts of total selenium in cell medium, cell lysate and the insoluble fractions was determined by ICP-MS. Speciation analysis of cellular fractions was performed by reversed phase, anion exchange and size...

  3. SU-G-TeP3-10: Radiation Induces Prompt Live-Cell Metabolic Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W; Bussink, J [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Burkel, B; Kimple, R; Kogel, A van der; Eliceiri, K [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare metabolic dynamics and HIF-1α expression following radiation between a cancerous cell line (UM-SCC-22B) and a normal, immortalized cell line, NOK (Normal Oral Keratinocyte). HIF-1 is a key factor in metabolism and radiosensitivity. A better understanding of how radiation affects the interplay of metabolism and HIF-1 might give a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiosensitivity. Methods: Changes in cellular metabolism in response to radiation are tracked by fluorescence lifetime of NADH. Expression of HIF-1α was measured by immunofluorescence for both cell lines with and without irradiation. Radiation response is also monitored with additional treatment of a HIF-1α inhibitor (chrysin) as well as a radical scavenger (glutathione). Changes in oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity are also monitored using the Seahorse XF analyzer. Results: An increase in HIF-1α was found to be in response to radiation for the cancer cell line, but not the normal cell line. Radiation was found to shift metabolism toward glycolytic pathways in cancer cells as measured by oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity. Radiation response was found to be muted by addition of glutathione to cell media. HIF-1α inhibition similarly muted radiation response in cancer. Conclusion: The HIF-1 protein complex is a key regulator cellular metabolism through the regulation of glycolysis and glucose transport enzymes. Moreover, HIF-1 has shown radio-protective effects in tumor vascular endothelia, and has been implicated in metastatic aggression. Monitoring interplay between metabolism and the HIF-1 protein complex can give a more fundamental understanding of radiotherapy response.

  4. Probing metabolic states of differentiating stem cells using two-photon FLIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Shirmanova, Marina V; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav I; Becker, Wolfgang; Bystrova, Alena S; Cherkasova, Elena I; Zagaynova, Elena V

    2016-02-25

    The ability of stem cells to differentiate into specialized cell types presents a number of opportunities for regenerative medicine, stem cell therapy and developmental biology. Because traditional assessments of stem cells are destructive, time consuming, and logistically intensive, the use of a non-invasive, label-free approach to study of cell differentiation provides a powerful tool for rapid, high-content characterization of cell and tissue cultures. Here, we elucidate the metabolic changes in MSCs during adipogenic differentiation, based on the fluorescence of the metabolic co-factors NADH, NADPH, and FAD using the methods of two-photon fluorescence microscopy combined with FLIM. To estimate the contribution of energy metabolism and lipogenesis in the observed changes of the metabolic profile, a separate analysis of NADH and NADPH is required. In our study we demonstrated, for the first time, an increased contribution of protein-bound NADPH in adipocytes that is associated with lipogenesis. The optical redox ratio FAD/NAD(P)H decreased during adipogenic differentiation, and that this was likely to be explained by the intensive biosynthesis of lipids and the enhanced NADPH production associated with this. Based on the data on the fluorescence lifetime contribution of protein-bound NAD(P)H, we registered a metabolic switch from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation in adipocytes.

  5. Polyamine Metabolism Is Sensitive to Glycolysis Inhibition in Human Neuroblastoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, M. Victoria; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Urdiales, José Luis; Keinänen, Tuomo A.; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation, and their levels are elevated in many human tumors. The oncogene n-myc is known to potentiate polyamine metabolism. Neuroblastoma, the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children, harbors the amplification of n-myc oncogene in 25% of the cases, and it is associated with treatment failure and poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic features of the human neuroblastoma cell lines Kelly, IMR-32, and SK-N-SH. We further investigated the effects of glycolysis impairment in polyamine metabolism in these cell lines. A previously unknown linkage between glycolysis impairment and polyamine reduction is unveiled. We show that glycolysis inhibition is able to trigger signaling events leading to the reduction of N-Myc protein levels and a subsequent decrease of both ornithine decarboxylase expression and polyamine levels, accompanied by cell cycle blockade preceding cell death. New anti-tumor strategies could take advantage of the direct relationship between glucose deprivation and polyamine metabolism impairment, leading to cell death, and its apparent dependence on n-myc. Combined therapies targeting glucose metabolism and polyamine synthesis could be effective in the treatment of n-myc-expressing tumors. PMID:25593318

  6. Polyamine metabolism is sensitive to glycolysis inhibition in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, M Victoria; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Urdiales, José Luis; Keinänen, Tuomo A; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation, and their levels are elevated in many human tumors. The oncogene n-myc is known to potentiate polyamine metabolism. Neuroblastoma, the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children, harbors the amplification of n-myc oncogene in 25% of the cases, and it is associated with treatment failure and poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic features of the human neuroblastoma cell lines Kelly, IMR-32, and SK-N-SH. We further investigated the effects of glycolysis impairment in polyamine metabolism in these cell lines. A previously unknown linkage between glycolysis impairment and polyamine reduction is unveiled. We show that glycolysis inhibition is able to trigger signaling events leading to the reduction of N-Myc protein levels and a subsequent decrease of both ornithine decarboxylase expression and polyamine levels, accompanied by cell cycle blockade preceding cell death. New anti-tumor strategies could take advantage of the direct relationship between glucose deprivation and polyamine metabolism impairment, leading to cell death, and its apparent dependence on n-myc. Combined therapies targeting glucose metabolism and polyamine synthesis could be effective in the treatment of n-myc-expressing tumors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. PET probes for distinct metabolic pathways have different cell specificities during immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair-Gill, Evan; Wiltzius, Stephanie M; Wei, Xiao X; Cheng, Donghui; Riedinger, Mireille; Radu, Caius G; Witte, Owen N

    2010-06-01

    Clinical tools that measure changes in immune cell metabolism would improve the diagnosis and treatment of immune dysfunction. PET, utilizing probes for specific metabolic processes, detects regions of immune activation in vivo. In this study we investigated the immune cell specificity of PET probes for two different metabolic pathways: [18F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG) for glycolysis and [18F]-2-fluoro-D-(arabinofuranosyl)cytosine ([18F]-FAC) for deoxycytidine salvage. We isolated innate and adaptive immune cells from tissues of mice challenged with a retrovirus-induced sarcoma and measured their ability to accumulate FDG and FAC. We determined that the two probes had distinct patterns of accumulation: FDG accumulated to the highest levels in innate immune cells, while FAC accumulated predominantly in CD8+ T cells in a manner that correlated with cellular proliferation. This study demonstrates that innate and adaptive cell types differ in glycolytic and deoxycytidine salvage demands during an immune response and that these differential metabolic requirements can be detected with specific PET probes. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of clinical PET scans that use [18F]-FDG or [18F]-FAC to assess immune function in vivo and suggest potential applications of metabolic PET to monitor the effects of targeted immune modulation.

  8. Metabolic Control of Dendritic Cell Activation and Function: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart eEverts

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are key regulators of both immunity and tolerance by controlling activation and polarization of effector T helper cell and regulatory T cell responses. Therefore, there is a major focus on developing approaches to manipulate DC function for immunotherapy. It is well known that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. Over the past decade there is a growing appreciation that these metabolic changes also underlie the capacity of immune cells to perform particular functions. This has led to the concept that the manipulation of cellular metabolism can be used to shape innate and adaptive immune responses. While most of our understanding in this area has been gained from studies with T cells and macrophages, evidence is emerging that the activation and function of DCs are also dictated by the type of metabolism these cells commit to. We here discuss these new insights and explore whether targeting of metabolic pathways in DCs could hold promise as a novel approach to manipulate the functional properties of DCs for clinical purposes.

  9. Memory CD8(+) T Cells Use Cell-Intrinsic Lipolysis to Support the Metabolic Programming Necessary for Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Sullivan, David; van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Buck, Michael D.; Qiu, Jing; Smith, Amber M.; Lam, Wing Y.; DiPlato, Lisa M.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Pearce, Edward J.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2014-01-01

    Generation of CD8(+) memory T cells requires metabolic reprogramming that is characterized by enhanced mitochondrial fatty-acid oxidation (FAO). However, where the fatty acids (FA) that fuel this process come from remains unclear. While CD8(+) memory T cells engage FAO to a greater extent, we found

  10. Historical perspectives in fat cell biology: the fat cell as a model for the investigation of hormonal and metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontan, Max

    2012-01-15

    For many years, there was little interest in the biochemistry or physiology of adipose tissue. It is now well recognized that adipocytes play an important dynamic role in metabolic regulation. They are able to sense metabolic states via their ability to perceive a large number of nervous and hormonal signals. They are also able to produce hormones, called adipokines, that affect nutrient intake, metabolism and energy expenditure. The report by Rodbell in 1964 that intact fat cells can be obtained by collagenase digestion of adipose tissue revolutionized studies on the hormonal regulation and metabolism of the fat cell. In the context of the advent of systems biology in the field of cell biology, the present seems an appropriate time to look back at the global contribution of the fat cell to cell biology knowledge. This review focuses on the very early approaches that used the fat cell as a tool to discover and understand various cellular mechanisms. Attention essentially focuses on the early investigations revealing the major contribution of mature fat cells and also fat cells originating from adipose cell lines to the discovery of major events related to hormone action (hormone receptors and transduction pathways involved in hormonal signaling) and mechanisms involved in metabolite processing (hexose uptake and uptake, storage, and efflux of fatty acids). Dormant preadipocytes exist in the stroma-vascular fraction of the adipose tissue of rodents and humans; cell culture systems have proven to be valuable models for the study of the processes involved in the formation of new fat cells. Finally, more recent insights into adipocyte secretion, a completely new role with major metabolic impact, are also briefly summarized.

  11. Kupffer cells facilitate the acute effects of leptin on hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlakunta, Anantha; Huang, Wan; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Dedousis, Nikolaos; Sipula, Ian; O'Doherty, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Leptin has potent effects on lipid metabolism in a number of peripheral tissues. In liver, an acute leptin infusion (~120 min) stimulates hepatic fatty acid oxidation (~30%) and reduces triglycerides (TG, ~40%), effects that are dependent on phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activity. In the current study we addressed the hypothesis that leptin actions on liver-resident immune cells are required for these metabolic effects. Myeloid cell-specific deletion of the leptin receptor (ObR) in mice or depletion of liver Kupffer cells (KC) in rats in vivo prevented the acute effects of leptin on liver lipid metabolism, while the metabolic effects of leptin were maintained in mice lacking ObR in hepatocytes. Notably, liver TG were elevated in both lean and obese myeloid cell ObR, but the degree of obesity and insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet was similar to control mice. In isolated primary hepatocytes (HEP), leptin had no effects on HEP lipid metabolism and only weakly stimulated PI3K. However, the coculture of KC with HEP restored leptin action on HEP fatty acid metabolism and stimulation of HEP PI3K. Notably, leptin stimulated the release from KC of a number of cytokines. However, the exposure of HEP to these cytokines individually [granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18] or in combination had no effects on HEP lipid metabolism. Together, these data demonstrate a role for liver mononuclear cells in the regulation of liver lipid metabolism by leptin. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Improvement of the energy metabolism of recombinant CHO cells by cell sorting for reduced mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterkörner, Georg; Brugger, Gudrun; Müller, Dethardt; Hesse, Friedemann; Kunert, Renate; Katinger, Hermann; Borth, Nicole

    2007-05-10

    One of the major problems in process performance of mammalian cell cultures is the production of lactic acid. Cell specific glucose uptake rates usually correlate to glucose concentration and approximately 80% of the metabolised glucose is converted into lactic acid. As the mitochondrial membrane potential was shown to correlate to cell specific glucose uptake rates, we used Rhodamine 123, a lipophilic cationic dye for cell sorting to improve the energy metabolism of existing production cell lines. Two recombinant CHO cell lines with known differences in lactic acid production rate were used to evaluate Rhodamine 123 staining as a descriptor for glucose uptake rates and to determine whether it is possible to isolate subclones with altered metabolic properties. Such subclones would exhibit an improved process performance, and in addition could be used as models for genomic and metabolic studies. From the cell line with high lactate production, a subclone sorted for reduced mitochondrial membrane potential was found to have a lower specific lactate formation rate compared to the parental cell line in batch cultures. In addition, the glucose consumption rate was also reduced, while both the growth rate and the final cell concentration were increased. A subclone sorted for high mitochondrial membrane potential, on the other hand, had a higher glucose consumption rate, a higher lactate production rate and reduced growth. The potential of using flow cytometric cell sorting methods based on physiological activity for cell line optimisation is discussed.

  13. {sup 13}C dynamic nuclear polarization for measuring metabolic flux in endothelial progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Nathalie; Laustsen, Christoffer; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde, E-mail: Lotte@clin.au.dk

    2016-11-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a heterogeneous cell population that is believed to be involved in vasculogenesis. With the purpose of enhancing endothelial repair, EPCs could have a potential for future cell therapies. Due to the low amount of EPCs in the peripheral circulating blood, in vitro expansion is needed before administration to recipients and the effects of in vitro culturing is still an under-evaluated field with little knowledge of how the cells change over time in culture. The aim of this study was to use hyperpolarised carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy to profile important metabolic pathways in a population of progenitor cells and to show that cell culturing in 3D scaffolds seem to block the metabolic processes that leads to cell senescence. The metabolic breakdown of hyperpolarized [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate was followed after injection of the substrate to a bioreactor system with EPCs either adhered to 3D printed scaffolds or kept in cell suspension. The pyruvate-to-lactate conversion was elevated in suspension of EPCs compared to the EPCs adhered to scaffolds. Furthermore in the setup with EPCs in suspension, an increase in lactate production was seen over time indicating that the older the cultures of EPCs was before using the cells for cell suspension experiments, the more lactate they produce, compared to a constant lactate level in the cells adhered to scaffolds. It could therefore be stated that cells grown first in 2D culture and subsequent prepared for cell suspension show a metabolism with higher lactate production consistent with cells senescence processes compared to cells grown first at 2D culture and subsequent in the 3D printed scaffolds, where metabolism shows no sign of metabolic shifting during the monitored period. - Highlights: • Hyperpolarized 13C MRS detects EPCs metabolic changes associated with ageing and cultivating conditions. • Increased lactate production in EPC’s correlates positively with aging.

  14. Is cancer a metabolic rebellion against host aging? In the quest for immortality, tumor cells try to save themselves by boosting mitochondrial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, Adam; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Birbe, Ruth C; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-01-15

    Aging drives large systemic reductions in oxidative mitochondrial function, shifting the entire body metabolically towards aerobic glycolysis, a.k.a, the Warburg effect. Aging is also one of the most significant risk factors for the development of human cancers, including breast tumors. How are these two findings connected? One simplistic idea is that cancer cells rebel against the aging process by increasing their capacity for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). Then, local and systemic aerobic glycolysis in the aging host would provide energy-rich mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketones) to directly "fuel" tumor cell growth and metastasis. This would establish a type of parasite-host relationship or "two-compartment tumor metabolism", with glycolytic/oxidative metabolic-coupling. The cancer cells ("the seeds") would flourish in this nutrient-rich microenvironment ("the soil"), which has been fertilized by host aging. In this scenario, cancer cells are only trying to save themselves from the consequences of aging, by engineering a metabolic mutiny, through the amplification of mitochondrial metabolism. We discuss the recent findings of Drs. Ron DePinho (MD Anderson) and Craig Thomspson (Sloan-Kettering) that are also consistent with this new hypothesis, linking cancer progression with metabolic aging. Using data mining and bioinformatics approaches, we also provide key evidence of a role for PGC1a/NRF1 signaling in the pathogenesis of (1) two-compartment tumor metabolism, and (2) mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells.

  15. Energy metabolism in rat mast cells in relation to histamine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The relation between the energy metabolism and the secretory activity of rat peritoneal mast cells has been studied by determination of the cellular content of ATP and the rate of lactate production reflecting the rate of ATP synthesis under various experimental conditions. Secretion...... and the cellular ATP content at the time of cell activation was demonstrated. This may indicate a direct link between ATP and the secretory mechanism. 3. The possibility of an increased utilization of ATP during histamine secretion was explored in mast cells exposed to metabolic inhibitors. Incubation of mast...... cells with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) decreased the ATP content of the cells, and a long-lasting and stable level of mast cell ATP was observed. This is explained by a small decrease in the rate of ATP-synthesis by 2-DG. In 2-DG-treated cells secretion of histamine in response to compound 48...

  16. Metabolic-flux analysis of mammalian-cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonarius, H.P.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry mammalian cells are cultivated for the production of recombinant glycoproteins, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies. In contrast to other expression systems, such as prokaryotes or yeasts, mammalian cells are able to glycosylate and fold therapeutic

  17. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Hefzi, Hooman

    2016-11-23

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways in CHO and associated them with >1,700 genes in the Cricetulus griseus genome. The genome-scale metabolic model based on this reconstruction, iCHO1766, and cell-line-specific models for CHO-K1, CHO-S, and CHO-DG44 cells provide the biochemical basis of growth and recombinant protein production. The models accurately predict growth phenotypes and known auxotrophies in CHO cells. With the models, we quantify the protein synthesis capacity of CHO cells and demonstrate that common bioprocess treatments, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, inefficiently increase product yield. However, our simulations show that the metabolic resources in CHO are more than three times more efficiently utilized for growth or recombinant protein synthesis following targeted efforts to engineer the CHO secretory pathway. This model will further accelerate CHO cell engineering and help optimize bioprocesses.

  18. METABOLIC MAPPING BY ENZYME HISTOCHEMISTRY IN LIVING ANIMALS, TISSUES AND CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins in intact animals, tissue and cells has become an indispensable tool in cell biology Imaging activity of enzymes, which is called metabolic mapping, provides information on subcellular localisation in combination with function of the enzymes

  19. GABA and glutamate uptake and metabolism in retinal glial (Müller cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBringmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the shaping and termination of the synaptic activity, particularly in the inner retina. Reactive Müller cells are neuroprotective, e.g., by the clearance of excess extracellular glutamate, but may also contribute to neuronal degeneration by a malfunctioning or even reversal of glial glutamate transporters, or by a downregulation of the key enzyme, glutamine synthetase. This review summarizes the present knowledge about the role of Müller cells in the clearance and metabolization of extracellular glutamate and GABA. Some major pathways of GABA and glutamate metabolism in Müller cells are described; these pathways are involved in the glutamate-glutamine cycle of the retina, in the defense against oxidative stress via the production of glutathione, and in the production of substrates for the neuronal energy metabolism.

  20. Autonomous Metabolic Oscillations Robustly Gate the Early and Late Cell Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, Alexandros; Niebel, Bastian; Wit, Ernst C; Heinemann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division is known to be controlled by the cyclin/cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) machinery. However, eukaryotes have evolved prior to CDKs, and cells can divide in the absence of major cyclin/CDK components. We hypothesized that an autonomous metabolic oscillator provides dynamic

  1. Differential sensitivities of bladder cancer cell lines to resveratol are unrelated to its metabolic profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Wu, Moli; Ren, Changle; Zhen, Yuhong; Ma, Xiaochi; Diao, Yunpeng; Ma, Xiaodong; Deng, Sa; Liu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a natural polyphenol compound with a wide range of activities, including inhibition of human bladder cancer (HBC) cell growth. Because RV is rapidly metabolized and has poor bioavailability, it is unclear whether the antitumor activity is due to RV or its metabolites. We therefore used liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy, qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blotting to evaluate the metabolic profile and biotransformation of RV in the T24 and EJ HBC cell lines. Both T24 and EJ cells generated the same RV metabolite, RV monosulfate (RVS), and both exhibited upregulation of the RV-associated metabolic enzyme SULT1A1 (sulfotransferase). Despite these similarities, T24 cells were more sensitive to RV than EJ cells, yet T24 cells exhibited no sensitivity to an RVS mixture (84.13% RVS). Primary rat bladder epithelial cells showed no adverse effects when exposed to a therapeutic dose (100 μM) of RV. The differences in RV sensitivity between the two HBC cell lines did not reflect differences in the RV metabolic profile or SULT1A1 expression. Because RV exhibited stronger antitumor activity and better safety than RVS, we conclude that RV has significant therapeutic potential for HBC treatment, provided individual differences are considered during clinical research and application. PMID:28178690

  2. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell line...

  3. Could Metabolic Syndrome, Lipodystrophy, and Aging Be Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exhaustion Syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mansilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important and complex diseases of modern society is metabolic syndrome. This syndrome has not been completely understood, and therefore an effective treatment is not available yet. We propose a possible stem cell mechanism involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. This way of thinking lets us consider also other significant pathologies that could have similar etiopathogenic pathways, like lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and aging. All these clinical situations could be the consequence of a progressive and persistent stem cell exhaustion syndrome (SCES. The main outcome of this SCES would be an irreversible loss of the effective regenerative mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs pools. In this way, the normal repairing capacities of the organism could become inefficient. Our point of view could open the possibility for a new strategy of treatment in metabolic syndrome, lipodystrophic syndromes, progeria, and even aging: stem cell therapies.

  4. METABOLIC MODELLING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CELL FACTORIES BY SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jouhten

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell factories are commonly microbial organisms utilized for bioconversion of renewable resources to bulk or high value chemicals. Introduction of novel production pathways in chassis strains is the core of the development of cell factories by synthetic biology. Synthetic biology aims to create novel biological functions and systems not found in nature by combining biology with engineering. The workflow of the development of novel cell factories with synthetic biology is ideally linear which will be attainable with the quantitative engineering approach, high-quality predictive models, and libraries of well-characterized parts. Different types of metabolic models, mathematical representations of metabolism and its components, enzymes and metabolites, are useful in particular phases of the synthetic biology workflow. In this minireview, the role of metabolic modelling in synthetic biology will be discussed with a review of current status of compatible methods and models for the in silico design and quantitative evaluation of a cell factory.

  5. Metabolic modelling in the development of cell factories by synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Tuulia Jouhten

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell factories are commonly microbial organisms utilized for bioconversion of renewable resources to bulk or high value chemicals. Introduction of novel production pathways in chassis strains is the core of the development of cell factories by synthetic biology. Synthetic biology aims to create novel biological functions and systems not found in nature by combining biology with engineering. The workflow of the development of novel cell factories with synthetic biology is ideally linear which will be attainable with the quantitative engineering approach, high-quality predictive models, and libraries of well-characterized parts. Different types of metabolic models, mathematical representations of metabolism and its components, enzymes and metabolites, are useful in particular phases of the synthetic biology workflow. In this minireview, the role of metabolic modelling in synthetic biology will be discussed with a review of current status of compatible methods and models for the in silico design and quantitative evaluation of a cell factory.

  6. Gene expression analyses reveal metabolic specifications in acute O2 -sensing chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Bonilla-Henao, Victoria; García-Flores, Paula; Arias-Mayenco, Ignacio; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2017-09-15

    Glomus cells in the carotid body (CB) and chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (AM) are essential for reflex cardiorespiratory adaptation to hypoxia. However, the mechanisms whereby these cells detect changes in O2 tension are poorly understood. The metabolic properties of acute O2 -sensing cells have been investigated by comparing the transcriptomes of CB and AM cells, which are O2 -sensitive, with superior cervical ganglion neurons, which are practically O2 -insensitive. In O2 -sensitive cells, we found a characteristic prolyl hydroxylase 3 down-regulation and hypoxia inducible factor 2α up-regulation, as well as overexpression of genes coding for three atypical mitochondrial electron transport subunits and pyruvate carboxylase, an enzyme that replenishes tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. In agreement with this observation, the inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase impairs CB acute O2 sensing. The responsiveness of peripheral chemoreceptor cells to acute hypoxia depends on a 'signature metabolic profile'. Acute O2 sensing is a fundamental property of cells in the peripheral chemoreceptors, e.g. glomus cells in the carotid body (CB) and chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (AM), and is necessary for adaptation to hypoxia. These cells contain O2 -sensitive ion channels, which mediate membrane depolarization and transmitter release upon exposure to hypoxia. However, the mechanisms underlying the detection of changes in O2 tension by cells are still poorly understood. Recently, we suggested that CB glomus cells have specific metabolic features that favour the accumulation of reduced quinone and the production of mitochondrial NADH and reactive oxygen species during hypoxia. These signals alter membrane ion channel activity. To investigate the metabolic profile characteristic of acute O2 -sensing cells, we used adult mice to compare the transcriptomes of three cell types derived from common sympathoadrenal progenitors, but exhibiting variable

  7. Metabolic Response to NAD Depletion across Cell Lines Is Highly Variable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD is a cofactor involved in a wide range of cellular metabolic processes and is a key metabolite required for tumor growth. NAMPT, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, which converts nicotinamide (NAM to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN, the immediate precursor of NAD, is an attractive therapeutic target as inhibition of NAMPT reduces cellular NAD levels and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. However, there is limited understanding of the metabolic response to NAD depletion across cancer cell lines and whether all cell lines respond in a uniform manner. To explore this we selected two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines that are sensitive to the NAMPT inhibitor GNE-617 (A549, NCI-H1334, one that shows intermediate sensitivity (NCI-H441, and one that is insensitive (LC-KJ. Even though NAD was reduced in all cell lines there was surprising heterogeneity in their metabolic response. Both sensitive cell lines reduced glycolysis and levels of di- and tri-nucleotides and modestly increased oxidative phosphorylation, but they differed in their ability to combat oxidative stress. H1334 cells activated the stress kinase AMPK, whereas A549 cells were unable to activate AMPK as they contain a mutation in LKB1, which prevents activation of AMPK. However, A549 cells increased utilization of the Pentose Phosphate pathway (PPP and had lower reactive oxygen species (ROS levels than H1334 cells, indicating that A549 cells are better able to modulate an increase in oxidative stress. Inherent resistance of LC-KJ cells is associated with higher baseline levels of NADPH and a delayed reduction of NAD upon NAMPT inhibition. Our data reveals that cell lines show heterogeneous response to NAD depletion and that the underlying molecular and genetic framework in cells can influence the metabolic response to NAMPT inhibition.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid-Serum Hydrogels Rapidly Restore Metabolism of Encapsulated Stem Cells and Promote Engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angel T.; Karakas, Mehmet F.; Vakrou, Styliani; Afzal, Junaid; Rittenbach, Andrew; Lin, Xiaoping; Wahl, Richard L.; Pomper, Martin G.; Steenbergen, Charles J.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell death due to anoikis, necrosis and cell egress from transplantation sites limits functional benefits of cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cell dissociation and suspension, which are a pre-requisite for most cell transplantation studies, lead to depression of cellular metabolism and anoikis, which contribute to low engraftment. Objective We tissue engineered scaffolds with the goal of rapidly restoring metabolism, promoting viability, proliferation and engraftment of encapsulated stem cells. Methods The carboxyl groups of HA were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to yield HA succinimidyl succinate (HA-NHS) groups that react with free amine groups to form amide bonds. HA-NHS was cross-linked by serum to generate HA:Serum (HA:Ser) hydrogels. Physical properties of HA:Ser hydrogels were measured. Effect of encapsulating cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) in HA:Ser hydrogels on viability, proliferation, glucose uptake and metabolism was assessed in vitro. In vivo acute intra-myocardial cell retention of 18FDG-labeled CDCs encapsulated in HA:Ser hydrogels was quantified. Effect of CDC encapsulation in HA:Ser hydrogels on in vivo metabolism and engraftment at 7 days was assessed by serial, dual isotope SPECT-CT and bioluminescence imaging of CDCs expressing the Na-iodide symporter and firefly luciferase genes respectively. Effect of HA:Ser hydrogels +/− CDCs on cardiac function was assessed at 7 days & 28 days post-infarct. Results HA:Ser hydrogels are highly bio-adhesive, biodegradable, promote rapid cell adhesion, glucose uptake and restore bioenergetics of encapsulated cells within 1 h of encapsulation, both in vitro and in vivo. These metabolic scaffolds can be applied epicardially as a patch to beating hearts or injected intramyocardially. HA:Ser hydrogels markedly increase acute intramyocardial retention (~6 fold), promote in vivo viability, proliferation, engraftment of encapsulated stem cells and angiogenesis. Conclusion HA:Ser hydrogels

  9. Exploiting immune cell metabolic machinery for functional HIV cure and the prevention of inflammaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Clovis S; Palchaudhuri, Riya; Albargy, Hassan; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2018-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in immunology suggests that metabolic reprogramming and immune cell activation and functions are intricately linked. Viral infections, such as HIV infection, as well as cancer force immune cells to undergo major metabolic challenges. Cells must divert energy resources in order to mount an effective immune response. However, the fact that immune cells adopt specific metabolic programs to provide host defense against intracellular pathogens and how this metabolic shift impacts immune cell functions and the natural course of diseases have only recently been appreciated. A clearer insight into how these processes are inter-related will affect our understanding of several fundamental aspects of HIV persistence. Even in patients with long-term use of anti-retroviral therapies, HIV infection persists and continues to cause chronic immune activation and inflammation, ongoing and cumulative damage to multiple organs systems, and a reduction in life expectancy. HIV-associated fundamental changes to the metabolic machinery of the immune system can promote a state of "inflammaging", a chronic, low-grade inflammation with specific immune changes that characterize aging, and can also contribute to the persistence of HIV in its reservoirs. In this commentary, we will bring into focus evolving concepts on how HIV modulates the metabolic machinery of immune cells in order to persist in reservoirs and how metabolic reprogramming facilitates a chronic state of inflammation that underlies the development of age-related comorbidities. We will discuss how immunometabolism is facilitating the changing paradigms in HIV cure research and outline the novel therapeutic opportunities for preventing inflammaging and premature development of age-related conditions in HIV + individuals.

  10. Characterizing steady states of genome-scale metabolic networks in continuous cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernandez-de-Cossio-Diaz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the continuous mode of cell culture, a constant flow carrying fresh media replaces culture fluid, cells, nutrients and secreted metabolites. Here we present a model for continuous cell culture coupling intra-cellular metabolism to extracellular variables describing the state of the bioreactor, taking into account the growth capacity of the cell and the impact of toxic byproduct accumulation. We provide a method to determine the steady states of this system that is tractable for metabolic networks of arbitrary complexity. We demonstrate our approach in a toy model first, and then in a genome-scale metabolic network of the Chinese hamster ovary cell line, obtaining results that are in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. We derive a number of consequences from the model that are independent of parameter values. The ratio between cell density and dilution rate is an ideal control parameter to fix a steady state with desired metabolic properties. This conclusion is robust even in the presence of multi-stability, which is explained in our model by a negative feedback loop due to toxic byproduct accumulation. A complex landscape of steady states emerges from our simulations, including multiple metabolic switches, which also explain why cell-line and media benchmarks carried out in batch culture cannot be extrapolated to perfusion. On the other hand, we predict invariance laws between continuous cell cultures with different parameters. A practical consequence is that the chemostat is an ideal experimental model for large-scale high-density perfusion cultures, where the complex landscape of metabolic transitions is faithfully reproduced.

  11. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Approaches to Model Inborn and Acquired Metabolic Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanana, Anita M.; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This article provides an overview of advances in the induced pluripotent stem cell field to model cardiomyopathies of inherited inborn errors of metabolism and acquired metabolic syndromes in vitro. Recent findings Several inborn errors of metabolism have been studied using “disease in a dish” model, including Pompe disease, Danon disease, Fabry disease, and Barth syndrome. Disease phenotypes of complex metabolic syndromes, such as diabetes mellitus and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency have also been observed. Summary Differentiation of patient- and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has provided the capacity to model deleterious cardiometabolic diseases to understand molecular mechanisms, perform drug screens, and identify novel drug targets. PMID:27022891

  12. Defects in mitochondrial energetic function compels Fanconi Anaemia cells to glycolytic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Enrico; Cuccarolo, Paola; Stroppiana, Giorgia; Miano, Maurizio; Bottega, Roberta; Cossu, Vanessa; Degan, Paolo; Ravera, Silvia

    2017-06-01

    Energetic metabolism plays an essential role in the differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In Fanconi Anaemia (FA), DNA damage is accumulated during HSC differentiation, an event that is likely associated with bone marrow failure (BMF). One of the sources of the DNA damage is altered mitochondrial metabolism and an associated increment of oxidative stress. Recently, altered mitochondrial morphology and a deficit in the energetic activity in FA cells have been reported. Considering that mitochondria are the principal site of aerobic ATP production, we investigated FA metabolism in order to understand what pathways are able to compensate for this energy deficiency. In this work, we report that the impairment in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in FA cells is countered by an increase in glycolytic flux. By contrast, glutaminolysis appears lower with respect to controls. Therefore, it is possible to conclude that in FA cells glycolysis represents the main pathway for producing energy, balancing the NADH/NAD(+) ratio by the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Finally, we show that a forced switch from glycolytic to OXPHOS metabolism increases FA cell oxidative stress. This could be the cause of the impoverishment in bone marrow HSC during exit from the homeostatic quiescent state. This is the first work that systematically explores FA energy metabolism, highlighting its flaws, and discusses the possible relationships between these defects and BMF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Roles of GSK3 in metabolic shift toward abnormal anabolism in cell senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Mie; Seo, Yong-Hak; Park, Chan-Bae; Yoon, Soo-Han; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2010-07-01

    Diverse metabolic alterations, including mitochondrial dysfunction, have often been reported as characteristic phenotypes of senescent cells. However, the overall consequence of senescent metabolic features, how they develop, and how they are linked to other senescent phenotypes, such as enlarged cell volume, increased granularity, and oxidative stress, is not clear. We investigated the potential roles of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a multifunctional kinase, in the development of the metabolic phenotypes in cell senescence. The inactivation of GSK3 via phosphorylation is commonly observed in diverse cell senescences. Furthermore, subcytotoxic concentration of GSK3 inhibitor was sufficient to induce cellular senescence, accompanied by augmented anabolism, such as enhanced protein synthesis, and increased glycogenesis and lipogenesis, in addition to mitochondrial dysfunction. Anabolism was accomplished through glycogen synthase, eIF2B, and SREBP1. These metabolic features seem to contribute to an increase in cellular mass by increasing glycogen granules, protein mass, and organelles. Taken together, our results suggest that GSK3 is one of the key modulators of metabolic alteration, leading the cells to senescence.

  14. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  15. Oxidative Metabolism Genes Are Not Responsive to Oxidative Stress in Rodent Beta Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faer Morrison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of oxidative metabolism genes has been described in the skeletal muscle of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic beta cells contain low levels of antioxidant enzymes and are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the effect of hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on a panel of oxidative metabolism genes in a rodent beta cell line. We exposed INS-1 rodent beta cells to low (5.6 mmol/L, ambient (11 mmol/L, and high (28 mmol/L glucose conditions for 48 hours. Increases in oxidative stress were measured using the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine 123. We then measured the expression levels of a panel of 90 oxidative metabolism genes by real-time PCR. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production was evident in INS-1 cells after 48 hours (P<0.05. TLDA analysis revealed a significant (P<0.05 upregulation of 16 of the 90 genes under hyperglycemic conditions, although these expression differences did not reflect differences in ROS. We conclude that although altered glycemia may influence the expression of some oxidative metabolism genes, this effect is probably not mediated by increased ROS production. The alterations to the expression of oxidative metabolism genes previously observed in human diabetic skeletal muscle do not appear to be mirrored in rodent pancreatic beta cells.

  16. Ptpmt1 induced by HIF-2α regulates the proliferation and glucose metabolism in erythroleukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qin-Qin [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001 (China); Qinghai Provincial People' s Hospital, Xining (China); Xiao, Feng-Jun; Sun, Hui-Yan [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 100850 (China); Shi, Xue-Feng [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001 (China); Qinghai Provincial People' s Hospital, Xining (China); Wang, Hua; Yang, Yue-Feng; Li, Yu-Xiang [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 100850 (China); Wang, Li-Sheng, E-mail: wangls@bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 100850 (China); Ge, Ri-Li, E-mail: geriligao@hotmail.com [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001 (China)

    2016-03-18

    Hypoxia provokes metabolism misbalance, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in both human and animal cells. However, the mechanisms which hypoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and energy metabolism misbalance still remain unclear. In this study, we presented evidence that mitochondrial phosphatase Ptpmt1 is a hypoxia response molecule that regulates cell proliferation, survival and glucose metabolism in human erythroleukemia TF-1 cells. Exposure to hypoxia or DFO treatment results in upregulation of HIF1-α, HIF-2α and Ptpmt1. Only inhibition of HIF-2α by shRNA transduction reduces Ptpmt1 expression in TF-1 cells under hypoxia. Ptpmt1 inhibitor suppresses the growth and induces apoptosis of TF-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Ptpmt1 inhibition reduces the Glut1 and Glut3 expression and decreases the glucose consumption in TF-1 cells. In additional, Ptpmt1 knockdown also results in the mitochondrial dysfunction determined by JC1 staining. These results delineate a key role for HIF-2α-induced Ptpmt1 upregulation in proliferation, survival and glucose metabolism of erythroleukemia cells. It is indicated that Ptpmt1 plays important roles in hypoxia-induced cell metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • Hypoxia induces upregulation of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and Ptpmt1; HIF-2a induces Ptpmt1 upregulation in TF-1 cells. • PTPMT-1 inhibition reduces growth and induces apoptosis of TF-1 cells. • PTPMT1 inhibition downregulates Glut-1, Glut-3 expression and reduces glucose consumption.

  17. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C.; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Richard, Derek J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive gen...

  18. Inhibition of Sphingolipid Metabolism Enhances Resveratrol Chemotherapy in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kyong-Oh; Park, Nam-Young; Seo, Cho-Hee; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Kil; Lee, Yong-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a chemopreventive agent, is rapidly metabolized in the intestine and liver via glucuronidation. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of resveratrol limits its efficacy. To improve efficacy, the activity of resveratrol was investigated in the context of sphingolipid metabolism in human gastric cancer cells. Diverse sphingolipid metabolites, including dihydroceramides (DHCer), were tested for their ability to induce resveratrol cytotoxicity. Exposure to resveratrol (100 ?M) for 24 hr induced...

  19. A functional genomics approach toward the understanding of secondary metabolism in plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goossens, Alain; Häkkinen, Suvi T.; Laakso, Into; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Biondi, Stefania; De Sutter, Valerie; Lammertyn, Freya; Nuutila, Anna Maria; Söderlund, Hans; Zabeau, Marc; Inzé, Dirk; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2003-01-01

    Despite the tremendous importance of secondary metabolites for humans as for the plant itself, plant secondary metabolism remains poorly characterized. Here, we present an experimental approach, based on functional genomics, to facilitate gene discovery in plant secondary metabolism. Targeted metabolite analysis was combined with cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism-based transcript profiling of jasmonate-elicited tobacco Bright yellow 2 cells. Transcriptome ana...

  20. Vitamin D3 Induces Tolerance in Human Dendritic Cells by Activation of Intracellular Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Gabriela Bomfim; Vanherwegen, An-Sofie; Eelen, Guy; Gutiérrez, Ana Carolina Fierro; Van Lommel, Leentje; Marchal, Kathleen; Verlinden, Lieve; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Nogueira, Tatiane; Georgiadou, Maria; Schuit, Frans; Eizirik, Décio L; Gysemans, Conny; Carmeliet, Peter; Overbergh, Lut; Mathieu, Chantal

    2015-02-04

    Metabolic switches in various immune cell subsets enforce phenotype and function. In the present study, we demonstrate that the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ), induces human monocyte-derived tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) by metabolic reprogramming. Microarray analysis demonstrated that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 upregulated several genes directly related to glucose metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA), and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Although OXPHOS was promoted by 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , hypoxia did not change the tolerogenic function of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -treated DCs. Instead, glucose availability and glycolysis, controlled by the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, dictate the induction and maintenance of the 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -conditioned tolerogenic DC phenotype and function. This metabolic reprogramming is unique for 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , because the tolerogenic DC phenotype induced by other immune modulators did not depend on similar metabolic changes. We put forward that these metabolic insights in tolerogenic DC biology can be used to advance DC-based immunotherapies, influencing DC longevity and their resistance to environmental metabolic stress. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin D3 Induces Tolerance in Human Dendritic Cells by Activation of Intracellular Metabolic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bomfim Ferreira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic switches in various immune cell subsets enforce phenotype and function. In the present study, we demonstrate that the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3, induces human monocyte-derived tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC by metabolic reprogramming. Microarray analysis demonstrated that 1,25(OH2D3 upregulated several genes directly related to glucose metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Although OXPHOS was promoted by 1,25(OH2D3, hypoxia did not change the tolerogenic function of 1,25(OH2D3-treated DCs. Instead, glucose availability and glycolysis, controlled by the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, dictate the induction and maintenance of the 1,25(OH2D3-conditioned tolerogenic DC phenotype and function. This metabolic reprogramming is unique for 1,25(OH2D3, because the tolerogenic DC phenotype induced by other immune modulators did not depend on similar metabolic changes. We put forward that these metabolic insights in tolerogenic DC biology can be used to advance DC-based immunotherapies, influencing DC longevity and their resistance to environmental metabolic stress.

  2. Systems approach to characterize the metabolism of liver cancer stem cells expressing CD133

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Wonhee; Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung Woo; Lee, Eun Byul; Lee, Sang Yup; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2017-04-01

    Liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) have attracted attention because they cause therapeutic resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Understanding the metabolism of LCSCs can be a key to developing therapeutic strategy, but metabolic characteristics have not yet been studied. Here, we systematically analyzed and compared the global metabolic phenotype between LCSCs and non-LCSCs using transcriptome and metabolome data. We also reconstructed genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) for LCSC and non-LCSC to comparatively examine differences in their metabolism at genome-scale. We demonstrated that LCSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate through enhancing glycolysis compared with non-LCSCs. We also confirmed that MYC, a central point of regulation in cancer metabolism, was significantly up-regulated in LCSCs compared with non-LCSCs. Moreover, LCSCs tend to have less active fatty acid oxidation. In this study, the metabolic characteristics of LCSCs were identified using integrative systems analysis, and these characteristics could be potential cures for the resistance of liver cancer cells to anticancer treatments.

  3. Metabolic cooperation between co-cultured lung cancer cells and lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukourakis, Michael I; Kalamida, Dimitra; Mitrakas, Achilleas G; Liousia, Maria; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Sivridis, Efthimios; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    Cooperation of cancer cells with stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), has been revealed as a mechanism sustaining cancer cell survival and growth. In the current study, we focus on the metabolic interactions of MRC5 lung fibroblasts with lung cancer cells (A549 and H1299) using co-culture experiments and studying changes of the metabolic protein expression profile and of their growth and migration abilities. Using western blotting, confocal microscopy and RT-PCR, we observed that in co-cultures MRC5 respond by upregulating pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1. In contrast, cancer cells increase the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT1), LDH5, PDH kinase and the levels of phosphorylated/inactivated pPDH. H1299 cells growing in the same culture medium with fibroblasts exhibit a 'metastasis-like' phenomenon by forming nests within the fibroblast area. LDH5 and pPDH were drastically upregulated in these nests. The growth rate of both MRC5 and cancer cells increased in co-cultures. Suppression of LDHA or PDK1 in cancer cells abrogates the stimulatory signal from cancer cells to fibroblasts. Incubation of MRC5 fibroblasts with lactate resulted in an increase of LDHB and of PDH expression. Silencing of PDH gene in fibroblasts, or silencing of PDK1 or LDHA gene in tumor cells, impedes cancer cell's migration ability. Overall, a metabolic cooperation between lung cancer cells and fibroblasts has been confirmed in the context of direct Warburg effect, thus the fibroblasts reinforce aerobic metabolism to support the intensified anaerobic glycolytic pathways exploited by cancer cells.

  4. “Limits of Control” – Crucial Parameters for a Reliable Quantification of Viable Campylobacter by Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Nora-Johanna; Buhler, Christiane; Iwobi, Azuka N.; Huber, Ingrid; Ellerbroek, Lüppo; Appel, Bernd; Stingl, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The unsuitability of the “CFU” parameter and the usefulness of cultivation-independent quantification of Campylobacter on chicken products, reflecting the actual risk for infection, is increasingly becoming obvious. Recently, real-time PCR methods in combination with the use of DNA intercalators, which block DNA amplification from dead bacteria, have seen wide application. However, much confusion exists in the correct interpretation of such assays. Campylobacter is confronted by oxidative and cold stress outside the intestine. Hence, damage caused by oxidative stress probably represents the most frequent natural death of Campylobacter on food products. Treatment of Campylobacter with peroxide led to complete loss of CFU and to significant entry of any tested DNA intercalator, indicating disruption of membrane integrity. When we transiently altered the metabolic state of Campylobacter by abolishing the proton-motive force or by inhibiting active efflux, CFU was constant but enhanced entry of ethidium bromide (EtBr) was observed. Consistently, ethidium monoazide (EMA) also entered viable Campylobacter, in particular when nutrients for bacterial energization were lacking (in PBS) or when the cells were less metabolically active (in stationary phase). In contrast, propidium iodide (PI) and propidium monoazide (PMA) were excluded from viable bacterial cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. As expected for a diffusion-limited process, the extent of signal reduction from dead cells depended on the temperature, incubation time and concentration of the dyes during staining, prior to crosslinking. Consistently, free protein and/or DNA present in varying amounts in the heterogeneous matrix lowered the concentration of the DNA dyes at the bacterial membrane and led to considerable variation of the residual signal from dead cells. In conclusion, we propose an improved approach, taking into account principles of method variability and recommend the implementation of

  5. "Limits of control"--crucial parameters for a reliable quantification of viable campylobacter by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Nora-Johanna; Buhler, Christiane; Iwobi, Azuka N; Huber, Ingrid; Ellerbroek, Lüppo; Appel, Bernd; Stingl, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The unsuitability of the "CFU" parameter and the usefulness of cultivation-independent quantification of Campylobacter on chicken products, reflecting the actual risk for infection, is increasingly becoming obvious. Recently, real-time PCR methods in combination with the use of DNA intercalators, which block DNA amplification from dead bacteria, have seen wide application. However, much confusion exists in the correct interpretation of such assays. Campylobacter is confronted by oxidative and cold stress outside the intestine. Hence, damage caused by oxidative stress probably represents the most frequent natural death of Campylobacter on food products. Treatment of Campylobacter with peroxide led to complete loss of CFU and to significant entry of any tested DNA intercalator, indicating disruption of membrane integrity. When we transiently altered the metabolic state of Campylobacter by abolishing the proton-motive force or by inhibiting active efflux, CFU was constant but enhanced entry of ethidium bromide (EtBr) was observed. Consistently, ethidium monoazide (EMA) also entered viable Campylobacter, in particular when nutrients for bacterial energization were lacking (in PBS) or when the cells were less metabolically active (in stationary phase). In contrast, propidium iodide (PI) and propidium monoazide (PMA) were excluded from viable bacterial cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. As expected for a diffusion-limited process, the extent of signal reduction from dead cells depended on the temperature, incubation time and concentration of the dyes during staining, prior to crosslinking. Consistently, free protein and/or DNA present in varying amounts in the heterogeneous matrix lowered the concentration of the DNA dyes at the bacterial membrane and led to considerable variation of the residual signal from dead cells. In conclusion, we propose an improved approach, taking into account principles of method variability and recommend the implementation of

  6. "Limits of control"--crucial parameters for a reliable quantification of viable campylobacter by real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora-Johanna Krüger

    Full Text Available The unsuitability of the "CFU" parameter and the usefulness of cultivation-independent quantification of Campylobacter on chicken products, reflecting the actual risk for infection, is increasingly becoming obvious. Recently, real-time PCR methods in combination with the use of DNA intercalators, which block DNA amplification from dead bacteria, have seen wide application. However, much confusion exists in the correct interpretation of such assays. Campylobacter is confronted by oxidative and cold stress outside the intestine. Hence, damage caused by oxidative stress probably represents the most frequent natural death of Campylobacter on food products. Treatment of Campylobacter with peroxide led to complete loss of CFU and to significant entry of any tested DNA intercalator, indicating disruption of membrane integrity. When we transiently altered the metabolic state of Campylobacter by abolishing the proton-motive force or by inhibiting active efflux, CFU was constant but enhanced entry of ethidium bromide (EtBr was observed. Consistently, ethidium monoazide (EMA also entered viable Campylobacter, in particular when nutrients for bacterial energization were lacking (in PBS or when the cells were less metabolically active (in stationary phase. In contrast, propidium iodide (PI and propidium monoazide (PMA were excluded from viable bacterial cells, irrespective of their metabolic state. As expected for a diffusion-limited process, the extent of signal reduction from dead cells depended on the temperature, incubation time and concentration of the dyes during staining, prior to crosslinking. Consistently, free protein and/or DNA present in varying amounts in the heterogeneous matrix lowered the concentration of the DNA dyes at the bacterial membrane and led to considerable variation of the residual signal from dead cells. In conclusion, we propose an improved approach, taking into account principles of method variability and recommend the

  7. Mouse genetics suggests cell-context dependency for Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes during tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisa M; Forshell, Tacha Zi Plym; Rimpi, Sara; Kreutzer, Christiane; Pretsch, Walter; Bornkamm, Georg W; Nilsson, Jonas A

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc (hereafter called Myc) belongs to a family of transcription factors that regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Myc initiates the transcription of a large cast of genes involved in cell growth by stimulating metabolism and protein synthesis. Some of these, like those involved in glycolysis, may be part of the Warburg effect, which is defined as increased glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of adequate oxygen supply. In this study, we have taken a mouse-genetics approach to challenge the role of select Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis in vivo. By breeding λ-Myc transgenic mice, Apc(Min) mice, and p53 knockout mice with mouse models carrying inactivating alleles of Lactate dehydrogenase A (Ldha), 3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (Shmt1), we obtained offspring that were monitored for tumor development. Very surprisingly, we found that these genes are dispensable for tumorigenesis in these genetic settings. However, experiments in fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells expressing oncogenic Ras show that these cells are sensitive to Ldha knockdown. Our genetic models reveal cell context dependency and a remarkable ability of tumor cells to adapt to alterations in critical metabolic pathways. Thus, to achieve clinical success, it will be of importance to correctly stratify patients and to find synthetic lethal combinations of inhibitors targeting metabolic enzymes.

  8. Evolution of Energy Metabolism, Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells: How the Warburg and Barker Hypotheses Might Be Linked

    OpenAIRE

    Trosko, James E.; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary transition from single cells to the metazoan forced the appearance of adult stem cells and a hypoxic niche, when oxygenation of the environment forced the appearance of oxidative phosphorylation from that of glycolysis. The prevailing paradigm in the cancer field is that cancers start from the “immortalization” or “re-programming” of a normal, differentiated cell with many mitochondria, that metabolize via oxidative phosphorylation. This paradigm has been challenged with one ...

  9. Systems biology analysis of drivers underlying hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Jamshidi, Neema; Corbett, Austin J.; Bordbar, Aarash; Thomas, Alex; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant transformation is often accompanied by significant metabolic changes. To identify drivers underlying these changes, we calculated metabolic flux states for the NCI60 cell line collection and correlated the variance between metabolic states of these lines with their other properties. The analysis revealed a remarkably consistent structure underlying high flux metabolism. The three primary uptake pathways, glucose, glutamine and serine, are each characterized by three features: (1) metabolite uptake sufficient for the stoichiometric requirement to sustain observed growth, (2) overflow metabolism, which scales with excess nutrient uptake over the basal growth requirement, and (3) redox production, which also scales with nutrient uptake but greatly exceeds the requirement for growth. We discovered that resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in these lines broadly correlates with the amount of glucose uptake. These results support an interpretation of the Warburg effect and glutamine addiction as features of a growth state that provides resistance to metabolic stress through excess redox and energy production. Furthermore, overflow metabolism observed may indicate that mitochondrial catabolic capacity is a key constraint setting an upper limit on the rate of cofactor production possible. These results provide a greater context within which the metabolic alterations in cancer can be understood.

  10. Targeting cancer stem-like cells in glioblastoma and colorectal cancer through metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, U D; Mooney, S M; Natsumeda, M; Steiger, H-J; Maciaczyk, J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are thought to be the main cause of tumor occurrence, progression and therapeutic resistance. Strong research efforts in the last decade have led to the development of several tailored approaches to target CSCs with some very promising clinical trials underway; however, until now no anti-CSC therapy has been approved for clinical use. Given the recent improvement in our understanding of how onco-proteins can manipulate cellular metabolic networks to promote tumorigenesis, cancer metabolism research may well lead to innovative strategies to identify novel regulators and downstream mediators of CSC maintenance. Interfering with distinct stages of CSC-associated metabolics may elucidate novel, more efficient strategies to target this highly malignant cell population. Here recent discoveries regarding the metabolic properties attributed to CSCs in glioblastoma (GBM) and malignant colorectal cancer (CRC) were summarized. The association between stem cell markers, the response to hypoxia and other environmental stresses including therapeutic insults as well as developmentally conserved signaling pathways with alterations in cellular bioenergetic networks were also discussed. The recent developments in metabolic imaging to identify CSCs were also summarized. This summary should comprehensively update basic and clinical scientists on the metabolic traits of CSCs in GBM and malignant CRC. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J B; Krost, Alois

    2009-11-03

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  12. Application of dynamic speckle interferometry for diagnosis of metabolism change in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Mikhailova, J. A.; Baharev, A. A.; Malygin, A. S.; Novosyolova, I. A.; Yakin, D. I.

    2015-08-01

    Previously, a speckle interferometry technique and a device that allows quantitative evaluation of the metabolic activity of cultured cells were theoretically grounded and successfully tested. A speckle time-averaging technique was proposed to separate and study the processes occurring in cells at various velocities. The objective of the present research was comparing the parameters of speckle dynamics used to evaluate cell metabolism and averaged in areas of various size. Areas inside the speckle image of a cell as well as areas of the image plane with various numbers of cells were averaging areas. Defrosted L-41 cells precipitated on a glass substrate were the target of the research. Time-average value T of digital radiation intensity in the TV camera pixels I~ (1) and the correlation coefficient of two digital images η (2) were used as speckle field change parameters. The digital images corresponded to a single frame area at two time moments.

  13. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J. B.; Krost, Alois

    2009-12-01

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  14. Aerobic Glycolysis: Meeting the Metabolic Requirements of Cell Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Lunt, Sophia Yunkyungkwon

    2011-01-01

    Warburg's observation that cancer cells exhibit a high rate of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) sparked debate over the role of glycolysis in normal and cancer cells. Although it has been established that defects in mitochondrial respiration are not the cause of cancer or aerobic glycolysis, the advantages of enhanced glycolysis in cancer remain controversial. Many cells ranging from microbes to lymphocytes use aerobic glycolysis during rapid proliferation, which...

  15. Stem Cell Transplant for Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-03

    Adrenoleukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Fucosidosis; Wolman Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Batten Disease; GM1 Gangliosidosis; Tay Sachs Disease; Sandhoff Disease

  16. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of themethod in fermenters and highthroughput systems proved...... equivalent, displaying reduction curves that interrelated directly with CFU counts. For growth rate estimation, the methylene blue reduction test (MBRT) proved superior, since the discriminatory nature of the method allowed for the quantification of metabolically active cells only, excluding dead cells...

  17. The metabolic inhibitor antimycin A can disrupt cell-to-cell communication by an ATP- and Ca(2+)-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Isabelle; Duthe, Fabien; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2003-11-01

    In cardiac myocytes of new-born rats, the degree of intercellular communication through gap junctional channels closely depends on the metabolic state of the cells. In contrast, in stably transfected HeLa cells expressing rat cardiac connexin43 (Cx43, the main channel-forming protein present in ventricular myocytes), a major part of junctional communication persisted in ATP-depleted conditions, in the presence of a metabolic inhibitor (KCN) or of a broad spectrum inhibitor of protein kinases (H7). However, another metabolic inhibitor, antimycin A, which like cyanide inhibits electron transfer in the respiratory chain, totally interrupted cell-to-cell communication between Cx43-HeLa cells, even in whole-cell conditions, when ATP (5 mM) was present. Antimycin A caused a modest increase in cytosolic calcium concentration; however, junctional uncoupling still occurred when this rise was prevented. Conditions of ischemic insult (e.g. ischemia or chemical hypoxia) frequently cause the activation of protein kinases, particularly of Src and MAP kinases, and such activations are known to markedly disrupt gap junctional communication. Antimycin-induced junctional uncoupling occurred even in the presence of inhibitors of these kinases. Antimycin A appears able to cause junctional uncoupling either through the ATP depletion it induces as a metabolic poison or via a direct action on gap junction constituents.

  18. Lymphotoxin organizes contributions to host defense and metabolic illness from innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-04-01

    The lymphotoxin (LT)-pathway is a unique constituent branch of the Tumor Necrosis Superfamily (TNFSF). Use of LT is a critical mechanism by which fetal innate lymphoid cells regulate lymphoid organogenesis. Within recent years, adult innate lymphoid cells have been discovered to utilize this same pathway to regulate IL-22 and IL-23 production for host defense. Notably, genetic studies have linked polymorphisms in the genes encoding LTα to several phenotypes contributing to metabolic syndrome. The role of the LT-pathway may lay the foundation for a bridge between host immune response, microbiota, and metabolic syndrome. The contribution of the LT-pathway to innate lymphoid cell function and metabolic syndrome will be visited in this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Growth and metabolism of mesenchymal stem cells cultivated on microcarriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schop, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs, are a great potential source for clinical applications in the field of tissue regeneration. Although MSCs can be isolated from several tissues of the human body, e.g. the bone marrow, the tissues does not contain clinically relevant amounts of MSCs for cell therapeutic

  20. Sphingolipid metabolism and programmed cell death in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, Stefanka Diankova

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death is genetically determined. When the regulation of the process is disrupted it can have severe or lethal consequences for the organism. In mammals, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with abnormalities in programmed cell death. Development of an animal embryo

  1. Effect of Light and Cytokinins on Secondary Metabolism in Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of secondary metabolites from cell suspensions of P. arguta, an endangered endemic plant from Mauritius has never been reported. In order to identity the optimum culture conditions, the effect of light and cytokinins on phenylpropanoid products was studied. These conditions were, exposure of cells to a ...

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Show Metabolomic Differences to Embryonic Stem Cells in Polyunsaturated Phosphatidylcholines and Primary Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissen, John K.; Yuen, Benjamin T. K.; Kind, Tobias; Riggs, John W.; Barupal, Dinesh K.; Knoepfler, Paul S.; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells are different from embryonic stem cells as shown by epigenetic and genomics analyses. Depending on cell types and culture conditions, such genetic alterations can lead to different metabolic phenotypes which may impact replication rates, membrane properties and cell differentiation. We here applied a comprehensive metabolomics strategy incorporating nanoelectrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (MS), gas chromatography-time of flight MS, and hydrophilic interaction- and reversed phase-liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight MS to examine the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) compared to parental fibroblasts as well as to reference embryonic stem cells (ESCs). With over 250 identified metabolites and a range of structurally unknown compounds, quantitative and statistical metabolome data were mapped onto a metabolite networks describing the metabolic state of iPSCs relative to other cell types. Overall iPSCs exhibited a striking shift metabolically away from parental fibroblasts and toward ESCs, suggestive of near complete metabolic reprogramming. Differences between pluripotent cell types were not observed in carbohydrate or hydroxyl acid metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway metabolites, or free fatty acids. However, significant differences between iPSCs and ESCs were evident in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid structures, essential and non-essential amino acids, and metabolites involved in polyamine biosynthesis. Together our findings demonstrate that during cellular reprogramming, the metabolome of fibroblasts is also reprogrammed to take on an ESC-like profile, but there are select unique differences apparent in iPSCs. The identified metabolomics signatures of iPSCs and ESCs may have important implications for functional regulation of maintenance and induction of pluripotency. PMID:23077522

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells show metabolomic differences to embryonic stem cells in polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines and primary metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Meissen

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells are different from embryonic stem cells as shown by epigenetic and genomics analyses. Depending on cell types and culture conditions, such genetic alterations can lead to different metabolic phenotypes which may impact replication rates, membrane properties and cell differentiation. We here applied a comprehensive metabolomics strategy incorporating nanoelectrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (MS, gas chromatography-time of flight MS, and hydrophilic interaction- and reversed phase-liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight MS to examine the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs compared to parental fibroblasts as well as to reference embryonic stem cells (ESCs. With over 250 identified metabolites and a range of structurally unknown compounds, quantitative and statistical metabolome data were mapped onto a metabolite networks describing the metabolic state of iPSCs relative to other cell types. Overall iPSCs exhibited a striking shift metabolically away from parental fibroblasts and toward ESCs, suggestive of near complete metabolic reprogramming. Differences between pluripotent cell types were not observed in carbohydrate or hydroxyl acid metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway metabolites, or free fatty acids. However, significant differences between iPSCs and ESCs were evident in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid structures, essential and non-essential amino acids, and metabolites involved in polyamine biosynthesis. Together our findings demonstrate that during cellular reprogramming, the metabolome of fibroblasts is also reprogrammed to take on an ESC-like profile, but there are select unique differences apparent in iPSCs. The identified metabolomics signatures of iPSCs and ESCs may have important implications for functional regulation of maintenance and induction of pluripotency.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells show metabolomic differences to embryonic stem cells in polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines and primary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissen, John K; Yuen, Benjamin T K; Kind, Tobias; Riggs, John W; Barupal, Dinesh K; Knoepfler, Paul S; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells are different from embryonic stem cells as shown by epigenetic and genomics analyses. Depending on cell types and culture conditions, such genetic alterations can lead to different metabolic phenotypes which may impact replication rates, membrane properties and cell differentiation. We here applied a comprehensive metabolomics strategy incorporating nanoelectrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (MS), gas chromatography-time of flight MS, and hydrophilic interaction- and reversed phase-liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight MS to examine the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) compared to parental fibroblasts as well as to reference embryonic stem cells (ESCs). With over 250 identified metabolites and a range of structurally unknown compounds, quantitative and statistical metabolome data were mapped onto a metabolite networks describing the metabolic state of iPSCs relative to other cell types. Overall iPSCs exhibited a striking shift metabolically away from parental fibroblasts and toward ESCs, suggestive of near complete metabolic reprogramming. Differences between pluripotent cell types were not observed in carbohydrate or hydroxyl acid metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway metabolites, or free fatty acids. However, significant differences between iPSCs and ESCs were evident in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid structures, essential and non-essential amino acids, and metabolites involved in polyamine biosynthesis. Together our findings demonstrate that during cellular reprogramming, the metabolome of fibroblasts is also reprogrammed to take on an ESC-like profile, but there are select unique differences apparent in iPSCs. The identified metabolomics signatures of iPSCs and ESCs may have important implications for functional regulation of maintenance and induction of pluripotency.

  5. Cholesterol, a cell size-dependent signal that regulates glucose metabolism and gene expression in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lay, S; Krief, S; Farnier, C; Lefrère, I; Le Liepvre, X; Bazin, R; Ferré, P; Dugail, I

    2001-05-18

    Enlarged fat cells exhibit modified metabolic capacities, which could be involved in the metabolic complications of obesity at the whole body level. We show here that sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and its target genes are induced in the adipose tissue of several models of rodent obesity, suggesting cholesterol imbalance in enlarged adipocytes. Within a particular fat pad, larger adipocytes have reduced membrane cholesterol concentrations compared with smaller fat cells, demonstrating that altered cholesterol distribution is characteristic of adipocyte hypertrophy per se. We show that treatment with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, which mimics the membrane cholesterol reduction of hypertrophied adipocytes, induces insulin resistance. We also produced cholesterol depletion by mevastatin treatment, which activates SREBP-2 and its target genes. The analysis of 40 adipocyte genes showed that the response to cholesterol depletion implicated genes involved in cholesterol traffic (caveolin 2, scavenger receptor BI, and ATP binding cassette 1 genes) but also adipocyte-derived secretion products (tumor necrosis factor alpha, angiotensinogen, and interleukin-6) and proteins involved in energy metabolism (fatty acid synthase, GLUT 4, and UCP3). These data demonstrate that altering cholesterol balance profoundly modifies adipocyte metabolism in a way resembling that seen in hypertrophied fat cells from obese rodents or humans. This is the first evidence that intracellular cholesterol might serve as a link between fat cell size and adipocyte metabolic activity.

  6. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor cell metabolism and application to therapy response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath eChallapalli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells do reprogramme their energy metabolism to enable several functions such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogues of choline including [11C]-choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogrammed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism.

  7. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N8-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  8. Mitochondria and carbon monoxide: cytoprotection and control of cell metabolism – a role for Ca2+?

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Oliveira, Sara; Queiroga, Cláudia S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gasotransmitter with important biological functions: anti‐inflammation, anti‐apoptosis, vasomodulation and cell metabolism modulation. The most recognized cellular target for CO is the mitochondria. Physiological concentrations of CO generate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signalling molecules for CO‐induced pathways. Indeed, small amounts of ROS promote cytoprotection by a preconditioning effect. Furthermore, CO prevents cell death by limiting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, which inhibits the release of pro‐apoptotic factors into the cytosol; both events are ROS dependent. CO also increases the ability of mitochondria to take up Ca2+. Mitochondrial metabolism is modulated by CO, namely by increasing TCA cycle rate, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial biogenesis, which, in turn, increases ATP production. CO's modulation of metabolism might be important for cellular response to diseases, namely cancer and ischaemic diseases. Finally, another cytoprotective role of CO involves the control of Ca2+ channels. By limiting the activity of T‐type and L‐type Ca2+ channels, CO prevents excitotoxicity‐induced cell death and modulates cell proliferation. Several questions concerning Ca2+ signalling, mitochondria and CO can be asked, for instance whether CO modulation of cell metabolism would be dependent on the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake capacity, since small amounts of Ca2+ can increase mitochondrial metabolism. Whether CO controls Ca2+ communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum is another open field of research. In summary, CO emerges as a key gasotransmitter in the control of several cellular functions of mitochondria: metabolism, cell death and Ca2+ signalling. PMID:26377343

  9. Selection of metastatic breast cancer cells based on adaptability of their metabolic state.

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    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis

  10. Grazing of particle-associated bacteria-an elimination of the non-viable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Priya, Madasamy Lakshmi; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam Adikesavan

    Quantification of bacteria being grazed by microzooplankton is gaining importance since they serve as energy subsidies for higher trophic levels which consequently influence fish production. Hence, grazing pressure on viable and non-viable fraction of free and particle-associated bacteria in a tropical estuary controlled mainly by protist grazers was estimated using the seawater dilution technique. In vitro incubations over a period of 42h showed that at the end of 24h, growth coefficient (k) of particle-associated bacteria was 9 times higher at 0.546 than that of free forms. Further, 'k' value of viable cells on particles was double that of free forms at 0.016 and 0.007, respectively. While bacteria associated with particles were grazed (coefficient of removal (g)=0.564), the free forms were relatively less grazed indicating that particle-associated bacteria were exposed to grazers in these waters. Among the viable and non-viable forms, 'g' of non-viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.615, Free=0.0086) was much greater than the viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.056, Free=0.068). Thus, grazing on viable cells was relatively low in both the free and attached states. These observations suggest that non-viable forms of particle-associated bacteria were more prone to grazing and were weeded out leaving the viable cells to replenish the bacterial standing stock. Particle colonization could thus be a temporary refuge for the "persistent variants" where the viable fraction multiply and release their progeny. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic effects of acute thiamine depletion are reversed by rapamycin in breast and leukemia cells.

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    Shuqian Liu

    Full Text Available Thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs control metabolic pathways that are frequently altered in cancer and therefore present cancer-relevant targets. We have previously shown that the recombinant enzyme thiaminase cleaves and depletes intracellular thiamine, has growth inhibitory activity against leukemia and breast cancer cell lines, and that its growth inhibitory effects were reversed in leukemia cell lines by rapamycin. Now, we first show further evidence of thiaminase therapeutic potential by demonstrating its activity against breast and leukemia xenografts, and against a primary leukemia xenograft. We therefore further explored the metabolic effects of thiaminase in combination with rapamycin in leukemia and breast cell lines. Thiaminase decreased oxygen consumption rate and increased extracellular acidification rate, consistent with the inhibitory effect of acute thiamine depletion on the activity of the TDEs pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes; these effects were reversed by rapamycin. Metabolomic studies demonstrated intracellular thiamine depletion and the presence of the thiazole cleavage product in thiaminase-treated cells, providing validation of the experimental procedures. Accumulation of ribose and ribulose in both cell lines support the thiaminase-mediated suppression of the TDE transketolase. Interestingly, thiaminase suppression of another TDE, branched chain amino ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, showed very different patterns in the two cell lines: in RS4 leukemia cells it led to an increase in BCKDH substrates, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells it led to a decrease in BCKDH products. Immunoblot analyses showed corresponding differences in expression of BCKDH pathway enzymes, and partial protection of thiaminase growth inhibition by gabapentin indicated that BCKDH inhibition may be a mechanism of thiaminase-mediated toxicity. Surprisingly, most of thiaminase-mediated metabolomic effects were also

  12. Metabolic Responses in Endothelial Cells Following Exposure to Ketone Bodies

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    Erika Meroni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet (KD is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet based on the induction of the synthesis of ketone bodies (KB. Despite its widespread use, the systemic impact of KD is not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological levels of KB on HMEC-1 endothelial cells. To this aim, DNA oxidative damage and the activation of Nrf2, a known transcriptional factor involved in cell responses to oxidative stress, were assessed. The exposure of cells to KB exerted a moderate genotoxic effect, measured by a significant increase in DNA oxidative damage. However, cells pre-treated with KB for 48 h and subjected to a secondary oxidative insult (H2O2, significantly decreased DNA damage compared to control oxidized cells. This protection occurred by the activation of Nrf2 pathway. In KB-treated cells, we found increased levels of Nrf2 in nuclear extracts and higher gene expression of HO-1, a target gene of Nrf2, compared to control cells. These results suggest that KB, by inducing moderate oxidative stress, activate the transcription factor Nrf2, which induces the transcription of target genes involved in the cellular antioxidant defense system.

  13. Endothelial progenitor cells physiology and metabolic plasticity in brain angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier modeling

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    Natalia Malinovskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons. Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies.

  14. A Perspective on the Müller Cell-Neuron Metabolic Partnership in the Inner Retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, A K; Skytt, D M; Kolko, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The Müller cells represent the predominant macroglial cell in the retina. In recent decades, Müller cells have been acknowledged to be far more influential on neuronal homeostasis in the retina than previously assumed. With its unique localization, spanning the entire retina being interposed...... between the vessels and neurons, Müller cells are responsible for the functional and metabolic support of the surrounding neurons. As a consequence of major energy demands in the retina, high levels of glucose are consumed and processed by Müller cells. The present review provides a perspective...

  15. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG : models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Helene; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Veronique; Staels, Bart

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological

  16. A reverse Warburg metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma is not dependent upon myofibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The reverse Warburg effect describes the phenomenon that epithelial cancer cells take advantage of the metabolic machinery from nearby cancer-associated fibroblast, inducing them to produce lactate and ketones to fuel the high metabolic demands of the epithelial tumour tissues. This is in breast...... expression of MCT-4 have been shown to have prognostic importance, primarily in patients with breast cancer. However, this phenomenon has only scarcely been described in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Given the prognostic importance of myofibroblasts in OSCC, we also examined a potential relationship...

  17. Beta-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

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    Blanca G Baez-Duarte

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Blanca G Baez-Duarte1,3, María Del Carmen Sánchez-Guillén3†, Ricardo Pérez-Fuentes2,3, Irma Zamora-Ginez1,3, Bertha Alicia Leon-Chavez1, Cristina Revilla-Monsalve4, Sergio Islas-Andrade41Posgrado en Ciencias Químicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México; 2Facultad de Medicina, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México; 3Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Oriente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Atlixco, Puebla, México; 4Multidiciplinary Research Group on Diabetes (José Sánchez-Corona, Fernando Guerrero-Romero, Martha Rodriguez-Moran, Agustin Madero, Jorge Escobedo-de-la-Peña, Silvia Flores-Martinez, Esperanza, Martinez-Abundis, Manuel Gonzalez-Ortiz, Alberto Rascon-Pacheco, Margarita Torres-Tamayo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, México, Distrito Federal, México; †María Del Carmen Sánchez-Guillén passed away on 27 November 2009.Aims: The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects.Material and methods: This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1 control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2 group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out.Results: Average age of the

  18. Methods for modeling chinese hamster ovary (cho) cell metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention generally relate to the computational analysis and characterization biological networks at the cellular level in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Based on computational methods utilizing a hamster reference genome, the invention provides methods...

  19. Using Generic Examples to Make Viable Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Anne E.; Ely, Rob; Yopp, David

    2017-01-01

    The twenty-first century has seen an increased call to train students to craft mathematical arguments. The third of the Common Core's (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP 3) (CCSSI 2010) calls for all mathematically proficient students to "construct viable arguments" to support the truth of their ideas and to "critique…

  20. Metabolic Effects of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles on Cervical Carcinoma Cells and Nontumorigenic Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz Bortolozo; de Moraes, Fabio Rogério; Candido, Natalia Maria; Sampaio, Isabella; Paula, Alex Silva; de Vasconcellos, Adriano; Silva, Thais Cerqueira; Miller, Alex Henrique; Rahal, Paula; Nery, Jose Geraldo; Calmon, Marilia Freitas

    2016-12-02

    The cytotoxic response, cellular uptake, and metabolomic profile of HeLa and HaCaT cell lines treated with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4 NPs) were investigated in this study. Cell viability assays showed low cytotoxicity caused by the uptake of the nanoparticles at 2 mg/mL. However, metabolomics revealed that these nanoparticles impacted cell metabolism even when tested at a concentration that presented low cytotoxicity according to the cell viability assay. The two cell lines shared stress-related metabolic changes such as increase in alanine and creatine levels. A reduced level of fumarate was also observed in HeLa cells after treatment with the nanoparticles, and this alteration can inhibit tumorigenesis. Fumarate is considered to be an oncometabolite that can inhibit prolyl hydroxylase, and this inhibition stabilizes HIF1α, one of the master regulators of tumorigenesis that promotes tumor growth and development. In summary, this study showed that nanoparticle-treated HeLa cells demonstrated decreased concentrations of metabolites associated with cell proliferation and tumor growth. The results clearly indicated that treatment with these nanoparticles might cause a perturbation in cellular metabolism.

  1. Motile hepatocellular carcinoma cells preferentially secret sugar metabolism regulatory proteins via exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lu, Shaohua; Zhou, Ye; Meng, Kun; Chen, Zhipeng; Cui, Yizhi; Shi, Yunfeng; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are deliverers of critically functional proteins, capable of transforming target cells in numerous cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We hypothesize that the motility of HCC cells can be featured by comparative proteome of exosomes. Hence, we performed the super-SILAC-based MS analysis on the exosomes secreted by three human HCC cell lines, including the non-motile Hep3B cell, and the motile 97H and LM3 cells. More than 1400 exosomal proteins were confidently quantified in each MS analysis with highly biological reproducibility. We justified that 469 and 443 exosomal proteins represented differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the 97H/Hep3B and LM3/Hep3B comparisons, respectively. These DEPs focused on sugar metabolism-centric canonical pathways per ingenuity pathway analysis, which was consistent with the gene ontology analysis on biological process enrichment. These pathways included glycolysis I, gluconeogenesis I and pentose phosphate pathways; and the DEPs enriched in these pathways could form a tightly connected network. By analyzing the relative abundance of proteins and translating mRNAs, we found significantly positive correlation between exosomes and cells. The involved exosomal proteins were again focusing on sugar metabolism. In conclusion, motile HCC cells tend to preferentially export more sugar metabolism-associated proteins via exosomes that differentiate them from non-motile HCC cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  3. FoxO3 coordinates metabolic pathways to maintain redox balance in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hyeonju; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Zhang, Yuqing; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Cantley, Lewis C; Paik, Ji-Hye

    2013-10-02

    Forkhead Box O (FoxO) transcription factors act in adult stem cells to preserve their regenerative potential. Previously, we reported that FoxO maintains the long-term proliferative capacity of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs), and that this occurs, in part, through the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Herein, we demonstrate that among the FoxO3-regulated genes in NPCs are a host of enzymes in central carbon metabolism that act to combat reactive oxygen species (ROS) by directing the flow of glucose and glutamine carbon into defined metabolic pathways. Characterization of the metabolic circuit observed upon loss of FoxO3 revealed a drop in glutaminolysis and filling of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Additionally, we found that glucose uptake, glucose metabolism and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activity were similarly repressed in the absence of FoxO3. Finally, we demonstrate that impaired glucose and glutamine metabolism compromises the proliferative potential of NPCs and that this is exacerbated following FoxO3 loss. Collectively, our findings show that a FoxO3-dependent metabolic programme supports redox balance and the neurogenic potential of NPCs.

  4. Cells producing their own nemesis: understanding methylglyoxal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sangeeta; Karmakar, Kapudeep; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2014-10-01

    Methylglyoxal, which is technically known as 2-oxopropanal or pyruvaldehyde, shows typical reactions of carbonyl compounds as it has both an aldehyde and a ketone functional group. It is an extremely cytotoxic physiological metabolite, which is generated by both enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions. The deleterious nature of the compound is due to its ability to glycate and crosslink macromolecules like protein and DNA, respectively. However, despite having toxic effects on cellular processes, methylglyoxal retains its efficacy as an anticancer drug. Indeed, methylglyoxal is one of the well-known anticancer therapeutic agents used in the treatment. Several studies on methylglyoxal biology revolve around the manifestations of its inhibitory effects and toxicity in microbial growth and diabetic complications, respectively. Here, we have revisited the chronology of methylglyoxal research with emphasis on metabolism of methylglyoxal and implications of methylglyoxal production or detoxification on bacterial pathogenesis and disease progression. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells show an energy producing anabolic metabolic phenotype compared with primary myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi Richard M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional status of a cell is expressed in its metabolic activity. We have applied stable isotope tracing methods to determine the differences in metabolic pathways in proliferating Rhabdomysarcoma cells (Rh30 and human primary myocytes in culture. Uniformly 13C-labeled glucose was used as a source molecule to follow the incorporation of 13C into more than 40 marker metabolites using NMR and GC-MS. These include metabolites that report on the activity of glycolysis, Krebs' cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and pyrimidine biosynthesis. Results The Rh30 cells proliferated faster than the myocytes. Major differences in flux through glycolysis were evident from incorporation of label into secreted lactate, which accounts for a substantial fraction of the glucose carbon utilized by the cells. Krebs' cycle activity as determined by 13C isotopomer distributions in glutamate, aspartate, malate and pyrimidine rings was considerably higher in the cancer cells than in the primary myocytes. Large differences were also evident in de novo biosynthesis of riboses in the free nucleotide pools, as well as entry of glucose carbon into the pyrimidine rings in the free nucleotide pool. Specific labeling patterns in these metabolites show the increased importance of anaplerotic reactions in the cancer cells to maintain the high demand for anabolic and energy metabolism compared with the slower growing primary myocytes. Serum-stimulated Rh30 cells showed higher degrees of labeling than serum starved cells, but they retained their characteristic anabolic metabolism profile. The myocytes showed evidence of de novo synthesis of glycogen, which was absent in the Rh30 cells. Conclusion The specific 13C isotopomer patterns showed that the major difference between the transformed and the primary cells is the shift from energy and maintenance metabolism in the myocytes toward increased energy and anabolic metabolism for proliferation in the Rh30 cells

  6. Regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and activation by glutamine metabolism.

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    Jiang Li

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, which is mainly caused by accumulation of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. The mechanisms of activation and proliferation of HSCs, two key events after liver damage, have been studied for many years. Here we report a novel pathway to control HSCs by regulating glutamine metabolism. We demonstrated that the proliferation of HSCs is critically dependent on glutamine that is used to generate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG and non-essential amino acid (NEAA. In addition, both culture- and in vivo-activated HSCs have increased glutamine utilization and increased expression of genes related to glutamine metabolism, including GLS (glutaminase, aspartate transaminase (GOT1 and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1. Inhibition of these enzymes, as well as glutamine depletion, had a significant inhibitory effect on HSCs activation. In addition to providing energy expenditure, conversion of glutamine to proline is enhanced. The pool of free proline may also be increased via downregulation of POX expression. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in the regulation of glutamine metabolism, as well as TGF-β1, c-Myc, and Ras signalings, via transcriptional upregulation and repression of key metabolic enzymes in this pathway. Finally, changes in glutamine metabolism were also found in mouse liver tissue following CCl4-induced acute injury.Glutamine metabolism plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and activation of HSCs. Strategies that are targeted at glutamine metabolism may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  7. Removal of viable bacteria and endotoxins by Electro Deionization (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Norimitsu; Otomo, Teruo; Watabe, Tomoichi; Ase, Tomonobu; Takemura, Takuto; Sato, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    Viable bacteria and endotoxins in water sometimes cause problems for human health. Endotoxins are major components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharides). In medical procedures, especially haemodialysis (HD) and related therapies (haemodiafiltration (HDF), haemofiltration (HF)), endotoxins in the water for haemodialysis can permeate through the haemodialysis membrane and cause microinflammation or various haemodialysis-related illnesses. To decrease such a biological risk, RO and UF membranes are generally used. Also, hot water disinfection or the chemical disinfection is regularly executed to kill bacteria which produce endotoxins. However, simple treatment methods and equipment may be able to decrease the biological risk more efficiently. In our experiments, we confirmed that viable bacteria and endotoxins were removed by Electro Deionization (EDI) technology and also clarified the desorption mechanisms.

  8. Gene expression profile of 5-fluorouracil metabolic enzymes in laryngeal cancer cell line: predictive parameters for response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiatti, Ana Lívia Silva; Caldas, Heloisa Cristina; Maniglia, José Victor; Pavarino, Erika Cristina; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria

    2014-06-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is an antifolate chemotherapeutic that has become established in many therapeutic regimes, but sensitivity variations and development of resistance are common problems that limit the efficiency of the treatments. Inter-individual variations to 5-FU outcome have been attributed to different expression profiles of genes related to folate metabolism. To elucidate the mechanisms of variations to 5-FU outcome, the authors investigated MTHFR, DHFR, TYMS and SLC19A1 folate genes expression for 5-FU response in laryngeal cancer cell line (Hep-2). Concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 ng/mL of 5-FU chemotherapeutic were added separately in Hep-2 cell line for 24 hours at 37 °C. Cell sensibility was evaluated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) label Bcl-2 by flow cytometry. The real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique was performed for quantification of gene expression using TaqMan(®) Gene Expression Assay. ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc tests were utilized to statistical analysis. The numbers of viable Hep-2 cells with 10, 50, and 100 ng/mL concentrations of 5-FU chemotherapy were 15.87, 28.3 and 68.9%, respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant association between control group and increased expression for TYMS gene in cells treated with 100 ng/mL/5-FU chemotherapy (Pexpression levels for TYMS folate gene in laryngeal cancer cell line. Although these experiments were performed in vitro, the results suggest that genetic factors are thought to play an important role in drug metabolism and may be useful for predicting treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Short term exposure to elevated levels of leptin reduces proximal tubule cell metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffa, Jessica F; Grinfeld, Esther; McAinch, Andrew J; Poronnik, Philip; Hryciw, Deanne H

    2014-01-25

    Leptin plays a pathophysiological role in the kidney, however, its acute effects on the proximal tubule cells (PTCs) are unknown. In opossum kidney (OK) cells in vitro, Western blot analysis identified that exposure to leptin increases the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p44/42 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Importantly leptin (0.05, 0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 μg/ml) significantly reduced the metabolic activity of PTCs, and significantly decreased protein content per cell. Investigation of the role of p44/42 and mTOR on metabolic activity and protein content per cell, demonstrated that in the presence of MAPK inhibitor U0126 and mTOR inhibitor Ku-63794, that the mTOR pathway is responsible for the reduction in PTC metabolic activity in response to leptin. However, p44/42 and mTOR play no role the reduced protein content per cell in OKs exposed to leptin. Therefore, leptin modulates metabolic activity in PTCs via an mTOR regulated pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Yeast cell metabolism investigated by CO{_2} production and soft X-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, A.; Batani, D.; Previdi, F.; Milani, M.; Pozzi, A.; Turcu, E.; Huntington, S.; Takeyasu, H.

    1999-01-01

    Results obtained using a new technique for studying cell metabolism are presented. The technique, consisting in CO2 production monitoring, has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. Also the cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the aim of producing a damage of metabolic processes at the wall level, responsible for fermentation, without great interference with respiration, taking place in mitochondria, and DNA activity. The source was calibrated with PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers and used Teflon stripes as target, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, with a very low penetration in biological material. X-ray doses delivered to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. Immediately after irradiation, the damage to metabolic activity was measured again by monitoring CO2 production. Results showed a general reduction in gas production by irradiated samples, together with non-linear and non-monotone response to dose. There was also evidence of oscillations in cell metabolic activity and of X-ray induced changes in oscillation frequency.

  11. A genetic and metabolic analysis revealed that cotton fiber cell development was retarded by flavonoid naringenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiafu; Tu, Lili; Deng, Fenglin; Hu, Haiyan; Nie, Yichun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2013-05-01

    The cotton (Gossypium spp.) fiber is a unique elongated cell that is useful for investigating cell differentiation. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of factors such as sugar metabolism, the cytoskeleton, and hormones, which are commonly known to be involved in plant cell development, while the secondary metabolites have been less regarded. By mining public data and comparing analyses of fiber from two cotton species (Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense), we found that the flavonoid metabolism is active in early fiber cell development. Different flavonoids exhibited distinct effects on fiber development during ovule culture; among them, naringenin (NAR) could significantly retard fiber development. NAR is a substrate of flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), and silencing the F3H gene significantly increased the NAR content of fiber cells. Fiber development was suppressed following F3H silencing, but the overexpression of F3H caused no obvious effects. Significant retardation of fiber growth was observed after the introduction of the F3H-RNA interference segment into the high-flavonoid brown fiber G. hirsutum T586 line by cross. A greater accumulation of NAR as well as much shorter fibers were also observed in the BC1 generation plants. These results suggest that NAR is negatively associated with fiber development and that the metabolism mediated by F3H is important in fiber development, thus highlighting that flavonoid metabolism represents a novel pathway with the potential for cotton fiber improvement.

  12. Geniposide regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion possibly through controlling glucose metabolism in INS-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Liu

    Full Text Available Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS is essential to the control of metabolic fuel homeostasis. The impairment of GSIS is a key element of β-cell failure and one of causes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Although the KATP channel-dependent mechanism of GSIS has been broadly accepted for several decades, it does not fully describe the effects of glucose on insulin secretion. Emerging evidence has suggested that other mechanisms are involved. The present study demonstrated that geniposide enhanced GSIS in response to the stimulation of low or moderately high concentrations of glucose, and promoted glucose uptake and intracellular ATP levels in INS-1 cells. However, in the presence of a high concentration of glucose, geniposide exerted a contrary role on both GSIS and glucose uptake and metabolism. Furthermore, geniposide improved the impairment of GSIS in INS-1 cells challenged with a high concentration of glucose. Further experiments showed that geniposide modulated pyruvate carboxylase expression and the production of intermediates of glucose metabolism. The data collectively suggest that geniposide has potential to prevent or improve the impairment of insulin secretion in β-cells challenged with high concentrations of glucose, likely through pyruvate carboxylase mediated glucose metabolism in β-cells.

  13. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA and this could be related to metabolic disturbances. This study investigated the association between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and metabolic risk factors in 1,019 subjects, aged...... was observed for the level of hOGG1-sensitive sites, whereas there was no association with the level of strand breaks. The effect of age on oxidatively damaged DNA in women disappeared in multivariate models, which showed robust positive associations between DNA damage and plasma levels of triglycerides...... metabolic syndrome criteria. In summary, positive associations between age and levels of oxidatively damaged DNA appeared mediated by age-related increases in metabolic risk factors....

  14. Metabolic adaptation to chronic inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozhena Jhas

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that the anti-bacterial agent tigecycline preferentially induces death in leukemia cells through the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we sought to understand mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline by establishing a leukemia cell line resistant to the drug. TEX leukemia cells were treated with increasing concentrations of tigecycline over 4 months and a population of cells resistant to tigecycline (RTEX+TIG was selected. Compared to wild type cells, RTEX+TIG cells had undetectable levels of mitochondrially translated proteins Cox-1 and Cox-2, reduced oxygen consumption and increased rates of glycolysis. Moreover, RTEX+TIG cells were more sensitive to inhibitors of glycolysis and more resistant to hypoxia. By electron microscopy, RTEX+TIG cells had abnormally swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structures. RNA sequencing demonstrated a significant over-representation of genes with binding sites for the HIF1α:HIF1β transcription factor complex in their promoters. Upregulation of HIF1α mRNA and protein in RTEX+TIG cells was confirmed by Q-RTPCR and immunoblotting. Strikingly, upon removal of tigecycline from RTEX+TIG cells, the cells re-established aerobic metabolism. Levels of Cox-1 and Cox-2, oxygen consumption, glycolysis, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential returned to wild type levels, but HIF1α remained elevated. However, upon re-treatment with tigecycline for 72 hours, the glycolytic phenotype was re-established. Thus, we have generated cells with a reversible metabolic phenotype by chronic treatment with an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. These cells will provide insight into cellular adaptations used to cope with metabolic stress.

  15. Distinct requirements for energy metabolism in mouse primordial germ cells and their reprogramming to embryonic germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yohei; Otsuka, Kei; Ebina, Masayuki; Igarashi, Kaori; Takehara, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Kanai, Akio; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2017-08-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), undifferentiated embryonic germ cells, are the only cells that have the ability to become gametes and to reacquire totipotency upon fertilization. It is generally understood that the development of PGCs proceeds through the expression of germ cell-specific transcription factors and characteristic epigenomic changes. However, little is known about the properties of PGCs at the metabolite and protein levels, which are directly responsible for the control of cell function. Here, we report the distinct energy metabolism of PGCs compared with that of embryonic stem cells. Specifically, we observed remarkably enhanced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and decreased glycolysis in embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) PGCs, a pattern that was gradually established during PGC differentiation. We also demonstrate that glycolysis and OXPHOS are important for the control of PGC reprogramming and specification of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into PGCs in culture. Our findings about the unique metabolic property of PGCs provide insights into our understanding of the importance of distinct facets of energy metabolism for switching PGC and PSC status.

  16. Gentamicin rapidly inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in high-frequency cochlear outer hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Jensen-Smith

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides (AG, including gentamicin (GM, are the most frequently used antibiotics in the world and are proposed to cause irreversible cochlear damage and hearing loss (HL in 1/4 of the patients receiving these life-saving drugs. Akin to the results of AG ototoxicity studies, high-frequency, basal turn outer hair cells (OHCs preferentially succumb to multiple HL pathologies while inner hair cells (IHCs are much more resilient. To determine if endogenous differences in IHC and OHC mitochondrial metabolism dictate differential sensitivities to AG-induced HL, IHC- and OHC-specific changes in mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH fluorescence during acute (1 h GM treatment were compared. GM-mediated decreases in NADH fluorescence and succinate dehydrogenase activity were observed shortly after GM application. High-frequency basal turn OHCs were found to be metabolically biased to rapidly respond to alterations in their microenvironment including GM and elevated glucose exposures. These metabolic biases may predispose high-frequency OHCs to preferentially produce cell-damaging reactive oxygen species during traumatic challenge. Noise-induced and age-related HL pathologies share key characteristics with AG ototoxicity, including preferential OHC loss and reactive oxygen species production. Data from this report highlight the need to address the role of mitochondrial metabolism in regulating AG ototoxicity and the need to illuminate how fundamental differences in IHC and OHC metabolism may dictate differences in HC fate during multiple HL pathologies.

  17. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. Glucose deprivation activates a metabolic and signaling amplification loop leading to cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Nicholas A; Tahmasian, Martik; Kohli, Bitika; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Zhu, Maggie; Vivanco, Igor; Teitell, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Graeber, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer can render cells dependent on the availability of metabolic substrates for viability. Investigating the signaling mechanisms underlying cell death in cells dependent upon glucose for survival, we demonstrate that glucose withdrawal rapidly induces supra-physiological levels of phospho-tyrosine signaling, even in cells expressing constitutively active tyrosine kinases. Using unbiased mass spectrometry-based phospho-proteomics, we show that glucose withdrawal initiates a unique signature of phospho-tyrosine activation that is associated with focal adhesions. Building upon this observation, we demonstrate that glucose withdrawal activates a positive feedback loop involving generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase and mitochondria, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by oxidation, and increased tyrosine kinase signaling. In cells dependent on glucose for survival, glucose withdrawal-induced ROS generation and tyrosine kinase signaling synergize to amplify ROS levels, ultimately resulting in ROS-mediated cell death. Taken together, these findings illustrate the systems-level cross-talk between metabolism and signaling in the maintenance of cancer cell homeostasis. PMID:22735335

  19. Optical imaging of radiation-induced metabolic changes in radiation-sensitive and resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhallak, Kinan; Jenkins, Samir V.; Lee, David E.; Greene, Nicholas P.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Griffin, Robert J.; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2017-06-01

    Radiation resistance remains a significant problem for cancer patients, especially due to the time required to definitively determine treatment outcome. For fractionated radiation therapy, nearly 7 to 8 weeks can elapse before a tumor is deemed to be radiation-resistant. We used the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH) to identify early metabolic changes in radiation-resistant lung cancer cells. These radiation-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells were developed by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated doses of radiation (2 Gy). Although there were no significant differences in the optical redox ratio between the parental and resistant cell lines prior to radiation, there was a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio of the radiation-resistant cells 24 h after a single radiation exposure (p=0.01). This change in the redox ratio was indicative of increased catabolism of glucose in the resistant cells after radiation and was associated with significantly greater protein content of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), a key promoter of glycolytic metabolism. Our results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio could provide a rapid method of determining radiation resistance status based on early metabolic changes in cancer cells.

  20. Metabolic Plasticity in Cancer Cells: Reconnecting Mitochondrial Function to Cancer Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2015-06-01

    Anomalous increase in glycolytic activity defines one of the key metabolic alterations in cancer cells. A realization of this feature has led to critical advancements in cancer detection techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) as well as a number of therapeutic avenues targeting the key glycolytic steps within a cancer cell. A normal healthy cell's survival relies on a sensitive balance between the primordial glycolysis and a more regulated mitochondrial bioenergetics. The salient difference between these two bioenergetics pathways is that oxygen availability is an obligatory requirement for mitochondrial pathway while glycolysis can function without oxygen. Early observations that some cancer cells up-regulate glycolytic activity even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) led to a hypothesis that such an altered cancer cell metabolism stems from inherent mitochondrial dysfunction. While a general validity of this hypothesis is still being debated, a number of recent research efforts have yielded clarity on the physiological origins of this aerobic glycolysis phenotype in cancer cells. Building on these recent studies, we present a generalized scheme of cancer cell metabolism and propose a novel hypothesis that might rationalize new avenues of cancer intervention.

  1. Modulation of Abnormal Metabolic Brain Networks by Experimental Therapies in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson Disease: An Application to Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Flores, Joseph; Cornfeldt, Michael; Mitrovic, Branka; Eidelberg, David; Doudet, Doris J

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal covariance pattern of regional metabolism associated with Parkinson disease (PD) is modulated by dopaminergic pharmacotherapy. Using high-resolution (18)F-FDG PET and network analysis, we previously derived and validated a parkinsonism-related metabolic pattern (PRP) in nonhuman primate models of PD. It is currently not known whether this network is modulated by experimental therapeutics. In this study, we examined changes in network activity by striatal implantation of human levodopa-producing retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells in parkinsonian macaques and evaluated the reproducibility of network activity in a small test-retest study. (18)F-FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 healthy macaques and 8 macaques with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced bilateral nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesions after unilateral putaminal implantation of hRPE cells or sham surgery. PRP activity was measured prospectively in all animals and in a subset of test-retest animals using a network quantification approach. Network activity and regional metabolic values were compared on a hemispheric basis between animal groups and treatment conditions. All individual macaques showed clinical improvement after hRPE cell implantation compared with the sham surgery. PRP activity was elevated in the untreated MPTP hemispheres relative to those of the normal controls (P therapy and other symptomatic interventions. With further validation in large samples, (18)F-FDG PET imaging with network analysis may provide a viable biomarker for assessing treatment response in animal models of PD after experimental therapies. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  2. Metabolic cleavage of cell-penetrating peptides in contact with epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the metabolic degradation kinetics and cleavage patterns of some selected CPP (cell-penetrating peptides) after incubation with confluent epithelial models. Synthesis of N-terminal CF [5(6)-carboxyfluorescein]-labelled CPP, namely hCT (human calcitonin)-derived sequences, Tat(47...... models and the CPP. The Calu-3 model exhibited the highest proteolytic activity. The patterns of metabolic cleavage of hCT(9-32) were similar in all three models. Initial cleavage of this peptide occurred at the N-terminal domain, possibly by endopeptidase activity yielding both the N- and the C......-57) and penetratin(43-58), was through Fmoc (fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Metabolic degradation kinetics of the tested CPP in contact with three cell-cultured epithelial models, MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney), Calu-3 and TR146, was evaluated by reversed-phase HPLC. Identification of the resulting...

  3. Cell swelling and glycogen metabolism in hepatocytes from fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustafson, L. A.; Jumelle-Laclau, M. N.; van Woerkom, G. M.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Meijer, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    Cell swelling is known to increase net glycogen production from glucose in hepatocytes from fasted rats by activating glycogen synthase. Since both active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase are present in hepatocytes, suppression of flux through phosphorylase may also contribute to the net increase

  4. Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Cholangiocarcinoma Stem-like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raggi, Chiara; Gammella, Elena; Correnti, Margherita

    2017-01-01

    conditions, CSC form 3D spheres (SPH), which retain stem-like tumour-initiating features. Here, we found different expression of iron proteins indicating increased iron content, oxidative stress and higher expression of CSC markers in CCA-SPH compared to tumour cells growing as monolayers. Exposure...

  5. Metabolic shifts : A fitness perspective for microbial cell factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goel, A.; Wortel, M.T.; Molenaar, D.; Teusink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Performance of industrial microorganisms as cell factories is limited by the capacity to channel nutrients to desired products, of which optimal production usually requires careful manipulation of process conditions, or strain improvement. The focus in process improvement is often on understanding

  6. Nuclear Phosphatidylcholine and Sphingomyelin Metabolism of Thyroid Cells Changes during Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Albi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine metabolism is involved in the response to ultraviolet radiation treatment in different ways related to the physiological state of cells. To evaluate the effects of low levels of radiation from the stratosphere on thyroid cells, proliferating and quiescent FRTL-5 cells were flown in a stratospheric balloon (BIRBA mission. After recovery, the activity of neutral sphingomyelinase, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelin synthase, and reverse sphingomyelin synthase was assayed in purified nuclei and the nuclei-free fraction. In proliferating FRTL-5, space radiation stimulate nuclear neutral sphingomyelinase and reverse sphingomyelin synthase activity, whereas phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and sphingomyelin synthase were inhibited, thus inducing sphingomyelin degradation and phosphatidylcholine synthesis. This effect was lower in quiescent cells. The possible role of nuclear lipid metabolism in the thyroid damage induced by space radiations is discussed.

  7. Serine, Glycine and One-carbon Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer Cell in Heterogeneous Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ke-Chih; Austin, Robert; Ducker, Greg; Sturm, James; Sturm, James

    The up-regulation of serine metabolism associated with one-carbon metabolism has been identified to support cellular biosynthesis and redox maintenance of tumors. The consistently over-expressed one-carbon genes have been targeted for potential drug development. To investigate the biological function of specific enzymes, we had genetic engineered HCT116 cell lines, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) deleted cell lines, growing in the artificial microhabitats array with serine and glycine gradient across. The impact of depletion of serine and the blocking of biosynthesis pathway will be shown in terms of cell morphology, proliferation rate, and cell motility. The evolution dynamic and migration rate can also be tracked throughout the experiments.

  8. GEM System: automatic prototyping of cell-wide metabolic pathway models from genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful realization of a "systems biology" approach to analyzing cells is a grand challenge for our understanding of life. However, current modeling approaches to cell simulation are labor-intensive, manual affairs, and therefore constitute a major bottleneck in the evolution of computational cell biology. Results We developed the Genome-based Modeling (GEM System for the purpose of automatically prototyping simulation models of cell-wide metabolic pathways from genome sequences and other public biological information. Models generated by the GEM System include an entire Escherichia coli metabolism model comprising 968 reactions of 1195 metabolites, achieving 100% coverage when compared with the KEGG database, 92.38% with the EcoCyc database, and 95.06% with iJR904 genome-scale model. Conclusion The GEM System prototypes qualitative models to reduce the labor-intensive tasks required for systems biology research. Models of over 90 bacterial genomes are available at our web site.

  9. Multi-OMIC profiling of survival and metabolic signaling networks in cells subjected to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijer, Ruud; Clavier, Séverine; Zaal, Esther A; Pijls, Maud M E; van Kooten, Robert T; Vermaas, Klaas; Leen, René; Jongejan, Aldo; Moerland, Perry D; van Kampen, Antoine H C; van Kuilenburg, André B P; Berkers, Celia R; Lemeer, Simone; Heger, Michal

    2017-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established palliative treatment for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma that is clinically promising. However, tumors tend to regrow after PDT, which may result from the PDT-induced activation of survival pathways in sublethally afflicted tumor cells. In this study, tumor-comprising cells (i.e., vascular endothelial cells, macrophages, perihilar cholangiocarcinoma cells, and EGFR-overexpressing epidermoid cancer cells) were treated with the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine that was encapsulated in cationic liposomes (ZPCLs). The post-PDT survival pathways and metabolism were studied following sublethal (LC50) and supralethal (LC90) PDT. Sublethal PDT induced survival signaling in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (SK-ChA-1) cells via mainly HIF-1-, NF-кB-, AP-1-, and heat shock factor (HSF)-mediated pathways. In contrast, supralethal PDT damage was associated with a dampened survival response. PDT-subjected SK-ChA-1 cells downregulated proteins associated with EGFR signaling, particularly at LC90. PDT also affected various components of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as metabolites involved in redox signaling. In conclusion, sublethal PDT activates multiple pathways in tumor-associated cell types that transcriptionally regulate cell survival, proliferation, energy metabolism, detoxification, inflammation/angiogenesis, and metastasis. Accordingly, tumor cells sublethally afflicted by PDT are a major therapeutic culprit. Our multi-omic analysis further unveiled multiple druggable targets for pharmacological co-intervention.

  10. Heterogeneity of autophagic status in pancreatic β cells under metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitani, Mai; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Miura, Masaki; Azuma, Kosuke; Suzuki, Luka; Himuro, Miwa; Katahira, Takehiro; Nishida, Yuya; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2018-02-05

    Autophagy in β cells has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cellular homeostasis and the progression of glucose intolerance. Although autophagic activity is affected by metabolic stress both in vivo and in vitro, it remains unclear as to what extent the autophagic status in each β cell is different from its neighboring cells. To address this question, GFP-LC3 reporter mice, which can visualize the autophagic status of each β cell as green-fluorescent puncta, were crossed with obese diabetic db/db mice. Imaging of green-fluorescent puncta in the islets of GFP-LC3 mice revealed that β cells are a heterogeneous population, as the density of GFP-LC3 puncta in each cell was variable. Furthermore, the variability was greater in GFP-LC3; db/db mice than in non-diabetic GFP-LC3; db/+ mice. Furthermore, when GFP-LC3 mice were treated with a low dose of S961, which antagonizes insulin signaling without inducing overt hyperglycemia, the number of β cells with a high density of GFP puncta was increased, suggesting that insulin resistance affects autophagic status independently of glucose profiles. These results suggest that pancreatic β cells under metabolic stress are heterogeneous regarding their autophagic status, which provides insights into the cellular dynamics of each β cell rather than the whole β-cell population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Concise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantz, Tobias; Sharma, Amar Deep; Ott, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The concept of cell-based therapies for inherited metabolic liver diseases has been introduced for now more than 40 years in animal experiments, but controlled clinical data in humans are still not available. In the era of dynamic developments in stem cell science, the "right" cell for transplantation is considered as an important key for successful treatment. Do we aim to transplant mature hepatocytes or do we consider the liver as a stem/progenitor-driven organ and replenish the diseased liver with genetically normal stem/progenitor cells? Although conflicting results from cell tracing and transplantation experiments have recently emerged about the existence and role of stem/progenitor cells in the liver, their overall contribution to parenchymal cell homeostasis and tissue repair is limited. Accordingly, engraftment and repopulation efficacies of extrahepatic and liver-derived stem/progenitor cell types are considered to be lower compared to mature hepatocytes. On the basis of these results, we will discuss the current clinical cell transplantation programs for inherited metabolic liver diseases and future developments in liver cell therapy. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  12. A metabolic link between the urea cycle and cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Erez, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations in citrullinemia type I, an inborn error of metabolism, led us to explore the benefits of somatic ASS1 silencing in cancer. We found that downregulation of ASS1 results in preferential utilization of its substrate, aspartate, for pyrimidine synthesis to support cell proliferation. Reducing aspartate availability for pyrimidine synthesis restricted cancerous proliferation.

  13. Cancer cell metabolism and mitochondria: Nutrient plasticity for TCA cycle fueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Cyril; Feron, Olivier

    2017-08-01

    Warburg's hypothesis that cancer cells take up a lot of glucose in the presence of ambient oxygen but convert pyruvate into lactate due to impaired mitochondrial function led to the misconception that cancer cells rely on glycolysis as their major source of energy. Most recent 13C-based metabolomic studies, including in cancer patients, indicate that cancer cells may also fully oxidize glucose. In addition to glucose-derived pyruvate, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids supply substrates to the TCA cycle to sustain mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we discuss how the metabolic flexibility afforded by these multiple mitochondrial inputs allows cancer cells to adapt according to the availability of the different fuels and the microenvironmental conditions such as hypoxia and acidosis. In particular, we focused on the role of the TCA cycle in interconnecting numerous metabolic routes in order to highlight metabolic vulnerabilities that represent attractive targets for a new generation of anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-cell level based approach to investigate bacterial metabolism during batch industrial fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Eriksen, Niels T.

    culture of Escherichia coli MG1655 was used to investigate glucose and acetate metabolism at single-cell level during different stages of glucose batch fermentation process. Uptake of the substrates was observed and measured in situ by quantitative microautoradiography. Sub-populations of Escherichia coli...

  15. Metabolism of fluoranthene in different plant cell cultures and intact plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, M.; Harms, H.

    2000-05-01

    The metabolism of fluoranthene was investigated in 11 cell cultures of different plant species using a [{sup 14}C]-labeled standard. Most species metabolized less than 5% of fluoranthene to soluble metabolites and formed less than 5% nonextractable residues during the standardized 48-h test procedure. Higher metabolic rates were observed in lettuce (Lactuca sativa, 6%), wheat (Tricitum aestivum, 9%), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, 15%). A special high metabolic rate of nearly 50% was determined for the rose species Paul's Scarlet. Chromatographic analysis of metabolites extracted from aseptically grown tomato plants proved that the metabolites detected in the cell cultures were also formed in the intact plants. Metabolites produced in tomato and rose cells from [{sup 14}C]-fluoranthene were conjugated with glucose, glucuronic acid, and other cell components. After acid hydrolyses, the main metabolite of both species was 1-hydroxyfluoranthene as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The second metabolite formed by both species was 8-hydroxyfluoranthene. A third metabolite in tomatoes was 3-hydroxyfluoranthene.

  16. Metabolomic analysis of isonitrosoacetophenone-induced perturbations in phenolic metabolism of Nicotiana tabacum cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madala, NE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemistry 94 (2013) 82–90 Metabolomic analysis of isonitrosoacetophenone-induced perturbations in phenolic metabolism of Nicotiana tabacum cells Ntakadzeni E. Madalaa, Paul A. Steenkampa,b, Lizelle A. Piater a, Ian A. Duberya,⇑ a...

  17. Hypoxia Pathway Proteins As Central Mediators of Metabolism in the Tumor Cells and Their Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundary Sormendi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low oxygen tension or hypoxia is a determining factor in the course of many different processes in animals, including when tissue expansion and cellular metabolism result in high oxygen demands that exceed its supply. This is mainly happening when cells actively proliferate and the proliferating mass becomes distant from the blood vessels, such as in growing tumors. Metabolic alterations in response to hypoxia can be triggered in a direct manner, such as the switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis or inhibition of fatty acid desaturation. However, as the modulated action of hypoxia-inducible factors or the oxygen sensors (prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes can also lead to changes in enzyme expression, these metabolic changes can also be indirect. With this review, we want to summarize our current knowledge of the hypoxia-induced changes in metabolism during cancer development, how they are affected in the tumor cells and in the cells of the microenvironment, most prominently in immune cells.

  18. Metabolism of furazolidone: alternative pathways and modes of toxicity in different cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelis, de I.; Rossi, L.; Pedersen, J.Z.; Vignoli, A.L.; Vincentini, O.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Polman, T.H.G.; Stammati, A.; Zucco, F.

    1999-01-01

    1. The metabolism and cytotoxicity of the antimicrobial nitrofuran drug furazolidone have been studied in Caco-2, HEp-2 and V79 cell lines. Free radical production, metabolite pattern, formation of bound residues, inhibition of cellular replication and protection by the antioxidant glutathione were

  19. Wholly Rickettsia! Reconstructed Metabolic Profile of the Quintessential Bacterial Parasite of Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Timothy P; Verhoeve, Victoria I; Guillotte, Mark L; Lehman, Stephanie S; Rennoll, Sherri A; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Rahman, M Sayeedur; Azad, Abdu F; Gillespie, Joseph J

    2017-09-26

    Reductive genome evolution has purged many metabolic pathways from obligate intracellular Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria; Rickettsiaceae). While some aspects of host-dependent rickettsial metabolism have been characterized, the array of host-acquired metabolites and their cognate transporters remains unknown. This dearth of information has thwarted efforts to obtain an axenic Rickettsia culture, a major impediment to conventional genetic approaches. Using phylogenomics and computational pathway analysis, we reconstructed the Rickettsia metabolic and transport network, identifying 51 host-acquired metabolites (only 21 previously characterized) needed to compensate for degraded biosynthesis pathways. In the absence of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway, cell envelope glycoconjugates are synthesized from three imported host sugars, with a range of additional host-acquired metabolites fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid and glycerophospholipid pathways also initiate from host precursors, and import of both isoprenes and terpenoids is required for the synthesis of ubiquinone and the lipid carrier of lipid I and O-antigen. Unlike metabolite-provisioning bacterial symbionts of arthropods, rickettsiae cannot synthesize B vitamins or most other cofactors, accentuating their parasitic nature. Six biosynthesis pathways contain holes (missing enzymes); similar patterns in taxonomically diverse bacteria suggest alternative enzymes that await discovery. A paucity of characterized and predicted transporters emphasizes the knowledge gap concerning how rickettsiae import host metabolites, some of which are large and not known to be transported by bacteria. Collectively, our reconstructed metabolic network offers clues to how rickettsiae hijack host metabolic pathways. This blueprint for growth determinants is an important step toward the design of axenic media to rescue rickettsiae from the eukaryotic cell.IMPORTANCE A hallmark of obligate intracellular

  20. Metabolic engineering of Salmonella vaccine bacteria to boost human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T

    2014-07-15

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long-lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA(-) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as did the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags.

  1. Metabolic impact of anti-angiogenic agents on U87 glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Mesti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioma cells not only secrete high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF but also express VEGF receptors (VEGFR, supporting the existence of an autocrine loop. The direct impact on glioma cells metabolism of drugs targeting the VEGF pathway, such as Bevacizumab (Bev or VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI, is poorly known. MATERIAL AND METHODS: U87 cells were treated with Bev or SU1498, a selective VEGFR2 TKI. VEGFR expression was checked with FACS flow cytometry and Quantitative Real-Time PCR. VEGF secretion into the medium was assessed with an ELISA kit. Metabolomic studies on cells were performed using High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Spectroscopy (HR-MAS. RESULTS: U87 cells secreted VEGF and expressed low level of VEGFR2, but no detectable VEGFR1. Exposure to SU1498, but not Bev, significantly impacted cell proliferation and apoptosis. Metabolomic studies with HR MAS showed that Bev had no significant effect on cell metabolism, while SU1498 induced a marked increase in lipids and a decrease in glycerophosphocholine. Accordingly, accumulation of lipid droplets was seen in the cytoplasm of SU1498-treated U87 cells. CONCLUSION: Although both drugs target the VEGF pathway, only SU1498 showed a clear impact on cell proliferation, cell morphology and metabolism. Bevacizumab is thus less likely to modify glioma cells phenotype due to a direct therapeutic pressure on the VEGF autocrine loop. In patients treated with VEGFR TKI, monitoring lipids with magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS might be a valuable marker to assess drug cytotoxicity.

  2. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, φ) = { f( t, φ, u)} uɛU is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function φ and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  3. Modeling Inborn Errors of Hepatic Metabolism Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournasr, Behshad; Duncan, Stephen A

    2017-11-01

    Inborn errors of hepatic metabolism are because of deficiencies commonly within a single enzyme as a consequence of heritable mutations in the genome. Individually such diseases are rare, but collectively they are common. Advances in genome-wide association studies and DNA sequencing have helped researchers identify the underlying genetic basis of such diseases. Unfortunately, cellular and animal models that accurately recapitulate these inborn errors of hepatic metabolism in the laboratory have been lacking. Recently, investigators have exploited molecular techniques to generate induced pluripotent stem cells from patients' somatic cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into a wide variety of cell types, including hepatocytes, thereby offering an innovative approach to unravel the mechanisms underlying inborn errors of hepatic metabolism. Moreover, such cell models could potentially provide a platform for the discovery of therapeutics. In this mini-review, we present a brief overview of the state-of-the-art in using pluripotent stem cells for such studies. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Cell Connections by Tunneling Nanotubes: Effects of Mitochondrial Trafficking on Target Cell Metabolism, Homeostasis, and Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignais, Marie-Luce; Caicedo, Andrés; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Jorgensen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communications play a major role in tissue homeostasis and responses to external cues. Novel structures for this communication have recently been described. These tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) consist of thin-extended membrane protrusions that connect cells together. TNTs allow the cell-to-cell transfer of various cellular components, including proteins, RNAs, viruses, and organelles, such as mitochondria. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are both naturally present and recruited to many different tissues where their interaction with resident cells via secreted factors has been largely documented. Their immunosuppressive and repairing capacities constitute the basis for many current clinical trials. MSCs recruited to the tumor microenvironment also play an important role in tumor progression and resistance to therapy. MSCs are now the focus of intense scrutiny due to their capacity to form TNTs and transfer mitochondria to target cells, either in normal physiological or in pathological conditions, leading to changes in cell energy metabolism and functions, as described in this review.

  5. The viable but non-culturable state in pathogenic Escherichia coli: A general review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Pienaar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The persistence and pathogenicity of pathogenic bacteria are dependent on the ability of the species to survive in adverse conditions. During the infectious process, the organism may need to pass through certain hostile anatomical sites, such as the stomach. Under various environmental stresses, many bacteria enter into the viable but non-culturable (VBNC state, where they are ‘alive’ or metabolically active, but will not grow on conventional media. Escherichia coli bacteria encounter several diverse stress factors during their growth, survival and infection and thus may enter into the VBNC state.Objectives: This review discusses various general aspects of the VBNC state, the mechanisms and possible public health impact of indicator and pathogenic E. coli entering into the VBNC state.Method: A literature review was conducted to ascertain the possibleimpact of E. coli entering into the VBNC state.Results: Escherichia coli enter into the VBNC state by means of several induction mechanisms. Various authors have found that E. coli can be resuscitated post-VBNC. Certain strains of pathogenic E. coli are still able to produce toxins in the VBNC state, whilst others are avirulent during the VBNC state but are able to regain virulence after resuscitation.Conclusion: Pathogenic and indicator E. coli entering into the VBNC state could have an adverse effect on public health if conventional detection methods are used, where the number of viable cells could be underestimated and the VBNC cells still produce toxins or could, at anytime, be resuscitated and become virulent again.

  6. Cell signaling mechanisms and metabolic regulation of germination and dormancy in barley seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguo Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. seeds, important morphological and physiological changes take place, including development of organs and tissues and activation of metabolic pathways. Germination and dormancy of seeds are regulated by abscisic acid, gibberellins, reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS and several other factors. Activities of ascorbate–glutathione cycle enzymes, responsible for scavenging ROS, strongly increase. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, also scavenging ROS, decrease at the onset of seed germination and then increase. With the increase in aerobic metabolism after radicle protrusion, the activities of the fermentation enzymes lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase decline rapidly. The RNS-scavenging activity of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase decreases in the course of seed germination, in concert with elevation of nitric oxide production and protein nitrosylation. This activity supports the role of RNS in regulating seed germination. Transcription of various genes at different phases of seed germination exhibits phase-specific changes. During imbibition, genes involved in cell wall metabolism are highly expressed; in the middle phase of seed germination before radicle protrusion, genes involved in amino acid synthesis, protein synthesis, and transport and nucleic acid synthesis are upregulated significantly, and after radicle protrusion, genes involved in photosynthetic metabolism are induced. In summary, signal transduction and metabolic regulation of seed germination involve diverse reactions and complex regulation at different levels of metabolic organization. Keywords: Seed germination, Reactive oxygen species, Reactive nitrogen species, Signal transduction, Gene expression

  7. Metabolic Profiles in Cell Lines Infected with Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinding Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Viruses require energy and biosynthetic precursors from host cells for replication. An understanding of the metabolic interplay between classical swine fever virus (CSFV and host cells is important for exploring the complex pathological mechanisms of classical swine fever (CSF. In the current study, and for the first time, we utilized an approach involving gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS to examine the metabolic profiles within PK-15 and 3D4/2 cells infected with CSFV. The differential metabolites of PK-15 cells caused by CSFV infection mainly included the decreased levels of glucose 6-phosphate [fold change (FC = −1.94] and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (FC = −1.83 during glycolysis, ribulose 5-phosphate (FC = −1.51 in the pentose phosphate pathway, guanosine (FC = −1.24 and inosine (FC = −1.16 during purine biosynthesis, but the increased levels of 2-ketoisovaleric acid (FC = 0.63 during the citrate cycle, and ornithine (FC = 0.56 and proline (FC = 0.62 during arginine and proline metabolism. However, metabolite changes caused by CSFV infection in 3D4/2 cells included the reduced glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (FC = −0.77 and pyruvic acid (FC = −1.42 during glycolysis, 2-ketoglutaric acid (FC = −1.52 in the citrate cycle, and the elevated cytosine (FC = 2.15 during pyrimidine metabolism. Our data showed that CSFV might rebuild cellular metabolic programs, thus aiding viral replication. These findings may be important in developing targets for new biomarkers for the diagnosis and identification of enzyme inhibitors or metabolites as antiviral drugs, or screening viral gene products as vaccines.

  8. Cross-Talk between Alternatively Spliced UGT1A Isoforms and Colon Cancer Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet-Delage, Yannick; Rouleau, Michèle; Rouleau, Mélanie; Roberge, Joannie; Miard, Stéphanie; Picard, Frédéric; Têtu, Bernard; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-03-01

    Alternative splicing at the human glucuronosyltransferase 1 gene locus (UGT1) produces alternate isoforms UGT1A_i2s that control glucuronidation activity through protein-protein interactions. Here, we hypothesized that UGT1A_i2s function as a complex protein network connecting other metabolic pathways with an influence on cancer cell metabolism. This is based on a pathway enrichment analysis of proteomic data that identified several high-confidence candidate interaction proteins of UGT1A_i2 proteins in human tissues-namely, the rate-limiting enzyme of glycolysis pyruvate kinase (PKM), which plays a critical role in cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. The partnership of UGT1A_i2 and PKM2 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation in the HT115 colon cancer cells and was supported by a partial colocalization of these two proteins. In support of a functional role for this partnership, depletion of UGT1A_i2 proteins in HT115 cells enforced the Warburg effect, with a higher glycolytic rate at the expense of mitochondrial respiration, and led to lactate accumulation. Untargeted metabolomics further revealed a significantly altered cellular content of 58 metabolites, including many intermediates derived from the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways. These metabolic changes were associated with a greater migration potential. The potential relevance of our observations is supported by the down-regulation of UGT1A_i2 mRNA in colon tumors compared with normal tissues. Alternate UGT1A variants may thus be part of the expanding compendium of metabolic pathways involved in cancer biology directly contributing to the oncogenic phenotype of colon cancer cells. Findings uncover new aspects of UGT functions diverging from their transferase activity. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Metabolomics Analysis of Metabolic Effects of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Inhibition on Human Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry–based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level. PMID:25486521

  10. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tolstikov

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  11. Differential effect of hypoxia and acidity on lung cancer cell and fibroblast metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Liousia, Maria; Arelaki, Stella; Kalamida, Dimitra; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Mitrakas, Achilleas; Tsolou, Avgi; Sivridis, Efthimios; Koukourakis, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the metabolic response of lung cancer cells and normal lung fibroblasts to hypoxia and acidity. GLUT1 and HXKII mRNA/protein expression was up-regulated under hypoxia in the MRC5 fibroblasts and in the A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines, indicating intensified glucose absorption and glycolysis. Under hypoxia, the LDHA mRNA and LDH5 protein levels increased in the cancer cells but not in the fibroblasts. Acidity suppressed the above-mentioned hypoxia effect. PDH-kinase-1 (PDK1 mRNA and protein) and inactive phosphorylated-PDH protein levels were induced under hypoxia in the cancer cells, whereas these were reduced in the MRC5 lung fibroblasts. In human tissue sections, the prevalent expression patterns supported the contrasting metabolic behavior of cancer cells vs. tumor fibroblasts. The monocarboxylate/lactate transporter 1 (MCT1) was up-regulated in all the cell lines under hypoxic conditions, but it was suppressed under acidic conditions. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content per cell decreased significantly in the A549 cancer cell line under hypoxia, but it increased in the MRC5 fibroblasts. Taking into account these findings, we suggest that, under hypoxia, cancer cells intensify the anaerobic direction in glycolysis, while normal fibroblasts prefer to seek energy by intensifying the aerobic use of the available oxygen.

  12. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 promotes metabolic reprogramming in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Lin, Shu-Hai; Fu, Li; Tang, Zhi; Che, Chi-Ming; Zhang, Li-Yi; Ming, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Teng-Fei; Tang, Xu-Ming; Tan, Bin-Bin; Xiang, Di; Li, Feng; Chan, On-Yee; Xie, Dan; Cai, Zongwei; Guan, Xin-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Reprogramming of intracellular metabolism is common in liver cancer cells. Understanding the mechanisms of cell metabolic reprogramming may present a new basis for liver cancer treatment. In our previous study, we reported that a novel oncogene eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (EIF5A2) promotes tumorigenesis under hypoxic condition. Here, we aim to investigate the role of EIF5A2 in cell metabolic reprogramming during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. In this study, we reported that the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of EIF5A2 was upregulated in 59 of 105 (56.2%) HCC clinical samples (P = 0.015), and EIF5A2 overexpression was significantly associated with shorter survival time of patients with HCC (P = 0.021). Ectopic expression of EIF5A2 in HCC cell lines significantly promoted cell growth and accelerated glucose utilization and lipogenesis rates. The high rates of glucose uptake and lactate secretion conferred by EIF5A2 revealed an abnormal activity of aerobic glycolysis in HCC cells. Several key enzymes involved in glycolysis including glucose transporter type 1 and 2, hexokinase 2, phosphofructokinase liver type, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase M2 isoform, phosphoglycerate mutase 1 and lactate dehydrogenase A were upregulated by overexpression of EIF5A2. Moreover, EIF5A2 showed positive correlations with FASN and ACSS2, two key enzymes involved in the fatty acid de novo biosynthetic pathway, at both protein and mRNA levels in HCC. These results indicated that EIF5A2 may regulate fatty acid de novo biosynthesis by increasing the uptake of acetate. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that EIF5A2 has a critical role in HCC cell metabolic reprogramming and may serve as a prominent novel therapeutic target for liver cancer treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Live-cell MRI with xenon hyper-CEST biosensors targeted to metabolically labeled cell-surface glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Christopher; Martos, Vera; Rose, Honor May; Reinke, Stefan; Klippel, Stefan; Schröder, Leif; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2015-02-23

    The targeting of metabolically labeled glycans with conventional MRI contrast agents has proved elusive. In this work, which further expands the utility of xenon Hyper-CEST biosensors in cell experiments, we present the first successful molecular imaging of such glycans using MRI. Xenon Hyper-CEST biosensors are a novel class of MRI contrast agents with very high sensitivity. We designed a multimodal biosensor for both fluorescent and xenon MRI detection that is targeted to metabolically labeled sialic acid through bioorthogonal chemistry. Through the use of a state of the art live-cell bioreactor, it was demonstrated that xenon MRI biosensors can be used to image cell-surface glycans at nanomolar concentrations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way. PMID:26616174

  15. Real-time quantitative analysis of metabolic flux in live cells using a hyperpolarized micromagnetic resonance spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sangmoo; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Park, Sun Mi; Alvarez, Julio; Tee, Sui Seng; Weissleder, Ralph; Kharas, Michael G; Lee, Hakho; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is widely considered a hallmark of cancer, and understanding metabolic dynamics described by the conversion rates or "fluxes" of metabolites can shed light onto biological processes of tumorigenesis and response to therapy. For real-time analysis of metabolic flux in intact cells or organisms, magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been developed in conjunction with hyperpolarization of nuclear spins. These approaches enable noninvasive monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy and are being tested in multiple clinical trials. However, because of their limited sensitivity, these methods require a larger number of cells, on the order of 10(7), which is impractical for analyzing scant target cells or mass-limited samples. We present a new technology platform, a hyperpolarized micromagnetic resonance spectrometer (HMRS), that achieves real-time, 10(3)-fold more sensitive metabolic analysis on live cells. This platform enables quantification of the metabolic flux in a wide range of cell types, including leukemia stem cells, without significant changes in viability, which allows downstream molecular analyses in tandem. It also enables rapid assessment of metabolic changes by a given drug, which may direct therapeutic choices in patients. We further advanced this platform for high-throughput analysis of hyperpolarized molecules by integrating a three-dimensionally printed microfluidic system. The HMRS platform holds promise as a sensitive method for studying metabolic dynamics in mass-limited samples, including primary cancer cells, providing novel therapeutic targets and an enhanced understanding of cellular metabolism.

  16. Metabolomics comparison of red cells stored in four additive solutions reveals differences in citrate anticoagulant permeability and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfsson, Ó; Sigurjonsson, Ó E; Magnusdottir, M; Johannsson, F; Paglia, G; Guðmundsson, S; Bordbar, A; Palsson, S; Brynjólfsson, S; Guðmundsson, S; Palsson, B

    2017-05-01

    Metabolomics studies have revealed transition points in metabolic signatures of red cells during storage in SAGM, whose clinical significance is unclear. We set out to investigate whether these transition points occur independent of storage media and define differences in the metabolism of red cells in additive solutions. Red cell concentrates were stored in SAGM, AS-1, AS-3 or PAGGSM, and sampled fourteen times spanning Day 1-46. Following quality control, the samples were split into extracellular and intracellular aliquots. These were analysed with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analysis affording quantitative metabolic profiles of both intra- and extracellular red cell metabolites. Differences were observed in glycolysis, purine salvage, glutathione synthesis and citrate metabolism on account of the storage solutions. Donor variability however hindered the accurate characterization of metabolic transition time-points. Intracellular citrate concentrations were increased in red cells stored in AS-3 and PAGGSM media. The metabolism of citrate in red cells in SAGM was subsequently confirmed using 13 C citrate isotope labelling and shown to originate from citrate anticoagulant. Metabolic signatures that discriminate between 'fresh' and 'old' stored red cells are dependent upon additive solutions. Specifically, the incorporation and metabolism of citrate in additive solutions with lower chloride ion concentration is altered and impacts glycolysis. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Glucose metabolism is altered after loss of L cells and α-cells but not influenced by loss of K cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J; Ugleholdt, Randi Kjærsgaard; Jørgensen, Signe Marie

    2013-01-01

    , and glucagon is associated with impaired regulation of metabolism. This study evaluates the consequences of acute removal of Gip- or Gcg-expressing cells on glucose metabolism. Generation of the two diphtheria toxin receptor cellular knockout mice, TgN(GIP.DTR) and TgN(GCG.DTR), allowed us to study effects...... of acute ablation of K and L cells and α-cells. Diphtheria toxin administration reduced the expression of Gip and content of GIP in the proximal jejunum in TgN(GIP.DTR) and expression of Gcg and content of proglucagon-derived peptides in both proximal jejunum and terminal ileum as well as content...

  18. A Brake for B Cell Proliferation: Appropriate responses to metabolic stress are crucial to maintain B cell viability and prevent malignant outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellusova, Julia; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-11-01

    B cell activation is accompanied by metabolic adaptations to meet the increased energetic demands of proliferation. The metabolic composition of the microenvironment is known to change during a germinal center response, in inflamed tissue and to vary significantly between different organs. To sustain cellular homeostasis B cells need to be able to dynamically adapt to changes in their environment. An inability to take up and process available nutrients can result in impaired B cell growth and a diminished humoral immune response. Furthermore, the metabolic microenvironment can affect B cell signaling and provide a means to avoid aberrant proliferation or modulate B cell function. Thus, a better understanding of the intricate interplay between cell signaling and metabolism could provide novel insight into how B cell function is regulated and have implications for the development of vaccines or treatment of autoimmune disorders and B cell derived malignancies. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Impaired Fat Efflux in Polarized Hepatic Cells: Consequences of Ethanol Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benita L. McVicker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steatosis, an early manifestation in alcoholic liver disease, is associated with the accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs. However, the role ethanol metabolism has in LD formation and turnover remains undefined. Here, we assessed LD dynamics following ethanol and oleic acid treatment to ethanol-metabolizing WIF-B cells (a hybrid of human fibroblasts (WI 38 and Fao rat hepatoma cells. An OA dose-dependent increase in triglyceride and stained lipids was identified which doubled (P<0.05 in the presence of ethanol. This effect was blunted with the inclusion of an alcohol metabolism inhibitor. The ethanol/ OA combination also induced adipophilin, LD coat protein involved in the attenuation of lipolysis. Additionally, ethanol treatment resulted in a significant reduction in lipid efflux. These data demonstrate that the metabolism of ethanol in hepatic cells is related to LD accumulation, impaired fat efflux, and enhancements in LD-associated proteins. These alterations in LD dynamics may contribute to ethanol-mediated defects in hepatocellular LD regulation and the formation of steatosis.

  20. Induction of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells by manufactured gas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goth-Goldstein, R.; Levine, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States); Leadon, S.A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chaloupka, K.; Safe, S. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the non-genotoxic effects of manufactured gas plant residues which present complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effect of these residues on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells was studied. Cells were preincubated with hexane-extractable coal tar material for 16 hr, then incubated with {sup 3}H-BaP for 2 hr and the amount of BaP metabolites in cell extracts was determined by HPLC. An up to 5-fold increase over control in BaP metabolites was seen after preincubation with 0.2 {mu}g/ml coal tar material (a oncytotoxic dose). Coal tar extracts were equally effective as pure BaP in inducing BaP metabolism. As BaP constitutes less than 1% of the coal tar, other components in the coal tar mixtures appear to be even more potent than BaP in inducing the enzyme system responsible for BaP metabolism. The increase in BaP metabolites was accompanied by a proportional increase in P4501A1 mRNA as measured by Northern blotting, and resulted in an increase of BaP adducts to DNA. These results show that coal tars and other P450-inducting compounds can act as cocarcinogens by enhancing the genotoxic effects of compounds metabolized by the P4501A1 enzyme.

  1. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  2. Mutagenicity of silver nanoparticles in CHO cells dependent on particle surface functionalization and metabolic activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigas, Claudia; Walz, Elke; Gräf, Volker; Heller, Knut J.; Greiner, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    The potential of engineered nanomaterials to induce genotoxic effects is an important aspect of hazard identification. In this study, cytotoxicity and mutagenicity as a function of metabolic activation of three silver nanoparticle (AgNP) preparations differing in surface coating were determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) subclone K1 cells. Three silver nanoparticle preparations ( x 90,0 polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-Ag) were used for the experiments. The cytotoxic effect of AgNPs was assessed with the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazoliumbromide) test using different concentrations of nanoparticles, while the mutagenicity was evaluated using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation assay. The cytotoxicity of all three AgNPs was lower in a cell culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) than in medium without FCS. The HPRT test without metabolic activation system S9 revealed that compared to the other AgNP formulations, citrate-coated Ag showed a lower genotoxic effect. However, addition of S9 increased the mutation frequency of all AgNPs and especially influenced the genotoxicity of Citrate-Ag. The results showed that exogenous metabolic activation of nanosilver is crucial even if interactions of the metabolic activation system, nanosilver, and cells are not really understood up to now.

  3. Changes in cancer cell metabolism revealed by direct sample analysis with MALDI mass spectrometry.

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    David A Pirman

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery using mass spectrometry (MS has recently seen a significant increase in applications, mainly driven by the rapidly advancing field of metabolomics. Instrumental and data handling advancements have allowed for untargeted metabolite analyses which simultaneously interrogate multiple biochemical pathways to elucidate disease phenotypes and therapeutic mechanisms. Although most MS-based metabolomic approaches are coupled with liquid chromatography, a few recently published studies used matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALDI, allowing for rapid and direct sample analysis with minimal sample preparation. We and others have reported that prostaglandin E3 (PGE3, derived from COX-2 metabolism of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, inhibited the proliferation of human lung, colon and pancreatic cancer cells. However, how PGE3 metabolism is regulated in cancer cells, particularly human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, is not fully understood. Here, we successfully used MALDI to identify differences in lipid metabolism between two human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines, A549 and H596, which could contribute to their differential response to EPA treatment. Analysis by MALDI-MS showed that the level of EPA incorporated into phospholipids in H596 cells was 4-fold higher than A549 cells. Intriguingly, H596 cells produced much less PGE3 than A549 cells even though the expression of COX-2 was similar in these two cell lines. This appears to be due to the relatively lower expression of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 in H596 cells than that of A549 cells. Additionally, the MALDI-MS approach was successfully used on tumor tissue extracts from a K-ras transgenic mouse model of lung cancer to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of EPA in the in vivo model. These results highlight the utility of combining a metabolomics workflow with MALDI-MS to identify the biomarkers that may regulate the

  4. The effect of vitamin D on MCF-7 breast cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracligil, B; Ozturk, B; Unlu, A; Abusoglu, S; Tekin, G

    The role of vitamin D in calcium absorption and bone health is known. The studies revealed that vitamin D modulates breast cancer cell growth and it is also associated with a reduced breast cancer risk. The primary objective of this study was to highlight the metabolic effect of Vitamin D on MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. For that purpose, we checked the apoptosis, energy, amino-acid and acylcarnitine levels in cancer cells, that the study propose, that 1α, 25(OH)2D3 could inhibit cell growth in a dose and time dependent manner. IC50 dose was calculated as 145 nM for vitamin D. We observed the apoptosis level in vitamin D groups, which were 18, 28 and 38.5 % at 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. During metabolic screening analysis, it was observed that glutamine, methionine and glutamic acid levels were treated more by Vitamin D groups in cell line and also, that acylcarnitine level was increased in 24 and 48 hour groups when compared to the control, but decreased in 72 hours. Further studies are needed to analyze the role of amino acids and acylcarnitines for early apoptosis and cancer metabolism (Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 24).

  5. Determinants of brain cell metabolic phenotypes and energy substrate utilization unraveled with a modeling approach.

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    Aitana Neves

    Full Text Available Although all brain cells bear in principle a comparable potential in terms of energetics, in reality they exhibit different metabolic profiles. The specific biochemical characteristics explaining such disparities and their relative importance are largely unknown. Using a modeling approach, we show that modifying the kinetic parameters of pyruvate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial NADH shuttling within a realistic interval can yield a striking switch in lactate flux direction. In this context, cells having essentially an oxidative profile exhibit pronounced extracellular lactate uptake and consumption. However, they can be turned into cells with prominent aerobic glycolysis by selectively reducing the aforementioned parameters. In the case of primarily oxidative cells, we also examined the role of glycolysis and lactate transport in providing pyruvate to mitochondria in order to sustain oxidative phosphorylation. The results show that changes in lactate transport capacity and extracellular lactate concentration within the range described experimentally can sustain enhanced oxidative metabolism upon activation. Such a demonstration provides key elements to understand why certain brain cell types constitutively adopt a particular metabolic profile and how specific features can be altered under different physiological and pathological conditions in order to face evolving energy demands.

  6. N-Glycosylation optimization of recombinant antibodies in CHO cell through process and metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou

    protein with ensured safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness, holistic understanding of titer and N-glycosylation of the protein in relation to cell culture process as well as genomic, proteomic, metabolic and physiological status of the cells becomes a superior approach. Combining the knowledge of CHO...... cell culture technology, upstream process engineering, metabolic engineering, and glycobiology into a systematic framework allow us to improve the production of recombinant therapeutic protein towards an optimal balance between quantity and quality. In the presented work, recent know-how on impact...... monoclonal antibody (mAb) towards desired patterns, and at the same time try to understand the underlying mechanisms of that from a systems biology perspective. Two different strategies were used and achieved great success in glyco-optimization: 1) optimize media and culture process; 2) Genetically optimize...

  7. mTORC1-Dependent Metabolic Reprogramming Underlies Escape from Glycolysis Addiction in Cancer Cells.

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    Pusapati, Raju V; Daemen, Anneleen; Wilson, Catherine; Sandoval, Wendy; Gao, Min; Haley, Benjamin; Baudy, Andreas R; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Evangelista, Marie; Settleman, Jeff

    2016-04-11

    Although glycolysis is substantially elevated in many tumors, therapeutic targeting of glycolysis in cancer patients has not yet been successful, potentially reflecting the metabolic plasticity of tumor cells. In various cancer cells exposed to a continuous glycolytic block, we identified a recurrent reprogramming mechanism involving sustained mTORC1 signaling that underlies escape from glycolytic addiction. Active mTORC1 directs increased glucose flux via the pentose phosphate pathway back into glycolysis, thereby circumventing a glycolysis block and ensuring adequate ATP and biomass production. Combined inhibition of glycolysis and mTORC1 signaling disrupted metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and inhibited their growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal novel combinatorial therapeutic strategies to realize the potential benefit from targeting the Warburg effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  9. Spheroid cancer stem cells display reprogrammed metabolism and obtain energy by actively running the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Takahashi, Juri; Eguchi, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-31

    The Warburg effect is a metabolic hallmark of cancer cells; cancer cells, unlike normal cells, exclusively activate glycolysis, even in the presence of enough oxygen. On the other hand, intratumoral heterogeneity is currently of interest in cancer research, including that involving cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the present study, we attempted to gain an understanding of metabolism in CSCs that is distinct from that in non-CSCs. After forming spheroids from the OVTOKO (ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma) and SiHa (cervical squamous cell carcinoma) cell lines, the metabolites of these cells were compared with the metabolites of cancer cells that were cultured in adherent plates. A principle components analysis clearly divided their metabolic features. Amino acids that participate in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle reactions, such as serine and glutamine, were significantly increased in the spheroids. Indeed, spheroids from each cell line contained more total adenylates than did their corresponding cells in adherent cultures. This study demonstrated that cancer metabolism is not limited to aerobic glycolysis (i.e. the Warburg effect), but is flexible and context-dependent. In addition, activation of TCA cycles was suggested to be a metabolic feature of CSCs that was distinct from non-CSCs. The amino acid metabolic pathways discussed here are already considered as targets for cancer therapy, and they are additionally proposed as potential targets for CSC treatment.

  10. Arachidonic acid metabolism and regulation of ion transport in rabbit Clara cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Scott, M.R.; McIntire, M.R.; Henke, D.C. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Sonicates of freshly isolated Clara cells produced thromboxane B2 (TxB2), prostaglandin (PG) D2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT), and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) as detected using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sonicates of Clara cells cultured on collagen matrices produced the same metabolites. Rates of (3H)arachidonic acid metabolism increased in culture, but the changes were not associated with changes in cell number. Sonicates of freshly isolated tracheal cells produced mainly 12-HETE. Cyclooxygenase products were not produced consistently. Sonicates of tracheal cultures produced significant quantities of TxB2, PGD2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and HHT, but 12-HETE remained the major metabolite. Equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) across cultured Clara cell epithelia was unaffected by bilateral exposure to TxB2, PGD2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, HHT, or 12-HETE. A minor (1%) decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rt) followed exposure to PGD2. Indomethacin had no significant effect on Rt or Ieq, but exposure of indomethacin-pretreated preparations to PGE2 revealed a minor (2%) increase in Ieq. In contrast, tracheal cell epithelia exhibited significant changes in Rt and Ieq in response to PGF2 alpha, PGE2, and HHT. These results indicate that Clara cells metabolize arachidonic acid to biologically active eicosanoids, but the resulting products do not play a major role in regulation of transepithelial ion transport by this cell type.

  11. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  12. Generation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 reporter cell lines for the assessment of ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Chang, Le; Zhai, Jiahui; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Donggen; Wang, Yunfang

    2017-12-01

    Both primary hepatocytes and stem cells-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are major sources for bioartificial liver (BAL). Maintenance of hepatocellular functions and induction of functional maturity of HLCs are critical for BAL's support effect. It remains difficult to assess and improve detoxification functions inherent to hepatocytes, including ammonia clearance. Here, we aim to assess ammonia metabolism and identify ammonia detoxification enhancer by developing an imaging strategy. In hepatoma cell line HepG2, and immortalized hepatic cell line LO2, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) gene, the first enzyme of ammonia-eliminating urea cycle, was labelled with fluorescence protein via CRISPR/Cas9 system. With the reporter-based screening approach, cellular detoxification enhancers were selected among a collection of 182 small molecules. In both CPS1 reporter cell lines, the fluorescence intensity is positively correlated with cellular CPS1 mRNA expression, ammonia elimination and secreted urea, and reflected ammonia detoxification in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, high-level CPS1 reporter clones also reserved many other critical hepatocellular functions, for example albumin secretion and cytochrome 450 metabolic functions. Sodium phenylbutyrate and resveratrol were identified to enhance metabolism-related gene expression and liver-enriched transcription factors C/EBPα, HNF4α. In conclusion, the CPS1-reporter system provides an economic and effective platform for assessment of cellular metabolic function and high-throughput identification of chemical compounds that improve detoxification activities in hepatic lineage cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. Novel small molecule drugs inhibit tumor cell metabolism and show potent anti-tumorigenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojel-Hansen, Christina; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Christensen, Mette Knak

    2011-01-01

    oxyphenisatine analogs TOP001 and TOP216 exert their anti-cancer effect by affecting tumor cell metabolism and inducing intracellular amino acid deprivation, leading to a block of cell proliferation. GCN2-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2a as well as mTOR pathway inhibition supports the above notion. In addition......, these novel anti-cancer compounds inhibit DNA and protein synthesis and induce apoptosis in a broad spectrum of cancer cell lines. In vivo, the compounds induce tumor stasis and regression in mouse xenograft models of human breast, prostate, ovarian and pancreatic cancer, both when administered intravenously...

  14. Molecular subtyping of metastatic melanoma based on cell ganglioside metabolism profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Cristina; Silvestri, Ilaria; Testa, Francesca; Baldassari, Paola; Anastasia, Luigi; Mortarini, Roberta; Anichini, Andrea; López-Requena, Alejandro; Tettamanti, Guido; Venerando, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    In addition to alterations concerning the expression of oncogenes and onco-suppressors, melanoma is characterized by the presence of distinctive gangliosides (sialic acid carrying glycosphingolipids). Gangliosides strongly control cell surface dynamics and signaling; therefore, it could be assumed that these alterations are linked to modifications of cell behavior acquired by the tumor. On these bases, this work investigated the correlations between melanoma cell ganglioside metabolism profiles and the biological features of the tumor and the survival of patients. Melanoma cell lines were established from surgical specimens of AJCC stage III and IV melanoma patients. Sphingolipid analysis was carried out on melanoma cell lines and melanocytes through cell metabolic labeling employing [3-3H]sphingosine and by FACS. N-glycolyl GM3 was identified employing the 14 F7 antibody. Gene expression was assayed by Real Time PCR. Cell invasiveness was assayed through a Matrigel invasion assay; cell proliferation was determined through the soft agar assay, MTT, and [3H] thymidine incorporation. Statistical analysis was performed using XLSTAT software for melanoma hierarchical clustering based on ganglioside profile, the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test, and the Mantel-Haenszel test for survival analysis. Based on the ganglioside profiles, through a hierarchical clustering, we classified melanoma cells isolated from patients into three clusters: 1) cluster 1, characterized by high content of GM3, mainly in the form of N-glycolyl GM3, and GD3; 2) cluster 2, characterized by the appearance of complex gangliosides and by a low content of GM3; 3) cluster 3, which showed an intermediate phenotype between cluster 1 and cluster 3. Moreover, our data demonstrated that: a) a correlation could be traced between patients' survival and clusters based on ganglioside profiles, with cluster 1 showing the worst survival; b) the expression of several enzymes (sialidase NEU3

  15. Determination of Metabolic Viability and Cell Mass Using a Tandem Resazurin/Sulforhodamine B Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Filomena S G; Starostina, Irina G; Ivanova, Vilena V; Rizvanov, Albert A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Pereira, Susana P

    2016-05-04

    The identification of rapid, reliable, and highly reproducible biological assays that can be standardized and routinely used in preclinical tests constitutes a promising approach to reducing drug discovery costs and time. This unit details a tandem, rapid, and reliable cell viability method for preliminary screening of chemical compounds. This assay measures metabolic activity and cell mass in the same cell sample using a dual resazurin/sulforhodamine B assay, eliminating the variation associated with cell seeding and excessive manipulations in assays that test different cell samples across plates. The procedure also reduces the amount of cells, test compound, and reagents required, as well as the time expended in conventional tests, thus resulting in a more confident prediction of toxic thresholds for the tested compounds. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism

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    Minjiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. High glucose- (HG- induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM or control (25 mM groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism.

  17. Cell organisation, sulphur metabolism and ion transport-related genes are differentially expressed in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelium and yeast cells

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    Passos Geraldo AS

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycelium-to-yeast transition in the human host is essential for pathogenicity by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and both cell types are therefore critical to the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. The infected population is of about 10 million individuals, 2% of whom will eventually develop the disease. Previously, transcriptome analysis of mycelium and yeast cells resulted in the assembly of 6,022 sequence groups. Gene expression analysis, using both in silico EST subtraction and cDNA microarray, revealed genes that were differential to yeast or mycelium, and we discussed those involved in sugar metabolism. To advance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition, we performed an extended analysis of gene expression profiles using the methods mentioned above. Results In this work, continuous data mining revealed 66 new differentially expressed sequences that were MIPS(Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences-categorised according to the cellular process in which they are presumably involved. Two well represented classes were chosen for further analysis: (i control of cell organisation – cell wall, membrane and cytoskeleton, whose representatives were hex (encoding for a hexagonal peroxisome protein, bgl (encoding for a 1,3-β-glucosidase in mycelium cells; and ags (an α-1,3-glucan synthase, cda (a chitin deacetylase and vrp (a verprolin in yeast cells; (ii ion metabolism and transport – two genes putatively implicated in ion transport were confirmed to be highly expressed in mycelium cells – isc and ktp, respectively an iron-sulphur cluster-like protein and a cation transporter; and a putative P-type cation pump (pct in yeast. Also, several enzymes from the cysteine de novo biosynthesis pathway were shown to be up regulated in the yeast form, including ATP sulphurylase, APS kinase and also PAPS reductase. Conclusion Taken

  18. Oncogene Activation Induces Metabolic Transformation Resulting in Insulin-Independence in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Dewey, T. Gregory; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Normal breast epithelial cells require insulin and EGF for growth in serum-free media. We previously demonstrated that over expression of breast cancer oncogenes transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Additionally, most breast cancer cell lines are insulin-independent for growth. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which oncogene over expression transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Analysis of the effects of various concentrations of insulin and/or IGF-I on proliferation of MCF10A cells demonstrated that some of the effects of insulin were independent from those of IGF-I, suggesting that oncogene over expression drives a true insulin-independent proliferative phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic functions of insulin signaling in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent cells. HER2 over expression in MCF10A cells resulted in glucose uptake in the absence of insulin at a rate equal to insulin-induced glucose uptake in non-transduced cells. We found that a diverse set of oncogenes induced the same result. To gain insight into how HER2 oncogene signaling affected increased insulin-independent glucose uptake we compared HER2-regulated gene expression signatures in MCF10A and HER2 over expressing MCF10A cells by differential analysis of time series gene expression data from cells treated with a HER2 inhibitor. This analysis identified genes specifically regulated by the HER2 oncogene, including VAMP8 and PHGDH, which have known functions in glucose uptake and processing of glycolytic intermediates, respectively. Moreover, these genes specifically implicated in HER2 oncogene-driven transformation are commonly altered in human breast cancer cells. These results highlight the diversity of oncogene effects on cell regulatory pathways and the importance of oncogene-driven metabolic transformation in breast cancer. PMID:21437235

  19. Oncogene activation induces metabolic transformation resulting in insulin-independence in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliccia Bollig-Fischer

    Full Text Available Normal breast epithelial cells require insulin and EGF for growth in serum-free media. We previously demonstrated that over expression of breast cancer oncogenes transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Additionally, most breast cancer cell lines are insulin-independent for growth. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which oncogene over expression transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Analysis of the effects of various concentrations of insulin and/or IGF-I on proliferation of MCF10A cells demonstrated that some of the effects of insulin were independent from those of IGF-I, suggesting that oncogene over expression drives a true insulin-independent proliferative phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic functions of insulin signaling in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent cells. HER2 over expression in MCF10A cells resulted in glucose uptake in the absence of insulin at a rate equal to insulin-induced glucose uptake in non-transduced cells. We found that a diverse set of oncogenes induced the same result. To gain insight into how HER2 oncogene signaling affected increased insulin-independent glucose uptake we compared HER2-regulated gene expression signatures in MCF10A and HER2 over expressing MCF10A cells by differential analysis of time series gene expression data from cells treated with a HER2 inhibitor. This analysis identified genes specifically regulated by the HER2 oncogene, including VAMP8 and PHGDH, which have known functions in glucose uptake and processing of glycolytic intermediates, respectively. Moreover, these genes specifically implicated in HER2 oncogene-driven transformation are commonly altered in human breast cancer cells. These results highlight the diversity of oncogene effects on cell regulatory pathways and the importance of oncogene-driven metabolic transformation in breast cancer.

  20. Mitochondrial elongation-mediated glucose metabolism reprogramming is essential for tumour cell survival during energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Huang, Q; Long, X; Guo, X; Sun, X; Jin, X; Li, Z; Ren, T; Yuan, P; Huang, X; Zhang, H; Xing, J

    2017-08-24

    To date, mechanisms of tumour cell survival under energy stress are not well understood. Cumulative evidence is beginning to reveal that specific mitochondrial morphologies are often associated with energetic states and survival of cells. However, the functional roles of mitochondria in the metabolic adaptation of tumour cells to energy stress remain to be elucidated. In this study, we first investigated the changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by nutrition deprivation in tumour cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism. We then systematically explored glucose metabolism reprogramming by energy stress-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and its effect on tumour cell survival. Our results showed that starvation treatment resulted in a dramatic mitochondrial elongation, which was mainly mediated by DRP1S637 phosphorylation through protein kinase A activation and subsequent suppression of mitochondrial translocation of DRP1. We further observed that tumour cells under an energy stress condition exhibited a clear shift from glycolysis towards oxidative phosphorylation, which was reversed by the recovery of mitochondrial fission induced by forced expression of mutant DRP1S637A. Mechanistically, energy stress-induced mitochondrial elongation facilitated cristae formation and assembly of respiratory complexes to enhance oxidative phosphorylation, which in turn exhibited a feedback inhibitory effect on glycolysis through NAD+-dependent SIRT1 activation. In addition, our data indicated that DRP1S637-mediated mitochondrial elongation under energy stress was essential for tumour cell survival both in vitro and in vivo and predicted poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Overall, our study demonstrates that remodelling of mitochondrial morphology plays a critical role in tumour cell adaptation to energy stress by reprogramming glucose metabolism.