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Sample records for vhl gene hereditary

  1. Identification of 3 novel VHL germ-line mutations in Danish VHL patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Mette; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Sunde, Lone

    2012-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene.......von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene....

  2. Small activating RNA induced expression of VHL gene in renal cell carcinoma.

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    Kang, Moo Rim; Park, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chang Woo; Lee, Myeong Youl; Han, Sang-Bae; Li, Long-Cheng; Kang, Jong Soon

    2018-02-06

    Recent studies have reported that chemically synthesized double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs), also known as small activating RNA (saRNAs), can specifically induce gene expression by targeting promoter sequences by a mechanism termed RNA activation (RNAa). In the present study, we designed 4 candidate saRNAs targeting the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene promoter. Among these saRNAs, dsVHL-821 significantly inhibited cell growth by up-regulating VHL at both the mRNA and protein levels in renal cell carcinoma 769-P cells. Functional analysis showed that dsVHL-821 induced apoptosis by increasing p53, decreasing Bcl-xL, activating caspase 3/7 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that dsVHL-821 increased the enrichment of Ago2 and RNA polymerase II at the dsVHL-821 target site. In addition, Ago2 depletion significantly suppressed dsVHL-821-induced up-regulation of VHL gene expression and related effects. Single transfection of dsVHL-821 caused long-lasting (14 days) VHL up-regulation. Furthermore, the activation of VHL by dsVHL-821 was accompanied by an increase in dimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me2) and acetylation of histone 4 (H4ac) and a decrease in dimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me2) and lysine 27 (H3K27me2) in the dsVHL-821 target region. Taken together, these results demonstrate that dsVHL-821, a novel saRNA for VHL, induces the expression of the VHL gene by epigenetic changes, leading to inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis, and suggest that targeted activation of VHL by dsVHL-821 may be explored as a novel treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Endemic polycythemia in Russia: mutation in the VHL gene.

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    Ang, Sonny O; Chen, Hua; Gordeuk, Victor R; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Polyakova, Lydia A; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Kralovics, Robert; Stockton, David W; Prchal, Josef T

    2002-01-01

    Chuvash polycythemia (CP) is an autosomal recessive condition that is endemic in the Russian mid-Volga River region of Chuvashia. We previously found that CP patients may have increased serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels, ruled out linkage to both the EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR) gene loci, and hypothesized that the defect may lie in the oxygen homeostasis pathway. We now report a study of five multiplex Chuvash families which confirms that CP is associated with significant elevations of serum EPO levels and rules out a location for the CP gene on chromosome 11 as had been reported by other investigators or a mutation of the HIF-1 alpha gene. Using a genome-wide screen, we localized a region on chromosome 3 with a LOD score >2. After sequencing three candidate genes, we identified a C to T transition at nucleotide 598 (an R200W mutation) in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. The VHL protein (pVHL) downregulates the alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 alpha), the main regulator of hypoxia adaptation, by targeting the protein for degradation. In the simplest scenario, disruption of pVHL function causes a failure to degrade HIF-1 alpha resulting in accumulation of HIF-1 alpha, upregulation of downstream target genes such as EPO, and the clinical manifestation of polycythemia. These findings strongly suggest that CP is a congenital disorder of oxygen homeostasis.

  4. Rare presentation of familial paraganglioma without evidence of mutation in the SDH, RET and VHL genes: towards further genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persu, Alexandre; Amyere, Mustapha; Gutierrez-Roelens, Ilse; Rustin, Pierre; Sempoux, Christine; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Van Beers, Bernard E; Horsmans, Yves; De Plaen, Jean-François; MarcHamoir; Vikkula, Miikka

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase and its anchoring subunits (SDH genes) are at the origin of hereditary head and neck paraganglioma (PGL) and a subset of apparently sporadic pheochromocytoma. We describe a family including three patients harbouring bilateral head and neck PGL diagnosed before 25 years of age. Multiple hypervascular hepatic lesions were subsequently discovered in two of them. In both, liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of PGL. In addition, in one patient, MRI disclosed multiple target-like lesions of the spine, highly suggestive of metastatic PGL. Family history was compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance with possible maternal imprinting. Combined single-strand conformation polymorphism and heteroduplex analysis followed by sequencing did not show any mutation of the coding parts of SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, RET or VHL genes. Screening of copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in the three affected family members showed no deletion or amplification of the SDH, RET and VHL genes. Furthermore, succinate dehydrogenase activity measured in a liver PGL sample was not significantly decreased in the affected patient as compared with controls, underscoring the exclusion of the SDH genes. To our knowledge, this is the first reported family of hereditary head and neck PGL with metastatic dissemination in the liver and the spine. A large body of evidence supports the absence of mutations in SDH, RET and VHL genes, which suggests the existence of a yet unknown gene at the origin of this particular form of familial PGL.

  5. VHL Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Website References Search Patients / What is VHL? / Manifestations People who have VHL disease may experience tumors ... very important to check regularly for possible VHL manifestations throughout a person’s lifetime. Most of these VHL ...

  6. [Prenatal exclusion of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in a Mexican family carrying a novel VHL gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Benitez-Granados, Jesús; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2014-03-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominant and familial multisystemic syndrome that is caused by the inactivation of the VHL gene and it is characterized by diverse types of high vasculated tumours of benign and malign nature. In this work we describe the clinical characteristics and the prenatal diagnosis of a woman with VHL. Describe the first exclusion prenatal case by DNA analysis of the VHL syndrome in Latinoamerican population. Analysis of a Mexican familial pedigree showed 5 affected subjects with VHL on 3 consecutive generations. The proband was a 7 weeks pregnancy woman who was referred to our service for familiar and personal history of this disease. Maternal DNA was obtained from peripheral blood leukocytes, while fetal DNA was isolated from amniotic liquid cells on the 15th week. The maternal and fetal DNA analysis were done by the Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) and the direct nucleotide sequence of the VHL gene. A novel mutation (c. 161_168 dup GGAGGCCG) in the VHL gene was identified in maternal DNA. Fetal DNA analysis indicated that the fetus inherited the wild-type allele from the mother. A novel VHL gene mutation was identified in a familial case of the disease, expanding the mutational spectrum in this disorder. The molecular prenatal testing in the affected woman at 15 weeks of gestation, demonstrated that the fetus did nor inherited the mutated allele. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of prenatal-molecular exclusion on VHL syndrome in Latinoamerica population.

  7. VHL and HIF-1α: gene variations and prognosis in early-stage clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessi, Francesca; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Tomei, Sara; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Minervini, Andrea; Menicagli, Michele; Apollo, Alessandro; Masieri, Lorenzo; Collecchi, Paola; Minervini, Riccardo; Carini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2014-03-01

    Von Hipple-Lindau gene (VHL) inactivation represents the most frequent abnormality in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression is regulated by O2 level. In normal O2 conditions, VHL binds HIF-1α and allows HIF-1α proteasomal degradation. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been found located in the oxygen-dependent degradation domain at codon 582 (C1772T, rs11549465, Pro582Ser). In hypoxia, VHL/HIF-1α interaction is abolished and HIF-1α activates target genes in the nucleus. This study analyzes the impact of genetic alterations and protein expression of VHL and the C1772T SNP of HIF-1α gene (HIF-1α) on prognosis in early-stage ccRCC (pT1a, pT1b, and pT2). Mutational analysis of the entire VHL sequence and the genotyping of HIF-1α C1772T SNP were performed together with VHL promoter methylation analysis and loss of heterozygosis (LOH) analysis at (3p25) locus. Data obtained were correlated with VHL and HIF-1α protein expression and with tumor-specific survival (TSS). VHL mutations, methylation status, and LOH were detected in 51, 11, and 12% of cases, respectively. Our results support the association between biallelic alterations and/or VHL silencing with a worse TSS. Moreover, we found a significant association between the HIF-1α C1772C genotype and a worse TSS. The same association was found when testing the presence of HIF-1α protein in the nucleus. Our results highlight the role of VHL/HIF-1α pathway in RCC and support the molecular heterogeneity of early-stage ccRCC. More important, we show the involvement of HIF-1α C1772T SNP in ccRCC progression.

  8. Identification of Somatic Mutations in the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL Gene in a Patient With Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chung Wang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the known causal molecular events in renal cell carcinoma is somatic mutation in the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL gene. Our study describes a 51-year-old Taiwanese man who had bilateral renal cell carcinoma. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy without postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and is still alive after renal transplantation without tumor recurrence after > 5 years. To clarify his predisposition for bilateral tumors, we performed molecular genetic analysis of the VHL gene in this study. Polymerase chain reaction–single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing were performed on DNA of blood samples and paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from this patient. DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes tested negative for germline mutations. However, there were two heterozygous alleles in the promoter and 3′ untranslated regions of this gene. Nonetheless, the DNA from his tumors showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH in these two loci. In addition to the LOH, we identified some different somatic mutations in his tumor tissues: C287T and G460A in the right-sided tumor, and G244A and G390A in the left-sided tumor. The possible roles of these genetic polymorphisms and point mutations in his renal tumorigenesis are discussed. This report provides new insights into renal cell carcinoma that result from VHL gene alterations in Taiwan.

  9. Von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Harbud, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    These clinical guidelines outline the criteria and recommendations for diagnostic and genetic work-up of families suspected of von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL), as well as recommendations for prophylactic surveillance for vHL patients. The guideline has been composed by the Danish Coordination Group...... for vHL which is comprised of Danish doctors and specialists interested in vHL. The recommendations are based on longstanding clinical experience, Danish original research, and extensive review of the international literature. vHL is a hereditary multi-tumour disease caused by germline mutations...... cell carcinoma), the adrenal glands (pheochromocytoma), the pancreas, as well as in other organs. As many different organs can be affected, several medical specialities often take part in both diagnosis and treatment of manifestations. vHL should be suspected in individuals with a family history...

  10. Playing Tag with HIF: The VHL Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri K. Leung

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumour suppressor gene product pVHL is the cause of inherited VHL disease and is associated with sporadic kidney cancer. pVHL is found in a multiprotein complex with elongins B/C, Cul2, and Rbx1 forming an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex called VEC. This modular enzyme targets the α subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF for ubiquitin-mediated destruction. Consequently, tumour cells lacking functional pVHL overproduce the products of HIF-target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which promotes angiogenesis. This likely accounts for the hypervascular nature of VHL-associated neoplasms. Although pVHL has been linked to the cell-cycle, differentiation, and the regulation of extracellular matrix assembly, microenvironment pH, and tissue invasiveness, this review will focus on the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms governing the E3 ubiquitin ligase function of VEC.

  11. Von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Harbud, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    These clinical guidelines outline the criteria and recommendations for diagnostic and genetic work-up of families suspected of von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL), as well as recommendations for prophylactic surveillance for vHL patients. The guideline has been composed by the Danish Coordination Group...... for vHL which is comprised of Danish doctors and specialists interested in vHL. The recommendations are based on longstanding clinical experience, Danish original research, and extensive review of the international literature. vHL is a hereditary multi-tumour disease caused by germline mutations...... of the disease, and/or in individuals with a vHL-associated manifestation; i.e. a hemangioblastoma in the retina or the central nervous system, familial or bilateral pheochromocytomas, familial, multiple, or early onset renal cell carcinomas, and in individuals with an endolymphatic sac tumour in the inner ear...

  12. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  13. Duplication of the VHL and IRAK2 genes in a patient with mental retardation/multiple congenital anomalies, epilepsy and ectomorphic habitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabchoub, E; Michils, G; Vermeesch, J R; De Cock, P; Lagae, L; Fryns, J P

    2010-01-01

    Partial 3p duplications are very rare. Often they are reported in translocations involving other chromosomes, whereas deletions encompassing the VHL gene in 3p25.3 predispose to Van-Hippel Lindau syndrome. We report here a paternally-inherited microduplication of 3p25.3 detected by array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) in a 17 year-old male patient presenting with mental retardation and multiple congenital anomalies (MR/MCA), epilepsy and ectomorphic habitus. He has no tumour and there is no history of familial cancer. We refined the duplication by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to a 251 kb region encompassing the VHL and IRAK2 genes. The duplication is likely to be causal. Interestingly, duplication of IRAK2 can cause epilepsy. Disruption of the GHRL gene can explain the ectomorphic habitus. To our knowledge, this is the smallest 3p duplication encompassing the VHL region. Its prognosis is unknown and a long-term follow-up is essential for an early diagnosis of malignancy.

  14. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

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    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  15. Novel homozygous VHL mutation in exon 2 is associated with congenital polycythemia but not with cancer.

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    Lanikova, Lucie; Lorenzo, Felipe; Yang, Chunzhang; Vankayalapati, Hari; Drachtman, Richard; Divoky, Vladimir; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-05-09

    Germline von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene mutations underlie dominantly inherited familial VHL tumor syndrome comprising a predisposition for renal cell carcinoma, pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, cerebral hemangioblastoma, and endolymphatic sac tumors. However, recessively inherited congenital polycythemia, exemplified by Chuvash polycythemia, has been associated with 2 separate 3' VHL gene mutations in exon 3. It was proposed that different positions of loss-of-function VHL mutations are associated with VHL syndrome cancer predisposition and only C-terminal domain-encoding VHL mutations would cause polycythemia. However, now we describe a new homozygous VHL exon 2 mutation of the VHL gene:(c.413C>T):P138L, which is associated in the affected homozygote with congenital polycythemia but not in her, or her-heterozygous relatives, with cancer or other VHL syndrome tumors. We show that VHL(P138L) has perturbed interaction with hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)1α. Further, VHL(P138L) protein has decreased stability in vitro. Similarly to what was reported in Chuvash polycythemia and some other instances of HIFs upregulation, VHL(P138L) erythroid progenitors are hypersensitive to erythropoietin. Interestingly, the level of RUNX1/AML1 and NF-E2 transcripts that are specifically upregulated in acquired polycythemia vera were also upregulated in VHL(P138L) granulocytes.

  16. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  17. Hereditary ovarian cancer: not only BRCA 1 and 2 genes.

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    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65-85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  18. Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary colorectal cancer.

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    Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mahdi; Roudbar, Zahra; Mahdavi, Morteza; Doosti, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased in Iran in the past three decades and is now considered as a serious problem for our society. This cancer has two types hereditary and non-hereditary, 80% of cases being the latter. Considering that the relationship between SNPs with diseases is a concern, many researchers believed that they offer valuable markers for identifying genes responsible for susceptibility to common diseases. In some cases, they are direct causes of human disease. One SNP can increase risk of cancer, but when considering the rate of overlap and frequency of DNA repair pathways, it might be expected that SNP alone cannot affect the final result of cancer, although several SNPs together can exert a significant influence. Therefore identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are: MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD7, STK11, XRCC3, DNMT1, MTHFR, Exo1, XRCC1 and VDR. Presence of SNPs in these genes decreases or increases risk of colorectal cancer. In this article we reviewed the Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary of colorectal cancer that recently were reported from candidate gene y, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. As with other cancers, colorectal cancer is associated with SNPs in gene loci. Generally, by exploring SNPs, it is feasible to predict the risk of developing colorectal cancer and thus establishing proper preventive measures. SNPs of genes associated with colorectal cancer can be used as a marker SNP panel as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  19. Differences in regulation of tight junctions and cell morphology between VHL mutations from disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isanova Bella

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease, germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene cause clear cell renal carcinomas, hemangioblastomas, and pheochromocytomas. The VHL gene product is part of an ubiquitin E3 ligase complex and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α is a key substrate, although additional VHL functions have been described. A genotype-phenotype relationship exists in VHL disease such that specific VHL mutations elicit certain subsets of these tumors. Here, we examine VHL genotype-phenotype correlations at the cellular level, focusing on the regulation of tight junctions and cell morphology. Methods Wild-type and various mutant VHL proteins representing VHL disease subtypes were stably expressed in 3 VHL-negative renal carcinoma cell lines. Using these cell lines, the roles of various VHL-associated cellular functions in regulation of cell morphology were investigated. Results As a whole, type 1 mutants varied greatly from type 2 mutants, demonstrating high levels of HIF-2α, cyclin D1 and α5 integrin, lower p27 levels, and a spindly, fibroblastic cellular appearance. Type 2 mutations demonstrated an epithelial morphology similar to wild-type VHL in the majority of the renal cell lines used. Knockdown of p27 in cells with wild-type VHL led to perturbations of both epithelial morphology and ZO-1 localization to tight junctions. ZO-1 localization correlated well with VHL disease subtypes, with greater mislocalization observed for genotypes associated with a higher risk of renal carcinoma. HIF-2α knockdown in 786-O partially restored ZO-1 localization, but did not restore an epithelial morphology. Conclusion VHL has both HIF-α dependent and HIF-α independent functions in regulating tight junctions and cell morphology that likely impact the clinical phenotypes seen in VHL disease.

  20. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

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    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-01-11

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for around five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, U.S.A. and the first kidney cancer associated gene, VHL was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms how an alteration of each kidney cancer associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer.

  2. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: new genes in confined pathways.

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    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; van Overeem Hansen, Thomas; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-09-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making.

  3. Genes and genetic testing in hereditary ataxias.

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    Sandford, Erin; Burmeister, Margit

    2014-07-22

    Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes.

  4. VHL genetic alteration in CCRCC does not determine de-regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyhan, Michelle J

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-alpha (HIF-alpha), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2\\/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. METHODS: The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL\\'s protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. RESULTS: VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10\\/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1alpha, HIF-2alpha and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15\\/17), 100% (17\\/17) and 88.2% (15\\/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2\\/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. CONCLUSION: As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), these data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis.

  5. Somatic mutation analysis of the SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, and RET genes in the clinical assessment of sporadic and hereditary pheochromocytoma.

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    Weber, Alexander; Hoffmann, Michael M; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Erlic, Zoran

    2012-08-01

    Systemic analysis of somatic mutations of other susceptibility genes in syndromic tumors as well as apparently sporadic tumors in well-characterized specimens is lacking. Its clinical relevance has not been studied. Our objective was to determine the frequency of second allele inactivation in syndromic tumors and determine the frequency and potential clinical impact of somatic mutations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the known susceptibility genes in syndromic and sporadic tumors. Nine tumor specimens from clinically characterized VHL mutation, five from SDHB mutation, four from SDHD mutation, two from RET mutation carriers, and eight from apparently sporadic cases were analyzed. Tumor DNA mutation screening of the SDHx, VHL, and RET genes and LOH analyses of the SDHx and VHL genes were performed. The Yates-corrected chi-squared test was used for comparison of the clinical data and the molecular-genetic results. Second allele inactivation in tumors was identified in 83% of VHL, 80% of SDHB, and 50% of SDHD specimen. High prevalence of VHL (6/6, p=0.024) and SDHB (7/7, p=0.018) somatic mutations has been identified in the sporadic group compared to all others. In the group of the VHL tumors the SDHB somatic events were significantly lower (2/6; p=0.045). In 18/19 (95%) of cases, we were able to demonstrate the presence of at least two concomitant affected susceptibility genes. We conclude that LOH is the most prevalent second allele-inactivating event. SDHB and VHL somatic mutation might play a role in the sporadic forms of tumor development. There is no clinical impact of mutation screening or LOH analysis of tumor specimens.

  6. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  7. Hereditary breast cancer: the era of new susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolou, Paraskevi; Fostira, Florentia

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%-10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  8. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHL444 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available library) VHL444 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15033-1 VHL444P (Link to Original site) VHL444F 595 VHL444Z...VHL444Z 674 VHL444P 1249 - - Show VHL444 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHL444 (Link to dictyBase)...tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHL4-B/VHL444Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHL444P (Link to Original site) Representative...Representative DNA sequence >VHL444 (VHL444Q) /CSM/VH/VHL4-B/VHL444Q.Seq.d/ CACTGTTGGCCTACTGGTATAGTTACA...significant alignments: (bits) Value VHL444 (VHL444Q) /CSM/VH/VHL4-B/VHL444Q.Seq.d/ 2420 0.0 VHN389 (VHN389Q)

  10. Role of gene defect in hereditary ALS clarified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J.

    1993-08-20

    Earlier research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) had identified the gene responsible for the hereditary form of the disease. The gene encoded superoxide dismutase (SOD), an enzyme widely studied. This stimulated hopes that the knowledge accumulated on SOD would lead to a better understanding of what brings about the neuronal generation in patients who have the mutant gene - and perhaps also in the larger number who have the nonhereditary form of the disease. Researchers have now found that mutations in the SOD gene disrupt the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, reducing its stability and activity. This could lead to damage of neurons by superoxide radicals. Many questions abouts SOD's role in ALS remain to be answered.

  11. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  12. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL inactivation in sporadic clear cell renal cancer: associations with germline VHL polymorphisms and etiologic risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee E Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal tumor heterogeneity studies have utilized the von Hippel-Lindau VHL gene to classify disease into molecularly defined subtypes to examine associations with etiologic risk factors and prognosis. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of VHL inactivation in clear cell renal tumors (ccRCC and to evaluate relationships between VHL inactivation subgroups with renal cancer risk factors and VHL germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. VHL genetic and epigenetic inactivation was examined among 507 sporadic RCC/470 ccRCC cases using endonuclease scanning and using bisulfite treatment and Sanger sequencing across 11 CpG sites within the VHL promoter. Case-only multivariate analyses were conducted to identify associations between alteration subtypes and risk factors. VHL inactivation, either through sequence alterations or promoter methylation in tumor DNA, was observed among 86.6% of ccRCC cases. Germline VHL SNPs and a haplotype were associated with promoter hypermethylation in tumor tissue (OR = 6.10; 95% CI: 2.28-16.35, p = 3.76E-4, p-global = 8E-5. Risk of having genetic VHL inactivation was inversely associated with smoking due to a higher proportion of wild-type ccRCC tumors [former: OR = 0.70 (0.20-1.31 and current: OR = 0.56 (0.32-0.99; P-trend = 0.04]. Alteration prevalence did not differ by histopathologic characteristics or occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. ccRCC cases with particular VHL germline polymorphisms were more likely to have VHL inactivation through promoter hypermethylation than through sequence alterations in tumor DNA, suggesting that the presence of these SNPs may represent an example of facilitated epigenetic variation (an inherited propensity towards epigenetic variation in renal tissue. A proportion of tumors from current smokers lacked VHL alterations and may represent a biologically distinct clinical entity from inactivated cases.

  13. Predisposing genes in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huusko, P. (Pia)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the two major genes predisposing individuals to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, were screened in Finnish and Turkish cancer families. Germline BRCA1 mutations were found in 7% (6/88) and BRCA2 mutations in 6% (5/88) of the Finnish families studied in Oulu. Two distinct BRCA1 (3745delT, 4216nt-2A→G) and three BRCA2 (999delTCAAA, 6503delTT, 9346nt-2A→G) mutations were identified, all of which are recurrently found in Finland....

  14. Characteristics of gene mutation in Chinese patients with hereditary hemochromatosis

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    LYU Tingxia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the characteristics of gene mutation in Chinese patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. MethodsA total of 9 patients with HH who visited Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2013 to December 2015 were enrolled. The genomic DNA was extracted, and PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing were performed for all the exons of four genotypes of HH, i.e., HFE (type Ⅰ, HJV (type ⅡA, HAMP (type ⅡB, TFR2 (type Ⅲ, and SLC40A1 (type Ⅳ to analyze gene mutations. A total of 50 healthy subjects were enrolled as control group to analyze the prevalence of identified gene mutations in a healthy population. ResultsOf all patients, 2 had H63D mutation of HFE gene in type Ⅰ HH, 1 had E3D mutation of HJV gene in type ⅡA HH, 2 had I238M mutation of TFR2 gene in type Ⅲ HH, and 1 had IVS 3+10 del GTT splice mutation of SLC40A1 gene in type Ⅳ HH. No patients had C282Y mutation of HFE gene in type Ⅰ HH which was commonly seen in European and American populations. Five patients had no missense mutation or splice mutation. In addition, it was found in a family that a HH patient had E3D mutation of HJV gene, H63D mutation of HFE gene, and I238M mutation of TFR2 gene, but the healthy brother and sister carrying two of these mutations did not had the phenotype of HH. ConclusionHH gene mutations vary significantly across patients of different races, and non-HFE-HH is dominant in the Chinese population. There may be HH genes which are different from known genes, and further investigation is needed.

  15. Hereditary genes and SNPs associated with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Kooshyar Mohammad; Nassiri, Mohammad Reza; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women affecting up to one third of tehm during their lifespans. Increased expression of some genes due to polymorphisms increases the risk of breast cancer incidence. Since mutations that are recognized to increase breast cancer risk within families are quite rare, identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are; BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, PPM1D, CDH1, MLH1, MRE11, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PMS1, PMS2, BRIP1, RAD50, RAD51C, STK11 and BARD1. Presence of SNPs in these genes increases the risk of breast cancer and associated diagnostic markers are among the most reliable for assessing prognosis of breast cancer. In this article we reviewed the hereditary genes of breast cancer and SNPs associated with increasing the risk of breast cancer that were recently were reported from candidate gene, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. SNPs of genes associated with breast cancer can be used as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  16. [Molecular genetics and gene analysis of hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by spasticity of the leg. HSP is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Mutations were detected in about 60% of autosomal dominant HSP patients. SPG4 is the most common form of autosomal dominant HSP worldwide. In autosomal recessive HSP patients, we detected mutations in about 40% using exome sequencing. Causes of autosomal recessive HSP are more heterogeneous than those of autosomal dominant HSP. We have to consider leukodystrophies/leukoencephalopathies, motor neuron diseases, spinocerebellar degenerations, or various metabolic diseases as differential diagnosis of complicated HSP. X-linked HSP or HSP with mitochondorial inheritance are rare. Further work on familial patients would lead to identify novel causative genes, which helps to understand pathophysiology of HSP and the nature of corticospinal tract and establish disease modifying therapy. Mutation detection rate for sporadic HSP is low at the moment, and molecular delineation of sporadic HSP is expected in the future.

  17. Management Strategies and Outcomes for VHL-related Craniospinal Hemangioblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christ Ordookhanian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are rare and benign tumors accounting for less than 2% of all central nervous system (CNS tumors. The vast majority of hemangioblastomas occur sporadically, whereas a small number of cases, especially in younger patients, are associated with Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL syndrome. It is thought that loss of tumor suppressor function of the VHL gene results in stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha with downstream activation of cellular proliferative and angiogenic genes that promote tumorigenesis. VHL-related hemangioblastomas predominantly occur in the cerebellum and spine. Lesions are often diagnosed on contrast-enhanced craniospinal MRIs, and the diagnosis of VHL occurs through assessment for germline VHL mutations. Surgical resection remains the primary treatment modality for symptomatic or worrisome lesions, with excellent local control rates and neurological outcomes. Stereotactic radiotherapy can be employed in patients who are deemed high risk for surgery, have multiple lesions, or have non-resectable lesions. Given the tendency for development of either new or multiple lesions, close radiographic surveillance is often recommended for asymptomatic lesions.

  18. Identification of novel hereditary cancer genes by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Bizin, Ilya V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful tool for medical genetic research. Several dozens of WES studies involving patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have already been reported. WES led to breakthrough in understanding of the genetic basis of some exceptionally rare syndromes; for example, identification of germ-line SMARCA4 mutations in patients with ovarian hypercalcemic small cell carcinomas indeed explains a noticeable share of familial aggregation of this disease. However, studies on common cancer types turned out to be more difficult. In particular, there is almost a dozen of reports describing WES analysis of breast cancer patients, but none of them yet succeeded to reveal a gene responsible for the significant share of missing heritability. Virtually all components of WES studies require substantial improvement, e.g. technical performance of WES, interpretation of WES results, mode of patient selection, etc. Most of contemporary investigations focus on genes with autosomal dominant mechanism of inheritance; however, recessive and oligogenic models of transmission of cancer susceptibility also need to be considered. It is expected that the list of medically relevant tumor-predisposing genes will be rapidly expanding in the next few years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ohno, Sumire; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Matsuura, Miyuki

    2013-09-01

    Women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome represent a unique group who are diagnosed at a younger age and result in an increased lifetime risk for developing breast, ovarian and other cancers. This review integrates recent progress and insights into the molecular basis that underlie the HBOC syndrome. A review of English language literature was performed by searching MEDLINE published between January 1994 and October 2012. Mutations and common sequence variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) genes are responsible for the majority of HBOC syndrome. Lifetime cancer risks in BRCA mutation carriers are 60-80% for breast cancer and 20-40% for ovarian cancer. Mutations in BRCA genes cannot account for all cases of HBOC, indicating that the remaining cases can be attributed to the involvement of constitutive epimutations or other cancer susceptibility genes, which include Fanconi anemia (FA) cluster (FANCD2, FANCA and FANCC), mismatch repair (MMR) cluster (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2 and MSH6), DNA repair cluster (ATM, ATR and CHK1/2), and tumor suppressor cluster (TP53, SKT11 and PTEN). Sporadic breast cancers with TP53 mutations or epigenetic silencing (hypermethylation), ER- and PgR-negative status, an earlier age of onset and high tumor grade resemble phenotypically BRCA1 mutated cancers termed 'BRCAness', those with no BRCA mutations but with a dysfunction of the DNA repair system. In conclusion, genetic or epigenetic loss-of-function mutations of genes that are known to be involved in the repair of DNA damage may lead to increased risk of developing a broad spectrum of breast and ovarian cancers.

  20. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

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    David A. Rowbotham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytomas (PCC are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  1. The VHL-dependent regulation of microRNAs in renal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawlings Lesley H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The commonest histological type of renal cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cc RCC, is associated with genetic and epigenetic changes in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumour suppressor. VHL inactivation leads to induction of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs and a hypoxic pattern of gene expression. Differential levels of specific microRNAs (miRNAs are observed in several tumours when compared to normal tissue. Given the central role of VHL in renal cancer formation, we examined the VHL-dependent regulation of miRNAs in renal cancer. Methods VHL-dependent miRNA expression in cc RCC was determined by microarray analysis of renal cell line RCC4 with mutated VHL (RCC4-VHL and reintroduced wild-type VHL (RCC4 + VHL. Five miRNAs highly upregulated in RCC4 + VHL and five miRNAs highly downregulated in RCC4 + VHL were studied further, in addition to miR-210, which is regulated by the HIF-VHL system. miRNA expression was also measured in 31 cc RCC tumours compared to adjacent normal tissue. Results A significant increase in miR-210, miR-155 and miR-21 expression was observed in the tumour tissue. miR-210 levels also showed a correlation with a HIF-regulated mRNA, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, and with VHL mutation or promoter methylation. An inverse correlation was observed between miR-210 expression and patient survival, and a putative target of miR-210, iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (ISCU1/2, shows reciprocal levels of mRNA expression in the tumours. Conclusions We have identified VHL-regulated miRNAs and found that for some the regulation is HIF-dependent and for others it is HIF-independent. This pattern of regulation was also seen in renal cancer tissue for several of these miRNAs (miR-210, miR-155, let-7i and members of the miR-17-92 cluster when compared with normal tissue. miR-210 showed marked increases in expression in renal cancer and levels correlated with patient survival. The inverse correlation between miR-210

  2. Gene Therapy for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuer, William J; Schiffman, Joyce C; Davis, Janet L; Porciatti, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Phillip; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Yuan, Huijun; Lalwani, Anil; Lam, Byron L; Guy, John

    2016-03-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a disorder characterized by severe and rapidly progressive visual loss when caused by a mutation in the mitochondrial gene encoding NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4). We have initiated a gene therapy trial to determine the safety and tolerability of escalated doses of an adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) expressing a normal ND4 complementary DNA in patients with a G to A mutation at nucleotide 11778 of the mitochondrial genome. In this prospective open-label trial (NCT02161380), the study drug (self-complementary AAV [scAAV]2(Y444,500,730F)-P1ND4v2) was intravitreally injected unilaterally into the eyes of 5 blind participants with G11778A LHON. Four participants with visual loss for more than 12 months were treated. The fifth participant had visual loss for less than 12 months. The first 3 participants were treated at the low dose of vector (5 × 10(9) vg), and the fourth participant was treated at the medium dose (2.46 × 10(10) vg). The fifth participant with visual loss for less than 12 months received the low dose. Treated participants were followed for 90 to 180 days and underwent ocular and systemic safety assessments along with visual structure and function examinations. Five legally blind patients with G11778A LHON. Loss of visual acuity. Visual acuity as measured by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) eye chart remained unchanged from baseline to 3 months in the first 3 participants. For 2 participants with 90-day follow-up, acuity increased from hand movements to 7 letters in 1 and by 15 letters in 1, representing an improvement equivalent to 3 lines. No one lost vision, and no serious adverse events were observed. Minor adverse events included a transient increase of intraocular pressure (IOP), exposure keratitis, subconjunctival hemorrhage, a sore throat, and a transient increase in neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against AAV2 in 1 participant. All blood samples were negative

  3. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to

  4. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  5. Application of gene detection technique in the antenatal diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y; Gu, M-S; Suo, F; Wang, C-X; Liu, X-H; Liu, F-M

    2017-04-01

    Gene chip and gene sequencing techniques were used to detect the main pathogenic genes in pregnant women with hereditary hearing loss. From May 2015 to May 2016, 1080 pregnant in Xuzhou Maternal and Child Health Hospital were enrolled in this study. Women age range was 18 to 40 years. 4 genes and 9 mutation sites, including 4 sites (35delG, 176, 235delC and 299) in GJB2 gene, 2 sites (2168A>G and IVS-7-2A>G) in SLC26A4 (PDS) gene, 2 sites (1494C>T and 1555A>G) in 12s rRNA gene and 1 site (538C>T) in GJB3 gene, were detected using the GeeDom® 9-item hereditary hearing loss gene detection kit. Deafness genes in the husband of the pregnant woman with GJB2 and SLC26A4 positive gene mutations were verified using Sanger sequencing. Fetuses with the same deafness genes as their parents were diagnosed before delivery using amniocentesis. 48 patients (4.45 %) were detected positive for hereditary hearing loss. Most of them (28 cases) were identified with GJB2 gene mutation (1 case with 176 site mutation, 22 cases with 235delC site mutation and 5 cases with 299 site mutation). We had 15 cases of the SLC26A4 gene mutation (3 cases of 2168A>G site mutation and 12 cases of IVS-7-2A>G site mutation), 2 cases of 538C>T site mutation of GJB3 gene and 3 cases of 1555A>G site mutation of 12s rRNA gene. The gene detection technique has a great health-economic significance in screening the main pathogenic genes involved in the hereditary hearing loss.

  6. The spectrum of genetic variants in hereditary pancreatic cancer includes Fanconi anemia genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Thomas P; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nehoray, Bita; Niell-Swiller, Mariana; Solomon, Ilana; Rybak, Christina; Blazer, Kathleen; Adamson, Aaron; Yang, Kai; Sand, Sharon; Guerrero-Llamas, Nancy; Castillo, Danielle; Herzog, Josef; Wu, Xiwei; Tao, Shu; Raja, Shivali; Chung, Vincent; Singh, Gagandeep; Nadesan, Sue; Brown, Sandra; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Petersen, Gloria M; Weitzel, Jeffrey

    2017-07-08

    Approximately 5-10% of all pancreatic cancer patients carry a predisposing mutation in a known susceptibility gene. Since >90% of patients present with late stage disease, it is crucial to identify high risk individuals who may be amenable to early detection or other prevention. To explore the spectrum of hereditary pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we evaluated germline DNA from pancreatic cancer participants (n = 53) from a large hereditary cancer registry. For those without a known predisposition mutation gene (n = 49), germline next generation sequencing was completed using targeted capture for 706 candidate genes. We identified 16 of 53 participants (30%) with a pathogenic (P) or likely pathogenic (LP) variant that may be related to their hereditary pancreatic cancer predisposition; seven had mutations in genes associated with well-known cancer syndromes (13%) [ATM (2), BRCA2 (3), MSH2 (1), MSH6 (1)]. Many had mutations in Fanconi anemia complex genes [BRCA2 (3 participants), FANCF, FANCM]. Eight participants had rare protein truncating variants of uncertain significance with no other P or LP variants. Earlier age of pancreatic cancer diagnosis (57.5 vs 64.8 years) was indicative of possessing a P or LP variant, as was cancer family history (p values cancer predisposing genetic susceptibility in those at risk for hereditary pancreatic cancer may have direct applicability to clinical practice in cases with mutations in actionable genes. Future pancreatic cancer predisposition studies should include evaluation of the Fanconi anemia genes.

  7. Genetics of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, Carsten C; Hensen, Erik F; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Maier, Wolfgang; van Nederveen, Francien H; Suárez, Carlos; Kunst, Henricus P; Rodrigo, Juan P; Takes, Robert P; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to give an overview on hereditary syndromes associated with head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGs). Our methods were the review and discussion of the pertinent literature. About one third of all patients with HNPGs are carriers of germline mutations. Hereditary HNPGs have been described in association with mutations of 10 different genes. Mutations of the genes succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD), succinate dehydrogenase complex assembly factor 2 gene (SDHAF2), succinate dehydrogenase subunit C (SDHC), and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) are the cause of paraganglioma syndromes (PGLs) 1, 2, 3, and 4. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA), von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), and transmembrane protein 127 (TMEM127) gene mutations also harbor the risk for HNPG development. HNPGs in patients with rearranged during transfection (RET), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and MYC-associated factor X (MAX) gene mutations have been described very infrequently. All patients with HNPGs should be offered a molecular genetic screening. This screening may usually be restricted to mutations of the genes SDHD, SDHB, and SDHC. Certain clinical parameters can help to set up the order in which those genes should be tested. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Routine use of gene panel testing in hereditary breast cancer should be performed with caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marcke, Cedric; De Leener, Anne; Berlière, Martine; Vikkula, Miikka; Duhoux, Francois P

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer occurring in women. Ten percent of these cancers are considered hereditary. Among them, 30% are attributed to germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other genes of lower penetrance are also known, explaining together up to 40% of the hereditary risk of breast cancer. New techniques, such as next-generation sequencing, allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple genes in a cost-effective way. As a logical consequence, gene panel testing is entering clinical practice with the promise of personalized care. We however advocate that gene panel testing is not ready for non-specialist clinical use, as it generates many variants of unknown significance and includes more genes than are presently considered clinically useful. We hereby review the data for each gene that can change the risk management of patients carrying a pathogenic variant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of mutations in the SOS-1 gene in two Polish families with hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, K; Bereta, G; Nowakowska, Z; Łazarz-Bartyzel, K; Potempa, J; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, M; Górska, R; Plakwicz, P

    2017-10-01

    To establish whether two families from Malopolska and Mazovia provinces in Poland are affected by hereditary gingival fibromatosis type 1, caused by a single-cytosine insertion in exon 21 of the Son-of-Sevenless-1 gene. Six subjects with hereditary gingival fibromatosis and five healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Gingival biopsies were collected during gingivectomy or tooth extraction and used for histopathological evaluation. Total RNA and genomic DNA were purified from cultured gingival fibroblasts followed by cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing and analysis. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis was confirmed by periodontal examination, X-ray, and laboratory tests. Histopathological evaluation showed hyperplastic epithelium, numerous collagen bundles, and abundant-to-moderate fibroblasts in subepithelial and connective tissue. Sequencing of exons 19-22 of the Son-of-Sevenless-1 gene did not reveal a single-cytosine insertion nor other mutations. Patients from two Polish families under study had not been affected by hereditary gingival fibromatosis type 1, caused by a single-cytosine insertion in exon 21 of the Son-of-Sevenless-1 gene. Further studies of the remaining regions of this gene as well as of other genes are needed to identify disease-related mutations in these patients. This will help to unravel the pathogenic mechanism of gingival overgrowth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutation analysis of genes within the dynactin complex in a cohort of hereditary peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, S; Ahmad-Annuar, A; Drew, A P; Shahrizaila, N; Nicholson, G A; Kennerson, M L

    2016-08-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein-dynactin genes are attractive candidates for neurodegenerative disorders given their functional role in retrograde transport along neurons. The cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) gene has been implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders, and dynactin 1 (DCTN1) genes have been implicated in a wide spectrum of disorders including motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, spinobulbar muscular atrophy and hereditary spastic paraplegia. However, the involvement of other dynactin genes with inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN) namely, hereditary sensory neuropathy, hereditary motor neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is under reported. We screened eight genes; DCTN1-6 and ACTR1A and ACTR1B in 136 IPN patients using whole-exome sequencing and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis. Eight non-synonymous variants (including one novel variant) and three synonymous variants were identified. Four variants have been reported previously in other studies, however segregation analysis within family members excluded them from causing IPN in these families. No variants of disease significance were identified in this study suggesting the dynactin genes are unlikely to be a common cause of IPNs. However, with the ease of querying gene variants from exome data, these genes remain worthwhile candidates to assess unsolved IPN families for variants that may affect the function of the proteins. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommering, Charlotte J; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jonker, Marianne A; Tops, Carli M J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Redeker, Egbert J W; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands. Uptake for retinoblastoma (Rb) was compared with uptake for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC). A questionnaire was completed by all nine DNA-diagnostic laboratories assessing the number of independent mutation-positive families identified from the start of diagnostic testing until May 2013, and the number of PNDs performed for these syndromes within these families. Of 187 families with a known Rb-gene mutation, 22 had performed PND (11.8%), this was significantly higher than uptake for FAP (1.6%) and HBOC (cancer syndromes PND started 10-15 years after the introduction and uptake for PND showed an increase after 2009. We conclude that uptake of PND for Rb was significantly higher than for FAP and HBOC, but not different from VHL and LFS. Early onset, high penetrance, lack of preventive surgery and perceived burden of disease may explain these differences.

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α stabilizes the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease suppressor, Myb-related protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Fumihiko; Joo-Okumura, Akiko; Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kamura, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligase von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (pVHL) negatively regulates protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α). Loss of pVHL causes HIF-α accumulation, which contributes to the pathogenesis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. In contrast, v-Myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog-like 2 (MYBL2; B-Myb), a transcription factor, prevents VHL pathogenesis by regulating gene expression of HIF-independent pathways. Both HIF-α and B-Myb are targets of pVHL-mediated polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that knockdown of HIF-2α induces downregulation of B-Myb in 786-O cells, which are deficient in pVHL, and this downregulation is prevented by proteasome inhibition. In the presence of pVHL and under hypoxia-like conditions, B-Myb and HIF-2α are both upregulated, and the upregulation of B-Myb requires expression of HIF-2α. We also show that HIF-2α and B-Myb interact in the nucleus, and this interaction is mediated by the central region of HIF-2α and the C-terminal region of B-Myb. These data indicate that oncogenic HIF-2α stabilizes B-Myb to suppress VHL pathogenesis.

  13. Dicty_cDB: VHL663 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHL663 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15767-1 VHL663P (Link... to Original site) VHL663F 574 VHL663Z 702 VHL663P 1256 - - Show VHL663 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHL663 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15767-1 Original site URL http://dict...WPDGFKYFFVDNQAGDSESAKSGKNLPIQRDIELNWNGEAYEYSNSNYFPINGQG FNDVSYPV--- ---SYATGKCEPDSSLCNDNNICTIDICVHEGILDGLPQG...ik rqelvgqmvlsifl*itklviqnlpnlvkifqfkeiss*igmekhmniviqitsqltdkv smm*aiq--- ---SYATGKCEPDSSLCNDNNICTIDICVHEGI

  14. Dicty_cDB: VHL434 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHL434 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16336-1 VHL434P (Link... to Original site) VHL434F 546 VHL434Z 778 VHL434P 1304 - - Show VHL434 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHL434 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U16336-1 Original site URL http://dict...EVMSCNKFSSKRIGYLAASQSFNEGTDVIVLATHQIRKDFLS SNQSEAYLALNCLSNICTTDLARELANDILTLLSTQKTHILKRAITVLYKIFLRYPES-- - --...GFDISWASFKIVEVMSCNKFSSKRIGYLAASQSFNEGTDVIVLATHQIRKDFLS SNQSEAYLALNCLSNICTTDLARELANDILTLLSTQKTHILKRAITVLYKIFL

  15. Von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Harbud, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    in the VHL gene. vHL is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Predisposed individuals are advised to undergo prophylactic examinations, as they are at lifelong risk of developing multiple cysts and tumours, especially in the cerebellum, the spinal cord, the retina (hemangioblastomas), the kidneys (renal...... are recommended to start in infancy with annual paediatric examinations and ophthalmoscopy until the age of five years. From five to 14 years, annual plasma-metanephrine and plasma-normetanephrine tests, as well as annual hearing examinations are added. Also, an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) examination....../MRI of the abdomen, e) annual plasma-metanephrine, plasma-normetanephrine, and plasma-chromogranin A tests, and f) annual hearing examination at a department of audiology. It is advised that one doctor takes on the responsibility of coordination of and referral to the many examinations, and the communication...

  16. Development and validation of a 36-gene sequencing assay for hereditary cancer risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina S. Vysotskaia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have brought many important advances in our understanding of the hereditary susceptibility to cancer. Numerous studies have provided convincing evidence that identification of germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes can lead to reductions in morbidity and mortality through targeted risk management options. Additionally, advances in gene sequencing technology now permit the development of multigene hereditary cancer testing panels. Here, we describe the 2016 revision of the Counsyl Inherited Cancer Screen for detecting single-nucleotide variants (SNVs, short insertions and deletions (indels, and copy number variants (CNVs in 36 genes associated with an elevated risk for breast, ovarian, colorectal, gastric, endometrial, pancreatic, thyroid, prostate, melanoma, and neuroendocrine cancers. To determine test accuracy and reproducibility, we performed a rigorous analytical validation across 341 samples, including 118 cell lines and 223 patient samples. The screen achieved 100% test sensitivity across different mutation types, with high specificity and 100% concordance with conventional Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. We also demonstrated the screen’s high intra-run and inter-run reproducibility and robust performance on blood and saliva specimens. Furthermore, we showed that pathogenic Alu element insertions can be accurately detected by our test. Overall, the validation in our clinical laboratory demonstrated the analytical performance required for collecting and reporting genetic information related to risk of developing hereditary cancers.

  17. [The CRISPR system can correct or modify the expression of genes responsible for hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jacques P

    2015-11-01

    A new technology, called CRISPR, derived from the immune system of bacteria, uses a Cas9 nuclease and a guided RNA complementary to a 20 nucleotides sequence of a gene to induce double strand DNA breaks. This permits to modify specifically the targeted gene in plant, animal and human cells. Variants of the technique also permit to reduce or increase the expression of a selected gene. This technology may thus be used not only to understand the role of a gene but also to develop therapies for hereditary and acquired diseases. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  18. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew Anthony; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Korsten, Alex; Leonhardt, Miriam; Dimitriadis, Konstantin; De Coo, Ireneaus F; Klopstock, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick Francis

    2009-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to confirm this to be the case. LHON has no treatment, so identifying environmental triggers is the key to disease prevention, whilst potentially revealing new mechanisms amenable to therapeutic manipulation. To address this issue, we conducted a large, multicentre epidemiological study of 196 affected and 206 unaffected carriers from 125 LHON pedigrees known to harbour one of the three primary pathogenic mtDNA mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C. A comprehensive history of exposure to smoking, alcohol and other putative environmental insults was collected using a structured questionnaire. We identified a strong and consistent association between visual loss and smoking, independent of gender and alcohol intake, leading to a clinical penetrance of 93% in men who smoked. There was a trend towards increased visual failure with alcohol, but only with a heavy intake. Based on these findings, asymptomatic carriers of a LHON mtDNA mutation should be strongly advised not to smoke and to moderate their alcohol intake.

  19. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members...... of the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours, requesting information regarding patients with HNPCC-associated SBC and germ line mismatch repair gene mutations. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 85 HNPCC patients with identified mismatch repair gene mutations and SBCs. SBC was the first...... HNPCC-associated malignancy in 14 of 41 (34.1%) patients for whom a personal history of HNPCC-associated cancers was available. The study population harbored 69 different germ line mismatch repair gene mutations, including 31 mutations in MLH1, 34 in MSH2, 3 in MSH6, and 1 in PMS2. We compared...

  20. Beyond BRCA: new hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economopoulou, P; Dimitriadis, G; Psyrri, A

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5-10% of breast cancer cases might be inheritable, up to 30% of which are due to BRCA1/2 mutations. During the past few years and thanks to technology evolution, we have been witnesses of an intensive search of additional genes with similar characteristics, under the premise that successful gene discovery will provide substantial opportunities for primary and secondary prevention of breast cancer. Consequently, new genes have emerged as breast cancer susceptibility genes, including rare germline mutations in high penetrant genes, such as TP53 and PTEN, and more frequent mutations in moderate penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM and PALB2. This review will summarize current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated Computational Analysis of Genes Associated with Human Hereditary Insensitivity to Pain. A Drug Repurposing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Lötsch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Genes causally involved in human insensitivity to pain provide a unique molecular source of studying the pathophysiology of pain and the development of novel analgesic drugs. The increasing availability of “big data” enables novel research approaches to chronic pain while also requiring novel techniques for data mining and knowledge discovery. We used machine learning to combine the knowledge about n = 20 genes causally involved in human hereditary insensitivity to pain with the knowledge about the functions of thousands of genes. An integrated computational analysis proposed that among the functions of this set of genes, the processes related to nervous system development and to ceramide and sphingosine signaling pathways are particularly important. This is in line with earlier suggestions to use these pathways as therapeutic target in pain. Following identification of the biological processes characterizing hereditary insensitivity to pain, the biological processes were used for a similarity analysis with the functions of n = 4,834 database-queried drugs. Using emergent self-organizing maps, a cluster of n = 22 drugs was identified sharing important functional features with hereditary insensitivity to pain. Several members of this cluster had been implicated in pain in preclinical experiments. Thus, the present concept of machine-learned knowledge discovery for pain research provides biologically plausible results and seems to be suitable for drug discovery by identifying a narrow choice of repurposing candidates, demonstrating that contemporary machine-learned methods offer innovative approaches to knowledge discovery from available evidence.

  2. Our genes, our selves: hereditary breast cancer and biological citizenship in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Pål; Hovig, Eivind

    2017-09-22

    The concept 'hereditary breast cancer' is commonly used to delineate a group of people genetically at risk for breast cancer-all of whom also having risk for other cancers. People carrying pathogenic variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are often referred to as those having predisposition for 'hereditary breast cancer'. The two genes, however, are when altered, associated with different risks for and dying from breast cancer. The main risk for dying for carriers of both genes is from ovarian cancer. These biological facts are of philosophical interest, because they are the facts underlying the public debate on BRCA1/2 genetic testing as a model for the discussion of how to implement genetic knowledge and technologies in personalized medicine. A contribution to this public debate describing inherited breast cancer as 'biological citizenship' recently printed in Med Health Care and Philos illustrated how fragmented and detached from the biological and socio-political facts this debate sometimes is. We here briefly summarize some of the biological facts and how they are implemented in today's healthcare based on agreed philosophical, ethical and moral principles. The suggestion of a 'biological citizenship' defined by hereditary breast cancer is incorrect and ill-advised. 'Identity politics' focusing hereditary breast cancer patients as a group based on a bundle of ill-defined negative arguments is well known, but is supported neither by scientific nor philosophical arguments. To those born with the genetic variants described, the philosophical rule of not doing harm is violated by unbalanced negative arguments.

  3. A multi-gene panel study in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock-Rada, A M; Ossa, C A; Garcia, H I; Gomez, L R

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for approximately 50% of inherited breast and ovarian cancers. Three founder mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in Colombia, but the pattern of mutations in other cancer susceptibility genes is unknown. This study describes the frequency and type of germline mutations in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer genes in a referral cancer center in Colombia. Eighty-five women referred to the oncogenetics unit of the Instituto de Cancerologia Las Americas in Medellin (Colombia), meeting testing criteria for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (NCCN 2015), who had germline testing with a commercial 25-gene hereditary cancer panel, were included in the analysis. Nineteen patients (22.4%) carried a deleterious germline mutation in a cancer susceptibility gene: BRCA1 (7), BRCA2 (8), PALB2 (1), ATM (1), MSH2 (1) and PMS2 (1). The frequency of mutations in BRCA1/2 was 17.6%. One BRCA2 mutation (c.9246dupG) was recurrent in five non-related individuals and is not previously reported in the country. Seventeen mutation-carriers had a diagnosis of breast cancer (median age of diagnosis of 36 years) and two of ovarian cancer. All BRCA1 mutation-carriers with breast cancer had triple negative tumors (median age of diagnosis of 31 years). Variants of unknown significance were reported in 35% of test results. This is the first report of a multi-gene study for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in a Latin American country. We found a high frequency and a wide spectrum of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes in Colombian patients, some of which were not previously reported in the country. We observed a very low frequency of known Colombian founder BRCA1/2 mutations (1.2%) and we found mutations in other genes such as PALB2, ATM, MSH2 and PMS2. Our results highlight the importance of performing multi-gene panel testing, including comprehensive BRCA1/2 analysis (full gene sequencing and large rearrangement

  4. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel......-based approaches detecting both SNVs, indels and CNVs in the same assay. We applied a panel including 19 CRC susceptibility genes to 91 individuals of six phenotypic subgroups. Targeted NGS-based sequencing of the whole gene regions including introns of the 19 genes was used. The individuals had a family history...... of CRC or had a phenotype consistent with a known CRC syndrome. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the diagnostic difficulties linked to genotype-phenotype diversity and the benefits of using a gene panel. Pathogenicity classification was carried out on 46 detected variants. In total we detected...

  5. Gene Expression Profiling in Hereditary, BRCA1-linked Breast Cancer: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudaladava Volha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Global analysis of gene expression by DNA microarrays is nowadays a widely used tool, especially relevant for cancer research. It helps the understanding of complex biology of cancer tissue, allows identification of novel molecular markers, reveals previously unknown molecular subtypes of cancer that differ by clinical features like drug susceptibility or general prognosis. Our aim was to compare gene expression profiles in breast cancer that develop against a background of inherited predisposing mutations versus sporadic breast cancer. In this preliminary study we analysed seven hereditary, BRCA1 mutation-linked breast cancer tissues and seven sporadic cases that were carefully matched by histopathology and ER status. Additionally, we analysed 6 samples of normal breast tissue. We found that while the difference in gene expression profiles between tumour tissue and normal breast can be easily recognized by unsupervised algorithms, the difference between those two types of tumours is more discrete. However, by supervised methods of data analysis, we were able to select a set of genes that may differentiate between hereditary and sporadic tumours. The most significant difference concerns genes that code for proteins engaged in regulation of transcription, cellular metabolism, signalling, proliferation and cell death. Microarray results for chosen genes (TOB1, SEPHS2 were validated by real-time RT-PCR.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling in Hereditary, BRCA1-linked Breast Cancer: Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Global analysis of gene expression by DNA microarrays is nowadays a widely used tool, especially relevant for cancer research. It helps the understanding of complex biology of cancer tissue, allows identification of novel molecular markers, reveals previously unknown molecular subtypes of cancer that differ by clinical features like drug susceptibility or general prognosis. Our aim was to compare gene expression profiles in breast cancer that develop against a background of inherited predisposing mutations versus sporadic breast cancer. In this preliminary study we analysed seven hereditary, BRCA1 mutation-linked breast cancer tissues and seven sporadic cases that were carefully matched by histopathology and ER status. Additionally, we analysed 6 samples of normal breast tissue. We found that while the difference in gene expression profiles between tumour tissue and normal breast can be easily recognized by unsupervised algorithms, the difference between those two types of tumours is more discrete. However, by supervised methods of data analysis, we were able to select a set of genes that may differentiate between hereditary and sporadic tumours. The most significant difference concerns genes that code for proteins engaged in regulation of transcription, cellular metabolism, signalling, proliferation and cell death. Microarray results for chosen genes (TOB1, SEPHS2) were validated by real-time RT-PCR. PMID:20223001

  7. [Genes beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 for hereditary breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Katharina; Geigl, Jochen B; Pristauz, Gunda

    2010-11-01

    germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are identified in less than 50% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Besides BRCA1/2 further high-risk breast cancer genes are known; however they account only for a small fraction of inherited breast cancer cases. Most of them are involved in rare cancer predisposition syndromes. Moderate and low-risk breast cancer genes confer modest cancer risk up to 10% and may be more relevant due to polygenic inheritance. The majority of hereditary breast cancer cases are still caused by unknown genes. genetic testing of other known genes is not yet routinely performed in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations, but can be recommended in special patients. In case of a calculated high-risk situation, participation in an early-detection screening program should be recommended. genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is heterogeneous and conferred by a large number of identified and yet undetected genes.

  8. Germline multi-gene hereditary cancer panel testing in an unselected endometrial cancer cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Kari L; Bruegl, Amanda S; Allen, Brian A; Elkin, Eric P; Singh, Nanda; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Daniels, Molly S; Broaddus, Russell R

    2016-11-01

    Hereditary endometrial carcinoma is associated with germline mutations in Lynch syndrome genes. The role of other cancer predisposition genes is unclear. We aimed to determine the prevalence of cancer predisposition gene mutations in an unselected endometrial carcinoma patient cohort. Mutations in 25 genes were identified using a next-generation sequencing-based panel applied in 381 endometrial carcinoma patients who had undergone tumor testing to screen for Lynch syndrome. Thirty-five patients (9.2%) had a deleterious mutation: 22 (5.8%) in Lynch syndrome genes (three MLH1, five MSH2, two EPCAM-MSH2, six MSH6, and six PMS2) and 13 (3.4%) in 10 non-Lynch syndrome genes (four CHEK2, one each in APC, ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, NBN, PTEN, and RAD51C). Of 21 patients with deleterious mutations in Lynch syndrome genes with tumor testing, 2 (9.5%) had tumor testing results suggestive of sporadic cancer. Of 12 patients with deleterious mutations in MSH6 and PMS2, 10 were diagnosed at age >50 and 8 did not have a family history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. Patients with deleterious mutations in non-Lynch syndrome genes were more likely to have serous tumor histology (23.1 vs 6.4%, P=0.02). The three patients with non-Lynch syndrome deleterious mutations and serous histology had mutations in BRCA2, BRIP1, and RAD51C. Current clinical criteria fail to identify a portion of actionable mutations in Lynch syndrome and other hereditary cancer syndromes. Performance characteristics of tumor testing are sufficiently robust to implement universal tumor testing to identify patients with Lynch syndrome. Germline multi-gene panel testing is feasible and informative, leading to the identification of additional actionable mutations.

  9. Identification of the Lipodepsipeptide MDN-0066, a Novel Inhibitor of VHL/HIF Pathway Produced by a New Pseudomonas Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastien Cautain

    Full Text Available Throughout recent history, metabolites of microbial origin have had an extraordinary impact on the welfare of humanity. In fact, natural products have largely been--and still are--considered an exceedingly valuable platform for the discovery of new drugs against diverse pathologies. Such value is partly due to their higher complexity and chemical diversity as compared to those of synthetic and combinatorial compounds. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau (vhl gene are responsible for VHL disease, congenital polycythemia, and are found in many sporadic tumor types. The primary cause of morbidity and mortality for these patients arises from progression of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC or end-stage renal disease. Inactivation of the Von Hippel-Lindau (vhl tumor suppressor gene arises in the majority of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC as well as in other types of cancer and is associated with a high degree of vascularization and poor prognosis. Loss of pVHL function thus represents a pathognomonic molecular defect for therapeutic exploitation. In this study, renal carcinoma cell lines with naturally occurring vhl mutations (RCC4 VA and their genetically matched wild-type vhl (RCC4 VHL counterparts were seeded onto 96-well plates and treated with a collection of 1,040 organic extracts obtained from 130 bacterial strains belonging to at least 25 genera of the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. This strategy allowed us to identify several extracts obtained from bacterial strain F-278,770T, the type strain of the recently proposed new species Pseudomonas granadensis, showing biological activities not associated with previously known bioactive metabolites. The fractionation and structural elucidation of one of these extracts led to the discovery of a new lipodepsipeptide (MDN-0066 with specific toxicity in pVHL deficient cells that is not detectable in cells with pVHL expression rescue. This specific toxicity is associated with

  10. Identification of the Lipodepsipeptide MDN-0066, a Novel Inhibitor of VHL/HIF Pathway Produced by a New Pseudomonas Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cautain, Bastien; de Pedro, Nuria; Schulz, Christian; Pascual, Javier; Sousa, Thiciana da S; Martin, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Asensio, Francisco; González, Ignacio; Bills, Gerald F; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Throughout recent history, metabolites of microbial origin have had an extraordinary impact on the welfare of humanity. In fact, natural products have largely been--and still are--considered an exceedingly valuable platform for the discovery of new drugs against diverse pathologies. Such value is partly due to their higher complexity and chemical diversity as compared to those of synthetic and combinatorial compounds. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau (vhl) gene are responsible for VHL disease, congenital polycythemia, and are found in many sporadic tumor types. The primary cause of morbidity and mortality for these patients arises from progression of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) or end-stage renal disease. Inactivation of the Von Hippel-Lindau (vhl) tumor suppressor gene arises in the majority of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) as well as in other types of cancer and is associated with a high degree of vascularization and poor prognosis. Loss of pVHL function thus represents a pathognomonic molecular defect for therapeutic exploitation. In this study, renal carcinoma cell lines with naturally occurring vhl mutations (RCC4 VA) and their genetically matched wild-type vhl (RCC4 VHL) counterparts were seeded onto 96-well plates and treated with a collection of 1,040 organic extracts obtained from 130 bacterial strains belonging to at least 25 genera of the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. This strategy allowed us to identify several extracts obtained from bacterial strain F-278,770T, the type strain of the recently proposed new species Pseudomonas granadensis, showing biological activities not associated with previously known bioactive metabolites. The fractionation and structural elucidation of one of these extracts led to the discovery of a new lipodepsipeptide (MDN-0066) with specific toxicity in pVHL deficient cells that is not detectable in cells with pVHL expression rescue. This specific toxicity is associated with apoptosis

  11. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: new genes, new treatments, new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Schmutzler, Rita K

    2011-05-01

    Every year, 60,000 women in Germany are found to have breast cancer, and 9000 to have ovarian cancer. Familial clustering of carcinoma is seen in about 20% of cases. We selectively review relevant articles published up to December 2010 that were retrieved by a search in PubMed, and we also discuss findings from the experience of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. High risk is conferred by the highly penetrant BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as well as by other genes such as RAD51C. Genes for breast cancer that were originally designated as moderately penetrant display higher penetrance than previously thought in families with a hereditary predisposition. The role these genes play in DNA repair is thought to explain why tumors associated with them are sensitive to platin derivatives and PARP inhibitors. In carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and adnexectomy significantly lowers the incidence of breast and ovarian cancer. Moreover, prophylactic adnexectomy also lowers the breast-and-ovarian-cancer-specific mortality, as well as the overall mortality. If a woman bearing a mutation develops cancer in one breast, her risk of developing cancer in the other breast depends on the particular gene that is mutated and on her age at the onset of disease. About half of all monogenically determined carcinomas of the breast and ovary are due to a mutation in one or the other of the highly penetrant BRCA genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2). Women carrying a mutated gene have an 80% to 90% chance of developing breast cancer and a 20% to 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer. Other predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer have been identified. Clinicians should develop and implement evidence-based treatments on the basis of these new findings.

  12. Identification of SLC26A4 gene mutations in Iranian families with hereditary hearing impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Kahrizi, Kimia; Mohseni, Marzieh; Nishimura, Carla; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Fischer, Stephanie M.; Dehghani, Atefeh; Sayfati, Morteza; Taghdiri, Maryam; Jamali, Payman; Smith, Richard J. H.; Azizi, Fereydoun; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene at the DFNB4 locus are responsible for Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss (DFNB4). This study included 80 nuclear families with two or more siblings segregating presumed autosomal recessive hearing loss. All deaf persons tested negative for mutations in GJB2 at the DFNB1 locus and were therefore screened for autozygosity by descent (ABD) using short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) that flanked SLC26A4. In 12 families, homozygosity for ...

  13. A novel hypothesis for the gene expression for the control of atopic and other hereditary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Okudaira

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of RNA polymerase proteins and transcription factor proteins for the expression of genetic information in DNA clearly indicates that the process is influenced by certain proteins in the body and/or in the environment, which is totally opposite to the 'central dogma' of Crick. In this article, we present a working hypothesis (helical hypothesis that may explain the programmed nature of various biological events simply and naturally. Future investigations on the factors that regulate the gene transcription of cytokine clusters, including intereukin (IL-4 and IL-5, may provide an answer for controlling atopic as well as other hereditary (genetic diseases.

  14. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817......-3T>G in ENG) initially seemed to be homozygous for the mutation. Aim: To explore the possibility of allelic dropout causing a false result in this patient. Methods: Mutation analysis of additional family members was performed and haplotype analysis carried out. New primers were designed to reveal...

  15. The homozygous VHL(D126N) missense mutation is associated with dramatically elevated erythropoietin levels, consequent polycythemia, and early onset severe pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Susmita; Lanikova, Lucie; Kapralova, Katarina; Acharya, Suchitra; Swierczek, Sabina; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wolfe, Lawrence; Prchal, Josef T

    2014-11-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia sensing mediated by transcription factors. Mutations in exon 3 of the VHL gene lead to Chuvash (VHL(R200W)) and Croatian (VHL(H191D)) polycythemias. Here, we describe an infant of Bangladesh ethnicity with a novel homozygous VHL(D126N) mutation with congenital polycythemia and dramatically elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, who developed severe fatal pulmonary hypertension. In contrast to Chuvash polycythemia, erythroid progenitors (BFU-Es) did not reveal a marked EPO hypersensitivity. Further, NF-E2 and RUNX1 transcripts that correlate with BFU-Es EPO hypersensitivity in polycythemic mutations were not elevated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Research progress in pathogenic genes of hereditary non-syndromic mid-frequency deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenjun; Liu, Fei; Ma, Duan

    2016-06-01

    Hearing impairment is considered as the most prevalent impairment worldwide. Almost 600 million people in the world suffer from mild or moderate hearing impairment, an estimated 10% of the human population. Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Hereditary hearing loss is divided into syndromic hearing loss (associated with other anomalies) and non-syndromic hearing loss (not associated with other anomalies). Approximately 80% of genetic deafness is non-syndromic. On the basis of the frequency of hearing loss, hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss can be divided into high-, mid-, low-, and total-frequency hearing loss. An audiometric finding of mid-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, or a "bowl-shaped" audiogram, is uncommon. Up to now, merely 7 loci have been linked to mid-frequency hearing loss. Only four genetic midfrequency deafness genes, namely, DFNA10 (EYA4), DFNA8/12 (TECTA), DFNA13 (COL11A2), DFNA44 (CCDC50), have been reported to date. This review summarizes the research progress of the four genes to draw attention to mid-frequency deafness genes.

  17. Multi-gene panel testing improves diagnosis and management of patients with hereditary anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Roberta; Andolfo, Immacolata; Manna, Francesco; Gambale, Antonella; Marra, Roberta; Rosato, Barbara Eleni; Caforio, Paola; Pinto, Valeria; Pignataro, Piero; Radhakrishnan, Kottayam; Unal, Sule; Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Forni, Gian Luca; Iolascon, Achille

    2018-02-03

    Mutations in more than 70 genes cause hereditary anemias (HA), a highly heterogeneous group of rare/low frequency disorders in which we included: hyporegenerative anemias, as congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia; hemolytic anemias due to erythrocyte membrane defects, as hereditary spherocytosis and stomatocytosis; hemolytic anemias due to enzymatic defects. The study describes the diagnostic workflow for HA, based on the development of two consecutive versions of a targeted-NGS panel, including 34 and 71 genes, respectively. Seventy-four probands from 62 unrelated families were investigated. Our study includes the most comprehensive gene set for these anemias and the largest cohort of patients described so far. We obtained an overall diagnostic yield of 64.9%. Despite 54.2% of cases showed conclusive diagnosis fitting well to the clinical suspicion, the multi-gene analysis modified the original clinical diagnosis in 45.8% of patients (nonmatched phenotype-genotype). Of note, 81.8% of nonmatched patients were clinically suspected to suffer from CDA. Particularly, 45.5% of the probands originally classified as CDA exhibited a conclusive diagnosis of chronic anemia due to enzymatic defects, mainly due to mutations in PKLR gene. Interestingly, we also identified a syndromic CDA patient with mild anemia and epilepsy, showing a homozygous mutation in CAD gene, recently associated to early infantile epileptic encephalopathy-50 and CDA-like anemia. Finally, we described a patient showing marked iron overload due to the coinheritance of PIEZO1 and SEC23B mutations, demonstrating that the multi-gene approach is valuable not only for achieving a correct and definitive diagnosis, but also for guiding treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Silencing of tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A, SLIT2, and WIF1 by promoter hypermethylation in hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Cornejo, Valeria; Fernandez, Wanda; Muñoz, Alex; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Devoto, Luigi; Carvallo, Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Promoter hypermethylation is gaining strength as one of the main mechanisms through which tumor suppressor genes are silenced during tumor progression. Three tumor suppressor genes are frequently found methylated in their promoter, in concordance with absence of expression, RASSF1A, SLIT2, and WIF1. In addition, a previous array-CGH analysis from our group showed that these genes are found in deleted genomic regions observed in hereditary breast cancer tumors. In the present work we analyzed the methylation status of these three tumor suppressor gene promoters in 47 hereditary breast cancer tumors. Promoter methylation status analysis of hereditary breast tumors revealed high methylation frequencies for the three genes (67% RASSF1A, 80% SLIT2, and 72% WIF1). Additionally, the presence of methylated PCR products was associated with absence of protein expression for the three genes and statistically significant for RASSF1A and WIF1. Interestingly, methylation of all the three genes was found in 4 out of 6 grade I invasive ductal carcinoma tumors. Association between RASSF1A methylation and DCIS tumors was found. These results suggest that silencing of these tumor suppressor genes is an early event in hereditary breast cancer, and could be a marker for pre-malignant phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Germline mutations of EXO1 gene in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and atypical HNPCC forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Post, JG; Mensink, RGJ; Verlind, E; Van Der Sluis, T; Kempinga, C; Sijmons, RH; Van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Kleibeuker, JH; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW

    (Background & Aims) under bar: Germline mutations in one of four mismatch repair genes have been found in the majority of families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), but only in a small part of families with atypical HNPCC. The recently cloned EXO1 gene might be involved in the

  20. Identification of a novel mutation of the CPO gene in a Japanese hereditary coproporphyria family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, S; Daimon, M; Kondo, H; Kondo, M; Yamatani, K; Sasaki, H

    1998-11-16

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) caused by a mutation in the CPO gene. Only 11 mutations of the gene have been reported in HCP patients. We report another mutation in a Japanese family. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequence analyses demonstrated a C to T substitution in exon 1 of the CPO gene at nucleotide position 85, which lies in the putative presequence for targeting to mitochondria. This mutation changes the codon for glutamine to a termination codon at amino acid position 29. MaeI restriction analysis showed two other carriers in the family. The C-T mutation is located within a recently proposed putative alternative translation initiation codon (TIC-1), supporting that TIC-1 is the real TIC rather than TIC-2.

  1. A novel mutation in the HSPD1 gene in a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob; Svenstrup, Kirsten; Ang, Debbie

    2007-01-01

    A mutation in the HSPD1 gene has previously been associated with an autosomal dominant form of spastic paraplegia in a French family. HSPD1 encodes heat shock protein 60, a molecular chaperone involved in folding and quality control of mitochondrial proteins. In the present work we have investiga......A mutation in the HSPD1 gene has previously been associated with an autosomal dominant form of spastic paraplegia in a French family. HSPD1 encodes heat shock protein 60, a molecular chaperone involved in folding and quality control of mitochondrial proteins. In the present work we have...... investigated 23 Danish index patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) for mutations in the HSPD1 gene. One patient was found to be heterozygous for a c.1381C > G missense mutation encoding the mutant heat shock protein 60 p.Gln461Glu. The mutation was also present in two unaffected brothers...

  2. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A patient with bilateral pheochromocytoma as part of a Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL syndrome type 2C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkes Inne

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disease. It is relatively recent that type 2C was identified as a separate group solely presenting with pheochromocytomas. As an illustration, an interesting case is presented of a pregnant woman with refractory hypertension. It proved to be the first manifestation of bilateral pheochromocytomas. The family history may indicate the diagnosis, but only identification of a germ line mutation in the DNA of a patient will confirm carriership. Case presentation A 27 year pregnant patient with intra uterine growth retardation presented with hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral adrenal pheochromocytoma. She underwent laparoscopic adrenelectomy and a missense mutation (Gly93Ser in exon 1 of the VHL gene on chromosome 3 (p25 – p26 was shown in the patient, her father and her daughter confirming the diagnosis of VHL. Conclusion In almost all VHL families molecular genetic analysis of DNA will demonstrate an inherited mutation. Because of the involvement in several organs, periodic clinical evaluation should take place in a well coordinated, multidisciplinary setting. VHL disease can be classified into several subtypes. VHL type 2C patients present with pheochromocytomas without evidence of haemangioblastomas in the central nervous system and/or retina and a low risk of renal cell carcinoma. Therefore, in such families, periodic clinical screening can be focussed on pheochromocytomas.

  4. Parallel Regulation of von Hippel-Lindau Disease by pVHL-Mediated Degradation of B-Myb and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Keiji; Byrne, Stuart D.; Hirano, Mie; Joo-Okumura, Akiko; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Shuin, Taro; Fukui, Yoshinori; Nakatsukasa, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    pVHL, the protein product of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene, is a ubiquitin ligase that targets hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) for proteasomal degradation. Although HIF-α activation is necessary for VHL disease pathogenesis, constitutive activation of HIF-α alone did not induce renal clear cell carcinomas and pheochromocytomas in mice, suggesting the involvement of an HIF-α-independent pathway in VHL pathogenesis. Here, we show that the transcription factor B-Myb is a pVHL substrate that is degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and/or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-dependent tyrosine 15 phosphorylation of B-Myb prevents its degradation. Mice injected with B-Myb knockdown 786-O cells developed dramatically larger tumors than those bearing control cell tumors. Microarray screening of B-Myb-regulated genes showed that the expression of HIF-α-dependent genes was not affected by B-Myb knockdown, indicating that B-Myb prevents HIF-α-dependent tumorigenesis through an HIF-α-independent pathway. These data indicate that the regulation of B-Myb by pVHL plays a critical role in VHL disease. PMID:27090638

  5. A novel MHC class I-like gene is mutated in patients with hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, J N; Gnirke, A; Thomas, W; Tsuchihashi, Z; Ruddy, D A; Basava, A; Dormishian, F; Domingo, R; Ellis, M C; Fullan, A; Hinton, L M; Jones, N L; Kimmel, B E; Kronmal, G S; Lauer, P; Lee, V K; Loeb, D B; Mapa, F A; McClelland, E; Meyer, N C; Mintier, G A; Moeller, N; Moore, T; Morikang, E; Prass, C E; Quintana, L; Starnes, S M; Schatzman, R C; Brunke, K J; Drayna, D T; Risch, N J; Bacon, B R; Wolff, R K

    1996-08-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH), which affects some 1 in 400 and has an estimated carrier frequency of 1 in 10 individuals of Northern European descent, results in multi-organ dysfunction caused by increased iron deposition, and is treatable if detected early. Using linkage-disequilibrium and full haplotype analysis, we have identified a 250-kilobase region more than 3 megabases telomeric of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that is identical-by-descent in 85% of patient chromosomes. Within this region, we have identified a gene related to the MHC class I family, termed HLA-H, containing two missense alterations. One of these is predicted to inactivate this class of proteins and was found homozygous in 83% of 178 patients. A role of this gene in haemochromatosis is supported by the frequency and nature of the major mutation and prior studies implicating MHC class I-like proteins in iron metabolism.

  6. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders; Törngren, Therese; Eiengård, Frida; Lundstam, Ulf; Zagoras, Theofanis; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Borg, Åke; Björk, Jan; Nilbert, Mef; Nordling, Margareta

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel-based approaches detecting both SNVs, indels and CNVs in the same assay. We applied a panel including 19 CRC susceptibility genes to 91 individuals of six phenotypic subgroups. Targeted NGS-based sequencing of the whole gene regions including introns of the 19 genes was used. The individuals had a family history of CRC or had a phenotype consistent with a known CRC syndrome. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the diagnostic difficulties linked to genotype-phenotype diversity and the benefits of using a gene panel. Pathogenicity classification was carried out on 46 detected variants. In total we detected sixteen pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants and 30 variants of unknown clinical significance. Four of the pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants were found in BMPR1A in patients with unexplained familial adenomatous polyposis or atypical adenomatous polyposis, which extends the genotype-phenotype spectrum for this gene. Nine patients had more than one variant remaining after the filtration, including three with truncating mutations in BMPR1A, PMS2 and AXIN2. CNVs were found in three patients, in upstream regions of SMAD4, MSH3 and CTNNB1, and one additional individual harbored a 24.2 kb duplication in CDH1 intron1.

  7. Identification of SLC26A4 gene mutations in Iranian families with hereditary hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrizi, Kimia; Mohseni, Marzieh; Nishimura, Carla; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Fischer, Stephanie M; Dehghani, Atefeh; Sayfati, Morteza; Taghdiri, Maryam; Jamali, Payman; Smith, Richard J H; Azizi, Fereydoun; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2009-06-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene at the DFNB4 locus are responsible for Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss (DFNB4). This study included 80 nuclear families with two or more siblings segregating presumed autosomal recessive hearing loss. All deaf persons tested negative for mutations in GJB2 at the DFNB1 locus and were, therefore, screened for autozygosity by descent (ABD) using short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) that flanked SLC26A4. In 12 families, homozygosity for STRPs suggested possible ABD in this genomic region. Affected individuals in five families had a positive perchlorate discharge test. Sequence analysis of SLC26A4 identified ten mutations in eight families (T420I, 1197delT, G334V, R409H, T721M, R79X, S448L, L597S, 965insA and L445W), of which, four are novel (T420I, G334V, 965insA and R79X). These results imply that Pendred syndrome is the most prevalent form of syndromic hereditary hearing loss in Iran.

  8. A haplotype and linkage disequilibrium analysis of the hereditary hemochromatosis gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, W; Fullan, A; Loeb, D B; McClelland, E E; Bacon, B R; Wolff, R K

    1998-05-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a recessive disease of iron metabolism widely distributed among people of European descent. Most patients have inherited the causative mutation from a single ancestor. In the course of cloning the hemochromatosis gene, genotypes were generated for these samples at 43 microsatellite repeat markers that span the 6.5-Mb hemochromatosis gene region. The data used to reconstruct the ancestral haplotype across the hemochromatosis gene region are presented in this paper. Portions of the ancestral haplotype were present on 85% of patient chromosomes in this sample and ranged in size from approximately 500 kb to greater than 6.5 Mb. Only one marker, D6S2239, was identical by descent on all of the patient chromosomes containing the ancestral mutation. In contrast, only 3 of the 128 control chromosomes, or 2.3%, carried the ancestral mutation and the surrounding ancestral haplotype. To test new methods for gene finding using linkage disequilibrium we analyzed the genotypic data with a multilocus maximum likelihood method (DISMULT) and a single point method (DISLAMB), both written to analyze data generated from multi-allelic markers. The maximum value from DISLAMB analysis occurred at marker D6S2239, which is less than 20 kb from the hemochromatosis gene HFE, consistent with the haplotype analysis. The peak of the multi-point analysis was 700 kb from HFE, possibly due to the nonuniform recombination rates within this large region. The recombination rate appears to be lower than expected centromeric of the HFE gene.

  9. A family with hereditary hemochromatosis carrying HFE gene splice site mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NING Huibin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate a new type of HFE gene mutation in a family with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. MethodsThe analysis of HFE gene was performed for one patient with a confirmed diagnosis of HH and five relatives. Blood genomic DNA was extracted and PCR multiplication was performed for the exon and intron splice sequences of related HFE, HJV, HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes. After agarose gel electrophoresis and purification, bi-directional direct sequencing was performed to detect mutation sites. ResultsThe proband had abnormal liver function and increases in serum iron, total iron binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation, as well as T→C homozygous mutation in the fourth base of intron 2 in the intervening sequence of the exon EXON2 of HFE gene (IVs 2+4T→C, C/C homozygous, splicing, abnormal. There were no abnormalities in HJV, HAMP, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes. The proband′s son had the same homozygous mutation, three relatives had heterozygous mutations, and one relative had no abnormal mutations. ConclusionGene detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of hemochromatosis, and IVs 2+4T→C mutation may be a new pathogenic mutation for HH in China.

  10. The impact of hereditary cancer gene panels on clinical care and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Volkan; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in hereditary cancer syndromes account for a modest fraction of all cancers; however, identifying patients with these germline mutations offers tremendous health benefits to both patients and their family members. There are about 60 genes that confer a high lifetime risk of specific cancers, and this information can be used to tailor prevention, surveillance, and treatment. With advances in next-generation sequencing technologies and the elimination of gene patents for evaluating genetic information, we are now able to analyze multiple genes simultaneously, leading to the widespread clinical use of gene panels for germline cancer testing. Over the last 4 years since these panels were introduced, we have learned about the diagnostic yield of testing, the expanded phenotypes of the patients with mutations, and the clinical utility of genetic testing in patients with cancer and/or without cancer but with a family history of cancer. We have also experienced challenges including the large number of variants of unknown significance (VUSs), identification of somatic mutations and need to differentiate these from germline mutations, technical issues with particular genes and mutations, insurance coverage and reimbursement issues, lack of access to data, and lack of clinical management guidelines for newer and, especially, moderate and low-penetrance genes. The lessons learned from cancer genetic testing panels are applicable to other clinical areas as well and highlight the problems to be solved as we advance genomic medicine. © 2017 Okur and Chung; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Role of the duplicated CCAAT box region in γ-globin gene regulation and hereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ronchi (Antonella); M. Berry (Meera); S. Raguz (Selina); A.M.A. Imam (Ali); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); S. Ottolenghi (Sergio); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.O. Dillon (Niall)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractHereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin (HPFH) is a clinically important condition in which a change in the developmental specificity of the gamma-globin genes results in varying levels of expression of fetal haemoglobin in the adult. The condition is benign and can significantly

  12. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa…

  13. Gene-Based Therapies for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. Hype or Hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, David A; Kearns, Lisa S; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy has now joined Leber congenital amaurosis in the list of genetic eye diseases undergoing gene therapy clinical trials. Although a dramatic response to treatment would be welcome, a minor improvement in vision is a major challenge in efficacy assessment, given this may occur spontaneously as part of the natural history of minor recovery in some patients. Thus, we must await the outcome of adequately powered clinical trials to know if the treatment is effective, particularly given the likely high cost of such therapeutic interventions in the future. We need global cooperation to ensure that the most suitable patients are enrolled in these trials and that support is provided for participants who need to travel from the Asia-Pacific region to Europe or North America if there are no local arms of these trials.

  14. Autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia: Novel mutations in the REEP1 gene (SPG31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the SPG4 gene (spastin and in the SPG3A gene (atlastin account for the majority of 'pure' autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Recently, mutations in the REEP1 gene were identified to cause autosomal dominant HSP type SPG31. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of REEP1 mutations in a cohort of 162 unrelated Caucasian index patients with 'pure' HSP and a positive family history (at least two persons per family presented symptoms. Methods 162 patients were screened for mutations by, both, DHPLC and direct sequencing. Results Ten mutations were identified in the REEP1 gene, these included eight novel mutations comprising small insertions/deletions causing frame shifts and subsequently premature stop codons, one nonsense mutation and one splice site mutation as well as two missense mutations. Both missense mutations and the splice site mutation were not identified in 170 control subjects. Conclusion In our HSP cohort we found pathogenic mutations in 4.3% of cases with autosomal dominant inheritance. Our results confirm the previously observed mutation range of 3% to 6.5%, respectively, and they widen the spectrum of REEP1 mutations.

  15. Detecting splicing patterns in genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Grégoire; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Castéra, Laurent; Harter, Valentin; Legros, Angelina; Muller, Etienne; Fouillet, Robin; Brault, Baptiste; Smirnova, Anna S; Lemoine, Fréderic; de la Grange, Pierre; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Houdayer, Claude; Bonnet, Françoise; Blanc-Fournier, Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Frebourg, Thierry; Martins, Alexandra; Vaur, Dominique; Krieger, Sophie

    2017-10-01

    Interpretation of variants of unknown significance (VUS) is a major challenge for laboratories performing molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), especially considering that many genes are now known to be involved in this syndrome. One important way these VUS can have a functional impact is through their effects on RNA splicing. Here we present a custom RNA-Seq assay plus bioinformatics and biostatistics pipeline to analyse specifically alternative and abnormal splicing junctions in 11 targeted HBOC genes. Our pipeline identified 14 new alternative splices in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in addition to detecting the majority of known alternative spliced transcripts therein. We provide here the first global splicing pattern analysis for the other nine genes, which will enable a comprehensive interpretation of splicing defects caused by VUS in HBOC. Previously known splicing alterations were consistently detected, occasionally with a more complex splicing pattern than expected. We also found that splicing in the 11 genes is similar in blood and breast tissue, supporting the utility and simplicity of blood splicing assays. Our pipeline is ready to be integrated into standard molecular diagnosis for HBOC, but it could equally be adapted for an integrative analysis of any multigene disorder.

  16. LOSS OF JAK2 REGULATION VIA VHL-SOCS1 E3 UBIQUITIN HETEROCOMPLEX UNDERLIES CHUVASH POLYCYTHEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ryan C.; Sufan, Roxana I.; Zhou, Bing; Heir, Pardeep; Bunda, Severa; Sybingco, Stephanie S.; Greer, Samantha N.; Roche, Olga; Heathcote, Samuel A.; Chow, Vinca W.K.; Boba, Lukasz M.; Richmond, Terri D.; Hickey, Michele M.; Barber, Dwayne L.; Cheresh, David A.; Simon, M. Celeste; Irwin, Meredith S.; Kim, William Y.; Ohh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Chuvash polycythemia (CP) is a rare congenital form of polycythemia caused by homozygous R200W and H191D mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene whose gene product is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying some of the hallmark features of CP such as hypersensitivity to erythropoietin are unclear. Here, we show that VHL directly binds suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) to form a heterodimeric E3 ligase that targets phosphorylated (p)JAK2 for ubiquitin-mediated destruction. In contrast, CP-associated VHL mutants have altered affinity for SOCS1 and fail to engage and degrade pJAK2. Systemic administration of a highly selective JAK2 inhibitor, TG101209, reverses the disease phenotype in vhlR200W/R200W knock-in mice, a model that faithfully recapitulates human CP. These results reveal VHL as a SOCS1-cooperative negative regulator of JAK2 and provide compelling biochemical and preclinical evidence for JAK2- targeted therapy in CP patients. PMID:21685897

  17. Loss of JAK2 regulation via a heterodimeric VHL-SOCS1 E3 ubiquitin ligase underlies Chuvash polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ryan C; Sufan, Roxana I; Zhou, Bing; Heir, Pardeep; Bunda, Severa; Sybingco, Stephanie S; Greer, Samantha N; Roche, Olga; Heathcote, Samuel A; Chow, Vinca W K; Boba, Lukasz M; Richmond, Terri D; Hickey, Michele M; Barber, Dwayne L; Cheresh, David A; Simon, M Celeste; Irwin, Meredith S; Kim, William Y; Ohh, Michael

    2011-06-19

    Chuvash polycythemia is a rare congenital form of polycythemia caused by homozygous R200W and H191D mutations in the VHL (von Hippel-Lindau) gene, whose gene product is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying some of the hallmark abnormalities of Chuvash polycythemia, such as hypersensitivity to erythropoietin, are unclear. Here we show that VHL directly binds suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) to form a heterodimeric E3 ligase that targets phosphorylated JAK2 (pJAK2) for ubiquitin-mediated destruction. In contrast, Chuvash polycythemia-associated VHL mutants have altered affinity for SOCS1 and do not engage with and degrade pJAK2. Systemic administration of a highly selective JAK2 inhibitor, TG101209, reversed the disease phenotype in Vhl(R200W/R200W) knock-in mice, an experimental model that recapitulates human Chuvash polycythemia. These results show that VHL is a SOCS1-cooperative negative regulator of JAK2 and provide biochemical and preclinical support for JAK2-targeted therapy in individuals with Chuvash polycythemia.

  18. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  19. Impact of Panel Gene Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer on Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumish, Heidi S; Steinfeld, Hallie; Koval, Carrie; Russo, Donna; Levinson, Elana; Wynn, Julia; Duong, James; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in next generation sequencing have enabled panel gene testing, or simultaneous testing for mutations in multiple genes for a clinical condition. With more extensive and widespread genetic testing, there will be increased detection of genes with moderate penetrance without established clinical guidelines and of variants of uncertain significance (VUS), or genetic variants unknown to either be disease-causing or benign. This study surveyed 232 patients who underwent genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer to examine the impact of panel gene testing on psychological outcomes, patient understanding, and utilization of genetic information. The survey used standardized instruments including the Impact of Event Scale (IES), Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA), Satisfaction with Decision Instrument (SWD), Ambiguity Tolerance Scale (AT-20), genetics knowledge, and utilization of genetic test results. Study results suggested that unaffected individuals with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer who received positive results were most significantly impacted by intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and distress. However, scores were also modestly elevated among unaffected patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer who received VUS, highlighting the impact of ambiguous results that are frequent among patients undergoing genetic testing with large panels of genes. Potential risk factors for increased genetic testing-specific distress in this study included younger age, black or African American race, Hispanic origin, lower education level, and lower genetic knowledge and highlight the need for developing strategies to provide effective counseling and education to these communities, particularly when genetic testing utilizes gene panels that more commonly return VUS. More detailed pre-test education and counseling may help patients appreciate the probability of various types of test results and how results

  20. Two novel FAH gene mutations in a patient with hereditary tyrosinemia type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Bang, Hae In; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Shin, Mee-Ran; Lee, Yong-Wha; Lee, Dong Hwan; Park, Hyung-Doo

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT I) is a severe inborn metabolic disorder affecting the tyrosine degradation pathway. Most untreated patients die within the first two years of life. HT I results from fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) deficiency caused by mutations in the FAH gene. The diagnosis of HT I is confirmed by measuring FAH enzyme activity in cultured fibroblasts or liver tissue and/or detecting disease-causing mutations in the FAH gene. A female neonate was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of an abnormal newborn screening test that showed elevated tyrosine levels. We analyzed amino acids and organic acids in the patient's blood and urine. To identify the genetic abnormality, all the coding exons and flanking introns of the FAH gene were analyzed via PCR. A repeat newborn screening test and plasma amino acid analysis revealed increased tyrosine levels in the patient. Urine organic acid analysis showed increased urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyphenyllactate, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, and succinylacetone. Sequence analysis of the FAH gene identified two novel variations (c.536A>G (p.Gln179Arg) and c.913+5G>A) that had not been previously reported and that were not found in 170 healthy controls. HT I was confirmed in this patient by molecular genetic analysis of the FAH gene, with highly suggestive biochemical findings. The novel sequence variations detected in the present study should be considered disease-causing mutations by in silico analysis. In the Korean population, this is the first described case of HT I caused by a point mutation in the FAH gene. © 2014 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  1. Massive sequencing of 70 genes reveals a myriad of missing genes or mechanisms to be uncovered in hereditary spastic paraplegias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sara; Raymond, Laure; Mairey, Mathilde; Coutinho, Paula; Brandão, Eva; Ribeiro, Paula; Loureiro, José Leal; Sequeiros, Jorge; Brice, Alexis; Alonso, Isabel; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by lower limb spasticity and weakness that can be complicated by other neurological or non-neurological signs. Despite a high genetic heterogeneity (>60 causative genes), 40–70% of the families remain without a molecular diagnosis. Analysis of one of the pioneer cohorts of 193 HSP families generated in the early 1990s in Portugal highlighted that SPAST and SPG11 are the most frequent diagnoses. We have now explored 98 unsolved families from this series using custom next generation sequencing panels analyzing up to 70 candidate HSP genes. We identified the likely disease-causing variant in 20 of the 98 families with KIF5A being the most frequently mutated gene. We also found 52 variants of unknown significance (VUS) in 38% of the cases. These new diagnoses resulted in 42% of solved cases in the full Portuguese cohort (81/193). Segregation of the variants was not always compatible with the presumed inheritance, indicating that the analysis of all HSP genes regardless of the inheritance mode can help to explain some cases. Our results show that there is still a large set of unknown genes responsible for HSP and most likely novel mechanisms or inheritance modes leading to the disease to be uncovered, but this will require international collaborative efforts, particularly for the analysis of VUS. PMID:28832565

  2. [Hereditary kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-qin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Hong-wen

    2013-04-18

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  3. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  4. [Hereditary ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikán, M; Foretová, L; Cibula, D; Kotlas, J; Pohlreich, P

    2006-05-01

    This article reviews the topic of hereditary ovarian cancer, describes persons at risk of hereditary disposition to cancer and gives instructions for genetic counselling and molecular analysis, including contacts to specialized centres in the Czech Republic. Review. Institute of Biochemistry and Experimental Oncology, Charles University in Prague. Hereditary ovarian cancer occurs in three autosomal dominant syndromes: appropriate hereditary ovarian cancer (HOC), hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and hereditary non-poliposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Physician in practice or specialist at the clinic should focus interest on patients form families with frequent occurrence of breast and/or ovarian cancer, patients with early onset disease or tumour duplicity (breast and ovarian cancer). Hereditary disposition to ovarian (and breast) cancer could be assessed by molecular genetic analysis of two main susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, or other genes in families with diverse tumours. Molecular genetic analysis should be in any cases indicated by experienced clinical genetic. In the Czech Republic, the consensus of genetic and clinical care of risk patients was published and specialized centres for families with hereditary predisposition were settled in Prague and Brno. Persons with hereditary susceptibility to cancer constitute noted group where painstaking dispensarisation and preventive care may prevent malignancy or detect it in the early stage.

  5. Potential value of EUS in pancreatic surveillance of VHL patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselt, Sophie Josephien; Brouwers, Adrienne H; van Dullemen, Hendrik M; van der Jagt, Eric J; Bongaerts, Alfons H; Koopmans, Klaas P; Kema, Ido; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; Timmers, Henri Jlm; de Herder, Wouter; Sluiter, Wim; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Links, T P

    Background: Patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease are prone to develop pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). However, the best imaging technique for early detection of pNETs in VHL is currently unknown. In a head-to-head comparison, we evaluated endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and

  6. Multi-gene panel testing for hereditary cancer predisposition in unsolved high-risk breast and ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Beth; Adams, Sophie B; Sittler, Taylor; van den Akker, Jeroen; Chan, Salina; Leitner, Ofri; Ryan, Lauren; Gil, Elad; van 't Veer, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Many women with an elevated risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have previously tested negative for pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Among them, a subset has hereditary susceptibility to cancer and requires further testing. We sought to identify specific groups who remain at high risk and evaluate whether they should be offered multi-gene panel testing. We tested 300 women on a multi-gene panel who were previously enrolled in a long-term study at UCSF. As part of their long-term care, all previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 either by limited or comprehensive sequencing. Additionally, they met one of the following criteria: (i) personal history of bilateral breast cancer, (ii) personal history of breast cancer and a first or second degree relative with ovarian cancer, and (iii) personal history of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinoma. Across the three groups, 26 women (9%) had a total of 28 pathogenic mutations associated with hereditary cancer susceptibility, and 23 women (8%) had mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2. Ashkenazi Jewish and Hispanic women had elevated pathogenic mutation rates. In addition, two women harbored pathogenic mutations in more than one hereditary predisposition gene. Among women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer who have previously tested negative for pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, we identified three groups of women who should be considered for subsequent multi-gene panel testing. The identification of women with multiple pathogenic mutations has important implications for family testing.

  7. Long-term outcomes of gene therapy for the treatment of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a disease that leads to blindness. Gene therapy has been investigated with some success, and could lead to important advancements in treating LHON. This was a prospective, open-label trial involving 9 LHON patients at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, from August 2011 to December 2015. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of gene therapy for LHON. Nine LHON patients voluntarily received an intravitreal injection of rAAV2-ND4. Systemic examinations and visual function tests were performed during the 36-month follow-up period to determine the safety and efficacy of this gene therapy. Based on successful experiments in an animal model of LHON, 1 subject also received an rAAV2-ND4 injection in the second eye 12 months after gene therapy was administered in the first eye. Recovery of visual acuity was defined as the primary outcome of this study. Changes in the visual field, visual evoked potential (VEP, optical coherence tomography findings, liver and kidney function, and antibodies against AAV2 were defined as secondary endpoints. Eight patients (Patients 2–9 received unilateral gene therapy and visual function improvement was observed in both treated eyes (Patients 4, 6, 7, and 8 and untreated eyes (Patients 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8. Visual regression fluctuations, defined as changes in visual acuity greater than or equal to 0.3 logMAR, were observed in Patients 2 and 9. Age at disease onset, disease duration, and the amount of remaining optic nerve fibers did not have a significant effect on the visual function improvement. The visual field and pattern reversal VEP also improved. The patient (Patient 1 who received gene therapy in both eyes had improved visual acuity in the injected eye after the first treatment. Unfortunately, visual acuity in this eye decreased 3 months after he received gene therapy in the second eye. Animal experiments suggested that ND4 expression remains

  8. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by compound heterozygous mutations outside the motor domain of the KIF1A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, M; Zulehner, G; Hotzy, C; Rath, J; Stogmann, E; Wagner, M; Haack, T B; Strom, T M; Zimprich, A; Zimprich, F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare, inherited disorders causing an upper motor neuron syndrome with (complex) or without (pure) additional neurological symptoms. Mutations in the KIF1A gene have already been associated with recessive and dominant forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG30) in a few cases. All family members included in the study were examined neurologically. Whole-exome sequencing was used in affected individuals to identify the responsible candidate gene. Conventional Sanger sequencing was conducted to validate familial segregation. A family of Macedonian origin with two affected siblings, one with slowly progressive and the other one with a more complex and rapidly progressing hereditary spastic paraplegia is reported. In both affected individuals, two novel pathogenic mutations outside the motor domain of the KIF1A gene were found (NM_001244008.1:c.2909G>A, p.Arg970His and c.1214dup, p.Asn405Lysfs*40) that segregate with the disease within the family establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive SPG30. This report provides the first evidence that mutations outside the motor domain of the gene can cause (recessive) SPG30 and extends the genotype-phenotype association for KIF1A-related diseases. © 2017 EAN.

  9. Iranian hereditary hemochromatosis patients: Baseline characteristics, laboratory data and gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Farhad; Bagheri, Zohreh; Bayat, Maryam; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Basi, Ali; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ajdarkosh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common autosomal recessive disorder in white people, characterized by highly abnormal uptake of iron from the gastrointestinal tracts. Recently, mutation studies have focused to detect the genes responsible for HH. Material/Methods In this cross-sectional study, 12 HH patients were recruited, who were referred to Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran. In addition to the clinical assessments, a complete laboratory evaluation, imaging modalities, histopathologic assessment, atomic absorption spectrophotometry and gene mutation study were performed. The genetic study for HFE gene mutation was examined for all of the patients since 2006, while non-HFE mutation was conducted since December 2010 (only for 1 of them). Results Twelve patients were evaluated consisting of 11 men and 1 woman, with the mean age of 39.58±12.68 yr. The average of atomic iron loads was 13.25±4.83-fold higher than normal standards. Four patients had heterozygotic mutation of H63D (33.3%). There was no significant difference in either the iron load of liver (P=0.927) and heart (P=0.164) or serum concentration of ferritin (P=0.907) and TIBC (P=0.937) between the HFE-mutant and without HFE mutation HH cases. Conclusions In contrast to other studies, C282Y mutation was not detected in any of our Iranian HH patients. Heterozygotic mutations of H63D (HFE) and TFR2 (non-HFE) genes were found to be more common in these patients. Similar to previous reports, these mutations were not found to be significantly associated with severity of presentation in HH patients. PMID:23018356

  10. Variants of cancer susceptibility genes in Korean BRCA1/2 mutation-negative patients with high risk for hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ji Soo; Lee, Seung-Tae; Nam, Eun Ji; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Hyung Seok

    2018-01-01

    Background We evaluated the incidence and spectrum of pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants of cancer susceptibility genes in BRCA1/2 mutation-negative Korean patients with a high risk for hereditary breast cancer using a comprehensive multigene panel that included 35 cancer susceptibility genes. Methods Samples from 120 patients who were negative for BRCA1/2 mutations, but had been diagnosed with breast cancer that was likely hereditary, were prospectively evaluated for the prevalence of...

  11. Hereditary nephrotic syndrome: a systematic approach for genetic testing and a review of associated podocyte gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-09-01

    Several genes have been implicated in genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome occurring in children. It is now known that the phenotypes associated with mutations in these genes display significant variability, rendering genetic testing and counselling a more complex task. This review will focus on the recent clinical findings associated with those genes known to be involved in isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in children and, thereby, propose an approach for appropriate mutational screening. The recurrence of proteinuria after transplantation in patients with hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome will also be discussed.

  12. Mutational spectrum of the SPAST and ATL1 genes in Korean patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunwoong; Kang, Seong-Ho; Park, Seungman; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Soo Hyun; Lee, Seung Jun; Lee, Jung Ae; Cho, Sung Im; Sung, Jung-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Sup; Seong, Moon-Woo

    2015-10-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by insidiously progressive lower-extremity weakness and spasticity. Spastic paraplegia 4 (SPAST) is the most common type of uncomplicated autosomal dominant HSP (40% of such cases), and spastic paraplegia 3A (ATL1) is the second most common. Here, we conducted mutational analysis of the SPAST and/or ATL1 genes in 206 unrelated patients with HSP. DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was used to analyze SPAST or ATL1 pathogenic variants. To confirm splice-site pathogenic variants, mRNA transcripts were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and sequencing. Among the 52 patients with medical records and SPAST or ATL1 gene pathogenic variants or novel unclassified variants, 50 showed spasticity or weakness in their lower extremities. We identified 16 known and 18 novel SPAST pathogenic variants and 2 known and a novel splicing pathogenic variants in ATL1. We also identified 4 unclassified SPAST variants in 5 patients and an unclassified ATL1 variant in 1 patient. Further, a novel leaky-splicing variant (c.1537-11A>G) was found in SPAST, which caused skipping of exon 13 or exons 13-14. Among the 206 unrelated patients with HSP, SPAST or ATL1 pathogenic variants and potentially pathogenic variants were identified in 52 patients, a low pathogenic variant rate compared to previous results. Results from our study suggest that other genes may be involved in HSP in the Korean population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Sébastien; Lavie, Julie; Banneau, Guillaume; Voirand, Nathalie; Lavandier, Karine; Debouverie, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous group of diseases little known in clinical practice due to its low prevalence, slow progression, and difficult diagnosis. This results in an underestimation of HSP leading to belated diagnosis and management. In depth diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and identification of genomic mutations. We describe the clinical presentation and pathogeny of HSP through a report of a case due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene (SPG31). Patient concerns: A 64-year-old woman presented gait disturbances due to spasticity of the lower limbs progressing since her third decade. Previous investigations failed to find any cause. Interventions: DNA analysis was performed to search for HSP causing mutations. Diagnoses: A novel heterozygote mutation (c.595 + 1G>A) of the REEP1 gene, within the splice site of intron 6, was discovered. This nucleotide change causes exon 6 skipping leading to frame shift and a truncated transcript identified by complementary DNA sequencing of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products. Outcomes: REEP1 is a known protein predominantly located in the upper motor neurons. Mutation of REEP1 primary affects the longest axons explaining predominance of pyramidal syndrome on lower limbs. Lessons: Slow progressive pyramidal syndrome of the lower limbs should elicit a diagnosis of HSP. We describe a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene causing HSP. Pathogeny is based on resulting abnormal REEP1 protein which is involved in the development of longest axons constituting the corticospinal tracts. PMID:28099355

  14. Thymidylate synthase gene (TYMS polymorphisms in sporadic and hereditary breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior José da Silva Nogueira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC is a genetic disorder characterized by growth and proliferation of breast cells in a disorderly. In Brazil, there are approximately 49.240 new cases of BC, every year. The BC etiology is still poorly understood. The BC can be sporadic (SBC or hereditary (HBC. Recent studies have correlated gene polymorphisms with the BC, such as alterations in thymidylate synthase gene (TYMS, which are used to improve diagnosis and prevention of the disease. Polymorphisms in the TYMS gene 5’-UTR region, usually present reps double (2R and/or triple (3R. Studies have shown that homozygous 3R/3R is overexpressed compared with 2R/2R genotype, and these polymorphic variations may contribute to individual susceptibility to the development of BC. In this context, the objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the TYMS 2R and 3R polymorphisms, comparing genotypic and allelic distribution with SBC and HBC patients. Methods In this study we included a total of 204 subjects, 70 with BC (33 with SBC, and 37 with HBC and 134 healthy subjects (controls. The Polymerase Chain Reaction was the method used. Results Results demonstrated a high frequency of the 3R allele at BC, SBC, and HBC groups. The frequency of genotype 2R/3R was significantly higher in BC group. This work showed association between the 2R/3R variants (OR = 4.14, CI95% = 1.77-9.71 in the development of SBC, and 2R/2R (OR = 0.233, CI95% = 1.63-7.65 and 2R/3R (OR = 3.53, CI95% = 0.06-0.81 for developing HBC. To BC, there was association with the genotype 2R/3R (OR: 3.79, CI95% = 2.03-7.08. Conclusion Our results show relation to the development of BC in association with the analyzed polymorphisms.

  15. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy-Gene Therapy: From Benchtop to Bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Guy, John

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disorder caused by point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Most cases are due to mutations in genes encoding subunits of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase that is Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC). These mutations are located at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, or 14484 in the mitochondrial genome. The disease is characterized by apoplectic, bilateral, and severe visual loss. While the mutated mtDNA impairs generation of ATP by all mitochondria, there is only a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and degeneration of optic nerve axons. Thus, blindness is typically permanent. Half of the men and 10% of females who harbor the pathogenic mtDNA mutation actually develop the phenotype. This incomplete penetrance and gender bias is not fully understood. Additional mitochondrial and/or nuclear genetic factors may modulate the phenotypic expression of LHON. In a population-based study, the mtDNA background of haplogroup J was associated with an inverse relationship of low-ATP generation and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effective therapy for LHON has been elusive. In this paper, we describe the findings of pertinent published studies and discuss the controversies of potential strategies to ameliorate the disease. PMID:21253496

  16. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy-Gene Therapy: From Benchtop to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari D. Koilkonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally transmitted disorder caused by point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Most cases are due to mutations in genes encoding subunits of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase that is Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC. These mutations are located at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, or 14484 in the mitochondrial genome. The disease is characterized by apoplectic, bilateral, and severe visual loss. While the mutated mtDNA impairs generation of ATP by all mitochondria, there is only a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and degeneration of optic nerve axons. Thus, blindness is typically permanent. Half of the men and 10% of females who harbor the pathogenic mtDNA mutation actually develop the phenotype. This incomplete penetrance and gender bias is not fully understood. Additional mitochondrial and/or nuclear genetic factors may modulate the phenotypic expression of LHON. In a population-based study, the mtDNA background of haplogroup J was associated with an inverse relationship of low-ATP generation and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Effective therapy for LHON has been elusive. In this paper, we describe the findings of pertinent published studies and discuss the controversies of potential strategies to ameliorate the disease.

  17. Mutations in human CPO gene predict clinical expression of either hepatic hereditary coproporphyria or erythropoietic harderoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Caroline; Gouya, Laurent; Malonova, Eva; Lamoril, Jérôme; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Flamme, Magali; Rose, Christian; Lyoumi, Said; Da Silva, Vasco; Boileau, Catherine; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Puy, Hervé

    2005-10-15

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), an autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyria, results from mutations in the gene that encodes coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPO). HCP (heterozygous or rarely homozygous) patients present with an acute neurovisceral crisis, sometimes associated with skin lesions. Four patients (two families) have been reported with a clinically distinct variant form of HCP. In such patients, the presence of a specific mutation (K404E) on both alleles or associated with a null allele, produces a unifying syndrome in which hematological disorders predominate: 'harderoporphyria'. Here, we report the fifth case (from a third family) with harderoporphyria. In addition, we show that harderoporphyric patients exhibit iron overload secondary to dyserythropoiesis. To investigate the molecular basis of this peculiar phenotype, we first studied the secondary structure of the human CPO by a predictive method, the hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) which allowed us to focus on a region of the enzyme. We then expressed mutant enzymes for each amino acid of the region of interest, as well as all missense mutations reported so far in HCP patients and evaluated the amount of harderoporphyrin in each mutant. Our results strongly suggest that only a few missense mutations, restricted to five amino acids encoded by exon 6, may accumulate significant amounts of harderoporphyrin: D400-K404. Moreover, all other type of mutations or missense mutations mapped elsewhere throughout the CPO gene, lead to coproporphyrin accumulation and subsequently typical HCP. Our findings, reinforced by recent crystallographic results of yeast CPO, shed new light on the genetic predisposition to HCP. It represents a first monogenic metabolic disorder where clinical expression of overt disease is dependent upon the location and type of mutation, resulting either in acute hepatic or in erythropoietic porphyria.

  18. Safety and effects of the vector for the Leber hereditary optic neuropathy gene therapy clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3

  19. [Double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager with hereditary multiple exostoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Cozar, Mónica; Grinberg, Daniel; Balcells, Susana; Asteggiano, Carla G; Martínez-Domenech, Gustavo; Bracho, Ana; Sánchez, Yanira; Stock, Frances; Delgado-Luengo, Wilmer; Zara-Chirinos, Carmen; Chacín, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary forms of multiple exostoses, now called EXT1/EXT2-CDG within Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, are the most common benign bone tumors in humans and clinical description consists of the formation of several cartilage-capped bone tumors, usually benign and localized in the juxta-epiphyseal region of long bones, although wide body dissemination in severe cases is not uncommon. Onset of the disease is variable ranging from 2-3 years up to 13-15 years with an estimated incidence ranging from 1/18,000 to 1/50,000 cases in European countries. We present a double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager and her family with hereditary multiple exostoses.

  20. Inactivation of Vhl in Osteochondral Progenitor Cells Causes High Bone Mass Phenotype and Protects Against Age-Related Bone Loss in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tujun; Xie, Yangli; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Yi, Lingxian; He, Qifen; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that disruption of von Hippel–Lindau gene (Vhl) coincides with activation of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) signaling in bone cells and plays an important role in bone development, homeostasis, and regeneration. It is known that activation of HIF1α signaling in mature osteoblasts is central to the coupling between angiogenesis and bone formation. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the coupling between skeletal angiogenesis and osteogenesis during bone remodeling are only partially elucidated. To evaluate the role of Vhl in bone homeostasis and the coupling between vascular physiology and bone, we generated mice lacking Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells (referred to as Vhl cKO mice) at postnatal and adult stages in a tamoxifen-inducible manner and changes in skeletal morphology were assessed by micro–computed tomography (µCT), histology, and bone histomorphometry. We found that mice with inactivation of Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells at the postnatal stage largely phenocopied that of mice lacking Vhl in mature osteoblasts, developing striking and progressive accumulation of cancellous bone with increased microvascular density and bone formation. These were accompanied with a significant increase in osteoblast proliferation, upregulation of differentiation marker Runx2 and osteocalcin, and elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. In addition, we found that Vhl deletion in osteochondral progenitor cells in adult bone protects mice from aging-induced bone loss. Our data suggest that the VHL-mediated signaling in osteochondral progenitor cells plays a critical role in bone remodeling at postnatal/adult stages through coupling osteogenesis and angiogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:23999831

  1. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 downregulated by von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor pVHL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, Peter; Sulitkova, Jitka; Lisztwan, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    Organ-specific metastasis is governed, in part, by interactions between chemokine receptors on cancer cells and matching chemokines in target organs. For example, malignant breast cancer cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and commonly metastasize to organs that are an abundant source...... regulates CXCR4 expression owing to its capacity to target hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) for degradation under normoxic conditions. This process is suppressed under hypoxic conditions, resulting in HIF-dependent CXCR4 activation. An analysis of clear cell renal carcinoma that manifests mutation of the VHL...... gene in most cases revealed an association of strong CXCR4 expression with poor tumour-specific survival. These results suggest a mechanism for CXCR4 activation during tumour cell evolution and imply that VHL inactivation acquired by incipient tumour cells early in tumorigenesis confers not only...

  2. Hereditary Persistence of Alpha-Fetoprotein Is Associated with the -119G>A Polymorphism in AFP Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Neha; Chavan, Radhika; Bale, Govardhan; Avanthi, Urmila Steffie; Aslam, Mohsin; Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Ravikanth, V V

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a glycoprotein that is produced by the liver and yolk sac during fetal development. Its levels are usually raised in malignant conditions. Hereditary persistence of AFP (HPAFP) is a rare benign condition with elevated levels of AFP. It is inherited in a dominant mode with complete penetrance and is usually not associated with any clinical disability. We report two individuals with elevated levels of AFP harboring the -119G>A polymorphism in the AFP gene. A genetic screening to rule out variants in the AFP gene is advised in cases with unexplained persistent AFP levels to avoid inappropriate treatment and surgical options.

  3. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, G L

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  4. HFE-Associated Hereditary Haemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eijkelkamp, Emmeke J; Yapp, Thomas R; Powell, Lawrie W

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism. Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996 and two candidate mutations; the C282Y mutation has been shown to be responsible for the majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis cases worldwide. The gene discovery has led ...

  5. Vhl deletion in osteoblasts boosts cellular glycolysis and improves global glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirckx, Naomi; Tower, Robert J; Mercken, Evi M; Vangoitsenhoven, Roman; Moreau-Triby, Caroline; Breugelmans, Tom; Nefyodova, Elena; Cardoen, Ruben; Mathieu, Chantal; Van der Schueren, Bart; Confavreux, Cyrille B; Clemens, Thomas L; Maes, Christa

    2018-02-12

    The skeleton has emerged as an important regulator of systemic glucose homeostasis, with osteocalcin and insulin representing prime mediators of the interplay between bone and energy metabolism. However, genetic evidence indicates that osteoblasts can influence global energy metabolism through additional, as yet unknown, mechanisms. Here, we report that constitutive or postnatally induced deletion of the hypoxia signaling pathway component von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) in skeletal osteolineage cells of mice led to high bone mass as well as hypoglycemia and increased glucose tolerance, not accounted for by osteocalcin or insulin. In vitro and in vivo data indicated that Vhl-deficient osteoblasts displayed massively increased glucose uptake and glycolysis associated with upregulated HIF-target gene expression, resembling the Warburg effect that typifies cancer cells. Overall, the glucose consumption by the skeleton was increased in the mutant mice, as revealed by 18F-FDG radioactive tracer experiments. Moreover, the glycemia levels correlated inversely with the level of skeletal glucose uptake, and pharmacological treatment with the glycolysis inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA), which restored glucose metabolism in Vhl-deficient osteogenic cells in vitro, prevented the development of the systemic metabolic phenotype in the mutant mice. Altogether, these findings reveal a novel link between cellular glucose metabolism in osteoblasts and whole-body glucose homeostasis, controlled by local hypoxia signaling in the skeleton.

  6. Role of VHL, HIF1A and SDH on the expression of miR-210: Implications for tumoral pseudo-hypoxic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Anna; Bernardo-Castiñeira, Cristóbal; Sáenz-de-Santa-María, Inés; Pitiot, Ana S; Balbín, Milagros; Astudillo, Aurora; Valdés, Nuria; Scola, Bartolomé; Del Toro, Raquel; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Piruat, José I; Suarez, Carlos; Chiara, María-Dolores

    2017-01-24

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its microRNA target, miR-210, are candidate tumor-drivers of metabolic reprogramming in cancer. Neuroendocrine neoplasms such as paragangliomas (PGLs) are particularly appealing for understanding the cancer metabolic adjustments because of their associations with deregulations of metabolic enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene involved in HIF-1α stabilization. However, the role of miR-210 in the pathogenesis of SDH-related tumors remains an unmet challenge. Herein is described an in vivo genetic analysis of the role of VHL, HIF1A and SDH on miR-210 by using knockout murine models, siRNA gene silencing, and analyses of human tumors. HIF-1α knockout abolished hypoxia-induced miR-210 expression in vivo but did not alter its constitutive expression in paraganglia. Normoxic miR-210 levels substantially increased by complete, but not partial, VHL silencing in paraganglia of knockout VHL-mice and by over-expression of p76del-mutated pVHL. Similarly, VHL-mutated PGLs, not those with decreased VHL-gene/mRNA dosage, over-expressed miR-210 and accumulate HIF-1α in most tumor cells. Ablation of SDH activity in SDHD-null cell lines or reduction of the SDHD or SDHB protein levels elicited by siRNA-induced gene silencing did not induce miR-210 whereas the presence of SDH mutations in PGLs and tumor-derived cell lines was associated with mild increase of miR-210 and the presence of a heterogeneous, HIF-1α-positive and HIF-1α-negative, tumor cell population. Thus, activation of HIF-1α is likely an early event in VHL-defective PGLs directly linked to VHL mutations, but it is a late event favored but not directly triggered by SDHx mutations. This combined analysis provides insights into the mechanisms of HIF-1α/miR-210 regulation in normal and tumor tissues potentially useful for understanding the pathogenesis of cancer and other diseases sharing similar underpinnings.

  7. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  8. Disease-Causing Variants in the ATL1 Gene Are a Rare Cause of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia among Czech Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészárosová, Anna Uhrová; Grečmalová, Dagmar; Brázdilová, Michaela; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kalina, Zdeněk; Čermáková, Marie; Vávrová, Dagmar; Smetanová, Irena; Staněk, David; Seeman, Pavel

    2017-11-01

    Variants in the ATL1 gene have been repeatedly described as the second most frequent cause of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a motor neuron disease manifested by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. Variants in ATL1 have been described mainly in patients with early onset HSP. We performed Sanger sequencing of all coding exons and adjacent intron regions of the ALT1 gene in 111 Czech patients with pure form of HSP and additional Multiplex-Ligation Probe Analysis (MLPA) testing targeting the ATL1 gene in 56 of them. All patients except seven were previously tested by Sanger sequencing of the SPAST gene with negative results. ATL1 diagnostic testing revealed only five missense variants in the ATL1 gene. Four of them are novel, but we suppose only two of them to be pathogenic and causal. The remaining variants are assumed to be benign. MLPA testing in 56 of sequence variant negative patients revealed no gross deletion in the ATL1 gene. Variants in the ATL1 gene are more frequent in patients with early onset HSP, but in general the occurrence of pathogenic variants in the ATL1 gene is low in our cohort, less than 4.5% and less than 11.1% in patients with onset before the age of ten. Variants in the ATL1 gene are a less frequent cause of HSP among Czech patients than has been previously reported among other populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  9. Gene Therapy for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Low- and Medium-Dose Visual Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, John; Feuer, William J; Davis, Janet L; Porciatti, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Phillip J; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Yuan, Huijun; Hauswirth, William W; Lam, Byron L

    2017-11-01

    To determine the effects of AAV2(Y444,500,730F)-P1ND4v2 in patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Prospective open-label, unilateral single-dose, intravitreal injection of AAV2(Y444,500,730F)-P1ND4v2 per participant. Fourteen patients with visual loss and mutated G11778A mitochondrial DNA. Intravitreal injection with the gene therapy vector AAV2(Y444,500,730F)-P1ND4v2 into 1 eye. Six participants with chronic bilateral visual loss lasting more than 12 months (group 1), 6 participants with bilateral visual loss lasting less than 12 months (group 2), and 2 participants with unilateral visual loss (group 3) were treated. Nine patients had at least 12 months of follow-up. Clinical testing included visual acuity, visual fields, optical coherence tomography, pattern electroretinography, and neuro-ophthalmic examinations. Generalized estimating equation methods were used for longitudinal analyses. Loss of visual acuity. For groups 1 and 2, month 12 average acuity improvements with treatment relative to baseline were 0.24 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR). Fellow eyes had a 0.09-logMAR improvement. A post hoc comparison found that at month 12, the difference between study eye minus fellow eye improvement in group 2 patients of 0.53 logMAR was greater than that observed in our prior acute natural history patients of 0.21 logMAR (P = 0.053). At month 18, the difference between study eye minus fellow eye improvement in our acute group 2 gene therapy patients of 0.96 was more than that observed in our prior acute natural history patients (0.17 logMAR; P < 0.001). Two patients demonstrated asymptomatic uveitis that resolved without treatment. Optical coherence tomography of treated eyes showed an average temporal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness of 54 μm before injection and 55 μm at month 12. For fellow eyes before injection, it was 56 μm, decreasing to 50 μm at month 12 (P = 0.013). Generalized estimating equations suggested

  10. Central nervous system gadolinium accumulation in patients undergoing periodical contrast MRI screening for hereditary tumor syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwen, Evelynn; Vanbinst, Anne-Marie; Brussaard, Carola; Janssens, Peter; De Clerck, Dieter; Van Lint, Michel; Houtman, Anne C; Michel, Olaf; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lefevere, Bieke; Bohler, Susanne; Michielsen, Dirk; Jansen, Anna C; Van Velthoven, Vera; Gläsker, Sven

    2018-01-01

    Patients with hereditary tumor syndromes undergo periodical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening with Gadolinium contrast. Gadolinium accumulation has recently been described in the central nervous system after repeated administrations. The prevalence and rate of accumulation in different subgroups of patients are unknown. Neither are the mechanism nor clinical impact. This may cause uncertainty about the screening. To explore the prevalence and rate of Gadolinium accumulation in different subgroups, we retrospectively analyzed MRIs of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). We determined the prevalence and rate of accumulation in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI from VHL and TSC patients. We compared the signal intensities of these regions to the signal intensity of the pons. We evaluated the impact of number of MRIs, kidney function and liver function on Gadolinium accumulation. Twenty eight VHL patients and 24 TSC patients were included. The prevalence of accumulation in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus increased linearly according to number of Gadolinium enhanced MRIs and was higher in the VHL group (100%). A significant linear correlation between number of MRIs and increased signal intensity was observed in the VHL group. Gadolinium accumulation occurs in almost all patients undergoing contrast MRI screening after >5 MRIs. We advocate a screening protocol for patients with hereditary tumor syndromes that minimizes the Gadolinium dose. This can be accomplished by using a single administration to simultaneously screen for brain, spine and/or abdominal lesions, using an MRI protocol focused on either VHL- or TSC-specific lesions. Higher prevalence and rate of accumulation in VHL patients may be explained by the typical vascular leakage accompanying central nervous system hemangioblastomas.

  11. Development and analytical validation of a 25-gene next generation sequencing panel that includes the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to assess hereditary cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Thaddeus; Leclair, Benoît; Bowles, Karla; Gutin, Natalia; Trost, Jeff; McCulloch, James; Bhatnagar, Satish; Murray, Adam; Craft, Jonathan; Wardell, Bryan; Bastian, Mark; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Chen, Jian; Tran, Thanh; Williams, Deborah; Potter, Jennifer; Jammulapati, Srikanth; Perry, Michael; Morris, Brian; Roa, Benjamin; Timms, Kirsten

    2015-04-02

    Germline DNA mutations that increase the susceptibility of a patient to certain cancers have been identified in various genes, and patients can be screened for mutations in these genes to assess their level of risk for developing cancer. Traditional methods using Sanger sequencing focus on small groups of genes and therefore are unable to screen for numerous genes from several patients simultaneously. The goal of the present study was to validate a 25-gene panel to assess genetic risk for cancer in 8 different tissues using next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. Twenty-five genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were selected for development of a panel to screen for risk of these cancers using NGS. In an initial technical assessment, NGS results for BRCA1 and BRCA2 were compared with Sanger sequencing in 1864 anonymized DNA samples from patients who had undergone previous clinical testing. Next, the entire gene panel was validated using parallel NGS and Sanger sequencing in 100 anonymized DNA samples. Large rearrangement analysis was validated using NGS, microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analyses (MLPA). NGS identified 15,877 sequence variants, while Sanger sequencing identified 15,878 in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 comparison study of the same regions. Based on these results, the NGS process was refined prior to the validation of the full gene panel. In the validation study, NGS and Sanger sequencing were 100% concordant for the 3,923 collective variants across all genes for an analytical sensitivity of the NGS assay of >99.92% (lower limit of 95% confidence interval). NGS, microarray CGH and MLPA correctly identified all expected positive and negative large rearrangement results for the 25-gene panel. This study provides a thorough validation of the 25-gene NGS panel and indicates that this analysis tool can be used to collect clinically significant information related to risk of

  12. Resolving basal ganglia calcification in hereditary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia due to a novel TRMP6 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi M Habeb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia (HSH is a rare condi-tion caused by mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 6 (TRMP6 gene. Patients usually present during early infancy with symptomatic hypocalcemia; however, intracranial calcification has not been previously reported in HSH. We report on a three-month-old Saudi girl who presented with hypocalcemic convulsions and was initially treated as nutritional rickets. However, further biochemical analysis of blood and urine were suggestive of HSH. This diagnosis was confirmed by mutation analysis, which identified a novel homozygous frame shift mutation (ins 2999T of the TRMP6 gene. A computed tomography brain scan, done around the time of diagnosis, identified bilateral basal ganglia calcification (BGC. Her serum calcium and the BGC improved with magnesium replacement. BGC can be added as a new feature of HSH and the case highlights the importance of measuring serum Mg in patients with hypocalcemic convulsions, particularly in children of consanguineous parents.

  13. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  14. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagala, Pawel; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Kurlapska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs) and to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Thirty five (22.2%) of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7%) of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%), and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%). In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined) were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined) were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group. Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  15. Role of VEGFA, CXCR4 and VHL mutation in tumour behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, Roeliene

    2014-01-01

    De ziekte van Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is een zeldzaam kankersyndroom. Patiënten met deze ziekte krijgen zowel goedaardige als kwaadaardige tumoren in verschillende organen. VHL-patiënten hebben een niet goed werkend VHL-eiwit waardoor er meer CXCR4, een chemokine receptor, en VEGFA, een

  16. Vhl deletion in renal epithelia causes HIF-1?-dependent, HIF-2?-independent angiogenesis and constitutive diuresis

    OpenAIRE

    Schönenberger, Désirée; Rajski, Michal; Harlander, Sabine; Frew, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest requirements for the formation of a solid tumor is the establishment of an adequate blood supply. Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) are highly vascularized tumors in which the earliest genetic event is most commonly the biallelic inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor gene, leading to constitutive activation of the HIF-1α and HIF-2α transcription factors, which are known angiogenic factors. However it remains unclear whether either or both HIF-1α or HIF-2α stabili...

  17. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ...

  18. Combined mutation and rearrangement screening by quantitative PCR high-resolution melting: is it relevant for hereditary recurrent Fever genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Pallares-Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent identification of genes implicated in hereditary recurrent fevers has allowed their specific diagnosis. So far however, only punctual mutations have been identified and a significant number of patients remain with no genetic confirmation of their disease after routine molecular approaches such as sequencing. The possible involvement of sequence rearrangements in these patients has only been examined in familial Mediterranean fever and was found to be unlikely. To assess the existence of larger genetic alterations in 3 other concerned genes, MVK (Mevalonate kinase, NLRP3 (Nod like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and TNFRSF1A (TNF receptor superfamily 1A, we adapted the qPCR-HRM method to study possible intragenic deletions and duplications. This single-tube approach, combining both qualitative (mutations and quantitative (rearrangement screening, has proven effective in Lynch syndrome diagnosis. Using this approach, we studied 113 unselected (prospective group and 88 selected (retrospective group patients and identified no intragenic rearrangements in the 3 genes. Only qualitative alterations were found with a sensitivity similar to that obtained using classical molecular techniques for screening punctual mutations. Our results support that deleterious copy number alterations in MVK, NLRP3 and TNFRSF1A are rare or absent from the mutational spectrum of hereditary recurrent fevers, and demonstrate that a routine combined method such as qPCR-HRM provides no further help in genetic diagnosis. However, quantitative approaches such as qPCR or SQF-PCR did prove to be quick and effective and could still be useful after non contributory punctual mutation screening in the presence of clinically evocative signs.

  19. Surveillance in von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Bisgaard, M L

    2010-01-01

    54 living vHL-mutation carriers, risks of intercurrent manifestations in-between surveillance examinations were determined and clinical consequences of surveillance findings evaluated. Current recommendations of annual ophthalmic and abdominal examinations corresponded to acceptably low intercurrent...... for the patient. Also, pre-symptomatic surveillance increased cumulative incidence of clinical vHL diagnosis from 46% to 72% and from 89% to 94% by age 30 and 50 years, respectively. The present results promote optimization of surveillance, expectantly improving clinical vHL outcomes....

  20. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Berends, M.J.; Wu, Y.; Sijmons, R.H.; Hollema, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Walle, H.E. de; Vries, E.G.F. de; Karrenbeld, A.; Buys, C.H.C.M.; Zee, A.G. van der; Hofstra, R.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. AIM: To analyse the value of family history,

  1. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R C; Berends, M J W; Wu, Y; Sijmons, R H; Hollema, H; Ligtenberg, M J L; de Walle, H E K; de Vries, E G E; Karrenbeld, A; Buys, C H C M; van der Zee, A G J; Hofstra, R M W; Kleibeuker, J H

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Aim: To analyse the value of family history,

  2. Genetic analysis of SPG4 and SPG3A genes in a cohort of Chinese patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xingjiao; Cen, Zhidong; Xie, Fei; Ouyang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Baorong; Zhao, Guohua; Luo, Wei

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP or SPG) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. At least 52 different gene loci have been identified so far, involving autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked (XL), and maternal inheritance. Mutations in the SPAST (SPG4) and ATL1 (SPG3A) genes are responsible for about 50% of pure AD-HSP patients. In this study, SPAST and ATL1 mutations were screened in 36 unrelated HSP patients (17 probands with AD family history and 19 sporadic HSP patients) by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA). We identified 3 micro-mutations and 2 exon deletions in SPAST gene and 2 micro-mutations in ATL1 gene. Four of five micro-mutations were novel and del. ex. 13-15 in SPAST was not reported previously. In this cohort of Chinese patients with spastic paraplegia, SPAST and ATL1 mutations were found in 5 of 17 HSP probands with AD family history and in 2 of 19 sporadic HSP patients. Four novel micro-mutations and one novel exon deletion were identified, which broadened the mutational spectrum of the genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chromosome 10 and RET gene copy number alterations in hereditary and sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampi, Raffaele; Romei, Cristina; Cosci, Barbara; Vivaldi, Agnese; Bottici, Valeria; Renzini, Giulia; Ugolini, Clara; Tacito, Alessia; Basolo, Fulvio; Pinchera, Aldo; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-02

    About 30% of hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC) have been demonstrated to harbour imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET alleles. We studied the RET copy number alterations (RET CNA) in 65 MTC and their correlation with RET mutation and patients' outcome. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization and Real-time PCR revealed RET CNA in 27.7% MTC but only in a variable percentage of cells. In sporadic MTC, RET CNA were represented by chromosome 10 aneuploidy while in hereditary MTC by RET amplification. A significant higher prevalence of RET CNA was observed in RET mutated MTC (P=0.003). RET CNA was also associated to a poorer outcome (P=0.005). However, the multivariate analysis revealed that only RET mutation and advanced clinical stage correlated with the worst outcome. In conclusion, 30% MTC harbour RET CNA in variable percentage of cells suggesting cell heterogeneity. RET CNA can be considered a poor prognostic factor potentiating the poor prognostic role of RET mutation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A genome-scale DNA repair RNAi screen identifies SPG48 as a novel gene associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołaj Słabicki

    Full Text Available DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair.

  5. Multiple-gene panel analysis in a case series of 255 women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedaldi, Gianluca; Tebaldi, Michela; Zampiga, Valentina; Danesi, Rita; Arcangeli, Valentina; Ravegnani, Mila; Cangini, Ilaria; Pirini, Francesca; Petracci, Elisabetta; Rocca, Andrea; Falcini, Fabio; Amadori, Dino; Calistri, Daniele

    2017-07-18

    As new genes predisposing to breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) are constantly emerging, the use of panels of genes analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is increasing in clinical diagnostics. The identification of a large number of new germline mutations allows for deeper knowledge of cancer predisposition, although raising many questions about patient management.BC and OC patients recruited by our counseling service between 2012-2015 were included in this study. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and a panel of 94 genes involved in hereditary tumors was analyzed by NGS. Patient clinical features of BC and OC and cancer family history were collected and compared to the patient genetic profile.A total of 255 women were analyzed, 57 of whom had a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 genes, and 17 carried pathogenic mutations in other genes, such as PALB2, ATM, BRIP1, RAD51D, MSH6, PPM1D, RECQL4, ERCC3, TSC2, SLX4 and other Fanconi anemia genes.Patients with a pathogenic mutation in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 showed no significant difference from the BRCA1/2-mutated carriers with respect to age at diagnosis and clinical features, suggesting that mutations in other genes could pose a high risk of cancer development.These patients had a much higher percentage of bilateral breast cancer (BBC) and a lower rate of OC than BRCA-mutated patients and patients with no pathogenic mutations: as a consequence, the surveillance protocol should be customized to the patient genetic characteristics.

  6. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Tai Timothy; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2017-01-01

    An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese) patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC), cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272), 6.8% (16/236) and 8.2% (13/159), respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272). Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T) and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG), were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0%) than patients with OC (25.0%) or BC (8.6%) alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes. PMID:28961279

  7. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Tai Timothy; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Peng-Hui; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2017-01-01

    An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese) patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC), cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272), 6.8% (16/236) and 8.2% (13/159), respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272). Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T) and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG), were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0%) than patients with OC (25.0%) or BC (8.6%) alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  8. Von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Harbud, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    cell carcinoma), the adrenal glands (pheochromocytoma), the pancreas, as well as in other organs. As many different organs can be affected, several medical specialities often take part in both diagnosis and treatment of manifestations. vHL should be suspected in individuals with a family history...

  9. Hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Sébastien; Lavie, Julie; Banneau, Guillaume; Voirand, Nathalie; Lavandier, Karine; Debouverie, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous group of diseases little known in clinical practice due to its low prevalence, slow progression, and difficult diagnosis. This results in an underestimation of HSP leading to belated diagnosis and management. In depth diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and identification of genomic mutations. We describe the clinical presentation and pathogeny of HSP through a report of a case due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene (SPG31). A 64-year-old woman presented gait disturbances due to spasticity of the lower limbs progressing since her third decade. Previous investigations failed to find any cause. DNA analysis was performed to search for HSP causing mutations. A novel heterozygote mutation (c.595 + 1G>A) of the REEP1 gene, within the splice site of intron 6, was discovered. This nucleotide change causes exon 6 skipping leading to frame shift and a truncated transcript identified by complementary DNA sequencing of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products. REEP1 is a known protein predominantly located in the upper motor neurons. Mutation of REEP1 primary affects the longest axons explaining predominance of pyramidal syndrome on lower limbs. Slow progressive pyramidal syndrome of the lower limbs should elicit a diagnosis of HSP. We describe a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene causing HSP. Pathogeny is based on resulting abnormal REEP1 protein which is involved in the development of longest axons constituting the corticospinal tracts.

  10. Mutational analysis ofBRCA1andBRCA2genes in Peruvian families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buleje, Jose; Guevara-Fujita, Maria; Acosta, Oscar; Huaman, Francia D P; Danos, Pierina; Murillo, Alexis; Pinto, Joseph A; Araujo, Jhajaira M; Aguilar, Alfredo; Ponce, Jaime; Vigil, Carlos; Castaneda, Carlos; Calderon, Gabriela; Gomez, Henry L; Fujita, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies in the world. In Peru, breast cancer is the second cause of death among women. Five to ten percent of patients present a high genetic predisposition due to BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations. We performed a comprehensive analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect large rearrangements in patients from 18 families, which met the criteria for hereditary breast cancer. In this series, we found four pathogenic mutations, three previously reported ( BRCA1 : c.302-1G>C and c.815_824dup10; BRCA2 : c.5946delT) and a duplication of adenines in exon 15 in BRCA1 gene (c.4647_4648dupAA, ClinVar SCV000256598.1). We also found two exonic and four intronic variants of unknown significance and 28 polymorphic variants. This is the first report to determine the spectrum of mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in Peruvian families selected by clinical and genetic criteria. The alteration rate in BRCA1/BRCA2 with proven pathogenic mutation was 22.2% (4 out 18) and this finding could be influenced by the reduced sample size or clinical criteria. In addition, we found three known BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and a BRCA1 c.4647_4648dupAA as a novel pathogenic mutation.

  11. Mutations in the ALK-1 gene and the phenotype of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in two large Danish families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Brusgaard, K; Poulsen, L

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the ENG gene on chromosome 9 (HHT 1) and in the ALK-1 gene on chromosome 12 (HHT 2) have been reported as causes of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT 1 has been correlated with a higher prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations than HHT 2. Other distinct...... phenotype-genotype correlations have not been described. The prevalence of HHT in the county of Fyn, Denmark, was 15.6 per 100,000 on January 1, 1995. All living patients and their first-degree relatives were invited to attend a detailed clinical examination and blood was drawn for mutation analysis. In two...... families mutations were identified in exon 8 of the ALK-1 gene. In family 6 we found a T1193A mutation. In this family a high prevalence of PAVM and severe GI bleeding was documented, while in family 8 with a C1120T mutation no individuals with PAVM were identified and only one patient had a history...

  12. Exceptions to the rule: case studies in the prediction of pathogenicity for genetic variants in hereditary cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, E T; Bowles, K R; Pruss, D; van Kan, A; Vail, P J; McElroy, H; Wenstrup, R J

    2015-12-01

    Based on current consensus guidelines and standard practice, many genetic variants detected in clinical testing are classified as disease causing based on their predicted impact on the normal expression or function of the gene in the absence of additional data. However, our laboratory has identified a subset of such variants in hereditary cancer genes for which compelling contradictory evidence emerged after the initial evaluation following the first observation of the variant. Three representative examples of variants in BRCA1, BRCA2 and MSH2 that are predicted to disrupt splicing, prematurely truncate the protein, or remove the start codon were evaluated for pathogenicity by analyzing clinical data with multiple classification algorithms. Available clinical data for all three variants contradicts the expected pathogenic classification. These variants illustrate potential pitfalls associated with standard approaches to variant classification as well as the challenges associated with monitoring data, updating classifications, and reporting potentially contradictory interpretations to the clinicians responsible for translating test outcomes to appropriate clinical action. It is important to address these challenges now as the model for clinical testing moves toward the use of large multi-gene panels and whole exome/genome analysis, which will dramatically increase the number of genetic variants identified. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, Juan I

    2011-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases encompass different rare clinical entities characterized by recurrent acute inflammatory episodes secondary to a dysregulated inflammatory process. Since their first clinical descriptions, the Mendelian hereditary nature of some of them became evident, with their genetic and molecular basis being recently elucidated. There are disease-causing mutations in genes encoding for different proteins involved in the innate immune response and inflammation. Herein, we will introduce the reader to an updated review of the main clinical, physiopathological and therapeutic features of the different hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of novel mutations in HFE, HFE2, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes in Chinese patients affected by hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongwei; Du, Yali; Liu, Gang; Guo, Shanshan; Hou, Bo; Jiang, Xianyong; Han, Bing; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a group of inherited iron-overload disorders associated with pathogenic defects in the genes encoding hemochromatosis (HFE), hemojuvelin (HJV/HFE2), hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2), and ferroportin (FPN1/SLC40A1) proteins, and the clinical features are well described. However, there have been only a few detailed reports of HH in Chinese populations. Thus, there is insufficient patient information for population-based analyses in Chinese populations or comparative studies among different ethical groups. In the current work, we describe eight Chinese cases of hereditary hemochromatosis. Gene sequencing results revealed eight mutations (five novel mutations) in HFE, HFE2, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes in these Chinese HH patients. In addition, we used Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 (Polyphen), Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT), and a sequence alignment program to predict the molecular consequences of missense mutations.

  15. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thein, S.L.; Weatherall, D.J. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sampietro, M.; Rohde, K.; Rochette, J.; Lathrop, G.M.; Demenais, F.

    1994-02-01

    [open quotes]Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin[close quotes] (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the [beta]-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. The authors have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with [beta]-thalassemia and/or [alpha]-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. The results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably [beta]-thalassemia and the XmnI-[sup G][gamma] polymorphism, are accounted for in this analysis. Linkage with the [beta]-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. 39 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer using genomic capture targeting multiple candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castéra, Laurent; Krieger, Sophie; Rousselin, Antoine; Legros, Angélina; Baumann, Jean-Jacques; Bruet, Olivia; Brault, Baptiste; Fouillet, Robin; Goardon, Nicolas; Letac, Olivier; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Tinat, Julie; Bera, Odile; Dugast, Catherine; Berthet, Pascaline; Polycarpe, Florence; Layet, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnes; Frébourg, Thierry; Vaur, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), we developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based screening based on the capture of a panel of genes involved, or suspected to be involved in HBOC, on pooling of indexed DNA and on paired-end sequencing in an Illumina GAIIx platform, followed by confirmation by Sanger sequencing or MLPA/QMPSF. The bioinformatic pipeline included CASAVA, NextGENe, CNVseq and Alamut-HT. We validated this procedure by the analysis of 59 patients' DNAs harbouring SNVs, indels or large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 or BRCA2. We also conducted a blind study in 168 patients comparing NGS versus Sanger sequencing or MLPA analyses of BRCA1 and BRCA2. All mutations detected by conventional procedures were detected by NGS. We then screened, using three different versions of the capture set, a large series of 708 consecutive patients. We detected in these patients 69 germline deleterious alterations within BRCA1 and BRCA2, and 4 TP53 mutations in 468 patients also tested for this gene. We also found 36 variations inducing either a premature codon stop or a splicing defect among other genes: 5/708 in CHEK2, 3/708 in RAD51C, 1/708 in RAD50, 7/708 in PALB2, 3/708 in MRE11A, 5/708 in ATM, 3/708 in NBS1, 1/708 in CDH1, 3/468 in MSH2, 2/468 in PMS2, 1/708 in BARD1, 1/468 in PMS1 and 1/468 in MLH3. These results demonstrate the efficiency of NGS in performing molecular diagnosis of HBOC. Detection of mutations within other genes than BRCA1 and BRCA2 highlights the genetic heterogeneity of HBOC.

  17. Correlation between mutations and mRNA expression of APC and MUTYH genes: new insight into hereditary colorectal polyposis predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Gitana Maria; Fantini, Fabiana; De Iure, Sabrina; Di Nicola, Marta; Palka, Giandomenico; Valanzano, Rosa; Di Gregorio, Patrizia; Stigliano, Vittoria; Genuardi, Maurizio; Battista, Pasquale; Cama, Alessandro; Curia, Maria Cristina

    2015-10-28

    Transcript dosage imbalance may influence the transcriptome. To gain insight into the role of altered gene expression in hereditary colorectal polyposis predisposition, in the present study we analyzed absolute and allele-specific expression (ASE) of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mutY Homolog (MUTYH) genes. We analyzed DNA and RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 49 familial polyposis patients and 42 healthy blood donors selected according similar gender and age. Patients were studied for germline alterations in both genes using dHPLC, MLPA and automated sequencing. APC and MUTYH mRNA expression levels were investigated by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis using TaqMan assay and by ASE assays using dHPLC-based primer extension. Twenty out of 49 patients showed germline mutations: 14 in APC gene and six in MUTYH gene. Twenty-nine patients did not show mutations in both genes. Results from qRT-PCR indicated that gene expression of both APC and MUTYH was reduced in patients analyzed. In particular, a significant reduction in APC expression was observed in patients without APC germline mutation vs control group (P mutation carrier patients, although lower compared to control individuals, did not show statistical significance. On the other hand a significant reduced MUTYH expression was detected in patients with MUTYH mutations vs control group (P mutation carriers. In particular one case showed a complete loss of one allele. Among APC mutation negative cases, 4 out of 13 showed a moderate ASE. ASE of MUTYH did not show any altered expression in the cases analyzed. Spearman's Rho Test analysis showed a positive and significant correlation between APC and MUTYH genes both in cases and in controls (P = 0.020 and P gene mutation. Expression of APC is decreased in mutation negative cases and this appears to be a promising indicator of FAP predisposition, while for MUTYH gene, mutation is associated to reduced m

  18. Phospholamban Is Downregulated by pVHL-Mediated Degradation through Oxidative Stress in Failing Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Yokoe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The E3 ubiquitin ligase, von Hippel–Lindau (VHL, regulates protein expression by polyubiquitination. Although the protein VHL (pVHL was reported to be involved in the heart function, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that pVHL was upregulated in hearts from two types of genetically dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM mice models. In comparison with the wild-type mouse, both DCM mice models showed a significant reduction in the expression of phospholamban (PLN, a potent inhibitor of sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, and enhanced interaction between pVHL and PLN. To clarify whether pVHL is involved in PLN degradation in failing hearts, we used carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP-lowering reagent, to mimic the heart failure condition in PLN-expressing HEK293 cells and found that CCCP treatment resulted in PLN degradation and increased interaction between PLN and pVHL. However, these effects were reversed with the addition of N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Furthermore, the co-transfection of VHL and PLN in HEK293 cells decreased PLN expression under oxidative stress, whereas knockdown of VHL increased PLN expression both under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Together, we propose that oxidative stress upregulates pVHL expression to induce PLN degradation in failing hearts.

  19. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aponte, Jennifer [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sega, Gary A [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Dhar, Madhu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Withrow, Catherine [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  1. Characterization of a de novo 43-bp deletion of the Gs[alpha] gene (GNAS1) in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttikhuis, M.E.M.O.; Trembath, R.C. (Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)); Wilson, L.C. (Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom) Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)); Leonard, J.V. (Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-15

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, obesity, mental retardation, subcutaneous calcification, and brachy-metaphalangia. Two distinct forms of AHO exist; pseudohypoparathyroidism type I (PHPI) and pseudopseudohypoparathyrodism (PPHP). The classification is dependent upon the presence or absence, respectively, of resistance to parathyroid and other hormones that bind to Gs-protein-coupled membrane receptors stimulating adenylyl cyclase. Gs is a heterotrimeric protein comprising [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-subunits encoded by separate genes. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral leukocytes from 13 unrelated AHO patients. Exon 4 and flanking intronic sequence of GNAS1 were PCR amplified. A single PCR product corresponding to the expected 159-bp fragment was identified in 12 affected individuals with either PHPIa or PPHP. In patient 10285 an additional smaller fragment was detected but was not present in either of the unaffected parents. These two fragments were isolated from a 2% agarose gel. Direct sequencing of the smaller fragment revealed a 43-bp deletion comprising at least 35 hp of the 3[prime] end of exon 4 and the donor splice site of intron 4 and extending into the following intro. The 43-bp deletion would lead to a premature stop codon, 62 codons downstream of the deletion. The de novo mutation reported here is the largest deletion in the Gs[alpha] gene described so far for AHO patients.

  2. Characterization of Alu and recombination-associated motifs mediating a large homozygous SPG7 gene rearrangement causing hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni; Sánchez, Ivelisse; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-04-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7) is one of the most common forms of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (AR-HSP). Although over 77 different mutations have been identified in SPG7 patients, only 9 gross deletions have been reported with only a few of them being fully characterized. Here, we present a detailed description of a large homozygous intragenic SPG7 gene rearrangement involving a 5144-base pair (bp) genomic loss (c. 1450-446_1779 + 746 delinsAAAGTGCT) encompassing exons 11 to 13, identified in a Spanish AR-HSP family. Analysis of the deletion junction sequences revealed that the 5' breakpoint of this SPG7 gene deletion was located within highly homologous Alu sequences where the 3' breakpoint appears to be flanked by the core crossover hotspot instigator (chi)-like sequence (GCTGG). Furthermore, an 8-bp (AAAGTTGCT) conserved sequence at the breakpoint junction was identified, suggesting that the most likely mechanism for the occurrence of this rearrangement is by Alu microhomology and chi-like recombination-associated motif-mediated multiple exon deletion. Our results are consistent with non-allelic homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining in deletion mutagenesis for the generation of rearrangements. This study provides more evidence associating repeated elements as a genetic mechanism underlying neurodegenerative disorders, highlighting their importance in human diseases.

  3. Canine hereditary ataxia in old english sheepdogs and gordon setters is associated with a defect in the autophagy gene encoding RAB24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryline Agler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia.

  4. Microsatellite instability and novel mismatch repair gene mutations in northern Chinese population with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Qiu; Chan, Tsun Leung; Chan, Yee Wai; Huang, Ji Sheng; Chen, Ji Gui; Zhang, Ming Zhi; Guo, Xiu Lan; Mu, Hong; Chan, Annie Sy; Li, Shi Rong; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer with an early age of onset. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are found in the majority of HNPCC families and provide an opportunity for genetic diagnosis and prophylactic screening. The MMR gene mutation spectrum may vary across different populations and be influenced by founder mutations that prevail in specific ethnic groups. China is a big and ancient nation with enormous genetic diversity, which is especially notable between the northern and southern Chinese populations. A MMR gene mutation database for the southern Chinese population based in Hong Kong has been previously established. This study compares the MMR gene mutation spectrum and the MSI of HNPCC between the northern and southern Chinese populations. Twenty-five HNPCC families from northern China were systematically analyzed. The MSI analysis was performed using five loci in the USA National Cancer Institute (NCI) panel (D2S123, D5S346, BAT-25, BAT-26 and BAT-40) by PCR from the tumor and normal tissue. MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 were performed using immunohistochemical staining. Two founder mutations of MSH2 and MLH1 were examined by PCR base analyses using primers flanking the two deletion sites (c.1452_1455delAATG in MSH2 and 1.8 kb deletion involving exon 11 of MLH1). Of the 25 families collected, 19 met Bethesda guideline (BG) 1 and six met BG3. Twenty-two (15.7%) were extra-colonic cancers with gastric cancer (in seven patients) being the most common cancer type. Of the 25 tumors analyzed, 21 (84%) were high level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and four (16%) were microsatellite stable (MSS). Eighteen (86%) of the 21 MSI-H tumors showed loss of either the MLH1 or the MSH2 protein. Three MSI-H tumors and all four MSS tumors showed no loss of expression of the three MMR proteins. Out of the 21 patients with MSI

  5. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel; Salinas-Sánchez, Antonio S; Pandiella, Atanasio; del Peso, Luis; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas. PMID:23730213

  6. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias-González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5, also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas.

  7. Collection of Prostate Cancer Families and Mapping Additional Hereditary Prostate Cancer Genes (HPC2, HPC3..)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William

    2001-01-01

    Segregation analyses of familial prostate cancer have provided evidence for the existence of dominantly-acting prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, with such genes being estimated to be responsible...

  8. Collection of Prostate Cancer Families and Mapping Additional Hereditary Prostate Cancer Genes (HPC2, HPC3,...)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William

    2000-01-01

    Segregation analyses of familial prostate cancer have provided evidence for the existence of dominantly-acting prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, with such genes being estimated to be responsible...

  9. PATCHED and p53 gene alterations in sporadic and hereditary basal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, G.; Ahmadian, A.; Persson, A.; Undén, A. B.; Afink, G.; Williams, C.; Uhlén, M.; Toftgård, R.; Lundeberg, J.; Pontén, F.

    2001-01-01

    It is widely accepted that disruption of the hedgehog-patched pathway is a key event in development of basal cell cancer. In addition to patched gene alterations, p53 gene mutations are also frequent in basal cell cancer. We determined loss of heterozygosity in the patched and p53 loci as well as

  10. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  11. Case-control analysis of truncating mutations in DNA damage response genes connects TEX15 and FANCD2 with hereditary breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantere, Tuomo; Tervasmäki, Anna; Nurmi, Anna; Rapakko, Katrin; Kauppila, Saila; Tang, Jiangbo; Schleutker, Johanna; Kallioniemi, Anne; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Nieminen, Pentti; Hanhisalo, Riitta; Lehto, Sini; Suvanto, Maija; Grip, Mervi; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Tengström, Maria; Auvinen, Päivi; Kvist, Anders; Borg, Åke; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Greenberg, Roger A; Winqvist, Robert; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pylkäs, Katri

    2017-04-06

    Several known breast cancer susceptibility genes encode proteins involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and are characterized by rare loss-of-function mutations. However, these explain less than half of the familial cases. To identify novel susceptibility factors, 39 rare truncating mutations, identified in 189 Northern Finnish hereditary breast cancer patients in parallel sequencing of 796 DDR genes, were studied for disease association. Mutation screening was performed for Northern Finnish breast cancer cases (n = 578-1565) and controls (n = 337-1228). Mutations showing potential cancer association were analyzed in additional Finnish cohorts. c.7253dupT in TEX15, encoding a DDR factor important in meiosis, associated with hereditary breast cancer (p = 0.018) and likely represents a Northern Finnish founder mutation. A deleterious c.2715 + 1G > A mutation in the Fanconi anemia gene, FANCD2, was over two times more common in the combined Finnish hereditary cohort compared to controls. A deletion (c.640_644del5) in RNF168, causative for recessive RIDDLE syndrome, had high prevalence in majority of the analyzed cohorts, but did not associate with breast cancer. In conclusion, truncating variants in TEX15 and FANCD2 are potential breast cancer risk factors, warranting further investigations in other populations. Furthermore, high frequency of RNF168 c.640_644del5 indicates the need for its testing in Finnish patients with RIDDLE syndrome symptoms.

  12. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Henson

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  13. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of SPAST, the Gene Most Frequently Mutated in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Brian J.; Zhu, Wan; Hardaway, Kelsey; Wetzel, Jaime L.; Stefan, Mihaela; Albers, Kathryn M.; Nicholls, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70–80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3′-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP. PMID:22574173

  14. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2/PARK9 gene cause complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Martin, Shaun; Chamova, Teodora; Synofzik, Matthis; Timmann, Dagmar; Holemans, Tine; Andreeva, Albena; Reichbauer, Jennifer; De Rycke, Riet; Chang, Dae-In; van Veen, Sarah; Samuel, Jean; Schöls, Ludger; Pöppel, Thorsten; Mollerup Sørensen, Danny; Asselbergh, Bob; Klein, Christine; Zuchner, Stephan; Jordanova, Albena; Vangheluwe, Peter; Tournev, Ivailo; Schüle, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower limbs due to degeneration of the corticospinal motor neurons. In a Bulgarian family with three siblings affected by complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia, we performed whole exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping and identified a homozygous p.Thr512Ile (c.1535C > T) mutation in ATP13A2. Molecular defects in this gene have been causally associated with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (#606693), an autosomal recessive form of juvenile-onset parkinsonism, and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (#606693), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigments. Further analysis of 795 index cases with hereditary spastic paraplegia and related disorders revealed two additional families carrying truncating biallelic mutations in ATP13A2. ATP13A2 is a lysosomal P5-type transport ATPase, the activity of which critically depends on catalytic autophosphorylation. Our biochemical and immunocytochemical experiments in COS-1 and HeLa cells and patient-derived fibroblasts demonstrated that the hereditary spastic paraplegia-associated mutations, similarly to the ones causing Kufor-Rakeb syndrome and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, cause loss of ATP13A2 function due to transcript or protein instability and abnormal intracellular localization of the mutant proteins, ultimately impairing the lysosomal and mitochondrial function. Moreover, we provide the first biochemical evidence that disease-causing mutations can affect the catalytic autophosphorylation activity of ATP13A2. Our study adds complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78) to the clinical continuum of ATP13A2-associated neurological disorders, which are commonly hallmarked by lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunction. The disease presentation in our patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia was dominated by an adult-onset lower-limb predominant

  15. Next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the genetic diagnostics of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Weiss, Maximilian E R; Schneider, Juliane; Köster, Julia; Papachristos, Efstathios B; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zakharkina, Tetyana; Nahavandi, Nahid; Kovacevic, Lejla; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-03-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer mostly relies on laborious molecular tools that use Sanger sequencing to scan for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We explored a more efficient genetic screening strategy based on next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. We first validated this approach in a cohort of 115 samples with previously known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was amplified using the Ion AmpliSeq BRCA1 and BRCA2 panel. The DNA Libraries were pooled, barcoded, and sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine sequencer. The combination of different robust bioinformatics tools allowed detection of all previously known pathogenic mutations and polymorphisms in the 115 samples, without detecting spurious pathogenic calls. We then used the same assay in a discovery cohort of 95 uncharacterized hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA1 and BRCA2. In addition, we describe the allelic frequencies across 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients of 74 unique definitely and likely pathogenic and uncertain BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants, some of which have not been previously annotated in the public databases. Targeted next-generation sequencing is ready to substitute classic molecular methods to perform genetic testing on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and provides a greater opportunity for more comprehensive testing of at-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. VHL type 2B mutations retain VBC complex form and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Hacker

    Full Text Available von Hippel-Lindau disease is characterized by a spectrum of hypervascular tumors, including renal cell carcinoma, hemangioblastoma, and pheochromocytoma, which occur with VHL genotype-specific differences in penetrance. VHL loss causes a failure to regulate the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha, resulting in accumulation of both factors to high levels. Although HIF dysregulation is critical to VHL disease-associated renal tumorigenesis, increasing evidence points toward gradations of HIF dysregulation contributing to the degree of predisposition to renal cell carcinoma and other manifestations of the disease.This investigation examined the ability of disease-specific VHL missense mutations to support the assembly of the VBC complex and to promote the ubiquitylation of HIF. Our interaction analysis supported previous observations that VHL Type 2B mutations disrupt the interaction between pVHL and Elongin C but maintain partial regulation of HIF. We additionally demonstrated that Type 2B mutant pVHL forms a remnant VBC complex containing the active members ROC1 and Cullin-2 which retains the ability to ubiquitylate HIF-1alpha.Our results suggest that subtypes of VHL mutations support an intermediate level of HIF regulation via a remnant VBC complex. These findings provide a mechanism for the graded HIF dysregulation and genetic predisposition for cancer development in VHL disease.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several genes, including HAMP , HFE , HFE2 , SLC40A1 , and TFR2 , can cause hereditary hemochromatosis . Type 1 hemochromatosis results ... the HFE2 or HAMP gene. Mutations in the TFR2 gene cause type 3 hemochromatosis, and mutations in ...

  18. Novel LOVD databases for hereditary breast cancer and colorectal cancer genes in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Cong, Peikuan; Wang, Yue; Lin, Changsong; Yuan, Ying; Dong, Jian; Banerjee, Santasree; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yanling; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Mingqing; Hu, Peter; Zheng, Shu; Zhang, Jin; Qi, Ming

    2011-12-01

    The Human Variome Project (HVP) is an international consortium of clinicians, geneticists, and researchers from over 30 countries, aiming to facilitate the establishment and maintenance of standards, systems, and infrastructure for the worldwide collection and sharing of all genetic variations effecting human disease. The HVP-China Node will build new and supplement existing databases of genetic diseases. As the first effort, we have created a novel variant database of BRCA1 and BRCA2, mismatch repair genes (MMR), and APC genes for breast cancer, Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), respectively, in the Chinese population using the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) format. We searched PubMed and some Chinese search engines to collect all the variants of these genes in the Chinese population that have already been detected and reported. There are some differences in the gene variants between the Chinese population and that of other ethnicities. The database is available online at http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/. Our database will appear to users who survey other LOVD databases (e.g., by Google search, or by NCBI GeneTests search). Remote submissions are accepted, and the information is updated monthly. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An ochre mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene causes hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 -resistant rickets in three families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, H.H.; Hughes, M.R.; Thompson, E.T.; Pike, J.W.; O' Malley, B.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Malloy, P.J.; Feldman, D. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Hochberg, Z. (Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel))

    1989-12-01

    Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets is a rare autosomal-recessive disease resulting from target-organ resistance to the action of the active hormonal form of vitamin D. Four affected children from three related families with the classical syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets and the absence of detectable binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblasts were examined for genetic abnormalities in the VDR gene. Genomic DNA from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts of eight family members was isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Amplified fragments containing the eight structural exons encoding the VDR protein were sequenced. The DNA from all affected children exhibited a single C {yields} A base substitution within exon 7 at nucleotide 970. Although the affected children were all homozygotic for the mutation, the four parents tested all exhibited both wild-type and mutant alleles, indicating a heterozygous state. Recreated mutant receptor exhibited no specific 1,25-({sup 3}H)dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} binding and failed to activate a cotransfected VDR promoter-reporter gene construct. Thus these findings identify an ochre mutation in a human steroid hormone receptor in patients with hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets.

  20. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J.; van Rooij, Eva|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/273357115; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on “omics.” Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  1. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  2. A cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal screening of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; van Ballegooijen, M; Buskens, E; Kleibeuker, JK; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; Menko, FH; Khan, PM

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It has been estimated that the prevalence of carriers of a mutated mismatch repair (MMR) gene among the general population in Western countries is between 5 and 50 per 10,000. These carriers have a risk of >85% of developing colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and therefore need careful

  3. Our genes, our selves: hereditary breast cancer and biological citizenship in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrække, Kari Nyheim; Søiland, Håvard; Lode, Kirsten; Gripsrud, Birgitta Haga

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we explore the rise of 'the breast cancer gene' as a field of medical, cultural and personal knowledge. We address its significance in the Norwegian public health care system in relation to so-called biological citizenship in this particular national context. One of our main findings is that, despite its claims as a measure for health and disease prevention, gaining access to medical knowledge of BRCA 1/2 breast cancer gene mutations can also produce severe instability in the individuals and families affected. That is, although gene testing provides modern subjects with an opportunity to foresee their biological destiny and thereby become patients in waiting, it undoubtedly also comes with difficult existential dilemmas and choices, with implications that resonate beyond the individual and into different family and love relations. By elaborating on this finding we address the question of whether the empowerment slogan, which continues to be advocated through various health, BRCA and breast cancer discourses, reinforces a naïve or an idealized notion of the actively responsible patient: resourceful enough to seek out medical expertise and gain sufficient knowledge, on which to base informed decisions, thereby reducing the future risk of developing disease. In contrast to this ideal, our Norwegian informants tell a different story, in which there is no apparent heroic mastery of genetic fates, but rather a pragmatic attitude to dealing with a dire situation over which they have little control, despite having complied with medical advice through national guidelines and follow-up procedures for BRCA 1/2 carriers. In conclusion we claim that the sense of safety that gene testing and its associated medical solutions allegedly promise to provide proved illusory. Although BRCA-testing offers the potential for protection from adverse DNA-heritage, administered through possibilities for self-monitoring and self-management of the body, the feeling of 'being in

  4. SEOM clinical guidelines for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Begoña; Lastra, Enrique; Llort, Gemma; Brunet, Joan; Isla, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Research in genetics has facilitated the identification of highly penetrant genes responsible for a large number of diseases. In the oncology field, genetic counselling and gene testing are focused on the two most common syndromes in familial cancer: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome (LS). The objective of this guideline in hereditary cancer is to summarise the current state of knowledge and make recommendations in the areas of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hereditary cancer.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with recessive trait caused by mutation in KLC4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakli, Fatih; Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Yuksel, Sirin; Yakicier, Cengiz; Erguner, Bekir; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Yuceturk, Betul; Ozer, Bugra; Doganay, Selim; Tanrikulu, Bahattin; Seker, Askin; Akbulut, Fatih; Ozen, Ali; Per, Huseyin; Kumandas, Sefer; Altuner Torun, Yasemin; Bayri, Yasar; Sakar, Mustafa; Dagcinar, Adnan; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    We report an association between a new causative gene and spastic paraplegia, which is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Clinical phenotyping of one consanguineous family followed by combined homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing analysis. Three patients from the same family shared common features of progressive complicated spastic paraplegia. They shared a single homozygous stretch area on chromosome 6. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.853_871del19) in the gene coding the kinesin light chain 4 protein (KLC4). Meanwhile, the unaffected parents and two siblings were heterozygous and one sibling was homozygous wild type. The 19 bp deletion in exon 6 generates a stop codon and thus a truncated messenger RNA and protein. The association of a KLC4 mutation with spastic paraplegia identifies a new locus for the disease.

  6. Mutational analysis of RAD51C and RAD51D genes in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families from Murcia (southeastern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Bermúdez, Ana Isabel; Sarabia-Meseguer, Ma Desamparados; García-Aliaga, Ángeles; Marín-Vera, Miguel; Macías-Cerrolaza, José Antonio; Henaréjos, Pilar Sánchez; Guardiola-Castillo, Verónica; Peña, Francisco Ayala-de la; Alonso-Romero, José Luis; Noguera-Velasco, José Antonio; Ruiz-Espejo, Francisco

    2018-01-31

    RAD51C and RAD51D have been defined as susceptibility genes for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome in several studies. In the present study, a mutation analysis of these genes was performed on non BRCA1/2 families. RAD51C and RAD51D genes were analyzed in 141 and 77 families, respectively. The analysis included direct sequencing and multiple ligation probe analysis. The RAD51C pathogenic variant c.404G > A was identified in a breast and ovarian cancer family (0.7%), while the RAD51D pathogenic variant c.694C > T was described in an ovarian cancer family (1.3%). Moreover, three unknown clinical significance variants were detected: c.307T > G in RAD51C, and c.413A > G and c.715C > T in RAD51D. No large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) were found. RAD51D carriers suffered from premenopausal ovarian tumors. These results increase our knowledge about the RAD51C and RAD51D mutation spectrum and support the notion that these genes should be included in the gene panel testing performed on patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  8. Pathology of hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Groep, Petra; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high or moderate penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes, all contributing to the hereditary breast cancer spe...

  9. Difference in CXCR4 expression between sporadic and VHL-related hemangioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, Roeliene C; van Marion, Denise M S; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; de Groot, Jan C; Hoving, Eelco W; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Derks, Rosalie P H; Cornelissen, Chantal; van der Luijt, Rob B; Links, Thera P; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system hemangioblastomas occur sporadically and in patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease due to a VHL germline mutation. This mutation leads to enhanced transcription of chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), its ligand (CXCL12) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). We

  10. Prevalence, birth incidence, and penetrance of von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Galanakis, Michael Carter Bisgaard; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2017-01-01

    . We further used national health registers to identify individuals who fulfilled the clinical diagnostic vHL criteria based on their registered diagnostic codes, but had not been diagnosed with vHL. We also assessed the medical histories of first-degree relatives to identify familial cases. This study...

  11. [Ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, R; Schöls, L

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias are genetic disorders with age-dependent nearly complete penetrance. The mostly monogenetic etiology allows one to establish the diagnosis, study pathogenesis and to develop new causative therapeutic approaches for these diseases. Both the causative genes as well as the clinical presentation overlap considerably between hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias. This strongly argues towards a united classification for these two groups of diseases. Next generation sequencing technologies have greatly expanded the number of genes known to be causative for hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias and allow simultaneous time- and cost-effective diagnostic testing of > 200 genes. However, repeat expansions and large genomic deletions must be considered separately. Here, we suggest a pragmatic algorithm for genetic testing in hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias that we have developed in our specialized outpatient clinics. Detailed phenotyping remains crucial to interpret the multitude of genetic variants discovered by high throughput sequencing techniques. Despite recent technical advances, a substantial proportion of ataxia and spastic paraplegia families are still without a molecular diagnosis. Beside new and so far undetected ataxia and spasticity genes, unusual mutation types including noncoding variants and polygenic inheritance patterns may contribute. Because of these clinical, genetic, and technological challenges, patients with hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias should be referred to specialized centers offering research and clinical studies. This will also help to recruit representative patient cohorts for upcoming interventional trials.

  12. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. An individual with both MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome identified by multi-gene hereditary cancer panel testing: a case report

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    Stephanie A Cohen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of next-generation sequencing technology to interrogate multiple genes simultaneously is being utilized more frequently in hereditary cancer testing. While this has benefits of reducing cost and allowing clinicians to cast a wide net in the elucidation of their patient’s cancer, panel testing has the potential to reveal unexpected information. We report on a proband with pathogenic variants resulting in two different hereditary colon cancer syndromes.A 39-year-old male with a history of colon cancer, more than 20 colon polyps and a family history of colon cancer presented for genetic counseling. Testing with a 7-gene high-risk hereditary colon cancer panel identified a homozygous pathogenic variant, c.1187G>A (p.Gly396Asp in MUTYH, and a likely pathogenic duplication of exon 7 in MSH2. Since this test result, the proband’s mother was diagnosed with colon cancer; subsequent genetic testing confirmed she also carries the likely pathogenic duplication in the MSH2 gene.Although the cancer risk in individuals who carry multiple pathogenic variants has not been established for combined biallelic MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome, the identification of multiple pathogenic variants does allow for screening for cancers associated with both syndromes and has implications for cancer risk for family members. In particular, this has significant impact on those who test negative for a known familial pathogenic variant, yet could be still be at risk for cancer due to a second pathogenic variant in a family. More information is needed on the frequency of occurrence of multiple pathogenic variants, as well as the phenotypic spectrum when multiple pathogenic variants are present.

  14. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this re...... of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency....

  15. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Pylkäs

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211. Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  16. Variants of cancer susceptibility genes in Korean BRCA1/2 mutation-negative patients with high risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Soo; Lee, Seung-Tae; Nam, Eun Ji; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Hyung Seok

    2018-01-16

    We evaluated the incidence and spectrum of pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants of cancer susceptibility genes in BRCA1/2 mutation-negative Korean patients with a high risk for hereditary breast cancer using a comprehensive multigene panel that included 35 cancer susceptibility genes. Samples from 120 patients who were negative for BRCA1/2 mutations, but had been diagnosed with breast cancer that was likely hereditary, were prospectively evaluated for the prevalence of high-penetrance and moderate-penetrance germline mutations. Nine patients (7.5%) had at least one pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant. Ten variants were identified in these patients: TP53 in two patients, PALB2 in three patients, BARD1 in two patients, BRIP1 in two patients, and MRE11A in one patient. We also identified 30 types of 139 variants of unknown significance (VUS). High-penetrance germline mutations, including TP53 and PALB2, tended to occur with high frequency in young (cancer patients (4/19, 21.1%) than in those diagnosed with breast cancer at ≥35 years of age (1/101, 1.0%; p = 0.003). These combined results demonstrate that multigene panels offer an alternative strategy for identifying veiled pathogenic and likely pathogenic mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  17. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylkäs, Katri; Vuorela, Mikko; Otsukka, Meeri; Kallioniemi, Anne; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Winqvist, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs) in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211). Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  18. Hereditary truncating mutations of DNA repair and other genes in BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2-negatively tested breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhota, F; Zemankova, P; Kleiblova, P; Soukupova, J; Vocka, M; Stranecky, V; Janatova, M; Hartmannova, H; Hodanova, K; Kmoch, S; Kleibl, Z

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary breast cancer comprises a minor but clinically meaningful breast cancer (BC) subgroup. Mutations in the major BC-susceptibility genes are important prognostic and predictive markers; however, their carriers represent only 25% of high-risk BC patients. To further characterize variants influencing BC risk, we performed SOLiD sequencing of 581 genes in 325 BC patients (negatively tested in previous BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2 analyses). In 105 (32%) patients, we identified and confirmed 127 truncating variants (89 unique; nonsense, frameshift indels, and splice site), 19 patients harbored more than one truncation. Forty-six (36 unique) truncating variants in 25 DNA repair genes were found in 41 (12%) patients, including 16 variants in the Fanconi anemia (FA) genes. The most frequent variant in FA genes was c.1096_1099dupATTA in FANCL that also show a borderline association with increased BC risk in subsequent analysis of enlarged groups of BC patients and controls. Another 81 (53 unique) truncating variants were identified in 48 non-DNA repair genes in 74 patients (23%) including 16 patients carrying variants in genes coding proteins of estrogen metabolism/signaling. Our results highlight the importance of mutations in the FA genes' family, and indicate that estrogen metabolism genes may reveal a novel candidate genetic component for BC susceptibility. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Pulmonary artery pressure and iron deficiency in patients with upregulation of hypoxia sensing due to homozygous VHL(R200W) mutation (Chuvash polycythemia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, Craig A; Aliyu, Zakari Y; Dham, Niti; Nouraie, Mehdi; Sachdev, Vandana; Sidenko, Stanislav; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Polyakova, Lydia A; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Okhotin, Daniel J; Bushuev, Vladimir; Remaley, Alan T; Niu, Xiaomei; Castro, Oswaldo L; Gladwin, Mark T; Kato, Gregory J; Prchal, Josef T; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2012-02-01

    Patients with Chuvash polycythemia, (homozygosity for the R200W mutation in the von Hippel Lindau gene (VHL)), have elevated levels of hypoxia inducible factors HIF-1 and HIF-2, often become iron-deficient secondary to phlebotomy, and have elevated estimated pulmonary artery pressure by echocardiography. The objectives of this study were to provide a comprehensive echocardiographic assessment of cardiovascular physiology and to identify clinical, hematologic and cardiovascular risk factors for elevation of tricuspid regurgitation velocity in children and adults with Chuvash polycythemia. This cross-sectional observational study of 120 adult and pediatric VHL(R200W) homozygotes and 31 controls at outpatient facilities in Chuvashia, Russian Federation included echocardiography assessment of pulmonary artery pressure (tricuspid regurgitation velocity), cardiac volume, and systolic and diastolic function, as well as hematologic and clinical parameters. We determined the prevalence and risk factors for elevation of tricuspid regurgitation velocity in this population and its relationship to phlebotomy. The age-adjusted mean ± SE tricuspid regurgitation velocity was higher in VHL(R200W) homozygotes than controls with normal VHL alleles (2.5±0.03 vs. 2.3±0.05 m/sec, P=0.005). The age-adjusted left ventricular diastolic diameter (4.8±0.05 vs. 4.5±0.09 cm, P=0.005) and left atrial diameter (3.4±0.04 vs. 3.2±0.08 cm, P=0.011) were also greater in the VHL(R200W) homozygotes, consistent with increased blood volume, but the elevation in tricuspid regurgitation velocity persisted after adjustment for these variables. Among VHL(R200W) homozygotes, phlebotomy therapy was associated with lower serum ferritin concentration, and low ferritin independently predicted higher tricuspid regurgitation velocity (standardized beta=0.29; P=0.009). Children and adults with Chuvash polycythemia have higher estimated right ventricular systolic pressure, even after adjustment for

  20. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations...

  1. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  2. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  3. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line from a patient with triple negative breast cancer with hereditary exon 17 deletion of BRCA1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscelli, Frank; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Feraud, Olivier; Divers, Dominique; Portier, Lucie; Turhan, Ali G; Bennaceur Griscelli, Annelise

    2017-10-01

    BRCA1 germline mutation confers hereditary predisposition for breast and ovarian cancer. To understand the physiopathology of mammary and ovarian epithelial cancer transformation, and to identify early driver molecular events, we have generated an iPSC line from a patient carrying a germline exon 17 deletion in BRCA1 gene (BRAC1Ex17 iPSC) in a high-risk family context. Blood cells were reprogrammed used non-integrative virus of Sendaï. The BRCA1-deleted iPSC had normal karyotype, harboured a deletion in the exon 17 of the BRCA1 gene, expressed pluripotent hallmarks and had the differentiation capacity into the three germ layers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Homozygosity for a novel mutation in the C1q C chain gene in a Turkish family with hereditary C1q deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulez, N; Genel, F; Atlihan, F

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary complete deficiency of complement component C1q is associated with a high prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus and increased susceptibility to severe recurrent infections. An 11-year-old girl was screened for immunodeficiency due to a history of recurrent meningitis and pneumonia....... Immunologic studies revealed absence of classic pathway hemolytic activity and undetectable levels of Clq. Exon-specific amplification of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequence analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation at codon 48 in the C1q C gene causing a glycine......-to-arginine substitution affecting the collagen-like region of C1q. No changes were seen in the exons of the A and B chains. The mutation affected both the formation and the secretion of C1q variant molecules. We describe a novel mutation in the C1q C chain gene that leads to an interchange in amino acids resulting...

  5. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from a patient with triple negative breast cancer with hereditary exon 17 deletion of BRCA1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Griscelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 germline mutation confers hereditary predisposition for breast and ovarian cancer. To understand the physiopathology of mammary and ovarian epithelial cancer transformation, and to identify early driver molecular events, we have generated an iPSC line from a patient carrying a germline exon 17 deletion in BRCA1 gene (BRAC1Ex17 iPSC in a high-risk family context. Blood cells were reprogrammed used non-integrative virus of Sendaï. The BRCA1-deleted iPSC had normal karyotype, harboured a deletion in the exon 17 of the BRCA1 gene, expressed pluripotent hallmarks and had the differentiation capacity into the three germ layers.

  6. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810789

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  7. Alternative splicing of Spg7, a gene involved in hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes a variant of paraplegin targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mancuso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hereditary spastic paraplegia defines a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs owing to retrograde degeneration of corticospinal axons. One autosomal recessive form of the disease is caused by mutation in the SPG7 gene. Paraplegin, the product of SPG7, is a component of the m-AAA protease, a high molecular weight complex that resides in the mitochondrial inner membrane, and performs crucial quality control and biogenesis functions in mitochondria. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show the existence in the mouse of a novel isoform of paraplegin, which we name paraplegin-2, encoded by alternative splicing of Spg7 through usage of an alternative first exon. Paraplegin-2 lacks the mitochondrial targeting sequence, and is identical to the mature mitochondrial protein. Remarkably, paraplegin-2 is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. We find that paraplegin-2 exposes the catalytic domains to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, endogenous paraplegin-2 accumulates in microsomal fractions prepared from mouse brain and retina. Finally, we show that the previously generated mouse model of Spg7-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia is an isoform-specific knock-out, in which mitochondrial paraplegin is specifically ablated, while expression of paraplegin-2 is retained. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest a possible additional role of AAA proteases outside mitochondria and open the question of their implication in neurodegeneration.

  8. Mutational spectrum of the SPG4 (SPAST and SPG3A (ATL1 genes in Spanish patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribacoba Renne

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias (HSP are characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. At least 45 loci have been identified in families with autosomal dominant (AD, autosomal recessive (AR, or X-linked hereditary patterns. Mutations in the SPAST (SPG4 and ATL1 (SPG3A genes would account for about 50% of the ADHSP cases. Methods We defined the SPAST and ATL1 mutational spectrum in a total of 370 unrelated HSP index cases from Spain (83% with a pure phenotype. Results We found 50 SPAST mutations (including two large deletions in 54 patients and 7 ATL1 mutations in 11 patients. A total of 33 of the SPAST and 3 of the ATL1 were new mutations. A total of 141 (31% were familial cases, and we found a higher frequency of mutation carriers among these compared to apparently sporadic cases (38% vs. 5%. Five of the SPAST mutations were predicted to affect the pre-mRNA splicing, and in 4 of them we demonstrated this effect at the cDNA level. In addition to large deletions, splicing, frameshifting, and missense mutations, we also found a nucleotide change in the stop codon that would result in a larger ORF. Conclusions In a large cohort of Spanish patients with spastic paraplegia, SPAST and ATL1 mutations were found in 15% of the cases. These mutations were more frequent in familial cases (compared to sporadic, and were associated with heterogeneous clinical manifestations.

  9. Human Papillomavirus 16 E6 Contributes HIF-1α Induced Warburg Effect by Attenuating the VHL-HIF-1α Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Guo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in women worldwide, especially in the developing countries. It is a major metabolic character of cancer cells to consume large quantities of glucose and derive more energy by glycolysis even in the presence of adequate oxygen, which is called Warburg effect that can be exaggerated by hypoxia. The high risk subtype HPV16 early oncoprotein E6 contributes host cell immortalization and transformation through interacting with a number of cellular factors. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α, a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator involved in induction of numerous genes associated with angiogenesis and tumor growth, is highly increased by HPV E6. HIF-1α is a best-known target of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL as an E3 ligase for degradation. In the present work, we found that HPV16 E6 promotes hypoxia induced Warburg effect through hindering the association of HIF-1α and VHL. This disassociation attenuates VHL-mediated HIF-1α ubiquitination and causes HIF-1α accumulation. These results suggest that oncoprotein E6 plays a major role in the regulation of Warburg effect and can be a valuable therapeutic target for HPV-related cancer.

  10. Analysis of SLC40A1 gene at the mRNA level reveals rapidly the causative mutations in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speletas, Matthaios; Kioumi, Anna; Loules, Gedeon; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Tsitouridis, John; Christakis, John; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the SLC40A1 gene result in a dominant genetic disorder [ferroportin disease; hereditary hemochromatosis type (HH) IV], characterized by iron overload with two different clinical manifestations, normal transferrin saturation with macrophage iron accumulation (the most prevalent type) or high transferrin saturation with hepatocyte iron accumulation (classical hemochromatosis phenotype). In previous studies, the mutational analysis of SLC40A1 gene has been performed at the genomic DNA level by PCR amplification and direct sequencing of all coding regions and flanking intron-exon boundaries (usually in 9 PCR reactions). In this study, we analyzed the SLC40A1 gene at the mRNA level, in two RT-PCR reactions, followed by direct sequencing and/or NIRCA (non-isotopic RNase cleavage assay). This protocol turned out to be rapid, sensitive and reliable, facilitating the detection of the SLC40A1 gene mutations in two patients with hyperferritinemia, normal transferrin saturation and iron accumulation predominantly in macrophages and Kupffer cells. The first one displayed the well-described alteration V162 Delta and the second a novel mutation (R178G) that was further detected in two relatives in a pedigree analysis. The proposed procedure would facilitate the wide-range molecular analysis of the SLC40A1 gene, contributing to better understanding the pathogenesis of the ferroportin disease.

  11. Characterization of canine rod photoreceptor cGMP-gated cation channel alpha-subunit gene and exclusion of its involvement in the hereditary retinal dystrophy of Swedish Briards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veske, A; Nilsson, S E; Gal, A

    1997-11-20

    The nucleotide sequence of the canine rod photoreceptor cGMP-gated cation channel alpha-subunit (cCNCG1) cDNA has been determined. The open reading frame consists of 2073 nucleotides, which encode a putative protein of 691 amino acids. In addition, we have established the exon/intron boundaries of the cCNCG1 gene and determined the complete sequence of six introns of a total of eight. The exon/intron organization (location and length of exons and introns) of the cCNCG1 gene is very similar to that of the human rod photoreceptor cGMP-gated cation channel alpha-subunit gene. We used single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis to search for potential pathogenic sequence changes in the cCNCG1 gene in a Swedish Briard and Briard-Beagle dog kindred, in which an autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy is segregating, a disease which shows phenotypic similarities to retinitis pigmentosa, a heterogeneous group of hereditary and progressive retinal degeneration in human. In intron 3, we found several DNA polymorphisms, which do not cosegregate with the affected status of the dogs, thus excluding cCNCG1 as a candidate gene for the retinal dystrophy in this strain of Swedish Briards.

  12. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  13. The phenotype of polycythemia due to Croatian homozygous VHL (571C>G:H191D) mutation is different from that of Chuvash polycythemia (VHL 598C>T:R200W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasic, Nikica Ljubas; Piterkova, Lucie; Huff, Chad; Bilic, Ernest; Yoon, Donghoon; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Niu, Xiaomei; Nekhai, Sergei; Gordeuk, Victor; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-04-01

    Mutations of VHL (a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factors) have position-dependent distinct cancer phenotypes. Only two known inherited homozygous VHL mutations exist and they cause polycythemia: Chuvash R200W and Croatian H191D. We report a second polycythemic Croatian H191D homozygote distantly related to the first propositus. Three generations of both families were genotyped for analysis of shared ancestry. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to better define their phenotypes, with an emphasis on a comparison with Chuvash polycythemia. The VHL H191D mutation did not segregate in the family defined by the known common ancestors of the two subjects, suggesting a high prevalence in Croatians, but haplotype analysis indicated an undocumented common ancestor ∼six generations ago as the founder of this mutation. We show that erythropoietin levels in homozygous VHL H191D individuals are higher than in VHL R200W patients of similar ages, and their native erythroid progenitors, unlike Chuvash R200W, are not hypersensitive to erythropoietin. This observation contrasts with a report suggesting that polycythemia in VHL R200W and H191D homozygotes is due to the loss of JAK2 regulation from VHL R200W and H191D binding to SOCS1. In conclusion, our studies further define the hematologic phenotype of VHL H191D and provide additional evidence for phenotypic heterogeneity associated with the positional effects of VHL mutations.

  14. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  15. Mitochondrial Gene Therapy Improves Respiration, Biogenesis, and Transcription in G11778A Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and T8993G Leigh's Syndrome Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Kristen; Young, Kisha; Gnaiger, Erich; Rao, Raj R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many incurable mitochondrial disorders result from mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and impaired respiration. Leigh's syndrome (LS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of infants, and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes blindness in young adults. Treatment of LHON and LS cells harboring G11778A and T8993G mutant mtDNA, respectively, by >90%, with healthy donor mtDNA complexed with recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (rhTFAM), improved mitochondrial respiration by ∼1.2-fold in LHON cells and restored >50% ATP synthase function in LS cells. Mitochondrial replication, transcription, and translation of key respiratory genes and proteins were increased in the short term. Increased NRF1, TFAMB1, and TFAMA expression alluded to the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis as a mechanism for improving mitochondrial respiration. These results represent the development of a therapeutic approach for LHON and LS patients in the near future. PMID:22390282

  16. A novel A792D mutation in the CSF1R gene causes hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids characterized by slow progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiho Ueda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS is an autosomal dominant white matter disease that causes adult-onset cognitive impairment. The clinical manifestations are a variable combination of personality and behavioral changes, cognitive decline, parkinsonism, spasticity, and epilepsy. In 2012, mutations in the gene encoding colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R were identified as the cause of HDLS. As the numbers of reported mutations are limited, the understanding of whole pathogenesis needs accumulation of disease-causing mutations with detailed clinical descriptions. We describe a Japanese family with autosomal dominant adult-onset cognitive impairment and characteristic white matter lesions. Genetic testing revealed a novel p.A792D mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of CSF1R in two affected family members. The symptom profile of the present cases mostly matched the previously reported cases, with the notable exceptions of late-onset and long disease duration.

  17. A monograph proposing the use of canine mammary tumours as a model for the study of hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Katie; Merner, Nancy D

    2017-05-01

    Canines are excellent models for cancer studies due to their similar physiology and genomic sequence to humans, companion status and limited intra-breed heterogeneity. Due to their affliction to mammary cancers, canines can serve as powerful genetic models of hereditary breast cancers. Variants within known human breast cancer susceptibility genes only explain a fraction of familial cases. Thus, further discovery is necessary but such efforts have been thwarted by genetic heterogeneity. Reducing heterogeneity is key, and studying isolated human populations have helped in the endeavour. An alternative is to study dog pedigrees, since artificial selection has resulted in extreme homogeneity. Identifying the genetic predisposition to canine mammary tumours can translate to human discoveries - a strategy currently underutilized. To explore this potential, we reviewed published canine mammary tumour genetic studies and proposed benefits of next generation sequencing canine cohorts to facilitate moving beyond incremental advances.

  18. Cigarette smoking, von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations and sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B.A.C. van; Schouten, L.J.; Oosterwijk, E.; Hulsbergen van de; Kaa, C.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether smoking is associated with mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene in 337 cases of sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) among 120 852 people followed for 11.3 years; the findings suggest that smoking causes RCC independently of VHL gene mutations. © 2006 Cancer Research.

  19. Demonstration by transfection studies that mutations in the adrenocorticotropin receptor gene are one cause of the hereditary syndrome of glucocorticoid deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naville, D.; Barjhoux, L.; Jaillard, C. [Hopital Debrousse, Tours (France)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The hereditary syndrome of unresponsiveness to ACTH is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by low levels of serum cortisol and high levels of plasma ACTH. There is no cortisol response to exogenous ACTH. Recent cloning of the human ACTH receptor gene has enabled us to study this gene in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency. By using the PCR to amplify the coding sequence of the ACTH receptor gene, we identified three mutations in two unrelated patients. One mutation present in homozygous form converted the negatively charged Asp{sup 107}, located in the third transmembrane domain, to an uncharged Asn residue. The second patient was a compound heterozygote: the paternal allele contained a one-nucleotide insertion leading to a stop codon within the third extracellular loop, and the maternal allele contained a point mutation converting Cys{sup 235} to Phe, also in the third extracellular loop. Normal and mutant ACTH receptor genes were expressed in the M3 cell line, and intracellular cAMP production in response to ACTH was measured. For the mutant receptors, no response to physiological ACTH concentrations was detected, suggesting an impaired binding of ACTH to the receptors and/or an altered coupling to the adenylate cyclase effector. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Identification of a novel gene (HSN2) causing hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II through the Study of Canadian Genetic Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Ronald G; MacDonald, Marcia L E; Dube, Marie-Pierre; MacFarlane, Julie; O'Driscoll, Mary; Brais, Bernard; Meilleur, Sebastien; Brinkman, Ryan R; Dadivas, Owen; Pape, Terry; Platon, Christele; Radomski, Chris; Risler, Jenni; Thompson, Jay; Guerra-Escobio, Ana-Maria; Davar, Gudarz; Breakefield, Xandra O; Pimstone, Simon N; Green, Roger; Pryse-Phillips, William; Goldberg, Y Paul; Younghusband, H Banfield; Hayden, Michael R; Sherrington, Robin; Rouleau, Guy A; Samuels, Mark E

    2004-05-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impairment of pain, temperature, and touch sensation owing to reduction or absence of peripheral sensory neurons. We identified two large pedigrees segregating the disorder in an isolated population living in Newfoundland and performed a 5-cM genome scan. Linkage analysis identified a locus mapping to 12p13.33 with a maximum LOD score of 8.4. Haplotype sharing defined a candidate interval of 1.06 Mb containing all or part of seven annotated genes, sequencing of which failed to detect causative mutations. Comparative genomics revealed a conserved ORF corresponding to a novel gene in which we found three different truncating mutations among five families including patients from rural Quebec and Nova Scotia. This gene, termed "HSN2," consists of a single exon located within intron 8 of the PRKWNK1 gene and is transcribed from the same strand. The HSN2 protein may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of peripheral sensory neurons or their supporting Schwann cells.

  1. A Systematic Comparison of Traditional and Multigene Panel Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in More Than 1000 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Stephen E; Kobayashi, Yuya; Anderson, Michael J; Yang, Shan; Desmond, Andrea J; Mills, Meredith A; Nilsen, Geoffrey B; Jacobs, Kevin B; Monzon, Federico A; Kurian, Allison W; Ford, James M; Ellisen, Leif W

    2015-09-01

    Gene panels for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk assessment are gaining acceptance, even though the clinical utility of these panels is not yet fully defined. Technical questions remain, however, about the performance and clinical interpretation of gene panels in comparison with traditional tests. We tested 1105 individuals using a 29-gene next-generation sequencing panel and observed 100% analytical concordance with traditional and reference data on >750 comparable variants. These 750 variants included technically challenging classes of sequence and copy number variation that together represent a significant fraction (13.4%) of the pathogenic variants observed. For BRCA1 and BRCA2, we also compared variant interpretations in traditional reports to those produced using only non-proprietary resources and following criteria based on recent (2015) guidelines. We observed 99.8% net report concordance, albeit with a slightly higher variant of uncertain significance rate. In 4.5% of BRCA-negative cases, we uncovered pathogenic variants in other genes, which appear clinically relevant. Previously unseen variants requiring interpretation accumulated rapidly, even after 1000 individuals had been tested. We conclude that next-generation sequencing panel testing can provide results highly comparable to traditional testing and can uncover potentially actionable findings that may be otherwise missed. Challenges remain for the broad adoption of panel tests, some of which will be addressed by the accumulation of large public databases of annotated clinical variants. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hereditary Pancreatitis Associated With the N29T Mutation of the PRSS1 Gene in a Brazilian Family: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytz, Marcio Garrison; Mendes de Melo, Julia; de Castro Santos, Olga; da Silva Santos, Isabel Durso; Rodacki, Melanie; Conceição, Flavia Lucia; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is an autosomal-dominant disease with incomplete penetrance manifesting as early-onset chronic relapsing pancreatitis. A mutation in the PRSS1 gene is present in greater than 70% of HP kindreds and leads to a gain-of-function characterized by the increased autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, promoting autodigestion and damage to acinar cells. Other genetic defects observed in the pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis include mutations in the genes encoding SPINK1, CTRC, and CPA1. There are few reports of HP in Latin America, and no families have been investigated in Brazil. A case-control observational study was conducted at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital in Brazil. Patients with suspected HP and healthy controls were enrolled in this study, and a detailed questionnaire was administered to patients with HP. PRSS1 and SPINK1 genes were analyzed by DNA sequencing, and a family that fit the HP diagnostic criteria was identified. The neutral polymorphism c.88-352A > G in the SPINK1 gene was found to be prevalent in the individuals studied, but no important alterations were found in this gene. Ten out of 16 individuals in this family carried the N29T mutation in the PRSS1 gene, with 2 clinically unaffected mutation carriers. The median age of HP onset was 6 years. Pancreatic exocrine failure occurred in 6 patients, 5 of whom also had diabetes mellitus. Surgical procedures were performed on 3 affected members, and no cases of pancreatic cancer have been reported thus far. This study identified the first PRSS1 gene mutation in a Brazilian family with HP.

  3. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  4. Measurements of plasma methoxytyramine, normetanephrine, and metanephrine as discriminators of different hereditary forms of pheochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Timmers, H.; Mannelli, M.; Grebe, S.K.; Hofbauer, L.C.; Bornstein, S.R.; Tiebel, O.; Adams, K.; Bratslavsky, G.; Linehan, W.M.; Pacak, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pheochromocytomas are rare catecholamine-producing tumors derived in more than 30% of cases from mutations in 9 tumor-susceptibility genes identified to date, including von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL); succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B, iron sulfur (Ip) (SDHB); and

  5. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  6. [Hereditary carcinoma: pathogenesis and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungck, M

    2000-01-01

    Effective prevention of cancer in patients with a hereditary disposition to malignant tumours was made possible by intensive prevention programs and molecular diagnosis. Taken hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as an example this article deals with the pathogenesis and molecular diagnosis in hereditary dispositions to cancer. HNPCC is inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion and caused by germline mutations in genes responsible for detection an removal of DNA-basepair-mismatches (DNA-mismatch-repair-genes). The error rate in DNA replication is reduced thousandfold by these genes. A defective DNA-mismatch-repair results in tumours if the increased mutation rate causes alterations of tumour-suppressor- or oncogenes. HNPCC patients develop colorectal cancer but also tumours of the renal pelvis, the ureter, the small bowel, the endometrium and less often in other organs. The clinical presentation of these tumours may be characteristic, the clinical diagnosis may be guided by different clinical criteria catalogues. The suspicion is proven by the identification of a germline mutation in DNA-mismatch-repair-genes. This laborious diagnostic procedure is often preceded by prescreening procedures as the detection of microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical tests. Once the germline mutation is identified in a affected family member, the first degree relatives may be tested for this mutation. If they have inherited the mutation, they harbour a extremely high risk for developing cancer and therefore may be included in prevention programs. This so called predictive testing must be preceded by genetic counseling.

  7. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  8. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hirano

    Full Text Available We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome. In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79 had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  9. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  10. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  11. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....... affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing...

  12. Reevaluation of the linkage of an optic atrophy susceptibility gene to X-chromosomal markers in Finnish families with Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juvonen, V.; Aula, P.; Vilkki, J.; Nikoskelainen, E.; Savontaus, M.-L.

    1993-07-01

    One of the commonest reasons for sudden-onset optic nerve degeneration in young men can be attributed to maternally inherited Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) (Nikoskelainen et al. 1987). Specific point mutations at either np 11778 (Wallace et al. 1988) or np 3460 (Howell et al. 1991; Huoponen et al. 1991) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding for respiratory enzyme complex I subunits (i.e., ND4 or ND1) can be found in 70% of families. These mutations exist as being either homoplasmic or heteroplasmic, but the correlation between the degree of heteroplasmy and the risk of developing optic atrophy is far from clear (Holt et al. 1989; Vilkki et al. 1990). Neither does heteroplasmy explain the strong male bias seen in LHON families, when the sex ratio of patients with visual impairment is observed. Earlier results indicated that susceptibility to optic atrophy in Finnish families with LHON was probably determined by an X-chromosomal gene closely linked to DXS7. Contradictory results prompted reevaluation of the existence of an X-chromosomal visual loss susceptibility gene in Finnish LHON families. The results of this present study clearly demonstrate that the earlier close linkage to DXS7 is implausible. The altered Z is due to revised pedigrees, the use of liability classes, and separation of the families according to the associated mtDNA mutation. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: identification and clinical characterization of a novel mutation in the FH gene in a Colombian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Valencia, Carolina; Rodríguez López, Martha Lucia; Cardona Barreto, Andrea Yimena; Garavito Rodríguez, Edgar; Arteaga Díaz, Clara Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer Syndrome (HLRCC) is a rare disease and since the first report, it has been found in just over 200 families approximately, around the world (Smit et al. in Clin Genet 79:49-59, 2009). Patients in Colombia or in Latin America have not been described, as far as we know. HLRCC is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and it is caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the FH gene, which encodes the fumarate hydratase enzyme. It is characterized mainly by the appearance of cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, and an early-onset, aggressive form of type 2- papillary renal cell carcinoma (Smit et al. in Clin Genet 79:49-59, 2009; Schmidt and Linehan in Int J Nephrol Renovasc Dis 7:253-260, 2014]. We report a Colombian family with HLRCC syndrome, with a novel mutation in FH gene (c.1349_1352delATGA) in which cutaneous leiomyomas have not been found, but other clinical manifestations such as type 2- papillary renal cell carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas and rare tumors were present. This investigation constitutes the first report of HLRCC syndrome in Colombia, and probably in Latin America.

  14. Early onset hereditary hemochromatosis resulting from a novel TFR2 gene nonsense mutation (R105X) in two siblings of north French descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gac, G; Mons, F; Jacolot, S; Scotet, V; Férec, C; Frébourg, T

    2004-06-01

    The molecular basis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is more complex than previously expected. More than 80% of hemochromatosis probands of Northern European descent are homozygous for the C282Y HFE gene mutation. However, five novel non-related-HFE HH forms have now been identified. The transferrin receptor(TFR2)-linked form is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern and is considered to be an adult-onset syndrome. Until now, it has been associated with five mutations that have only been detected in Japanese and southern European patients. Here, we report the identification of a novel TFR2 nonsense mutation in two related French adolescents. We discuss the phenotype of this sibling pair from precedent biological and clinical findings as well as the expected role of TFR2 in iron homeostasis. Finally, we suggest that iron overload phenotypes associated with mutations in TFR2 may be intermediate between those related to mutations in HFE and those related to mutations in juvenile hemochromatosis genes.

  15. RAD50 and NBS1 are not likely to be susceptibility genes in Chinese non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Di, Gen-Hong; Cao, A-Yong; Hu, Zhen; Jin, Wei; Shen, Zhen-Zhou; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2012-05-01

    Deleterious mutations in several genes that are involved in repair of damage to DNA have been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Recent studies have shown sequence variants in two such genes, RAD50 and NBS1, which can be predisposed to breast cancer. The aim of this study is to elucidate the contribution of RAD50 and NBS1 germline mutations to the etiology of non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast cancer in China. We conducted a mutational analysis of RAD50 and NBS1 in genomic DNA from 384 Chinese women with early-onset breast cancer and/or affected relatives. All the coding exons and adjacent intronic splice junction rejoins of RAD50 and NBS1 were screened using PCR-DHPLC and DNA sequencing analysis. Among all cases, no obviously deleterious mutations were observed in RAD50; one synonymous change c.102G>A at codon 34 and one single nucleotide polymorphism IVS9 + 19C>T were identified in NBS1. Furthermore, there was no remarkable difference in the allele frequency of NBS1 c.553G>C (E185Q) between cases (172/384) and controls (182/420). Our results exclude the possible role of RAD50 and NBS1 in familial breast cancer predisposition in Chinese women, and there is no evidence for the recommendation of RAD50 and NBS1 for genetic testing in China.

  16. X-Linked Hereditary Nephropathy in Navasota Dogs: Clinical Pathology, Morphology, and Gene Expression During Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benali, S L; Lees, G E; Nabity, M B; Aricò, A; Drigo, M; Gallo, E; Giantin, M; Aresu, L

    2016-07-01

    X-linked hereditary nephropathy (XLHN) in Navasota dogs is a spontaneously occurring disease caused by a mutation resulting in defective production of type IV collagen and juvenile-onset renal failure. The study was aimed at examining the evolution of renal damage and the expression of selected molecules potentially involved in the pathogenesis of XLHN. Clinical data and renal samples were obtained in 10 XLHN male dogs and 5 controls at 4 (T0), 6 (T1), and 9 (T2) months of age. Glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were scored by light microscopy, and the expression of 21 molecules was investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction with selected proteins evaluated by immunohistochemistry. No significant histologic lesions or clinicopathologic abnormalities were identified in controls at any time-point. XLHN dogs had progressive proteinuria starting at T0. At T1, XLHN dogs had a mesangioproliferative glomerulopathy with glomerular loss, tubular necrosis, and interstitial fibrosis. At T2, glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were more severe, particularly glomerular loss, interstitial fibrosis, and inflammation. At T0, transforming growth factor β, connective tissue growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor α mRNA were overexpressed in XLHN dogs compared with controls. Clusterin and TIMP1 transcripts were upregulated in later stages of the disease. Transforming growth factor β, connective tissue growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor α should be considered as key players in the initial events of XHLN. Clusterin and TIMP1 appear to be more associated with the progression rather than initiation of tubulointerstitial damage in chronic renal disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveils a lack of driver-gene mutations linking non-hereditary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and highly prevalent second primary malignancies: random or nonrandom, that is the question

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Yu-Tung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The association of non-hereditary (sporadic) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second primary malignancies is known to be nonrandom, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, 136 of 749 (18.1%) patients with sporadic GISTs were found to have additional associated cancers, with gastrointestinal and genitourinary/gynecologic/breast cancers being the most prevalent. Gene mutations in GISTs and their associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) (n=9) were analy...

  18. Fifteen novel mutations in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, 2, 3, 4, 4L, 5 and 6 genes from Iranian patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Zahra; Didari, Elmira; Arastehkani, Ahoura; Ghodsinejad, Vadieh; Aryani, Omid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2013-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an optic nerve dysfunction resulting from mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is transmitted in a maternal pattern of inheritance. It is caused by three primary point mutations: G11778A, G3460A and T14484C; in the mitochondrial genome. These mutations are sufficient to induce the disease, accounting for the majority of LHON cases, and affect genes that encode for the different subunits of mitochondrial complexes I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Other mutations are secondary mutations associated with the primary mutations. The purpose of this study was to determine MT-ND variations in Iranian patients with LHON. In order to determine the prevalence and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in the LHON patients, their DNA was studied using PCR and DNA sequencing analysis. Sequencing of MT-ND genes from 35 LHON patients revealed a total of 44 nucleotide variations, in which fifteen novel variations-A14020G, A13663G, C10399T, C4932A, C3893G, C10557A, C12012A, C13934T, G4596A, T12851A, T4539A, T4941A, T13255A, T14353C and del A 4513-were observed in 27 LHON patients. However, eight patients showed no variation in the ND genes. These mutations contribute to the current database of mtDNA polymorphisms in LHON patients and may facilitate the definition of disease-related mutations in human mtDNA. This research may help to understand the disease mechanism and open up new diagnostic opportunities for LHON.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary angioedema Health Topic: Vascular Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary ...

  20. VHL loss in renal cell carcinoma leads to up-regulation of CUB domain-containing protein 1 to stimulate PKC{delta}-driven migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razorenova, Olga V; Finger, Elizabeth C; Colavitti, Renata; Chernikova, Sophia B; Boiko, Alexander D; Chan, Charles K F; Krieg, Adam; Bedogni, Barbara; LaGory, Edward; Weissman, Irving L; Broome-Powell, Marianne; Giaccia, Amato J

    2011-02-01

    A common genetic mutation found in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CC-RCC) is the loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, which results in stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), and contributes to cancer progression and metastasis. CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) was shown to promote metastasis in scirrhous and lung adenocarcinomas as well as in prostate cancer. In this study, we established a molecular mechanism linking VHL loss to induction of the CDCP1 gene through the HIF-1/2 pathway in renal cancer. Also, we report that Fyn, which forms a complex with CDCP1 and mediates its signaling to PKCδ, is a HIF-1 target gene. Mechanistically, we found that CDCP1 specifically regulates phosphorylation of PKCδ, but not of focal adhesion kinase or Crk-associated substrate. Signal transduction from CDCP1 to PKCδ leads to its activation, increasing migration of CC-RCC. Furthermore, patient survival can be stratified by CDCP1 expression at the cell surface of the tumor. Taken together, our data indicates that CDCP1 protein might serve as a therapeutic target for CC-RCC.

  1. A novel homozygous p.R1105X mutation of the AP4E1 gene in twins with hereditary spastic paraplegia and mycobacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Kong

    Full Text Available We report identical twins with intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia and short stature, born to a consanguineous family. Intriguingly, both children presented with lymphadenitis caused by the live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Two syndromes - hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP and mycobacterial disease - thus occurred simultaneously. Whole-exome sequencing (WES revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.R1105X of the AP4E1 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The p.R1105X mutation has no effect on AP4E1 mRNA levels, but results in lower levels of AP-4ε protein and of the other components of the AP-4 complex, as shown by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Thus, the C-terminal part of the AP-4ε subunit plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of the AP-4 complex. No abnormalities of the IL-12/IFN-γ axis or oxidative burst pathways were identified. In conclusion, we identified twins with autosomal recessive AP-4 deficiency associated with HSP and mycobacterial disease, suggesting that AP-4 may play important role in the neurological and immunological systems.

  2. Autosomal dominant transmission of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a dominant negative mutation of KIF1A, SPG30 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Lim, So-Hee; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Kim, Doyoun; Lee, Na-Yoon; Yoon, Tae-Sung; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Eunjoon; Lee, Jae-Ran

    2017-10-02

    KIF1A is a brain-specific anterograde motor protein that transports cargoes towards the plus-ends of microtubules. Many variants of the KIF1A gene have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and developmental delay. Homozygous mutations of KIF1A have been identified in a recessive subtype of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), SPG30. In addition, KIF1A mutations have been found in pure HSP with autosomal dominant inheritance. Here we report the first case of familial complicated HSP with a KIF1A mutation transmitted in autosomal dominant inheritance. A heterozygous p.T258M mutation in KIF1A was found in a Korean family through targeted exome sequencing. They displayed phenotypes of mild intellectual disability with language delay, epilepsy, optic nerve atrophy, thinning of corpus callosum, periventricular white matter lesion, and microcephaly. A structural modeling revealed that the p.T258M mutation disrupted the binding of KIF1A motor domain to microtubules and its movement along microtubules. Assays of peripheral accumulation and proximal distribution of KIF1A motor indicated that the KIF1A motor domain with p.T258M mutation has reduced motor activity and exerts a dominant negative effect on wild-type KIF1A. These results suggest that the p.T258M mutation suppresses KIF1A motor activity and induces complicated HSP accompanying intellectual disability transmitted in autosomal dominant inheritance.

  3. QUOTE-gene(ca) : Development of a counselee-centered instrument to measure needs and preferences in genetic counseling for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poeterse, A; Van Dulmen, S; Ausems, M; Beemer, F; Bensing, J

    Counselees' motives for seeking genetic counseling for hereditary cancer have already been investigated, however not using instruments based on counselees' perspective. In addition, expectations regarding the process of counseling have scarcely been assessed. This article describes the construction

  4. A mutation in the canine BHD gene is associated with hereditary multifocal renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis in the German Shepherd dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingaas, F; Comstock, KE; Kirkness, EF; Sorensen, A; Aarskaug, T; Hitte, C; Nickerson, ML; Moe, L; Schmidt, LS; Thomas, R; Breen, M; Galibert, F; Zbar, B; Ostrander, EA

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary multifocal renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis (RCND) is a naturally occurring canine kidney cancer syndrome that was originally described in German Shepherd dogs. The disease is characterized by bilateral, multifocal tumors in the kidneys, uterine leiomyomas and nodules

  5. Prevalence of von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma: results from The Netherlands cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwelingen, K.P. van; Dijk, B.A. van; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Schouten, L.J.; Gorissen, H.; Schalken, J.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Oosterwijk, E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biallelic von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene defects, a rate-limiting event in the carcinogenesis, occur in approximately 75% of sporadic clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). We studied the VHL mutation status in a large population-based case group. METHODS: Cases were identified within the

  6. Methylation profiles of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Guus M.; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P. M.; Bart, Joost; Vooijs, Marc; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    Aims: Tumour suppressor gene silencing through promoter hypermethylation plays an important role in oncogenesis. Carcinogenesis of hereditary cancers usually differs from that of their sporadic counterparts, but methylation has hardly been studied in hereditary ovarian cancer. The aim of this study

  7. A mutation in the SUV39H2 gene in Labrador Retrievers with hereditary nasal parakeratosis (HNPK provides insights into the epigenetics of keratinocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhya Jagannathan

    Full Text Available Hereditary nasal parakeratosis (HNPK, an inherited monogenic autosomal recessive skin disorder, leads to crusts and fissures on the nasal planum of Labrador Retrievers. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS using 13 HNPK cases and 23 controls. We obtained a single strong association signal on chromosome 2 (p(raw = 4.4×10⁻¹⁴. The analysis of shared haplotypes among the 13 cases defined a critical interval of 1.6 Mb with 25 predicted genes. We re-sequenced the genome of one case at 38× coverage and detected 3 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval with respect to the reference genome assembly. We genotyped these variants in larger cohorts of dogs and only one was perfectly associated with the HNPK phenotype in a cohort of more than 500 dogs. This candidate causative variant is a missense variant in the SUV39H2 gene encoding a histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9 methyltransferase, which mediates chromatin silencing. The variant c.972T>G is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved asparagine into a lysine in the catalytically active domain of the enzyme (p.N324K. We further studied the histopathological alterations in the epidermis in vivo. Our data suggest that the HNPK phenotype is not caused by hyperproliferation, but rather delayed terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. Thus, our data provide evidence that SUV39H2 is involved in the epigenetic regulation of keratinocyte differentiation ensuring proper stratification and tight sealing of the mammalian epidermis.

  8. Characterization of mutations in the CPO gene in British patients demonstrates absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and identifies relationship between hereditary coproporphyria and harderoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoril, J; Puy, H; Whatley, S D; Martin, C; Woolf, J R; Da Silva, V; Deybach, J C; Elder, G H

    2001-05-01

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is the least common of the autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyrias. It results from mutations in the CPO gene that encodes the mitochondrial enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase. A few patients have also been reported who are homoallellic or heteroallelic for CPO mutations and are clinically distinct from those with HCP. In such patients the presence of a specific mutation (K404E) on one or both alleles produces a neonatal hemolytic anemia that is known as "harderoporphyria"; mutations on both alleles elsewhere in the gene give rise to the "homozygous" variant of HCP. The molecular relationship between these disorders and HCP has not been defined. We describe the molecular investigation and clinical features of 17 unrelated British patients with HCP. Ten novel and four previously reported CPO mutations, together with three previously unrecognized single-nucleotide polymorphisms, were identified in 15 of the 17 patients. HCP is more heterogeneous than other acute porphyrias, with all but one mutation being restricted to a single family, with a predominance of missense mutations (10 missense, 2 nonsense, 1 frameshift, and 1 splice site). Of the four known mutations, one (R331W) has previously been reported to cause disease only in homozygotes. Heterologous expression of another mutation (R401W) demonstrated functional properties similar to those of the K404E harderoporphyria mutation. In all patients, clinical presentation was uniform, in spite of the wide range (1%-64%) of residual coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity, as determined by heterologous expression. Our findings add substantially to knowledge of the molecular epidemiology of HCP, show that single copies of CPO mutations that are known or predicted to cause "homozygous" HCP or harderoporphyria can produce typical HCP in adults, and demonstrate that the severity of the phenotype does not correlate with the degree of inactivation by mutation of coproporphyrinogen oxidase.

  9. Dissimilarity between sporadic, non-BRCA1/2 families and hereditary breast cancer, linked to BRCA genes, in the Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Aouatef; Gourabi, Mohamel El; Chabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2016-09-01

    Most breast cancers (90 %) are sporadic. Only 5-10 % of all cancer cases can be attributed to genetic defects. BRCA genes are strongly incriminated in the hereditary predisposition to the disease. The purpose of our study was to provide more efficient approach to identify pathogenic BRCA mutation carriers and to determine subgroups within the non-BRCA tumor class. Different clinicopathological features, reproductive factors, as well as psychosocial ones were compared in women carrying mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes (12 cases) with non-BRCA1/2 family tumors (36 cases) and age-matched sporadic cases, unselected for family history (44 cases). A BRCA-related class was yielded based on age at diagnosis (age ≤ 35 years; p = 0.1), molecular subtypes(the triple-negative subtype was predominant: 43 % of cases; p = 0.025) and age at menarche (p = 0.04). Furthermore, a "probably sporadic" class was distinguished using hormonal contraceptive use (through 30-40 years of age; p = 0.039), the number of full-term pregnancies (age ≥40 years; p = 0.01), age at menopause(age > 50 years; p = 0.04) and psychosocial factors (age ≥ 40 years; p = 0.01). However, analysis of non-BRCA1/2 family tumors indicated that they constitute a heterogeneous class, showing few perceptible differences with sporadic group, but distinct from BRCA1/2 tumors. In Tunisian population, breast cancer can be classified with a high level of accuracy as sporadic or related to BRCA germline mutations by combining different clinicopathological features and reproductive factors. This can be clinically useful in genetic counseling and decision making for BRCA genetic test.

  10. Trial end points and natural history in patients with G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy : preparation for gene therapy clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Byron L; Feuer, William J; Schiffman, Joyce C; Porciatti, Vittorio; Vandenbroucke, Ruth; Rosa, Potyra R; Gregori, Giovanni; Guy, John

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Establishing the natural history of G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is important to determine the optimal end points to assess the safety and efficacy of a planned gene therapy trial. OBJECTIVE To use the results of the present natural history study of patients with G11778A LHON to plan a gene therapy clinical trial that will use allotopic expression by delivering a normal nuclear-encoded ND4 gene into the nuclei of retinal ganglion cells via an adeno-associated virus vector injected into the vitreous. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective observational study initiated in 2008 was conducted in primary and referral institutional practice settings. Participants included 44 individuals with G11778A LHON, recruited between September 2008 and March 2012, who were evaluated every 6 months and returned for 1 or more follow-up visits (6-36 months) as of August 2012. EXPOSURES Complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and main measures. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Visual acuity, automated visual field testing, pattern electroretinogram, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Clinical measures were stable during the follow-up period, and visual acuity was as good as or better than the other visual factors used for monitoring patients. Based on a criterion of 15 or more letters from the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart, 13 eyes of 8 patients (18%) improved, but 24 months after the onset of symptoms, any further improvements were to no better than 20/100. Acuity recovery occurred in some patients despite continued marked retinal nerve fiber layer thinning indistinguishable from that in patients who did not recover visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Spontaneous improvement of visual acuity in patients with G11778A LHON is not common and is partial and limited when it occurs, so improvements in vision with adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy of a synthetic wild-type ND4 subunit gene should be

  11. A mutation at IVS1 + 5 of the von Hippel-Lindau gene resulting in intron retention in transcripts is not pathogenic in a patient with a tongue cancer?: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asakawa Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome predisposing the patient to a variety of malignant and benign neoplasms, most frequently hemangioblastoma, renal cell carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and pancreatic tumors. VHL is caused by mutations of the VHL tumor suppressor gene on the short arm of chromosome 3, and clinical manifestations develop if both alleles are inactivated according to the two-hit hypothesis. VHL mutations are more frequent in the coding region and occur occasionally in the splicing region of the gene. Previously, we reported that the loss of heterozygosity (LOH of the VHL gene is common in squamous cell carcinoma tissues of the tongue. Case Presentation We describe a case of squamous cell carcinoma in the tongue caused by a point mutation in the splicing region of the VHL gene and discuss its association with VHL disease. Sequence analysis of DNA extracted from the tumor and peripheral blood of the patient with squamous cell carcinoma revealed a heterozygous germline mutation (c. 340 + 5 G > C in the splice donor sequence in intron 1 of the VHL gene. RT-PCR analysis of the exon1/intron1 junction in RNA from tumor tissue detected an unspliced transcript. Analysis of LOH using a marker with a heterozygous mutation of nucleotides (G or C revealed a deletion of the mutant C allele in the carcinoma tissues. Conclusions The fifth nucleotide G of the splice donor site of the VHL gene is important for the efficiency of splicing at that site. The development of tongue cancer in this patient was not associated with VHL disease because the mutation occurred in only a single allele of the VHL gene and that allele was deleted in tumor cells.

  12. Hereditary cochleovestibular dysfunction due to a COCH gene mutation (DFNA9): a follow-up study of a family.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, W.I.M.; Bom, S.J.H.; Fransen, E.; Camp, G. van; Huygen, P.L.M.; Theunissen, E.J.J.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Cochleovestibular impairment was evaluated, in relation to age, in a longitudinal follow-up study on a Dutch family with a DFNA9 trait caused by a Pro51Ser mutation in the COCH gene on chromosome 14q12-q13. Fourteen cases were genotyped. The onset age of progressive impairment reported by the

  13. Mutation in the RPE65 gene causing hereditary retinal dystrophy in the Briard dogs: application of a new detection method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bechyňová, Renata; Dostál, Jaromír; Stratil, Antonín; Jílek, F.; Horák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2008), s. 176-179 ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500450578; GA ČR GD523/03/H076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : RPE65 gene * CSNB * dog Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.735, year: 2008

  14. Abnormal Igf2 gene in Prague hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats: its relation to blood pressure and plasma lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlecová, Michaela; Dobesová, Zdenka; Zicha, Josef; Kunes, Jaroslav

    2008-07-01

    Prague hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) rats represent a suitable model of metabolic syndrome. We have established the set of F(2) hybrids derived from HTG and Lewis progenitors to investigate the relationship between respective polymorphism(s) of Igf2 gene and blood pressure (BP) or other cardiovascular phenotypes. HTG rats had elevated systolic BP and plasma triglycerides but lower plasma cholesterol compared to Lewis rats of both genders. In males, there was higher mean arterial pressure, diastolic BP and relative heart weight in HTG than in Lewis rats. The results obtained in the total population of F(2) hybrids indicated strong segregation of Igf2 genotype with plasma triglycerides. There was no segregation of Igf2 genotype with any BP component except BP changes occurring after the blockade of either renin-angiotensin system (RAS) or NO synthase. When F(2) population was analyzed according to gender, male F(2) progeny homozygous for HTG Igf2 allele had significantly higher plasma triglycerides and greater BP changes after NO synthase blockade than those homozygous for Lewis allele. On the contrary, male F(2) progeny homozygous for HTG Igf2 allele had significantly lower plasma cholesterol and smaller BP changes after RAS blockade. PCR analysis of Igf2 gene by using of microsatelite D1Mgh22 has shown polymorphism between HTG and Lewis rats. Sequence analysis of cDNA revealed insertion of 14 nucleotides in HTG gene. In conclusion, polymorphism in Igf2 gene may be responsible for differences in lipid metabolism between HTG and Lewis rats. It remains to determine how these abnormalities could be involved in BP regulation by particular vasoactive systems.

  15. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

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    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  16. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  18. Body Mass Index and von Hippel-Lindau Gene Mutations in Clear-cell Renal Cancer: Results of the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, K.M.; Schouten, L.J.; Hudak, E.; Verhage, B.; Dijk, B.A.C. van; Hulsbergen - Kaa, C.A. van de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Body mass index (BMI) is an important risk factor for clear-cell renal cancer (cc-RCC). A common molecular alteration in cc-RCC is loss-of-function of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. We evaluated the association between BMI and VHL mutations in cc-RCC by using data from the Netherlands

  19. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, S F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian carcinomas are frequently caused by germline mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2 syndromes) and are often less associated with other hereditary syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni and Peutz-Jeghers. The BRCA1/2 proteins have a special role in DNA repair. Therefore, loss of function due to mutation causes an accumulation of mutations in other genes and subsequent tumorigenesis at an early age. BRCA1/2 mutations are irregularly distributed over the length of the genes without hot spots, although special mutations are known. Breast and ovarian cancer occur far more frequently in women with BRCA1/2 germline mutations compared with the general population. Breast cancer occurs increasingly from the age of 30, ovarian cancer in BRCA1 syndrome from the age of 40 and BRCA2 from the age of 50. Suspicion of a BRCA syndrome should be prompted in the case of clustering of breast cancer in 1st degree relatives, in particular at a young age, if breast and ovarian cancer have occurred, and if cases of male breast cancer are known. Breast carcinomas with medullary differentiation seem to predominate in BRCA syndromes, but other carcinoma types may also occur. BRCA germline mutations seem to occur frequently in triple-negative breast carcinomas, whereas an association with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is rare. Ovarian carcinomas in BRCA syndromes are usually high-grade serous, mucinous carcinomas and borderline tumors are unusual. Pathology plays a special role within the multidisciplinary team in the recognition of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes.

  20. Mutational and large deletion study of genes implicated in hereditary forms of primary hyperparathyroidism and correlation with clinical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Elena; Borsari, Simona; Saponaro, Federica; Bogazzi, Fausto; Urbani, Claudio; Mariotti, Stefano; Pigliaru, Francesca; Satta, Chiara; Pani, Fabiana; Materazzi, Gabriele; Miccoli, Paolo; Grantaliano, Lorena; Marcocci, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out genetic screening of the MEN1, CDKN1B and AIP genes, both by direct sequencing of the coding region and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay in the largest monocentric series of Italian patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) and Familial Isolated Hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). The study also aimed to describe and compare the clinical features of MEN1 mutation-negative and mutation-positive patients during long-term follow-up and to correlate the specific types and locations of MEN1 gene mutations with onset and aggressiveness of the main MEN1 manifestations. A total of 69 index cases followed at the Endocrinology Unit in Pisa over a period of 19 years, including 54 MEN1 and 15 FIHP kindreds were enrolled. Seven index cases with MEN1 but MEN1 mutation-negative, followed at the University Hospital of Cagliari, were also investigated. FIHP were also tested for CDC73 and CaSR gene alterations. MEN1 germline mutations were identified in 90% of the index cases of familial MEN1 (F-MEN1) and in 23% of sporadic cases (S-MEN1). MEN1 and CDC73 mutations accounted for 13% and 7% of the FIHP cohort, respectively. A CDKN1B mutation was identified in one F-MEN1. Two AIP variants of unknown significance were detected in two MEN1-negative S-MEN1. A MEN1 positive test best predicted the onset of all three major MEN1-related manifestations or parathyroid and gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors during follow-up. A comparison between the clinical characteristics of F and S-MEN1 showed a higher prevalence of a single parathyroid disease and pituitary tumors in sporadic compared to familial MEN1 patients. No significant correlation was found between the type and location of MEN1 mutations and the clinical phenotype. Since all MEN1 mutation-positive sporadic patients had a phenotype resembling that of familial MEN1 (multiglandular parathyroid hyperplasia, a prevalence of gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors and

  1. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  2. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  3. [Preventive resection of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancers are rare, accounting for at most 1-3% of gastric cancers. It can be caused by a mutation in the tumour-suppressor gene CDH1. A healthy person carrying a CDH1 mutation has a cumulative risk of developing gastric cancer of 70-80%. In most cases, gastric cancer is

  4. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and

  5. Prevalence of H63D, S65C and C282Y hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations in Slovenian population by an improved high-throughput genotyping assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupreht Ruth

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is a common genetic disease characterized by excessive iron overload that leads to multi-organ failure. Although the most prevalent genotype in HH is homozygosity for C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, two additional mutations, H63D and S65C, appear to be associated with a milder form of HH. The aim of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay for HFE mutations screening based on TaqMan technology and to determine the frequencies of HFE mutations in the Slovenian population. Methods Altogether, 1282 randomly selected blood donors from different Slovenian regions and 21 HH patients were analyzed for the presence of HFE mutations by an in-house developed real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology using shorter non-interfering fluorescent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-specific MGB probes. The assay was validated by RFLP analysis and DNA sequencing. Results The genotyping assay of the H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations in the HFE gene, based on TaqMan technology proved to be fast, reliable, with a high-throughput capability and 100% concordant with genotypes obtained by RFLP and DNA sequencing. The observed frequency of C282Y homozygotes in the group of HH patients was only 48%, others were of the heterogeneous HFE genotype. Among 1282 blood donors tested, the observed H63D, S65C and C282Y allele frequency were 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI 11.5 – 14.2%, 1.8% (95% CI 1.4 – 2.5% and 3.6% (95% CI 3.0 – 4.5%, respectively. Approximately 33% of the tested subjects had at least one of the three HH mutations, and 1% of them were C282Y homozygotes or compound heterozygotes C282Y/H63D or C282Y/S65C, presenting an increased risk for iron overload disease. A significant variation in H63D allele frequency was observed for one of the Slovenian regions. Conclusion The improved real-time PCR assay for H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations detection is accurate, fast, cost-efficient and ready for

  6. Prevalence of H63D, S65C and C282Y hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations in Slovenian population by an improved high-throughput genotyping assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukjati, Marko; Vaupotic, Tomaz; Rupreht, Ruth; Curin-Serbec, Vladka

    2007-11-23

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common genetic disease characterized by excessive iron overload that leads to multi-organ failure. Although the most prevalent genotype in HH is homozygosity for C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, two additional mutations, H63D and S65C, appear to be associated with a milder form of HH. The aim of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay for HFE mutations screening based on TaqMan technology and to determine the frequencies of HFE mutations in the Slovenian population. Altogether, 1282 randomly selected blood donors from different Slovenian regions and 21 HH patients were analyzed for the presence of HFE mutations by an in-house developed real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology using shorter non-interfering fluorescent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific MGB probes. The assay was validated by RFLP analysis and DNA sequencing. The genotyping assay of the H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations in the HFE gene, based on TaqMan technology proved to be fast, reliable, with a high-throughput capability and 100% concordant with genotypes obtained by RFLP and DNA sequencing. The observed frequency of C282Y homozygotes in the group of HH patients was only 48%, others were of the heterogeneous HFE genotype. Among 1282 blood donors tested, the observed H63D, S65C and C282Y allele frequency were 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11.5-14.2%), 1.8% (95% CI 1.4-2.5%) and 3.6% (95% CI 3.0-4.5%), respectively. Approximately 33% of the tested subjects had at least one of the three HH mutations, and 1% of them were C282Y homozygotes or compound heterozygotes C282Y/H63D or C282Y/S65C, presenting an increased risk for iron overload disease. A significant variation in H63D allele frequency was observed for one of the Slovenian regions. The improved real-time PCR assay for H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations detection is accurate, fast, cost-efficient and ready for routine screening and diagnostic procedures. The genotype frequencies in

  7. A missense mutation (Q279R in the Fumarylacetoacetate Hydrolase gene, responsible for hereditary tyrosinemia, acts as a splicing mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baklouti Faouzi

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tyrosinemia type I, the most severe disease of the tyrosine catabolic pathway is caused by a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH. A patient showing few of the symptoms associated with the disease, was found to be a compound heterozygote for a splice mutation, IVS6-1g->t, and a putative missense mutation, Q279R. Analysis of FAH expression in liver sections obtained after resection for hepatocellular carcinoma revealed a mosaic pattern of expression. No FAH was found in tumor regions while a healthy region contained enzyme-expressing nodules. Results Analysis of DNA from a FAH expressing region showed that the expression of the protein was due to correction of the Q279R mutation. RT-PCR was used to assess if Q279R RNA was produced in the liver cells and in fibroblasts from the patient. Normal mRNA was found in the liver region where the mutation had reverted while splicing intermediates were found in non-expressing regions suggesting that the Q279R mutation acted as a splicing mutation in vivo. Sequence of transcripts showed skipping of exon 8 alone or together with exon 9. Using minigenes in transfection assays, the Q279R mutation was shown to induce skipping of exon 9 when placed in a constitutive splicing environment. Conclusion These data suggest that the putative missense mutation Q279R in the FAH gene acts as a splicing mutation in vivo. Moreover FAH expression can be partially restored in certain liver cells as a result of a reversion of the Q279R mutation and expansion of the corrected cells.

  8. Development of synchronous VHL syndrome tumors reveals contingencies and constraints to tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Rosalie; Horswell, Stuart; Rowan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    with a germline VHL mutation. We report that tumors arising in this context are clonally independent and harbour distinct secondary events exemplified by loss of chromosome 3p, despite an identical genetic background and tissue microenvironment. We propose that divergent mutational and copy number anomalies......Background : Genomic analysis of multi-focal renal cell carcinomas from an individual with a germline VHL mutation offers a unique opportunity to study tumor evolution. Results : We perform whole exome sequencing on four clear cell renal cell carcinomas removed from both kidneys of a patient...... are contingent upon the nature of 3p loss of heterozygosity occurring early in tumorigenesis. However, despite distinct 3p events, genomic, proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses reveal evidence for convergence upon the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. Four germline tumors in this young patient...

  9. VHL negatively regulates SARS coronavirus replication by modulating nsp16 ubiquitination and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Chen, Shuliang; Hou, Panpan; Wang, Min; Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2015-04-03

    Eukaryotic cellular and most viral RNAs carry a 5'-terminal cap structure, a 5'-5' triphosphate linkage between the 5' end of the RNA and a guanosine nucleotide (cap-0). SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nonstructural protein nsp16 functions as a methyltransferase, to methylate mRNA cap-0 structure at the ribose 2'-O position of the first nucleotide to form cap-1 structures. However, whether there is interplay between nsp16 and host proteins was not yet clear. In this report, we identified several potential cellular nsp16-interacting proteins from a human thymus cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid screening. VHL, one of these proteins, was proven to interact with nsp16 both in vitro and in vivo. Further studies showed that VHL can inhibit SARS-CoV replication by regulating nsp16 ubiquitination and promoting its degradation. Our results have revealed the role of cellular VHL in the regulation of SARS-CoV replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Elevated homocysteine, glutathione and cysteinylglycine concentrations in patients homozygous for the Chuvash polycythemia VHL mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergueeva, Adelina I.; Miasnikova, Galina Y.; Okhotin, Daniel J.; Levina, Alla A.; Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatiana; Niu, Xiaomei; Romanova, Elena A.; Nekhai, Sergei; DiBello, Patricia M.; Jacobsen, Donald W.; Prchal, Josef T.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2010-01-01

    In Chuvash polycythemia, homozygous von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) 598C>T leads to increased hypoxia inducible factor-1α and 2α, thromboses and lower systemic blood pressures. Circulating homocysteine, glutathione, γ-glutamyltransferase and cysteinylglycine concentrations were higher in 34 VHL598C>T homozygotes than in 37 normal controls and cysteine was lower. Multivariate analysis showed elevated homocysteine independently associated with higher mean systemic blood pressures and elevated glutathione was associated with lower pressures to a similar degree. Among VHL598C>T homozygotes, homocysteine was elevated with low and normal folate concentrations, consistent with a possible defect in the remethylation pathway. The elevated glutathione and γ-glutamyltranserase levels correlated positively with cysteinylglycine, consistent with possible upregulation of a glutathione synthetic enzyme and γ-glutamyltransferase. Cysteinylglycine correlated inversely with cysteine, consistent with possible reduced cysteinyldipeptidase activity. We conclude that up-regulated hypoxia-sensing may influence multiple steps in thiol metabolism. The effects of the resultant elevated levels of homocysteine and glutathione on systemic blood pressure may largely balance each other out. PMID:18223282

  11. Crystal Structure of the Cul2-Rbx1-EloBC-VHL Ubiquitin Ligase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardote, Teresa A F; Gadd, Morgan S; Ciulli, Alessio

    2017-06-06

    Cullin RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) function in the ubiquitin proteasome system to catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from E2 conjugating enzymes to specific substrate proteins. CRLs are large dynamic complexes and attractive drug targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors and chemical inducers of protein degradation. The atomic details of whole CRL assembly and interactions that dictate subunit specificity remain elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of a pentameric CRL2VHL complex, composed of Cul2, Rbx1, Elongin B, Elongin C, and pVHL. The structure traps a closed state of full-length Cul2 and a new pose of Rbx1 in a trajectory from closed to open conformation. We characterize hotspots and binding thermodynamics at the interface between Cul2 and pVHL-EloBC and identify mutations that contribute toward a selectivity switch for Cul2 versus Cul5 recognition. Our findings provide structural and biophysical insights into the whole Cul2 complex that could aid future drug targeting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....... (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers...

  13. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  14. Hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena

    2008-10-01

    Persons carrying mutations for hereditary cancer syndromes are at high risk for the development of tumors at an early age, as well as the synchronous or metachronous development of multiple tumors of the corresponding tumor spectrum. The genetic causes of many hereditary cancer syndromes have already been identified. About 5% of all cancers are part of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Selective literature review, including evidence-based guidelines and recommendations. Clinical criteria are currently available according to which many hereditary cancer syndromes can be diagnosed or suspected and which point the way to further molecular genetic analysis. A physician can easily determine whether these criteria are met by directed questioning about the patient's personal and family medical history. The identification of the causative germ line mutation in the family allows confirmation of the diagnosis in the affected individual and opens up the option of predictive testing in healthy relatives. Mutation carriers for hereditary cancer syndromes need long-term medical surveillance in a specialized center. It is important that these persons should be identified in the primary care setting and then referred for genetic counseling if molecular genetic testing is to be performed in a targeted, rational manner.

  15. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation of the HIF2α degradation-related HIF2α-VHL complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaotian; Su, Xiaoru; Yu, Jiong; Liu, Jingqi; Shi, Xiaowei; Pan, Qiaoling; Yang, Jinfeng; Chen, Jiajia; Li, Lanjuan; Cao, Hongcui

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha (HIF2α), prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2), and the von Hippel Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) are three principal proteins in the oxygen-sensing pathway. Under normoxic conditions, a conserved proline in HIF2α is hydroxylated by PHD2 in an oxygen-dependent manner, and then pVHL binds and promotes the degradation of HIF2α. However, the crystal structure of the HIF2α-pVHL complex has not yet been established, and this has limited research on the interaction between HIF and pVHL. Here, we constructed a structural model of a 23-residue HIF2α peptide (528-550)-pVHL-ElonginB-ElonginC complex by using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. We also applied these methods to HIF2α mutants (HYP531PRO, F540L, A530 V, A530T, and G537R) to reveal structural defects that explain how these mutations weaken the interaction with pVHL. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) structural model of the HIF2α-VHL complex. Subsequently, MolProbity, an active validation tool, was used to analyze the reliability of the model. Molecular mechanics energies combined with the generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) and solvated interaction energy (SIE) methods were used to calculate the binding free energy between HIF2a and pVHL, and the stability of the simulation system was evaluated by using root mean square deviation (RMSD) analysis. We also determined the secondary structure of the system by using the definition of secondary structure of proteins (DSSP) algorithm. Finally, we investigated the structural significance of specific point mutations known to have clinical implications. We established a reliable structural model of the HIF2α-pVHL complex, which is similar to the crystal structure of HIF1α in 1LQB. Furthermore, we compared the structural model of the HIF2α-pVHL complex and the HIF2α (HYP531P, F540L, A530V, A530T, and G537

  16. Investigação genética da surdez hereditária: mutação do gene da Conexina 26 Genetic investigation of hereditary deafness: connexin 26 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Michele da Silva Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos houve grande progresso na localização de genes associados à deficiência auditiva hereditária, possibilitando diagnósticos cada vez mais precisos e precoces. Mutações no gene da Conexina 26 (GJB2 - Cx26 causam deficiência auditiva. Pela facilidade e benefício do rastreamento de mutações no gene GJB2, o teste genético está se tornando um importante recurso na saúde pública. O objetivo foi realizar pesquisa bibliográfica sobre a mutação do gene da Conexina 26 e sua influência na audição. Foi realizado um levantamento bibliográfico por meio de busca eletrônica utilizando os descritores: perda auditiva, genética, triagem genética, Conexina 26, nas bases de dados MEDLINE, SciELO e LILACS, desde a década de 90 até os dias atuais. Concluiu-se que a mutação 35delG da Conexina 26 está potencialmente vinculada a alguns casos de perda auditiva não esclarecida. A pesquisa desta mutação poderia ser incluída na bateria de exames de investigação etiológica da surdez indeterminada, uma vez que esclarece a etiologia de alguns casos e a sua identificação possibilita o aconselhamento genético.In the last few years, great progress has been made in the search for genes associated to hereditary hearing impairment, allowing more precise and earlier diagnosis. Connexin 26 gene mutations (GJB2 - Cx26 cause hearing impairment. Due to the easiness and benefits of the screening of mutations on the gene GJB2, genetic testing is becoming an important resource in public health. The aim of the present study was to conduct a literature research about the mutation of the Connexin 26 gene and its influence in hearing. It was carried out a literature review through electronic search using the keywords: hearing loss, genetics, genetic screening, and Connexin 26, at the databases MEDLINE, SciELO and LILACS, from the 90s to the present days. The results indicate that the 35delG mutation of Connexin 26 is potentially associated

  17. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social issues relevant to the given population in running the Hereditary Cancer Clinic.

  18. Hereditary gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous and highly prevalent disease, being the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer associated death worldwide. Most cases are sporadic and familial clustering is observed in about 10% of the cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and a single hereditary syndrome - Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) - has been characterised. Among families that fulfil the clinical criteria for HDGC, about 40% carry CDH1 germline mutations, the genetic cause of the others being unknown. The management options for CDH1 asymptomatic germline carriers are intensive endoscopic surveillance and prophylactic gastrectomy. In this chapter we review the pathophysiology and clinicopathological features of HDGC and discuss issues related with genetic testing and management of family members.

  19. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHL343 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available region, section 4; and merlin (NF2) gene, exons 2 through 16 and complete cds. 34 4.0 3 AC133850 |AC133850.1...ence. 34 4.0 6 AY123429 |AY123429.1 Papio anubis anubis neurofibromatosis type 2

  1. Pedigree and BRCA gene analysis in breast cancer patients to identify hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality of disease in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooei, Mina; Poornima, Subhadra; Salma, Bibi Umae; Iyer, Gayatri R; Pujar, Akhilesh N; Annapurna, Srirambhatla; Shah, Ashwin; Maddali, Srinivas; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2017-02-01

    Global burden of breast cancer is expected to increase to >2 million new cases every year by 2030 and 10% of these are likely to have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Identifying these individuals by pedigree and BRCA1/2 mutation analyses will enable us to offer targeted mutation testing and appropriate counseling. This study from a tertiary care hospital showed that of the 127 breast cancer patients on treatment during 2014-2015, 24 of them fulfilled the criteria of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome after detailed verbal autopsy and pedigree analysis, and BRCA1 and 2 next-generation sequencing done after pre-test counseling revealed mutations in 13 cases (54%), these included 9 BRCA1 mutations (69%) and 4 BRCA2 mutation (31%). Subsequent post-test counseling recommended targeted mutation analysis for 64 high-risk members in these 13 families with pathogenic mutations, which will help in surveillance for early detection, appropriate management, and prevention of the disease by decreasing the burden to both family and nation. Results from this preliminary study highlight the importance of genetic counseling, pedigree analysis, and genetic testing. It can be recommended that all oncology units should have a genetic counseling service for providing appropriate support to oncologists, patients, and families to prevent unnecessary testing; however, breast cancer screening program is incomplete without evaluating for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.

  2. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting

  3. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  4. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...

  5. A study of over 35,000 women with breast cancer tested with a 25-gene panel of hereditary cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Saundra S; Sandbach, John F; Gammon, Amanda; Patel, Gayle; Kidd, John; Brown, Krystal L; Sharma, Lavania; Saam, Jennifer; Lancaster, Johnathan; Daly, Mary B

    2017-05-15

    As panel testing becomes more common in clinical practice, it is important to understand the prevalence and trends associated with the pathogenic variants (PVs) identified. This is especially true for genetically heterogeneous cancers, such as breast cancer (BC), in which PVs in different genes may be associated with various risks and cancer subtypes. The authors evaluated the outcomes of genetic testing among women who had a personal history of BC. A total of 35,409 women with a single diagnosis of BC who underwent clinical genetic testing with a 25-gene panel were included in the current analysis. Women with multiple BCs and men with BC were excluded. The frequency and distribution of PVs were assessed for the overall cohort, among women with triple-negative BC (TNBC) (n = 4797), and by age at diagnosis. PVs were identified in 9.3% of women tested; 51.5% of PVs were identified in genes other than breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and BRCA2, including checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) (11.7%), ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM; ATM serine/threonine kinase) (9.7%), and partner and localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2) (9.3%). The prevalence of PVs in BRCA1, PALB2, BRCA1-associated RING domain 1 (BARD1), BRCA1-interacting protein C-terminal helicase 1 (BRIP1), and RAD51 paralog C (RAD51C) was statistically higher among women with TNBC. The PV rate was higher among women aged 59 years, and relatively constant (8.5%-9.0%) among women who were diagnosed between ages 40 and 59 years. These results demonstrate that panel testing increased the number of women identified as carrying a PV in this cohort compared with BRCA testing alone. Furthermore, the proportion of women identified who carried a PV in this cohort did not decrease between ages 40 and 59 years. Cancer 2017;123:1721-1730. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Hereditary hemochromatosis: genetic complexity and new diagnostic approaches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, D.W.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Bergmans, J.; Marx, J.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996, several novel gene defects have been detected, explaining the mechanism and diversity of iron-overload diseases. At least 4 main types of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) have been identified. Surprisingly, genes involved in HH encode for

  7. Hereditary ovarian cancer: beyond the usual suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2012-02-01

    In the past, hereditary ovarian carcinoma was attributed almost entirely to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with a much smaller contribution from mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Recently, three new ovarian cancer susceptibility genes have been identified: RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1. In addition, germline mutations in women with ovarian carcinoma have been recently identified in many of the previously identified breast cancer genes in the Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway. While mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 are each individually rare, together they make up a significant proportion of cases. With at least 16 genes implicated in hereditary ovarian cancer to date, comprehensive testing for ovarian cancer risk will require assessment of many genes. As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the practice of evaluating cancer susceptibility one gene at a time is rapidly becoming obsolete. New advances in genomic technologies will likely accelerate the discovery of additional cancer susceptibility genes and increase the feasibility of comprehensive evaluation of multiple genes simultaneously at low cost. Improved recognition of inherited risk will identify individuals who are candidates for targeted prevention. In addition, identifying inherited mutations in a variety of FA-BRCA pathway genes may aid in identifying individuals who will selectively benefit from PARP inhibitors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L.; Wedding, Iselin M.; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstr?m, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%)...

  9. pVHL co-ordinately regulates CXCR4/CXCL12 and MMP2/MMP9 expression in human clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struckmann, K; Mertz, Kd; Steu, S

    2008-01-01

    Loss of pVHL function, characteristic for clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), causes increased expression of CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which triggers expression of metastasis-associated MMP2/MMP9 in different human cancers. The impact of pVHL on MMP2/MMP9 expression and their relationship...

  10. Gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Turcot, Katia; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    The degree of disability in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia has been reported variable even in members of the same family (same gene mutation). Moreover, it has been established that patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia should be treated differently from cerebral palsy patients due to the progressive nature of this disease. However, the gait evolution of hereditary spastic paraplegia showing onset symptoms at an early age has been described as stable. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the walking ability and the influence of treatments on gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Clinical gait analyses were performed in six hereditary spastic paraplegia patients from the same family with a follow-up of 4-15 years. Based on the gait deviation index, results showed a large variation of walking ability in these patients and no statistical difference between the first and last examination. In fact, three patients have improved their gait (from childhood to adolescence) whereas three patients worsened their gait. Gait alterations in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous. Gait evolution in hereditary spastic paraplegia with early symptoms had a tendency to improve gait until adolescence with adapted treatments and to decline in the adulthood. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Committee opinion no. 634: Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A hereditary cancer syndrome is a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer, often with onset at an early age, caused by inherited mutations in one or more genes. Cases of cancer commonly encountered by obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric-gynecologic providers--such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer--are features of specific hereditary cancer syndromes. The most common hereditary cancer syndromes related to gynecologic cancer include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. A hereditary cancer risk assessment is the key to identifying patients and families who may be at increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Screening should include, at minimum, a personal cancer history and a first- and second-degree relative cancer history that includes a description of the type of primary cancer, the age of onset, and the lineage (paternal versus maternal) of the family member. In addition, a patient's ethnic background can influence her genetic risk. If a hereditary cancer risk assessment suggests an increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome, referral to a specialist in cancer genetics or a health care provider with expertise in genetics is recommended for expanded gathering of family history information, risk assessment, education, and counseling, which may lead to genetic testing.

  12. Homozygous p.M172K mutation of the TFR2 gene in an Italian family with type 3 hereditary hemochromatosis and early onset iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majore, S; Milano, F; Binni, F; Stuppia, L; Cerrone, A; Tafuri, A; De Bernardo, C; Palka, G; Grammatico, P

    2006-08-01

    The p.M172K TFR2 mutation was identified in two Italian siblings aged 32 and 40 years old with primary iron overload. The two patients showed a severe increase in serum iron indices. From the age of 25, the male sib also revealed abnormal levels of hepatic enzymes, presumably in relation to iron induced liver damage. Clinical findings seem to evidence that type 3 hemochromatosis can be more serious than classic hemochromatosis. This report adds two more type 3 hereditary hemochromatosis cases which suggest that TFR2 mutations could be more frequently involved in non-HFE hemochromatosis than has been actually thought.

  13. Nuclear matrix proteins and hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjakste, N; Sjakste, T

    2005-03-01

    The review summarizes literature data on alterations of structure or expression of different nuclear matrix proteins in hereditary syndromes. From the point of view of involvement of nuclear matrix proteins in etiology and pathogenesis of the disease hereditary pathologies can be classified in pathologies with pathogenesis associated with defects of nuclear matrix proteins and pathologies associated to changes of the nuclear matrix protein spectrum. The first group includes laminopathies, hereditary diseases with abnormal nuclear-matrix associated proteins and triplet extension diseases associated with accumulation of abnormal proteins in the nuclear matrix. Laminopathies are hereditary diseases coupled to structural defects of the nuclear lamina. These diseases include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with conduction system disease, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorder type 2, CMT2), mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD), Hutchison Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGS), Greenberg Skeletal Dysplasia, and Pelger-Huet anomaly (PHA). Most of them are due to mutations in the lamin A/C gene, one - to mutations in emerin gene, some are associated with mutations in Lamin B receptor gene. In Werner's, Bloom's, Cockayne's syndromes, Fanconi anemia, multiple carboxylase deficiency mutations in nuclear matrix protein or enzyme gene lead to deficient DNA repair, abnormal regulation of cell growth and differentiation or other specific metabolic functions. Proteins with a long polyglutamic tract synthesized in the cells of patients with dentato-rubral and pallido-luysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease interfere with transcription on the nuclear matrix. Down's syndrome is a representative of the group of diseases with altered nuclear matrix protein spectrum.

  14. Microtubular stability affects pVHL-mediated regulation of HIF-1alpha via the p38/MAPK pathway in hypoxic cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous research found that structural changes of the microtubule network influence glycolysis in cardiomyocytes by regulating the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α during the early stages of hypoxia. However, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanism of the changes of HIF-1α caused by microtubule network alternation. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL, as a ubiquitin ligase, is best understood as a negative regulator of HIF-1α. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In primary rat cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cardiac cells, microtubule-stabilization was achieved by pretreating with paclitaxel or transfection of microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4 overexpression plasmids and microtubule-depolymerization was achieved by pretreating with colchicine or transfection of MAP4 siRNA before hypoxia treatment. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for overexpressing pVHL or silencing of pVHL expression were constructed and transfected in primary rat cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells. With different microtubule-stabilizing and -depolymerizing treaments, we demonstrated that the protein levels of HIF-1α were down-regulated through overexpression of pVHL and were up-regulated through knockdown of pVHL in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Importantly, microtubular structure breakdown activated p38/MAPK pathway, accompanied with the upregulation of pVHL. In coincidence, we found that SB203580, a p38/MAPK inhibitor decreased pVHL while MKK6 (Glu overexpression increased pVHL in the microtubule network altered-hypoxic cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that pVHL plays an important role in the regulation of HIF-1α caused by the changes of microtubular structure and the p38/MAPK pathway participates in the process of pVHL change following microtubule network alteration in hypoxic cardiomyocytes.

  15. Hereditary Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Lakshmi; Jim, Belinda

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary kidney disease comprises approximately 10% of adults and nearly all children who require renal replacement therapy. Technologic advances have improved our ability to perform genetic diagnosis and enhanced our understanding of renal and syndromic diseases. In this article, we review the genetics of renal diseases, including common monogenic diseases such as polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Fabry disease, as well as complex disorders such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. We provide the nephrologist with a general strategy to approach hereditary disorders, which includes a discussion of commonly used genetic tests, a guide to genetic counseling, and reproductive options such as prenatal diagnosis or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for at-risk couples. Finally, we review pregnancy outcomes in certain renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  17. Characteristics of scientific production in Special Education in Virtual Health Library (VHL: a bibliometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pizzani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize, through bibliometric approach, the scientific literature in this Special Education in the databases of the Virtual Health Library (VHL. The VHL is coordinated by BIREME - Specialized Center of the Pan American Health Organization whose objective is to promote the dissemination and use of scientific information in health. Method: The research methodology was performed by observing the following steps: a literature review on education special and bibliometrics, data collection from the site of BIREME about the presence of special education in the databases, organization, processing and bibliometric analysis of data collected using the software MS Excel and Vantage Point. Results: indicators produced allow signal that the predominant language of scientific production was the Portuguese and the majority of records were written individually, the themes addressed were psychology and developmental psychology. Conclusion: These bibliometric indicators characterizing the state of the art of scientific literature in Special Education at the various bases Data Bireme and also showed a field of interconnections between Health Sciences and Special Education.

  18. Allelic variants of hereditary prions: The bimodularity principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhodeyev, Oleg N; Tarasov, Oleg V; Bondarev, Stanislav A

    2017-01-02

    Modern biology requires modern genetic concepts equally valid for all discovered mechanisms of inheritance, either "canonical" (mediated by DNA sequences) or epigenetic. Applying basic genetic terms such as "gene" and "allele" to protein hereditary factors is one of the necessary steps toward these concepts. The basic idea that different variants of the same prion protein can be considered as alleles has been previously proposed by Chernoff and Tuite. In this paper, the notion of prion allele is further developed. We propose the idea that any prion allele is a bimodular hereditary system that depends on a certain DNA sequence (DNA determinant) and a certain epigenetic mark (epigenetic determinant). Alteration of any of these 2 determinants may lead to establishment of a new prion allele. The bimodularity principle is valid not only for hereditary prions; it seems to be universal for any epigenetic hereditary factor.

  19. [Genetic testing in hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzsiev, Kinga; Balikó, László; Komlósi, Katalin; Lőcsei-Fekete, Anett; Csábi, Györgyi; Bene, Judit; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Béla

    2015-01-18

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is the overall term for clinically and genetically diverse disorders characterized with progressive and variable severe lower extremity spasticity. The most common causes of autosomal dominantly inherited hereditary spastic paraplegias are different mutations of the spastin gene with variable incidence in different ethnic groups, ranging between 15-40%. Mutations in the spastin gene lead to loss of spastins function, causing progressive neuronal failure, which results in axon degeneration finally. The molecular testing of spastin gene is available in the institution of the authors since January, 2014. The experience gained with the examination of the first eleven patients is described in this article. After polymerase chain reaction, Sanger sequencing was performed to examine the 17 exons of the spastin gene. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect greater rearrangements in the spastin gene. Eight of the patients were examined in the genetic counseling clinic of the authors and after detailed phenotype assessment spastin gene testing was obtained. The other three patients were referred to the laboratory from different outpatient clinics. Out of the 11 examined patients, four different pathogenic mutations were found in 5 patients. The first Hungarian data, gained with the examination of spastin gene are presented in this article. The five patients, in whom mutations were detected, represent 45.5% of all tested patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, which is similar to those published in the international literature. Molecular testing and subsequent detailed genotype-phenotype correlations of the Hungarian patients may serve valuable new information about the disease, which later on may influence our therapeutic possibilities and decisions.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hyperekplexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neuromuscular Disorders Health Topic: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hyperekplexia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  3. COL5A1: Genetic mapping and exclusion as candidate gene in families with nail-patella syndrome, tuberous sclerosis 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Northrup, H.; Au, K.S. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-10

    COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, has been considered a candidate gene for certain diseases based on chromosomal location and/or disease phenotype. We have employed 3{prime}-untranslated region RFLPs to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis 1, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type H, and nail-patella syndrome. In addition, we describe a polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) within a COL5A1 intron. This SSR is used to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber disease) and to add COL5A1 to the existing map of {open_quotes}index{close_quotes} markers of chromosome 9 by evaluation of the COL5A1 locus on the CEPH 40-family reference pedigree set. This genetic mapping places COL5A1 between markers D9S66 and D9S67. 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CA repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.

  5. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  6. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  7. A mitochondrial mutation at nt 9101 in the ATP synthase 6 gene associated with deficient oxidative phosphorylation in a family with leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamninen, T.; Junoven, V.; Aula, P.; Savontaus, M.L. [Univ. of Turku (Finland); Majander, A.; Wikstroem, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-05-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited ocular disease resulting in bilateral optic atrophy in young adults. Several mtDNA point mutations have been proposed as being causative for LHON, all in complex I, III, or IV of the respiratory chain. The ND4/11778 mutation accounts for {approximately}50% of all LHON families, the ND1/3460 mutation is detected in {approximately}15% of cases, and {approximately}10% of LHON families have the ND6/14484 mutation. All these mutations are restricted to LHON families, and they change evolutionary conserved amino acids. Furthermore, these primary mutations have never been observed to occur simultaneously. Besides the primary mutations, several other replacement mutations have been found in LHON families. These mutations are also detected at low frequency in control individuals, and they change evolutionarily less conserved amino acids. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, T; Soumittra, N; Vidubala, E; Sridevi, V; Mahajan, V; Ramanan, SG; Vijaya, S

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social...

  9. Canine hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Olby, Natasha J

    2014-11-01

    The hereditary ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause a progressive (or episodic) cerebellar ataxia. A large number of different disorders have been described in different breeds of purebred dog, and in some instances, more than one disorder occurs in a single breed, creating a confusing clinical picture. The mutations associated with these disorders are being described at a rapid rate, potentially changing our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat affected dogs. A breed-related neurodegenerative process should be suspected in any pure bred dog with slowly progressive, symmetric signs of ataxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  11. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  12. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. WAGAIYU, R. N. NG'ANG'A and A. M. KEMOLI. SUMMARY. Hereditary gingival hyperplasia (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by hyperplastic, dense fibrous connective tissue with acanthotic gingival epithelium. A family presented.

  13. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveils a lack of driver-gene mutations linking non-hereditary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and highly prevalent second primary malignancies: random or nonrandom, that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Yu-Tung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-12-13

    The association of non-hereditary (sporadic) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second primary malignancies is known to be nonrandom, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, 136 of 749 (18.1%) patients with sporadic GISTs were found to have additional associated cancers, with gastrointestinal and genitourinary/gynecologic/breast cancers being the most prevalent. Gene mutations in GISTs and their associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) (n=9) were analyzed using a panel of 409 cancer-related genes, while a separate group of 40 sporadic CRCs not associated with GISTs served as controls. All 9 of the GISTs had either KIT (8 of 9) or PDGFRA (1 of 9) mutations that were not present in their associated CRCs. Conversely, all but one of the 9 GIST-associated CRCs exhibited an APC mutation, a TP53 mutation or both, while none of their corresponding GISTs harbored either APC or TP53 mutations. The genetic profile of CRCs with and without associated GISTs did not differ. Although population-based studies and case series worldwide, including ours, have unanimously indicated that the GIST-CRC association is nonrandom, our targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveiled a lack of driver-gene mutations linking sporadic GISTs to highly prevalent second primaries. Further studies are needed to elucidate other genetic alterations that may be responsible for this puzzling contradiction.

  14. A Comparison Between Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Detecting Mutations in Genes Associated with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and the Identification of 9 New Mutations Previously Unidentified by DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a relatively new method by which heteroduplex structures formed during the PCR amplification of heterozygote samples can be rapidly identified. The use of this technology for mutation detection in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has the potential to appreciably shorten the time it takes to analyze genes associated with this disorder. Prior to acceptance of this method for screening genes associated with HNPCC, assessment of the reliability of this method should be performed. In this report we have compared mutation and polymorphism detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC in a set of 130 families. All mutations/polymorphisms representing base substitutions, deletions, insertions and a 23 base pair inversion were detected by DHPLC whereas DGGE failed to identify four single base substitutions and a single base pair deletion. In addition, we show that DHPLC has been used for the identification of 5 different mutations in exon 7 of hMSH2 that could not be detected by DGGE. From this study we conclude that DHPLC is a more effective and rapid alternative to the detection of mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 with the same or better accuracy than DGGE. Furthermore, this technique offers opportunities for automation, which have not been realised for the majority of other methods of gene analysis.

  15. Long-term auxological and pubertal outcome of patients with hereditary insulin-like growth factor-I deficiency (Laron and growth hormone-gene deletion syndrome) treated with recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, M F; Arrigo, T; Valenzise, M; Ghizzoni, L; Caruso-Nicoletti, M; Zucchini, S; Chiabotto, P; Crisafulli, G; Zirilli, G; De Luca, F

    2011-04-01

    GH-IGF-I axis is mainly involved in the complex process of somatic growth but emerging evidence suggests that it also influences hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) function. We report some data regarding long-term auxological and pubertal outcome of five female patients with hereditary forms of GH-IGF-I deficiency (Laron and GH-gene deletion syndrome) and a mean age of 23.4±5.3 yr (range 19-32). All the patients received recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I, Pharmacia and Upjohn, Stockholm, Sweden, and rhIGF-I, Genentech, San Francisco, CA, USA) from a mean age of 8.6 yr (range 3.2-14.2) up to the final height. Final height was very disappointing (≤ -5.0 SD scores) and lower than target height in all the patients. Pubertal onset was delayed in most of them but menarche occurred spontaneously in all the patients. Median age at menarche was 15.1 yr. Menstrual cycles were regular for several years. Median duration of gynecological follow- up was 8.3 yr with the longest span of 17.2 yr. We can assert that GH-IGF-I axis has an essential role in promoting linear growth in humans and its physiological action cannot be replaced by pharmacological treatment in most patients with hereditary forms of IGF-I insufficiency as demonstrated by their subnormal final height. Our clinical observations can also support an essential role of IGF-I in genitalia growth but not in the function of HPG axis as demonstrated by the maintenance of regular menstrual cycles in the presence of subnormal levels of IGF-I after treatment discontinuation.

  16. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Jonker, Marianne A.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E. M.; Moll, Annette C.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  17. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); C. Tops (Carli); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); Mensenkamp, A.R. (Arjen R.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J.W. Redeker (Egbert); C. de Die-Smulders (Christine); A.C. Moll (Annette); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSince the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the

  18. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, C.J.; Henneman, L.; Hout, A.H. van der; Jonker, M.A.; Tops, C.M.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Luijt, R.B. van der; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Redeker, E.J.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Moll, A.C.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  19. Surveillance for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - A long-term study on 114 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDTN; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Taal, BG; Kleibeuker, JH; Vasen, HF

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a 60 to 85 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer. In the Netherlands hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families are monitored in an intensive

  20. Methylation profiles of the BRCA1 promoter in hereditary and sporadic breast cancer among Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Da; Zhao, Yashuang; Xue, Weinan; Shan, Ming; Chen, Yanbo; Zhang, Youxue; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Dalin; Yang, Yanmei

    2012-09-01

    The development of breast cancer is a multistep process associated with complex changes in host gene expression patterns including inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. Critically, hereditary predisposition plays a significant role in cancer susceptibility. However, mutation of the BRCA1 gene is found only in the minority of hereditary breast cancer, which indicates that there might be alternative, novel mechanisms contributing to inactivation of the BRCA1 gene. Studies have shown that aberrant methylation of genomic DNA plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation may be an alternative mechanism for the inactivation of BRCA1 as an epigenetic modification of the genome and whether hereditary breast cancer has a different BRCA1 methylation phenotype pattern than sporadic breast cancer. The pattern of CpG island methylation within the promoter region of BRCA1 was assessed by bisulfite sequencing DNA from peripheral blood cells of 72 patients with hereditary predisposition but without BRCA1 mutations and 30 sporadic breast cancer controls. The overall methylation level in patients with hereditary predisposition was significantly lower than that in the sporadic control group. However, patients with hereditary predisposition showed a significantly higher methylation susceptibility for the sites -518 when compared to controls. These results suggest that there might be different BRCA1 promoter methylation levels and patterns in sporadic and hereditary breast cancer in peripheral blood DNA. These findings may facilitate the early diagnosis of hereditary breast cancer.

  1. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  2. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  3. Novel frameshift and splice site mutations in the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene (NTRK1) associated with hereditary sensory neuropathy type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Nathalie; Claeys, Kristl G; Deprez, Liesbet; Jacobs, An; Van Gerwen, Veerle; Lagae, Lieven; Arts, Willem Frans; De Meirleir, Linda; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent; Nelis, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV) is the first human genetic disorder implicated in the neurotrophin signal transduction pathway. HSAN IV is characterized by absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, recurrent episodes of fever, anhidrosis, self-mutilating behavior and often mental retardation. Mutations in the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 1 (NTRK1) are associated with this disorder. Here we report four homozygous mutations, two frameshift (p.Gln626fsX6 and p.Gly181fsX58), one missense (p.Arg761Trp) and one splice site (c.359+5G>T) mutation in four HSAN IV patients. The splice site mutation caused skipping of exons 2 and 3 in patient's mRNA resulting in an in-frame deletion of the second leucine-rich motif. NTRK1 mutations are only rarely reported in the European population. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with HSAN IV.

  4. Fasciculations in human hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Aliyev, Rahim

    2015-06-01

    Fasciculations are a manifestation of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in addition to myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps, or tetany. Fasciculations occur in hereditary and non-hereditary diseases. Among the hereditary diseases, fasciculations are most frequently reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Among the non-hereditary diseases, fasciculations occur most frequently in peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes (Isaac's syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, cramp fasciculation syndrome, Morvan syndrome). If the cause of fasciculations remains unknown, they are called benign. Systematically reviewing the literature about fasciculations in hereditary disease shows that fasciculations can be a phenotypic feature in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), GM2-gangliosidosis, triple-A syndrome, or hereditary neuropathy. Additionally, fasciculations have been reported in familial amyloidosis, spinocerebellar ataxias, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, central nervous system disease due to L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) mutations, Fabry's disease, or Gerstmann-Sträussler disease. Rarely, fasciculations may be a phenotypic feature in patients with mitochondrial disorders or other myopathies. Fasciculations are part of the phenotype in much more genetic disorders than commonly assumed. Fasciculations not only occur in motor neuron disease, but also in hereditary neuropathy, spinocerebellar ataxia, GM2-gangliosidosis, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, Fabry's disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler disease, mitochondrial disorders, or muscular dystrophies.

  5. Prevalence of a Loss-of-Function Mutation in the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter Gene (PCFT-SLC46A1) Causing Hereditary Folate Malabsorption in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeo, Kris M.; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Ramirez, Sonia I.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Rivera, Enid; Martin, Madelena; Lerner, Norma B.; DiAntonio, Lisa; Duva, Salvatore; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro J.; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether subjects of Puerto Rican heritage are at increased risk for a specific mutation of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) causing hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM). Study design Three percent of the births in Puerto Rico in 2005, with additional regional oversampling, were screened for the prevalence of the c.1082G>A; p.Y362_G389 del PCFT gene mutation. Six new subjects of Puerto Rican heritage with the clinical diagnosis of HFM were also assessed for this mutation. Results Six subjects of Puerto Rican heritage with the clinical diagnosis of HFM were all homozygous for the c.1082G>A; p.Y362_G389 del PCFT mutation. Three heterozygote carriers were identified from the 1582 newborn samples randomly selected from births in Puerto Rico in 2005. The carrier frequency for the mutated allele was 0.2% island-wide and 6.3% in Villalba. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a common mutation in the PCFT gene causing HFM that has disseminated to Puerto Ricans who have migrated to mainland United States. Because prompt diagnosis and treatment of infants with HFM can prevent the consequences of this disorder, newborn screening should be considered in high-risk populations and physicians should be aware of its prevalence in infants of Puerto Rican ancestry. PMID:21489556

  6. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  8. Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary fructose intolerance, the prevalence of which is 1 : 20,000 population, is diagnosed much less frequently than is found in child and adult populations. Presented pathology is caused by a deficiency in ferment aldolase B and block of fructose transformation in the gastrointestinal tract with the accumulation of unprocessed fructose in the intestine, manifesting by characteristic symptom and numerous biochemical changes in the body. The disease is asymptomatic until a person begins to use fructose, sucrose or sorbitol. This article describes the fructose metabolism, genetic aspects of the discussing disease, the diversity of its clinical manifestations. The authors presented modern diagnostic criteria and international approaches to diet therapy.

  9. Novel mutations c.[5121_5122insAG]+[6859C>T] of the SPG11 gene associated with cerebellum hypometabolism in a Chinese case of hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Xiong, Likuan; Chang, Yu; Jing, Xiangyi; Huang, Weijun; Hu, Bin; Shi, Xinchong; Xu, Weiping; Wang, Yiming; Li, Xunhua

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a very heterogeneous disease, both genetically and clinically. To date, approximately 52 loci and 31 genes have been reported to be involved in the causality of HSP. The pattern of inheritance of the disease can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked recessive. Autosomal recessive HSP with thin corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC) is one form of this disease, and a recessive gene, SPG11, is responsible for 41-77% of all ARHSP-TCC cases. SPG11 encodes the protein SPATACSIN, which is most prominently expressed in the cerebellum. However, little is known about its function. Despite diverse clinical presentations, diffuse hypometabolism in the cerebellum has not been reported previously. We have identified an HSP-TCC patient that presented with prominent intellectual disability rather than spasticity. (18)Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)FDG-PET/CT) examination showed diffuse hypometabolism in both cerebella. Mutation screening of the SPG11 gene using Sanger sequencing identified the novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[5121_5122insAG]+[6859C>T] (p.[I1708RfsX2]+[Q2287X]) in the patient. The mother bears the c.5121_5122insAG mutation, which results in a frameshift and is predicted to truncate the 735 amino acids from the C-terminus, and the father carries the c.6859C>T mutation, which terminates the 157 amino acids from the C-terminus. Therefore, these mutations may result in the loss of function of wild-type SPATACSIN. Our results suggest that SPATACSIN may be involved in cerebella metabolism, and the novel mutations provide more data for the mutational spectrum of this gene, which will aid in the development of quick and accurate genetic diagnostic tools for this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  11. Uptake of genetic testing and long-term tumor surveillance in von Hippel-Lindau disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chávez Mireya; Rodríguez Yaneth; Sosa Ana-Luisa; Yescas Petra; Familiar Itziar; De Biase Irene; Ochoa Adriana; Alonso Elisa; Rasmussen Astrid; López-López Marisol; Bidichandani Sanjay I

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. Patients have significant morbidity and mortality secondary to vascular tumors. Disease management is centered on tumor surveillance that allows early detection and treatment. Presymptomatic genetic testing is therefore recommended, including in at-risk children. Methods We tested 17 families (n = 109 individuals) for VHL mutations including 43 children under the a...

  12. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE Therapeutic avenues for hereditary forms of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chitra

    Key words: retinal disease; retinitis pigmentosa; gene therapy; retinoid; clinical trial; stem cell; cell therapy. Abstract. Hereditary retinal diseases, known as retinal degenerations or dystrophies, are a large group of inherited eye disorders resulting in irreversible visual loss and blindness. They develop due to mutations in one ...

  14. Guidelines for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary recurrent fevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinar, Y; Obici, L; Aksentijevich, I

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible ...

  15. Mitochondrial processes are impaired in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, I.; Novershtern, N.; Itzhaki, Z.; Becker-Cohen, M.; Sadeh, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Friedman, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms leading

  16. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  17. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  18. MLPA screening in the BRCA1 gene from 1,506 German hereditary breast cancer cases: novel deletions, frequent involvement of exon 17, and occurrence in single early-onset cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Stefanie; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Betz, Beate; Kast, Karin; Kutsche, Michael; Hellebrand, Heide; Goecke, Timm O; Kiechle, Marion; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Meindl, Alfons

    2008-07-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of 1,506 German families for large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) in the BRCA1 gene and of 450 families in the BRCA2 gene by the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique. A total of 32 pathogenic rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene were found, accounting for 1.6% of all mutations, but for 9.6% of all BRCA1 mutations identified in a total of 1,996 families, including 490 with small pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations. Considering only high risk groups for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, the prevalence of rearrangements is 2.1%. Interestingly, deletions involving exon 17 of the BRCA1 gene seem to be most frequent in Germany. Apart from recurrent aberrations like del ex17, dupl ex13, and del ex22, accounting for more than 50% of all BRCA1 LGRs, we could fully characterize 11 novel deletions. Moreover, one novel deletion involving exons 1-7 and one deletion affecting the entire BRCA1 gene were identified. All rearrangements were detected in families with: 1) at least two breast cancer cases prior to the age of 51 years; 2) breast and ovarian cancer cases; 3) ovarian cancer only families with at least two ovarian cancer cases; or 4) a single breast cancer case prior to the age of 36 years, while no mutations were detected in breast cancer only families with no or only one breast cancer case prior to the age of 51 years. Analysis for gross rearrangements in 412 high-risk individuals, revealed no event in the BRCA2 gene and only two known CHEK2 mutations. However, in an additional 38 high-risk families with cooccurrence of female breast/ovarian and male breast cancer, one rearrangement in the BRCA2 gene was found. In summary, we advise restricting BRCA1 MLPA screening to those subgroups that revealed LGRs and recommend BRCA2 MLPA screening only for families presenting with cooccurrence of female and male breast cancer.

  19. Approach to genetic analysis in the diagnosis of hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Vesely, R.; Myrdal, U.; Yoshimura, K.; Duys, P.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. Seven subtypes have been described, caused by mutations in four different genes. Apart from a common phenotype of lifelong recurrent inflammatory attacks, all subtypes have distinct

  20. MUTATIONS IN THE VHL GENE FRIOM POTASSIUM BROMATE-INDUCED RAT CLEAR CELL RENAL TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a rat renal carcinogen and a major drinking water disinfection by-product in water disinfected with ozone. Clear cell renal tumors, the most common form of human renal epithelial neoplasm, are rare in animals but are inducible by KBrO3 in F344 rats. ...

  1. [Hereditary spastic paraplegia: up to date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSP genetic loci are designated SPG1-72 in order of their discovery. In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). We have identified novel mutations in the C12orf65 gene and the LYST gene in several Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSP. JASPAC will facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of HSP. The future challenge will be the establishment of treatment of HSP.

  2. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Castellanos; Bernat Gel; Inma Rosas; Eva Tornero; Sheila Santín; Raquel Pluvinet; Juan Velasco; Lauro Sumoy; Jesús del Valle; Manuel Perucho; Ignacio Blanco; Matilde Navarro; Joan Brunet; Marta Pineda; Lidia Feliubadaló

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, ...

  3. A recurrent WARS mutation is a novel cause of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Soong, Bing-Wen; Mademan, Inès; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liu, Chia-Rung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Wu, Hung-Ta; Liu, Tze-Tze; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Kon-Ping; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L; Chan, Chih-Chiang; De Jonghe, Peter; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Yi-Chu; Züchner, Stephan; Baets, Jonathan; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2017-05-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies characterized by distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Although at least 15 genes have been implicated in distal hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetic causes remain elusive in many families. To identify an additional causal gene for distal hereditary motor neuropathy, we performed exome sequencing for two affected individuals and two unaffected members in a Taiwanese family with an autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy in which mutations in common distal hereditary motor neuropathy-implicated genes had been excluded. The exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.770A > G (p.His257Arg), in the cytoplasmic tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) gene (WARS) that co-segregates with the neuropathy in the family. Further analyses of WARS in an additional 79 Taiwanese pedigrees with inherited neuropathies and 163 index cases from Australian, European, and Korean distal hereditary motor neuropathy families identified the same mutation in another Taiwanese distal hereditary motor neuropathy pedigree with different ancestries and one additional Belgian distal hereditary motor neuropathy family of Caucasian origin. Cell transfection studies demonstrated a dominant-negative effect of the p.His257Arg mutation on aminoacylation activity of TrpRS, which subsequently compromised protein synthesis and reduced cell viability. His257Arg TrpRS also inhibited neurite outgrowth and led to neurite degeneration in the neuronal cell lines and rat motor neurons. Further in vitro analyses showed that the WARS mutation could potentiate the angiostatic activities of TrpRS by enhancing its interaction with vascular endothelial-cadherin. Taken together, these findings establish WARS as a gene whose mutations may cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy and alter canonical and non-canonical functions of TrpRS. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  4. De novo REEP2 missense mutation in pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Roda, Ricardo H.; Schindler, Alice B.; Blackstone, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Alterations in proteins that regulate endoplasmic reticulum morphology are common causes of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG1?78, plus others). Mutations in the REEP1 gene that encodes an endoplasmic reticulum?shaping protein are well?known causes of SPG31, a common autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia. A closely?related gene, REEP2, is mutated in SPG72, with both autosomal and recessive inheritances. Here, we report a patient with a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a de ...

  5. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor genes causing the hereditary syndromes predisposing to head and neck cancer via promoter hypermethylation in sporadic head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian M; Mithani, Suhail K; Mydlarz, Wojciech K; Chang, Steven S; Califano, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) and dyskeratosis congenita (DC) are rare inherited syndromes that cause head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). Prior studies of inherited forms of cancer have been extremely important in elucidating tumor suppressor genes inactivated in sporadic tumors. Here, we studied whether sporadic tumors have epigenetic silencing of the genes causing the inherited forms of HNSCC. Using bisulfite sequencing, we investigated the incidence of promoter hypermethylation of the 17 Fanconi- and DC-associated genes in sporadic HNSCC. Genes that only showed methylation in the tumor patients were chosen for quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) in a set of 45 tumor and 16 normal patients. Three gene promoters showed differences in methylation: FancB (FAAP95, FA core complex), FancJ (BRIP1, DNA Helicase/ATPase), and DKC1 (dyskeratin). Bisulfite sequencing revealed that only FancB and DKC1 showed no methylation in normal patients, yet the presence of promoter hypermethylation in tumor patients. On qMSP, 1/16 (6.25%) of the normal mucosal samples from non-cancer patients and 14/45 (31.1%) of the tumor patients demonstrated hypermethylation of the FancB locus (p < 0.05). These results suggest that inactivation of FancB may play a role in the pathogenesis of sporadic HNSCC.

  6. Cloning and characterization of CLCN5, the human kidney chloride channel gene implicated in Dent disease (an X-linked hereditary nephrolithiasis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S.E.; Van Bakel, I.; Craig, I.W. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    Dent disease, an X-linked familial renal tubular disorder, is a form of Fanconi syndrome associated with proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, and eventual renal failure. We have previously used positional cloning to identify the 3{prime} part of a novel kidney-specific gene (initially termed hClC-K2, but now referred to as CLCN5), which is deleted in patients from one pedigree segregating Dent disease. Mutations that disrupt this gene have been identified in other patients with this disorder. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the human CLCN5 gene, which is predicted to encode a protein of 746 amino acids, with significant homology to all known members of the ClC family of voltage-gated chloride channels. CLCN5 belongs to a distinct branch of this family, which also includes the recently identified genes CLCN3 and CLCN4. We have shown that the coding region of CLCN5 is organized into 12 exons, spanning 25-30 kb of genomic DNA, and have determined the sequence of each exon-intron boundary. The elucidation of the coding sequence and exon-intron organization of CLCN5 will both expedite the evaluation of structure/function relationships of these ion channels and facilitate the screening of other patients with renal tubular dysfunction for mutations at this locus. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  8. Molecular aspects of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Anne; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive lower limbs spasticity and weakness. What was first thought to be a small group of rare Mendelian disorder has now become a large group that includes many complex syndromes. While large families with defined modes of inheritance were used for the initial HSP gene discovery, new sequencing technologies have recently allowed the study of small families, with the identification of many new disease causative genes. These discoveries are slowly leading to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP with the identification of precise disease pathways. These insights may lead to new therapeutic strategies for what is a group of largely untreatable diseases. This review looks at the key players involved in HSP and where they act in their specific pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetics of hereditary large vessel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of hereditary large vessel diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) have not only identified responsible genes but also provided better understanding of the pathophysiology and revealed possible new therapeutic targets. Genes identified for these diseases include FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, TGFB2, TGFB3, SKI, EFEMP2, COL3A1, FLNA, ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK and SLC2A10, as well as others. Their dysfunction disrupts the function of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways, as well as that of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle contractile apparatus, resulting in progression of structural damage to large vessels, including aortic aneurysms and dissections. Notably, it has been shown that the TGF-β signaling pathway has a key role in the pathogenesis of MFS and related disorders, which may be important for development of strategies for medical and surgical treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Effect of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Gene H63D and C282Y Mutations on Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Kasım Terzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disease that is one of the most important reasons for iron overload. Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that occurs as a result of a homozygous mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Erythrocyte transfusion is frequently used in the treatment of this disease. Iron overload as a result of transfusion is important in the mortality and morbidity of sickle cell anemia patients as well as in other hemoglobinopathies. In this study, the effect of hemochromatosis gene (HFE p.H63D and p.C282Y mutations on transfusion-related cardiac and liver iron overload in sickle cell disease patients who carry homozygous hemoglobin S mutation has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective single-center crosssectional study in patients with homozygous hemoglobin S mutation between the years 2008 and 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (group A, n=31 was receiving chelation therapy and the second group (group B, n=13 was not. Direct and indirect iron loads were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging and biochemically, respectively. HFE gene mutations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical analyses were performed by independent samples t-test. Results: p.H63D mutation was detected in 10 (32.3% patients in group A and in only 1 patient (7.7% in group B. When the 2 groups were compared for iron overload, iron deposition in the liver was significantly higher in group B (p=0.046. In addition, in group A, iron deposition was significantly higher in HFE mutation carriers compared to patients without the mutation (p=0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that HFE gene mutations are important in iron deposition in the liver in patients with sickle cell disease.

  12. Non-coding RNAs at the Gnas and Snrpn-Ube3a imprinted gene loci and their involvement in hereditary disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius ePlagge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have long been recognized at imprinted gene loci and provided early paradigms, to investigate their functions and molecular mechanisms of action. The characteristic feature of imprinted genes, their monoallelic, parental-origin-dependent expression, is achieved through complex epigenetic regulation, which is modulated by ncRNAs. This minireview focuses on two imprinted gene clusters, in which changes in ncRNA expression contribute to human disorders. At the GNAS locus loss of NESP RNA can cause autosomal dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (AD-PHP-Ib, while at the SNRPN-UBE3A locus a long ncRNA and processed snoRNAs play a role in Angelman-Syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi-Syndrome (PWS. The ncRNAs silence overlapping protein-coding transcripts in sense or anti-sense orientation through changes in histone modifications as well as DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequence motifs. Their epigenetic modulatory functions are required in early development in the pre-implantation embryo or already in the parental germ cells. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence homology-carrying ncRNA itself is required, or whether the process of its transcription through other promoters causes the silencing effect.

  13. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Boland, C Richard

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer affecting men and women in the United States. Approximately one-third of CRCs are diagnosed in individuals who have family members also affected with the disease. Although the vast majority of colorectal neoplasms develop as a consequence of somatic genomic alterations arising in individual cells, approximately 5% of all CRCs arise in the setting of germline mutations in genes involved in key cellular processes. To date, multiple genes have been implicated in single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes, many of which are associated with increased risk for CRC, as well as other tumor types. This review outlines the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of the hereditary cancer syndromes known to be associated with increased risk for CRC and delineates strategies for implementing genetic risk assessments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of PALB2 gene in BRCA1/BRCA2 negative Spanish hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families with pancreatic cancer cases.

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    Ana Blanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PALB2 gene, also known as FANCN, forms a bond and co-localizes with BRCA2 in DNA repair. Germline mutations in PALB2 have been identified in approximately 1% of familial breast cancer and 3-4% of familial pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of PALB2 mutations in a population of BRCA1/BRCA2 negative breast cancer patients selected from either a personal or family history of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: 132 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families with at least one pancreatic cancer case were included in the study. PALB2 mutational analysis was performed by direct sequencing of all coding exons and intron/exon boundaries, as well as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. RESULTS: Two PALB2 truncating mutations, the c.1653T>A (p.Tyr551Stop previously reported, and c.3362del (p.Gly1121ValfsX3 which is a novel frameshift mutation, were identified. Moreover, several PALB2 variants were detected; some of them were predicted as pathological by bioinformatic analysis. Considering truncating mutations, the prevalence rate of our population of BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer patients with pancreatic cancer is 1.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rate of PALB2 mutations in non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families, selected from either a personal or family pancreatic cancer history, is similar to that previously described for unselected breast/ovarian cancer families. Future research directed towards identifying other gene(s involved in the development of breast/pancreatic cancer families is required.

  15. Lymphocyte gene expression signatures from patients and mouse models of hereditary hemochromatosis reveal a function of HFE as a negative regulator of CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation and differentiation in vivo.

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    Mónica Costa

    Full Text Available Abnormally low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers is characteristic of some patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH, a MHC-linked disorder of iron overload. Both environmental and genetic components are known to influence CD8+ T-lymphocyte homeostasis but the role of the HH associated protein HFE is still insufficiently understood. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed in peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes from HH patients selected according to CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers and from Hfe-/- mice maintained either under normal or high iron diet conditions. In addition, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry in HH patients. HH patients with low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers show a differential expression of genes related to lymphocyte differentiation and maturation namely CCR7, LEF1, ACTN1, NAA50, P2RY8 and FOSL2, whose expression correlates with the relative proportions of naïve, central and effector memory subsets. In addition, expression levels of LEF1 and P2RY8 in memory cells as well as the proportions of CD8+ T cells in G2/M cell cycle phase are significantly different in HH patients compared to controls. Hfe-/- mice do not show alterations in CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers but differential gene response patterns. We found an increased expression of S100a8 and S100a9 that is most pronounced in high iron diet conditions. Similarly, CD8+ T lymphocytes from HH patients display higher S100a9 expression both at the mRNA and protein level. Altogether, our results support a role for HFE as a negative regulator of CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation. While the activation markers S100a8 and S100a9 are strongly increased in CD8+ T cells from both, Hfe-/- mice and HH patients, a differential profile of genes related to differentiation/maturation of CD8+ T memory cells is evident in HH patients only. This supports the notion that HFE contributes, at least in part, to the generation of low peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes

  16. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

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    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  17. Kidney Tumor in a von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) Patient With Intensely Increased Activity on 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-12-01

    Renal and pancreatic cysts and tumors are the most common visceral manifestations of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, a heritable multisystem cancer syndrome characterized by development of a variety of malignant and benign tumors. We report a case of a VHL patient with multiple renal cystic and complex cystic/solid lesions. The patient underwent Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET/CT showing intensely increased activity by a solid lesion which demonstrated enhancement on both CT and MRI scans, raising high suspicion for malignancy. The presented case indicates application of SSTR-imaging using Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides in VHL-patients and emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of renal parenchyma Ga-DOTATATE activity.

  18. Phenotypic heterogeneity of hereditary gynecologic cancers: a report from the Creighton hereditary cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie; Stacy, Mark; Watson, Patrice

    2013-12-01

    To determine the validity of observations suggesting a significant dichotomy of gynecologic cancers determined by linkage to specific genetic defects associated with two major autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndromes; the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for female carriers of germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, associated with the Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, and in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6, associated with Lynch syndrome, who were registered with invasive uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancers between January 1, 1959 and December 31, 2010. From 217 such cases, a total of 174 subjects, consisting of 95 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and 79 carriers of mutations in MMR genes, were identified who had current signed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act forms and complete primary diagnostic pathology reports and clinical records. Data meticulously extracted from these cases were categorized and statistically analyzed. There were highly significant differences between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and carriers of MMR gene mutations in the proportion of serous carcinomas compared with endometrioid carcinomas of the uterus, including cervix and endometium (p cancers (p cancer, and endometrioid carcinoma was found in two of four MMR gene mutation carriers with fallopian tube cancers. All other fallopian tube cancers were serous carcinomas. Seven BRCA1 and one BRCA2 mutation carriers were diagnosed with primary peritoneal serous carcinoma; no peritoneal carcinomas were registered in MMR gene mutation carriers. Nine of 14 gynecologic cancers with associated endometriosis in mutation carriers were endometrioid or endometrioid mixed carcinomas compared with just three of other histologic types. Primary breast cancers, that characterize the HBOC syndrome, were much more frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; while multiple gynecologic cancers and

  19. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  20. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

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    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  1. Genetic screening analysis of patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer from northern and northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Barros, Mariceli Baia Leão; do Nascimento Borges, Bárbara; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Lamarão, Leticia Martins; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Bona, Amanda Braga; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a hereditary autosomal inherited syndrome associated with CDH1 germline mutations. In Brazil, gastrointestinal tumors are among the most prevalent tumor types and constitute a serious public health problem, especially in the northern and northeastern regions. This study aimed to investigate germline mutations, methylation pattern and genomic rearrangements in the CDH1 gene and quantitative changes in the DNA of HDGC patients in northern a...

  2. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  3. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-08-07

    To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level. MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism. The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively. The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene.

  4. Novel EXOSC3 mutation causes complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Ayelet; Lerer, Israela; Cohen, Rony; Kornreich, Liora; Shuper, Avinoam; Gamliel, Moria; Zimerman, Bat-El; Korabi, Isam; Meiner, Vardiella; Straussberg, Rachel; Lossos, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    We describe two pairs of siblings from a consanguineous family manifesting autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by a novel mutation in the EXOSC3 gene, previously reported in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1. Clinical findings included delayed motor milestones, early-onset spastic paraplegia, variable cognitive disability, and cerebellar signs. Cerebral imaging demonstrated enlarged cisterna magna and mild hypoplasia and atrophy of the lower vermis with a normal pons. Genetic analysis using homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing identified homozygous c.571G>T; p.G191C mutation in the EXOSC3 gene. We suggest that EXOSC3 mutations may present not only as pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1, but also as a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia without pontine hypoplasia or atrophy.

  5. Management of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The Asian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Kwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations are the most common high penetrant genes associated with an increased lifetime risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. Although genetic testing is standard of care in Western developed countries, there are still variations in availability of genetic testing and risk assessment for HBOC in Asia. Depending on the countries, there are variations in the clinical strategies and cancer management. The Asian BRCA Consortium has grouped together 14 Asian countries and reviewed genetic counselling/testing uptake rates and clinical management options in these countries. Moreover economic factors, healthcare and legal frameworks, and cultural issues affecting the genetic service availability in Asia were discussed. Mutation spectrum, and VUS rates and the increase use of NGS gene panel testing poses more decisional issues in the clinical management of Hereditary Breast cancer in Asia. These will be discussed. Keywords: BRCA1/BRCA2, germline, HBOC, Asia BRCA Consortium, NGS

  6. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF HEREDITARY OVARIAN CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Kotiv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most established risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The purpose of the study was to analyze BRCA1/2 testing in ovarian cancer patients. Materials and methods. We analyzed 222 patients with ovarian cancer (OC who underwent genetic testing. Results. Recurrent Slavic mutations in these genes were detected in 60/222 (27% patients.104 patients lacked any clinical signs of hereditary form of the disease, however BRCA1/2 genetic defects were identified among 11 (11% of these women. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas were characterized by more advanced stage at diagnosis and predominance of high-grade serous histological tumor subtype. Conclusion. These results emphasize the need for BRCA1/2 testing for all patients with OC. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas have clinical and pathological cgaracteristics, which should be considered while planning therapy. 

  7. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  8. Deletion of a region that is a candidate for the difference between the deletion forms of hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and deltabeta-thalassemia affects beta- but not gamma-globin gene expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Calzolari (Roberta); T. McMorrow (Tara); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); A. Langeveld (An); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe analysis of a number of cases of beta-globin thalassemia and hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) due to large deletions in the beta-globin locus has led to the identification of several DNA elements that have been implicated in the switch

  9. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  10. Practice Bulletin No 182: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by multiple family members with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both. Based on the contemporary understanding of the origins and management of ovarian cancer and for simplicity in this document, ovarian cancer also refers to fallopian tube cancer and primary peritoneal cancer. Clinical genetic testing for gene mutations allows more precise identification of those women who are at an increased risk of inherited breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For these individuals, screening and prevention strategies can be instituted to reduce their risks. Obstetrician-gynecologists play an important role in the identification and management of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. If an obstetrician-gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider does not have the necessary knowledge or expertise in cancer genetics to counsel a patient appropriately, referral to a genetic counselor, gynecologic or medical oncologist, or other genetics specialist should be considered (1). More genes are being discovered that impart varying risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other types of cancer, and new technologies are being developed for genetic testing. This Practice Bulletin focuses on the primary genetic mutations associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also will briefly discuss some of the other genes that have been implicated.

  11. Syringomyelia in hereditary multiple exostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Janet M; Modaff, Peggy; Iskandar, Bermans J; Pauli, Richard M

    2016-11-01

    We describe five children with Hereditary Multiple Exostosis (HME) who also had syringomyelia. Of these, four had a tethered cord/fibrolipoma. No spinal osteochondromas were found in these patients. All had antecedent neurological signs or symptoms that prompted spinal imaging with MRI. Of all patients with HME seen in the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinic from 1982 to present, 44% (17/39) of patients had signs or symptoms concerning for possible cord-related neurological findings. However, only 10 of 39 had spinal imaging. Assuming that all individuals with syringomyelia were identified, then 5/39 (13%) were in that way affected. This, of course, is a minimal estimate given that many were not imaged. The incidence of syringomyelia appears to be increased in this population, and seems to be unrelated to spinal osteochondromas. A low threshold for obtaining spinal MRI in patients with Hereditary Multiple Exostosis seems rational. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  13. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; Del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-04

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk.

  14. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk. PMID:28051113

  15. Hereditary multiple exostosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pachajoa Londoño, Harry Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    La exostosis múltiple hereditaria o osteocondromatosis hereditaria es una enfermedad genética autosómica dominante causada por mutaciones en genes que codifican la exostosina, EXT1 (8q24.1), EXT2 (11p11-p13) y EXT3 (19p). Se caracteriza por presentar múltiples proyecciones de hueso cubiertas por cartílago, principalmente en las metáfisis de los huesos largos como el brazo y el antebrazo, aunque también pueden involucrar a huesos de la cintura escapular, pélvica y ...

  16. Hereditary aspects of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    McLellan, D. L.; Norman, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current literature on the hereditary aspects of prostate cancer and to evaluate the importance of family history in history taking and screening for prostate cancer. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for articles in English or French published between Jan. 1, 1956, and Oct. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH headings "prostatic neoplasms," "genetics" and "chromosomes." Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of articles found during the search. STUDY SELE...

  17. A web resource on DNA tests for canine and feline hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Jeffrey; Raj, Karthik; Yuhnke, Scott; Bell, Jerold; Fretwell, Neale; Hedhammar, Ake; Wade, Claire; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Following the first identification of a disease-causing mutation in dogs in 1989 and the more recent completion of canine and feline genome sequences, much progress has been made in the molecular characterization of hereditary diseases in dogs and cats. To increase access to information on diagnosing hereditary diseases in dogs and cats, a web application has been developed to collect, organize and display information on available DNA tests and other supporting information, including gene and chromosomal locations, mutations, primary research citations and disease descriptions. The DNA testing information can be accessed at the URL: http://research.vet.upenn.edu/WSAVA-LabSearch. There are currently 131 molecular genetic tests available for hereditary diseases in dogs and cats offered by 43 laboratories worldwide. This tool should provide clinicians, researchers, breeders and companion animal owners with a single comprehensive, up-to-date and readily searchable webpage for information on hereditary disease testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gilbert Syndrome with Concomitant Hereditary Spherocytosis Presenting with Moderate Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiso, Mitsuhiko; Yagi, Minami; Tanaka, Atsushi; Miura, Kotaro; Miura, Ryo; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Nakahara, Sayuri; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Takikawa, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We experienced a case of a 19-year-old man with Gilbert syndrome with concomitant hereditary spherocytosis. The patient presented with moderate unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and inherited etiology was strongly suspected. The diagnosis of Gilbert syndrome was confirmed by the genetic analysis of the UGT1A1 gene, demonstrating UGT1A1*28 and compound heterozygote UGT1A1*6. In addition, since the laboratory findings and imaging studies revealed lysemia as well as gallstone and splenomegaly, a diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis was made as a comorbidity. Both Gilbert syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis are hereditary diseases with a high frequency, and the hyperbilirubinemia may be exacerbated when these two diseases are concomitant.

  19. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does how...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  20. Oncologic Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, George; Nagalla, Srikanth; Aklilu, Mebea

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in females and the third most common cancer diagnosed in males. Familial CRC comprises ~20 to 30% of all CRC cases. Lynch syndrome (LS), previously called hereditary nonpolyposis CRC (HNPCC), is the most common of the hereditary CRC syndromes. In this review, the oncological management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the medical oncologist perspective is discussed with special emphasis on Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is character...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topic: Benign Tumors Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary multiple osteochondromas Educational Resources (6 links) Cleveland Clinic: ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome Health Topic: Arteriovenous Malformations Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National ...

  3. [Epidemiology of monogenic hereditary diseases in Rostov oblast: population dynamic factors determining the differentiation of the load of hereditary diseases in eight districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Amelina, S S; Shokarev, R A; Val'kov, R A; Val'kova, T I; Vetrova, N V; Kriventsova, N V; El'chinova, G I; Petrova, N V; Khlebnikova, O V

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of the diversity of monogenic hereditary diseases in eight raions (districts) of Rostov oblast (region) of Russia (Tsimlyansk, Volgodonskoi, Tselina, Egorlykskaya, Millerovo, Tarasovskaya, Rodionovo-Nesvetaiskaya, and Matveevo-Kurgan raions) has been summarized. The total sample size was 320925 subjects. The spectrum of hereditary diseases detected in the eight districts comprises 187 diseases, including 99 autosomal dominant (AD), 72 autosomal recessive (AR), and 16 X-linked diseases. The mean prevalence rate of each disease in the total population has been calculated. Accumulation of individual diseases in different regions of Rostov oblast has been calculated; the disease accumulation has been compared with that in some populations of Russia examined earlier. Cluster analysis using the data on the frequencies of genes of hereditary diseases has shown the gene geographic position of the Rostov oblast population among the following ethnic populations of Russia: Russians (Kostroma, Kirov, and Rostov oblasts and Krasnodar krai), Chuvashes (Chuvashia), Adygeans (Adygea), Maris (Marii El), and Udmurts (Udmurtia).

  4. [Hereditary factors in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliers, E A; Franke, B; Buitelaar, J K

    2005-07-30

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by concentration problems, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Disturbances in dopamine and/or noradrenalin neurotransmission are probably the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ADHD. Around 80% of variants of the phenotype can be ascribed to hereditary factors. There are various chromosomal loci containing ADHD genes. They partially overlap the loci found in linkage studies on dyslexia and autism. It seems likely that a number of genetic variants, each with a small effect size, in combination with gene-environment interactions predispose to ADHD. There is a high degree of phenotypical heterogeneity among people with ADHD. Finding endophenotypes may improve the power of genetic studies. Endophenotypes are specific expressions of the underlying pathophysiology, intermediate between gene and phenotype. Neuro-imaging studies in children with ADHD have indicated abnormalities in frontostriatal, temporal and cerebellar volume. Unaffected brothers and sisters show the same cerebral abnormalities, but not the cerebellar abnormalities. These brain abnormalities together with specific neuropsychological features could be ADHD endophenotypes.

  5. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paulo C. J. L.; Krieger, Jose E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV), hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) and ferroportin (SLC40A1) have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp) should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment. PMID:22408404

  6. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  7. Consanguinity and hereditary hearing loss in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Giorgia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Vuckovic, Dragana; Vozzi, Diego; Khalifa Alkowari, Moza; Gasparini, Paolo; Badii, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Qatar is a sovereign state located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. Its native population consists of 3 major subgroups: people of Arabian origin or Bedouins, those from an Eastern or Persian ancestry and individuals with African admixture. Historically, all types of consanguineous marriages have been and still are common in the Qatari population, particularly among first and double-first cousins. Thus, there is a higher risk for most inherited diseases including hereditary hearing loss (HHL). In particular, a hearing loss prevalence of 5.2% has been reported in Qatar, with parental consanguinity being more common among affected individuals as compared with unaffected ones. Our recent molecular results confirm a high homogeneity and level of inbreeding in Qatari HHL patients. Among all HHL genes, GJB2, the major player worldwide, accounts for a minor proportion of cases and at least 3 additional genes have been found to be mutated in Qatari patients. Interestingly, one gene, BDP1, has been described to cause HHL only in this country. These results point towards an unexpected level of genetic heterogeneity despite the high level of inbreeding. This review provides an up-to-date picture of HHL in Qatar and of the impact of consanguinity on this disease. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. SOMATIC MUTATIONS OF THE VON HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR GENE IN NONFAMILIAL CLEAR-CELL RENAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FOSTER, K; PROWSE, A; van den Berg, Anke; FLEMING, S; HULSBEEK, MMF; CROSSEY, PA; RICHARDS, FM; CAIRNS, P; FERGUSONSMITH, MA; BUYS, CHCM; MAHER, ER

    1994-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies have suggested that somatic mutations of a tumour suppressor gene or genes on chromosome 3p are a critical event in the pathogenesis of non-familial renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Germline mutations of the von Hippel - Lindau (VHL) disease gene predispose to early

  9. [Frequency of hereditary neurologic diseases. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Baldini, S; Voltolin, G; Norat, M; Bottacchi, E

    1993-09-01

    The nervous system is affected in 30% of hereditary monogenic disorders and as many as 500 single-gene disorders display major neurologic symptoms. We have studied the frequency of hereditary neurological diseases to assess their importance in daily hospital activity. Only single-gene hereditary diseases with central or peripheral nervous system involvement were considered; thus chromosomal diseases and diseases with multifactorial etiology were excluded. We surveyed admission to in- and out-patient departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Dermatology of the Aosta Regional Hospital for the calendar years 1982-1991, collecting 229 cases, 95 women and 134 men. Out-patient departments held 126 patients, the others came from in-patient departments. Admission to the neurological in-patient department were 1.8% of total neurological admissions in the same period. Each diagnosis was assigned to the code number of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-IX Revision, 1975). We found 33 different phenotypes. Most frequent diagnoses were: essential tremor (89 patients), hereditary sensory-motor neuropathy (HSMN) type I (28), Huntington's chorea (13), progressive muscular dystrophy limb-girdle type (8), neurofibromatosis type I (9), HSMN type II (9), spinocerebellar ataxia (9), hereditary spastic paraplegia (7), spinal muscular atrophy type IV (5), myotonic dystrophy (5), cerebellar ataxia (4), HSMN type III (4), spinal muscular atrophy type II and III (3), tuberous sclerosis (3). Essential tremor mostly affected persons in the over-50 age groups. On the contrary, the other neurologic monogenic diseases were diagnosed in all ages with the following age-group breakdown: 0-9, 11%; 10-19, 16%; 20-29, 15%; 30-39, 8%; 40-49, 11%; 50-59, 19%; 60-69, 14%, 70+, 7%. Consistently with the general rule, autosomic recessive diseases have the earliest onset and autosomic dominant ones the latest; HSMN, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington's chorea were the disorders diagnosed

  10. Risk factors for cancer in hereditary pancreatitis. International Hereditary Pancreatitis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Whitcomb, D C

    2000-05-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of pancreatitis, accounting for approximately 1% of all types of pancreatitis. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, with incomplete penetrance. The genetic defect is believed to be caused by mutations in the trypsinogen gene. Patients who inherit the disorder suffer from a form of pancreatitis that resembles other types of pancreatitis, but the age of onset is much earlier. Sixteen biopsy-proven pancreatic cancers have developed in a cohort of 412 patients with a median follow-up period of 18 years (interquartile range, 7 to 30 years) since the onset of symptoms. Compared with the background population, the risk of pancreatic cancer is approximately 50 to 60 times greater than expected. Smoking appears to be an additional risk factor in these patients: Smoking increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer and lowers the age of onset by approximately 20 years. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are urged to avoid smoking because it greatly increases the risk of pancreatic cancer and to avoid alcohol, a known risk factor for all forms of pancreatitis.

  11. Exome sequencing is a useful diagnostic tool for complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettencourt, C.; Lopez-Sendon, J. L.; Garcia-Caldentey, J.; Rizzu, P.; Bakker, I. M. C.; Shomroni, O.; Quintans, B.; Davila, J. R.; Bevova, M. R.; Sobrido, M-J; Heutink, P.; de Yebenes, J. G.

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases encompassing pure and complicated forms, for which at least 52 loci and 31 causative genes have been identified. Although mutations in the SPAST gene explain approximately 40% of the pure autosomal dominant

  12. Exome sequencing is a useful diagnostic tool for complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettencourt, C.; Lopez-Sendon, J.L.; Garcia-Caldentey, J.; Rizzu, P.; Bakker, I.M.C.; Shomroni, O.; Quintans, B.; Davila, J.R.; Bevova, M.R.; Sobrido, M.J.; Heutink, P.; Yebenes, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases encompassing pure and complicated forms, for which at least 52 loci and 31 causative genes have been identified. Although mutations in the SPAST gene explain approximately 40% of the pure autosomal dominant

  13. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role...

  14. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the p...

  15. Guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis cancer).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Moslein, G.; Alonso, A.; Bernstein, I.; Bertario, L.; Blanco, I.; Burn, J.; Capella, G.; Engel, C.; Frayling, I.; Friedl, W.; Hes, F.J.; Hodgson, S.; Mecklin, J.P.; Moller, P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Parc, Y.; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L.; Sampson, J.R.; Stormorken, A.; Wijnen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The discovery of these genes, 15 years ago,

  16. SDHAF2 (PGL2-SDH5) and hereditary head and neck paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, H.P.M.; Rutten, M.H.; Monnink, J.P. de; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Jansen, J.C.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Bayley, J.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL) syndromes are associated with mutations in the SDHD(PGL1), SDHC(PGL3), and SDHB(PGL4) genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunits. We recently described mutations in a previously uncharacterized human gene, now called SDHAF2, and showed

  17. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; ZHANG, ZHEN-HAI; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.

  19. Working the endless puzzle of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sfriso, Paolo; Fioretti, Maria; Costa, Luisa; Vitale, Antonio; Atteno, Mariangela; Galeazzi, Mauro; Muscari, Isabella; Magnotti, Flora; Frediani, Bruno; Punzi, Leonardo; Rigante, Donato

    2014-05-01

    Hereditary autoinflammatory disorders encompass manifold dysfunctions of innate immunity caused by mutations in genes coding for the main characters of the inflammatory scene: most of these conditions have an early onset, ranging from the first days of life to the first decades, and include hereditary periodic fevers, NLRP-related diseases, granulomatous and pyogenic syndromes, which are basically characterized by upturned inflammasome activity and overproduction of bioactive interleukin (IL)-1β and other proinflammatory cytokines. The discovery of a causative link between autoinflammation and IL-1β release has improved our understanding of the intimate mechanisms of innate immunity, and has likewise led to the identification of extraordinary treatments for many of these disorders.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  1. Hereditary kidney diseases: highlighting the importance of classical Mendelian phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Heidet, Laurence; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-12-01

    A Mendelian inheritance underlies a nonnegligible proportion of hereditary kidney diseases, suggesting that the encoded proteins are essential for maintenance of the renal function. The identification of genes involved in congenital anomalies of the kidney and in familial forms of nephrotic syndrome significantly increased our understanding of the renal development and kidney filtration barrier physiology. This review will focus on the classical phenotype and clinical heterogeneity observed in the monogenic forms of these disorders. In addition, the role of susceptibility genes in kidney diseases with a complex inheritance will also be discussed. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  3. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this system...

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  5. Familial pheochromocytoma associated with a novel mutation in the von Hippel-Lindau gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, D.J.; Avishai, N.; Meiner, V.; Abeliovich, D.; Filon, D. [Hadassah Univ. Hospital and the Hebrew Univ.-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    We report a three generation, 25 member kindred with familial pheochromocytoma. Seven subjects of generations I and II had pheochromocytoma, in five of the seven, the tumors were bilateral, and in two of the seven, the tumors were both adrenal and extraadrenal. One patient also had a carotid body chemodectoma, and one patient had a malignant adrenal tumor and abdominal paraganglioma. In the patient with the chemodectoma, a cerebellar hemagioblastoma became manifest 25 yr after his initial diagnosis with pheochromocytoma, leading only then to a clinical diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL). A mutational analysis of the VHL gene revealed a novel nucleotide 709 G{r_arrow}T transversion present in all affected subjects and in four presymptomatic children. In familial pheochromocytoma the diagnosis of VHL should be considered, even when the formal criteria for diagnosis of the syndrome are lacking. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer and Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lesley; Mutch, David G

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome in a majority of families and 14% of epithelial ovarian cancer cases. Despite next-generation sequencing, other identified genes (Lynch Syndrome, RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1) account for only a small proportion of cases. The risk of ovarian cancer by age 70 is approximately 40% for BRCA1 and 18% for BRCA2. Most of these cancers are high-grade serous cancers that predominantly arise in the fimbriae of the fallopian tube. Ovarian screening does not improve outcomes, so women at high risk are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy around the age of 40, followed by hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Specimens should be carefully examined for occult malignancy. Mutation carriers may benefit from newly developed poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors. Genetic testing should only be performed after careful counseling, particularly if testing involves the testing of panels of genes that may identify unsuspected disease predisposition or confusing variants of uncertain significance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Advantages and Some Remaining Challenges in Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Panel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Tara; Balay, Lara; Jung, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer affects 1 in 20 men and women in their lifetime. About 30% of these cases have been shown to be familial while only about 5% are associated with a highly penetrant hereditary colon cancer syndrome. In many familial cases, however, no mutation in the commonly implicated CRC genes is found. With the development of next-generation sequencing, testing laboratories are now able to offer hereditary gastrointestinal panel testing, which allows for the simultaneous sequencing of a much broader set of genes associated with CRC. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such testing to inform best clinical practice. PMID:28492537

  8. New treatments addressing the pathophysiology of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alvin E

    2008-04-14

    Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a deficiency of C1-inhibitor. The condition is the result of a defect in the gene controlling the synthesis of C1-inhibitor, which regulates the activity of a number of plasma cascade systems. Although the prevalence of hereditary angioedema is low - between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 - the condition can result in considerable pain, debilitation, reduced quality of life, and even death in those afflicted. Hereditary angioedema presents clinically as cutaneous swelling of the extremities, face, genitals, and trunk, or painful swelling of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Angioedema of the upper airways is extremely serious and has resulted in death by asphyxiation.Subnormal levels of C1-inhibitor are associated with the inappropriate activation of a number of pathways - including, in particular, the complement and contact systems, and to some extent, the fibrinolysis and coagulation systems.Current findings indicate bradykinin, a product of contact system activation, as the primary mediator of angioedema in patients with C1-inhibitor deficiency. However, other systems may play a role in bradykinin's rapid and excessive generation by depleting available levels of C1-inhibitor.There are currently no effective therapies in the United States to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, and currently available agents used to treat hereditary angioedema prophylactically are suboptimal. Five new agents are, however, in Phase III development. Three of these agents replace C1-inhibitor, directly addressing the underlying cause of hereditary angioedema and re-establishing regulatory control of all pathways and proteases involved in its pathogenesis. These agents include a nano-filtered C1-inhibitor replacement therapy, a pasteurized C1-inhibitor, and a recombinant C1-inhibitor isolated from the milk of transgenic rabbits. All C1-inhibitors are being investigated for acute angioedema attacks; the nano-filtered C1

  9. Topological Structures and Membrane Nanostructures of Erythrocytes after Splenectomy in Hereditary Spherocytosis Patients via Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liyuan; Li, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is an inherited red blood cell membrane disorder resulting from mutations of genes encoding erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. Few equipments can observe the structural characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis directly expect for atomic force microscopy In our study, we proved atomic force microscopy is a powerful and sensitive instrument to describe the characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis. Erythrocytes from hereditary spherocytosis patients were small spheroidal, lacking a well-organized lattice on the cell membrane, with smaller cell surface particles and had reduced valley to peak distance and average cell membrane roughness vs. those from healthy individuals. These observations indicated defects in the certain cell membrane structural proteins such as α- and β-spectrin, ankyrin, etc. Until now, splenectomy is still the most effective treatment for symptoms relief for hereditary spherocytosis. In this study, we further solved the mysteries of membrane nanostructure changes of erythrocytes before and after splenectomy in hereditary spherocytosis by atomic force microscopy. After splenectomy, the cells were larger, but still spheroidal-shaped. The membrane ultrastructure was disorganized and characterized by a reduced surface particle size and lower than normal Ra values. These observations indicated that although splenectomy can effectively relieve the symptoms of hereditary spherocytosis, it has little effect on correction of cytoskeletal membrane defects of hereditary spherocytosis. We concluded that atomic force microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of hereditary spherocytosis and to monitor treatment efficacy in clinical practices. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to study hereditary spherocytosis with atomic force microscopy and offers important mechanistic insight into the underlying role of splenectomy.

  10. BRCA1/2-negative hereditary triple-negative breast cancers exhibit BRCAness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers are sensitive to poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and platinum compounds mainly due to their deficiency in DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR). However, approximately only 15% of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are BRCA1/2-associated. TNBCs that exhibit BRCAness (a phenotype reflecting impaired HR in BRCA1/2-negative tumors) are also regarded sensitive to PARP inhibitors and platinum compounds. Thus, we hypothesized that hereditary BRCA1/2-negative TNBCs may exhibit BRCAness. To find a subset of hereditary BRCA1/2-negative TNBCs among 360 TNBCs, we first identified a group of 41 hereditary TNBCs by analyzing the family histories of the patients. Next, we tested this group for the presence of germline BRCA1/2 mutations, and finally, we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in HR and five other major mechanisms of DNA damage repair between BRCA1/2-associated and BRCA1/2-negative subgroups of hereditary TNBCs using real-time PCR arrays. Approximately 73% of the hereditary TNBCs were BRCA1/2-associated and 27% were BRCA1/2-negative. The expression levels of the analyzed genes showed no significant differences between these two subgroups indicating the BRCAness of the BRCA1/2-negative hereditary TNBCs and thereby distinguishing a novel subset of TNBCs as a potential target for PARP inhibitors or platinum-based therapy. The results show the significance of family history in selecting patients with TNBC for therapies directed at incompetent DNA repair (e.g., PARP inhibitors and/or platinum-based therapies) and indicate that a relatively simple strategy for broadening the target group for these modes of treatment is to identify patients with hereditary TNBCs. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Hereditary Renal Cystic Disorders: Imaging of the Kidneys and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Trout, Andrew T; Smith, Ethan A; Towbin, Alexander J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the hereditary renal cystic diseases that can manifest in children and adults, with specific attention to pathogenesis and imaging features. Various common and uncommon hereditary renal cystic diseases are reviewed in terms of their underlying etiology, including the involved genetic mutations and the affected proteins and cellular structures. Focus is placed on the morphologic findings in each condition and the features that distinguish one disorder from another. The two most common categories of hereditary renal cystic disease are (a) the ciliopathic disorders, which are related to mutations affecting the primary cilia (called "ciliopathies"), and (b) the phakomatoses. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, and the "medullary cystic disease complex" are all ciliopathies but have different phenotypes. Tuberous sclerosis complex and the associated "contiguous gene syndrome," as well as von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, are phakomatoses that can manifest with cystic renal lesions but have uniquely different extrarenal manifestations. Finally, DICER1 mutations can manifest with renal cystic lesions (typically, cystic nephromas) in patients predisposed to other malignancies in the chest, ovaries, and thyroid. Although some overlap exists in the appearance of the renal cysts associated with each of these diseases, there are clear morphologic differences (eg, cyst size, location, and complexity) that are emphasized in this review. To improve patient outcomes, it is important for the radiologist to recognize the various hereditary renal cystic diseases so that a correct diagnosis is assigned and so that the patient is adequately evaluated and followed up. ©RSNA, 2017.

  12. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L; Wedding, Iselin M; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H; Henriksen, Sandra P; Tallaksen, Chantal M E; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process.

  13. Hereditary ovarian cancer and two-compartment tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Balliet, Renee M.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are commonly found in hereditary ovarian cancers. Here, we used a co-culture approach to study the metabolic effects of BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells on adjacent tumor-associated stromal fibroblasts. Our results directly show that BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells produce large amounts of hydrogen peroxide, which can be abolished either by administration of simple antioxidants (N-acetyl-cysteine; NAC) or by replacement of the BRCA1 gene. Thus, the BRCA1 gene normally suppresses tumor growth by functioning as an antioxidant. Importantly, hydrogen peroxide produced by BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells induces oxidative stress and catabolic processes in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, such as autophagy, mitophagy and glycolysis, via stromal NFκB activation. Catabolism in stromal fibroblasts was also accompanied by the upregulation of MCT4 and a loss of Cav-1 expression, which are established markers of a lethal tumor microenvironment. In summary, loss of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene induces hydrogen peroxide production, which then leads to metabolic reprogramming of the tumor stroma, driving stromal-epithelial metabolic coupling. Our results suggest that new cancer prevention trials with antioxidants are clearly warranted in patients that harbor hereditary/familial BRCA1 mutations. PMID:23047606

  14. Carotenoid and vitamin intake, von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations and sporadic renal cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B.A.C. van; Schouten, L.J.; Oosterwijk, E.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether dietary carotenoid and vitamin intake and supplemental vitamin use were inversely associated with RCC risk and with Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-gene mutations in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (NLCS)

  15. Carotenoid and vitamin intake, von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations and sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B.A.C. van; Schouten, L.J.; Oosterwijk, E.; Hulsbergen van de; Kaa, C.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether dietary carotenoid and vitamin intake and supplemental vitamin use were inversely associated with RCC risk and with Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-gene mutations in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (NLCS)

  16. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  17. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Barshir; Omer Shwartz; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Esti Yeger-Lotem

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  18. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...

  19. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, Carole; Leach, Brandie H; Burke, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer and cancer deaths in the Western world. Approximately 5-10% of CRC are hereditary, due to a defined genetic cause. Individuals and families affected with a hereditary CRC syndrome exhibit benign and malignant extra-intestinal tumors, require aggressive cancer screening and benefit from management by a multi-disciplinary team of professionals. The clinical manifestations, genetic causes and current management of patients with hereditary colon cancer syndrome is provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified....... Hospital stay was 6-8 days and there were no complications. Small foci of diffuse gastric cancer were found in all patients-intramucosal in six and advanced in one. Preoperative endoscopic biopsies had revealed a microscopic cancer focus in two of the patients. Our data confirmed the pathogenic nature...

  1. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  2. Pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) was first described in the 19th century. Over the past 50 years, many details of the pathophysiology and molecular biology of HAE have been elucidated. Two types of HAE, type I and type II, result from mutations in the gene for the broad-spectrum protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor (C1INH). Type I HAE is characterized by low antigenic and functional C1INH levels and type II HAE has normal antigenic but low functional C1INH levels. Type III HAE, by contrast, has normal antigenic and functional C1INH levels. In some families, type III HAE has been linked to mutations in Hageman factor. C1INH is the primary inhibitor of the complement proteases C1r and C1s as well as the contact system proteases activated Hageman factor (coagulation factor XIIa and XIIf) and plasma kallikrein. It is also an inhibitor of plasmin and coagulation factor XIa. The primary mediator of swelling in HAE has now been unequivocally shown to be bradykinin, generated from activation of the plasma contact system. The knowledge gained concerning the underlying mechanisms of the different types of HAE allow the clinician to approach the laboratory diagnosis with confidence and provides opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary xanthinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type I is caused by mutations in the XDH gene. This gene provides instructions for making an ... excreted in urine and feces). Mutations in the XDH gene reduce or eliminate the activity of xanthine ...

  4. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research.

  5. High prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in central Norway: from clinical observation to evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Krogh, A S; Quist-Paulsen, P; Waage, A; Langseth, Ø O; Thorstensen, K; Brudevold, R; Tjønnfjord, G E; Largiadèr, C R; Lämmle, B; Kremer Hovinga, J A

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The population prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is unknown. We studied the prevalence of hereditary TTP and population frequencies of two ADAMTS-13 mutations. A high frequency of hereditary TTP related to ADAMTS-13 mutation c.4143_4144dupA was found. Vicinity of ABO blood group and ADAMTS-13 loci may facilitate screening of ADAMTS-13 mutations. Background Hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused by ADAMTS-13 mutations is a rare, but serious condition. The prevalence is unknown, but it seems to be high in Norway. Objectives To identify all patients with hereditary TTP in central Norway and to investigate the prevalence of hereditary TTP and the population frequencies of two common ADAMTS-13 mutations. Patients/Methods Patients were identified in a cross-sectional study within the Central Norway Health Region by means of three different search strategies. Frequencies of ADAMTS-13 mutations, c.4143_4144dupA and c.3178 C>T (p.R1060W), were investigated in a population-based cohort (500 alleles) and in healthy blood donors (2104 alleles) by taking advantage of the close neighborhood of the ADAMTS-13 and ABO blood group gene loci. The observed prevalence of hereditary TTP was compared with the rates of ADAMTS-13 mutation carriers in different geographical regions. Results We identified 11 families with hereditary TTP in central Norway during the 10-year study period. The prevalence of hereditary TTP in central Norway was 16.7 × 10(-6) persons. The most prevalent mutation was c.4143_4144dupA, accounting for two-thirds of disease causing alleles among patients and having an allelic frequency of 0.33% in the central, 0.10% in the western, and 0.04% in the southeastern Norwegian population. The allelic frequency of c.3178 C>T (p.R1060W) in the population was even higher (0.3-1%), but this mutation was infrequent among patients, with no homozygous cases. Conclusions We found a high prevalence of hereditary

  6. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F.; Heald, Brandie

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  7. How we manage persons with hereditary angioedema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema ( HAE ) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder clinically characterized by recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and mucosal swelling that can result in significant morbidity and even mortality...

  8. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  9. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  10. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have an increased risk for pregnancy loss (miscarriage) or stillbirth. Related Information What does it mean ... Meer J. High long-term absolute risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with hereditary deficiencies of ...

  12. The Genetics Of Blood Disorders: Hereditary Hemoglobinopathies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonati M.F.; Costa F.F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize recently published data on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell diseases and β-Thalassemias, the most relevant hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the global population. Sources: Searches were run on the MEDLINE and SCIELO databases, limited to the period from 2003 to May 2008, using the terms hereditary hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell diseases and β-thalassemia. Two books and two chapters were also included. Summary of the findings: More than 2,000...

  13. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  14. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoş Tiberius; Iacobini Andra Evelin

    2016-01-01

    Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is...

  15. Coexistence of Gilbert syndrome with hereditary haemolytic anaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawa, Katarzyna; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Matysiak, Michal; Trzemecka, Anna; Burzynska, Beata

    2012-07-01

    Gilbert syndrome is an inherited disease characterised by mild unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia caused by mutations in UGT1A1 gene which lead to decreased activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1. The most frequent genetic defect is a homozygous TA dinucleotide insertion in the regulatory TATA box in the UGT1A1 gene promoter. 182 Polish healthy individuals and 256 patients with different types of hereditary haemolytic anaemias were examined for the A(TA)(n)TAA motif. PCR was performed using sense primer labelled by 6-Fam and capillary electrophoresis was carried out in an ABI 3730 DNA analyser. The frequency of the (TA)(7)/(TA)(7) genotype in the control group was estimated at 18.13%, (TA)(6)/(TA)(7) at 45.05% and (TA)(6)/(TA)(6) at 36.26%. There was a statistically significant difference in the (TA)(6)/(TA)(6) genotype distribution between healthy individuals and patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (p=0.041). Additionally, uncommon genotypes, (TA)(5)/(TA)(6), (TA)(5)/(TA)(7) and (TA)(7)/(TA)(8) of the promoter polymorphism, were discovered. Genotyping of the UGT1A1 gene showed distinct distribution of the common A(TA)(n)TAA polymorphism relative to other European populations. Because of a greater risk of hyperbilirubinaemia due to hereditary haemolytic anaemia, the diagnosis of Gilbert syndrome in this group of patients is very important.

  16. ATL1 and REEP1 mutations in hereditary and sporadic upper motor neuron syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, S. T.; Veldink, J. H.; Vermeer, S.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Brugman, F.; Scheffer, H.; van den Berg, L. H.; Kremer, H. P. H.; Kamsteeg, E. J.; van de Warrenburg, B. P.

    SPAST mutations are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegias (AD-HSPs), but many spastic paraplegia patients are found to carry no mutations in this gene. In order to assess the contribution of ATL1 and REEP1 in AD-HSP, we performed mutational analysis in 27

  17. Changing aspects of HFE-related hereditary haemochromatosis and endeavours to early diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, E. M. G.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; Kreeftenberg, H. G.; van Deursen, C. Th. B. M.; Marx, J. J. M.; Stalenhoef, A. F. H.; Swinkels, D. W.; de Vries, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    HFE-related hereditary haernochromatosis (HH) is an iron overload disease attributed to the highly prevalent homozygosity for the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene. The pathophysiology of this error in iron metabolism is not completely elucidated yet, although deficiency of the iron regulatory hormone

  18. Changing aspects of HFE-related hereditary haemochromatosis and endeavours to early diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, E.M.G.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Kreeftenberg, H.G.; Deursen, C.T. van; Marx, J.J.M.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Swinkels, D.W.; Vries, R.A. de

    2007-01-01

    HFE-related hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is an iron overload disease attributed to the highly prevalent homozygosity for the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene. The pathophysiology of this error in iron metabolism is not completely elucidated yet, although deficiency of the iron regulatory hormone

  19. X-linked hereditary motor sensory neuropathy (type 1) presenting with a stroke-like episode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, Geetha; Maheshwari, Nitin; Roberts, David; Padeniya, Anuruddha; Hamilton-Ayers, Michele; van der Knaap, Marjo; Fratter, Carl; Jayawant, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    X-linked hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type 1 (CMTX 1) is caused by mutation in the GJB1 gene that codes for the connexin 32 protein. Central nervous system involvement with or without white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rarely been reported in this condition. We

  20. Transferrin hypoglycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance: using the clues and avoiding the pitfalls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamowicz, M.; Ploski, R.; Rokicki, D.; Morava, E.; Gizewska, M.; Mierzewska, H.; Pollak, A.; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Pronicka, E.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is caused by a deficiency of aldolase B due to mutations of the ALDOB gene. The disease poses diagnostic problems because of unspecific clinical manifestations. We report three cases of HFI all of whom had a chronic disease with neurological, nephrological or

  1. Presence of C1-Inhibitor Polymers in a Subset of Patients Suffering from Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Gram, Jørgen Brodersen

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor (C1-inh). The mutations cause decreased functional plasma levels of C1-inh, which triggers unpredictable recurrent edema attacks...

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG4) using direct mutation detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen E; Koefoed, Pernille; Kjaergaard, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a report on prenatal diagnosis using direct SPG4 gene analysis in a family with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP). METHODS: Genetic linkage and haplotype analysis were previously carried out with chromosome 2p markers. DNA was obtained from affected...

  3. [Consensus on hereditary cancer between the Spanish Oncology Society and the primary care societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L; Balmaña, J; Barrel, I; Grandes, S; Graña, B; Guillén, C; Marcos, H; Ramírez, D; Redondo, E; Sánchez, J

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that 5% of all cancers are hereditary, on being caused by mutations in the germinal line in cancer susceptibility genes. The hereditary pattern in the majority of cases is autosomal dominant. Genetic tests are only recommended to individuals whose personal or family history is highly suggestive of a hereditary cancer. The appropriate assessment of these individuals and their families must be performed in Cancer Genetic Counselling Units (UCGC). Representatives of the Spanish Medical Oncology Society (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica [SEOM]) and the three primary care scientific societies: Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [SEMFyC]), Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN]) and the Spanish Society of General and Family Doctors (Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG]), met to prepare this consensus document on hereditary cancer. The consensus identified the three main aspects: how to identify subjects at risk of hereditary cancer; how to refer to a UCGC; and the usefulness of the assessment and genetic studies. A document, with the text fully agreed by all the participants, has been prepared. It contains a summary of the principal characteristics of the care for individuals with hereditary cancer. It shows how to; identify them, assess them, refer them to a UCGC. How to assess their genetic risk, perform genetic studies, as well as prevention measures and reduction of the risk is also presented. This consensus document is a landmark in the relationships with several Scientific Societies that represent the professionals who provide care to individuals with cancer and their families, and will help to improve care in hereditary cancer in Spain. Copyright © 2013. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  4. Loss of the Birt-Hogg-Dubé gene product folliculin induces longevity in a hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Hakam; Fabretti, Francesca; Bharill, Puneet; Rinschen, Markus M; Brinkkötter, Sibylle; Frommolt, Peter; Burst, Volker; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Müller, Roman-Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    Signaling through the hypoxia-inducible factor hif-1 controls longevity, metabolism, and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) protein levels are regulated through an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin ligase complex. Mutations in the VHL gene, encoding a core component of this complex, cause a multitumor syndrome and renal cell carcinoma in humans. In the nematode, deficiency in vhl-1 promotes longevity mediated through HIF-1 stabilization. However, this longevity assurance pathway is not yet understood. Here, we identify folliculin (FLCN) as a novel interactor of the hif-1/vhl-1 longevity pathway. FLCN mutations cause Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in humans, another tumor syndrome with renal tumorigenesis reminiscent of the VHL disease. Loss of the C. elegans ortholog of FLCN F22D3.2 significantly increased lifespan and enhanced stress resistance in a hif-1-dependent manner. F22D3.2, vhl-1, and hif-1 control longevity by a mechanism distinct from insulin-like signaling. Daf-16 deficiency did not abrogate the increase in lifespan mediated by flcn-1. These findings define FLCN as a player in HIF-dependent longevity signaling and connect organismal aging, stress resistance, and regulation of longevity with the formation of renal cell carcinoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and the Anatomical Society.

  5. HEREDITARY CHARACTERISTICS BRCA1 5382INSC/СHEK2/BLM-ASSOCIATED BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. М. Bit-Sava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary breast cancer (HBC occurs in 5–10 % of all cases of breast cancer. The mutations in the genes of high penetrance – BRCA1, BRCA2 is mainly the reason HBC. In the study presented the features of HBC (age of onset of the disease, cancer family history, primary tumor process multiple character. Depending on the presence of mutations BRCA1 5382insC, BLM, CHEK2 carried out a comparative analysis of the occurrence of hereditary characteristics in breast cancer patients.

  6. Hereditary angioedema type III (estrogen-dependent) report of three cases and literature review*

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Amanda Rodrigues; de Ue, Ana Paula Fusel; Sabbag, Dominique Vilarinho; Furlani, Wellington de Jesus; de Souza, Patr?cia Karla; Rotta, Osmar

    2013-01-01

    In this article, three cases of hereditary angioedema (HAE) type III (estrogen-dependent or with normal C1 inhibitor) are reported. The HAE was initially described in women of the same family in association with high-leveled estrogenic conditions such as the use of oral contraceptives and pregnancy. There is no change in the C1 inhibitor as happens in other types of hereditary angioedema, and mutations are observed in the encoding gene of the XII factor of coagulation in several patients. The...

  7. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated......Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... an effect from anticipation with cancer diagnosed mean 11.4 years (t-test, p

  8. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...... an effect from anticipation with cancer diagnosed mean 11.4 years (t-test, p

  9. Progress of the factors influencing the penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Wei Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy(LHONis a maternally inherited blinding disease. The clinical phenotype of LHON is the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells(RGCsand a progressive degeneration of the optic nerve. Three common mutations, G11778A, T14484C and G3460A are responsible for over 90% of cases. Differences in penetrance indicate the additional modifier genes influencing penetrance of the mitochondrial DNA mutation for LHON patients. Different types of mitochondrial haplogroups, environmental factors also have different effects on the penetrance of the mitochondrial DNA mutations. In the present paper, here the progress of the factors influencing the penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy will be summarized.

  10. Novel mutations in FH and expansion of the spectrum of phenotypes expressed in families with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, M-H; Toure, O; Glenn, G M; Pithukpakorn, M; Neckers, L; Stolle, C; Choyke, P; Grubb, R; Middelton, L; Turner, M L; Walther, M M; Merino, M J; Zbar, B; Linehan, W M; Toro, J R

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC; OMIM 605839) is the predisposition to develop smooth muscle tumours of the skin and uterus and/or renal cancer and is associated with mutations in the fumarate hydratase gene (FH...

  11. Alcohol consumption and mutations or promoter hypermethylation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene in renal cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Dijk, B.A.C. van; Oosterwijk, E.; Engeland, M. van; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kester, A.; Vogel, S de; Schalken, J.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has been associated with a decreased risk for renal cell cancer in several studies. We investigated whether alcohol is associated with (epi)genetic changes of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene in renal cell cancer. The Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) on Diet and Cancer started in

  12. Alcohol consumption and mutations or promoter hypermethylation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene in renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Dijk, B.A.C.van; Oosterwijk, E.; Engeland, M. van; Hulsbergen - Kaa, C.A. van de; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kester, A.; Vogel, S. de; Schalken, J.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has been associated with a decreased risk for renal cell cancer in several studies. We investigated whether alcohol is associated with (epi)genetic changes of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene in renal cell cancer. The Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) on Diet and Cancer started in

  13. Pancreatic cyst development: insights from von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Asselt Sophie J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic cysts are a heterogeneous group of lesions, which can be benign or malignant. Due to improved imaging techniques, physicians are more often confronted with pancreatic cysts. Little is known about the origin of pancreatic cysts in general. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an atypical ciliopathy and inherited tumor syndrome, caused by a mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene encoding the VHL protein (pVHL. VHL patients are prone to develop cysts and neuroendocrine tumors in the pancreas in addition to several other benign and malignant neoplasms. Remarkably, pancreatic cysts occur in approximately 70% of VHL patients, making it the only hereditary tumor syndrome with such a discernible expression of pancreatic cysts. Cellular loss of pVHL due to biallelic mutation can model pancreatic cystogenesis in other organisms, suggesting a causal relationship. Here, we give a comprehensive overview of various pVHL functions, focusing on those that can potentially explain pancreatic cyst development in VHL disease. Based on preclinical studies, cilia loss in ductal cells is probably an important early event in pancreatic cyst development.

  14. miRNA expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE hereditary breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljana Tanić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer constitutes only 5–10% of all breast cancer cases and is characterized by strong family history of breast and/or other associated cancer types. Only ~25% of hereditary breast cancer cases carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, while mutations in other rare high and moderate-risk genes and common low penetrance variants may account for additional 20% of the cases. Thus the majority of cases are still unaccounted for and designated as BRCAX tumors. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles as regulators of gene expression and are deregulated in cancer. To characterize hereditary breast tumors based on their miRNA expression profiles we performed global microarray miRNA expression profiling on a retrospective cohort of 80 FFPE breast tissues, including 66 hereditary breast tumors (13 BRCA1, 10 BRCA2 and 43 BRCAX, 10 sporadic breast carcinomas and 4 normal breast tissues, using Exiqon miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array v.11.0. Here we describe in detail the miRNA microarray expression data and tumor samples used for the study of BRCAX tumor heterogeneity (Tanic et al., 2013 and biomarkers associated with positive BRCA1/2 mutation status (Tanic et al., 2014. Additionally, we provide the R code for data preprocessing and quality control.

  15. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease.

  16. Genetics of human isolated hereditary hair loss disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, S; Khan, S; Ahmad, W

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hair loss in human is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. It is characterized by sparse to complete absence of hair on the scalp and other parts of the body. In few cases tightly curled twisted wooly hair (WH) on the scalp has been reported as well. The hair loss disorders, including both syndromic and non-syndromic (isolated) forms, segregate either in autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern. To date, seven autosomal dominant and equal numbers of autosomal recessive isolated forms of hair loss disorders have been characterized. Genes responsible for causing most of these disorders have been identified. In this review, we have provided an update on clinical and genetic aspects of isolated hereditary hair loss disorders manifesting with hypotrichosis and/or WHs. Because most of the recessive genes have been mapped using consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, therefore emphasis is given to mutations identified in these families. OMIM nomenclature has been followed to indicate different forms of hair loss disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. New genetic causes for complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi de; Bortholin, Thiago; Dias, Renan Braido; Chieia, Marco Antônio Troccoli; Burlin, Stênio; Naylor, Fernando George Monteiro; Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) represents a complex and heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that share a common clinical feature of weakness and lower limb spasticity that can occur alone or in combination with a constellation of other neurological or systemic signs and symptoms. Although the core clinical feature of weakness and lower limb spasticity is virtually universal, the genetic heterogeneity is almost uncountable with more than 70 genetic forms described so far. We performed review of medical records from twenty-one patients from seventeen Brazilian families with complex phenotype of HSP. All cases have previously negative mutations in SPG11/KIAA1840 and SPG7 gene and were evaluated by whole-exome sequencing. An extensive description of systemic and neurological signs has been described. Whole-exome sequencing was unremarkable in eight patients and established a definite genetic diagnosis in thirteen patients of twelve non-related families. Mutations were found in genes previously implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Hereditary Neuropathy, Spastic Ataxias, Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation, Glycogen Metabolism, Congenital Lipodystrophy and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases disorders. We report thirteen new genetically-proven cases of complex HSP, expanding the clinical spectrum of presentations of HSP, providing new pathophysiological mechanisms and disclosing new potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards a dietary prevention of hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2005-03-01

    Inheritance of a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confers a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Variation in penetrance between individuals suggests that factors other than the gene mutation itself may influence the risk of cancer in susceptible women. Several risk factors have been identified which implicate estrogen-induced growth stimulation as a probable contributor to breast cancer pre-disposition. The protein products of both of these genes appear to help preserve genomic integrity via their participation in the DNA damage response and repair pathways. To date, the evidence for a cancer-protective role of dietary nutrients, for the most part those with antioxidant properties, has been based on women without any known genetic pre-disposition and it is important to identify and evaluate dietary factors which may modify the risk of cancer in BRCA carriers. Here we propose that diet modification may modulate the risk of hereditary breast cancer by decreasing DNA damage (possibly linked to estrogen exposure) or by enhancing DNA repair. The prevention of hereditary breast cancer through diet is an attractive complement to current management strategies and deserves exploration.

  19. The tumor suppressor gene TRC8/RNF139 is disrupted by a constitutional balanced translocation t(8;22(q24.13;q11.21 in a young girl with dysgerminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorio Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNF139/TRC8 is a potential tumor suppressor gene with similarity to PTCH, a tumor suppressor implicated in basal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. TRC8 has the potential to act in a novel regulatory relationship linking the cholesterol/lipid biosynthetic pathway with cellular growth control and has been identified in families with hereditary renal (RCC and thyroid cancers. Haploinsufficiency of TRC8 may facilitate development of clear cell-RCC in association with VHL mutations, and may increase risk for other tumor types. We report a paternally inherited balanced translocation t(8;22 in a proposita with dysgerminoma. Methods The translocation was characterized by FISH and the breakpoints cloned, sequenced, and compared. DNA isolated from normal and tumor cells was checked for abnormalities by array-CGH. Expression of genes TRC8 and TSN was tested both on dysgerminoma and in the proposita and her father. Results The breakpoints of the translocation are located within the LCR-B low copy repeat on chromosome 22q11.21, containing the palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR involved in recurrent and non-recurrent translocations, and in an AT-rich sequence inside intron 1 of the TRC8 tumor-suppressor gene at 8q24.13. TRC8 was strongly underexpressed in the dysgerminoma. Translin is underexpressed in the dysgerminoma compared to normal ovary. TRC8 is a target of Translin (TSN, a posttranscriptional regulator of genes transcribed by the transcription factor CREM-tau in postmeiotic male germ cells. Conclusion A role for TRC8 in dysgerminoma may relate to its interaction with Translin. We propose a model in which one copy of TRC8 is disrupted by a palindrome-mediated translocation followed by complete loss of expression through suppression, possibly mediated by miRNA.

  20. Association of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-related tumors displaying low microsatellite instability with MSH6 germline mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Mensink, RGJ; Kempinga, C; Sijmons, RH; van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Kleibeuker, JH; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) (Amsterdam criteria) is often caused by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, and tumors of patients with HNPCC show microsatellite instability (MSI-high phenotype), Germline mutations of MMR genes have rarely been found in families that have

  1. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neetika Garg,1 Monica Khunger,2 Arjun Gupta,3 Nilay Kumar4 1Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India; 3Department of Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1 or ACVRLK1 (HHT2 genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals, liver (~40%–70%, brain (~10%, and spine (~1%. Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs, presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. Keywords: arteriovenous

  2. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Foroozan, Rod; Lee, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    While Leber hereditary optic neuropathy typically causes bilateral visual loss in the second through fourth decades, we highlight visual loss from Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in older patients to characterize the clinical features of this cohort. Retrospective case series. Patients seen between January 2003 and July 2012 at Baylor College of Medicine and between April 2010 and July 2012 at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. Patients with visual loss from genetically confirmed Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were identified via retrospective chart review. Clinical courses of patients. Five patients with visual loss from genetically confirmed Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were greater than 60 years of age at the time of visual loss (range 62-70 years, mean 66.4 ± 3.0). This series reinforces the importance of including Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in the differential diagnosis of patients of any age with optic neuropathy. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type V Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects nerve cells ...

  4. The Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer Study: Review and Future Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-01-01

    .... In 2007, the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) Study was established to obtain evidence for the accurate risk assessment and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in Korea...

  5. [Quality control of DNA testing in hereditary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Scheffer, H.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratories performing diagnostic studies regarding hereditary diseases and the specialists providing hereditary counselling are housed in clinical genetic centres. The laboratories are subject to the Special Medical Performances Act and have had licenses from the Ministry. The DNA diagnostic

  6. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  7. Hereditary interstitial lung diseases manifesting in early childhood in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Cho, Kazutoshi; Hayasaka, Itaru; Morioka, Keita; Kaneshi, Yosuke; Furuta, Itsuko; Yamada, Masafumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2014-11-01

    Genetic variations associated with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) have not been extensively studied in Japanese infants. Forty-three infants with unexplained lung dysfunction were studied. All 43, 22, and 17 infants underwent analyses of surfactant protein (SP)-C gene (SFTPC) and ATP-binding cassette A3 gene (ABCA3), SP-B gene (SFTPB), and SP-B western blotting, respectively. Two and four underwent assessment of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-stimulating phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (pSTAT-5) and analyses of FOXF1 gene (FOXF1), respectively. ILD were diagnosed clinically in nine infants: four, three, and two had interstitial pneumonitis, hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP), and alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV), respectively. Genetic variations considered responsible were detected in six (67%) of the nine infants with ILD: three with hPAP (SFTPC p.Leu45Arg and p.Gln145fs, and ABCA3 p.Arg1583Trp/p.Val1495CysfsX21), two with interstitial pneumonitis (SFTPC p.Lys63Glu and p.Ser72Asn/p.Gly100Ala), and one with ACD/MPV (FOXF1 p.Leu300ArgfsX79). None showed SFTPB mutations or defects in pSTAT-5. The 17 bronchoalveolar lavage or tracheal aspirates contained enough SP-B protein. The SP-C abnormality was most prevalent, and SP-B deficiency was rare in Japanese infants with hereditary ILD.

  8. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  9. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  10. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited hemolytic anemia due to red cell membrane defects. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a compensatory response to insufficient bone marrow blood cell production. The preferred sites of extramedullary hematopoietic involvement are the spleen, liver and lymph nodes; but in HS, the posterior paravertebral mediastinum is also commonly involved. We report a case of a 50-year-old male who presented to us in respiratory distress and with bilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal masses, which on trucut biopsy were found to be extra-hematopoietic masses; and the patient was found to have hereditary spherocytosis.

  11. [Recurrent urinary lithiasis revealing hereditary xanthinuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlous, Afef; Gasmi, Manef; Mohsni, Amira; Abdelmoula, Jaouida

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria, due to a purine metabolism disorder, is a rare cause of urinary lithiasis in children. We report the case of a child aged 3 and a half years, who presented recurrent urinary lithiasis that led to destruction of the right kidney. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the calculus concluded that it was composed of 100% xanthine. Laboratory tests showed hypouricemia and hypouricosuria with elevated urinary excretion of oxypurines. These findings led to a diagnosis of hereditary xanthinuria. Early diagnosis of this rare disease is essential to avoid its complications. Metabolic causes must be sought in children with lithiasis.

  12. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Barshir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs. The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  13. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-06-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  14. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families Mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2: estudo da frequência em famílias brasileiras com câncer de mama e cólon hereditários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.INTRODUÇÃO: CHEK2 codifica uma proteína quinase envolvida em um ponto de checagem do ciclo celular que desempenha um papel importante na via de reparação do DNA, danos ativados principalmente por ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutado em resposta a danos na dupla hélice do DNA. A mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2 tem sido descrita como um alelo de baixa penetrância em um número significativo de famílias com câncer de mama e cólon em certos países e também está associada com risco

  15. Hyper-IgD syndrome and hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vicentini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are a group of systemic disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of systemic inflammation (autoinflammation without infectious or autoimmune cause. The hyper-IgD syndrome (HIDS is a rare autosomal recessive inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever, increased serum IgD (normal value < 100 U/ml and generalized inflammation (lymphadenopathy, arthralgias/arthritis, abdominal complaints, skin rash, and headache. The attacks persist during the entire life although frequency and severity tend to diminish with age. HIDS is caused by specific mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, resulting in depressed enzymatic activity. At present the therapy for the syndrome is only supportive. Other than HIDS, other hereditary systemic inflammatory disorders have been described: the Familial Mediterranean Fever, the tumour necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS, a disease related to the mutations of one of the TNF receptors, the Familial Cold Urticaria and the Muckle-Wells syndrome. The differential diagnosis with other causes of periodic fever is crucial for assessing appropriate management and treatment.

  16. Lateral medullary syndrome in a boy with hereditary dysfibrinogenemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, Tetsuya; Ikeya, Manae; Yokochi, Kenji; Okumura, Nobuo

    2012-11-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with sudden onset of nausea, vomiting and unsteady gait after a bread-eating game, which possibly caused neck hyperextension. Neurological examination revealed hemisensory loss of pain and temperature sensation in the right trunk and limbs along with left Horner's syndrome, suggesting lateral medullary syndrome (LMS). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed infarction at the left lateral medulla. MR angiography showed no sign of arterial dissection and no occlusion or stenosis of the intracranial, basilar or vertebral arteries or their branches. No evidence of cardioemboli or systemic inflammation was apparent. Repeated blood examination revealed low activity of fibrinogen. Genetic testing confirmed the presence of hereditary dysfibrinogenemia with a mutation in the FGB gene (BβGly15Cys). This fibrinogen variant has previously been found in Japanese patients with atherosclerosis obliterans or no symptoms. Under conservative treatment without anticoagulation and aspirin, the patient made a good recovery within a few months. We presume that microthrombosis may have been deposited within the vertebral system as a result of extension and rotation of the neck during sports activity, with a contribution from hereditary dysfibrinogenemia. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A; Haridy, Nourelhoda A; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P; Korlipara, L V Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry

    2016-07-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  18. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S.; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A.; Haridy, Nourelhoda A.; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Korlipara, L.V. Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  19. Hereditary Breast Cancer in the Han Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenming; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and has a strong genetic background. So far, 13 breast cancer susceptibility genes of high or moderate penetrance have been identified. This review summarizes findings on these genes in Han Chinese. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the 2 most important susceptibility genes. They have a relatively low mutation rate, and the most frequent sites of mutation are in exon 11. Frameshift mutations are the main type of mutation. Founder mutations may also exist, and BRCA-associated breast cancer has specific clinicopathologic characteristics. TP53 and PALB2 are relatively rare susceptibility genes. The relationship between the other 9 genes and breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. At present, the mutation spectrum for these susceptibility genes is not well understood in the Chinese population, and there are few reports on prognosis and clinical intervention in high-risk populations. Therefore, the true value of genetic counseling for breast cancer has yet to be realized. This article reviews studies of hereditary breast cancer in the Han Chinese population, highlights potential inadequacies, and provides a foundation for genetic counseling for breast cancer in China. PMID:23318652

  20. Brief Assessment of Parents’ Attitudes Toward Testing Minor Children for Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Genes: Development and Validation of the Pediatric BRCA1/2 Testing Attitudes Scale (P-TAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshkin, Beth N.; DeMarco, Tiffani A.; Garber, Judy E.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.; Patenaude, Andrea F.; Schneider, Katherine A.; Schwartz, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Predictive genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer risk (BRCA1/2 testing) is not recommended for minor children due to its lack of immediate medical benefit and potential psychological risk. Yet, tested mothers are often interested in learning about their children's cancer risks via pediatric BRCA1/2 testing, raising a host of bioethical concerns. However, no reliable or valid tool exists to formally gauge parents’ interest in such testing. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a new measure for use in genetic research and consultation, known as the Pediatric BRCA1/2 Testing Attitudes Scale (P-TAS). Methods After pretest genetic counseling and provision of a blood sample for BRCA1/2 testing, the P-TAS was administered to 187 mothers of children between 8- and 21-years-old. The measure was also given to 96 of the mothers’ nontested co-parents. Analyses of the factor structure and psychometric properties of the measure were performed in mothers and confirmed in their co-parents. Results The two factors of the P-TAS, labeled Attitudes and Beliefs (Factor 1) and Decision Making and Communication (Factor 2), accounted for 62.9% of the variance and were reliable (Cronbach's coefficient αs =.70 and.90, respectively); the structure and properties were largely confirmed among co-parents. Validity was indicated through its convergence with related constructs. Conclusions This new tool may be integrated into genetic counseling research to better assess parents’ attitudes and interests in pediatric BRCA1/2 testing. Such information may help guide ongoing discussions about the appropriateness of testing in adolescent or young adult children. PMID:18385162

  1. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  2. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  3. Hereditary spherocytosis. | Hassan | Annals of African Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. Although a positive family history of spherocytosis increases the risk for this disorder, it may be sporadic in some cases. In severe cases the ...

  4. Presumed hereditary retinal degenerations: Ibadan experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary retinal degenerative condition with no known treatment. Associated ocular conditions, such as cataract and glaucoma, when present further worsen vision, but these conditions are often treatable. There are, however, no known reports of cataract or glaucoma surgery in ...

  5. Hereditary spectrin deficiency in Golden Retriever dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slappendel, Robbert J.; van Zwieten, Rob; van Leeuwen, Martin; Schneijdenberg, Chris T. W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Spectrin deficiency with increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF) is a hallmark of hereditary spherocytosis, which is the most common congenital hemolytic anemia in humans of northern European ancestry. A radioimmunoassay revealed that erythrocyte spectrin concentration was 50-65% of normal in 5

  6. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is

  7. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  8. Hereditary breast cancer in Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) populations: identification of novel, recurrent and founder BRCA1 mutations in the Tunisian population

    OpenAIRE

    Mahfoudh, Wijden; Bouaouina, Noureddine; Ahmed, Slim Ben; Gabbouj, Sallouha; Shan, Jingxuan; Mathew, Rebecca; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Troudi, Wafa; Elgaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Hassen, Elham; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 breast cancer susceptibility gene account for a large proportion of hereditary breast cancer families and show considerable ethnic and geographical variations. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to hereditary breast cancer has not yet been thoroughly investigated in Middle Eastern and North African populations. In this study, 16 Tunisian high-risk breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in the entire BRCA1 coding region and exon?intron boundar...

  9. Research on Potential Biomarkers in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Maria Botella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, involving mutations in two predominant genes known as Endoglin (ENG; HHT1 and Activin receptor like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1; HHT2, as well as in some less frequent genes, such as MADH4/SMAD4 (JP-HHT or BMP9/GDF2 (HHT5. The diagnosis of HHT patients currently remains at the clinical level, according to the Curaçao criteria, whereas the molecular diagnosis is used to confirm or rule out suspected HHT cases, especially when a well characterized index case is present in the family or in an isolated population. Unfortunately, many suspected patients do not present a clear HHT diagnosis or do not show pathogenic mutations in HHT genes, prompting the need to investigate additional biomarkers of the disease. Here, several HHT biomarkers and novel methodological approaches developed during the last years will be reviewed. On one hand, products detected in plasma or serum samples: soluble proteins (VEGF, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin, angiopoietin-2 and microRNA variants (miR-27a, miR-205, miR-210. On the other hand, differential HHT gene expression fingerprinting, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of a panel of genes involved in HHT, and infrared spectroscopy combined with Artificial Neural Network (ANN patterns will also be reviewed. All these biomarkers might help to improve and refine HHT diagnosis by distinguishing from the non-HHT population.

  10. Clinical features of pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Qian-qian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical features and diagnostic methods of patients with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Methods Patients diagnosed with pure HSP from October 2006 to February 2013 admitted to Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University were included. The patients were assessed by the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale and the clinical features were reviewed. Results Thirty-three HSP patients (21 men and 12 women were included in the study. Thirteen patients (39.39% had family history of HSP and the most common genetic mode of the familial cases were autosomal dominant inheritance (11/13. The mean age of onset were (20.35 ± 15.55 years and the mean disease duration were (12.77 ± 9.83 years. All of the included patients presented with signs of impairment of the pyramidal tract such as increased muscular tone, tendon hyperreflexia and positive Babinski's sign of the lower limbs. Impairment of the pyramidal tract also presented in the upper limbs in some patients. Scissors gait appeared in 29 patients and feet deformity in 5 patients. Atrophy of thoracic cord on MRI were presented in 5 patients while 2 patients complicated with peripheral nerve damage. Four patients had a novel exon 10-17 deletion in SPG4 gene. There were no differences in onset age, disease duration and mean score of the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale between male and female patients as well as between patients with and without family history (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion The onset age of pure HSP is variational and males are more common than females. The most common inheritance mode is autosomal dominant and most of the cases are characterized by impairment of the pyramidal tract of the lower limbs and occasionally bladder dysfunction and peripheral nerve damage. Gender and family history do not affect the clinical features. Clinical features, family history and spinal cord MRI will assist the correct diagnosis, and making a definite

  11. Population screening for hereditary and familial cancer syndromes in Valka district of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanags Andrejs

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing possibilities of cancer prevention and treatment as well as the increasing knowledge about hereditary cancers require proper identification of the persons at risk. The aim of this study was to test the outcome of population screening in the scientific and practical evaluation of hereditary cancer. Methods Population screening for hereditary cancer was carried out retrospectively in a geographic area of Latvia. Family cancer histories were collected from 18642 adults representing 76.6% of the population of this area. Hereditary cancer syndromes were diagnosed clinically. Molecular testing for BRCA1 founder mutations 300 T/G, 4153delA and 5382insC was conducted in 588 persons who reported at least one case of breast or ovary cancer among blood relatives. Results Clinically, 74 (0.40%; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.32 - 0.50% high-risk and 548 (2.94%, 95% CI: 2.71 - 3.19 moderate-risk hereditary cancer syndromes were detected covering wide cancer spectrum. All syndromes were characterised by high cancer frequency among blood relatives ranging 8.6 - 46.2% in contrast to spouse correlation of 2.5 - 3.6%. The mean age of cancer onset ranged 38.0 - 72.0 years in different syndromes. The BRCA1 gene mutations were identified in 10 (1.7%; 95% CI: 0.9 - 3.1% probands. Families with established BRCA1 gene founder mutations were identified with the frequency 1:2663 clinically screened persons. Conclusions Population screening is a useful practical tool for the identification of persons belonging to families with high frequency of malignant tumours. The whole hereditary and familial cancer spectrum along with the age structure was identified adjusting follow-up guidelines. Another benefit of the population screening is the possibility to identify oncologically healthy persons belonging to hereditary and familial cancer families so that appropriate surveillance can be offered. Clinical diagnostics is appropriate for population

  12. Familial pancreatic cancer and hereditary syndromes: screening strategy for high-risk individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Globally, and almost evenly across nations, a familial disposition can be found in 4-10% of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). A family history of PC is a risk for this disease and the risk level changes in correlation with the number of affected relatives. Several hereditary syndromes with potential germline mutation also have a high risk for PC; however, little is yet known regarding the genes responsible for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). Characteristics of FPC cases are similar to those of other familial tumors, including younger onset than in sporadic cases and an ethnic difference (Ashkenazi Jewish > other Caucasian). Other risks resemble those of sporadic cases and include smoking and diabetes mellitus. People with several genetic syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, and familial adenomatous polyposis also have an increased risk of PC. In many countries, but not yet in Japan, screening of these high-risk individuals is now ongoing for the detection of early PC under established familial pancreatic cancer registries. In addition to the ordinary risk factors, such as smoking, diabetes, pancreatitis, cysts, duct ectasia, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), individuals with a family history of PC and hereditary syndromes are expected to be entered into the screening protocol.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary thrombophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a multifactorial disease that depends on variable combinations of acquired and genetic risk factors. The genetic risk factors include loss-of-function mutations in the genes that encode proteins with clot-restraining function, and gain-of-function mutations in procoagulant

  14. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of function can impair the production of digestive enzymes and disrupt normal digestion, leading to fatty stool (steatorrhea), weight loss, and ... its working or active form called trypsin. When digestion is complete and trypsin is no ... the enzyme is broken down. Some PRSS1 gene mutations that ...

  15. Machado-Joseph disease versus hereditary spastic paraplegia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teive Hélio A. Ghizoni

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is the most common autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia and presents great phenotypic variability. MJD presenting with spastic paraparesis was recently described in Japanese patients. We report the case of 41-year-old woman with the phenotype of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. Her father died at the age of 56 years due to an undiagnosed progressive neurological disease that presented parkinsonism. She had an expanded allele with 66 CAG repeats and a normal allele with 22 repeats in the gene of MJD. MJD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of autosomal dominant complicated HSP. A patient with the phenotype of complicated HSP and relatives with other clinical features of a neurodegenerative disease should raise the suspicion of MJD.

  16. National mutation study among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P M; Brusgaard, K; Ousager, L B

    2014-01-01

    carry mutations in the ENG, ACVRL1 or SMAD4 genes. Here, we report on the genetic heterogeneity in the Danish national HHT population and address the prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). Probands of 107 apparently unrelated families received genetic testing, including sequencing....... Large deletions were identified in ENG and ACVRL1. The prevalence of PAVM was 52.3% in patients with an ENG mutation and 12.9% in the ACVRL1 mutation carriers. We diagnosed 80% of the patients clinically, fulfilling the Curaçao criteria, and those remaining were diagnosed by genetic testing......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominantly inherited vascular disease characterized by the presence of mucocutaneous telangiectasia and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). The clinical diagnosis of HHT is based on the Curaçao criteria. About 85% of HHT patients...

  17. ENG mutational mosaicism in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, or SMAD4. Around 90% of HHT patients present with a heterozygous pathogenic genetic variation. Almost all cases of HHT have a family history. Very few cases are de......, and the flanking sequences of the genes were sequenced by NGS. RESULTS: The proband had clinical HHT fulfilling the Curaçao criteria and genetic testing identified a frameshift mutation in ENG. The mother of the proband, also with clinical HHT, was found negative when analyzing DNA from blood for the familial...... mutation using Sanger sequencing. Analyzing her DNA by NGS HHT panel sequencing when extracted from both peripheral blood leukocytes, and cheek swabs, identified the familial ENG mutation at low levels. CONCLUSION: We provide evidence of ENG mutational mosaicism in an individual presenting with clinical...

  18. Sepsis and siderosis, Yersinia enterocolitica and hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Phoebe A; Woods, Marion L

    2017-01-04

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with sepsis, relative bradycardia, CT evidence of numerous small liver abscesses and 'skin bronzing' consistent with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 infection was confirmed by serology specimens taken 10 days apart. Iron overload was detected, and homozygous C282Y gene mutation confirmed HH. Liver biopsy revealed grade IV siderosis with micronodular cirrhosis. Haemochromatosis is a common, inherited disorder leading to iron overload that can produce end-organ damage from excess iron deposition. Haemochromatosis diagnosis allowed aggressive medical management with phlebotomy achieving normalisation of iron stores. Screening for complications of cirrhosis was started that included hepatoma surveillance. Iron overload states are known to increase patient susceptibility to infections caused by lower virulence bacteria lacking sophisticated iron metabolism pathways, for example, Yersinia enterocolitica Although these serious disseminated infections are rare, they may serve as markers for occult iron overload and should prompt haemochromatosis screening. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. De novo REEP2 missense mutation in pure hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Ricardo H; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig

    2017-05-01

    Alterations in proteins that regulate endoplasmic reticulum morphology are common causes of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG1-78, plus others). Mutations in the REEP1 gene that encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-shaping protein are well-known causes of SPG31, a common autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia. A closely-related gene, REEP2, is mutated in SPG72, with both autosomal and recessive inheritances. Here, we report a patient with a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a de novo missense mutation (c.119T > G, p.Met40Arg) in REEP2 at a highly-conserved residue very close to another known pathogenic missense change. This represents only the second autosomal dominant SPG72 missense mutation reported.

  20. Comprehensive mutational screening in a cohort of Danish families with hereditary congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Nürnberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Identification of the causal mutations in 28 unrelated families and individuals with hereditary congenital cataract identified from a national Danish register of hereditary eye diseases. Seven families have been published previously, and the data of the remaining 21 families are presented...... together with an overview of the results in all families. METHODS: A combined screening approach of linkage analysis and sequencing of 17 cataract genes were applied to mutation analyses of total 28 families. RESULTS: The study revealed a disease locus in seven of eight families that were amenable......, and a gene conversion is the most likely mutational event causing this variant. Ten families had microcornea cataract, and a mutation was identified in eight of those. Most families displayed mixed phenotypes with nuclear, lamellar, and polar opacities and no apparent genotype-phenotype correlation emerged...