WorldWideScience

Sample records for vha upper midwest

  1. 7 CFR 1030.2 - Upper Midwest marketing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Upper Midwest marketing area. 1030.2 Section 1030.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE UPPER MIDWEST MARKETING AREA Order...

  2. 75 FR 39039 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment for the Upper Midwest Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Bill Hayman, Facility Mechanical Engineer at Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences... (ultraviolet) equipment for disinfection of final effluent. Repair fence and gates. Repair eroded bank outside...

  3. Mitigation strategies and unforseen consequences: A systematic assessment of the adaption of upper midwest agriculture to future climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, O.; Lowenberg-DeBoer, J.; Habeck, M. [and others

    1997-12-31

    Our starting point is the assumption of global climate change that doubles CO{sub 2} in the Upper Midwest by 2050. This work then concentrates on determining agriculture in the Upper Midwest successfully adapts to such a climate change.

  4. Measuring the health literacy of the Upper Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Caitlin J; Koffel, Jonathan B; Theis-Mahon, Nicole R

    2017-01-01

    Health literacy-the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information-is a major determinant of an individual's overall health and health care utilization. In this project, the authors examined predictors of health literacy levels, including numeracy and graphic literacy, among an adult population in the Upper Midwest. The research was conducted at the Minnesota State Fair. Three previously validated scales were used to assess health literacy: Newest Vital Sign, the General Health Numeracy Test, and questions from Galesic and Garcia-Retamero's Graph Literacy Scale. Demographic information-such as age, educational attainment, zip code, and other potential predictors and modifiers-was collected. Multivariate linear regression was conducted to examine the independent effects of educational attainment, race, ethnicity, gender, and rural or urban location on overall health literacy and scores on each of the individual instruments. A total of 353 Upper Midwest residents completed the survey, with the majority being white, college-educated, and from an urban area. Having a graduate or professional degree or being under the age of 21 were associated with increased health literacy scores, while having a high school diploma or some high school education, being Asian American, or being American Indian/Alaska Native were associated with lower health literacy scores. Advanced health literacy skills, including the ability to calculate and compare information, were problematic even in well-educated populations. Understanding numerical and graphical information was found to be particularly difficult, and more research is needed to understand these deficits and how best to address them.

  5. Upper midwest climate variations: farmer responses to excess water risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Lois Wright; Hobbs, Jonathan; Arbuckle, J Gordon; Loy, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Persistent above average precipitation and runoff and associated increased sediment transfers from cultivated ecosystems to rivers and oceans are due to changes in climate and human action. The US Upper Midwest has experienced a 37% increase in precipitation (1958-2012), leading to increased crop damage from excess water and off-farm loss of soil and nutrients. Farmer adaptive management responses to changing weather patterns have potential to reduce crop losses and address degrading soil and water resources. This research used farmer survey ( = 4778) and climate data (1971-2011) to model influences of geophysical context, past weather, on-farm flood and saturated soils experiences, and risk and vulnerability perceptions on management practices. Seasonal precipitation varied across six Upper Midwest subregions and was significantly associated with variations in management. Increased warm-season precipitation (2007-2011) relative to the past 40 yr was positively associated with no-till, drainage, and increased planting on highly erodible land (HEL). Experience with saturated soils was significantly associated with increased use of drainage and less use of no-till, cover crops, and planting on HEL. Farmers in counties with a higher percentage of soils considered marginal for row crops were more likely to use no-till, cover crops, and plant on HEL. Respondents who sell corn through multiple markets were more likely to have planted cover crops and planted on HEL in 2011.This suggests that regional climate conditions may not well represent individual farmers' actual and perceived experiences with changing climate conditions. Accurate climate information downscaled to localized conditions has potential to influence specific adaptation strategies. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. NACP MCI: CO2 Flux from Inversion Modeling, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides estimates of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) flux for the U.S. Upper Midwest at 0.5-degree resolution for the year 2007. Estimates were...

  7. NACP MCI: CO2 Flux from Inversion Modeling, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides estimates of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) flux for the U.S. Upper Midwest at 0.5-degree resolution for the year 2007. Estimates were produced...

  8. NACP MCI: Tower Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides high precision and high accuracy atmospheric CO2 data from seven instrumented communication towers located in the U.S. Upper Midwest. The...

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris; Apiaceae) in the upper Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbottam Piya; Madhav P. Nepal; Jack L. Butler; Gary E. Larson; Achal Neupane

    2014-01-01

    Sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris), an introduced species native to Europe and Asia, grows as an aggressive weed in some areas of the upper Midwest in the United States. We are reporting genetic diversity and population structure of sickleweed populations using microsatellite markers and nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. Populations showed high genetic differentiation...

  10. Estimation of invasive probability of multiflora rose in the upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiming Yu; Zhaofei Fan; W. K. Moser; M. H. Hansen; M. D. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Multiflora rose (Rosa Multiflora Thunb.) (MFR) is widely spreading across the United States, with up to 38 states in the contiguous United States reporting the presence of this species. In this study, U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data from the Upper Midwest states for the period of 2005-2006 were...

  11. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Thoma, Ed [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; Ojzcyk, Cindy [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership

    2012-12-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored.

  12. Upper Midwest farmer perceptions: Too much uncertainty about impacts of climate change to justify changing current agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lois Wright Morton; Gabrielle E. Roesch-McNally; Adam Wilke

    2017-01-01

    To be uncertain is to be unsure or have doubt. Results from a random sample survey show the majority (89.5%) of farmers in the Upper Midwest perceived there was too much uncertainty about the impacts of climate to justify changing their agricultural practices and strategies, despite scientific evidence regarding the causes and potential consequences of climate change....

  13. Strip-tillage reduces productivity in organically managed grain and forage cropping systems in the Upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally, tillage is decreasing due to recognized benefits of fuel savings and improved soil health in the absence of disturbance. However, a perceived inability to control weeds effectively and economically hinders no-till adoption in organic production systems in the Upper Midwest. A strip-tilla...

  14. New Radiocarbon Dates on Upper Mid-West Proboscideans: Determining Date Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, G.; Widga, C.; Lengyel, S. N.; Saunders, J.; Walker, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    With the objective of refining the picture of Megafaunal extinction patterns in the upper Midwest in the terminal Pleistocene, we have assembled for radiocarbon dating specimens from more than 80 distinct Mammut and Mammuthus remains from potentially late sites. So far, we have measurements for 65 bones, tusks and teeth, nearly double the extant number of published dates . These new specimens were all from museums rather than excavation sites, and 60% were known to be coated with a consolidant. The predominant consolidant was Butvar B-76, however shellac, Elmer's Glue, Glyptol were also noted in the conservation records, or deduced from knowledge of a particular museum's practices. Given the objective of the project is to identify extinction patterns, coupled with the wide prevalence of consolidants amongst the specimen set, it was imperative that testing be carried out to confirm that radiocarbon laboratory protocols removed the consolidants, so that ultimately the dates can be considered robust. To this end, key specimens were dated three times using different sample preparation protocols. These were 1) a solvent extraction followed by a modified Longin-plus -Base continuous flow collagen extraction method used in the NSF-Arizona AMS facility, 2) the solvent/modified Longin method plus ultrafiltration, and 3) solvent/modified Longin method plus hydroxyproline single amino acid dating. Among the specimens subjected to triplicate testing were some of the youngest late Wisconsin proboscidean specimens from the Upper Midwest Region. The data reveal general agreement between the different protocols, and suggested either limited penetration of consolidants into the specimens, or that the standard laboratory cleaning protocols were sufficient to remove traces from deep within bone, tooth or tusk tissue. The preservation of each specimen, recorded in terms of collagen content, C/N ratio and stable isotope values, indicated that most were actually well preserved, implying

  15. An Ecoregional Context for Forest Management on National Wildlife Refuges of the Upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corace, R. Gregory; Shartell, Lindsey M.; Schulte, Lisa A.; Brininger, Wayne L.; McDowell, Michelle K. D.; Kashian, Daniel M.

    2012-02-01

    To facilitate forest planning and management on National Wildlife Refuges, we synthesized multiple data sources to describe land ownership patterns, land cover, landscape pattern, and changes in forest composition for four ecoregions and their associated refuges of the Upper Midwest. We related observed patterns to ecological processes important for forest conservation and restoration, with specific attention to refuge patterns of importance for forest landbirds of conservation priority. The large amount of public land within the ecoregions (31-80%) suggests that opportunities exist for coarse and meso-scale approaches to conserving and restoring ecological processes affecting the refuges, particularly historical fire regimes. Forests dominate both ecoregions and refuges, but refuge forest patches are generally larger and more aggregated than in associated ecoregions. Broadleaf taxa have increased in dominance in the ecoregions and displaced fire-dependent taxa such as pine ( Pinus spp.) and other coniferous species; these changes in forest composition have likely also affected refuge forests. Despite compositional changes, larger forest patches on refuges suggests that they may provide better habitat for area-sensitive forest landbirds of mature, compositionally diverse forests than surrounding lands if management continues to promote increased patch size. We reason that although fine-scale research and monitoring for species of conservation priority is important, broad scale (ecoregional) assessments provide crucial context for effective forest and wildlife management in protected areas.

  16. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Thoma, E.; Ojczyk, C.

    2012-12-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored. All three builders commonly seek ENERGY STAR certification on their homes and implement strategies that would allow them to meet the requirements for the Building America Builders Challenge program. Their desire for continuous improvement, willingness to seek outside assistance, and ambition to be leaders in their field are common themes. Problem solving to overcome challenges was accepted as part of doing business. It was concluded that crossing the gap from code-based building to high performance based building was a natural evolution for these leading builders.

  17. Gliomas and farm pesticide exposure in women: the Upper Midwest Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Ruder, Avima M; Waters, Martha A; Davis-King, Karen E; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Schulte, Paul A; Connally, Barbara; Ward, Elizabeth M; Sanderson, Wayne T; Heineman, Ellen F; Mandel, Jack S; Morton, Roscoe F; Reding, Douglas J; Rosenman, Kenneth D; Talaska, Glenn

    2005-05-01

    An excess incidence of brain cancer in male farmers has been noted in several studies, but few studies have focused on women. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Upper Midwest Health Study evaluated effects of rural exposures for 341 female glioma cases and 528 controls, all adult (18-80 years of age) nonmetropolitan residents of Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. On average, controls lived longer on farms than did cases. After adjusting for age, age group, education, and farm residence, no association with glioma was observed for exposure to arsenicals, benzoic acids, carbamates, chloroacetanilides, dinitroanilines, inorganics, organochlorines, organophosphates, phenoxys, triazines, or urea-based or estrogenic pesticides. An increased risk of glioma was observed for carbamate herbicides but was not statistically significant (odds ratio = 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.9-9.5). No association was observed between glioma and exposure to 12 widely used specific pesticides, after adjustment for age, age group, education, and any other pesticide exposure. These results were not affected after exclusion of proxy respondents (43% of cases, 2% of controls). Women were less likely than men to have applied pesticides, but more likely to have laundered pesticide-contaminated clothes. Storing pesticides in the house was associated with a statistically non-significant increased risk. Results show that exposure to pesticides was not associated with an increased risk of intracranial gliomas in women. Other farm-related factors could be etiologic factors and will be discussed in future reports.

  18. Decision support system development at the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Timothy J.; Nelson, J. C.; Rohweder, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    A Decision Support System (DSS) can be defined in many ways. The working definition used by the U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) is, “A spatially based computer application or data that assists a researcher or manager in making decisions.” This is quite a broad definition—and it needs to be, because the possibilities for types of DSSs are limited only by the user group and the developer’s imagination. There is no one DSS; the types of DSSs are as diverse as the problems they help solve. This diversity requires that DSSs be built in a variety of ways, using the most appropriate methods and tools for the individual application. The skills of potential DSS users vary widely as well, further necessitating multiple approaches to DSS development. Some small, highly trained user groups may want a powerful modeling tool with extensive functionality at the expense of ease of use. Other user groups less familiar with geographic information system (GIS) and spatial data may want an easy-to-use application for a nontechnical audience. UMESC has been developing DSSs for almost 20 years. Our DSS developers offer our partners a wide variety of technical skills and development options, ranging from the most simple Web page or small application to complex modeling application development.

  19. Veterans Health Administration (VHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is for SSA to verify SSNs and other identifying information for the Department of Veterans Affairs, VHA. DVA will use the information...

  20. Flight Synchrony among the Major Moth Pests of Cranberries in the Upper Midwest, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn A. Steffan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The cranberry fruitworm (Acrobasis vaccinii Riley, sparganothis fruitworm (Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens, and blackheaded fireworm (Rhopobota naevana Hübner are historically significant pests of cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton in the Upper Midwest (Wisconsin, USA. Their respective natural histories are well documented but correlations between developmental benchmarks (e.g., larval eclosion and degree-day accruals are not yet known. Treatment timings are critical to the optimization of any given control tactic, and degree-day accrual facilitates optimization by quantifying the developmental status of pest populations. When key developmental benchmarks in the pest life cycle are linked to degree-days, real-time weather data can be used to predict precise treatment timings. Here, we provide the degree-day accumulations associated with discrete biological events (i.e., initiation of flight and peak flight for the three most consistent moth pests of cranberries in Wisconsin. Moths were trapped each spring and summer from 2003 to 2011. To characterize flight dynamics and average timing of flight initiation, pheromone-baited trap-catch data were tallied for all three pest species within each of seven growing seasons. These flight dynamics were then associated with the corresponding degree-day accumulations generated using the cranberry plant’s developmental thresholds. Finally, models were fit to the data in order to determine the peak flight of each species. The initiation of the spring flight among all three moth species was highly synchronous, aiding in the timing of control tactics; however, there were substantial differences in the timing of peak flight among the moth species. Characterization of the relationship between temperature and pest development allows pest management professionals to target specific life stages, improving the efficacy of any given pest control tactic.

  1. Flight Synchrony among the Major Moth Pests of Cranberries in the Upper Midwest, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffan, Shawn A; Singleton, Merritt E; Sojka, Jayne; Chasen, Elissa M; Deutsch, Annie E; Zalapa, Juan E; Guédot, Christelle

    2017-02-26

    The cranberry fruitworm (Acrobasis vaccinii Riley), sparganothis fruitworm (Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens), and blackheaded fireworm (Rhopobota naevana Hübner) are historically significant pests of cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) in the Upper Midwest (Wisconsin), USA. Their respective natural histories are well documented but correlations between developmental benchmarks (e.g., larval eclosion) and degree-day accruals are not yet known. Treatment timings are critical to the optimization of any given control tactic, and degree-day accrual facilitates optimization by quantifying the developmental status of pest populations. When key developmental benchmarks in the pest life cycle are linked to degree-days, real-time weather data can be used to predict precise treatment timings. Here, we provide the degree-day accumulations associated with discrete biological events (i.e., initiation of flight and peak flight) for the three most consistent moth pests of cranberries in Wisconsin. Moths were trapped each spring and summer from 2003 to 2011. To characterize flight dynamics and average timing of flight initiation, pheromone-baited trap-catch data were tallied for all three pest species within each of seven growing seasons. These flight dynamics were then associated with the corresponding degree-day accumulations generated using the cranberry plant's developmental thresholds. Finally, models were fit to the data in order to determine the peak flight of each species. The initiation of the spring flight among all three moth species was highly synchronous, aiding in the timing of control tactics; however, there were substantial differences in the timing of peak flight among the moth species. Characterization of the relationship between temperature and pest development allows pest management professionals to target specific life stages, improving the efficacy of any given pest control tactic.

  2. Spatiotemporal distributions of intestinal helminths in female lesser scaup Aythya affinis during spring migration from the upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, J. C.; Levengood, J.M.; Osborn, J. M.; Yetter, A. P.; Kinsella, J.M.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Cory D. Suski,; Hagy, Heath M.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the associations between intestinal helminth infracommunity structure and infection parameters and the age, size, and year and region of collection of 130 female lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) during their 2014–2015 spring migrations through the upper Midwest, USA. We identified a total of 647,174 individual helminths from 40 taxa, including 20 trematodes, 14 cestodes, 4 nematodes and 2 acanthocephalans parasitizing lesser scaup within the study area. Lesser scaup were each infected with 2–23 helminth taxa. One digenean, Plenosoma minimum, is reported for the first time in lesser scaup and in the Midwest. Mean trematode abundance and total helminth abundance was significantly less in 2015 than 2014, and we suspect that colder weather late in 2015 impacted the intermediate host fauna and caused the observed differences. Brillouin's species diversity of helminths was greatest in the northernmost region of the study area, which coincides with the range of a non-indigenous snail that indirectly causes annual mortality events of lesser scaup. While host age and size were not determined to be influential factors of helminth infracommunity structure, non-parametric ordination and permutational analysis of co-variance revealed that year and region of collection explained differences in helminth infracommunities. Our results suggest that spatiotemporal variations play an important role in the structure of intestinal helminth infracommunities found in migrating lesser scaup hosts, and may therefore impact host ability to build endogenous reserves at certain stopover locations in the Midwest.

  3. Biochemical conversions of lignocellulosic biomass for sustainable fuel-ethanol production in the upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur-Campbell, Michael J.

    Biofuels are an increasingly important component of worldwide energy supply. This research aims to understand the pathways and impacts of biofuels production, and to improve these processes to make them more efficient. In Chapter 2, a life cycle assessment (LCA) is presented for cellulosic ethanol production from five potential feedstocks of regional importance to the upper Midwest — hybrid poplar, hybrid willow, switchgrass, diverse prairie grasses, and logging residues — according to the requirements of Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Direct land use change emissions are included for the conversion of abandoned agricultural land to feedstock production, and computer models of the conversion process are used in order to determine the effect of varying biomass composition on overall life cycle impacts. All scenarios analyzed here result in greater than 60% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions relative to petroleum gasoline. Land use change effects were found to contribute significantly to the overall emissions for the first 20 years after plantation establishment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the effects of biomass mixtures on overall sugar recovery from the combined processes of dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Biomass mixtures studied were aspen, a hardwood species well suited to biochemical processing; balsam, a high-lignin softwood species, and switchgrass, an herbaceous energy crop with high ash content. A matrix of three different dilute acid pretreatment severities and three different enzyme loading levels was used to characterize interactions between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yield for any species was 70% of theoretical for switchgrass, and maximum xylose yield was 99.7% of theoretical for aspen. Supplemental β-glucosidase increased glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis by an average of 15%, and total sugar recoveries for mixtures could be predicted to within 4% by linear interpolation of the pure

  4. Use of DNA sequencing to detect pathogenic, saprotrophic, and stain fungi in sapwood of declining red pine (Pinus resinosa) in the Upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.T. Banik; D.L. Lindner; J. Juzwik; J.A. Glaeser

    2013-01-01

    An inexpensive kit was developed to collect wood samples for molecular detection of pathogenic, saprotrophic and stain fungi in declining Pinus resinosa in the Upper Midwest. The kit contained materials for "clean" collection of sapwood drill shavings, which were then subjected to PCR of the rDNA ITS region with fungal-specific primers,...

  5. EPA Awards Clean Diesel Grant to the American Lung Association of the Upper Midwest for Work in Florida and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that the American Lung Association of the Upper Midwest is among the recipients of clean diesel grants. EPA has awarded $8 million to communities in 21 states and Puerto Rico t

  6. Indirect Costs SEA-LEA Workshop. Report of Workshop Conducted by Upper Midwest Regional Interstate Project. (Chicago, Illinois, January 17-18, 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Robb L., Comp.

    The Policy Committee of the Upper Midwest Regional Interstate Project saw a need to inform the State Education Agencies (SEAs) concerning the implications of federal program indirect costs. The Indirect Cost Workshop was established to develop communication concerning the problems between the United States Office of Education (USOE), SEAs, and…

  7. Fish and land use influence Gammarus lacustris and Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda) densities in large wetlands across the upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Afton, Alan D.; Anteau, Andrea C.E.; Moser, E. Barry

    2011-01-01

    Gammarus lacustrisK/i> and Ki>Hyalella azteca (hereafter G. lacustris and H. azteca, respectively) are important components of secondary production in wetlands and shallow lakes of the upper Midwest, USA. Within the past 50 years, amphipod densities have decreased while occurrences of fish and intensity of agricultural land use have increased markedly across this landscape. We investigated influences of fish, sedimentation, and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) on densities of G. lacustris and H. azteca in semipermanent and permanent wetlands and shallow lakes (n = 283) throughout seven eco-physiographic regions of Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota during 2004–2005. G. lacustris and H. azteca densities were positively correlated with densities of SAV (P P P = 0.01 and P = 0.013, respectively) and with high densities of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; P P = 0.033, respectively). H. azteca densities also were negatively correlated with densities of small fish (e.g., other minnows [Cyprinidae] and sticklebacks [Gasterosteidae]; P = 0.048) and common carp (Cyprinus spp.; P = 0.022). G. lacustris densities were negatively correlated with high levels of suspended solids (an index for sedimentation; P H. azteca densities were positively correlated with the width of upland-vegetation buffers (P = 0.004). Our results indicate that sedimentation and fish reduce amphipod densities and may contribute to the current low densities of amphipods in the upper Midwest. Thus, removing/excluding fish, and providing a thick buffer of upland vegetation around wetlands may help restore amphipod densities and wetland and water quality within this landscape.

  8. Is Miscanthus a High Risk Biofuel Feedstock Prospect for the Upper Midwest US?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, C. J.; VanLoocke, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Miscanthus is a highly productive C4 perennial rhizomatous grass that is native to Southeast Asia, but its potential as a feedstock for cellulosic biofuel in the Midwest US is intriguing given extremely high productivity for low amounts of agrochemical inputs. However, Miscanthus x giganteus, a key variety currently studied is not planted from seed, but rather from rhizomes planted at a soil depth of 5 to 10 cm. Therefore, it is costly to establish on the basis of both time and money, making it a potentially risky investment in geographic regions that experience cold wintertime temperatures that can effectively kill the crop. The 50% kill threshold for M. giganteus rhizomes occurs when soil temperatures fall below -3.5C, which may contribute to a high risk of improper establishment during the first few seasons. Our first objective here was to study a historical, simulated reconstruction of daily wintertime soil temperatures at high spatial resolution (5 min) across the Midwest US from 1948-2007, and use this information to quantify the frequency that lethal soil temperature thresholds for Miscanthus were reached. A second objective was to investigate how the use of crop residues could impact wintertime soil temperatures. In this study, a dynamic agroecosystem model (Agro-IBIS) that has been modified to simulate Miscanthus growth and phenology was used in conjunction with high-resolution datasets of soil texture and daily gridded weather data. Model simulations suggest that across the states of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and the northern half of Iowa, the kill threshold of -3.5C at a 10cm soil depth was reached in 70-95% of the simulation years. A boundary representing a 50% likelihood of reaching -3.5C at 10cm depth in any given year runs approximately from east central Colorado, thought northern Kansas and Missouri, through central Illinois, central Indiana, and central Ohio. An analysis of monthly mean 10cm soil temperatures

  9. The effects of more extreme rainfall patterns on nitrogen leaching from a field crop system in the upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, L.; Hinckley, E. L. S.; Robertson, G. P.; Matson, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    As global surface temperatures rise, the proportion of total rainfall that falls in heavy storm events is increasing in many areas, in particular the US Midwest, a major agricultural region. These changes in rainfall patterns may have consequences for ecosystem nutrient losses, especially from agricultural ecosystems. We conducted a multi-year rainfall manipulation experiment to examine how more extreme rainfall patterns affect nitrogen (N) leaching from row-crop ecosystems in the upper Midwest, and to what extent tillage may moderate these effects. 5x5m rainout shelters were installed in April 2015 to impose control and extreme rainfall patterns in replicated plots under conventional tillage and no-till management at the Kellogg Biological Station LTER site. Plots exposed to the control rainfall treatment received ambient rainfall, and those exposed to the extreme rainfall treatment received the same total amount of water but applied once every 2 weeks, to simulate larger, less frequent storms. N leaching was calculated as the product of measured soil water N concentrations and modeled soil water drainage at 1.2m depth using HYDRUS-1D. Based on data to date, more N has been leached from both tilled and no-till soils exposed to the extreme rainfall treatment compared to the control rainfall treatment. Results thus far suggest that greater soil water drainage is a primary driver of this increase, and changes in within-system nitrogen cycling - such as net N mineralization and crop N uptake - may also play a role. The experiment is ongoing, and our results so far suggest that intensifying precipitation patterns may exacerbate N leaching from agricultural soils, with potentially negative consequences for receiving ground- and surface waters, as well as for farmers.

  10. NACP MCI: CO2 Flux Tower Measurements, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides high precision and high accuracy atmospheric CO2 data from seven instrumented communication towers located in the U.S. Upper...

  11. Hastighedskort for Danmark vha. GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Lahrmann, Harry; Torp, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Hastighed på vejnettet er en central metrik indenfor trafikplanlægning og trafikoptimering. I denne artikel beskrives, hvorledes et hastighedskort for hele Danmark er skabt udelukkende vha. GPS data. To tilgangsvinkler til at beregne hastigheder vha. GPS data er præsenteret. Dette er hhv. en....... Opsummeret anses den turbaseret for at beregne det mest akkurate estimat, men metoden er meget datakrævende. Det er derfor nødvendigt at have den punktbaserede at falde tilbage på. Generelt mangler metoder til beregning af hastigheder vha. GPS data at blive valideret. Hvordan en sådan validering kan...

  12. Chemical and biological status of lakes and streams in the upper midwest: assessment of acidic deposition effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, J.G.; Eilers, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest - northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan - have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. Northcentral Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan together contain about 150-300 acidic lakes (ANC ≤ 0), whereas none have been found in Minnesota. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, Clearwater seepage lakes having small surface area, shallow depth, and low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. The spatial distribution of these acidic lakes parallels a west to east gradient of increasing sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition. Several of these acidic lakes exhibit chemical characteristics and biological changes consistent with those observed elsewhere in waters reported to be acidified by acidic deposition. However, an hypothesis of recent lake acidification is not supported by analyses of either historical chemical data or diatom remains in lake sediments, and natural sources of acidity and alternative ecological processes have not been conclusively eliminated as causative factors. Streams in this three-state region have high ANC and appear to be insensitive to acidic deposition. The species richness and composition of lacustrine fish communities in the region are partly related to pH and associated chemical factors. Sport fishes considered acid-sensitive and of primary concern with regard to acidification include walleye, smallmouth bass, and black crappie. The fishery in at least one lake, Morgan Lake in Wisconsin (pH 4.6), may have declined because of acidification. Given the general lack of quantitative fishery data for acidic Wisconsin and Michigan lakes, however, more general conclusions concerning impacts or the absence of impacts of acidification on the region's fishery resources are not possible.

  13. A feasibility study of stationary and dual-axis tracking grid-connected photovoltaic systems in the Upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ryan Duwain

    Three primary objectives were defined for this work. The first objective was to determine, assess, and compare the performance, heat transfer characteristics, economics, and feasibility of real-world stationary and dual-axis tracking grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems in the Upper Midwest. This objective was achieved by installing two grid-connected PV systems with different mounting schemes in central Iowa, implementing extensive data acquisition systems, monitoring operation of the PV systems for one full year, and performing detailed experimental performance and economic studies. The two PV systems that were installed, monitored, and analyzed included a 4.59 kWp roof-mounted stationary system oriented for maximum annual energy production, and a 1.02 kWp pole-mounted actively controlled dual-axis tracking system. The second objective was to demonstrate the actual use and performance of real-world stationary and dual-axis tracking grid-connected PV systems used for building energy generation applications. This objective was achieved by offering the installed PV systems to the public for demonstration purposes and through the development of three computer-based tools: a software interface that has the ability to display real-time and historical performance and meteorological data of both systems side-by-side, a software interface that shows real-time and historical video and photographs of each system, and a calculator that can predict performance and economics of stationary and dual-axis tracking grid-connected PV systems at various locations in the United States. The final objective was to disseminate this work to social, professional, scientific, and academic communities in a way that is applicable, objective, accurate, accessible, and comprehensible. This final objective will be addressed by publishing the results of this work and making the computer-based tools available on a public website (www.energy.iastate.edu/Renewable/solar). Detailed experimental

  14. Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the United States for the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia mayonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Lars; Breuner, Nicole E; Hojgaard, Andrias; Hoxmeier, J Charles; Pilgard, Mark A; Replogle, Adam J; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Dolan, Marc C

    2017-01-01

    Borrelia mayonii, a recently recognized species within the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, has been detected in host-seeking Ixodes scapularis Say ticks and found to be associated with Lyme disease in the Upper Midwest. This spirochete has, to date, not been documented from the Northeast, but we previously demonstrated that I. scapularis ticks originating from Connecticut are capable of serving as a vector of B. mayonii In this follow-up study, we compared the vector efficiency for B. mayonii (strain MN14-1420) of I. scapularis ticks originating from Minnesota in the Upper Midwest and Connecticut in the Northeast. CD-1 outbred white mice previously infected with B. mayonii via tick bite were exposed to simultaneous feeding by Minnesota and Connecticut larvae contained within separate feeding capsules. We found no difference in the ability of Minnesota and Connecticut larvae to acquire B. mayonii from infected mice and pass spirochetes to the nymphal stage (overall nymphal infection rates of 11.6 and 13.3%, respectively). Moreover, the efficiency of transmission of B. mayonii by single infected nymphs was similar for the Minnesota and Connecticut ticks (33 and 44%, respectively). We conclude that the examined I. scapularis ticks from the Upper Midwest and Northeast did not differ in their efficiency as vectors for B. mayonii. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016 This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Climate induced changes in biome distribution, NPP and hydrology for potential vegetation of the Upper Midwest U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motew, M.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    While much attention is focused on future impacts of climate change on ecosystems, much can be learned about the previous interactions of ecosystems with recent climate change. In this study, we investigated the impacts of climate change on potential vegetation distributions (i.e. grasses, trees, and shrubs) and carbon and water cycling across the Upper Midwest USA from 1948-2007 using the Agro-IBIS dynamic vegetation model. We drove the model using a historical, gridded daily climate data set (temperature, precipitation, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) at a spatial resolution of 5 min x 5 min. While trends in climate variables exhibited heterogeneous spatial patterns over the study period, the overall impact of climate change on vegetation productivity was positive. We observed total increases in net primary productivity (NPP) ranging from 20-150 g C m-2, based on linear regression analysis. We determined that increased summer relative humidity, increased annual precipitation and decreased mean maximum summer temperatures were key variables contributing to these positive trends, likely through a reduction in soil moisture stress (e.g., increased available water) and heat stress. Model simulations also illustrated an increase in annual drainage throughout the region of 20-140 mm yr-1, driven by substantial increases in annual precipitation. Evapotranspiration had a highly variable spatial trend over the 60-year period, with total change over the study period ranging between -100 and +100 mm yr-1. We also analyzed potential changes in plant functional type (PFT) distributions at the biome level, but hypothesize that the model may be unable to adequately capture competitive interactions among PFTs as well as the dynamics between upper and lower canopies consisting of trees, grasses and shrubs. An analysis of the bioclimatic envelopes for PFTs common to the region revealed no significant change to the boreal conifer tree climatic domain over the study

  16. A Comparison of Multiple Datasets for Monitoring Thermal Time in Urban Areas over the U.S. Upper Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Krehbiel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional studies of urban climate used air temperature observations from local urban/rural weather stations in order to analyze the general pattern of higher temperatures in urban areas compared with corresponding rural regions, also known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect. More recently, satellite remote sensing datasets of land surface temperature have been exploited to monitor UHIs. While closely linked, air temperature and land surface temperature (LST observations do not measure the same variables. Here we analyze land surface temperature vs. air temperature-based characterization and seasonality of the UHI and the surface UHI (SUHI from 2003 to 2012 over the Upper Midwest region of the United States using LST from MODIS, and air temperature from the Daymet modeled gridded daily air temperature dataset, and compare both datasets to ground station data from first-order weather stations of the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN located in eleven urban areas spanning our study region. We first convert the temperature data to metrics of nocturnal, diurnal, and daily thermal time and their annual accumulations to draw conclusions on nighttime vs. daytime and seasonal dynamics of the UHI. In general, the MODIS LST-derived results are able to capture urban–rural differences in daytime, nighttime, and daily thermal time while the Daymet air temperature-derived results show very little urban–rural differences in thermal time. Compared to the GHCN ground station air temperature-derived observations, MODIS LST-derived results are closer in terms of urban–rural differences in nighttime thermal time, while the results from Daymet are closer to the observations from GHCN during the daytime. We also found differences in the seasonal dynamics of UHIs measured by air temperature observations and SUHIs measured by LST observations.

  17. Cluster analysis of Dairy Herd Improvement data to discover trends in performance characteristics in large Upper Midwest dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotzman, R L; Cook, N B; Nordlund, K; Bennett, T B; Gomez Rivas, A; Döpfer, D

    2015-05-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a variable reduction method used on over-parameterized data sets with a vast number of variables and a limited number of observations, such as Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) data, to select subsets of variables that describe the largest amount of variance. Cluster analysis (CA) segregates objects, in this case dairy herds, into groups based upon similarity in multiple characteristics simultaneously. This project aimed to apply PCA to discover the subset of most meaningful DHI variables and to discover groupings of dairy herds with similar performance characteristics. Year 2011 DHI data was obtained for 557 Upper Midwest herds with test-day mean ≥200 cows (assumed mostly freestall housed), that remained on test for the entire year. The PCA reduced an initial list of 22 variables to 16. The average distance method of CA grouped farms based on best goodness of fit determined by the minimum cophenetic distance. Six groupings provided the optimal fitting number of clusters. Descriptive statistics for the 16 variables were computed per group. On observations of means, groups 1, 2, and 6 demonstrated the best performances in most variables, including energy-corrected milk, linear somatic cell score (log of somatic cell count), dry period intramammary infection cure rate, new intramammary infection risk, risk of subclinical intramammary infection at first test, age at first calving, days in milk, and Transition Cow Index. Groups 3, 4, and 5 demonstrated the worst mean performances in most the PCA-selected variables, including DIM, age at first calving, risk of subclinical intramammary infection at first test, and dry period intramammary infection cure rate. Groups 4 and 5 also had the worst mean herd performances in energy-corrected milk, Transition Cow Index, linear somatic cell score, and new intramammary infection risk. Further investigation will be conducted to reveal patterns of management associated with herd categorization. The

  18. The upper midwest health study: a case–control study of pesticide applicators and risk of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiin James H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An excess incidence of brain cancer in farmers has been noted in several studies. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health developed the Upper Midwest Health Study (UMHS as a case–control study of intracranial gliomas and pesticide uses among rural residents. Previous studies of UMHS participants, using “ever-never” exposure to farm pesticides and analyzing men and women separately, found no positive association of farm pesticide exposure and glioma risks. The primary objective was to determine if quantitatively estimated exposure of pesticide applicators was associated with an increased risk of glioma in male and female participants. Methods The study included 798 histologically confirmed primary intracranial glioma cases (45 % with proxy respondents and 1,175 population-based controls, all adult (age 18–80 non-metropolitan residents of Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The analyses used quantitatively estimated exposure from questionnaire responses evaluated by an experienced industrial hygienist with 25 years of work on farm pesticide analyses. Odds ratios (ORs and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs using unconditional logistic regression modeling were calculated adjusting for frequency-matching variables (10-year age group and sex, and for age and education (a surrogate for socioeconomic status. Analyses were separately conducted with or without proxy respondents. Results No significant positive associations with glioma were observed with cumulative years or estimated lifetime cumulative exposure of farm pesticide use. There was, a significant inverse association for phenoxy pesticide used on the farm (OR 0.96 per 10 g-years of cumulative exposure, CI 0.93-0.99. No significant findings were observed when proxy respondents were excluded. Non-farm occupational applicators of any pesticide had decreased glioma risk: OR 0.72, CI 0.52-0.99. Similarly, house and garden pesticide applicators

  19. Using GIS to integrate FIA and remotely sensed data to estimate the invasibility of major forest types by non-native invasive plants in the Upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaofei Fan; W. Keith Moser; Michael K. Crosby; Weiming Yu

    2012-01-01

    Non-native invasive plants (NNIP) are rapidly spreading into natural ecosystems such as forests in the Upper Midwest. Using the strategic inventory data from the 2005-2006 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program and forest land cover data, we estimated the regional-invasibility patterns of NNIPs for major...

  20. Genetic relationships among populations of Gibberella zeae from barley, wheat, potato, and sugar beet in the upper Midwest of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakoti, R R; Ali, S; Secor, G A; Neate, S M; McMullen, M P; Adhikari, T B

    2008-09-01

    Gibberella zeae, a causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat and barley, is one of the most economically harmful pathogens of cereals in the United States. In recent years, the known host range of G. zeae has also expanded to noncereal crops. However, there is a lack of information on the population genetic structure of G. zeae associated with noncereal crops and across wheat cultivars. To test the hypothesis that G. zeae populations sampled from barley, wheat, potato, and sugar beet in the Upper Midwest of the United States are not mixtures of species or G. zeae clades, we analyzed sequence data of G. zeae, and confirmed that all populations studied were present in the same clade of G. zeae. Ten variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) markers were used to determine the genetic structure of G. zeae from the four crop populations. To examine the effect of wheat cultivars on the pathogen populations, 227 strains were sampled from 10 subpopulations according to wheat cultivar types. The VNTR markers also were used to analyze the genetic structure of these subpopulations. In all populations, gene (H = 0.453 to 0.612) and genotype diversity (GD = or >0.984) were high. There was little or no indication of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in all G. zeae populations and subpopulations. In addition, high gene flow (Nm) values were observed between cereal and noncereal populations (Nm = 10.69) and between FHB resistant and susceptible wheat cultivar subpopulations (Nm = 16.072), suggesting low population differentiation of G. zeae in this region. Analysis of molecular variance also revealed high genetic variation (>80%) among individuals within populations and subpopulations. However, low genetic variation (wheat subpopulations. Overall, these results suggest that the populations or subpopulations are likely a single large population of G. zeae affecting crops in the upper Midwest of the United States.

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHA421 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHA421 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15767-1 VHA421P (Link... to Original site) VHA421F 553 VHA421Z 679 VHA421P 1212 - - Show VHA421 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHA421 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15767-1 Original site URL http://dict...INGQGFNDVS --- ---SYATGKCEPDSSLCNDNNICTIDICVHEGILDGLPQGNCSNTPVDCGANDEDKCKTW SCDPTKGGCQSTPVVCEDKGKCLVGTCQPSTG...dkvsmm*a --- ---SYATGKCEPDSSLCNDNNICTIDICVHEGILDGLPQGNCSNTPVDCGANDEDKCKTW SCDPTKG

  2. Midwest Transmission Workshop I Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Bryan

    2001-05-01

    OAK-B135 The meeting was opened with a review of the purposes of the workshop: (1) Present and discuss key studies and assessments of transmission upgrades, additions and related issues for the upper Midwest, including work that addresses the full range of views on these topics; (2) Understand the various transmission issues in the upper Midwest and discuss options for addressing the issues; and (3) Identify the decision makers and entities that need to play an active role if transmission issues are to be resolved, and agree on next steps for engaging these individuals and organizations through education, outreach, and information dissemination.

  3. Occurrence of Coliform and Escherichia coli Contamination and Absence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Romaine Lettuce from Retail Stores in the Upper Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Josephine D; Zietlow, Mark S; Miller, Kevin M; Ellingson, Jay L E

    2015-09-01

    A total of 720 whole, romaine lettuce heads were purchased from retail locations in the Upper Midwest and assessed for coliform and Escherichia coli contamination and for the presence of E. coli O157:H7. During a 16-month period (August 2010 through December 2011), coliform and E. coli counts were enumerated on Petrifilm, and the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and the virulence gene eae was evaluated by real-time PCR (qPCR). Over half (400 of 720) of the lettuce samples were processed with an immunomagnetic separation step before the qPCR assay. All retail lettuce samples were negative for E. coli O157:H7 when tested with the R.A.P.I.D. LT qPCR targeting a region of the O-antigen, and only two (0.28%) were positive for the eae gene when tested with LightCycler qPCR. On Petrifilm, coliform counts of most lettuce samples (96.4%) were between retail locations, specifically revealing the absence of E. coli O157:H7 and low levels of contamination with coliforms and other E. coli strains.

  4. The Migration of Tradition: Land Tenure and Culture in the U.S. Upper Mid-West

    OpenAIRE

    Joranger, Terje Mikael Hasle

    2008-01-01

    1. IntroductionBetween 1815 and 1915 about 50 million individuals emigrated from Europe to overseas destinations, 35 million of whom went to the United States of America. A large number of these settlers, especially from Western and Northern Europe, followed a rural-to-rural migration pattern in that they came from peasant backgrounds and settled in agricultural areas in America. The region known as the upper Middle West, often labelled the heartland of the nation, was the destination for a l...

  5. The Migration of Tradition: Land Tenure and Culture in the U.S. Upper Mid-West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terje Mikael Hasle Joranger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available 1. IntroductionBetween 1815 and 1915 about 50 million individuals emigrated from Europe to overseas destinations, 35 million of whom went to the United States of America. A large number of these settlers, especially from Western and Northern Europe, followed a rural-to-rural migration pattern in that they came from peasant backgrounds and settled in agricultural areas in America. The region known as the upper Middle West, often labelled the heartland of the nation, was the destination for a l...

  6. Thermal maturity assessment of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic Nampo Group, mid-west Korea: Reconstruction of thermal history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egawa, K.; Il Lee, Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Republic of Korea). School of Earth & Environmental Science

    2008-03-15

    Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic Nampo Group, a sediment-fill of the Chungnam Basin located in the central western part of South Korea, was assessed by illite crystallinity measurement and sandstone microtexture analysis. The Nampo Group consists of a fluvio-lacustrine deposit bearing meta-anthracitic coals and was over-thrusted by the basement rocks. Sandstones are characterized by down sequence increasing illite crystallinity, from anchizone to epizone, which is strongly suggestive of burial heating. Deep-burial diagenesis and deformation are evidenced by well-developed pressure solution textures, whose intensity tends to increase down sequence, and by ductile deformation in the lowermost strata. On the basis of the result of illite crystallinity measurement, the maximum paleo-temperature and total burial depth of the Nampo Group are estimated to be ca 340{sup o}C and 10 km, respectively; these conditions are in good agreement with the observed ductile deformation features. The absence of strata younger than the Nampo Group in and around the Chungnam Basin suggests that deep burial of the Nampo Group was caused by tectonic crustal loading. The tectonic overload was because of basement over-thrusting that occurred during the Jurassic Daebo orogeny, which is closely related to the orthogonal subduction of the Izanagi Plate beneath the East Asian continent. Subsequent hydrothermal alteration disturbed the thermal maturity pattern, resulting in anomalously high illite crystallinity and meta-anthracitization.

  7. Pharmacotherapy for Weight Management in the VHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semla, Todd P; Ruser, Chris; Good, Chester B; Yanovski, Susan Z; Ames, Donna; Copeland, Laurel A; Billington, Charles; Ferguson, U Inge; Aronne, Louis J; Wadden, Thomas A; Garvey, W Timothy; Apovian, Caroline M; Atkins, David

    2017-04-01

    Weight management medications (WMM) are underutilized as an adjunct to behavioral and lifestyle interventions. In fiscal years 2014-2015, a total of approximately 2500 veterans-a mere 2% of veterans receiving care from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA)-eligible for a WMM received a prescription for one. A State of the Art Conference on Weight Management workgroup, focused on pharmacotherapy, developed evidence-based recommendations and strategies to foster the appropriate use of WMM in the VHA. The workgroup identified patient, prescriber, and health system barriers to and facilitators for prescribing WMM. Barriers included patient and provider concerns about medication safety and efficacy, limited involvement of primary care, restrictive medication criteria for use (CFU), and skepticism among providers regarding the safety and efficacy of WMM and the perception of obesity as a disease. Potential facilitators for removing barriers included patient and provider education about WMM and the health benefits of weight loss, increased engagement of primary care providers in weight management, relaxation of the CFU, and creation of a system to help patients navigate through weight management treatment options. Several research questions were framed with regard to WMM in general, and specifically to the care of obese veterans. While some of the workgroup's conclusions reflect issues specific to the VHA, many are likely to be applicable to other health organizations.

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHA176 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHA176 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15241-1 VHA176P (Link to Original site)...VHA176Z 198 VHA176P 389 - - Show VHA176 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHA176 (Link to dictyBase)...CW957947 |CW957947.1 TcB53.3_F04_T7 Tribolium BAC library Tribolium castaneum genomic, genomic survey sequence...CW954836 |CW954836.1 TcB44.3_D09_SP6 Tribolium BAC library Tribolium castaneum genomic, genomic survey sequence...CG768735 |CG768735.1 TcB47.3_H07_SP6 Tribolium BAC library Tribolium castaneum genomic, genomic survey sequence

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHA365 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHA365 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16349-1 - (Link to Or...iginal site) - - VHA365Z 352 - - - - Show VHA365 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHA365 (Link to dicty...Base) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U16349-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.b...TTGGGTACCAAGAACTGACCGTCAATTTGCTGGTTCATGGTTT sequence update 2002. 9.10 Translated Amino Acid sequence ---QLFAGIKSICT...wfmv Frame C: ---QLFAGIKSICTEMAMDGCEKCSGNSPTTTCDVLPVYSSLCMAMPDMSQCANWTKMCS SSGQLY

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHA530 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHA530 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11361-1 - (Link to Or...iginal site) VHA530F 655 - - - - - - Show VHA530 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHA530 (Link to dicty...Base) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U11361-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.b...ato cDNA clone He_wd2a1_74D09 5' similar to UniRef90_UPI000051A2A9 Cluster related to UPI000051A2A9; PREDICT...91.1 SiJWH07ADU Lausanne fire ant library Solenopsis invicta cDNA, mRNA sequence. 46 2e-12 4 EL596939 |EL596

  11. Midwest Transmission Workshop III Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Bryan

    2003-03-12

    OAK-B135 On March 12-13, 2002, the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), in cooperation with regional stakeholders, held a two-day workshop: Planning for Electrical Transmission Needs in the Upper Midwest. The workshop was the outgrowth of an effort to develop a forum and process for consideration of transmission options that strives for equitable allocation of benefits and impacts among all affected parties. The goal of this workshop was to provide a catalyst for an enhanced, inclusive process for transmission planning with participation of and acceptance by all affected stakeholders. Participants in the meeting included representatives of state and regional regulatory agencies, utilities and power generators, the wind industry, environmental and landowner interests, and other interested parties (see Attachment A for a list of meeting participants).

  12. 75 FR 41577 - VBA/VHA Musculoskeletal Forum: Improving VA's Disability Evaluation Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VBA/VHA Musculoskeletal Forum: Improving VA's Disability Evaluation Criteria AGENCY: Department of... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA)/Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Musculoskeletal Forum...

  13. 76 FR 40454 - Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment... attorney by veterans who have medical information recorded in VHA electronic health records system... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health...

  14. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900... recorded in VHA electronic health records system. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not...

  15. Influence of Land Cover Heterogeneity, Land-Use Change and Management on the Regional Carbon Cycle in the Upper Midwest USA as Evaluated by High-Density Observations and a Dynamic Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, A. R.; Bolstad, P. V.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Davis, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    The interplay between land use change, forest management and land cover variability complicates the ability to characterize regional scale (10-1000 km) exchange of carbon dioxide between the land surface and atmosphere in heterogeneous landscapes. An attempt was made to observe and model these factors and their influence on the regional carbon cycle across the upper Midwest USA. A high density of eddy-covariance carbon flux, micrometeorology, carbon dioxide mixing ratio, stand-scale biometry and canopy component flux observations have been occurring in this area as part of the Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study. Observations limited to sampling only dominant stands and coarse-resolution biogeochemical models limited to biome-scale parameterization neither accurately capture the variability of carbon fluxes measured by the network of eddy covariance towers nor match the regional-scale carbon flux inferred from very tall tower eddy covariance measurements and multi-site upscaling. Analysis of plot level biometric data, U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory Analysis data and high-resolution land cover data around the tall tower revealed significant variations in vegetation type, stand age, canopy stocking and structure. Wetlands, clearcuts and recent natural disturbances occur in characteristic small non-uniformly distributed patches that aggregate to form more than 30% of the landscape. The Ecosystem Demography model, a dynamic ecosystem model that incorporates vegetation heterogeneity, canopy structure, stand age, disturbance, land use change and forest management, was parameterized with regional biometric data and meteorology, historical records of land management and high-resolution satellite land cover maps. The model will be used to examine the significance of past land use change, natural disturbance history and current forest management in explaining landscape structure and regional carbon fluxes observed in the region today.

  16. VHA Blueprints: redefining the way clinical knowledge is transferred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosel, Keith C; Clark, Teresa; Haywood, Trent T; Lonappan, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing interest in health care quality improvement, little has changed regarding how clinicians acquire, assimilate, and transfer knowledge concerning leading practices. Working with hospitals with recognized leading clinical practices, VHA Inc developed an innovative methodology for generating and transferring knowledge using a visual story format that incorporates structural, process, and contextual elements into a comprehensive knowledge transfer vehicle called a VHA Leading Practice Blueprint. The authors describe a validation study comparing the effectiveness of the Blueprint methodology as a knowledge transfer vehicle to 2 commonly used sources of performance improvement knowledge: traditional case study and peer-reviewed journal article. Six dimensions-display, content, transferability, recall, diffusion, and actionable-were evaluated. Analysis of data indicates that the Blueprint methodology was judged superior to case studies and peer-reviewed articles on all 6 dimensions. The Blueprint methodology appears to hold promise as a new medium for conveying leading practices in health care.

  17. VHA Corporate Data Warehouse height and weight data: opportunities and challenges for health services research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noël, Polly Hitchcock; Copeland, Laurel A; Perrin, Ruth A; Lancaster, A Elizabeth; Pugh, Mary Jo; Wang, Chen-Pin; Bollinger, Mary J; Hazuda, Helen P

    2010-01-01

    Within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), anthropometric measurements entered into the electronic medical record are stored in local information systems, the national Corporate Data Warehouse (CDW...

  18. Travel time and attrition from VHA care among women veterans: how far is too far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sarah A; Frayne, Susan M; Berg, Eric; Hamilton, Alison B; Washington, Donna L; Saechao, Fay; Maisel, Natalya C; Lin, Julia Y; Hoggatt, Katherine J; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2015-04-01

    Travel time, an access barrier, may contribute to attrition of women veterans from Veterans Health Administration (VHA) care. We examined whether travel time influences attrition: (a) among women veterans overall, (b) among new versus established patients, and (c) among rural versus urban patients. This retrospective cohort study used logistic regression to estimate the association between drive time and attrition, overall and for new/established and rural/urban patients. In total, 266,301 women veteran VHA outpatients in the Fiscal year 2009. An "attriter" did not return for VHA care during the second through third years after her first 2009 visit (T0). Drive time (log minutes) was between the patient's residence and her regular source of VHA care. "New" patients had no VHA visits within 3 years before T0. Models included age, service-connected disability, health status, and utilization as covariates. Overall, longer drive times were associated with higher odds of attrition: drive time adjusted odds ratio=1.11 (99% confidence interval, 1.09-1.14). The relationship between drive time and attrition was stronger among new patients but was not modified by rurality. Attrition among women veterans is sensitive to longer drive time. Linking new patients to VHA services designed to reduce distance barriers (telemedicine, community-based clinics, mobile clinics) may reduce attrition among women new to VHA.

  19. Midwest Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttica, John; Haefke, Cliff

    2013-12-31

    The Midwest Clean Energy Application Center (CEAC) was one of eight regional centers that promoted and assisted in transforming the market for combined heat and power (CHP), waste heat to power (WHP), and district energy (DE) technologies and concepts throughout the United States between October 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. The key services the CEACs provided included: Market Opportunity Analyses – Supporting analyses of CHP market opportunities in diverse markets including industrial, federal, institutional, and commercial sectors. Education and Outreach – Providing information on the energy and non-energy benefits and applications of CHP to state and local policy makers, regulators, energy end-users, trade associations and others. Information was shared on the Midwest CEAC website: www.midwestcleanergy.org. Technical Assistance – Providing technical assistance to end-users and stakeholders to help them consider CHP, waste heat to power, and/or district energy with CHP in their facility and to help them through the project development process from initial CHP screening to installation. The Midwest CEAC provided services to the Midwest Region that included the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

  20. VHA mental health information system: applying health information technology to monitor and facilitate implementation of VHA Uniform Mental Health Services Handbook requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafton, Jodie A; Greenberg, Greg; Harris, Alex H S; Tavakoli, Sara; Kearney, Lisa; McCarthy, John; Blow, Fredric; Hoff, Rani; Schohn, Mary

    2013-03-01

    To describe the design and deployment of health information technology to support implementation of mental health services policy requirements in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Using administrative and self-report survey data, we developed and fielded metrics regarding implementation of the requirements delineated in the VHA Uniform Mental Health Services Handbook. Finalized metrics were incorporated into 2 external facilitation-based quality improvement programs led by the VHA Mental Health Operations. To support these programs, tailored site-specific reports were generated. Metric development required close collaboration between program evaluators, policy makers and clinical leadership, and consideration of policy language and intent. Electronic reports supporting different purposes required distinct formatting and presentation features, despite their having similar general goals and using the same metrics. Health information technology can facilitate mental health policy implementation but must be integrated into a process of consensus building and close collaboration with policy makers, evaluators, and practitioners.

  1. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  2. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  3. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  4. 1989 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  5. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  6. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  7. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  8. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  9. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  10. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  11. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  12. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  13. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  14. Broad phylogenetic expression of heavy-chain determinants detected by rabbit antisera to VHa allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenshein, I L; Marchalonis, J J

    1985-10-01

    Immunoglobulin molecules from diverse vertebrate species were examined, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for the expression of determinants detectable by rabbit antisera to VHa allotypes. The data indicate that immunoglobulins of elasmobranchs, teleosts, amphibians and birds express determinants cross-reactive with those specified by the a1, a2 and a3 alleles in the domestic rabbit. We localize VHa cross-reactive specificity to the denatured heavy chain of a primitive vertebrate, the Galapagos shark (Carcharhinus galapagensis). Furthermore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the shark heavy chain shows significant homology with rabbit heavy chains of known VHa type at positions where allotype-correlated differences have been implicated. VHa-related determinants are shared by immunoglobulins of a wide range of vertebrates from sharks to man and thus seem to be epitopes which have been conserved during vertebrate evolution. The determinants detected on immunoglobulins of lower vertebrates by rabbit anti-VHa allotype sera most probably are VH-subgroup rather than allotypic markers. Their distribution demonstrates a strong phylogenetic conservation of VH-regions.

  15. VHA-19 is essential in Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes for embryogenesis and is involved in trafficking in oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J Knight

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop new drugs against parasitic nematodes, which are a significant burden on human health and agriculture. Information about the function of essential nematode-specific genes provides insight to key nematode-specific processes that could be targeted with drugs. We have characterized the function of a novel, nematode-specific Caenorhabditis elegans protein, VHA-19, and show that VHA-19 is essential in the germline and, specifically, the oocytes, for the completion of embryogenesis. VHA-19 is also involved in trafficking the oocyte receptor RME-2 to the oocyte plasma membrane and is essential for osmoregulation in the embryo, probably because VHA-19 is required for proper eggshell formation via exocytosis of cortical granules or other essential components of the eggshell. VHA-19 may also have a role in cytokinesis, either directly or as an indirect effect of its role in osmoregulation. Critically, VHA-19 is expressed in the excretory cell in both larvae and adults, suggesting that it may have a role in osmoregulation in C. elegans more generally, probably in trafficking or secretion pathways. This is the first time a role for VHA-19 has been described.

  16. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2012-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) and USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) will be collaborating with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA) to assess stream quality across the Midwestern United States. The sites selected for this study are a subset of the larger NRSA, implemented by the EPA, States and Tribes to sample flowing waters across the United States (http://water.epa.gov/type/rsl/monitoring/riverssurvey/index.cfm). The goals are to characterize water-quality stressors—contaminants, nutrients, and sediment—and ecological conditions in streams throughout the Midwest and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic organisms in the streams. Findings will contribute useful information for communities and policymakers by identifying which human and environmental factors are the most critical in controlling stream quality. This collaborative study enhances information provided to the public and policymakers and minimizes costs by leveraging and sharing data gathered under existing programs. In the spring and early summer, NAWQA will sample streams weekly for contaminants, nutrients, and sediment. During the same time period, CERC will test sediment and water samples for toxicity, deploy time-integrating samplers, and measure reproductive effects and biomarkers of contaminant exposure in fish or amphibians. NRSA will sample sites once during the summer to assess ecological and habitat conditions in the streams by collecting data on algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities and collecting detailed physical-habitat measurements. Study-team members from all three programs will work in collaboration with USGS Water Science Centers and State agencies on study design, execution of sampling and analysis, and reporting.

  17. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Registry Veterans in VHA Care in 2015, for the Nation, by VISN and by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report describes the number of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) registry Veterans in VHA care in 2015 based on serologic evidence of HCV infection status (HCV Positive)...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Lockport Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  1. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 5a

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  2. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  3. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  4. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  5. Medical Home Features of VHA Primary Care Clinics and Avoidable Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Rose, Danielle E; Canelo, Ismelda; Upadhyay, Anjali S; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    As the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) reorganizes providers into the patient-centered medical home, questions remain whether this model of care can demonstrate improved patient outcomes and cost savings. We measured adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics prior to widespread implementation of the patient-centered medical home and examined if they were associated with lower risk and costs of potentially avoidable hospitalizations. Secondary patient data was linked to clinic administrative and survey data. Patient and clinic factors in the baseline year (FY2009) were used to predict patient outcomes in the follow-up year. 2,853,030 patients from 814 VHA primary care clinics Patient outcomes were measured by hospitalizations for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) and their costs and identified through diagnosis and procedure codes from inpatient records. Clinic adoption of medical home features was obtained from the American College of Physicians Medical Home Builder®. The overall mean home builder score in the study clinics was 88 (SD = 13) or 69%. In adjusted analyses an increase of 10 points in the medical home adoption score in a clinic decreased the odds of an ACSC hospitalization for patients by 3% (P = 0.032). By component, higher access and scheduling (P = 0.004) and care coordination and transitions (P = 0.020) component scores were related to lower risk of an ACSC hospitalization, and higher population management was related to higher risk (P = 0.023). Total medical home features was not related to ACSC hospitalization costs among patients with at least one (P = 0.074). Greater adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics was found to be significantly associated with lower risk of avoidable hospitalizations with access and scheduling and care coordination/transitions in care as key factors.

  6. Access, Education and Policy Awareness: Predictors of Influenza Vaccine Acceptance Among VHA Healthcare Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jennifer Lipkowitz; Mohr, David C; McPhaul, Kathleen M; Kaslow, Richard A; Martinello, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify predictors of influenza vaccine acceptance among VHA healthcare workers (HCWs), with emphasis on modifiable factors related to promotion campaigns. DESIGN Survey. SETTING National single-payer healthcare system with 140 hospitals and 321,000 HCWs. PARTICIPANTS National voluntary sample of HCWs in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system. METHODS We invited a random sample of 5% of all VHA HCWs to participate. An 18-item intranet-based survey inquired about occupation, vaccination status, employer policy, and local campaign efforts. RESULTS The response rate was 17.4%. Of 2,502 initial respondents, 2,406 (96.2%) provided usable data. This sample includes respondents from all 140 VA hospitals. Self-reported influenza vaccination rates were highest among physicians (95.6%) and licensed independent providers (88.3%). Nonclinical staff (80.7%) reported vaccine uptake similar to other certified but nonlicensed providers (81.2%). The strongest predictor of vaccine acceptance among VHA HCWs was individual awareness of organizational policy. Vaccine acceptance was also higher among HCWs who reported more options for access to vaccination and among those in facilities with more education activities. CONCLUSIONS Influenza vaccine acceptance varied significantly by employee awareness of employer policy and on-site access to vaccine. Employer-sponsored activities to increase access continue to show positive returns across occupations. Local influenza campaign efforts to educate HCWs may have reached saturation in this target group. These results suggest that focused communications to increase HCW awareness and understanding of employer policy can drive further increase in influenza vaccination acceptance. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:970-975.

  7. Professional Quality of Life and Changes in Spirituality Among VHA Chaplains: A Mixed Methods Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Wesley H; Carroll, Timothy D; Slagel, Brett A; Drescher, Kent D; Nieuwsma, Jason A; Currier, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    A mixed method design was implemented to examine the spirituality and emotional well-being of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) chaplains and how potential changes in spirituality and emotional well-being may affect their professional quality of life. Four distinct categories of changes emerged from the narrative statements of a nationally representative sample of 267 VHA chaplains: (1) positive changes (e.g., increased empathy), (2) negative changes (e.g., dysthymic mood, questioning religious beliefs), (3) combination of positive and negative changes, and (4) no change (e.g., sustenance through spirituality or self-care). Most chaplains reported positive (37%) or no change (30%) in their spirituality and/or emotional well-being. However, quantitative analyses revealed that chaplains who reported negative changes endorsed greater burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Overall, these findings suggest VHA chaplains are predominantly spiritually resilient, but negative changes in the spiritual domain can occur, potentially increasing the risk of adverse changes in professional quality of life.

  8. Chicano Literature of the Midwest: The Production of "Los Desarraigados."

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    Following a brief discussion of the origins of the Chicanos in the Midwest, this paper surveys and quotes at length from several Spanish language periodicals produced in the Midwest between 1925 and the early 1980s. Discussion of the Chicano origins in the Midwest touches on emigration resulting from the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1917, the…

  9. Midwest Logging Firm Perspectives: Harvesting on Increasingly Parcelized Forestlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shorna Allred

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Loggers play a critical role in the sustainable production of wood and paper products, and harvesting activities contribute to economic health and viability of many Upper Midwest communities in the United States. If the logging sector is unable to procure wood efficiently and economically from an increasingly parcelized land base, the competitive ability of the forest industry could be jeopardized. Little is known about the functions of the logging sector related to the forest resource land base on which they depend, and it is imperative to improve our understanding of this important part of the forest industry. The purpose of this study was to determine prospective attitudes about the future of the logging industry and how trends in forestland parcelization and harvesting mechanization are impacting the logging industry, especially as it relates to smaller tracts of land.

  10. Prediction of pesticide toxicity in Midwest streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Megan E.; Stone, Wesley W.; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pesticide mixtures is common in stream waters of the United States, and the impact of multiple compounds on aquatic organisms is not well understood. Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) models were developed to predict Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) values in unmonitored streams in the Midwest and are referred to as WARP-PTI models. The PTI is a tool for assessing the relative toxicity of pesticide mixtures to fish, benthic invertebrates, and cladocera in stream water. One hundred stream sites in the Midwest were sampled weekly in May through August 2013, and the highest calculated PTI for each site was used as the WARP-PTI model response variable. Watershed characteristics that represent pesticide sources and transport were used as the WARP-PTI model explanatory variables. Three WARP-PTI models—fish, benthic invertebrates, and cladocera—were developed that include watershed characteristics describing toxicity-weighted agricultural use intensity, land use, agricultural management practices, soil properties, precipitation, and hydrologic properties. The models explained between 41 and 48% of the variability in the measured PTI values. WARP-PTI model evaluation with independent data showed reasonable performance with no clear bias. The models were applied to streams in the Midwest to demonstrate extrapolation for a regional assessment to indicate vulnerable streams and to guide more intensive monitoring.

  11. PAs in orthopedics in the VHA's community-based outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel O; Hooker, Roderick S

    2017-04-01

    In the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system, most orthopedic care takes place in the VA medical centers (VAMCs). Because most patients receiving orthopedic care were referred by adult medicine providers, more widely deploying physician assistants (PAs) in orthopedic medicine might help offset this workload. An orthopedic medicine demonstration project recruited, trained, and positioned PAs in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) to improve access to care. The project involved surgeons at the Houston VAMC instructing five newly employed PAs in a wide range of orthopedic evaluation and management strategies before their assignment to a CBOC. An administrative assessment compared encounter data pre- and postproject (2012 and 2014) to determine if this strategy modified orthopedic workload and improved patient access to care. By 2014, orthopedic patient visit volume had increased 31%-10% at the VAMC and 21% at the five CBOCs. Overall, the five deployed PAs managed 28% of all orthopedic encounters spread over 1 year and only 3.2% of visits required VAMC referral for further evaluation or treatment. During the project, the total volume of patient visits increased throughout the Houston VAMC region but access to care for this specialty service also increased, with more veteran musculoskeletal care being met at the five CBOCs, off-loading visit demand centrally. The adaptability and flexibility of new roles has been identified as one of the defining characteristics of PAs. That the VHA can take advantage of this role malleability suggests that employing PAs is useful in meeting medical service needs of veterans.

  12. Outpatient Provider Contact Prior to Unintentional Opioid Overdose Among VHA Service Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lewei Allison; Bohnert, Amy S B; Ilgen, Mark A; Pfeiffer, Paul N; Ganoczy, Dara; Blow, Frederic C

    2015-11-01

    Prescription opioid medications are the most commonly implicated substances in unintentional overdoses. Outpatient health care encounters represent a potential opportunity to intervene to reduce opioid overdose risk. This study assessed the timing and type of outpatient provider contacts prior to death from unintentional prescription opioid overdose. This study examined all adult patients nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) who died from unintentional prescription opioid overdose in fiscal years 2004-2007 and who used VHA services anytime within two years of their deaths (N=1,813). For those whose final treatment contact was in an outpatient setting (N=1,457), demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics were compared among patients categorized by the location of their last contact. Among individuals last seen in outpatient settings, 33% were seen within one week of their overdose and 62% within one month of their overdose. A substantial proportion of patients (30%) were last seen within one month of death in mental health or substance use disorder outpatient settings. The majority of patients (86%) did not fill an opioid prescription on their last outpatient visit prior to death from unintentional opioid overdose. Most patients who died by unintentional prescription opioid overdose were seen in outpatient settings within a month of their overdose. These settings may provide an opportunity to prevent patients from dying from prescription opioid overdoses. Interventions to reduce risk should not be limited to visits during which an opioid is prescribed.

  13. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  14. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-02-03

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H(+) transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties 'Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)' and an early maturing mutant 'Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)'. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis.

  15. 2002 Land Cover/Use Data for Pool 8 - Upper Mississippi River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created a high-resolution land cover/use data set for Mississippi River...

  16. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Saricks, Christoper [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wu, May [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1997-12-19

    This study addresses two issues: (1) data and information essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than estimates based specifically on activities and practices in the principal domestic corn production and milling region -- the upper Midwest.

  17. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  19. Experiences with VHA care: a qualitative study of U.S. women veterans with self-reported trauma histories

    OpenAIRE

    Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Harwood, Eileen M.; Spoont, Michele R.; Sayer, Nina A.; Gerould, Heather; Murdoch, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Background Women veterans in the United States, particularly those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or a history of military sexual assault, have unique health care needs, but their minority status in the US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has led to documented healthcare disparities when compared to men. This study?s objective was to obtain a richer understanding of the challenges and successes encountered by women veterans with self-reported service-related trauma histories (p...

  20. Treatment of Veterans with Depression Who Die from Suicide: Timing and Quality of Care at Last VHA Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric G.; Craig, Thomas J.; Ganoczy, Dara; Walters, Heather; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the recency and quality of the last Veterans Health Administration (VHA) visit for patients with depression dying from suicide. Methods We obtained services and pharmacy data for all 1843 VHA patients with recognized depressive disorders dying from suicide from April 1999-September 2004. We describe the location and timing of their final VHA visit. For visits occurring within 30 days of suicide, we examined three quality indicators: 1) evidence that mental illness was a focus of the final visit; 2) adequacy of antidepressant dosage, and 3) recent receipt of mental health services. Results 51% of patients with depression diagnoses had a VHA visit within 30 days of suicide. A minority of these patients (43%) died by suicide within 30 days of a final visit with mental health services, although 64.5% had received such services within 91 days of their suicide. Among the 57% of patients dying by suicide within 30 days seen in non-mental health settings for their final visit, only 34.1% had a mental health condition coded at the final visit, and only 41.5% were receiving adequate dosages of antidepressant (versus 55.3% last seen by mental health services) (psuicide within 30 days of their final visit received relatively high rates of mental health services, but most final visits still occurred in non-mental health settings. Increased referrals to mental health services, attention to mental health issues in non-mental health settings, and focus on antidepressant treatment adequacy by all providers might have reduced suicide risks for these patients. PMID:20868636

  1. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Hagigi, Fred; Parker, Louise E; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Kirchner, JoAnn E

    2009-09-28

    Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  2. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems. PMID:19785754

  3. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Louise E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA. Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  4. Subcellular distribution of the V-ATPase complex in plant cells, and in vivo localisation of the 100 kDa subunit VHA-a within the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluge Christoph

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vacuolar H+-ATPases are large protein complexes of more than 700 kDa that acidify endomembrane compartments and are part of the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. They are built from 14 different (VHA-subunits. The paper addresses the question of sub-cellular localisation and subunit composition of plant V-ATPase in vivo and in vitro mainly by using colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques (FRET. Focus is placed on the examination and function of the 95 kDa membrane spanning subunit VHA-a. Showing similarities to the already described Vph1 and Stv1 vacuolar ATPase subunits from yeast, VHA-a revealed a bipartite structure with (i a less conserved cytoplasmically orientated N-terminus and (ii a membrane-spanning C-terminus with a higher extent of conservation including all amino acids shown to be essential for proton translocation in the yeast. On the basis of sequence data VHA-a appears to be an essential structural and functional element of V-ATPase, although previously a sole function in assembly has been proposed. Results To elucidate the presence and function of VHA-a in the plant complex, three approaches were undertaken: (i co-immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed to epitopes in the N- and C-terminal part of VHA-a, respectively, (ii immunocytochemistry approach including co-localisation studies with known plant endomembrane markers, and (iii in vivo-FRET between subunits fused to variants of green fluorescence protein (CFP, YFP in transfected cells. Conclusions All three sets of results show that V-ATPase contains VHA-a protein that interacts in a specific manner with other subunits. The genomes of plants encode three genes of the 95 kDa subunit (VHA-a of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase. Immuno-localisation of VHA-a shows that the recognized subunit is exclusively located on the endoplasmic reticulum. This result is in agreement with the hypothesis that the different isoforms of VHA

  5. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  6. Celebrating 40 Years of the Midwest Nursing Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Wynd, Christine A; Glass, Laurie K; O'Connell, Karen M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Bergstrom, Nancy; Lusk, Sally Lechlitner

    2017-05-01

    The Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS) recently held its 40th annual conference and celebrated four decades of nursing research in the Midwest. MNRS continues to be one of the largest nursing research societies in the United States. Over the years, a vast majority of programmatic initiatives included education and tangible support for novice and experienced nurse researchers. In this article, the background for development of MNRS is reviewed with examination of driving forces that led to its creation. Three past presidents, Dr. Joyce Fitzpatrick, the first President of MNRS (1980-1981); Dr. Nancy Bergstrom, the eighth President (1993-1995); and Dr. Sally Lusk, the 14th President (2005-2007), discuss challenges, opportunities, and the exceptional progress made toward fostering excellence in nursing research for the Midwest and contributing to nursing science on a national and global scale. Lessons from the past as well as opportunities for the future are addressed.

  7. NaCl-induced expression of AtVHA-c5 gene in the roots plays a role in response of Arabidopsis to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aimin; Liu, Enhui; Ma, Hongping; Feng, Shuang; Gong, Shufang; Wang, Jingang

    2018-01-06

    Suppression of AtVHA-c5 expression results in changes in H+ and Na+ fluxes of roots, and increase sensitivity to salt in Arabidopsis. Vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit endomembrane proton pump, is essential in plant growth and response to environmental stresses. In the present study, the function of Arabidopsis V-ATPase subunit c5 (AtVHA-c5) gene in response to salt stress was investigated. Subcellular localization showed that AtVHA-c5 was mainly localized to endosomes and the vacuolar membrane in Arabidopsis. The analysis of quantitative real-time PCR showed that expression of AtVHA-c5 gene was induced by NaCl stress. Histochemical analysis revealed that AtVHA-c5 was expressed in the root epidermis of untreated Arabidopsis and in the whole root elongation zone after NaCl treatment. Phenotypic analysis showed that the atvha-c5 mutant is sensitive to high NaCl as compared to the wild type. The non-invasive micro-test technology measurement demonstrated that the net H+ and Na+ efflux in the root elongation zone of the atvha-c5 mutant was weaker than that of the wild type under NaCl treatment, suggesting that H+ and Na+ fluxes in atvha-c5 roots are impaired under NaCl stress. Moreover, compared to the wild type, the expression of AtSOS1 (salt overly sensitive 1) and AtAHA1 (plasma membrane H+-ATPase 1) were down-regulated in atvha-c5 roots under NaCl stress. Overall, our results indicate that AtVHA-c5 plays a role in Arabidopsis root response to NaCl stress by influencing H+ and Na+ fluxes.

  8. 76 FR 4104 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Midwest ISO Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Midwest ISO Meetings January 13... Commission staff may attend the following Midwest ISO-related meetings during the 2011 year: Advisory.... Paul, MN) September 14 October 19 November 16 December 6 Midwest ISO Informational Forum (3 p.m.-5 p.m...

  9. 75 FR 51996 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Midwest ISO Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Midwest ISO Meetings August 16... Commission staff may attend the following Midwest ISO-related meetings: Advisory Committee (10 a.m.-3 p.m.... Paul Hotel, 350 Market St., St. Paul, MN) September 15 October 20 November 17 December 1 Midwest ISO...

  10. 75 FR 3228 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Midwest ISO Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Midwest ISO Meetings January 12... Commission staff may attend the following Midwest ISO-related meetings: Advisory Committee (10 a.m.-3 p.m... October 20 November 17 December 1 Midwest ISO Informational Forum (3 p.m.-5 p.m., ET) January 19 February...

  11. El Midwest Canto Al Pueblo: "otra vez, c/s"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guernica, Antonio Jose; Saavedra, Pilar

    1977-01-01

    El Midwest Canto Al Pueblo was a successful effort to bring artists, poets, musicians, and cultural workers together in a setting conducive to a free and easy interchange of ideas and directions in order to reaffirm, share, and celebrate the identity of La Raza with el pueblo. The activities during the 10-day festival included poetry readings,…

  12. Geographic Constructions of Race: The Midwest Asian American Students Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Corinne M.; Poon, OiYan A.; Manzano, Lester J.; Sihite, Ester U.

    2017-01-01

    This case study was focused on the establishment of the Midwest Asian American Students Union (MAASU) as a racial project reflecting students' articulations of a regional, panethnic identity in response to racism. A critical race theory lens was used to analyze interviews with 13 MAASU founders. Findings highlight the role of social context (in…

  13. Teacher Contract Non-Renewal: Midwest, Rocky Mountains, and Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Andy; Dam, Margaret; Packard, Abbot L.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated reasons that school principals recommend non-renewal of probationary teachers' contracts. Principal survey results from three regions of the US (Midwest, Rocky Mountains, & Southeast) were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U statistical procedures, while significance was tested applying a…

  14. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential

  15. 75 FR 3225 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Organization of MISO States and Midwest ISO Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Midwest ISO Meetings January 12, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that....m. CT All meetings scheduled to be held in Carmel will take place at: Midwest ISO Headquarters, 720.... LLC v. Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc. Docket No. ER08-15, Midwest ISO...

  16. The Upper Mississippi River System—Topobathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jayme M.; Hanson, Jenny L.; Sattler, Stephanie R.

    2017-03-23

    The Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), the navigable part of the Upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, is a diverse ecosystem that contains river channels, tributaries, shallow-water wetlands, backwater lakes, and flood-plain forests. Approximately 10,000 years of geologic and hydrographic history exist within the UMRS. Because it maintains crucial wildlife and fish habitats, the dynamic ecosystems of the Upper Mississippi River Basin and its tributaries are contingent on the adjacent flood plains and water-level fluctuations of the Mississippi River. Separate data for flood-plain elevation (lidar) and riverbed elevation (bathymetry) were collected on the UMRS by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program. Using the two elevation datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) developed a systemic topobathy dataset.

  17. Outbreak of caprine abortion by Toxoplasma gondii in Midwest Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Bravim Caldeira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of abortion by Toxoplasma gondii in goats on a farm in the Brazilian Midwest is reported. Gross lesions were not observed in seven aborted fetuses submitted to the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory, Federal University of Mato Grosso, for necropsy investigation. The main histologic lesions were mononuclear cell pneumonia and necrotizing encephalitis in varying degrees of intensity. PCR for Brucella abortus and Neospora caninum and aerobic cultures were negative in all cases. Antibody titles against T. gondii varying from 1:1024 to 1:32.768 were detected in serum samples from four aborted goats. Nested-PCR assay for T. gondii were positive in brain samples of all cases submitted. These findings indicate that T. gondii infection should be considered in the diagnosis of abortion in goats in Midwest Brazil.

  18. Challenges with modifications of the McClean Lake mill to process midwest ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Backham, L., E-mail: leslie.backham@areva.ca [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Midwest is a unique uranium deposit with exceptionally high arsenic content. The ore body is located 17 km west of the McClean Lake operation. The McClean Lake mill will be modified to process Midwest ore and handle solid wastes from the Midwest water treatment plant. This paper describes the modifications required of the McClean Lake mill, process challenges associated with treatment of the arsenic, and the possibility of recovering nickel and cobalt as a by-product. It also reviews the complexity in the design of the Midwest water treatment facility which incorporates reverse osmosis technology with conventional physical-chemical water treatment. (author)

  19. 77 FR 9225 - Pioneer Transmission, LLC v. Northern Indiana Public Service Company Midwest Independent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Pioneer Transmission, LLC v. Northern Indiana Public Service Company Midwest... (Pioneer) filed a formal complaint against Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO) and Midwest... available for review in the Commission's Public Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an ``e...

  20. Assessing groundwater vulnerability to agrichemical contamination in the Midwest US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, M.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; James, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Agrichemicals (herbicides and nitrate) are significant sources of diffuse pollution to groundwater. Indirect methods are needed to assess the potential for groundwater contamination by diffuse sources because groundwater monitoring is too costly to adequately define the geographic extent of contamination at a regional or national scale. This paper presents examples of the application of statistical, overlay and index, and process-based modeling methods for groundwater vulnerability assessments to a variety of data from the Midwest U.S. The principles for vulnerability assessment include both intrinsic (pedologic, climatologic, and hydrogeologic factors) and specific (contaminant and other anthropogenic factors) vulnerability of a location. Statistical methods use the frequency of contaminant occurrence, contaminant concentration, or contamination probability as a response variable. Statistical assessments are useful for defining the relations among explanatory and response variables whether they define intrinsic or specific vulnerability. Multivariate statistical analyses are useful for ranking variables critical to estimating water quality responses of interest. Overlay and index methods involve intersecting maps of intrinsic and specific vulnerability properties and indexing the variables by applying appropriate weights. Deterministic models use process-based equations to simulate contaminant transport and are distinguished from the other methods in their potential to predict contaminant transport in both space and time. An example of a one-dimensional leaching model linked to a geographic information system (GIS) to define a regional metamodel for contamination in the Midwest is included.

  1. Book review: The Tallgrass Prairie Center guide to seed and seedling identification in the Upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Diane L.; Galatowitsch, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    This attractive, slim volume provides a wonderful introduction to a neglected aspect of prairie plant identification: seeds and seedlings. Williams, and the illustrator Brent Butler, take the mystery out of dichotomous keys with clear descriptions, vivid illustrations, and abundant photographs of characteristics that distinguish common, tallgrass prairie, seedlings. A botanical novice should have no problem using this book to identify seedlings in their prairie garden – presuming that they planted only those species included in the book (more on that later).

  2. Assessment of multimodal freight bottlenecks and alleviation strategies for upper Midwest region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The freight that passes through the Mississippi Valley Region is high volume and has a substantial impact on the economy of the : region. According to the BTS-sponsored Commodity Flow Survey, trucks carried almost 2.5 billion tons of freight across t...

  3. Environmental and biological controls of urban tree transpiration in the Upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, E. B.; McFadden, J.; Montgomery, R.

    2009-12-01

    Urban trees provide a variety of ecosystem services to urban and suburban areas, including carbon uptake, climate amelioration, energy reduction, and stormwater management. Tree transpiration, in particular, modifies urban water budgets by providing an alternative pathway for water after rain events. The relative importance of environmental and biological controls on transpiration are poorly understood in urban areas, yet these controls are important for quantifying and scaling up the ecosystem services that urban trees provide at landscape and regional scales and predicting how urban ecosystems will respond to climate changes. The objectives of our study were to quantify the annual cycle of tree transpiration in an urban ecosystem and to determine how different urban tree species and plant functional types respond to environmental drivers. We continuously measured whole-tree transpiration using thermal dissipation sap flow at four urban forest stands that were broadly representative of the species composition and tree sizes found in a suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota. A total of 40 trees, representing different species, plant functional types, successional stages, and xylem anatomy, were sampled throughout the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons (April-November). At each site we monitored soil moisture, air temperature, and relative humidity continuously, and we measured leaf area index weekly. Urban tree transpiration was strongly correlated with diurnal changes in vapor pressure deficit and photosynthetically active radiation and with seasonal changes in leaf area index. We found that plant functional type better explained species differences in transpiration per canopy area than either successional stage or xylem anatomy, largely due to differences in canopy structure between conifer and broad-leaf deciduous trees. We also observed inter-annual differences in transpiration rates due to a mid-season drought and longer growing season in 2007, compared with the cooler, wetter conditions in 2008. These results were scaled to estimate the relative contribution of each tree type at the scale of a suburban landscape. The findings of this study have implications for understanding the role of trees in managing urban water budgets and predicting the impacts of climate change on urban ecosystem services.

  4. Fungi associated with stem cankers and coincidental scolytid beetles on declining hickory in the upper midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Juzwik; Linda Haugen; Ji-Hyun Park; Melanie Moore

    2008-01-01

    Higher than expected levels of hickory decline and mortality have recently been reported by Forest Health Monitoring, USDA Forest Service, on Carya spp. in Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Widespread mortality of hickory has historically been attributed to outbreaks of the hickory bark beetle (Scolytus...

  5. Change in Reported Lyme Disease Incidence in the Northeast and Upper Midwest, 1991-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This indicator shows how reported Lyme disease incidence has changed by state since 1991, based on the number of new cases per 100,000 people. The total change has...

  6. Change in Reported Lyme Disease Incidence in the Northeast and Upper Midwest, 1991-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This indicator shows how reported Lyme disease incidence has changed by state since 1991, based on the number of new cases per 100,000 people. The total change has been estimated from the average annual rate of change in each state. This map is limited to the 14 states where Lyme disease is most common, where annual rates are consistently above 10 cases per 100,000. Connecticut, New York, and Rhode Island had too much year-to-year variation in reporting practices to allow trend calculation. For more information: www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators

  7. NACP MCI: CO2 Emissions Inventory, Upper Midwest Region, USA., 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a bottom-up CO2 emissions inventory for the mid-continent region of the United States for the year 2007. The study was undertaken as part of...

  8. NACP MCI: CO2 Emissions Inventory, Upper Midwest Region, USA., 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides a bottom-up CO2 emissions inventory for the mid-continent region of the United States for the year 2007. The study was undertaken as...

  9. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) Procedures F - Z GI Bleeding Manometry Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) Polypectomy ... Gastrointestinal Glossary of Terms Home / Clinical Topics / Procedures F - Z / Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Upper Endoscopy (EGD) The ...

  10. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brochure Understanding Upper Endoscopy Brochure Make the Best Choice for Your Endoscopic Procedure Brochure Members-only content ... Brochure Understanding Upper Endoscopy Brochure Make the Best Choice for Your Endoscopic Procedure Brochure View more Products ...

  11. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Procedure Brochure Understanding Upper Endoscopy Brochure Make the Best Choice for Your Endoscopic Procedure Brochure Members-only ... Procedure Brochure Understanding Upper Endoscopy Brochure Make the Best Choice for Your Endoscopic Procedure Brochure View more ...

  12. 77 FR 60457 - Draft Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan Within Eight-State Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan Within... period for receipt of comments pertaining to the development of the Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species..., intend to prepare the Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) under the...

  13. A River Runs through It: Art, Geology and Life on the Upper Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lynette K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a pilot interdisciplinary project for middle-school students including visual literacy, studio art, English-language literacy, geology and the study of indigenous groups. The location of the pilot was in the upper Midwest, along the Mississippi river bluffs of St. Paul, Minnesota. English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) students…

  14. Agricultural Climate Services Planning and Engagement in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluck, D.

    2009-12-01

    Agribusiness and related industries in the Midwest are dominant influences on the regional economy, politics and the livelihoods of many communities. The successes and failures of crops and commodities markets in this area, often referred to as the “Corn Belt”, has a disproportionate effect globally in terms of food and energy production. Agribusiness in the Midwest is proud of the fact that they “feed the world” and have some of the highest output per acre of row crops on Earth. In spite of attempts to lessen the impact of climate (irrigation, genetic manipulation, etc…) it remains one of the most influential inputs to crop success. Thus, early warning of climate events and repercussions from climate change are increasingly important for preparedness, sustainability and adaptation. Drought, floods, heat, cold, early/late freeze, disease and invasive species all serve as major factors for this sector. Recognizing the importance of these impacts, NOAA and its partners plan to continue a discussion on the needs of critical information for agricultural decision makers. NOAA and its partners are eager to understand the climate information priorities within the agricultural community so it can determine where effort and support should go to address the gaps. This September 9-10th NOAA will convene experts from NOAA, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, USDA-CSREES (Extension Services), academia, state climate offices, Regional Climate Centers, and others to determine a possible path for such services. This meeting will follow on from the “Corn and Climate Workshop” which began this discussion last September (2008). This will be a first for regional climate services planning meetings in the Midwest. A plethora of possible inputs and outcomes are anticipated from the meeting. One of the goals is to collect and prioritize actionable suggestions from a variety of sources before and during the two-day session. From this list, meeting participants will discuss and

  15. Productive efficiency of rural health clinics: the Midwest experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinay, T

    2001-01-01

    This article identifies the characteristics of efficient and inefficient rural clinics in the Midwest, using 1994 Medicare cost reports. Rural health clinics are compared on the basis of productive efficiency by estimating a nonparametric frontier. Six inputs and five output categories were employed to estimate an efficient frontier. The results show that an efficient clinic, on average, employs approximately 1.5 more physicians than an inefficient clinic and incurs capital expenses more than twice those of the inefficient clinic. Future rural clinics are expected to be larger, employing more capital and labor to take advantage of scale economies. However, given the steady (or decreasing) population of rural communities, the expansion of relatively small rural clinics could involve forming rural health care systems and/or networks in close proximity to create synergies from scale economies, staff recruitment, easier access to capital, shared information systems, improved mobility of physicians among several clinics and savings from management costs.

  16. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Quality & Safety GIQuIC Registry Infection Control Privileging & Credentialing Quality Indicators Education & Meetings Advanced Education & Training ARIA Industry ...

  17. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Midwest Region easements manual

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This manual provides pollices, establishes procedures and sets guidelines to administer easement interests for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Midwest Region. It is...

  18. Evaluation and analysis of Texas biofuel supply chains originating in the United States Midwest and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This 2009 study, funded by the Southwest Region University Transportation Center, investigates : competing ethanol supply chains terminating in the State of Texas. Midwest corn ethanol and : Brazilian sugarcane ethanol constitute two sources of the b...

  19. A data library management system for midwest FreightView and its data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Midwest FreightView (MWFV) and its associated data repository is part of a large multifaceted : effort to promote regional economic development throughout the Great Lakes : system. The main objective for the system is to promote sustainable maritime ...

  20. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than

  1. Identifying Decision Support Tools to Bridge Climate and Agricultural Needs in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B. L.; Kluck, D. R.; Hatfield, J.; Black, C.; Kellner, O.; Woloszyn, M.; Timlin, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate monitoring tools designed to help stakeholders reduce climate impacts have been developed for the primary Midwest field crops of corn and soybean. However, the region also produces vital livestock and specialty crops that currently lack similar climate monitoring and projection tools. In autumn 2015, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and Midwestern Regional Climate Center (MRCC) partnered with the US Department of Agriculture's Midwest Climate Hub to convene agriculture stakeholders, climate scientists, and climate service specialists to discuss climate impacts and needs for these two, often under-represented, sectors. The goals of this workshop were to (1) identify climate impacts that specialty crops and livestock producers face within the Midwest, (2) develop an understanding of the types of climate and weather information and tools currently available in the Midwest that could be applied to decision making, and (3) discover the types of climate and weather information and tools needed to address concerns of specialty crop and livestock commodities across the Midwest. This presentation will discuss the workshop and provide highlights of the outcomes that developed into strategic plans for the future to better serve these sectors of agriculture in the Midwest.

  2. Rail height effects on safety performance of Midwest Guardrail System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi Pajouh, Mojdeh; Julin, Ramen D; Stolle, Cody S; Reid, John D; Faller, Ronald K

    2017-07-11

    Guardrail heights play a crucial role in the way that errant vehicles interact with roadside barriers. Low rail heights increase the propensity of vehicle rollover and override, whereas excessively tall rails promote underride. Further, rail mounting heights and post embedment depths may be altered by variations in roadside terrain. An increased guardrail height may be desirable to accommodate construction tolerances, soil erosion, frost heave, and future roadway overlays. This study aimed to investigate and identify a maximum safe installation height for the Midwest Guardrail System that would be robust and remain crashworthy before and after pavement overlays. A research investigation was performed to evaluate the safety performance of increased mounting heights for the standard 787-mm (31-in.)-tall Midwest Guardrail System (MGS) through crash testing and computer simulation. Two full-scale crash tests with small passenger cars were performed on the MGS with top-rail mounting heights of 864 and 914 mm (34 and 36 in.). Test results were then used to calibrate computer simulation models. In the first test, a small car impacted the MGS with 864-mm (34-in.) rail height at 102 km/h (63.6 mph) and 25.0° and was successfully redirected. In the second test, another small car impacted the MGS with a 914-mm (36-in.) rail height at 103 km/h (64.1 mph) and 25.6° and was successful. Both system heights satisfied the Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) Test Level 3 (TL-3) evaluation criteria. Test results were then used to calibrate computer simulation models. A mounting height of 36 in. was determined to be the maximum guardrail height that would safely contain and redirect small car vehicles. Simulations confirmed that taller guardrail heights (i.e., 37 in.) would likely result in small car underride. In addition, simulation results indicated that passenger vehicle models were successfully contained by the 34- and 36-in.-tall MGS installed on approach slopes

  3. Coping with epilepsy in Zimbabwe and the Midwest, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlieger, P; Piachaud, J; Leung, P; George, N

    1994-09-01

    In this article, the experiences of persons with epilepsy were explored in terms of coping with providing a basis of discussion and training to support groups, particularly in Zimbabwe. Coping mechanisms lay stress upon the individual's control in mastering the disease. It was assumed that a systematic research effort of intra-cultural and cross-cultural sharing of experiences could enhance discussion and training in the support groups. Coping with epilepsy was explored with 37 adults (27 from Zimbabwe and 10 from the Midwest, USA) using open-ended questions in a written questionnaire. Questions aimed to elicit general feelings, experiences and strategies and skills in coping with epilepsy. The questionnaire covered such semantic domains as childhood, education, employment, friendships, relations within the family, and handling of seizures in public places. Coping mechanisms were categorized into two modes, one, adjustment to the disability (palliative), the other adjustment to the environment (problem-solving). In comparing the information between the two groups, some trends can be distinguished which need a larger scale validation. First, palliative skills during childhood in the Zimbabwean group is indicative for early development of personality characteristics and socialization as a result of the illness experiences. A great variety in palliative mechanisms in handling seizures indicates better familiarity with seizures in the Midwestern group. Similarities between the two groups are found in the friendship domain, where palliative coping skills seem to be of no importance, as well as in the domain of intimate relations, where a trend in adherence to medication is observed in both groups. Second, many problem-solving skills are developed in both groups but vary in context. In view of public education and training activities and the enhancement of problem-solving skills, the domain of education for the Zimbabwean group and the domains of friendship with the

  4. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Upper Endoscopy (EGD) The Latest Practice Guidelines Technology Reviews Articles Videos Events & Products Ensuring the Safety of ... S0016-5107(98)70268-8 View more Technology Reviews Members-only content Document Link: ASGE Leading Edge: ...

  5. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... EGD) Upper Endoscopy (EGD) The Latest Practice Guidelines Technology Reviews Articles Videos Events & Products Ensuring the Safety ... 1016/S0016-5107(98)70268-8 View more Technology Reviews Members-only content Document Link: ASGE Leading ...

  6. Upper Endoscopy

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    Full Text Available ... Drainage Stent Placement Stricture Dilation Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Quality & Safety GIQuIC Registry Infection Control Privileging & Credentialing Quality Indicators Education & Meetings Advanced Education & Training ARIA Industry ...

  7. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Rent IT&T Facility Gastrointestinal Glossary of Terms Home / Clinical Topics / Procedures F - Z / Upper Endoscopy ( ... Facebook ASGE on Youtube ASGE on Twitter Privacy | Terms of Use | © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

  8. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Quality & Safety GIQuIC Registry Infection Control Privileging & Credentialing Quality Indicators Education & Meetings Advanced Education & Training ARIA Industry Training ASGE Endorsed Activities ASGE Masterclasses Clinical Courses DDW / Digestive Disease Week ® ...

  9. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Endoscopy (EGD) The Latest Practice Guidelines Technology Reviews Articles Videos Events & Products Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure Brochure Understanding Upper Endoscopy Brochure Make the Best Choice for Your Endoscopic Procedure Brochure ...

  10. Upper Endoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Year Fellow (FYF) Courses Training & Core Curriculum Practice Support Advocacy Advocacy Agenda Issues Policy Statements Take Action ... Rent IT&T Facility Gastrointestinal Glossary of Terms Home / Clinical Topics / Procedures F - Z / Upper Endoscopy (EGD) ...

  11. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  12. 77 FR 4292 - Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Response to Data Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Response to Data Request Take notice that on January 19, 2012, Midwest Independent Transmission System... representatives of Transmission Owners and Non-Transmission Owners, MISO Advisory Committee participants, and all...

  13. Data-base system for northern Midwest regional aquifer-system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontis, A.L.; Mandle, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a study of the Cambrian and Ordovician aquifer system of the northern Midwest as part of a national series of Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis (RASA). An integral part of this study will be a simulation of the ground-water flow regime using the Geological Survey's three-dimensional finite-difference model. The first step in the modeling effort is the design and development of a systematic set of processes to facilitate the collection, evaluation, manipulation, and use of large quantities of information. A computerized data-base system to accomplish these goals has been completed for the northern Midwest RASA.

  14. AnnAGNPS Model Application for Nitrogen Loading Assessment for the Future Midwest Landscape Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Jackson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Future Midwest Landscape (FML project is part of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA’s new Ecosystem Services Research Program, undertaken to examine the variety of ways in which landscapes that include crop lands, conservation areas, wetlands, lakes, and streams affect human well-being. The goal of the FML project is to quantify current and future ecosystem services across the region and to examine changes expected to occur as a result of the growing demand for biofuels. This study is one of several pilots taking place under the umbrella of the FML research project. In this study, the USDA Annualized Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution (AnnAGNPS model was applied to the East Fork Kaskaskia River watershed (289.3 km2 located in the Kaskaskia River Basin within the Upper Mississippi River Basin in Illinois. The effect of different spatial resolutions on model performance was investigated by comparing the observed runoff with the AnnAGNPS simulated results. Alternative future scenarios such as meeting future biofuel target were also simulated and analyzed. All delineations of the study area (coarser to finer produced satisfactory results in simulating monthly and annual runoff. However, the size of the delineation does impact the simulation results. Finer delineations better represented the actual landscape and captured small critical areas that would be homogenized in coarser delineation. Those small critical areas are important to target to achieve maximum environment benefit. Simulations of alternative future scenarios showed that as corn production increases to meet future biofuel needs, total nitrogen loss increases. For this watershed, total N loss would be more than doubled if converting all corn/soybean rotation (15,871.2 ha to continuous corn comparing with the base year total N loss which is 11.2 kg/ha. Conservation practices are needed to reduce total nitrogen loss from the watershed. This study provides an important

  15. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Dietary Patterns of Preadolescents Attending Schools in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepper, Martha J.; Chai, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined dietary intake of fruit and vegetables and dietary patterns of preadolescents attending schools in the Midwest. Methods: A total of 506 students (11.2 ± 1.3 years) from four public and private schools in Nebraska completed a validated 41-item Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess their dietary intake.…

  16. An early look at forest regeneration indicator results for the Midwest and Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; James A. Westfall

    2015-01-01

    Interacting regeneration stressors create challenges for policy makers and managers who are tasked with making decisions for restoring forest following major disturbances, such as harvest or catastrophic mortality. Concern over an aging forest, dwindling young forest habitat, and restoration of native forests in the midwest and northeast United States has resulted in...

  17. 76 FR 75542 - Rail Splitter Wind Farm, LLC v. Ameren Services Company Midwest Independent Transmission, System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Rail Splitter Wind Farm, LLC v. Ameren Services Company Midwest... Regulatory Commission's (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedures, 18 CFR 385.206, Rail Splitter Wind Farm, LLC (Rail Splitter or Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Ameren Services Company...

  18. Status of neotropical migrant landbirds in the Midwest: identifying species of management concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank R. Thompson; Stephen J. Lewis; Janet D. Green; David N. Ewert

    1993-01-01

    We ranked species of neotropical migrant landbirds by decreasing management concern for their viability in the Midwest. This was part of a coordinated effort by regional working groups of the Partners In Flight Program, an interagency program for the conservation of neotropical migratory birds (NTMBs). Species were ranked by seven criteria, developed by working group...

  19. Atmospheric Rivers and Their Role in Extreme Precipitation in the Midwest U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    located in the warm sector of extratropical cyclones (warm conveyor belt) and can be characterized by strong winds (low level jet) and large water...L. Kinter III, 2009: The Maya Express—Late spring floods in the U.S. Midwest. Eos, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union, 90, 101-102. Draxler, R.R. and

  20. Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Corinne; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the job satisfaction of 253 Latino/a newcomers in three rural communities in the Midwest. Specifically, the authors explored the effects of ethnic identity, Anglo acculturation, Latino/a acculturation, perceptions of the community (social relations, discrimination/racism, and language pressures), job tenure, work hours, and…

  1. The Midwest flood of 1993: did trees protect levees along the Missouri River?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John P. Dwyer; Douglas Wallace; David R. Larsen

    1997-01-01

    Following the Midwest flood of 1993, a study was initiated along a 39-mile segment of the Missouri River to determine if there was an association between woody corridors and levee stability. A systematic sample of levee failures revealed that primary levees which did not fail had a significantly wider woody corridor than failed levees. Analysis of the total inventory...

  2. Wood-plastic composites utilizing wood flours derived from fast- growing trees common to the midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are several non- or under-utilized hardwood trees common to the Midwestern states. Wood flour (WF) derived from fast-growing Midwest trees (Osage orange, Black Locust and Red Mulberry) were evaluated as a source of bio-based fiber reinforcements. Wood plastic composites (WPC) of high density p...

  3. Exploring the Special Education versus Regular Education Decisions of Future Teachers in the Rural Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSutter, Keri L.; Lemire, Steven Dale

    2016-01-01

    Persistent shortages of special education teachers, particularly in rural areas, exist across the country. This study assessed the openness of teacher candidates enrolled in an introductory education course at two rural Midwest universities to a special education career path. Survey findings confirmed that work or volunteer experience involving…

  4. Vulnerability of grain crops and croplands in the Midwest to climatic variability and adaptation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Gylcine max (L.) Merr.) are the dominant grain crops across the Midwest and are grown on 75% of the arable land with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.) small but economically important crops. Historically there have been variations in annual yiel...

  5. Vulnerability of forests of the Midwest and Northeast United States to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Swanston; Leslie A. Brandt; Maria K. Janowiak; Stephen D. Handler; Patricia Butler-Leopold; Louis Iverson; Frank R. Thompson; Todd A. Ontl; P. Danielle. Shannon

    2018-01-01

    Forests of the Midwest and Northeast significantly define the character, culture, and economy of this large region but face an uncertain future as the climate continues to change. Forests vary widely across the region, and vulnerabilities are strongly influenced by regional differences in climate impacts and adaptive capacity. Not all forests are vulnerable; longer...

  6. Proceedings of the Midwest Philosophy of Education Society, 1999-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliker, Michael A., Ed.

    This proceedings of the Midwest Philosophy of Education Society contain two presidential addresses: "Separating School and State: An Analytical Polemic" (D. G. Smith); and "'Whither Now, Alfonse?': Beyond the Polemic (A Response to Smith)" (J. M. Fennell). The Proceedings contains the following papers from the 1999 meeting:…

  7. Midwest Forensics Resource Center Project Summary June 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Baldwin

    2005-06-01

    The mission of the MFRC Research and Development Program, is to provide technological advances in forensic science for the benefit of our regional partners as well as the forensic community at large. Key areas of forensic science need are identified through our interactions with our Midwest partners and our R&D advisory group, as well as through our participation in national meetings in forensic science. Under the sponsorship of the National Institute of Justice, the MFRC solicits proposals for the development of practical and useful technology, instrumentation, and methodology that address needs in areas related to forensic science and its application to operational crime laboratories. The MFRC facilitates proposal development by working to establish partnerships between researchers and our regional partners. The MFRC administers a peer-review of the proposals and then funds the selected projects at a cost of approximately $55,000 each, with a 12-month period of performance. The process for selection of these projects includes the following steps: (1) drafting of a call for proposals by MFRC staff, (2) review of the draft call by members of the R&D advisory committee, (3) review and approval of the call by NIJ, (4) issuance of the call to ISU, Ames Laboratory, regional partners, and research organizations, (5) receipt of proposals, (6) review of proposals by R&D advisory committee, (7) ranking and selection by MFRC staff using advisory committee reviews, with concurrence by NIJ, (8) notification of proposers, (9) receipt and review of progress reports by MFRC, (10) receipt and review of final reports by MFRC, R&D advisory committee, and NIJ. The decision to fund any specific project is based upon a peer-reviewed call-for-proposal system administered by the MFRC. The reviewers are crime laboratory specialists and scientists who are asked to rate the proposals on four criteria areas including: (1) relevance to the mission of the MFRC, (2) technical approach and

  8. Production, transportation and milling costs of sweet sorghum as a feedstock for centralized bioethanol production in the upper Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Albert S; Anex, Robert P

    2009-02-01

    Sweet sorghum has been identified as a possible ethanol feedstock because of its biomass yield and high concentration of readily fermentable sugars. It has found limited use, however, because of poor post-harvest storage characteristics and short harvest window in cooler climates. Previous research (Bennett, A.S., Anex, R.P., 2008. Farm-gate production costs of sweet sorghum as a bioethanol feedstock. Transactions of the ASABE 51(2), 603-613) indicates that fermentable carbohydrates (FC) can be produced at less expense from sweet sorghum than from corn grain. Previous research, however, did not include costs associated with off-farm transportation, storage, or capital costs associated with milling and energy recovery equipment that are required to provide FC suitable for biological conversion. This study includes these additional costs and reevaluates sweet sorghum as a biocommodity feedstock. A total of eight harvest-transport-processing options are modeled, including 4-row self-propelled and 2-row tractor-pulled forage harvesters, two different modes of in-field transport, fresh processing, on-farm ensilage and at-plant ensilage. Monte Carlo simulation and sensitivity analysis are used to account for system variability and compare scenarios. Transportation costs are found to be significant ranging from $33 to $71 Mg (-1) FC, with highest costs associated with at-plant ensilage scenarios. Economies of scale benefit larger milling equipment and boiler systems reducing FC costs by more than 50% when increasing annual plant capacity from 37.9 to 379 million liters. Ensiled storage of high moisture sweet sorghum in bunkers can lead to significant losses of FC (>20%) and result in systems with net FC costs well above those of corn-derived FC. Despite relatively high transport costs, seasonal, fresh processed sweet sorghum is found to produce FC at costs competitive with corn grain derived FC.

  9. Semi-automted analysis of high-resolution aerial images to quantify docks in Upper Midwest glacial lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Hatch, Lorin K.; Vinje, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Lake resources can be negatively affected by environmental stressors originating from multiple sources and different spatial scales. Shoreline development, in particular, can negatively affect lake resources through decline in habitat quality, physical disturbance, and impacts on fisheries. The development of remote sensing techniques that efficiently characterize shoreline development in a regional context could greatly improve management approaches for protecting and restoring lake resources. The goal of this study was to develop an approach using high-resolution aerial photographs to quantify and assess docks as indicators of shoreline development. First, we describe a dock analysis workflow that can be used to quantify the spatial extent of docks using aerial images. Our approach incorporates pixel-based classifiers with object-based techniques to effectively analyze high-resolution digital imagery. Second, we apply the analysis workflow to quantify docks for 4261 lakes managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Overall accuracy of the analysis results was 98.4% (87.7% based on ) after manual post-processing. The analysis workflow was also 74% more efficient than the time required for manual digitization of docks. These analyses have immediate relevance for resource planning in Minnesota, whereas the dock analysis workflow could be used to quantify shoreline development in other regions with comparable imagery. These data can also be used to better understand the effects of shoreline development on aquatic resources and to evaluate the effects of shoreline development relative to other stressors.

  10. Lichen elemental content bioindicators for air quality in upper Midwest, USA: A model for large-scale monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Will-Wolf; Sarah Jovan; Michael C. Amacher

    2017-01-01

    Our development of lichen elemental bioindicators for a United States of America (USA) national monitoring program is a useful model for other large-scale programs. Concentrations of 20 elements were measured, validated, and analyzed for 203 samples of five common lichen species. Collections were made by trained non-specialists near 75 permanent plots and an expert...

  11. Awareness, perceptions and use of snus among young adults from the upper Midwest region of the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kelvin; Forster, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Since its introduction in 2006, snus has been aggressively marketed by tobacco companies. However, little is known about the awareness, perceptions and use of snus among young adults after Camel and Marlboro snus were sold nationwide in 2010. Data were collected from 2607 young adults (ages 20-28) who participated in the Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort Study in 2010-2011. Data include awareness of snus, ever and past 30-day use, perceived potential of snus as a quit aid, and perceived harmfulness and addictiveness of snus relative to cigarettes. The authors assessed the associations between these outcome variables and socio-demographic characteristics. Overall, 64.8% of participants were aware of snus, 14.5% ever used snus and 3.2% used snus in the past 30 days. Men and participants who smoked >100 cigarettes in their lifetime were associated with these three outcomes (pperceptions were associated with ever use and the past 30-day use of snus (pPerceptions of snus are associated with snus use. Strategic health communication interventions targeting young adults to confront the positive perceptions associated with snus may be needed to curb the interest in snus.

  12. The Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium Environmental Information Network: Building ‘Learning Communities’ in the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Leigh; Seielstad, George; McClurg, Pat; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2000-01-01

    In the last two decades alone, the U.S. and large portions of the world have witnessed what can be aptly be described as an explosion of scientific information and technological innovations that has permeated almost every aspect of our lives. Given these trends, it is clear that science and the understanding of science are becoming increasingly more relevant and essential to decision-makers and the decision-making process. Every environmental issue confronting society has an undisputed scientific underpinning. Understanding the implications of the science underpinning issues of particular importance to the health and well being of society constitutes the basis for making more informed and enlightened decisions. However obvious this linkage may be, many factors continue to serve as impediments to the broader understanding and incorporation of science into policy- and decision-making processes, as perhaps is best exemplified by the case of climate science.

  13. Exposure to farm crops, livestock, and farm tasks and risk of glioma: the Upper Midwest Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, Avima M; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Davis-King, Karen E; Waters, Martha A; Schulte, Paul A; Mandel, Jack S; Morton, Roscoe F; Reding, Douglas J; Rosenman, Kenneth D

    2009-06-15

    Some studies of brain cancer have found an excess risk for farmers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health previously found no increased glioma risk for ever (vs. never) being exposed to pesticides on a farm among 798 cases and 1,175 population-based controls (adult (ages 18-80 years) nonmetropolitan residents of Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin). For this analysis (1995-1998), 288 cases and 474 controls (or their proxies) who had lived on farms at age 18 years or after were asked about exposure to crops, livestock, and farm tasks. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios adjusted for age, age group, sex, state, and education. Never immediately washing up (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.78, 5.34) or changing clothes (OR = 2.84, 95% CI: 1.04, 7.78) after applying pesticides was associated with increased glioma risk. Living on a farm on which corn, oats, soybeans, or hogs were raised was associated with decreased risk (corn-OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.20, 0.69; oats-OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.00; soybeans-OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.98; hogs-OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.43, 0.93). Negative associations may be due to chance or a "healthy farmer" effect. Farmers' increased risk of glioma may be due to work practices, other activities, or an inverse association with allergies (reported by other investigators).

  14. An examination of ethnic entrepreneurship in the Mid-West of Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Birdthistle, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThis research was commissioned by Doras Luimní  with the aim of providing a micro and strategic analysis of ethnic entrepreneurs in the Midwest region of Ireland. A number of objectives were formed in order to answer this aim. The study examined two sets of entrepreneurs: those in the planning phase and those that have been established. Both established entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs in the planning phase were studied so as to provide a skill set analysi...

  15. Integrating climate change into northeast and midwest State Wildlife Action Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Michelle D.; Morelli, Toni Lyn; Bryan, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) conducts research that responds to the regional natural resource management community’s needs to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. The NE CSC is supported by a consortium of partners that includes the University of Massachusetts Amherst, College of Menominee Nation, Columbia University, Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Minnesota, University of Missouri Columbia, and University of Wisconsin. The NE CSC also engages and collaborates with a diversity of other federal, state, academic, tribal, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to conduct collaborative, stakeholder-driven, and climate-focused work. The State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAPs) are revised every 10 years; states are currently working towards a target deadline of October 2015. SWAP coordinators have been challenged to incorporate climate change impacts and species responses into their current revisions. This synthesis is intended to inform the science going into Northeast and Midwest SWAPs across the 22 NE CSC states ranging from Maine to Virginia, and Minnesota and Missouri in the eastern United States. It is anticipated that this synthesis will help guide SWAP authors in writing specific sections, help revise and finalize existing sections, or be incorporated as an appendix or addendum. The purpose of this NE CSC-led cooperative report is to provide a synthesis of what is known and what is uncertain about climate change and its impacts across the NE CSC region, with a particular focus on the responses and vulnerabilities of Regional Species of Greatest Conservation Need (RSGCN) and the habitats they depend on. Another goal is to describe a range of climate change adaptation approaches, processes, tools, and potential partnerships that are available to State natural resource managers across the Northeast and Midwest regions of the United States. Through illustrative case studies submitted by the NE CSC and

  16. Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusak, Z.; Luijten, J.; Kooijman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates a wearable exoskeleton for a user having a torso with an upper limb to support motion of the said upper limb. The wearable exoskeleton comprises a first fixed frame mountable to the torso, an upper arm brace and a first group of actuators for moving the upper arm brace

  17. Drivers of Change in Managed Water Resources: Modeling the Impacts of Climate and Socioeconomic Changes Using the US Midwest as a Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2016-08-01

    A global integrated assessment model including a water-demand model driven by socio-economics, is coupled in a one-way fashion with a land surface hydrology – routing – water resources management model. The integrated modeling framework is applied to the U.S. Upper Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi, and Ohio) to advance understanding of the regional impacts of climate and socio-economic changes on integrated water resources. Implications for future flow regulation, water supply, and supply deficit are investigated using climate change projections with the B1 and A2 emission scenarios, which affect both natural flow and water demand. Changes in water demand are driven by socio-economic factors, energy and food demands, global markets and prices. The framework identifies the multiple spatial scales of interactions between the drivers of changes (natural flow and water demand) and the managed water resources (regulated flow, supply and supply deficit). The contribution of the different drivers of change are quantified regionally, and also evaluated locally, using covariances. The integrated framework shows that water supply deficit is more predictable over the Missouri than the other regions in the Midwest. The predictability of the supply deficit mostly comes from long term changes in water demand although changes in runoff has a greater contribution, comparable to the contribution of changes in demand, over shorter time periods. The integrated framework also shows that spatially, water demand drives local supply deficit. Using elasticity, the sensitivity of supply deficit to drivers of change is established. The supply deficit is found to be more sensitive to changes in runoff than to changes in demand regionally. It contrasts with the covariance analysis that shows that water demand is the dominant driver of supply deficit over the analysed periods. The elasticity indicates the level of mitigation needed to control the demand in order to reduce the

  18. Macro-Scale Correction of Precipitation Undercatch in the Midwest/Great Lakes Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C. M.; Hamlet, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation gauge undercatch is a serious problem in the context of using observed meteorological data sets for hydrologic modeling studies in regions with cold winters, such as the Midwest. Attention to this matter is urgently needed to support hydroclimatological research efforts in the region. To support hydrologic modeling studies, a new hybrid gridded meteorological dataset at 1/16 degree resolution based on data from CO-OP station records, the U. S. Historical Climatology Network, the Historical Canadian Climate Database, and Precipitation Regression on Independent Slopes Method has been assembled over the Great Lakes and Midwest regions from 1915-2013 at daily time step. Preliminary hydrologic simulations results using the Variable Infiltration Capacity hydrology model with this hybrid gridded meteorological dataset showed that precipitation gauge undercatch was a very significant issue throughout the region, especially for winter snowfall and simulated streamflow, which were both grossly underpredicted. Correction of primary CO-OP station data is generally infeasible due to missing station meta data and lack of local-scale wind speed measurements. Instead, macro-scale post processing techniques were developed to adjust the regridded precipitation product from CO-OP station records from 1950-2013 forwards, accounting for undercatch as a function of regridded wind speed simulations obtained from NCAR Reanalysis. Comparisons of simulated and observed streamflow over seven river basins in the Midwest were used to evaluate the datasets constructed using different combinations of meteorological station inputs, with and without undercatch corrections. The comparisons show promise in producing corrected precipitation data sets from 1950-2013 for hydrologic modeling studies, with substantial improvements in streamflow simulation from the uncalibrated VIC model when gauge undercatch corrections are included.

  19. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium bovis from Cattle Reared in Midwest Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo César Tavares Carvalho

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (BTB, the pathogen responsible for serious economic impact on the livestock sector. In order to obtain data on isolated M. bovis strains and assist in the control and eradication program for BTB, a cross sectional descriptive molecular epidemiology study in the Brazilian Midwest was conducted. Through spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR methods, 37 clinical isolates of M. bovis circulating in the region were analyzed, 10 isolated from the state of Mato Grosso, 12 from the state of Mato Grosso do Sul and 15 from the state of Goiás. The spoligotyping analysis identified 10 distinct M. bovis profiles (SB0121 n = 14, SB0295 n = 6, SB0140 n = 6, SB0881 n = 3, SB1144 n = 2, SB1145 n = 2, SB0134 n = 1, SB1050 n = 1, SB1055 n = 1, SB1136 n = 1 grouped in six clusters and four orphan patterns. The MIRU-VNTR 24-loci grouped the same isolates in six clusters and 22 unique orphan patterns, showing higher discriminatory power than spoligotyping. When associating the results of both techniques, the isolates were grouped in five clusters and 24 unique M. bovis profiles. Among the 24-loci MIRU-VNTR evaluated, two, ETR-A and QUB 11b loci, showed high discriminatory ability (h = ≥ 0.50, while MIRU 16, MIRU 27, ETR-B, ETR-C, Mtub21 and QUB 26 loci showed moderate ability (h = 0.33 or h = 0.49 and were the most effective in evaluating the genotypic similarities among the clinical M. bovis isolate samples. Herein, the 29 patterns found amongst the 37 isolates of M. bovis circulating in the Brazilian Midwest can be due to the animal movement between regions, municipalities and farms, thus causing the spread of various M. bovis strains in herds from Midwest Brazil.

  20. The Use of Cover Crops as Climate-Smart Management in Midwest Cropping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basche, A.; Miguez, F.; Archontoulis, S.; Kaspar, T.

    2014-12-01

    The observed trends in the Midwestern United States of increasing rainfall variability will likely continue into the future. Events such as individual days of heavy rain as well as seasons of floods and droughts have large impacts on agricultural productivity and the natural resource base that underpins it. Such events lead to increased soil erosion, decreased water quality and reduced corn and soybean yields. Winter cover crops offer the potential to buffer many of these impacts because they essentially double the time for a living plant to protect and improve the soil. However, at present, cover crops are infrequently utilized in the Midwest (representing 1-2% of row cropped land cover) in particular due to producer concerns over higher costs and management, limited time and winter growing conditions as well as the potential harm to corn yields. In order to expand their use, there is a need to quantify how cover crops impact Midwest cropping systems in the long term and namely to understand how to optimize the benefits of cover crops while minimizing their impacts on cash crops. We are working with APSIM, a cropping systems platform, to specifically quantify the long term future impacts of cover crop incorporation in corn-based cropping systems. In general, our regional analysis showed only minor changes to corn and soybean yields (Agriculture Project (CSCAP), a collaboration of eleven Midwestern institutions established to evaluate how conservation practices, including cover crops, improve the resilience of Midwest agriculture to future change. Such collaborations can help better quantify long term impacts of conservation practices on the landscape that ultimately lead to more climate-smart management of such agricultural systems.

  1. National Coal Utilization Assessment. a preliminary assessment of the health and environmental effects of coal utilization in the Midwest. Volume I. Energy scenarios, technology characterizations, air and water resource impacts, and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for 1975-2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. The following are among the more significant issues identified and evaluated in this study: If environmental and related issues can be resolved, coal will continue to be a major source of energy for the Midwest; existing sulfur emission constraints will increase use of western coal; the resource requirements and environmental impacts of coal utilization will require major significant environmental and economic tradeoffs in site selection; short-term (24-hr) ambient standards for sulfur dioxide will limit the sizes of coal facilities or require advanced control technologies; an impact on public health may result from long-range transport of airborne sulfur emissions from coal facilities in the Midwest; inadequately controlled effluents from coal gasification may cause violations of water-quality standards; the major ecological effects of coal extraction are from pre-mining and post-reclamation land use; and sulfur dioxide is the major potential contributor to effects on vegetation of atmospheric emissions from coal facilities.

  2. Evaluation of selected near-term energy-conservation options for the Midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.R.; Colsher, C.S.; Hamilton, R.W.; Buehring, W.A.

    1978-11-01

    This report evaluates the potential for implementation of near-term energy-conservation practices for the residential, commercial, agricultural, industrial, transportation, and utility sectors of the economy in twelve states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The information used to evaluate the magnitude of achievable energy savings includes regional energy use, the regulatory/legislative climate relating to energy conservation, technical characteristics of the measures, and their feasibility of implementation. This work is intended to provide baseline information for an ongoing regional assessment of energy and environmental impacts in the Midwest. 80 references.

  3. Northeast and Midwest regional species and habitats at greatest risk and most vulnerable to climate impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Michelle D.; Hilberg, Laura; Janowiak, Maria; Swanton, C.O.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this Chapter are to describe climate change vulnerability, it’s components, the range of assessment methods being implemented regionally, and examples of training resources and tools. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments (CCVAs) have already been conducted for numerous Regional Species of Greatest Conservation Need and their dependent 5 habitats across the Northeast and Midwest. This chapter provides a synthesis of different assessment frameworks, information on the locations (e.g., States) where vulnerability assessments were conducted, lists of individual species and habitats with their respective vulnerability rankings, and a comparison of how vulnerability rankings were determined among studies.

  4. Implementation findings from a hybrid III implementation-effectiveness trial of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Reardon, Caitlin M; AuYoung, Mona; Moin, Tannaz; Datta, Santanu K; Sparks, Jordan B; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Steinle, Nanette I; Weinreb, Jane E; Hughes, Maria; Pinault, Lillian F; Xiang, Xinran M; Billington, Charles; Richardson, Caroline R

    2017-07-26

    The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is an effective lifestyle intervention to reduce incidence of type 2 diabetes. However, there are gaps in knowledge about how to implement DPP. The aim of this study was to evaluate implementation of DPP via assessment of a clinical demonstration in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). A 12-month pragmatic clinical trial compared weight outcomes between the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Prevention Program (VA-DPP) and the usual care MOVE!® weight management program (MOVE!). Eligible participants had a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 (or BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 with one obesity-related condition), prediabetes (glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 5.7-6.5% or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) 100-125 mg/dL), lived within 60 min of their VA site, and had not participated in a weight management program within the last year. Established evaluation and implementation frameworks were used to guide the implementation evaluation. Implementation barriers and facilitators, delivery fidelity, participant satisfaction, and implementation costs were assessed. Using micro-costing methods, costs for assessment of eligibility and scheduling and maintaining adherence per participant, as well as cost of delivery per session, were also assessed. Several barriers and facilitators to Reach, Adoption, Implementation, Effectiveness and Maintenance were identified; barriers related to Reach were the largest challenge encountered by site teams. Fidelity was higher for VA-DPP delivery compared to MOVE! for five of seven domains assessed. Participant satisfaction was high in both programs, but higher in VA-DPP for most items. Based on micro-costing methods, cost of assessment for eligibility was $68/individual assessed, cost of scheduling and maintaining adherence was $328/participant, and cost of delivery was $101/session. Multi-faceted strategies are needed to reach targeted participants and successfully implement DPP. Costs for assessing patients for

  5. 76 FR 63991 - Midwest Rail d/b/a Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway-Lease and Operation Exemption-Toledo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... Surface Transportation Board Midwest Rail d/b/a Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway--Lease and Operation Exemption--Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway and Museum, Inc. Midwest Rail d/b/a Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway (Toledo), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to...

  6. Effects of Land Use Change for Crops on Water and Carbon Budgets in the Midwest USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for food and bioenergy has altered the global landscape dramatically in recent years. Land use and land cover change affects the environmental system in many ways through biophysical and biogeochemical mechanisms. In this study, we evaluate the impacts of land use and land cover change driven by recent crop expansion and conversion on the water budget, carbon exchange, and carbon storage in the Midwest USA. A dynamic global vegetation model was used to simulate and examine the impacts of landscape change in a historical case based on crop distribution data from the United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Services. The simulation results indicate that recent crop expansion not only decreased soil carbon sequestration (60 Tg less of soil organic carbon and net carbon flux into ecosystems (3.7 Tg·year−1 less of net biome productivity, but also lessened water consumption through evapotranspiration (1.04 × 1010 m3·year−1 less over 12 states in the Midwest. More water yield at the land surface does not necessarily make more water available for vegetation. Crop residue removal might also exacerbate the soil carbon loss.

  7. Responses by White Christians to Recent Latino Immigration in the Rural U.S. Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Rehwaldt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty-five years, the rural U.S. Midwest has undergone dramatic demographic changes as the population of white people decreased in many areas and the number of Latinos surged. These shifts are especially noteworthy in areas that had stable, relatively homogeneous populations over at least the last half-century. Many Christian churches, both Protestant and Catholic, are responding by reaching out to new residents. Such efforts have sometimes led to tension as Anglo Christians seek to reconcile the moral claims of their faith communities with the prejudices and fears they have of Latino immigrants. This article describes how Anglo-majority mainline Protestant congregations and Catholic parishes are responding to these demographic changes, notes key differences between the two groups’ responses, and then sketches several possible explanations for the differences, including the underlying theology of their efforts, the prior religious affiliation of Latino newcomers, the organizational structure of church bodies, and varying impetuses for action. The paper concludes with observations about the future of Christian communities in the rural Midwest.

  8. Blockage of upper airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Upper Kenai Corridor Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Kenai Corridor study describes and evaluates the Upper Kenai River and the land which embraces it. It also places the river corridor in its regional...

  10. Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Rusak, Z.; Luijten, J.; Kooijman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates a wearable exoskeleton for a user having a torso with an upper limb to support motion of the said upper limb. The wearable exoskeleton comprises a first fixed frame mountable to the torso, an upper arm brace and a first group of actuators for moving the upper arm brace relative to the first fixed frame. In an example the present invention is for use in post-stroke therapy.

  11. Precipitation and lake-level changes in the West and Midwest over the past 10,000 to 24,000 years. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, T. III; Street, F.A.; Howe, S.

    1980-02-04

    The goal of the research described in this report is to document the climatic variability over the past 10,000 to 20,000 years in areas in which sites may be designated for the burial of nuclear wastes. Three separate data sets were studied, and the results are presented in three chapters. The first data set consisted of radiocarbon dates documenting past changes in lake levels in lakes and playas in the western United States. The sites were mapped where water levels were higher than the levels today and were presented in a table telling what evidence is available at each site. The lake-level fluctuations for the past 24,000 years at sites in the West were also mapped and time series for these fluctuations at four sites were presented. The second data set was a selection of the published radiocarbon-dated pollen diagrams from the western United States. These data are a valuable source of climatic information and complement the geological evidence of lake-level fluctuations in the West. A table is presented that gives the location, elevation, and number of radiocarbon dates for each site. The third data set was a set of fossil pollen data from 20 sites in the upper Midwest. These data were calibrated in terms of precipitation changes over the past 10,000 years, and maps are presented of the estimated precipitation changes between 10,000 and 7000 years ago and between 7000 years ago and today.

  12. 77 FR 62535 - Hydro Aluminum North America, Inc., Midwest Region, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hydro Aluminum North America, Inc., Midwest Region, Including On- Site Leased Workers From Employment Group, Aerotek, and Manpower, Kalamazoo, Michigan; Hydro Aluminum North... and former workers of Hydro Aluminum North America, Inc., Kalamazoo, Michigan. The subject worker...

  13. State Policies and Procedures on Response to Intervention in the Midwest Region. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detgen, Amy; Yamashita, Mika; Davis, Brittany; and Wraight, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Based on a review of state documents and interviews with state and local officials in six Midwest Region states, this qualitative study describes state education agency policy development and planning for response to intervention approaches to instruction. It also looks at the support provided to districts and schools implementing response to…

  14. State Policies and Procedures on Response to Intervention in the Midwest Region. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detgen, Amy; Yamashita, Mika; Davis, Brittany; and Wraight, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Based on a review of state documents and interviews with state and local officials in six Midwest Region states, this qualitative study describes state education agency policy development and planning for response to intervention approaches to instruction. It also looks at the support provided to districts and schools implementing response to …

  15. Caution, the Use of Humor May Lead to Confusion: Evaluation of a Video Podcast of the Midwest Teen Sex Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Shelly; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Spies, Erica L.; Losch, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Web sites about sexual health lack the interactivity, humor, and "viral" nature required to attract young adults. The Midwest Teen Sex Show (www.midwestteensexshow.com) is an interactive, humor-based Web site that provides sexual health information to young adults. One episode from the Web site was shown to six focus groups of young women, ages…

  16. Forests, Water and People: Drinking water supply and forest lands in the Northeast and Midwest United States, June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina Barnes; Albert Todd; Rebecca Whitney Lilja; Paul Barten

    2009-01-01

    Forests are critically important to the supply of clean drinking water in the Northeast and Midwest portion of the United States. In this part of the country more than 52 million people depend on surface water supplies that are protected in large part by forested lands. The public is generally unaware of the threats to their water supplies or the connection between...

  17. Midwest-Great Lakes SER Chapter: Who we are, what we do, and what we will do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwestern United States consists of 12 states and six of them (Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio) contact Great Lakes. This subregion defines the boundaries of the Midwest-Great Lakes (MWGL) Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER). This region has a diversi...

  18. 78 FR 24192 - J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corp. v. Midwest Independent System Operator, Inc. PJM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corp. v. Midwest Independent System Operator, Inc. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on April 10, 2013, J.P. Morgan...

  19. Working the Second Shift: Perceptions of Part-Time Faculty Teaching Evening Classes at a Midwest Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined perceptions of part-time faculty who teach classes during the evening at three Midwest community college campuses. Through the use of semi-structured, one-on-one interviews, perceptions of part-time faculty were explored in the areas of in-classroom experiences, out-of-classroom experiences, and institutional…

  20. The Rite of Relocation: Social and Material Transformations in the Midwest US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tam E

    2014-01-01

    Concerns of appropriate housing may arise in older adulthood. Some older adults may make life work in the place we call home; others take steps to voluntarily relocate in anticipation of health and other needs. While moving at any age can be challenging, moving from one's home in later life also represents multiple reflections: past, present and future selves, control of one's space and relinquishing the care of one's space to another person or corporation, family support and family fissures, and the body's capacities and limitations. Moving is examined as a moment where regimes of value are negotiated through competing semiotic ideologies and at times social roles are transformed. Ethnographic fieldwork occurred from January 2009-May 2012 in the Midwest United States. This paper presents experiences of relocation of material and social role transformation as older adults make this housing, and writ large, life transition.

  1. Regional Online Union Catalog of the Greater Midwest Regional Medical Library Network: development and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammell, K A

    1984-04-01

    The GMRMLN Online Catalog was developed as an easily accessible locator tool for monographs and audiovisuals held within the Greater Midwest Regional Medical Library Network. The catalog was generated from machine-readable records in MARC formats contributed by regional libraries. It was mounted by BRS as a private database and is fully free text searchable using BRS search. Each institutional file was merged and purged of duplicates to create a single entry for each title. The catalog features an online interlibrary loan system that automatically routes a request to the two nearest, smallest libraries that own the title. If the request is not filled within the region, the system automatically routes it to the National Library of Medicine without the need to rekeyboard data. The system collects management data on interlibrary loan processing. Funding for the catalog permitted a trial period of use with cost support. Data on system operation were gathered during this demonstration.

  2. The hydrometeorological sustainability of Miscanthus x giganteus as a biofuel crop in the US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Gavin R.

    Miscanthus x giganteus (M. x giganteus ) is a dense, 3-5 m tall, productive perennial grass that has been suggested to replace corn as the principal source of biofuel for the US transportation industry. However, cultivating a regime of this water-intensive rhizomatous crop across the US Midwest may not be agronomically realistic if it is unable to survive years of low precipitation or extreme cold wintertime soil temperatures, both of which have previously killed experimental crops. The goal of this research was to use a third-generation land surface model (LSM) to provide a new assessment of the hypothetical biogeophysical sustainability of a regime of M. x giganteus across the US Midwest given that, for the first time, a robust and near-complete dataset over a large area of mature M. x giganteus was available for model validation. Modifications to the local hydrology and microclimate would necessarily occur in areas where M. x giganteus is adapted, but a switch to this biofuel crop can only occur where its intense growing season water usage (up to 600 mm) and wintertime soil temperature requirements (no less than -6° C) are feasibly sustainable without irrigation. The first step was to interpret the observed turbulent and ecosystem flux behavior over an extant area of mature M. x giganteus and replicate this behavior within the SiB3 third-generation LSM (Simple Biosphere Model, version 3). A new vegetation parameterization was developed in SiB3 using several previous empirical studies of M. x giganteus as a foundation. The simulation results were validated against a new, robust series of turbulent and ecosystem flux data taken over a four-hectare experimental crop of M. x giganteus in Champaign, IL, USA from 2011-2013. Wintertime mortality of M. x giganteus was subsequently assessed. It was proposed that areas with higher seasonal snowfall in the US Midwest may be favorable for M. x giganteus sustainability and expansion due to the significant insulating effect

  3. Nasalance score variation in normal adult Japanese speakers of Mid-West Japanese dialect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachimura, T; Mori, C; Hirata, S I; Wada, T

    2000-09-01

    The aims of this study were to examine nasalance score variation for normal adult Japanese speakers of Mid-West dialect and the gender difference in average mean nasalance score. Nasalance scores were obtained using a nasometer model 6200. The sample stimulus "Kitsutsuki passage," constructed of four sentences containing no Japanese nasal sounds, was used three times by each subject. One hundred normal adult speakers (50 women and 50 men) of Japanese served as subjects. The subjects ranged in age from 19 to 35 years of age (24.0 +/- 3.2). A mean nasalance score as well as an overall average nasalance value across speakers was calculated for each subject. The average mean nasalance scores between men and women were compared. The average mean nasalance score for the normal Japanese speakers was 9.1% (+/- 3.9). There was no statistically significant sex difference (p nasometer.

  4. Midwest FreightView and the Great Lakes Maritime Information Delivery System : a resource for the regional analysis of intermodal freight flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Midwest FreightView and the Great Lakes Maritime Information Delivery System is a comprehensive data repository and information : clearinghouse in support of Great Lakes maritime commerce. This multifunctional resource integrated in a geographic info...

  5. Design and methods of the Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA), 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Jessica D.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Journey, Celeste A.; Nakagaki, Naomi; Button, Daniel T.; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2017-10-18

    During 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Project (NAWQA), in collaboration with the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA), and the EPA Office of Pesticide Programs assessed stream quality across the Midwestern United States. This Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) simultaneously characterized watershed and stream-reach water-quality stressors along with instream biological conditions, to better understand regional stressor-effects relations. The MSQA design focused on effects from the widespread agriculture in the region and urban development because of their importance as ecological stressors of particular concern to Midwest region resource managers.A combined random stratified selection and a targeted selection based on land-use data were used to identify and select sites representing gradients in agricultural intensity across the region. During a 14-week period from May through August 2013, 100 sites were selected and sampled 12 times for contaminants, nutrients, and sediment. This 14-week water-quality “index” period culminated with an ecological survey of habitat, periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish at all sites. Sediment was collected during the ecological survey for analysis of sediment chemistry and toxicity testing. Of the 100 sites, 50 were selected for the MSQA random stratified group from 154 NRSA sites planned for the region, and the other 50 MSQA sites were selected as targeted sites to more evenly cover agricultural and urban stressor gradients in the study area. Of the 50 targeted sites, 12 were in urbanized watersheds and 21 represented “good” biological conditions or “least disturbed” conditions. The remaining 17 targeted sites were selected to improve coverage of the agricultural intensity gradient or because of historical data collection to provide temporal context for the

  6. ACA Federal Upper Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Affordable Care Act Federal Upper Limits (FUL) based on the weighted average of the most recently reported monthly average manufacturer price (AMP) for...

  7. Upper GI Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to diagnose conditions such as cancer celiac disease gastritis Doctors also use upper GI endoscopy to treat ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  8. Influence of gender equity awareness on women's reproductive healthcare in rural areas of midwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Li; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Yan; Shi, Wei

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the impact of married women's gender equity awareness on use of reproductive healthcare services in rural China. The questionnaire-based study recruited 1500 married women who were aged 15-49years, had at least 1 pregnancy, and were living in rural Gansu, Qinghai, Shanxi, or Xinjiang, China, between October and December 2010. "Gender equity awareness" was quantified by responses to 7 statements, graded in accordance with a system scoring the strength of overall belief (≥19, strong; 15-18, moderate; and ≤14, weak). Only 383 women (26.3%) demonstrated high gender equity awareness. The percentage of women who received consistent prenatal care was highest in the group scoring 15 points or more (Pgender equity awareness is not strong in rural midwest China. There was a positive correlation between gender equity awareness and use of reproductive healthcare services. There should be an emphasis on various activities to educate women so that they can fully access reproductive healthcare. © 2013.

  9. Simulating changes in precipitation associated with the 2011 US Mid-West floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, P.; Stone, D. A.; Wehner, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Large floods within the Ohio River basin have been known to occur on a few occasions during the past century, and are associated with an eastward shift of the usual synoptic system that transports moisture inland from the gulf of Mexico. Here we focus on the damaging floods of spring 2011, which were associated with heavy spring rainfalls following large winter snowfalls. We take a first look at a medium-sized (order 50-member) ensemble of simulations of Mid-West US precipitation, generated with the global CAM5.1 under conditions representing the large-scale atmospheric and oceanic conditions for spring 2011 -- with a view to downscaling and feeding this precipitation in to a hydrology model to determine the odds of the observed magnitude of floods occurring. Furthermore, we look at a parallel ensemble of simulations generated under hypothetical spring 2011 conditions in which anthropogenic climate drivers were not present, in order determine the change (if any) in odds of flood occurrence, as per a Probabilistic Event Attribution framework.

  10. Renin Angiotensin System Blocker Fetopathy: A Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Shahid; Hashmat, Shireen; Defreitas, Marissa J; Westreich, Katherine D; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Selewski, David T; Onder, Ali M; Chiang, Myra; Weaver, Donald J; Steinke, Julia; Barcia, John; Hernandez, Joel; Hidalgo, Guillermo; Ingraham, Susan E; Abitbol, Carolyn L; Pan, Cynthia; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-10-01

    Fetuses continue to be exposed to renin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers despite their known teratogenicity and a black box warning. We hypothesized that fetopathy from in utero exposure to RAS blockers has a broader spectrum of clinical manifestations than described previously and that there are a variety of clinical scenarios leading to such exposures. This was a retrospective study performed through the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium. Cases of RAS blocker fetopathy were identified, with determination of renal and extrarenal manifestations, timing of exposure, and the explanation for the fetal exposure. Twenty-four cases were identified. RAS blocker exposure after the first trimester was associated with more severe renal manifestations. Chronic dialysis or kidney transplantation was required in 8 of 17 (47%) patients with RAS blocker exposure after the first trimester and 0 of 7 patients with exposure restricted to the first trimester (P = .05). Extrarenal manifestations, some not previously noted in the literature, included central nervous system anomalies (cystic encephalomalacia, cortical blindness, sensorineural hearing loss, arachnoid cysts) and pulmonary complications (pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum). RAS blocker exposure usually was secondary to absent or poor prenatal care or undiagnosed pregnancy. RAS blocker fetopathy continues to be a cause of considerable morbidity, with more severe renal manifestations associated with exposure after the first trimester. A variety of significant extrarenal manifestations occur in these patients. Clinicians should emphasize the risk of fetopathy when prescribing RAS blockers to women of childbearing age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Controllership practices adopted in private institutions of higher education (ipes in the midwest region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramão Humberto Martins Manvailer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the adoption of controllership practices by managers of Private Institutions of Higher Education (IPES of the Midwest Region of Brazil. It also sought to identify the characteristics of IPES and analyze the association between them. The controllership practices addressed in this study were raised in the literature and submitted to the opinion of specialists in this knowledge area for validation. The data were collected through a questionnaire, with Likert scales, getting 25 responses that make up the research sample. The most adopted practices in IPES management are: performance evaluation, capital budget and the analysis of investment return. To investigate the association between controllership practices, according to the classification of the four stages of IFAC (1998, and characteristics of IPES, it was used the Fisher’s Exact Test. An association was observed between the adoption of controllership practices of the different stages of Managerial Accounting and variables such as size, administrative classification and economic performance. There is an association between internal control in asset protection and the size of IPES. The analysis practice cost-volume-profit (CVL is more adopted by for-profit institutions. Internal control in asset protection is more used by IPES that indicated unfavorable economic performance. As for the third and fourth stages practices, only the meta-funding showed a greater association with small size IPES.

  12. Risk management and market efficiency on the Midwest Independent System Operator electricity exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin

    Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc. (MISO) is a non-profit regional transmission organization (RTO) that oversees electricity production and transmission across thirteen states and one Canadian province. MISO also operates an electronic exchange for buying and selling electricity for each of its five regional hubs. MISO oversees two types of markets. The forward market, which is referred to as the day-ahead (DA) market, allows market participants to place demand bids and supply offers on electricity to be delivered at a specified hour the following day. The equilibrium price, known as the locational marginal price (LMP), is determined by MISO after receiving sale offers and purchase bids from market participants. MISO also coordinates a spot market, which is known as the real-time (RT) market. Traders in the real-time market must submit bids and offers by thirty minutes prior to the hour for which the trade will be executed. After receiving purchase and sale offers for a given hour in the real time market, MISO then determines the LMP for that particular hour. The existence of the DA and RT markets allows producers and retailers to hedge against the large fluctuations that are common in electricity prices. Hedge ratios on the MISO exchange are estimated using various techniques. No hedge ratio technique examined consistently outperforms the unhedged portfolio in terms of variance reduction. Consequently, none of the hedge ratio methods in this study meet the general interpretation of FASB guidelines for a highly effective hedge. One of the major goals of deregulation is to bring about competition and increased efficiency in electricity markets. Previous research suggests that electricity exchanges may not be weak-form market efficient. A simple moving average trading rule is found to produce statistically and economically significant profits on the MISO exchange. This could call the long-term survivability of the MISO exchange into question.

  13. Familial autoimmunity and polyautoimmunity in 60 Brazilian Midwest patients with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Magno Coelho Horimoto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a connective tissue disease of unknown etiology, characterized by a triad of vascular injury, autoimmunity and tissue fibrosis. It is known that a positive family history is the greatest risk factor already identified for the development of SSc in a given individual. Preliminary observation of a high prevalence of polyautoimmunity and of familial autoimmunity in SSc patients support the idea that different autoimmune phenotypes may share common susceptibility variants. Objectives: To describe the frequency of familial autoimmunity and polyautoimmunity in 60 SSc patients in the Midwest region of Brazil, as well as to report the main autoimmune diseases observed in this association of comorbidities. Methods: A cross-sectional study with recruitment of 60 consecutive patients selected at the Rheumatology Department, University Hospital, Medicine School, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (FMUFMS, as well as interviews of their relatives during the period from February 2013 to March 2014. Results: A frequency of 43.3% of polyautoimmunity and of 51.7% of familial autoimmunity in SSc patients was found. Patients with the presence of polyautoimmunity and familial autoimmunity presented primarily the diffuse form of SSc, but this indicator did not reach statistical significance. The autoimmune diseases most frequently observed in polyautoimmunity patients were: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (53.8%, Sjögren's syndrome (38.5%, and inflammatory myopathy (11.5%. The main autoimmune diseases observed in SSc patients' relatives were: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (32.3%, rheumatoid arthritis (22.6%, and SLE (22.6%. The presence of more than one autoimmune disease in SSc patients did not correlate with disease severity or activity. Conclusions: From the high prevalence of coexisting autoimmune diseases found in SSc patients, we stress the importance of the concept of shared autoimmunity, in order to promote a

  14. Building a framework to explore water-human interaction for sustainable agro ecosystems in US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Ding, D.; Rapolu, U.

    2012-12-01

    Human activity is intricately linked to the quality and quantity of water resources. Although many studies have examined water-human interaction, the complexity of such coupled systems is not well understood largely because of gaps in our knowledge of water-cycle processes which are heavily influenced by socio-economic drivers. On this context, this team has investigated connections among agriculture, policy, climate, land use/land cover, and water quality in Iowa over the past couple of years. To help explore these connections the team is developing a variety of cyber infrastructure tools that facilitate the collection, analysis and visualization of data, and the simulation of system dynamics. In an ongoing effort, the prototype system is applied to Clear Creek watershed, an agricultural dominating catchment in Iowa in the US Midwest, to understand water-human processes relevant to management decisions by farmers regarding agro ecosystems. The primary aim of this research is to understand the connections that exist among the agricultural and biofuel economy, land use/land cover change, and water quality. To help explore these connections an agent-based model (ABM) of land use change has been developed that simulates the decisions made by farmers given alternative assumptions about market forces, farmer characteristics, and water quality regulations. The SWAT model was used to simulate the impact of these decisions on the movement of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus across the landscape. The paper also demonstrate how through the use of this system researchers can, for example, search for scenarios that lead to desirable socio-economic outcomes as well as preserve water quantity and quality.

  15. Breast Cancer Screening Disparity among Korean American Immigrant Women in Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Jang, Yoo Jeong; Lee, Do Kyung

    2017-10-26

    Purpose: Using three breast cancer screening methods such as mammogram, Clinical Breast Examination (CBE), and Breast Self-Examination (BSE), this study investigated breast cancer screening rates and its associated factors in Korean American immigrant women. Method: Cross-sectional data were obtained from 168 Korean immigrant women aged 40 and older in Midwest. The Andersen’s Behavioral Model (1995) theoretically guided this study and logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with screening receipt and performance. Results: Study participants reported low screening rates, specifically mammography and CBE uptake. About 71% of the women had a mammography at least once in their lifetime, while about 36% indicating receipt of a mammogram in the last three years. About 59% of the women received a CBE at least once in their lifetime, while about 32% had CBE in the past three years. About 74% of study participants have performed BSE at least once in their life time, while about 68% have done it in the past three years. Knowledge of screening method was consistently correlated with participant’s three breast cancer screening uptake. Additional factors that were positively associated with screening included older age, low barriers to mammograms, and lower educational attainment. Conclusions: Overall, study participants reported low rates of breast cancer screening receipt and performance. It is required to promote screening uptake among Korean immigrant women, especially women with young age, a lower level of education, and lack of health accessibility. A community-based language-appropriate health education program should be developed to increase health care access. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. Complex mixtures of Pesticides in Midwest U.S. streams indicated by POCIS time-integrating samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C; Alvarez, David A; Mahler, Barbara J; Nowell, Lisa; Sandstrom, Mark; Moran, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The Midwest United States is an intensely agricultural region where pesticides in streams pose risks to aquatic biota, but temporal variability in pesticide concentrations makes characterization of their exposure to organisms challenging. To compensate for the effects of temporal variability, we deployed polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) in 100 small streams across the Midwest for about 5 weeks during summer 2013 and analyzed the extracts for 227 pesticide compounds. Analysis of water samples collected weekly for pesticides during POCIS deployment allowed for comparison of POCIS results with periodic water-sampling results. The median number of pesticides detected in POCIS extracts was 62, and 141 compounds were detected at least once, indicating a high level of pesticide contamination of streams in the region. Sixty-five of the 141 compounds detected were pesticide degradates. Mean water concentrations estimated using published POCIS sampling rates strongly correlated with means of weekly water samples collected concurrently, however, the POCIS-estimated concentrations generally were lower than the measured water concentrations. Summed herbicide concentrations (units of ng/POCIS) were greater at agricultural sites than at urban sites but summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides were greater at urban sites. Consistent with these differences, summed concentrations of herbicides correlate to percent cultivated crops in the watersheds and summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides correlate to percent urban land use. With the exception of malathion concentrations at nine sites, POCIS-estimated water concentrations of pesticides were lower than aquatic-life benchmarks. The POCIS provide an alternative approach to traditional water sampling for characterizing chronic exposure to pesticides in streams across the Midwest region. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Statistical Attribution of Changes in Streamflow in the U.S. Midwest over the 20th and 21st Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, L. J.; Villarini, G.

    2016-12-01

    Streamflows have increased notably across the Midwest over the past century. These changes have largely been attributed to the influence of upward trends in heavy precipitation and agricultural increases in row crop production. However, attempts to understand the specific causes of the changes in streamflow timing, magnitude, frequency, and seasonality have led to much debate in recent years, particularly regarding the influence of changing agricultural practices. Separating the different - climatic or land use/land cover - drivers of changing streamflow from a statistical perspective is not straightforward, and different methods have been implemented in the literature. Here, we develop statistical models in 476 U.S. Midwest river basins with long-term USGS discharge records to investigate the influence of the main drivers of changing streamflows: urbanization (using basin-averaged population per square kilometer), agricultural land cover (total corn and soybean harvested acreage), basin-averaged temperature, basin-averaged precipitation, and antecedent soil moisture (using precipitation from the month preceding each season as a proxy). We model the changes in the seasonal discharge quantiles from low to high flows as a function of these drivers (separately and combined), to evaluate which set of predictors is the best in each river basin. Results indicate that precipitation is indeed the most widespread driver in regions that are neither predominantly agricultural nor heavily urbanized. Elsewhere, we find strong regional patterns in terms of the best-fitting drivers, depending on climate, agricultural land cover and urbanization. Using these models, we then examine the sensitivity of discharge to different scenarios based on potential changes in each of the predictors. The projected changes have profound implications for water resources management across the Midwest.

  18. Complex mixtures of Pesticides in Midwest U.S. streams indicated by POCIS time-integrating samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Alvarez, David; Mahler, Barbara J.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    The Midwest United States is an intensely agricultural region where pesticides in streams pose risks to aquatic biota, but temporal variability in pesticide concentrations makes characterization of their exposure to organisms challenging. To compensate for the effects of temporal variability, we deployed polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) in 100 small streams across the Midwest for about 5 weeks during summer 2013 and analyzed the extracts for 227 pesticide compounds. Analysis of water samples collected weekly for pesticides during POCIS deployment allowed for comparison of POCIS results with periodic water-sampling results. The median number of pesticides detected in POCIS extracts was 62, and 141 compounds were detected at least once, indicating a high level of pesticide contamination of streams in the region. Sixty-five of the 141 compounds detected were pesticide degradates. Mean water concentrations estimated using published POCIS sampling rates strongly correlated with means of weekly water samples collected concurrently, however, the POCIS-estimated concentrations generally were lower than the measured water concentrations. Summed herbicide concentrations (units of ng/POCIS) were greater at agricultural sites than at urban sites but summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides were greater at urban sites. Consistent with these differences, summed concentrations of herbicides correlate to percent cultivated crops in the watersheds and summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides correlate to percent urban land use. With the exception of malathion concentrations at nine sites, POCIS-estimated water concentrations of pesticides were lower than aquatic-life benchmarks. The POCIS provide an alternative approach to traditional water sampling for characterizing chronic exposure to pesticides in streams across the Midwest region.

  19. Hydrogeology of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern Midwest: B in Regional aquifer-system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.L.; Siegel, D.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system contains the most extensive and continuous aquifers in the northern Midwest of the United States. It is the source of water for many municipalities, industries, and rural water users. Since the beginning of ground-water development from the aquifer system in the late 1800's, hydraulic heads have declined hundreds of feet in the heavily pumped Chicago-Milwaukee area and somewhat less in other metropolitan areas. The U.S. Geological Survey has completed a regional assessment of this aquifer system within a 161,000-square-mile area encompassing northern Illinois, northwestern Indiana, Iowa, southeastern Minnesota, northern Missouri, and Wisconsin.

  20. Gravity changes in mid-west Greenland from GOCE gravity model and gradient data using ground and airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tscherning, Carl Christian; Herceg, Matija; Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna

    GOCE TRF (terrestrial reference frame) vertical anomalous gradients (Tzz) from two periods have been used to determine gravity anomalies changes in mid-west Greenland, where a large mass-loss has been detected using GRACE (Fig. 1). As additional data were used the GOCE DIR-3 model and ground...... gravity at the coast on solid rock, where no mass loss is expected. The methods of Least-Squares Collocation (LSC) and the Reduced Point Mass (RPM) methods have been used, however only LSC included the ground data....

  1. Projecting the long-term biogeochemical impacts of a diverse agroforestry system in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz, K. J.; DeLucia, E. H.; Paul, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    results illustrate the potential long-term biogeochemical impacts that can be generated by a land-use transition to a diverse agroforestry system in the Midwest.

  2. Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency in maize-soybean crops in the US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M. Z.; Hamilton, S. K.; Bhardwaj, A. K.; Basso, B.; Thelen, K.; Robertson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration from maize and soybean crops is an important component of terrestrial water balance in the US Midwest. In this study we examine water use in continuous maize (corn) vs. maize-soybean rotations, with cover crops planted in some years. From 2010-14, we continuously measured growing season evapotranspiration (ET) based on daily drawdown of soil moisture content using TDR (time-domain reflectometry) probes installed throughout the root zone. Treatments included continuous maize (CM), continuous maize with cover crops (CMC) and maize-soybean rotation with cover crops (MSC), all grown without irrigation in a temperate humid climate (Michigan, USA). Cover crops were planted in the autumn after harvest of the main crop and harvested in spring prior to planting of the next main crop during 2012-2013 (2013) and 2013-2014 (2014). Four study years (2010, 2011, 2013 and 2014) had normal growing season rainfall (568, 555, 445, and 472 mm) while 2012 was an extreme drought season with a growing-season rainfall deficit of ~50% (210 mm below average). Growing season ET in CM, CMC and MSC during years of normal rainfall averaged 517, 433, and 443 mm, respectively, compared to 455, 374 and 304 mm in the 2012 drought year. Cover crop ET was inconsequential to the subsequent main crops due to abundant rainfall in the spring periods; soils held as much water as they could at the transition from cover crops to main crops. Grain yield in years of normal rainfall for CM, CMC and MSC averaged 12.6, 8.4 and 7.8 Mg ha-1, respectively, compared to 4.9, 4.0, and 4.0 Mg ha-1 in the 2012 drought year. Maximum biomass in years of normal rainfall averaged 38, 30 and 21 Mg ha-1 compared to 19, 13, and 13 Mg ha-1 in the drought year. Water use efficiencies, defined as ratio of maximum standing-stock biomass to growing season evapotranspiration, were 74, 69, and 47 kg ha-1 mm-1 for CM, CMC and MSC in years of normal rainfall, while values in the drought year were 41, 34 and 46 kg ha

  3. Carbon and energy balances for cellulosic biofuel crops in U.S. Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    Cellulosic biofuels produced on lands not used for food production have the potential to avoid competition for food and associated indirect land use costs. Understanding the carbon and energy balance implications for different cellulosic production systems is important for the development of decision making tools and policies. Here we present carbon and energy balances of alternative agricultural management. We use 20 years of data from KBS LTER experiments to produce farm level CO2 and energy balances for different management practices. Our analyses include four grain and four perrenial systems in the U.S. Midwest: corn (Zea mays) - soybean (Glycine max) - wheat (Triticum aestivum) rotations managed with (1) conventional tillage, (2) no till, (3) low chemical input, and (4) biologically-based (organic) practices; (5) continuous alfalfa (Medicago sativa); (6) Poplar; and (7,8) Successionnal fields, both fertilized and unfertilized. Measurements include fluxes of N2O and CH4, soil organic carbon change, agricultural yields, and agricultural inputs (e.g. fertilization and farm fuel use). Our results indicate that management decisions such as tillage and plant types have a great influence on the net carbon and energy balances and benefits of cellulosic biofuels production. Specifically, we show that cellulosic biofuels produced from an early successional, minimally managed system have a net C sequestration (i.e., negative C balance) of -841±46 gCO2e m-2 yr-1 vs. -594±93 gCO2e m-2 yr-1 for more productive and management intensive alfalfa, and vs. 232±157 gCO2e m-2 for poplar. The reference agricultural system (a conventionally tilled corn-soybean-wheat rotation) has net sequestration of -149±33 g CO2e m-2 yr-1. Among the annual grain crops, average energy costs of farming for the different systems ranged from 4.8 GJ ha-1 for the organic system to 7.1 GJ ha-1 for the conventional; the no-till system was also low at 4.9 GJ ha-1 and the low-chemical input system

  4. Vulnerabilities of national parks in the American Midwest to climate and land use changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Esther D.; Struckhoff, Matthew A.; Shaver, David; Karstensen, Krista A.

    2016-06-08

    Many national parks in the American Midwest are surrounded by agricultural or urban areas or are in highly fragmented or rapidly changing landscapes. An environmental stressor is a physical, chemical, or biological condition that affects the functioning or productivity of species or ecosystems. Climate change is just one of many stressors on park natural resources; others include urbanization, land use change, air and water pollution, and so on. Understanding and comparing the relative vulnerability of a suite of parks to projected climate and land use changes is important for region-wide planning. A vulnerability assessment of 60 units in the 13-state U.S. National Park Service Midwestern administrative region to climate and land use change used existing data from multiple sources. Assessment included three components: individual park exposure (5 metrics), sensitivity (5 metrics), and constraints to adaptive capacity (8 metrics) under 2 future climate scenarios. The three components were combined into an overall vulnerability score. Metrics were measures of existing or projected conditions within park boundaries, within 10-kilometer buffers surrounding parks, and within ecoregions that contain or intersect them. Data were normalized within the range of values for all assessed parks, resulting in high, medium, and low relative rankings for exposure, sensitivity, constraints to adaptive capacity, and overall vulnerability. Results are consistent with assessments regarding patterns and rates of climate change nationwide but provide greater detail and relative risk for Midwestern parks. Park overall relative vulnerability did not differ between climate scenarios. Rankings for exposure, sensitivity, and constraints to adaptive capacity varied geographically and indicate regional conservation planning opportunities. The most important stressors for the most vulnerable Midwestern parks are those related to sensitivity (intrinsic characteristics of the park) and

  5. Upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    of invasive and non-invasive tumors in ureter and renal pelvis based on the enhancement measured with Hounsfield Units. PURPOSE: To examine the value of CTU using split-bolus technique to distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinomas in the upper urinary tract. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients......, but the examination is useful to diagnose a tumor in the renal pelvis and the ureter....

  6. Screening retreatment tuberculosis patients for drug resistance in mid-west Nepal: how well are we doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharu, M B; Harries, A D; Goel, S; Srivastava, S; Kumar, A M V; Adhikari, M; Shrestha, B; Maharjan, B; Khadka, H

    2014-03-21

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, defined as resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin) is poorly detected in Nepal; one reason may be poor functioning of culture and drug susceptibility testing (CDST) services for retreatment tuberculosis (TB) patients. To determine, among retreatment TB patients in mid-west Nepal, 1) the number of patients registered for treatment between July 2011 and July 2012; 2) the number submitting sputum specimens for CDST to the Central Reference Laboratory (CRL), Kathmandu, along with the results; and 3) the length of time for submission and receipt of specimens. Retrospective cohort study involving the review of treatment and laboratory registers from the Nepalgunj TB Referral Centre and the CRL. Of 431 retreatment patients, 66 (15%) submitted sputum samples, of which 63 reached the CRL. Of these, 39 (62%) were culture-positive; 13 (33%) patients had MDR-TB. The CDST results of 19 patients were received back at the TB Referral Centre. The median turnaround time from sending specimens to receipt of results at the TB Referral Centre was 119 days. Less than 10% of retreatment TB patients in mid-West Nepal had CDST results recorded, leading to the underdiagnosis of MDR-TB in the region. Urgent solutions are needed to rectify this problem.

  7. Farmers' Market Manager's Level of Communication and Influence on Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) Adoption at Midwest Farmers' Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Afroza; Smith, Sylvia

    2018-01-01

    To understand market managers' level of communication and use of technology that might influence decision to adopt Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) at farmers' markets. Cross-sectional study using the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation. Electronic survey administered in midwest states of Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Farmers' market managers in Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Information on EBT adoption, market managers' communication, and technology use. Binary logistic regression analysis with EBT adoption as the dependent variable and frequency of technology use, partnership with organizations, farmers' market association (FMA) membership, Facebook page and Web site for the market, and primary source of information as independent variables. Chi-square tests and ANOVA were used to compare states and adopter categories. Logistic regression results showed that the odds of adopting EBT was 7.5 times higher for markets that had partnership with other organizations. Compared with non-adopters, a significantly greater number of early adopters had partnership, FMA membership, and a Facebook page and Web site for market, and reported to a board of directors. Markets that had partnership, FMA membership, a Facebook page and Web site, and mandatory reporting to a board of directors were important factors that influenced EBT adoption at midwest farmers' markets. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. NU-WRF Simulations of Heavy Rain Events Over Mid-West US in the Spring 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Lau, W. K. M.; Wu, D.; Tao, W. K.

    2014-12-01

    The spring of 2011 continent US (CONUS) was an excellent case study for climate extremes. During the April-May of 2011, there were many episodes of heavy precipitation events occurred in Midwest and Ohio Valley, which contributed to the worst flood in recorded history in the lower Mississippi River. Excessive rainfall was also found over northern States especially the Northwest. At the same time, record dry condition prevailed in the southern US. Texas and New Mexico were stricken by the worst drought in recorded history. La Nino - like large-scale circulation systems persisted from the previous winter to the spring was likely the main factor for the extreme wet conditions in the north and the hot and dry conditions in the south. The study employs NU-WRF to investigate the interactions between the large-scale forcing and local processes, especially the land surface processes to the evolution of soil moisture and atmospheric boundary conditions in the pre-season Midwest US and how these conditions affect the heavy rain events in the April-May 2011. Moisture and energy budget in the sensitivity tests will be analyzed to examine the influence of large-scale forcing and land-surface processes on the timing, intensity, and spatial distribution of the precipitation events during the period.

  9. Evidence for Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides in the Upper Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Anthony A; Menger-Anderson, James; Silverstein, Celia; Potter, Bruce D; MacRae, Ian V; Hodgson, Erin W; Koch, Robert L

    2017-10-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a damaging invasive pest of soybean in the upper Midwest. Threshold-based insecticide applications are the primary control method for soybean aphid, but few insecticide groups are available (i.e., pyrethroids, organophosphates, and neonicotinoids). To quantify current levels of soybean aphid susceptibility to pyrethroids in the upper Midwest and monitor for insecticide resistance, leaf-dip bioassays were performed with λ-cyhalothrin in 2013-2015, and glass-vial bioassays were performed with λ-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin in 2015 and 2016. Soybean aphids were collected from 27 population-years in Minnesota and northern Iowa, and were compared with a susceptible laboratory colony with no known insecticide exposure since discovery of soybean aphid in North America in 2000. Field-collected aphids from some locations in leaf-dip and glass-vial bioassays had significantly lower rates of insecticide-induced mortality compared with the laboratory population, although field population susceptibility varied by year. In response to sublethal concentrations of λ-cyhalothrin, adult aphids from some locations required higher concentrations of insecticide to reduce nymph production compared with the laboratory population. The most resistant field population demonstrated 39-fold decreased mortality compared with the laboratory population. The resistance documented in this study, although relatively low for most field populations, indicates that there has been repeated selection pressure for pyrethroid resistance in some soybean aphid populations. Integrated pest management and insecticide resistance management should be practiced to slow further development of soybean aphid resistance to pyrethroids. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Uzman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There is increasing interest in sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE. Prospective randomized studies comparing sedation properties and complications of propofol and midazolam/meperidine in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE are few. Aim: To compare propofol and midazolam/meperidine sedation for UGE in terms of cardiopulmonary side effects, patient and endoscopist satisfaction and procedure-related times. Material and methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of propofol versus midazolam and meperidine in 100 patients scheduled for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The patients were divided into propofol and midazolam/meperidine groups. Randomization was generated by a computer. Cardiopulmonary side effects (hypotension, bradycardia, hypoxemia, procedure-related times (endoscopy time, awake time, time to hospital discharge, and patient and endoscopist satisfaction were compared between groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to the cost, endoscopy time, or demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Awake time and time to hospital discharge were significantly shorter in the propofol group (6.58 ±4.72 vs. 9.32 ±4.26 min, p = 0.030 and 27.60 ±7.88 vs. 32.00 ±10.54 min, p = 0.019. Hypotension incidence was significantly higher in the propofol group (12% vs. 0%, p = 0.027. The patient and endoscopist satisfaction was better with propofol. Conclusions : Propofol may be preferred to midazolam/meperidine sedation, with a shorter awake and hospital discharge time and better patient and endoscopist satisfaction. However, hypotension risk should be considered with propofol, and careful evaluation is needed, particularly in cardiopulmonary disorders.

  11. Risk factors and prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis A virus (HAV in children from day-care centers, in Goiania, Brazil Fatores de risco e prevalência de anticorpos contra o vírus da hepatite A (VHA em crianças de creche em Goiânia, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.O. Queiróz

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available A seroepidemiologic survey about hepatitis A virus (HAV infection was carried out in a group comprising 310 children, ranging in age from 3 months to 9 years, from day-care centers, in Goiania, a middle sized city in the central region of Brazil. The biomarkers employed in the investigation of previous infection include total IgG and IgM anti-HAV antibodies, and for the detection of more recent infection, IgM anti-HAV antibodies were analyzed. The study was performed in 1991 and 1992. According to the results, 69.7% of the children presented total IgG/IgM anti-HAV antibodies, with 60% of the group in the age range of 1 to 3 years. Among 10 day-care centers analyzed, the prevalence of the biomarker IgM anti-HAV was 3.2%, with an uniform distribution of the cases in the group of children ranging in age from 1 to 4 years. Multi-variate analysis was performed to investigate the sociodemographic factors that could influence the results. It was verified that the risk for the infection increased with the length of the attendance in the day-care centers, i.e., the risk for children with attendance of one year or more was 4.7 times higher, when compared with children with one month attendance (CI 95% 2.3-9.9. According to the results, hepatitis A is an endemic infection in day-care centers in the study area. The length of attendance in the day-care settings was demonstrated to be a risk factor for the HAV infection. Such findings suggest that if hepatits A vaccination becomes available as a routine policy in our region, the target group should be children under one year. Moreover, those children should receive the vaccine before they start to attend the day-care centers.Um estudo soroepidemiológico para o vírus da hepatite A (VHA, investigando os marcadores de infecção passada (anti-VHA total - IgG e IgM e infecção recente (anti-VHA IgM, foi realizado entre 1991 e 1992, em crianças de creche de Goiânia-Brasil central. Das 310 crianças com idade

  12. Legacies and Upstarts in Ecological Restoration: A Summary of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Midwest-Great Lakes SER Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Second Annual Chapter Meeting of the Midwest-Great Lakes SER Chapter was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum on Friday April 9 and Saturday April 10, 2010. Our meeting theme was an exploration of how the past, the present, and the future influence ecological restoration in the...

  13. Exploring the Comprehensive Internationalization Process of a U.S. Higher Education Institution: A Case Study of an Urban Research University in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Ling Gao

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the internationalization process of an urban research university in the Midwest in order to understand how the process approach of internationalization (De Wit, 2002) frames the university's international planning and activities and makes an impact on their effectiveness. De Wit's (2002) internationalization circle was employed…

  14. PREDICTING THE OCCURRENCE OF NUTRIENTS AND PESTICIDES DURING BASE FLOW IN STREAMS: STATUS OF MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN AND MIDWEST CORN BELT STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Random surveys of 174 headwater streams of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (MACP) and 110 third-order streams in the Midwest Corn Belt (MCB) were conducted in 2000 and 2004, respectively in two cooperative research studies by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Geolo...

  15. Coupled Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Injection in Mt. Simon Sandstone Formation, Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Lu, P.; Zhu, C.; Xiao, Y.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 sequestration in deep geological formations is one of the promising options for CO2 emission reduction. While several large scale CO2 injections in saline aquifers have shown to be successful for the short-term, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding on key issues such as CO2 storage capacity, injectivity, and security over multiple spatial and temporal scales that need to be addressed. To advance these understandings, we applied multi-phase coupled reactive mass transport modeling to investigate the fate of injected CO2 and reservoir responses to the injection into Mt. Simon Formation. We developed both 1-D and 2-D reactive transport models in a radial region of 10,000 m surrounding a CO2 injection well to represent the Mt. Simon sandstone formation, which is a major regional deep saline reservoir in the Midwest, USA. Supercritical CO2 is injected into the formation for 100 years, and the modeling continues till 10,000 years to monitor both short-term and long-term behavior of injected CO2 and the associated rock-fluid interactions. CO2 co-injection with H2S and SO2 is also simulated to represent the flue gases from coal gasification and combustion in the Illinois Basin. The injection of CO2 results in acidified zones (pH ~3 and 5) adjacent to the wellbore, causing progressive water-rock interactions in the surrounding region. In accordance with the extensive dissolution of authigenic K-feldspar, sequential precipitations of secondary carbonates and clay minerals are predicted in this zone. The vertical profiles of CO2 show fingering pattern from the top of the reservoir to the bottom due to the density variation of CO2-impregnated brine, which facilitate convection induced mixing and solubility trapping. Most of the injected CO2 remains within a radial distance of 2500 m at the end of 10,000 years and is sequestered and immobilized by solubility and residual trapping. Mineral trapping via secondary carbonates, including calcite, magnesite

  16. Geospatial database of the study boundary, sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Naomi; Qi, Sharon L.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Button, Daniel T.; Baker, Nancy T.; Burley, Thomas E.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental geospatial data was required to develop physical and anthropogenic characteristics of the study region, sampled sites and corresponding watersheds, and riparian zones. This dataset is composed of the four fundamental geospatial data layers that were developed for the Midwest study: 1) study boundary, 2) sampled sites, 3) watershed boundaries, and 4) riparian-zone boundaries.References cited:Nakagaki, N., Qi, S.L., and Baker, N.T., 2016, Selected environmental characteristics of sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment: U.S. Geological Survey data release, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F77W699S.U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, The Midwest stream quality assessment: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2012-3124, 2 p.

  17. 6th Annual Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, January 18-20, 2013, Urbana, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, Kevin T. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    2016-04-28

    This document is the program for the 6th Annual Midwest Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics, which was held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on January 18-20, 2013. The goals of the conference were to foster a culture in which undergraduate women are encouraged and supported to pursue, and also to succeed in, higher education in physics; to provide career information to students in physics and related fields; to give women the resources, motivation, and confidence to apply to graduate school and successfully complete a Ph.D. program in Physics; to provide information and dispel misconceptions about the application process for graduate school and the diverse employment opportunities in physics and related fields, enabling women to make more informed decisions about their goals and attain them; and to connect female physics students with successful female physicists to whom they can relate and who can act as inspirational role models and mentors.

  18. Analysis of brokerage feasibility for unit coal train shipments to the Midwest. [Unit train shipment and local distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, R.; Vezeris, S.; Wilkie, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of aggregating industry and utility demand for coal and serving the demand through a local brokerage operation to reduce transportation cost. This cost saving is associated with the economy of scale of unit train shipments. The delivered price of western coal is calculated for local users in a given midwest subregion based on present utility and industrial coal demand. The broker operation would consist of unit train hauls from western mines, a receiving and storage terminal, local truck or rail transportation from the terminal to each user, and possible transshipment to distant waterfront users. The research focuses on the Green Bay, Wisconsin area. Applicability of this brokerage concept to other areas receiving western coal shipments is also discussed.

  19. The greenhouse gas intensity and potential biofuel production capacity of maize stover harvest in the US Midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Curtis D. [Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Zhang, Xuesong [Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and University of Maryland, College Park MD 20740 USA; Reddy, Ashwan D. [Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Robertson, G. Philip [Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 USA; W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University, Hickory Corners MI 49060 USA; Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 USA; Izaurralde, Roberto César [Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Texas A& M AgriLife Research & Extension Center, Temple TX 76502 USA

    2017-08-11

    Agricultural residues are important sources of feedstock for a cellulosic biofuels industry that is being developed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve energy independence. While the US Midwest has been recognized as key to providing maize stover for meeting near-term cellulosic biofuel production goals, there is uncertainty that such feedstocks can produce biofuels that meet federal cellulosic standards. Here, we conducted extensive site-level calibration of the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) terrestrial ecosystems model and applied the model at high spatial resolution across the US Midwest to improve estimates of the maximum production potential and greenhouse gas emissions expected from continuous maize residue-derived biofuels. A comparison of methodologies for calculating the soil carbon impacts of residue harvesting demonstrates the large impact of study duration, depth of soil considered, and inclusion of litter carbon in soil carbon change calculations on the estimated greenhouse gas intensity of maize stover-derived biofuels. Using the most representative methodology for assessing long-term residue harvesting impacts, we estimate that only 5.3 billion liters per year (bly) of ethanol, or 8.7% of the near-term US cellulosic biofuel demand, could be met under common no-till farming practices. However, appreciably more feedstock becomes available at modestly higher emissions levels, with potential for 89.0 bly of ethanol production meeting US advanced biofuel standards. Adjustments to management practices, such as adding cover crops to no-till management, will be required to produce sufficient quantities of residue meeting the greenhouse gas emission reduction standard for cellulosic biofuels. Considering the rapid increase in residue availability with modest relaxations in GHG reduction level, it is expected that management practices with modest benefits to soil carbon would allow considerable expansion of potential cellulosic

  20. Annual maximum daily rainfall trends in the Midwest, southeast and southern Brazil in the last 71 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ruy Porto de Carvalho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to model, based on the overall distribution of extreme values, the probability of occurrence of a particular level of annual maximum daily rainfall in three Brazilian regions (Midwest, Southeast and South and study their behavior over the past 71 years. The parameters of the general distribution of extreme values were estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The Mann–Kendall test showed that there is a positive trend in the annual maximum daily rainfall data series. The non-stationarity was rejected by the augmented Dickey–Fuller test supporting the use of the density function of extreme value distribution to describe the values of the occurrence of annual maximum daily rainfall. The Kolmogorov–Smirnov/Lilliefors goodness-of-fit test showed the good fit of the studied variable to the probability distribution function. The Midwest region has a return period of more frequent annual maximum daily rainfall below 300 mm in comparison with other regions. There is a clear change in the behavior of this extreme event in the Southern region. According to the literature, in past decades annual maximum daily rainfall of 248 mm has been estimated for a return period of 100 years for the state of Santa Catarina-South region, while the results found with the current series, annual maximum daily rainfall of 250 mm was estimated for a return period of 10 years. Extreme annual maximum daily rainfalls for return periods smaller were also found in other regions.

  1. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding - Upper GI bleeding is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding - Upper GI bleeding is the most common complication of peptic ulceration and portal hypertension. SR Thomson. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  2. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, J M; Badia, J R

    1999-03-01

    This article reviews the clinical picture, diagnosis and management of the upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). Presently, there is not enough data on key points like the frequency of UARS and the morbidity associated with this condition. Furthermore, the existence of LIARS as an independent sleep disorder and its relation with snoring and obstructive events is in debate. The diagnosis of UARS is still a controversial issue. The technical limitations of the classic approach to monitor airflow with thermistors and inductance plethysmography, as well as the lack of a precise definition of hypopnea, may have led to a misinterpretation of UARS as an independent diagnosis from the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be missed using a conventional polysomnographic setting unless appropriate techniques are applied. The use of an esophageal balloon to monitor inspiratory effort is currently the gold standard. However, other sensitive methods such as the use of a pneumotachograph and, more recently, nasal cannula/pressure transducer systems or on-line monitoring of respiratory impedance with the forced oscillation technique may provide other interesting possibilities. Recognition and characterization of this subgroup of patients within sleep breathing disorders is important because they are symptomatic and may benefit from treatment. Management options to treat UARS comprise all those currently available for sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). However, the subset of patients classically identified as LIARS that exhibit skeletal craneo-facial abnormalities might possibly obtain further benefit from maxillofacial surgery.

  3. Upper jaw in human cyclopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, P

    1989-01-01

    In human cyclopia the upper jaw forms a solid bony mass between the median orbit and the oral cavity. The skeletal elements forming the upper jaw have been studied in serial sections through the median third of the head in 3 perinatal human specimens presenting with a median orbit and proboscis. One head was sectioned in the sagittal plane and 2 in the coronal plane. The upper jaw has also been studied in a dried cyclops skull and in a desiccated cyclops head in which the roof of the orbit had been removed. The data obtained demonstrate the particular contributions made by the lacrimal bones, the maxillae and the palatine bones to the upper jaw in human cyclopia. The effects of the absence of the frontonasal process contribution and of the absence of the nasal cavity on the upper jaw in cyclopia are considered.

  4. FY2015 VHA Enrollees by County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the number of Veteran enrollees by state/county for fiscal year 2015....

  5. Cow- and herd-level risk factors for on-farm mortality in Midwest US dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, M Q; Reneau, J K; Chester-Jones, H; Chebel, R C; Endres, M I

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe on-farm mortality and to investigate cow- and herd-level risk factors associated with on-farm mortality in Midwest US dairy herds using lactation survival analysis. We analyzed a total of approximately 5.9 million DHIA lactation records from 10 Midwest US states from January 2006 to December 2010. The cow-level independent variables used in the models were first test-day milk yield, milk fat percent, milk protein percent, fat-to-protein ratio, milk urea nitrogen, somatic cell score, previous dry period, previous calving interval, stillbirth, calf sex, twinning, calving difficulty, season of calving, parity, and breed. The herd-level variables included herd size, calving interval, somatic cell score, 305-d mature-equivalent milk yield, and herd stillbirth percentage. Descriptive analysis showed that overall cow-level mortality rate was 6.4 per 100 cow-years and it increased from 5.9 in 2006 to 6.8 in 2010. Mortality was the primary reason of leaving the herd (19.4% of total culls) followed by reproduction (14.6%), injuries and other (14.0%), low production (12.3%), and mastitis (10.5%). Risk factor analysis showed that increased hazard for mortality was associated with higher fat-to-protein ratio (>1.6 vs. 1 to 1.6), higher milk fat percent, lower milk protein percent, cows with male calves, cows carrying multiple calves, higher milk urea nitrogen, increasing parity, longer previous calving interval, higher first test-day somatic cell score, increased calving difficulty score, and breed (Holstein vs. others). Decreased hazard for mortality was associated with higher first test-day milk yield, higher milk protein, and shorter dry period. For herd-level factors, increased hazard for mortality was associated with increased herd size, increased percentage of stillbirths, higher somatic cell score, and increased herd calving interval. Cows in herds with higher milk yield had lower mortality hazard. Results of the study

  6. Automated lidar-derived canopy height estimates for the Upper Mississippi River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, Enrika

    2015-01-01

    Land cover/land use (LCU) classifications serve as important decision support products for researchers and land managers. The LCU classifications produced by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) include canopy height estimates that are assigned through manual aerial photography interpretation techniques. In an effort to improve upon these techniques, this project investigated the use of high-density lidar data for the Upper Mississippi River System to determine canopy height. An ArcGIS tool was developed to automatically derive height modifier information based on the extent of land cover features for forest classes. The measurement of canopy height included a calculation of the average height from lidar point cloud data as well as the inclusion of a local maximum filter to identify individual tree canopies. Results were compared to original manually interpreted height modifiers and to field survey data from U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots. This project demonstrated the effectiveness of utilizing lidar data to more efficiently assign height modifier attributes to LCU classifications produced by the UMESC.

  7. Agro-hydrologic Landscapes in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E.; Wolter, Calvin F.; McLellan, Eileen

    2015-03-01

    A critical part of increasing conservation effectiveness is targeting the "right practice" to the "right place" where it can intercept pollutant flowpaths. Conceptually, these flowpaths can be inferred from soil and slope characteristics, and in this study, we developed an agro-hydrologic classification to identify N and P loss pathways and priority conservation practices in small watersheds in the U.S. Midwest. We developed a GIS framework to classify 11,010 small watersheds in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River basins based on soil permeability and slope characteristics of agricultural cropland areas in each watershed. The amount of cropland in any given watershed varied from 60 %. Cropland areas were classified into five main categories, with slope classes of 5 %, and soil drainage classes of poorly and well drained. Watersheds in the Upper Mississippi River basin (UMRB) were dominated by cropland areas in low slopes and poorly drained soils, whereas less-intensively cropped watersheds in Wisconsin and Minnesota (in the UMRB) and throughout the Ohio River basin were overwhelmingly well drained. Hydrologic differences in cropped systems indicate that a one-size-fits-all approach to conservation selection will not work. Consulting the classification scheme proposed herein may be an appropriate first-step in identifying those conservation practices that might be most appropriate for small watersheds in the basin.

  8. Agro-hydrologic landscapes in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; McLellan, Eileen

    2015-03-01

    A critical part of increasing conservation effectiveness is targeting the "right practice" to the "right place" where it can intercept pollutant flowpaths. Conceptually, these flowpaths can be inferred from soil and slope characteristics, and in this study, we developed an agro-hydrologic classification to identify N and P loss pathways and priority conservation practices in small watersheds in the U.S. Midwest. We developed a GIS framework to classify 11,010 small watersheds in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River basins based on soil permeability and slope characteristics of agricultural cropland areas in each watershed. The amount of cropland in any given watershed varied from 60 %. Cropland areas were classified into five main categories, with slope classes of 5 %, and soil drainage classes of poorly and well drained. Watersheds in the Upper Mississippi River basin (UMRB) were dominated by cropland areas in low slopes and poorly drained soils, whereas less-intensively cropped watersheds in Wisconsin and Minnesota (in the UMRB) and throughout the Ohio River basin were overwhelmingly well drained. Hydrologic differences in cropped systems indicate that a one-size-fits-all approach to conservation selection will not work. Consulting the classification scheme proposed herein may be an appropriate first-step in identifying those conservation practices that might be most appropriate for small watersheds in the basin.

  9. DNA barcoding for conservation, seed banking and ecological restoration of Acacia in the Midwest of Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevill, Paul G; Wallace, Mark J; Miller, Joseph T; Krauss, Siegfried L

    2013-11-01

    We used DNA barcoding to address an important conservation issue in the Midwest of Western Australia, working on Australia's largest genus of flowering plant. We tested whether or not currently recommended plant DNA barcoding regions (matK and rbcL) were able to discriminate Acacia taxa of varying phylogenetic distances, and ultimately identify an ambiguously labelled seed collection from a mine-site restoration project. Although matK successfully identified the unknown seed as the rare and conservation priority listed A. karina, and was able to resolve six of the eleven study species, this region was difficult to amplify and sequence. In contrast, rbcL was straightforward to recover and align, but could not determine the origin of the seed and only resolved 3 of the 11 species. Other chloroplast regions (rpl32-trnL, psbA-trnH, trnL-F and trnK) had mixed success resolving the studied taxa. In general, species were better resolved in multilocus data sets compared to single-locus data sets. We recommend using the formal barcoding regions supplemented with data from other plastid regions, particularly rpl32-trnL, for barcoding in Acacia. Our study demonstrates the novel use of DNA barcoding for seed identification and illustrates the practical potential of DNA barcoding for the growing discipline of restoration ecology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Development and Implementation of the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium CO2-Technology Transfer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Sallie E. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-06-30

    In 2009, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), in collaboration with the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), created a regional technology training center to disseminate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology gained through leadership and participation in regional carbon sequestration projects. This technology training center was titled and branded as the Sequestration Training and Education Program (STEP). Over the last six years STEP has provided local, regional, national, and international education and training opportunities for engineers, geologists, service providers, regulators, executives, K-12 students, K-12 educators, undergraduate students, graduate students, university and community college faculty members, and participants of community programs and functions, community organizations, and others. The goal for STEP educational programs has been on knowledge sharing and capacity building to stimulate economic recovery and development by training personnel for commercial CCS projects. STEP has worked with local, national and international professional organizations and regional experts to leverage existing training opportunities and provide stand-alone training. This report gives detailed information on STEP activities during the grant period (2009-2015).

  11. Correlation of preadmission organic chemistry courses and academic performance in biochemistry at a midwest chiropractic doctoral program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Marc P

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p organic chemistry 2 (p organic chemistry can be used as an indicator of future academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry.

  12. An Overview of Interdisciplinary Research at Notre Dame Addressing "Grand Challenges" in the Midwest and Great Lakes Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, A. F.; Bolster, D.; Tank, J. L.; Hellmann, J.; Christopher, S. F.; Sharma, A.; Chiu, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Midwest and Great Lakes region face a number of "Grand Challenges" associated with climate, land use, agriculture, and water resources infrastructure. These include sustainability of agricultural systems and related impacts to food security and the regional economy; sustainability of Great Lakes water levels; changing storm statistics and impacts to stormwater management and flooding; water quality in rivers and downstream receiving water bodies related to non-point source pollution on agricultural lands and combined sewer overflows in urban areas; urban impacts related to aging infrastructure and climate change, and ecosystem management and restoration. In the context of water management, groundwater resources are poorly understood in comparison with surface water resources, and regional-scale simulation models are needed to address questions of sustainability both in terms of supply and water quality. Interdisciplinary research at the University of Notre Dame is attempting to address these research challenges via 1) integrated macro-scale groundwater and surface water modeling to address issues related to sustainable water supply, ecosystem restoration, and agricultural impacts; 2) development of high-resolution regional climate models dynamically coupled to the Great Lakes to address urban impacts, changing storm statistics and to quantify precipitation and evaporation over the Great Lakes; 3) and integrated macro-scale hydrology and water quality modeling to assess the large-scale performance of innovative land management BMPs on agricultural land (such as the two-stage ditch, cover crops, and dynamic drainage control) intended to improve water quality.

  13. Geospatial assessment of bioenergy land use and its impacts on soil erosion in the U.S. Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SooHoo, William M; Wang, Cuizhen; Li, Huixuan

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural land use change, especially corn expansion since 2000s, has been accelerating to meet the growing bioenergy demand of the United States. This study identifies the environmentally sensitive lands (ESLs) in the U.S. Midwest using the distance-weighted Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) associated with bioenergy land uses extracted from USDA Cropland Data Layers. The impacts of soil erosion to downstream wetlands and waterbodies in the river basin are counted in the RUSLE with an inverse distance weighting approach. In a GIS-ranking model, the ESLs in 2008 and 2011 (two representative years of corn expansion) are ranked based on their soil erosion severity in crop fields. Under scenarios of bioenergy land use change (corn to grass and grass to corn) on two land types (ESLs and non-ESLs) at three magnitudes (5%, 10% and 15% change), this study assesses the potential environmental impacts of bioenergy land use at a basin level. The ESL distributions and projected trends vary geographically responding to different agricultural conversions. Results support the idea of re-planting native prairie grasses in the identified High and Severe rank ESLs for sustainable bioenergy management in this important agricultural region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oncoplastic Surgery for Upper/Upper Inner Quadrant Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lin

    Full Text Available Tumors located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast warrant more attention. A small lesion relative to the size of breast in this location may be resolved by performing a level I oncoplastic technique. However, a wide excision may significantly reduce the overall quality of the breast shape by distorting the visible breast line. From June 2012 to April 2015, 36 patients with breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant underwent breast-conservation surgery with matrix rotation mammoplasty. According to the size and location of the tumor relative to the nipple-areola complex, 11 patients underwent matrix rotation with periareolar de-epithelialization (donut group and the other 25 underwent matrix rotation only (non-donut group. The cosmetic results were self-assessed by questionnaires. The average weights of the excised breast lumps in the donut and non-donut groups were 104.1 and 84.5 g, respectively. During the 3-year follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in one case and was managed with nipple-sparing mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction with prosthetic implants. In total, 31 patients (88.6% ranked their postoperative result as either acceptable or satisfactory. The treated breasts were also self-evaluated by 27 patients (77.1% to be nearly identical to or just slightly different from the untreated side. Matrix rotation is an easy breast-preserving technique for treating breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast that requires a relatively wide excision. With this technique, a larger breast tumor could be removed without compromising the breast appearance.

  15. Thunderstorms and upper troposphere chemistry during the early stages of the 2006 North American Monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Barth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To study the meteorology and chemistry that is associated with the early stages of the North American Monsoon, the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem is applied for the first time at high resolution (4 km grid spacing, allowing for explicit representation of convection over a large region (continental US and northern Mexico for a multi-week (15 July to 7 August 2006 integration. Evaluation of model results shows that WRF-Chem reasonably represents the large-scale meteorology and strong convective storms, but tends to overestimate weak convection. In the upper troposphere, the WRF-Chem model predicts ozone (O3 and carbon monoxide (CO to within 10–20% of aircraft and sonde measurements. Comparison of UT O3 and CO frequency distributions between WRF-Chem and satellite data indicates that WRF-Chem is lofting CO too frequently from the boundary layer (BL. This excessive lofting should also cause biases in the WRF-Chem ozone frequency distribution; however it agrees well with satellite data suggesting that either the chemical production of O3 in the model is overpredicted or there is too much stratosphere to troposphere transport in the model. Analysis of different geographic regions (West Coast, Rocky Mountains, Central Plains, Midwest, and Gulf Coast reveals that much of the convective transport occurs in the Rocky Mountains, while much of the UT ozone chemical production occurs over the Gulf Coast and Midwest regions where both CO and volatile organic compounds (VOCs are abundant in the upper troposphere and promote the production of peroxy radicals. In all regions most of the ozone chemical production occurs within 24 h of the air being lofted from the boundary layer. In addition, analysis of the anticyclone and adjacent air indicates that ozone mixing ratios within the anticyclone region associated with the North American Monsoon and just outside the anticyclone are similar

  16. Development Of Sustainable Biobased Products And Bioenergy In Cooperation With The Midwest Consortium For Sustainable Biobased Products And Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Ladisch; Randy Woodson

    2009-03-18

    Collaborative efforts of Midwest Consortium have been put forth to add value to distiller's grains by further processing them into fermentable sugars, ethanol, and a protein rich co-product consistent with a pathway to a biorenewables industry (Schell et al, 2008). These studies were recently published in the enclosed special edition (Volume 99, Issue 12) of Bioresource Technology journal. Part of them have demonstrated the utilization of distillers grains as additional feedstock for increased ethanol production in the current dry grind process (Kim et al., 2008a, b; Dien et al.,2008, Ladisch et al., 2008a, b). Results showed that both liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were effective for enhancing digestibility of distiller's grains. Enzymatic digestion of distiller's grains resulted in more than 90% glucose yield under standard assay conditions, although the yield tends to drop as the concentration of dry solids increases. Simulated process mass balances estimated that hydrolysis and fermentation of distillers grains can increase the ethanol yield by 14% in the current dry milling process (Kim et al., 2008c). Resulting co-products from the modified process are richer in protein and oil contents than conventional distiller's grains, as determined both experimentally and computationally. Other research topics in the special edition include water solubilization of DDGS by transesterification reaction with phosphite esters (Oshel el al., 2008) to improve reactivity of the DDGS to enzymes, hydrolysis of soluble oligomers derived from DDGS using functionalized mesoporous solid catalysts (Bootsma et al., 2008), and ABE (acetone, butanol, ethanol) production from DDGS by solventogenic Clostridia (Ezeji and Blaschek, 2008). Economic analysis of a modified dry milling process, where the fiber and residual starch is extracted and fermented to produce more ethanol from the distillers grains while producing highly

  17. Correlation of Preadmission Organic Chemistry Courses and Academic Performance in Biochemistry at a Midwest Chiropractic Doctoral Program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Marc P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Methods: Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. Results: For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p organic chemistry 2 (p organic chemistry can be used as an indicator of future academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry PMID:20480012

  18. Expanding Local Cancer Clinical Trial Options: Analysis of the Economic Impact of the Midwest Cancer Alliance in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, J Atlee; Gurley-Calvez, Tami; Krebill, Hope; Lai, Sue Min; Christiadi; Doolittle, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Patients benefit from receiving cancer treatment closer to home when possible and at high-volume regional centers when specialized care is required. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the economic impact of retaining more patients in-state for cancer clinical trials and care, which might offset some of the costs of establishing broader cancer trial and treatment networks. Kansas Cancer Registry data were used to estimate the number of patients retained in-state for cancer care following the expansion of local cancer clinical trial options through the Midwest Cancer Alliance based at the University of Kansas Medical Center. The 2014 economic impact of this enhanced local clinical trial network was estimated in four parts: Medical spending was estimated on the basis of National Cancer Institute cost-of-care estimates. Household travel cost savings were estimated as the difference between in-state and out-of-state travel costs. Trial-related grant income was calculated from administrative records. Indirect and induced economic benefits to the state were estimated using an economic impact model. The authors estimated that the enhanced local cancer clinical trial network resulted in approximately $6.9 million in additional economic activity in the state in 2014, or $362,000 per patient retained in-state. This estimate includes $3.6 million in direct spending and $3.3 million in indirect economic activity. The enhanced trial network also resulted in 45 additional jobs. Retaining patients in-state for cancer care and clinical trial participation allows patients to remain closer to home for care and enhances the state economy.

  19. Naturally occurring Influenza A virus subtype H1N2 infection in a Midwest United States mink (Mustela vison) ranch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Schwartz, Kent; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Jianqiang; Hildebrandt, Hugh

    2012-03-01

    Influenza A virus (FLUAV) causes acute respiratory disease in humans and a variety of animal species. The virus tends to remain within the species of origin; nonetheless, naturally occurring cross-species transmission of FLUAV has been periodically documented. Multiple cross-species transmissions of FLUAV have been reported from companion animals and captive wild animals, neither of which is historically considered as natural hosts of FLUAV. In the fall of 2010, mink (Mustela vison) inhabiting a 15,000-head mink farm in the Midwest United States experienced persistent severe respiratory distress and nose and/or mouth bleeding. Mink losses averaged approximately 10 animals per day. Six dead mink at 6 months of age were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for diagnostic investigation. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed that all 6 mink had hemorrhagic bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Hemolytic Escherichia coli was isolated from lungs, probably accounting for hemorrhagic pneumonia. All animals tested negative for Canine distemper virus and Aleutian mink disease virus. Interestingly, FLUAV of H1N2 subtype, which contained the matrix gene of swine lineage, was detected in the lungs. Serological follow-up on mink that remained in the ranch until pelting also confirmed that the ranch had been exposed to FLUAV of H1 subtype (δ clade). The case study suggests that FLUAV should be included in the differential diagnosis when mink experience epidemics of respiratory disease. Since the source of FLUAV appeared to be uncooked turkey meat, feeding animals fully cooked ration should be considered as a preventive measure.

  20. A Use Case for implementing Earth observation (EO) to avoid regional groundwater contamination in the Midwest US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Pearlman, J.

    2016-12-01

    A use case to implement Landsat data for application in decisions in the agricultural sector is being developed. Stakeholders are at both the farm level and regional level. Decisions by individual farmers and communities about the intensity of use of agrochemicals on crops can affect the future quality of the groundwater in Iowa. An initial case study was completed to examine some of the technical perspectives of adapting and coupling satellite imagery and in situ water quality measurements to forecast changes in groundwater quality. This analysis was conducted to identify the benefits of EO to assist in specific decisions to improve agricultural land management and regulation of groundwater contamination. Results demonstrated that Landsat information facilitates spatiotemporal analysis of the impact of nitrates on groundwater resources. Value is dependent on whether additional information reduces the variance (uncertainty) in outcomes. The use case ultimately involves scientific experts, farmers and their representatives, and the Government. Decisions involve some level of uncertainty in scientific measurement and statistical variability affects its informational value. These issues are concerns with implementing remote sensing technology and must be examined with end users and their impact discussed and understood. Thus, the study team held meetings with subject experts from Iowa State University and the Iowa Farm Bureau to explore the next steps in developing the use case. Discussion with the subject experts focused on more detail to capture new agricultural science advances and engineering options that could be linked in a multi-scale approach. A second meeting between the study and the Iowa Farm Bureau centered on the need for efficient regulation of land use and regulation of agrochemical application in the Midwest. The impacts of these discussions and other user inputs on the directions of the use case will be presented.

  1. Bayesian versus frequentist upper limits

    CERN Document Server

    Rover, Christian; Prix, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    While gravitational waves have not yet been measured directly, data analysis from detection experiments commonly includes an upper limit statement. Such upper limits may be derived via a frequentist or Bayesian approach; the theoretical implications are very different, and on the technical side, one notable difference is that one case requires maximization of the likelihood function over parameter space, while the other requires integration. Using a simple example (detection of a sinusoidal signal in white Gaussian noise), we investigate the differences in performance and interpretation, and the effect of the "trials factor", or "look-elsewhere effect".

  2. Tracing suspended sediment sources in the Upper Sangamon River Basin using fingerprinting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Neal, C.; Anders, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    As the awareness of water pollution, eutrophication and other water related environmental concerns grows, the significance of sediment in the transport of nutrients and contaminants from agricultural areas to streams has received increasing attention. Both the physical and geochemical properties of suspended sediment are strongly controlled by sediment sources. Thus, tracing sources of suspended sediment in watersheds is important for the design of management practices to reduce sediment loads and contributions of sediment-adsorbed nutrients from agricultural areas to streams. However, the contributions of different sediment sources to suspended sediment loads within intensively managed watersheds in the Midwest still remain insufficiently explored. This study aims to assess the provenance of suspended sediment and the relation between channel morphology and production of suspended sediment in the Upper Sangamon River Basin, Illinois. The 3,690-km2 Upper Sangamon River Basin is characterized by low-relief, agricultural lands dominated by row-crop agriculture. Sediment source samples were collected in the Saybrook and Wildcat Slough sub-watersheds from six potential sources: row-crop agriculture, forest, floodplains, river banks, pastures, and grasslands. Event-based suspended sediment samples were collected by in situ suspended sediment samplers and ISCO automatic pump samplers from the streams. A quantitative geochemical fingerprinting technique, combining statistically verified multicomponent signatures and an unmixing model, was employed to estimate the relative contributions of sediment from six potential sources to the suspended sediment loads. Our preliminary results indicate that the majority of suspended sediment is derived from channel banks and forest adjacent to meandering reaches in the downstream portions of the watersheds, while only minor amounts of suspended sediment are derived from upland areas adjacent to channelized rivers in the low

  3. Diagnostic indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aim: Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy now assumes a prominent role in the diagnosis and therapy of upper GI diseases. Some indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy include dyspepsia, dysphagia, peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study aimed to review the ...

  4. Summary of ground-water hydrology of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern Midwest, United States: A in Regional aquifer system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system contains very productive aquifers throughout an area of about 161,000 square miles in the northern Midwest. The aquifer system is used extensively for industrial and rural water supplies and is the primary source of water for many municipalities in most of its area of occurrence, except in Indiana, central and southern Illinois, and western Iowa, where the aquifer system contains saline water. About 680 million gallons per day was withdrawn from drilled wells in the aquifer system in 1980.

  5. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ese clinical factors, age over 60, and shock on admission are highly predictive.[7] Concurrent medical therapy is particularly important as NSAIDs and anticoagulants, which are commonly prescribed in the elderly, have a direct deleterious effect on coagulation. e. Table 1. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding-related ...

  6. Modelling spatial and temporal variations in the water quality of an artificial water reservoir in the semiarid Midwest of Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid, Fabricio D., E-mail: fabricio.cid@gmail.com [Laboratory of Biology ' Prof. E. Caviedes Codelia' , Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Laboratory of Integrative Biology, Institute for Multidisciplinary Research in Biology (IMIBIO-SL), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, San Luis (Argentina); Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Anton, Rosa I. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Pardo, Rafael; Vega, Marisol [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique [Laboratory of Biology ' Prof. E. Caviedes Codelia' , Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Laboratory of Integrative Biology, Institute for Multidisciplinary Research in Biology (IMIBIO-SL), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, San Luis (Argentina); Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: {yields} Water quality of an Argentinean reservoir has been investigated by N-way PCA. {yields} PARAFAC mode modelled spatial and seasonal variations of water composition. {yields} Two factors related with organic and lead pollution have been identified. {yields} The most polluted areas of the reservoir were located, and polluting sources identified. - Abstract: Temporal and spatial patterns of water quality of an important artificial water reservoir located in the semiarid Midwest of Argentina were investigated using chemometric techniques. Surface water samples were collected at 38 points of the water reservoir during eleven sampling campaigns between October 1998 and June 2000, covering the warm wet season and the cold dry season, and analyzed for dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity, pH, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, total dissolved solids (TDS), alkalinity, hardness, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, fluoride, sodium, potassium, iron, aluminum, silica, phosphate, sulfide, arsenic, chromium, lead, cadmium, chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), viable aerobic bacteria (VAB) and total coliform bacteria (TC). Concentrations of lead, ammonium, nitrite and coliforms were higher than the maximum allowable limits for drinking water in a large proportion of the water samples. To obtain a general representation of the spatial and temporal trends of the water quality parameters at the reservoir, the three-dimensional dataset (sampling sites x parameters x sampling campaigns) has been analyzed by matrix augmentation principal component analysis (MA-PCA) and N-way principal component analysis (N-PCA) using Tucker3 and PARAFAC (Parallel Factor Analysis) models. MA-PCA produced a component accounting for the general behavior of parameters associated with organic pollution. The Tucker3 models were not appropriate for modelling the water quality dataset. The two-factor PARAFAC model provided the best picture to understand the

  7. Mumps epidemiology in the mid-west of Ireland 2004-2008: increasing disease burden in the university/college setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whyte, D

    2009-01-01

    Mumps is a contagious vaccine-preventable viral disease that is experiencing a revival in students attending second and third level colleges. Large mumps outbreaks have been reported in several countries despite the presence of childhood immunisation programmes over many years, including measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. In 2008, 1,377 cases of mumps were notified in Ireland and 1,734 in the first three months of 2009 (provisional data). This paper reviews the recent epidemiology of mumps in the Mid-West region of Ireland and highlights preventive measures. A substantial proportion of cases were not laboratory-confirmed and it is important that doctors continue to notify suspected cases. In the Irish Mid-West, data from enhanced surveillance shows a high proportion of mumps in the age group 15-24 years. Complications were uncommon and rarely severe. Where data were available, over half of the cases did not recall having received two doses of MMR, but most recalled one dose. Parents should continue to ensure children receive both MMR vaccinations so that uptake is optimal for protection. Steps were taken to increase awareness of the disease in the school, college and university settings. Preventive measures implemented to limit mumps transmission in the school\\/college setting over recent years included vaccination of close contacts, isolation for five days and hand hygiene.

  8. Gastrin and upper GI cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Chang, Wenju; Jin, Guangchun; Wang, Timothy C

    2016-12-01

    Gastrin was initially identified as the hormone primarily responsible for gastric acid secretion, but was subsequently shown to be a growth factor for the proximal stomach, acting through the gastrin receptor CCK2R. Studies in the past several decades have explored the role of gastrin, along with its incompletely processed precursors, in cancer development. The growth in long-term PPI use has frequently led to elevations in serum gastrin levels in patients with upper GI disease, including GERD, peptic ulcers, and chronic gastritis. However, while accumulated evidence has shown that gastrin likely does not promote-and may even suppress-distal antral gastric cancer, questions have now arisen regarding possible effects of gastrin on the development of gastric cardia cancer or esophageal adenocarcinoma at gastroesophageal junction. Here, we provide an overview of the possible roles of these gastrin peptides in upper GI cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Rhinoscleroma Causing Upper Airway Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetika Verma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoscleroma is a chronic granulomatous condition of the respiratory tract, and is not uncommon in tropical regions; particularly, Mexico, Central America and the Middle East. A few cases have been reported in North America, primarily involving immigrants from endemic countries. The causative organism is Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, a Gram-negative coccobacillus. Diagnosis is made on the basis of culture of the organism and the characteristic pathology of Mikulicz cells on light microscopy. The condition primarily affects the upper airway, and frequently presents with nasal discharge, nasal obstruction or frontal facial pain. Despite the term 'rhinoscleroma', there may be involvement of the entire respiratory tract. Although the condition is slowly progressive, its natural course portends extensive destruction. Laryngotracheal involvement occurs in approximately 15% to 80% of cases, but patients rarely present with isolated laryngotracheal disease. In the present paper, a case of rhinoscleroma presenting with symptoms of upper airway obstruction is described.

  10. Technology improves upper extremity rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczewski, Jan; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Stroke survivors with hemiparesis and spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors with tetraplegia find it difficult or impossible to perform many activities of daily life. There is growing evidence that intensive exercise therapy, especially when supplemented with functional electrical stimulation (FES), can improve upper extremity function, but delivering the treatment can be costly, particularly after recipients leave rehabilitation facilities. Recently, there has been a growing level of interest among researchers and healthcare policymakers to deliver upper extremity treatments to people in their homes using in-home teletherapy (IHT). The few studies that have been carried out so far have encountered a variety of logistical and technical problems, not least the difficulty of conducting properly controlled and blinded protocols that satisfy the requirements of high-level evidence-based research. In most cases, the equipment and communications technology were not designed for individuals with upper extremity disability. It is clear that exercise therapy combined with interventions such as FES, supervised over the Internet, will soon be adopted worldwide in one form or another. Therefore it is timely that researchers, clinicians, and healthcare planners interested in assessing IHT be aware of the pros and cons of the new technology and the factors involved in designing appropriate studies of it. It is crucial to understand the technical barriers, the role of telesupervisors, the motor improvements that participants can reasonably expect and the process of optimizing IHT-exercise therapy protocols to maximize the benefits of the emerging technology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Midwest veneer industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe F. Christopher; Herbert S. Sternizke

    1964-01-01

    This report presents information on 1963 veneer log production and consumption in the Midsouth. The information is from a canvass of the industry made by the Southern Forest Experiment Station. Though an effort was made to locate all active plants, a few may have been overlooked. Omission of a firm, therefore, is no reflection upon its activities, nor does inclusion...

  12. Confusing or Ambiguous Upper Gut Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Upper GI Disorders Lower GI Disorders Other Disorders Kids & Teens Manage Your Health Finding a Doctor The Digestive ... Upper GI Disorders Lower GI Disorders Other Disorders Kids & Teens Manage Your Health Finding a Doctor The Digestive ...

  13. Telling the Life Stories of Adult Immigrants Learning English as a Second Language in the Midwest: A Chronotopic Approach Informed by Bakhtin's "Forms of Time and of the Chronotype in the Novel"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yin Lam

    2013-01-01

    Adult immigrants are invaluable assets to our society as they bring along their cultural capital across borders. However, little is known about how their rich life histories reflect and refract their plights as ESL learners. This study is an investigation of three adult immigrants' English learning in an immigration center in the Midwest. The…

  14. Composites for Exploration Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, J. C.; Jackson, J. R.; Richardson, S. W.; Thomas, A. D.; Mann, T. O.; Miller, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The Composites for Exploration Upper Stage (CEUS) was a 3-year, level III project within the Technology Demonstration Missions program of the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate. Studies have shown that composites provide important programmatic enhancements, including reduced weight to increase capability and accelerated expansion of exploration and science mission objectives. The CEUS project was focused on technologies that best advanced innovation, infusion, and broad applications for the inclusion of composites on future large human-rated launch vehicles and spacecraft. The benefits included near- and far-term opportunities for infusion (NASA, industry/commercial, Department of Defense), demonstrated critical technologies and technically implementable evolvable innovations, and sustained Agency experience. The initial scope of the project was to advance technologies for large composite structures applicable to the Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) by focusing on the affordability and technical performance of the EUS forward and aft skirts. The project was tasked to develop and demonstrate critical composite technologies with a focus on full-scale materials, design, manufacturing, and test using NASA in-house capabilities. This would have demonstrated a major advancement in confidence and matured the large-scale composite technology to a Technology Readiness Level 6. This project would, therefore, have bridged the gap for providing composite application to SLS upgrades, enabling future exploration missions.

  15. Geochemistry of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern Midwest, United States: D in Regional aquifer-system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    Distributions of solutes in aquifers of Cambrian and Ordovician age were studied in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, northwestern Indiana, and northern Missouri to determine the sources of solutes and the probable chemical mechanisms that control regional variations in water quality. This work is part of the Northern Midwest Regional Aquifer-System Analysis project, whose objective is to describe and model the regional hydrogeology of the Cambrian- Ordovician aquifer system in the study region. The data base used included more than 3,000 ground-water-quality analyses from all major aquifers, but especially from the St. Peter, Jordan, and Mount Simon Sandstones and their equivalents. Regional variations in the water chemistry of glacial drift and other sedimentary units that overlie the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in recharge areas in Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Illinois were also studied, but to a lesser degree.

  16. Updates on upper eyelid blepharoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Bhattacharjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The human face is composed of small functional and cosmetic units, of which the eyes and periocular region constitute the main point of focus in routine face-to-face interactions. This dynamic region plays a pivotal role in the expression of mood, emotion, and character, thus making it the most relevant component of the facial esthetic and functional unit. Any change in the periocular unit leads to facial imbalance and functional disharmony, leading both the young and the elderly to seek consultation, thus making blepharoplasty the surgical procedure of choice for both cosmetic and functional amelioration. The applied anatomy, indications of upper eyelid blepharoplasty, preoperative workup, surgical procedure, postoperative care, and complications would be discussed in detail in this review article.

  17. Analyzing log and chip truck performance in the upper peninsula of Michigan with GPS tracking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Minimizing transportation costs is essential in the forest products industry, as the relatively low value and high weight of the products causes transportation to account for exceptionally high portion of the overall cost. The Midwest forest products...

  18. Unsedated Flexible Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Need for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unsedated Flexible Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Need for Routine Oxygen Monitoring? HY Embu, MJ Misauno, ES Isamade, MG Yilkudi. Abstract. Background: To determine the incidence of oxygen desaturation and whether routine oxygen monitoring is necessary during unsedated diagnostic flexible upper ...

  19. Upper gastrointestinal fiberoptic endoscopy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, J C; Diehl, A S; Bemvenuti, G A; Loguercio, S V; Magalhães, D S; Silveira, T R

    1983-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal fiberendoscopy in pediatric patients is done safely and under local anesthesia in most instances. This study of 47 children confirmed the value of fiberendoscopy in establishing the etiology of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the presence of esophageal varices. It also contributed significantly to the management of patients with disphagia, pyrosis, epigastric pain, and ingestion of foreign bodies. No significant morbidity was caused.

  20. Endoscopic Findings in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common medical condition that results in high morbidity and mortality, especially if not properly and aggressively managed. Identification of cause of bleeding is paramount towards effective management. The aim of this study was to determine the common causes of upper ...

  1. Upper bound on quantum stabilizer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Xing, Li-Juan

    2009-03-01

    By studying sets of operators having constant weight, we present an analytical upper bound on the pure quantum stabilizer codes whose underlying quantum system can be of arbitrary dimension, which outperforms the well-known quantum Hamming bound, the optimal analytical upper bound so far for small code length.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation of algal assemblages in six Midwest agricultural streams having varying levels of atrazine and other physicochemical attributes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, J. Malia, E-mail: andrusm@waterborne-env.com [Waterborne Environmental, Inc., 2001 South First Street, Suite 109, Champaign, IL 61820 (United States); Winter, Diane, E-mail: dwinter1@juno.com [Rhithron Associates, Inc., 33 Fort Missoula Rd., Missoula, MT 59804 (United States); Algal Analysis, LLC, Missoula, MT (United States); Scanlan, Michael, E-mail: mscanlan@maptech-inc.com [MapTech, Inc., 3154 State Street, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Sullivan, Sean, E-mail: ssullivan@rhithron.com [Rhithron Associates, Inc., 33 Fort Missoula Rd., Missoula, MT 59804 (United States); Bollman, Wease, E-mail: wbollman@rhithron.com [Rhithron Associates, Inc., 33 Fort Missoula Rd., Missoula, MT 59804 (United States); Waggoner, J.B., E-mail: jwaggoner@inovatia.com [Inovatia, Inc., 120 East Davis Street, Fayette, MO 65248 (United States); Hosmer, Alan J., E-mail: alan.hosmer@syngenta.com [Syngenta Crop Protection, LLC, 410 Swing Rd., Greensboro, NC 27419 (United States); Brain, Richard A., E-mail: richard.brain@syngenta.com [Syngenta Crop Protection, LLC, 410 Swing Rd., Greensboro, NC 27419 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Potential effects of pesticides on stream algae occur alongside complex environmental influences; in situ studies examining these effects together are few, and have not typically controlled for collinearity of variables. We monitored the dynamics of periphyton, phytoplankton, and environmental factors including atrazine, and other water chemistry variables at 6 agricultural streams in the Midwest US from spring to summer of 2011 and 2012, and used variation partitioning of community models to determine the community inertia that is explained uniquely and/or jointly by atrazine and other environmental factors or groups of factors. Periphyton and phytoplankton assemblages were significantly structured by year, day of year, and site, and exhibited dynamic synchrony both between site–years and between periphyton and phytoplankton in the same site–year. The majority of inertia in the models (55.4% for periphyton, 68.4% for phytoplankton) was unexplained. The explained inertia in the models was predominantly shared (confounded) between variables and variable groups (13.3, 30.9%); the magnitude of inertia that was explained uniquely by variable groups (15.1, 18.3%) was of the order hydroclimate > chemistry > geography > atrazine for periphyton, and chemistry > hydroclimate > geography > atrazine for phytoplankton. The variables most influential to the assemblage structure included flow and velocity variables, and time since pulses above certain thresholds of nitrate + nitrite, total phosphorus, total suspended solids, and atrazine. Time since a ≥ 30 μg/L atrazine pulse uniquely explained more inertia than time since pulses ≥ 10 μg/L or daily or historic atrazine concentrations; this result is consistent with studies concluding that the effects of atrazine on algae typically only occur at ≥ 30 μg/L and are recovered from. - Highlights: • We monitored algal communities at 6 Midwest streams receiving atrazine in 2011 and 2012. • Partitioning of CCA models of

  3. Evaluation of a model framework to estimate soil and soil organic carbon redistribution by water and tillage using 137Cs in two U.S. Midwest agricultural fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Claudia J.; Liu, Shuguang; Schumacher, Joseph A.; Schumacher, Thomas E.; Kaspar, Thomas C.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Napton, Darrell; Jaynes, Dan B.

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated lands in the U.S. Midwest have been affected by soil erosion, causing soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution in the landscape and other environmental and agricultural problems. The importance of SOC redistribution on soil productivity and crop yield, however, is still uncertain. In this study, we used a model framework, which includes the Unit Stream Power-based Erosion Deposition (USPED) and the Tillage Erosion Prediction (TEP) models, to understand the soil and SOC redistribution caused by water and tillage erosion in two agricultural fields in the U.S. Midwest. This model framework was evaluated for different digital elevation model (DEM) spatial resolutions (10-m, 24-m, 30-m, and 56-m) and topographic exponents (m = 1.0–1.6 and n = 1.0–1.3) using soil redistribution rates from 137Cs measurements. The results showed that the aggregated 24-m DEM, m = 1.4 and n = 1.0 for rill erosion, and m = 1.0 and n = 1.0 for sheet erosion, provided the best fit with the observation data at both sites. Moreover, estimated average SOC redistributions were 1.3 ± 9.8 g C m− 2 yr− 1 in field site 1 and 3.6 ± 14.3 g C m− 2 yr− 1 in field site 2. Spatial distribution patterns showed SOC loss (negative values) in the eroded areas and SOC gain (positive value) in the deposition areas. This study demonstrated the importance of the spatial resolution and the topographic exponents to estimate and map soil redistribution and the SOC dynamics throughout the landscape, helping to identify places where erosion and deposition from water and tillage are occurring at high rates. Additional research is needed to improve the application of the model framework for use in local and regional studies where rainfall erosivity and cover management factors vary. Therefore, using this model framework can help to improve the information about the spatial distribution of soil erosion across agricultural landscapes and to gain a better understanding of SOC

  4. Assessment of the health and environmental effects of power generation in the Midwest. Volume II. Ecological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, A J; Pentecost, E D

    1977-04-01

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six Midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for the period 1975 to 2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. Volume I of the report includes a characterization of the energy demand and siting scenarios, coal related technologies, and coal resources, and the related impacts on air quality, water quality, and human health. Volume II includes background information on the native ecosystems, climate, soils, and agricultural land use and a description of the ecological impacts expected from coal utilization in southern Illinois, which as ecosystems representative of a large segment of the six-state area.

  5. CHUVAS, EROSIVIDADE, ERODIBILIDADE, USO DO SOLO E SUAS RELAÇÕES COM FOCOS EROSIVOS LINEARES NA ALTA BACIA DO RIO ARAGUAIA / Rainfall, erosivity, erodibility, land use and their relationships with erosion sites in the upper Araguaia River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvando Carlos da Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The intensive process of land occupation by farmers in the tropical savanna region of MidwestBrazil during the last three decades has promoted several environment impacts, such as theoccurrence of gully erosion processes as a consequence of intensive deforestation. Just in theUpper Araguaia River Basin, it was identified more than 300 large and medium gully features,which are related with the high natural susceptibility of the sandy soils; high erosivity and erodibility; inadequate land-use; lack of soil conservation practices; and a high annual rainfallindex during the rainy season. The objective of this research was to identify spatial relationshipsbetween rainfall distribution, erosivity, erodibility, land-use, and gully erosion distribution,which may support environmental planning actions related to land use conservation.Quantitative results show a high correlation between gully erosion distribution and higherosivity/erodibility and inadequate land-use.

  6. Increased tree-ring network density reveals more precise estimations of sub-regional hydroclimate variability and climate dynamics in the Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Justin T.; Harley, Grant L.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the historic variability in the hydroclimate provides important information on possible extreme dry or wet periods that in turn inform water management plans. Tree rings have long provided historical context of hydroclimate variability of the U.S. However, the tree-ring network used to create these countrywide gridded reconstructions is sparse in certain locations, such as the Midwest. Here, we increase ( n = 20) the spatial resolution of the tree-ring network in southern Indiana and compare a summer (June-August) Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) reconstruction to existing gridded reconstructions of PDSI for this region. We find both droughts and pluvials that were previously unknown that rival the most intense PDSI values during the instrumental period. Additionally, historical drought occurred in Indiana that eclipsed instrumental conditions with regard to severity and duration. During the period 1962-2004 CE, we find that teleconnections of drought conditions through the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation have a strong influence ( r = -0.60, p < 0.01) on secondary tree growth in this region for the late spring-early summer season. These findings highlight the importance of continuing to increase the spatial resolution of the tree-ring network used to infer past climate dynamics to capture the sub-regional spatial variability. Increasing the spatial resolution of the tree-ring network for a given region can better identify sub-regional variability, improve the accuracy of regional tree-ring PDSI reconstructions, and provide better information for climatic teleconnections.

  7. An observational study of the utility of continuous positive airway pressure ventilation for appropriate candidates in prehospital care in the Midwest region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Donncha, C; Cummins, N; Hennelly, D; Hannigan, A; Ryan, D

    2017-05-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) practitioners in Ireland have been recently licensed to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation for patients with pulmonary oedema. Both the British Thoracic Society and the Canadian Medical Association advocate the use of CPAP in hospital for patients with severe exacerbations of pulmonary oedema. The aim of this study was to identify prehospital patients in the Midwest, over a 6-month period, which could potentially benefit from CPAP if it were available in the National Ambulance Service. Potential CPAP patients were identified in the Advanced Paramedic Clinical Activity Study (APCAS) database and then followed up in the receiving hospital emergency department (ED) and medical records. Prior to this study, Irish guidance for prehospital use of CPAP did not exist and therefore the database was interrogated using a Toronto EMS Medical Directive. Descriptive analysis was conducted in Microsoft Excel and SPSS. Emergency AS1 calls (999/112) were assessed (n = 1369) and 141 patients (10.3, 95 % confidence interval 8.9-12.1 %) were identified as potential candidates for prehospital CPAP. Further investigation of ED records for 63 potential candidates found 36.5 % (95 % confidence interval 26-49 %) met the Toronto EMS criteria for CPAP. This study suggests that a suitable patient cohort for CPAP exists in the prehospital environment and highlights the need for a prospective study of CPAP use on these patients.

  8. Molecular and morphological differentiation between Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera, Aphididae and related species, with particular reference to the North American Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Lagos-Kutz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, is one of the most biologically diverse species of aphids; a polyphagous species in a family where most are host specialists. It is economically important and belongs to a group of closely related species that has challenged aphid taxonomy. The research presented here seeks to clarify the taxonomic relationships and status of species within the A. gossypii group in the North American Midwest. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI, nuclear elongation factor 1-α (EF1-α, and nuclear sodium channel para-type (SCP genes were used to differentiate between A. gossypii and related species. Aphis monardae, previously synonymised with A. gossypii, is re-established as a valid species. Phylogenetic analyses support the close relationship of members of the A. gossypii group native to North America (A. forbesi, A. monardae, A. oestlundi, A. rubifolii, and A. rubicola, Europe (A. nasturtii, A. urticata and A. sedi, and Asia (A. agrimoniae, A. clerodendri, A. glycines, A. gossypii, A. hypericiphaga, A. ichigicola, A. ichigo, A. sanguisorbicola, A. sumire and A. taraxicicola. The North American species most closely related to A. gossypii are A. monardae and A. oestlundi. The cosmopolitan A. gossypii and A. sedi identified in the USA are genetically very similar using COI and EF1-α sequences, but the SCP gene shows greater genetic distance between them. We present a discussion of the biological and morphological differentiation of these species.

  9. Dental problems and Familismo: social network discussion of oral health issues among adults of Mexican origin living in the Midwest United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, G; McConnell, W R; Perry, B L

    2016-12-01

    To examine the influence of collectivist orientation (often called familismo when applied to the Latino sub-group in the United States) in oral health discussion networks. Through respondent-driven sampling and face-to-face interviews, we identified respondents' (egos) personal social network members (alters). Egos stated whom they talked with about oral health, and how often they discussed dental problems in the preceding 12 months. An urban community of adult Mexican-American immigrants in the Midwest United States. We interviewed 332 egos (90% born in Mexico); egos named an average of 3.9 alters in their networks, 1,299 in total. We applied egocentric network methods to examine the ego, alter, and network variables that characterize health discussion networks. Kin were most often leveraged when dental problems arose; egos relied on individuals whom they perceive to have better knowledge about dental matters. However, reliance on knowledgeable alters decreased among egos with greater behavioral acculturation. This paper developed a network-based conceptualization of familismo. We describe the structure of oral health networks, including kin, fictive kin, peers, and health professionals, and examine how networks and acculturation help shape oral health among these Mexican-Americans.

  10. Assessing bioenergy-driven agricultural land use change and biomass quantities in the U.S. Midwest with MODIS time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuizhen; Zhong, Cheng; Yang, Zhengwei

    2014-01-01

    Bioenergy land use is expanding today as biofuel is consuming higher amount of agricultural production. In 2007, a widespread expansion of corn planting areas was recorded in the United States Department of Agriculture crop census. To better document the corn-related land use change, this study mapped the spatial distributions of four major annual crops (corn, soybean, winter wheat, and spring wheat) and three perennial crops (shortgrass, warm-season tallgrass, and cool-season tallgrass) in the Midwest. From 2006 to 2008, the 8-day, 500-m moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance products were used to retrieve the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) composites. A support vector machine classifier was applied to identify these crops based on their unique growth cycles reflected from NDVI trajectories. The results showed a net increase of 15% of corn fields in 2007 accompanied by a net decrease of 16% in 2008. With the season-long integrated NDVI, this study also explored the geographic context and biomass proxy of native perennial grasses, an important feedstock of cellulosic biofuel. Mostly growing in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas, their biomass quantities increased from west to east. This study indicates that frequent satellite observations may provide an efficient tool for monitoring biomass supplies and land use changes to assist national bioenergy decision-making.

  11. Furniture dimensions and postural overload for schoolchildren's head, upper back and upper limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistão, Mariana Vieira; Sentanin, Anna Cláudia; Moriguchi, Cristiane Shinohara; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Coury, Helenice Jane Cote Gil; de Oliveira Sato, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how the fixed furniture dimensions match with students' anthropometry and to describe head, upper back and upper limbs postures and movements. Evaluation was performed in 48 students from a Brazilian state school. Furniture dimensions were measured with metric tape, movements and postures by inclinometers (Logger Tecknologi, Åkarp, Sweden). Seat height was high for 21% and low for 36% of the students; seat length was short for 45% and long for 9% and table height was high for 53% and low for 28%. Regression analysis showed that seat/popliteal height quotient is explained by 90th percentile of upper back inclination (β=0.410) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (β=-0.293). For seat/thigh length quotient the significant variables were 90th percentile of upper back velocity (β=-0.282) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (β=0.410). This study showed a relationship between furniture mismatch and postural overload. When the seat height is low students increase upper back left inclination and right upper arm elevation; when the seat is short students decrease the upper back flexion velocity and increase right upper arm elevation.

  12. Tracing suspended sediment sources in the Upper Sangamon River Basin using conservative and non-conservative tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Stumpf, A.

    2015-12-01

    As the awareness of water pollution, eutrophication and other water related environmental concerns grows, the significance of sediment in the transport of nutrients and contaminants from agricultural areas to streams has received increasing attention. Both the physical and geochemical properties of suspended sediment are strongly controlled by sediment sources. Thus, tracing sources of suspended sediment in watersheds is important for the design of management practices to reduce sediment loads and contributions of sediment-adsorbed nutrients from agricultural areas to streams. However, the contributions of different sediment sources to suspended sediment loads within intensively managed watersheds in the Midwest still remain insufficiently explored. This study aims to assess the provenance of suspended sediment and the relation between channel morphology and production of suspended sediment in the Upper Sangamon River Basin, Illinois, USA. The 3,690-km2 Upper Sangamon River Basin is characterized by low-relief, agricultural lands dominated by row-crop agriculture. Sediment source samples were collected in the Saybrook from five potential sources: farmland, forests, floodplains, river banks, and grasslands. Event-based and accumulated suspended sediment samples were collected by ISCO automatic pump samplers and in situ suspended sediment samplers and from the stream at watershed outlet. A quantitative geochemical fingerprinting technique, combining statistically verified multicomponent signatures and an un-mixing model, was employed to estimate the relative contributions of sediment from five potential sources to the suspended sediment loads. Organic matter content, trace elements, and radionuclides from soil samples were used as potential tracers. Our preliminary results indicate that the majority of suspended sediment is derived from floodplains in the downstream portions of the watersheds, while only minor amounts of suspended sediment are derived from upland

  13. Delaware River and Upper Bay Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The area of coverage consists of 192 square miles of benthic habitat mapped from 2005 to 2007 in the Delaware River and Upper Delaware Bay. The bottom sediment map...

  14. Rock glaciers, Upper Engadin, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The investigated region is called Upper Engadin and is situated in the Eastern part of the Swiss Alps. The area is characterized by a high situated valley floor with...

  15. Upper limb injuries associated with rock climbing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bannister, P; Foster, P

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of upper limb injuries secondary to rock-climbing or training for rock climbing are presented. All four cases had diagnosis and treatment delayed because of unawareness of the range of injuries seen in high grade rock climbing.

  16. Unified physicochemical property estimation relationships (UPPER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Bo; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2014-09-01

    The knowledge of physicochemical properties of organic compounds becomes increasingly important in pharmaceutical sciences, chemical engineering, and other fields. In this study, we developed UPPER (Unified Physicochemical Property Estimation Relationships), a comprehensive model for the estimation of 20 physicochemical properties of organic compounds. UPPER is a system of thermodynamically sound relationships that relate the various phase-transition properties to one another, which includes transition heats, transition entropies, transition temperatures, molar volume, vapor pressure, solubilities and partition coefficients in different solvents, and so on. UPPER integrates group contributions with the molecular geometric factors that affect transition entropies. All of the predictions are directly based on molecular structure. As a result, the proposed model provides a simple and accurate prediction of the properties studied. UPPER is designed to predict industrially, pharmaceutically, and environmentally relevant physicochemical properties. It can be an aid for the efficient design and synthesis of compounds with optimal physicochemical properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Saline Nasal Irrigation for Upper Respiratory Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic upper respiratory conditions are common and expensive disorders with enormous impact on patient quality of life and society at large. Saline nasal irrigation (SNI), a therapy with roots in Ayurvedic medicine that bathes the nasal mucosa with in spray or liquid saline, has been used as adjunctive care for upper respiratory conditions. In liquid form, SNI has been found to be effective adjunctive care by the Cochrane Collaboration for symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive clinical trial evidence supports its use in spray and liquid forms as adjunctive treatment for mild-to-moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory infections. Consensus or expert opinion recommendations exist for SNI as a treatment for a variety of other conditions including rhinitis of pregnancy. SNI appears safe; side effects are minimal and transient. It can be recommended by clinicians to interested patients with a range of upper respiratory conditions in the context of patient education and printed instructional handouts. PMID:19904896

  18. Endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Jagdeesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a second case of endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract presenting 17 years after hysterectomy for high grade adenocarcinoma of ovary. A 51-year-old nullipara presented to us with a complaint of hematuria. After complete work up, she underwent right radical nephro-ureterectomy with bladder cuff excision. The histology showed endometrioid carcinoma of upper urinary tract without any evidence of endometriosis.

  19. [Endoscopy in upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón Sepúlveda, M

    1990-01-01

    There are several changes in the role that endoscopy plays in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. We propose indications and make point about the factors than an endoscopist must have in mind referring to timing the endoscopy study. In the experience of our Hospital (Hospital Central Norte de Petroleos Mexicanos, Mexico City), during 20 years we found a diminution in the prevalence of duodenal ulceration and an increase in gastric ulceration, erosive gastritis an neoplasies as causes of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  20. Maui Analysis of Upper Atmospheric Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Rainer A.

    2008-01-01

    Maui Analysis of Upper Atmospheric Injections (MAUI) will observe the Space Shuttle engine exhaust plumes from the Maui Space Surveillance Site in Hawaii. The observations will occur when the Space Shuttle fires its engines at night or twilight. A telescope and all-sky imagers will take images and data while the Space Shuttle flies over the Maui site. The images will be analyzed to better understand the interaction between the spacecraft plume and the upper atmosphere of Earth.

  1. Laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marcio L; Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G; Carvalho, Patricia T; Ungersbock, Elaine; Olimpio, Hugo; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim M

    2007-01-01

    Report the results of laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy in infants. Six consecutive infants underwent 7 laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy. Pre and postoperative evaluation included renal sonography, voiding cystourethrogram and renal scintigraphy. All infants showed upper-pole exclusion. Surgery was performed through a transperitoneal approach with full flank position in all infants. Three or 4 ports were used according to the necessity of retracting the liver. The distal ureter was ligated close to the bladder whenever reflux was present and the dysplastic upper-pole was divided with the help of an electrocautery. Data regarding operative time, postoperative use of analgesics, time to resume oral feeding, hospital stay and tubular function were collected and analyzed. All procedures were concluded as planned. Mean operative time was 135 min. One patient underwent staged bilateral upper-pole nephrectomy. There were no complications and the postoperative hospital stay was 48 hours in 5 procedures and 24 hours in 2 procedures. Pain medication was required only in the first day. Renal tubular function showed improvement in half of the cases. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure in infants. Due to the magnification provided by the lenses, a better vision of the structures is achieved, facilitating selective dissection of vascular upper-pole, renal parenchyma and distal ureter. This approach is less damaging to the lower pole, and is associated to low morbidity and a short hospital stay.

  2. Laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio L. Miranda

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Report the results of laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy in infants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six consecutive infants underwent 7 laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy. Pre and postoperative evaluation included renal sonography, voiding cystourethrogram and renal scintigraphy. All infants showed upper-pole exclusion. Surgery was performed through a transperitoneal approach with full flank position in all infants. Three or 4 ports were used according to the necessity of retracting the liver. The distal ureter was ligated close to the bladder whenever reflux was present and the dysplastic upper-pole was divided with the help of an electrocautery. Data regarding operative time, postoperative use of analgesics, time to resume oral feeding, hospital stay and tubular function were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: All procedures were concluded as planned. Mean operative time was 135 min. One patient underwent staged bilateral upper-pole nephrectomy. There were no complications and the postoperative hospital stay was 48 hours in 5 procedures and 24 hours in 2 procedures. Pain medication was required only in the first day. Renal tubular function showed improvement in half of the cases. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure in infants. Due to the magnification provided by the lenses, a better vision of the structures is achieved, facilitating selective dissection of vascular upper-pole, renal parenchyma and distal ureter. This approach is less damaging to the lower pole, and is associated to low morbidity and a short hospital stay.

  3. Amlodipine-induced bilateral upper extremity edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshalingham, Anusha; Wong, William

    2007-09-01

    To report a case of bilateral upper extremity edema associated with amlodipine use in a child. A previously well and normotensive 6-year-old girl presented with a generalized vasculitis of unknown origin and severe hypertension. Large vessels predominantly affecting the neck, chest, and abdomen were found to be involved, resulting in abnormal arterial circulation and significant blood pressure differences between the upper and lower extremities. Multiple antihypertensive agents were initially required to control blood pressure. She was stabilized and discharged on amlodipine 10 mg each evening, atenolol 50 mg/day, and warfarin. Three days later she was noted to have facial and bilateral upper extremity pitting edema. Laboratory and radiologic assessments for possible etiologies were negative. Discontinuation of amlodipine resulted in resolution of edema. As of June 2007, there had been no cases of bilateral upper extremity edema associated with amlodipine use reported in the English literature. Adverse effects of amlodipine, a widely used antihypertensive, have been well reported. These include flushing, headache, and peripheral edema. Lower limb edema is the most common, while periocular and perioral edema have occurred less frequently. Anasarca edema has been described only once in the English literature. According to the Naranjo probability scale, amlodipine was a probable cause of bilateral upper extremity edema in this child. Bilateral upper extremity edema has been associated with amlodipine use in a child with an abnormal arterial circulation. The edema resolved upon discontinuation of the drug.

  4. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  5. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Gitau, Margaret; Merwade, Venkatesh; Arnold, Jeffrey; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Hirschi, Michael; Engel, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991-2003) field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR) watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine) and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine). Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.65) and nitrate in tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.68) for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE = 0.00-0.32 and -0.29-0.06, respectively). The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE = 0.50-0.81) better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE = -0.11-0.49). The calibration provided reasonable parameter sets for the old and new routines in the LVR watershed, and the validation results showed that the new routine has the potential to accurately simulate hydrologic processes in mildly sloped watersheds.

  6. Approach to growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease varies across North America: the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Oleh M; Kogon, Amy J; Kumar, Juhi; Sethna, Christine B; Hammad, Hoda T; Christos, Paul J; Mahan, John D; Greenbaum, Larry A; Woroniecki, Robert

    2017-05-30

    Growth impairment remains common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Available literature indicates low level of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization in short children with CKD. Despite efforts at consensus guidelines, lack of high-level evidence continues to complicate rhGH therapy decision-making and the level of practice variability in rhGH treatment by pediatric nephrologists is unknown. Cross-sectional online survey electronically distributed to pediatric nephrologists through the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium and American Society of Pediatric Nephrology. Seventy three pediatric nephrologists completed the survey. While the majority (52.1%) rarely involve endocrinology in rhGH management, 26.8% reported that endocrinology managed most aspects of rhGH treatment in their centers. The majority of centers (68.5%) have a dedicated renal dietitian, but 20.6% reported the nephrologist as the primary source of nutritional support for children with CKD. Children with growth failure did not receive rhGH most commonly because of family refusal. Differences in initial work-up for rhGH therapy include variable use of bone age (95%), thyroid function (58%), insulin-like growth factor-1 (40%), hip/knee X-ray (36%), and ophthalmologic evaluation (7%). Most pediatric nephrologists (95%) believe that rhGH treatment improves quality of life, but only 24% believe that it improves physical function; 44% indicated that rhGH improves lean body mass. There is substantial variation in pediatric nephrology practice in addressing short stature and rhGH utilization in children with CKD. Hence, there may be opportunities to standardize care to study and improve growth outcomes in short children with CKD.

  7. Relationship of nutrition and physical activity behaviors and fitness measures to academic performance for sixth graders in a midwest city school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jane U; Mauch, Lois; Winkelman, Mark R

    2011-02-01

    To support curriculum and policy, a midwest city school district assessed the association of selected categories of nutrition and physical activity (NUTR/PA) behaviors, fitness measures, and body mass index (BMI) with academic performance (AP) for 800 sixth graders. Students completed an adapted Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (NUTR/PA behaviors), fitness assessments (mile run, curl-ups, push-ups, height, and weight) with results matched to standardized scores (Measures of Academic Progress [MAP]), meal price status, and gender. Differences in mean MAP scores (math and reading) were compared by selected categories of each variable utilizing 1-way analysis of variance. Associations were determined by stepwise multiple regression utilizing mean MAP scores (for math and for reading) as the dependent variable and NUTR/PA behaviors, fitness, and BMI categories as independent variables. Significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher MAP math scores were associated with NUTR (more milk and breakfast; less 100% fruit juice and sweetened beverages [SB]) and PA (increased vigorous PA and sports teams; reduced television), and fitness (higher mile run performance). Higher MAP reading scores were associated with NUTR (fewer SB) and PA (increased vigorous PA, reduced television). Regression analysis indicated about 11.1% of the variation in the mean MAP math scores and 6.7% of the mean MAP reading scores could be accounted for by selected NUTR/PA behaviors, fitness, meal price status, and gender. Many positive NUTR/PA behaviors and fitness measures were associated with higher MAP scores supporting the school district focus on healthy lifestyles. Additional factors, including meal price status and gender, contribute to AP. © 2011, Fargo Public School.

  8. Assessing non-linear variation of temperature and precipitation for different growth periods of maize and their impacts on phenology in the Midwest of Jilin Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Enliang; Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Yongfang; Alu, Si; Wang, Rui; Li, Danjun; Ha, Si

    2017-04-01

    In the past two decades, the regional climate in China has undergone significant change, resulting in crop yield reduction and complete failure. The goal of this study is to detect the variation of temperature and precipitation for different growth periods of maize and assess their impact on phenology. The daily meteorological data in the Midwest of Jilin Province during 1960-2014 were used in the study. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition method was adopted to analyze the non-linear trend and fluctuation in temperature and precipitation, and the sensitivity of the length of the maize growth period to temperature and precipitation was analyzed by the wavelet cross-transformation method. The results show that the trends of temperature and precipitation change are non-linear for different growth periods of maize, and the average temperature in the sowing-jointing stage was different from that in the other growth stages, showing a slight decrease trend, while the variation amplitude of maximum temperature is smaller than that of the minimum temperature. This indicates that the temperature difference between day and night shows a gradually decreasing trend. Precipitation in the growth period also showed a decreasing non-linear trend, while the inter-annual variability with period of quasi-3-year and quasi-6-year dominated the variation of temperature and precipitation. The whole growth period was shortened by 10.7 days, and the sowing date was advanced by approximately 11 days. We also found that there was a significant resonance period among temperature, precipitation, and phenology. Overall, a negative correlation between phenology and temperature is evident, while a positive correlation with precipitation is exhibited. The results illustrate that the climate suitability for maize has reduced over the past decades.

  9. Temporal and spatial characteristics of extreme precipitation events in the Midwest of Jilin Province based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis method and copula functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Enliang; Zhang, Jiquan; Si, Ha; Dong, Zhenhua; Cao, Tiehua; Lan, Wu

    2017-10-01

    Environmental changes have brought about significant changes and challenges to water resources and management in the world; these include increasing climate variability, land use change, intensive agriculture, and rapid urbanization and industrial development, especially much more frequency extreme precipitation events. All of which greatly affect water resource and the development of social economy. In this study, we take extreme precipitation events in the Midwest of Jilin Province as an example; daily precipitation data during 1960-2014 are used. The threshold of extreme precipitation events is defined by multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) method. Extreme precipitation (EP), extreme precipitation ratio (EPR), and intensity of extreme precipitation (EPI) are selected as the extreme precipitation indicators, and then the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test is employed to determine the optimal probability distribution function of extreme precipitation indicators. On this basis, copulas connect nonparametric estimation method and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) method is adopted to determine the bivariate copula function. Finally, we analyze the characteristics of single variable extremum and bivariate joint probability distribution of the extreme precipitation events. The results show that the threshold of extreme precipitation events in semi-arid areas is far less than that in subhumid areas. The extreme precipitation frequency shows a significant decline while the extreme precipitation intensity shows a trend of growth; there are significant differences in spatiotemporal of extreme precipitation events. The spatial variation trend of the joint return period gets shorter from the west to the east. The spatial distribution of co-occurrence return period takes on contrary changes and it is longer than the joint return period.

  10. Geomechanical Framework for Secure CO2 Storage in Fractured Reservoirs and Caprocks for Sedimentary Basins in theMidwest United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sminchak, Joel [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This report presents final technical results for the project Geomechanical Framework for Secure CO2 Storage in Fractured Reservoirs and Caprocks for Sedimentary Basins in the Midwest United States (DE-FE0023330). The project was a three-year effort consisting of seven technical tasks focused on defining geomechanical factors for CO2 storage applications in deep saline rock formations in Ohio and the Midwest United States, because geomechancial issues have been identified as a significant risk factor for large-scale CO2 storage applications. A basin-scale stress-strain analysis was completed to describe the geomechanical setting for rock formations of Ordovician-Cambrian age in Ohio and adjacent areas of the Midwest United States in relation to geologic CO2 storage applications. The tectonic setting, stress orientation-magnitude, and geomechanical and petrophysical parameters for CO2 storage zones and caprocks in the region were cataloged. Ten geophysical image logs were analyzed for natural fractures, borehole breakouts, and drilling-induced fractures. The logs indicated mostly less than 10 fractures per 100 vertical feet in the borehole, with mostly N65E principal stress orientation through the section. Geophysical image logs and other logs were obtained for three wells located near the sites where specific models were developed for geomechanical simulations: Arches site in Boone County, Kentucky; Northern Appalachian Basin site in Chautauqua County, New York; and E-Central Appalachian Basin site in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. For these three wells, 9,700 feet of image logs were processed and interpreted to provide a systematic review of the distribution within each well of natural fractures, wellbore breakouts, faults, and drilling induced fractures. There were many borehole breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures but few natural fractures. Concentrated fractures were present at the Rome-basal sandstone

  11. Hypnosis and upper digestive function and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Palsson, Olafur S; Whitehead, William E

    2008-01-01

    Hypnosis is a therapeutic technique that primarily involves attentive receptive concentration. Even though a small number of health professionals are trained in hypnosis and lingering myths and misconceptions associated with this method have hampered its widespread use to treat medical conditions, hypnotherapy has gained relevance as an effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome not responsive to standard care. More recently, a few studies have addressed the potential influence of hypnosis on upper digestive function and disease. This paper reviews the efficacy of hypnosis in the modulation of upper digestive motor and secretory function. The present evidence of the effectiveness of hypnotherapy as a treatment for functional and organic diseases of the upper bowel is also summarized, coupled with a discussion of potential mechanisms of its therapeutic action. PMID:19009639

  12. A Boundary Property for Upper Domination

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2016-08-08

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality.The problem of finding an upper dominating set is generally NP-hard, but can be solved in polynomial time in some restricted graph classes, such as P4-free graphs or 2K2-free graphs.For classes defined by finitely many forbidden induced subgraphs, the boundary separating difficult instances of the problem from polynomially solvable ones consists of the so called boundary classes.However, none of such classes has been identified so far for the upper dominating set problem.In the present paper, we discover the first boundary class for this problem.

  13. Management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is unique from variceal bleeding in terms of patient characteristics, management, rebleeding rates, and prognosis, and should be managed differently. The majority of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds will not rebleed once treated successfully. The incidence is 80 to 90% of all upper gastrointestinal bleeds and the mortality is between 5 to 10%. The causes include nonacid-related ulceration from tumors, infections, inflammatory disease, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosions, esophagitis, dieulafoy lesions, angiodysplasias, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Rarer causes include hemobilia, hemosuccus pancreaticus, and aortoenteric fistulas. Hematemesis and melena are the key features of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, but fresh per rectal bleeding may be present in a rapidly bleeding lesion. Resuscitation and stabilization before endoscopy leads to improved outcomes. Fluid resuscitation is essential to avoid hypotension. Though widely practiced, there is currently insufficient evidence to show that routine red cell transfusion is beneficial. Coagulopathy requires correction, but the optimal international normalized ratio has not been determined yet. Risk stratification scores such as the Rockall and Glasgow-Blatchford scores are useful to predict rebleeding, mortality, and to determine the urgency of endoscopy. Evidence suggests that high-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPI should be given as an infusion before endoscopy. If patients are intolerant of PPIs, histamine-2 receptor antagonists can be given, although their acid suppression is inferior. Endoscopic therapy includes thermal methods such as coaptive coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and hemostatic clips. Four quadrant epinephrine injections combined with either thermal therapy or clipping reduces mortality. In hypoxic patients, endoscopy masks allow high-flow oxygen during upper

  14. Washing Machine Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S S

    2008-01-01

    Washing machines are part of every household and there are various reports of upper extremity injuries due to inadequate safety precautions while operating the machine. Most of the injuries occur when an attempt is made to remove the clothes from the machine and the hand gets caught in the spinning machine. The presentation can vary from minor soft tissue injuries to a mangled upper extremity. The chance of neurovascular damage resulting in compartment syndrome is very high. The author reports three cases of washing machine injuries to draw attention to this not so uncommon injury. The relevant literature is also considered. PMID:21654964

  15. Saline nasal irrigation for upper respiratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2009-11-15

    Saline nasal irrigation is an adjunctive therapy for upper respiratory conditions that bathes the nasal cavity with spray or liquid saline. Nasal irrigation with liquid saline is used to manage symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive evidence supports the use of spray and liquid saline nasal irrigation to manage symptoms of mild to moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory tract infections. Consensus guidelines recommend saline nasal irrigation as a treatment for a variety of other conditions, including rhinitis of pregnancy and acute rhinosinusitis. Saline nasal irrigation appears safe, with no reported serious adverse events. Minor adverse effects can be avoided with technique modification and salinity adjustment.

  16. Upper urinary tract. Pyelography and interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Dorph, S.

    Pyelography is superior to all other imaging techniques for the demonstration of fine detail in the pelveocalyceal system and the ureter. For almost 90 years it has been performed through a retrogradely inserted catheter, but during the recent 30 years antegrade injection via a transparenchymally inserted needle or catheter has become an accepted alternative, especially in case of dilated upper urinary tract. Both methods have their advantages and their disadvantages. This article presents a review of indications, techniques, and complications. Furthermore, interventional procedures on the upper urinary tract - such as stent placement and baloon dilatation - are now handled by the radiologist, mainly through an antegrade approach. These therapeutic procedures are also reviewed.

  17. Information Literacy in the Upper Secondary School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Schreiber, Trine; Tønnesen, Pia Hvid

    The discussion paper is a publication from the project Information Literacy in the Upper Secondary School. The project is a collaboration between the National Library of Education at the Danish School of Education, Aarhus University, and the Royal School of Library and Information Science....... The project is funded by Denmark's Electronic Research Library (DEFF). The discussion paper is published in connection with the conference Information Literacy in the Upper Secondary School on 22 April 2010. See video streaming from the conference etc. at www.dpu.dk/info....

  18. [Upper lateral incisor with 2 canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabra Campos, H

    1991-01-01

    Clinical case summary of the patient with an upper lateral incisor with two root canals. The suspicion that there might be an anatomic anomaly in the root that includes a complex root canal system was made when an advanced radicular groove was detected in the lingual surface or an excessively enlarged cingulum.

  19. The Upper Permian in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.

    1955-01-01

    The Upper Permian in the Netherlands, as known from borehole data, is deposited in a mainly evaporitic facies north of the Brabant and Rhenish Massifs. In the extreme south (Belgian Campine, de Peel) a near-shore facies of reef dolomites and elastics occurs. In the western and central Netherlands

  20. Helicobacter pylori and upper digestive diseases - diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori, which has been designated by the WHO as type I carcinogen, has a global prevalence of over 50%. The aim of this study was to determine the association between this bacterium and upper gastrointestinal problems in an endoscopy unit in Ouagadougou, using a molecular diagnostic method.

  1. An approach to the painful upper limb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical findings are key to pinpointing the pain source. History. Cervical and upper limb pain may present in isolation or be associated with altered sensation. .... Positive test is presence of 'electric-like sensations' down spine or extremities. Myelopathy. Hoffmann's sign. Passive snapping flexion of middle finger distal ...

  2. Spinal (Intrathecal) Ketamine Anaesthesia for Upper Abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous ketamine is usually administered for the induction of general anaesthesia. Spinal ketamine for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery is sporadically reported in the literature. However, the use of spinal ketamine for upper body surgery is rare. We describe the case of a 35-year old man, with a retroperitoneal ...

  3. Upper blepharoplasty : Defying dogmas and clarifying uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Shariselle Mirna Wietske

    2016-01-01

    Upper blepharoplasty is one of the most commonly performed procedures by (oculo)plastic surgeons and it is generally recognized as a relatively easy technical procedure. However, seemingly minor aspects before, during and after surgery can be identified that significantly contribute to surgical

  4. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings and prevalence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dyspepsia is a common presenting complaint of various upper gastrointestinal disorders. The symptoms of causes of dyspepsia often overlap and this makes etiological diagnosis difficult. Endoscopy is the ideal procedure for identifying organic diseases of the foregut. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with various ...

  5. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings and prevalence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Dyspepsia is a common presenting complaint of various upper gastrointestinal disorders. The symptoms of causes of dyspepsia often overlap and this makes etiological diagnosis difficult. Endoscopy is the ideal procedure for identifying organic diseases of the foregut. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with.

  6. Modernization of upper secondary school in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Jakob Ditlev

    2008-01-01

    The Danish upper secondary school is currently undergoing a hyper complex process of modernization where new organizational forms, teacher-student roles and principles of management are introduced. The process is set-off most directly by a new reform. This article explores the implementation...

  7. Upper limb injuries associated with rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, P; Foster, P

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of upper limb injuries secondary to rock-climbing or training for rock climbing are presented. All four cases had diagnosis and treatment delayed because of unawareness of the range of injuries seen in high grade rock climbing. PMID:3730754

  8. Update on embryology of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Kozin, Scott H

    2013-09-01

    Current concepts in the steps of upper limb development and the way the limb is patterned along its 3 spatial axes are reviewed. Finally, the embryogenesis of various congenital hand anomalies is delineated with an emphasis on the pathogenetic basis for each anomaly. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Schroedinger upper bounds to semirelativistic eigenvalues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Richard L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8 (Canada); Lucha, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2005-09-16

    Problems posed by semirelativistic Hamiltonians of the form H = {radical}(m{sup 2} + p{sup 2}) + V(r) are studied. It is shown that energy upper bounds can be constructed in terms of certain related Schroedinger operators; these bounds include free parameters which can be chosen optimally.

  10. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding | Thomson | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 11 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. SR Thomson. Abstract.

  11. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leg, and an image is recorded on special film or a computer. This image shows the soft tissues and the bone in the upper leg, which is called the femur. The X-ray image is black and white. Dense body parts that block the passage of the X- ...

  12. Upper Bounds on Numerical Approximation Errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper suggests a method for determining rigorous upper bounds on approximationerrors of numerical solutions to infinite horizon dynamic programming models.Bounds are provided for approximations of the value function and the policyfunction as well as the derivatives of the value function...

  13. Upper Bounds for Mutations of Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Cruz Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we provide a new, algebraic proof of the excessive Laurent phenomenon for mutations of potentials (in the sense of [Galkin S., Usnich A., Preprint IPMU 10-0100, 2010] by introducing to this theory the analogue of the upper bounds from [Berenstein A., Fomin S., Zelevinsky A., Duke Math. J. 126 (2005, 1-52].

  14. Pathophysiology of upper extremity muscle disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A review of the literature on the pathophysiology of upper extremity muscle disorders (UEMDs) was performed. An overview is given of clinical findings and hypotheses on the pathogenesis of UEMDs. The literature indicates that disorders of muscle cells and limitations of the local circulation

  15. Poststroke hypertonicity: upper limb assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Hypertonicity is common in patients with upper limb dysfunction following hemiplegic stroke and is associated with greater impairment, worse function, and lower health-related quality of life. In addition to increased rest activity, abnormal patterns of muscle activation, such as spastic co-contraction, may contribute to disability. In the upper limb, flexor muscles are more commonly involved distally, and at the shoulder, spasticity of adductors, flexors, and internal rotators is most often observed. Prior to interventions, a history regarding prior interventions, comorbid diagnoses, and limitations imposed by abnormal tone should be elicited. Commonly used scales to assess hypertonicity include the Modified Ashworth, the Modified Tardieu, the Spasm Frequency, the Disability Assessment, the Fugl-Meyer, and the Motor Assessment Scales. Treatment interventions for upper limb hypertonicity include stretching, splinting, strengthening of antagonist muscles, oral medications, and focal injections (phenol or botulinum toxins). Intrathecal baclofen may also impact upper limb tone. For focal injections, correct identification of muscles contributing to problematic tone is evaluated by eliciting resistance to movement at rest and observation of patterns of tightness as the limb is used functionally. The botulinum toxins have been shown to decrease tone in stroke survivors and improve active and passive functioning. Because secondary changes such as contractures and weakness may occur with prolonged hypertonicity, therapy to improve range of motion, strengthen weakened muscles, and incorporate use of the limb should be considered following focal injections, oral medications, or intrathecal pump placement.

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHA855 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GMGFWKPGSGII HQIVLENYAFPG--- ---GHLDNISNNMLIGXINFENGKANAVFNQFXGEIGPVPTVGXEYXKXGVXWIVVGDEX YGEGXFCEHX...lvwvsgsqvqvls iksf*kimhsq--- ---GHLDNISNNMLIGXINFENGKANAVFNQFXGEIGPVPTVGXEYXKXGVXWIVVGDEX YGEGXFCEHX

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHA477 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amino Acid sequence iysyifiylfiyflfl*yyfnninsntkrwhlvkrknirellkrfslklkvvkcn*vilv nxfifak*vqsnfkrldli*RQKHKR...n*sn*nly*icixsr*fksnttrn**iykvfyyngkeyg*** ynek--- Frame B: iysyifiylfiyflfl*yyfnninsntkrwhlvkrknirellkrfslklkvvkcn*vilv nxfifa

  18. Estimering af brændstofforbrug vha. GPS Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Lahrmann, Harry; Torp, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Det er simpelt og billigt at opsamle GPS målinger fra køretøjer. Når større mængder GPS data indsamles fra et passende antal køretøjer kan dataen bruges til at beregne f.eks. køretider. Det er ligeledes muligt ud fra GPS data at estimere miljøindikatorer så som, hvor aggressivt kører bilister og er...... der nogle vejstrækninger, der har en højere (negativ) miljø påvirkning end andre? I denne artikel præsenterer et forsøg, hvor GPS data anvendes til at estimere brændstofforbruget ved en enkelt tur og for vejnettet generelt. Dette gøres ved at opbygge en database med GPS data. Ud fra disse data gives...

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHA306 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EGIPPDQQRLX Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: ---xxgxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxixxvxxxxxxxxxx...wxxxgxxxxxxxxxhskgi xxsxsfkixrwyanfc*nsxw*nyhfgs*rx**y*kckg*npr*rrystrstkinxcr*t ir...PDQQRLXFAGKQ LEDGRTLXDYNIQKESTXHLVLRLXGGMQXFVKTXTGKTITLEVEGXDNIENVKAKIQDK EGIPPDQQRLX Frame C: ---xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxixxxxgxxxxxxxx...xxxvxxxxxvxxxxxxtfxrnx xfx*f*d*xvvckfllklsxvklslwklkvxiilkm*rlkskikkvfhqinkd*xlpvnn

  20. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Hospital Settings

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHA317 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DGKPTFLSTTIKNETDSIIVVLNLPHCTK ECLIDPDFSLLVDPQFKPECESKSRKWVVPVAVVVSVVGFSGLAXAGFILYKKQSIAIKV QIHK Translated...DGKPTFLSTTIKNETDSIIVVLNLPHCTK ECLIDPDFSLLVDPQFKPECESKSRKWVVPVAVVVSVVGFSGLAXAGFILYKKQSIAIKV QIHK Frame

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHA506 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |BU497602.1 PfESToab81g05.y1 Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 asexual cDNA Plasmodium falciparum cDNA 5' similar to SW:RAB7_CANFA...|BQ596061.1 PfESToab28g07.y1 Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 asexual cDNA Plasmodium falciparum cDNA 5' similar to SW:RAB7_CANFA

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHA296 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DASLPFLFKLSRSSTIHHSIKAVVIGTIAECFKLIGSGLQCLFTKNTXIHLESIKE SRRVCKSSKSXLFPLGCNITKFN*shsrsissnftieftnhyetrsrsigir*cnwlyls ydrw*siicts...KFN*shsrsissnftieftnhyetrsrsigir*cnwlyls ydrw*siictsxysftsfnlkixnskrs*rn*ssfkcslgiiqxsirfnrstysnycsif ssihex

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHA441 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a genomic, DNA sequence. 50 0.16 1 ED460729 |ED460729.1 AUAC-aao05g05.g1 Ascaris suum whole genome shotgun library (PMAJ_4 GSS) Ascar...is suum genomic, genomic survey sequence. 50 0.16 1 ED450392 |ED450392.1 AUAC-aan56c12.g1 Ascaris... suum whole genome shotgun library (PMAJ_4 GSS) Ascaris suum genomi...c, genomic survey sequence. 50 0.16 1 ED393242 |ED393242.1 AUAC-aai25f10.g1 Ascaris suum whole genome shotgu...n library (PMAJ_4 GSS) Ascaris suum genomic, genomic survey sequence. 50 0.16 1 ED186094 |ED186094.1 AUAC-aah66a04.g1 Ascaris

  5. Dicty_cDB: VHA418 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 |ED419185.1 AUAC-aab08f12.g1 Ascaris suum whole genome shotgun library (PMAJ_4 GSS) Ascaris suum genomic, ...genomic survey sequence. 46 2.6 1 ED361276 |ED361276.1 AUAC-aal14e01.b1 Ascaris suum whole genome shotgun library (PMAJ_4 GSS) Ascari...66 |ED337566.1 AUAC-aao38c10.g1 Ascaris suum whole genome shotgun library (PMAJ_4 GSS) Ascaris suum genomic,

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHA289 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DY907212 |DY907212.1 CHAX1940.b1_G05.ab1 CHA(XYZ) common wild sunflower Helianthus annuus cDNA clone CHAX1940...DY910258 |DY910258.1 CHAX5220.b1_G10.ab1 CHA(XYZ) common wild sunflower Helianthus annuus cDNA clone CHAX5220

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHA684 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Value N BU746157 |BU746157.1 CH3#002_C07T7 Canine heart normalized cDNA Library in pBluescriptCanis familiaris...043 1 BU746156 |BU746156.1 CH3#002_C07T3 Canine heart normalized cDNA Library in pBluescript Canis familiaris

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHA801 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VP DRGSWNYNFMGVKHSTNMTYGLKLDYPKNFYDESHRPAHFQNWTQMAPSANDDEENQPKX KFIXIIIKIIIFF*khlink*k Translated Amino...VP DRGSWNYNFMGVKHSTNMTYGLKLDYPKNFYDESHRPAHFQNWTQMAPSANDDEENQPKX KFIXIIIKIIIFF*khlink*k Frame B: sgms

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHA757 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17 |CB980117.1 CAB70001_IaR_H03 Cabernet Sauvignon Berry Post-Veraison - CAB7 Vitis vinifera cDNA clone CAB7...0001_IaR_H03 3', mRNA sequence. 44 5.0 1 CB980047 |CB980047.1 CAB70001_IaF_H03 Caberne... 5.0 1 CB979848 |CB979848.1 CAB70001_IIcF_H03 Cabernet Sauvignon Berry Post-Veraison - CAB7 Vitis vinifera c

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHA711 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IASMA L1 HindIII BAC library Vitis vinifera genomic, genomic survey sequence. 44 0.010 2 CB980117 |CB980117.1 CAB70001_IaR_H03 Cabern...DNA clone CAB70001_IaR_H03 3', mRNA sequence. 44 0.011 2 CB979848 |CB979848.1 CAB70001_IIcF_H03 Cabernet Sau...CB980047 |CB980047.1 CAB70001_IaF_H03 Cabernet Sauvignon Berry Post-Veraison - CA...lone ENTAV 115. 38 0.014 2 CT502850 |CT502850.1 A BAC library has been constructed from cultivar Cabernet Sa

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHA335 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 518011.1 A BAC library has been constructed from cultivar Cabernet Sauvignon using two different restriction...082 1 CT497858 |CT497858.1 A BAC library has been constructed from cultivar Cabernet Sauvignon using two dif

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHA717 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TYTIPASKKLHTYLHVKNQENLERFTKNSSFIRVLAYASE LEVSISDESRPGCIVNVVNENVSTLLDVRGSVDFNLEIARLETKKQQLVKNYETLVSKTT...TYTIPASKKLHTYLHVKNQENLERFTKNSSFIRVLAYASE LEVSISDESRPGCIVNVVNENVSTLLDVRGSVDFNLEIARLETKKQQLVKNYETLVSKTT...Frame C: *krhkyiinnvrtktnstnqrd**gn*kke*rekesqrgresreisknerkgs*tssskr kritk*t*krtrekrkrs*rkrktrs*rknc...imlgqf*h *grnetmsryhqinsftscylyhssl*ktshlssr*ksresrtfh*klfihscfslcl*t rsfh***isswlyr*ccq*kcfnpfrc*ri

  13. Dicty_cDB: VHA882 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available complete sequence. 44 1.1 1 AB053516 |AB053516.1 Carabus stjernvalli mitochondrial gene for NADH dehydrogenase...isolate:25-98P36. 44 1.1 1 AB053515 |AB053515.1 Carabus stjernvalli mitochondrial gene for NADH dehydrogenase...isolate:24-99P18. 44 1.1 1 AB053514 |AB053514.1 Carabus stjernvalli mitochondrial gene for NADH dehydrogenase

  14. Dicty_cDB: VHA848 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7_1( DQ881447 |pid:none) Betula halophila calmodulin (CaM) ... 115 3e-24 S58311( S58311 ) calmodulin - Bid...ens pilosa &X89890_1(X89890|pid:... 115 4e-24 X98404_1( X98404 |pid:none) C.annuum

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHA409 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |EB223488.1 PEG002-C-104408-501 Normalized Pedal-Pleural Ganglia Aplysia califor...nica cDNA clone PEG002-C-104408 5', mRNA sequence. 44 0.44 2 EB238172 |EB238172.1 PEG003-C-223796-501 Normalized Pedal

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHA342 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e genome shotgun sequence, contig VV78X174301.7, clone ENTAV 115. 46 0.038 2 EB223488 |EB223488.1 PEG002-C-104408-501 Normalized Peda... 44 0.54 2 EB238172 |EB238172.1 PEG003-C-223796-501 Normalized Pedal-Pleural Gang

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHA596 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available um heat-shock cognate protein 70 (hsc70) mRNA, complete cds. 145 4e-76 3 EH431862 |EH431862.1 NPE00000311 Neocallimastix patricia...rum ZAP II cDNA library Neocallimastix patriciarum cDNA, mRNA sequence. 210 7e-71 3 CF6

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHA808 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 431344.1 NPE00000880 Neocallimastix patriciarum ZAP II cDNA library Neocallimastix patriciarum cDNA, mRNA se...mRNA sequence. 92 3e-14 1 EH431853 |EH431853.1 NPE00000476 Neocallimastix patriciarum ZAP II cDNA library Neocallimastix patricia

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHA513 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iarum ZAP II cDNA library Neocallimastix patriciarum cDN... to SW:SYM_HUMAN P56192 METHIONYL-TRNA SYNTHETASE ;, mRNA sequence. 68 7e-16 3 EH431684 |EH431684.1 NPE00000653 Neocallimastix patric

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHA116 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 585 |BI863585.1 kx46a06.y1 Parastrongyloides trichosuri FL pAMP1 v1 Chiapelli McCarter Parastrongyloides tri...ce. 66 3e-21 4 BI863575 |BI863575.1 kx45h07.y1 Parastrongyloides trichosuri FL pAMP1 v1 Chiapelli McCarter Parastrongyloides...5e-18 3 BI451383 |BI451383.1 kx23e09.y1 Parastrongyloides trichosuri FL pAMP1 v1 Chiapelli McCarter Parastrongyloides

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHA158 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available alophila cDNA, mRNA sequence. 90 9e-20 3 BG661617 |BG661617.1 kx04b11.y1 Parastrongyloides trichosuri IL SL1 TOPO v2 Parastrongyloide...quence. 46 1e-10 4 BI744098 |BI744098.1 kx55f06.y1 Parastrongyloides trichosuri PA pAMP1 v1 Chiapelli McCarter Parastrongyloides... mRNA sequence. 44 4e-10 4 BG661838 |BG661838.1 kx07a08.y1 Parastrongyloides tric...hosuri IL SL1 TOPO v2 Parastrongyloides trichosuri cDNA similar to SW:RSP4_CAEEL P46769 PROBABLE 40S RIBOSOM

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHA196 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9-PA (LD28793p), mRNA sequence. 74 6e-09 2 BI742991 |BI742991.1 kx37e02.y1 Parastrongyloides... trichosuri IL pAMP1 v1 Chiapelli McCarter Parastrongyloides trichosuri cDNA 5' similar to TR:Q19...070 Q19070 ELONGATION FACTOR 2-LIKE ;, mRNA sequence. 70 9e-09 2 BI743756 |BI743756.1 kx52f02.y1 Parastrongyloides... trichosuri PA pAMP1 v1 Chiapelli McCarter Parastrongyloides trichosuri cDNA 5' similar to TR:O08810 O...08810 U5-116KD. ;, mRNA sequence. 70 9e-09 2 BI501287 |BI501287.1 kx30d02.y1 Parastrongyloides

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHA862 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 38 0.17 5 CX072513 |CX072513.1 UCRCS08_28E10_g Parent Washington Navel Orange Callus cDNA Library UCRCS08-2... 46 1.2 1 CX072512 |CX072512.1 UCRCS08_28E10_b Parent Washington Navel Orange Callus cDNA Library UCRCS08-2

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHA888 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CV632073 |CV632073.1 Mdfrt3098d19.y1 Mdfrt Malus x domestica cDNA clone Mdfrt3098d19 5' similar to TR:O74320...CV627953 |CV627953.1 Mdfrt3107k12.y1 Mdfrt Malus x domestica cDNA clone Mdfrt3107k12 5' similar to SW:PNPP_YEAST...(AARA) Royal Gala partially senescing leaf Malus x domestica cDNA clone AARA010182, mRNA sequence. 34 1.0

  5. Dicty_cDB: VHA138 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineering clone MHPP186g09. 50 0.17 1 CR034434 |CR034434....1 Forward strand read from insert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineering...4 CR103667 |CR103667.1 Forward strand read from insert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engine...ering clone MHPP142o16. 50 0.17 1 CR044130 |CR044130.1 Forward strand read from ins

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHA372 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and read from insert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineering clo...ne MHPP142o16. 50 0.16 1 CR044130 |CR044130.1 Forward strand read from insert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineerin...in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineering clone MHPP47e19. 50 0.16... 1 CR023465 |CR023465.1 Forward strand read from insert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineering...insert in 3'HPRT insertion targeting and chromosome engineering clone MHPP414o21.

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHA647 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SQDPFPL YPGEVVIAQPVPLQVIQTNSALRLKCLRDFVEVKADKTTVSHIAGDEWLFEGPGTYYPRG *sssc--- Translated Amino Acid sequence...SQDPFPL YPGEVVIAQPVPLQVIQTNSALRLKCLRDFVEVKADKTTVSHIAGDEWLFEGPGTYYPRG *sssc--- Frame B: nyflqiyf*ytnn

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHA280 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available skml*mvkngllnligmpfsiklmnmlknn*vkyfikiyv qilvnvl*mhxkmn*lknqslmqillkrly*llmkmprthpigsmhlmvvn*IFYSRKVR NNITEA...lnligmpfsiklmnmlknn*vkyfikiyv qilvnvl*mhxkmn*lknqslmqillkrly*llmkmprthpigsmhlmvvn*IFYSRKVR NNITEAGNFELYKVIPS

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHA617 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lv*lgyrgerlieqpsswflpkfpsg*leqysssil*rq*lavsga*c sqlilkl*tggyhfnslnwilklnctcamknrss*waifgkqnwrcglnqilg*dv*HS...rtlfrkdlrlst*ngtrkvvnya*grrsqgkl *wrlvamltckslv*lgyrgerlieqpsswflpkfpsg*leqysssil*rq*lavsga*c sqlilkl*tggyhfnslnwilklnctcamk

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHA679 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pkfpsg*leqysssil*rq*lavsga*csqlil kl*tggyhfnslnwilklnctcamknrss*waifgkqnwrcglnqilg*dv*HSLIDTTK GVSSLR--- ---...kl*wrlv amltckslv*lgyrgerlieqpsswflpkfpsg*leqysssil*rq*lavsga*csqlil kl*tggyhfnslnwilklnctcamknrss*waifgkqnw

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHA265 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 145 9e-96 9 DQ060426 |DQ060426.1 Cryptosporidium andersoni strain zzca heat shock protein 70-like gene,...127 1e-85 8 AY954892 |AY954892.1 Cryptosporidium andersoni strain HenanZhzhca heat shock protein 70 gene...123 2e-85 9 AY954893 |AY954893.1 Cryptosporidium andersoni strain changchunca heat shock protein 70 gene

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHA602 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mRNA sequence. 52 0.044 1 DW014230 |DW014230.1 w7l15_M13F Myzus persicae, tobacco lineage, whole aphid library Myzus... persicae cDNA clone w7l15_M13F, mRNA sequence. 52 0.044 1 DW013855 |DW013855.1 w6j1_M13F Myzus... persicae, tobacco lineage, whole aphid library Myzus persicae cDNA clone w6j1_M13F, m...RNA sequence. 52 0.044 1 DW013658 |DW013658.1 w6a21_M13F Myzus persicae, tobacco lineage, whole aphid library Myzus... persicae cDNA clone w6a21_M13F, mRNA sequence. 52 0.044 1 DW012158 |DW012158.1 w16b5_M13F Myzus pers

  13. Dicty_cDB: VHA534 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available partial sequence. 56 2e-06 2 EE263933 |EE263933.1 D05_D05gf3f10_pDNRf_505335 Myzus persicae, line G006, who...le female aphid library Myzus persicae cDNA clone D05_D05gf3f10_pDNRf_505335, mRN

  14. Dicty_cDB: VHA279 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2e-14 4 EC388462 |EC388462.1 C05_C05gm3n9_pDNRf_491526 Myzus persicae, line G006, whole aphid library Myzus... persicae cDNA clone C05_C05gm3n9_pDNRf_491526, mRNA sequence. 58 4e-13 3 EC388376 |EC388376.1 B10_B10gm2a20_pDNRf_490797 Myzus... persicae, line G006, whole aphid library Myzus persicae cDNA clone B10_B10gm2a20_pDNRf_4

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHA408 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available apiens chromosome 13q34 schizophrenia region contig 1 section 5 of 11 of the complete sequence. 42 0.37 6 DU...ome 11 clone RP11-195I23, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 25 unordered pieces. 44 0.14 4 AE014308 |AE014308.1 Homo s

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHA180 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ophrenia region contig 1 section 5 of 11 of the complete...11 clone RP11-195I23, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 25 unordered pieces. 44 0.15 4 AE014308 |AE014308.1 Homo sapiens chromosome 13q34 schiz

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHA526 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available *fnxfvlfsmvmvivvigknspnxex*qiyhrlqrl* qiltlkrilnsflkvifshqxnwnhvkrfslkfiinqlkskqtlymi*fqlwyfqlvlli krillnl*t...tlkrilnsflkvifshqxnwnhvkrfslkfiinqlkskqtlymi*fqlwyfqlvlli krillnl*tl*chsfkvknlsvnqiinilislkslnl Homology vs

  18. VHA Support Service Center Electronic Wait List (EWL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The goal of the Electronic Wait List (EWL) is to provide care to the patient as quickly as possible. To facilitate this goal, patients may be placed on a Wait List...

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHA876 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gngk eieeydieskinfavfpslqggphenviagvavalkeadsqefkeyalqvkknaaaigna lmnkgyklvtngtdnhlilwdlrpkeltgnkfekaadianit...vnknavhgdtnaispggi rigssaltsrglkeadfekiadfldrivsisleiqgrvgkklvdfvveinkskelldlrk eveefsskftlpgi*iir*k Homolog

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHA713 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Mus musculus chromosome UNK clone RP23-210F5, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 11 unordered pieces. 42 3.7 1 AC091082...sapiens chromosome 11 clone RP11-869B15 map 11, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 13 unordered pieces. 42 3.7 1 AC090368...sapiens chromosome 11 clone RP11-686D5 map 11, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 12 unordered pieces. 42 3.7 1 AC090316...sapiens chromosome 11 clone RP11-772K10 map 11, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 23 unordered pieces. 42 3.7 1 Y12335...genomic DNA, chromosome 11q13 clone:RP11-686D5, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 40 unordered pieces. 42 3.7 1 AP000928

  1. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  2. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Patient Satisfaction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHA186 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NA, RIKEN full-length enriched library, clone:BH10065F07, 3' end partial sequence. 26 1.8 4 AC195027 |AC195027.2 Colobus guereza... clone CH272-158P19, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 9 ordered pieces. 44 3.4 1 AC193841 |AC193841.2 Colobus guereza

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHA468 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available staceipes cDNA clone WLt055_D06 5', mRNA sequence. 62 6e-19 4 EC825570 |EC825570.1 SME00006960 esmbsro2 Sawy...eria marylandensis cDNA, mRNA sequence. 56 8e-19 5 EC825841 |EC825841.1 SME00002495 esmbsr

  5. Undersøgelse af antibiotikaresistens vha. Sensititre systemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mueller-Hinton/bakteireblandingen overføres til reservoirskålen. 8-kanalspipetten introduceres, og dens indstilling vises. Sådan påsættes spidser på 8-kanalspipetten. Der suges bakterieblanding op i pipetten, og der vises at man skal huske at tjekke at der er lige meget væske i alle 8 spidser. Væ....... Væsken overføres til 1. kolonne i Sensititrepladen, gentages 1 gang mere. Påsætning af film, tryk filmen godt og grundigt fast. Visning af at pladen er mærket med Gruppe, øvelse, isolat, dato. Skrivning af klokkeslæt for inkubering....

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHA633 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  7. Dicty_cDB: VHA312 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  8. Dicty_cDB: VHA687 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHA285 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHA466 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  11. Dicty_cDB: VHA262 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHA358 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY893926.1 CeleSEQ13391 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...DY885896 |DY885896.1 CeleSEQ991 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY886077.1 CeleSEQ1581 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY895351.1 CeleSEQ15152 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  13. Dicty_cDB: VHA185 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  14. Dicty_cDB: VHA293 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DN814237 |A Chain A, The Structure Of The Bovine Lysosomal A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For Low...ine Lysosomal A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For Low Ph Activation, mRNA sequence. 52 3e-16 4 DN81...sidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For Low Ph Activation, mRNA sequence. 52 2e-16 ... Ph Activation, mRNA sequence. 52 2e-16 4 DN816506 |A Chain A, The Structure Of The Bovine Lysosomal A-Manno

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHA111 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n A, The Structure Of The Bovine Lysosomal A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism...al A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For Low Ph Activation, mRNA sequence. 52 2e-16 4 CX633815 |CX633...annosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For Low Ph Activation, mRNA sequence. 52 4e

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHA313 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For Low Ph Activation, mRNA sequence. 52... 4e-14 4 DN816506 |A Chain A, The Structure Of The Bovine Lysosomal A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism... 4 DT613126 |A Chain A, The Structure Of The Bovine Lysosomal A-Mannosidase Suggests A Novel Mechanism For L

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHA356 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available clone: QccE-11692, 5' end, expressed incerebellum cortex. 50 0.090 1 CJ470069 |CJ470069.1 Macaca fascicularis...clone: QccE-20786, 5' end, expressed in cerebellum cortex. 48 0.36 1 CI031426 |CI031426.1 Oryza sativa (japonica

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHA443 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vermiformis cDNA, mRNA sequence. 131 2e-26 1 EC130095 |EC130095.1 HVE00009927 Ha...iformis Normalized long fraction Hartmannella vermiformis cDNA, mRNA sequence. 123 4e-24 1 EC130620 |EC13062

  19. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHA130 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DLISHKYNVAPSIDKEDKVDFRTLKLDPETEHQYAHHIKEFRDKDAKGLISQQDAFEFTN YINYLKESSATSPIIQSLKSSIHMKSNNNELIDQFNAESLEKDTTTTDKLSPEGLFFKQL...DLISHKYNVAPSIDKEDKVDFRTLKLDPETEHQYAHHIKEFRDKDAKGLISQQDAFEFTN YINYLKESSATSPIIQSLKSSIHMKSNNNELIDQFNAESLEKDTTTTDKLSPEGLFFKQL

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHA609 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 002.10.25 Translated Amino Acid sequence lsfiqngqhpksp*dslcqvqqthptqgypiqsw*tksfrtr*ktlrs*tirfwwsnqts fpqesq...sewnvhvvtrnnkf*rdvnvsnsvvrknqrtkllrckfililiv *k*r*tykkkpfk Frame B: lsfiqngqhpksp*dslcqvqqthptqgypiqsw*tksfrtr*ktlrs*tirf...sfiqngqhpksp*dslcqvqqthptqgypiqsw*tksfrtr*ktlrs*tirfwwsn qtsfpqesqnyqkdrtqngmfmwlqettsfkem*tfrtrw*ekikersy*d

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHA579 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rcl *snesywid***tk--- ---skfntxriitsxfnxnl*tsnxckxcpxkxwwpxxkcktir*sxlrfxw*ilngix...f xxg*yfxcfxsxlw*lvgcrvkrxxw*ssfklftixkxxcpxkxwwsxssxw*xcsxyxy nfwwxxxwwfq*wpinxsirxwxxssixxwwygskrwlgsssixx

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHA254 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sequence. 44 0.004 7 CV301445 |CV301445.1 MM8_F01 Young roots probed with 3 week old root enriched transcripts...sequence. 54 0.011 1 CV301444 |CV301444.1 MM8_E01 Young roots probed with 3 week old root enriched transcripts

  4. Dicty_cDB: VHA112 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Translated Amino Acid sequence FGVMPKIGWHIDPFGHSATQARIFGQLGFDAFIIGRMDYQDIEARLENKQMEFMWRSTQS TPENQVFTSVL...rffkgfvftfspm qirt Frame C: FGVMPKIGWHIDPFGHSATQARIFGQLGFDAFIIGRMDYQDIEARLENKQMEFMWRSTQS TPENQVFTSVL

  5. Dicty_cDB: VHA108 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EU937530_1( EU937530 |pid:none) Mus musculus sucrase-isomaltase mR... 117 5e-25 AB057452_1( AB057452 |pid:none)...sapiens maltase-glucoamylase ... 114 3e-24 L25926_1( L25926 |pid:none) Rat sucrase-isomaltase (SI) mRNA...Full=Sucrase-isomaltase, intestinal; Contains:... 113 6e-24 ( O43451 ) RecName: Full=Maltase-glucoamylase

  6. Dicty_cDB: VHA663 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Value N U72236 |U72236.1 Dictyostelium discoideum ModA (modA) gene, complete cds. 1134 0.0 1 DV771667 |DV771667...Expect = 4e-50, mRNA sequence. 36 0.065 2 CX994013 | ModA - Dictyostelium discoideum. Score = 178 bits (451)

  7. Evaluation of Flammability of Footwear Upper Materials. Patent and Regular Shoe Upper Leather vs. Porvair and Clarino Poromerics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    EVALUATION OF( 4 ) FLAMMABILITY OF FOOTWEAR UPPER MATERIALS: PATENT AND REGULAR SHOE UPPER LEATHER Vs. I’ORVAIR AND CLARINO POROMERICS 44., ET DTIC...EVALUATION OF FLAMMABILITY OF FOOTWEAR UPPER MATERIALS: PATENT AND REGULAR SHOE UPPER Final Report LEATHER VS. PORVAIR AND CLARINO POROMERICS S...Identify by block number) Flammability of Footwear Upper Materials;,’Military Dress Shoes ;-Poromeric Materials; Leather Materials; Patent Leather

  8. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991–2003 field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine. Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE  <  0.5 uncalibrated flow and nitrate loss results for a mildly sloped watershed with low runoff. The calibrated monthly tile flow, surface flow, nitrate-N in tile and surface flow, sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.65 and nitrate in tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.68 for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE  =  0.00–0.32 and −0.29–0.06, respectively. The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE  =  0.50–0.81 better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE  =  −0.11–0.49. The calibration

  9. Timing and origin for sand dunes in the Green River Lowland of Illinois, upper Mississippi River Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, X.; Hanson, P.R.; Wang, Hongfang; Young, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The recent increase in dune studies in North America has been heavily focused in the Great Plains, while less attention has historically been given to the dune fields east of the Mississippi River. Here we report ages and suggest a potential sediment source for sand dunes in the Green River Lowland, Illinois, which may provide a better understanding of the dynamic interactions between eolian, glacial, lacustrine and fluvial processes that shaped the landscapes of the upper Midwest. Seven coherent optically stimulated luminescence ages (OSL, or optical ages) obtained from four sites suggest that major dune construction in the Green River Lowland occurred within a narrow time window around 17,500 ago. This implies either an enhanced aridity or an episodic increase of sediment supply at 17,500 years ago, or combination of the both. Contrary to previous assertions that dune sand was sourced from the deflation of the underlying outwash sand deposited when the Lake Michigan Lobe retreated from the area, we propose that Green River Lowland dunes sand originated from the Green Bay Lobe through the Rock River. Specifically, sediment supply increased in the Rock River valley during drainage of Glacial Lake Scuppernong, which formed between ???18,000 and 17,000 years ago, when the Green Bay Lobe retreated from its terminal moraine. The lake drained catastrophically through the Rock River valley, providing glacial sediment and water to erode the preexisting sandy sediments. Throughout the remainder of the late Pleistocene, the Laurentide Ice Sheet drained into larger more northerly glacial lakes that in turn drained through other river valleys. Therefore, the dunes in the Green River Lowland formed only during the catastrophic drainage of Glacial Lake Scuppernong, but were stabilized through the remainder of the Pleistocene. This scenario explains the abrupt dune construction around 17,500 years ago, and explains the lack of later dune activity up to the Pleistocene

  10. Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum of the Upper Lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan A. Al-Habsi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP is a rare skin tumour believed to arise from the apocrine or eccrine sweat glands. It appears predominantly in childhood, usually at birth. It is exceedingly rare for it to appear on the upper lip. We report a case of SCAP in a 10-year-old Omani girl who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in February 2012 with a non-tender, non-pruritic, solitary verrucous papule of 4 x 5 mm on the left side of the upper lip. It had been present since birth and had slowly been increasing in size over the years. It was occasionally associated with recurrent ulceration and bleeding and had previously been misdiagnosed and mismanaged. An excisional biopsy was performed and the whole lesion was removed. The surgical site was then sutured and the patient was discharged on the same day.

  11. A giant upper eyelid ossifying pilomatrixoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizvi Syed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilomatrixoma of the eyelid is extremely rare in middle age and rarely develops into a large tumor. A 45-year-old female developed a painless, progressive swelling (3.0 cm x 2.0 cm of the left upper eyelid over a period of two years. Overlying skin was normal in color and texture. A differential diagnosis of dermoid, epidermoid cyst, chalazion and basal cell carcinoma was made. An excisional biopsy was performed. A diagnosis of pilomatrixoma was made on histopathological features (dystrophic calcification of matrix with keratin and foreign body granulomatous reaction, basaloid cells and shadow cells/ghost cells. It also comprises ossification apart from the usual calcification. This is a report of an unusually large ossifying pilomatrixoma in left upper eyelid of a middle-aged woman. The patient should be followed up at regular intervals to rule out any recurrence or malignant transformation.

  12. Fibrolipoma on upper eyelid in child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corredor-Osorio, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An 18-months-old male infant presented with a rapidly growing tumor on the right upper eyelid. Orbital computed tomography (CT revealed a large, well-circumscribed mass with low density signal in the right upper eyelid. Magnetic resonance images (MRI showed a lesion of mixed T1-signal intensity and high signal intensity in T2-weighted images. The tumor was treated by simple anterior orbitotomy with excisional biopsy, and the diagnosis of fibrolipoma was made by histopathologic examination. There was no evidence of tumor at the four-year follow-up. Fibrolipoma is one of the rare variant of the lipoma and only four cases have been reported in the orbit including the present case. Except for this case all other cases were reported in adults.

  13. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated-measures des......OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated...... procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability...

  14. Emulating Upper Limb Disorder for Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ayuni binti Che Zakaria

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Robotics not only contributes to the invention of rehabilitation devices, it can also enhance the quality of medical education. In recent years, the use of patient simulators and part-task trainers in the medical education field has brought meaningful improvements in the training of medical practitioners. Nevertheless, in the context of therapy training for upper limb disorders, trainee therapists still have to engage directly with the patients to gain experience of the rehabilitation of physical diseases. In this work, a high-fidelity part-task trainer that is able to reproduce the stiffness of spasticity and rigidity symptoms of the upper limb, such as those observed in post-stroke patients and Parkinson's disease patients, has been developed. Based on the evaluation carried out by two experienced therapists, the developed part-task trainer is able to simulate different patient cases and help trainee therapists gain pre-clinical experience in a safe and intuitive learning environment.

  15. PWR upper/lower internals shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homyk, W.A. [Indian Point Station, Buchanan, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    During refueling of a nuclear power plant, the reactor upper internals must be removed from the reactor vessel to permit transfer of the fuel. The upper internals are stored in the flooded reactor cavity. Refueling personnel working in containment at a number of nuclear stations typically receive radiation exposure from a portion of the highly contaminated upper intervals package which extends above the normal water level of the refueling pool. This same issue exists with reactor lower internals withdrawn for inservice inspection activities. One solution to this problem is to provide adequate shielding of the unimmersed portion. The use of lead sheets or blankets for shielding of the protruding components would be time consuming and require more effort for installation since the shielding mass would need to be transported to a support structure over the refueling pool. A preferable approach is to use the existing shielding mass of the refueling pool water. A method of shielding was devised which would use a vacuum pump to draw refueling pool water into an inverted canister suspended over the upper internals to provide shielding from the normally exposed components. During the Spring 1993 refueling of Indian Point 2 (IP2), a prototype shield device was demonstrated. This shield consists of a cylindrical tank open at the bottom that is suspended over the refueling pool with I-beams. The lower lip of the tank is two feet below normal pool level. After installation, the air width of the natural shielding provided by the existing pool water. This paper describes the design, development, testing and demonstration of the prototype device.

  16. Postoperative pleural effusion following upper abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P H; Jepsen, S B; Olsen, A D

    1989-01-01

    Of 128 patients who underwent upper abdominal surgery, examined by standard preoperative and postoperative chest roentgenograms for the formation of postoperative pleural effusions, 89 had postoperative pleural effusions. Their presence was not related to the type of operation, infection, serum...... to postoperative sodium and water retention, and aggravated by an age-related relative cardiac decompensation. Early postoperative pleural effusions are common and do not require specific treatment....

  17. Neck muscle fatigue alters upper limb proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Limb proprioception is an awareness by the central nervous system (CNS) of the location of a limb in three-dimensional space and is essential for movement and postural control. The CNS uses the position of the head and neck when interpreting the position of the upper limb, and altered input from neck muscles may affect the sensory inputs to the CNS and consequently may impair the awareness of upper limb joint position. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue of the cervical extensors muscles (CEM) using a submaximal fatigue protocol alters the ability to recreate a previously presented elbow angle with the head in a neutral position. Twelve healthy individuals participated. CEM activity was examined bilaterally using surface electromyography, and kinematics of the elbow joint was measured. The fatigue protocol included an isometric neck extension task at 70 % of maximum until failure. Joint position error increased following fatigue, demonstrating a significant main effect of time (F 2, 18 = 19.41, p ≤ 0.0001) for absolute error. No significant differences were found for variable error (F 2, 18 = 0.27, p = 0.76) or constant error (F 2, 18 = 1.16 of time, p ≤ 0.33). This study confirms that fatigue of the CEM can reduce the accuracy of elbow joint position matching. This suggests that altered afferent input from the neck subsequent to fatigue may impair upper limb proprioception.

  18. Upper thymic prolongation simulating mediastinal lymphadenomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Wosny

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is located in the anterior portion of the upper mediastinum, immediately behind the sternal manubrium, and extends to the anterior mediastinum, anteriorly to the pericardium. Two patients were evaluated due to nodulations at the transition from the cervical region to the anterior mediastinum, which simulated lymphadenomegaly. The first patient, a seven-year-old male, presented with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the masticatory space; during progressive follow-up, a nodule was noted with FDG uptake on the positron emission tomography coupled with the computed tomography (PET-CT. The second patient, a 51-year-old female, presented with a nodulation characterized on the magnetic resonance image for follow-up of a papilliferous carcinoma of the thyroid. In both cases, the nodulation displayed an upper prolongation of the thymus. These nodulations showed the same density on the computed tomography and the same signal intensity on the magnetic resonance image as the adjacent thymic tissue, and there was no adipose tissue layer between the nodulations and the thymus. Knowledge of the upper prolongation of the thymus as an anatomical variation is vital for differentiating it from mediastinal lymphadenomegaly, thus avoiding unnecessary biopsies or procedures.

  19. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  20. Aeronomy of the Venus Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Bougher, S. W.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Pätzold, M.; Drossart, P.; Piccioni, G.

    2017-11-01

    We present aeronomical observations collected using remote sensing instruments on board Venus Express, complemented with ground-based observations and numerical modeling. They are mostly based on VIRTIS and SPICAV measurements of airglow obtained in the nadir mode and at the limb above 90 km. They complement our understanding of the behavior of Venus' upper atmosphere that was largely based on Pioneer Venus observations mostly performed over thirty years earlier. Following a summary of recent spectral data from the EUV to the infrared, we examine how these observations have improved our knowledge of the composition, thermal structure, dynamics and transport of the Venus upper atmosphere. We then synthesize progress in three-dimensional modeling of the upper atmosphere which is largely based on global mapping and observations of time variations of the nitric oxide and O2 nightglow emissions. Processes controlling the escape flux of atoms to space are described. Results based on the VeRA radio propagation experiment are summarized and compared to ionospheric measurements collected during earlier space missions. Finally, we point out some unsolved and open questions generated by these recent datasets and model comparisons.

  1. Land Capability Evaluation of Upper Sekampung Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Sukri Banuwa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation is a serious problem in the Upper Sekampung Watersheds. This is because the farmers cultivated in steep land to coffee crops without in adequate soil and water conservation practices. The land degradation is mostly caused by erosion. The erosion problem not only stripping the most fertile top soil and decreasing crop production, but also resulting problems in lowland. Therefore, the reorientation land management should be improved to produce agriculture sustainability. The first step is to evaluated land capability this area. The objectives of the research were evaluate land capability of Upper Sekampung Watersheds. The results showed that the Upper Sekampung Watersheds were dominated with class and subclass land capability of III-l2 about 17.630,51 ha (41,58%. All of the constrain for each land capability in this area is erosion hazard, especially land slope. From this research, cultivated land to coffee base crops were allowed in land capability II-l1.e1, III-l2, IV-l3, and VI-l4, with in adequate soil and water conservation practices. In contrary, the land capability of VII-l5 unsuitable for agriculture, they should be a nature or for conservation forest.

  2. Infantile lipofibromatosis of the upper limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Harvey E.L.; Peh, Wilfred C.G. [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Chan, Mei-Yoke [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Medicine, Singapore (Singapore); Walford, Norman [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Pathology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2005-12-01

    The imaging features of extensive lipofibromatosis presenting in a 1-day-old female infant are reported. This lesion involved her entire right upper limb, extending from the axilla to the palm of the hand. Radiographs showed marked deformity and thinning of all the right upper-limb bones due to pressure effect of soft-tissue enlargement, especially affecting the distal humerus and proximal forearm bones. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge soft-tissue mass infiltrating most of the muscles of the entire upper limb, with bony erosion. The mass was largely T1-isointense, moderately T2-hyperintense and showed marked enhancement. There were intra-lesional signal changes consistent with fatty elements. A lesion debulking procedure was performed and the histology was that of lipofibromatosis. The limb was found to be non-viable after the procedure and a subsequent above-elbow amputation was performed. Although the resection margins were not clear, she had no further recurrence over a subsequent 3-year follow-up period. (orig.)

  3. Upper gastrointestinal diseases in patients for endoscopy in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p-values< 0.05). Conclusion: Gastritis, ulcerative disease, and upper gastrointestinal malignancies are common in South-Western Ugandans and are associated with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori. Keywords: Upper gastrointestinal ...

  4. Pattern of Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UGT) including gastro esophageal reflux (GERD), peptic ulcer diseases (PU), and upper gastrointestinal malignancies was not studied recently in Sudan. Objectives: The aim of this study is to know the pattern of endoscopic findings of upper ...

  5. Venlafaxine and Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Elderly Depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucio Ghio; Serena Puppo; Andrea Presta

    2012-01-01

    .... In order to promote debate about possible risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly patients taking antidepressants different from SSRIs, we report a case of venlafaxine-induced upper...

  6. Possibilities of prosthetic upper limb fitting in cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Doležalová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor thesis give an overview of possible solutions in upper limbs prosthetic fitting which is suitable for cycling. And provide enough information on modifications that should be performed on a bicycle so that it can be used by humans with upper extremity prostheses. It can be an essential guide for anyone looking for a solution that would allow a person with an amputated upper limb again sit on the bike. Keywords: amputation, upper limb prosthesis, prosthetic fitting, cycling

  7. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Social networking among upper extremity patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Tamara D; George, Tina M; Chacko, Aron T

    2010-05-01

    Despite their rising popularity, the health care profession has been slow to embrace social networking sites. These are Web-based initiatives, designed to bring people with common interests or activities under a common umbrella. The purpose of this study is to evaluate social networking patterns among upper extremity patients. A total of 742 anonymous questionnaires were distributed among upper extremity outpatients, with a 62% response rate (462 were completed). Demographic characteristics (gender, age, level of education, employment, type of health insurance, and income stratification) were defined, and data on computer ownership and frequency of social networking use were collected. Social network users and nonusers were compared according to their demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Our patient cohort consisted of 450 patients. Of those 450 patients, 418 had a high school education or higher, and 293 reported a college or graduate degree. The majority of patients (282) were employed at the time of the survey, and income was evenly distributed among U.S. Census Bureau quintiles. A total of 349 patients reported computer ownership, and 170 reported using social networking sites. When compared to nonusers, social networking users were younger (pnetworking use. Most users (n = 114) regularly visit a single site. Facebook was the most popular site visited (n=142), followed by MySpace (n=28) and Twitter (n=16). Of the 450 upper extremity patients in our sample, 170 use social networking sites. Younger age, higher level of education, and computer ownership were associated with social networking use. Physicians should consider expanding their use of social networking sites to reach their online patient populations. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Historical Geography of the Upper Tombigbee Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    0-0117 005 AL4AA8A IIV IN BZFI~~N$A cmkf FOR TH4I STW ~V O5-C PlO 5/4045TORICAL W5APm or T~iq LP t’ viLLEY. tuM AY t an 0 Po ot C4714(76) iL d Au rI...Archeology Upper Tombigbee Valley Cultural Resources Tombigbee River Predictive Models * A Settlement Patterns Transportation Activities cont on n xt...Tombigbee River Multi- Resource District of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway in Alabama and Mississippi. THE CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN HISTORY

  10. External Environment and Upper Echelons Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escribá-Esteve, Alejandro; Nielsen, Sabina; Yamak, Sibel

    This work reviews empirical research on TMTs with a specific emphasis on the role of the external environment. We extend the existing research on upper echelons theory, which has largely focused on the team and firm level of analyses of top management teams (TMT). Considering institutional...... and industrial organization theories, we elaborate a cross-level conceptual model outlining the direct, mediating and moderating effects of the external environment on TMTs and their impact. Our review distinguishes between industry and institutional level of analyses and three types of environmental...

  11. Compressive neuropathy in the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrampment neuropathy or compression neuropathy is a fairly common problem in the upper limb. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest, followed by Cubital tunnel compression or Ulnar Neuropathy at Elbow. There are rarer entities like supinator syndrome and pronator syndrome affecting the Radial and Median nerves respectively. This article seeks to review comprehensively the pathophysiology, Anatomy and treatment of these conditions in a way that is intended for the practicing Hand Surgeon as well as postgraduates in training. It is generally a rewarding exercise to treat these conditions because they generally do well after corrective surgery. Diagnostic guidelines, treatment protocols and surgical technique has been discussed.

  12. Compressive neuropathy in the upper limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Mansukhani, Khushnuma A.

    2011-01-01

    Entrampment neuropathy or compression neuropathy is a fairly common problem in the upper limb. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest, followed by Cubital tunnel compression or Ulnar Neuropathy at Elbow. There are rarer entities like supinator syndrome and pronator syndrome affecting the Radial and Median nerves respectively. This article seeks to review comprehensively the pathophysiology, Anatomy and treatment of these conditions in a way that is intended for the practicing Hand Surgeon as well as postgraduates in training. It is generally a rewarding exercise to treat these conditions because they generally do well after corrective surgery. Diagnostic guidelines, treatment protocols and surgical technique has been discussed. PMID:22022039

  13. Volkmann's ischemic contracture of the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botte, M J; Keenan, M A; Gelberman, R H

    1998-08-01

    Upper extremity deformity of ischemic contracture usually includes elbow flexion, forearm pronation, wrist flexion, thumb flexion and adduction, digital metacarpophalangeal joint extension, and interphalangeal joint flexion. Treatment of mild contractures consists of either nonoperative management with a comprehensive rehabilitation program (to increase range of motion and strenght) or operative management consisting of infarct excision or tendon lengthening. Treatment of moderate-to-severe contractures consists of release of secondary nerve compression, treatment of contractures (with tendon lengthening or recession), tendon or free-tissue transfers to restore lost function, and/or salvage procedures for the severely contracted or neglected extremity.

  14. Multicultural Upper Secondary School Life in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    Education has played an important role in the development of the Nordic welfare states. As in other European countries, present day Denmark wrestles with the problem of finding ways to handle the increased diversity of its population in terms of, for instance, ethnicity, religion and language....... Hence, negotiations and contestations about how to operationalize different forms of multiculturalism on all sorts of multicultural issues are currently on the agenda in relation to the welfare state. This article explores the interaction between ethnic majority and ethnic minority students in an upper...

  15. UPPER LIMB FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT USING HAPTIC INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Bardorfer

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the assessment of the upper limb (UL functional state, using a haptic interface is presented. A haptic interface is used as a measuring device, capable of providing objective, repeatable and quantitative data of the UL motion. A patient is presented with a virtual environment, both graphically via a computer screen and haptically via the Phantom Premium 1.5 haptic interface. The setup allows the patient to explore and feel the virtual environment with three of his/her senses; sight, hearing, and most important, touch. Specially designed virtual environments are used to assess the patient’s UL movement capabilities. The tests range from tracking tasks – to assess the accuracy of movement – tracking tasks with added disturbances in a form of random forces – to assess the patient’s control abilities, a labyrinth test – to assess both speed and accuracy, to the last test for measuring the maximal force capacity of the UL.A new method for the assessment of the upper limb (UL functional state, using a haptic interface is presented. A haptic interface is used as a measuring device, capable of providing objective, repeatable and quantitative data of the UL motion. A patient is presented with a virtual environment, both graphically via a computer screen and haptically via the Phantom Premium 1.5 haptic interface. The setup allows the patient to explore and feel the virtual environment with three of his/her senses; sight, hearing, and most important, touch. Specially designed virtual environments are used to assess the patient’s UL movement capabilities. The tests range from tracking tasks–to assess the accuracy of movement-tracking tasks with added disturbances in a form of random forces-to assess the patient’s control abilities, a labyrinth test-to assess both speed and accuracy, to the last test for measuring the maximal force capacity of the UL.A comprehensive study, using the developed measurement setup within the

  16. Phantom pain in bilateral upper limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modirian, Ehsan; Shojaei, Hadi; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Masoumi, Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    To alert health professionals on presence and extent of phantom pain and sensation following bilateral upper limb amputation. Of a total of 140 war-related bilateral upper limb amputees in Iran, 103 subjects were thoroughly examined in this cross-sectional study by a physical medicine specialist. The patients were questioned for the presence of phantom pain and sensations, and frequency and intensity of the feeling were recorded. At 17.1 +/- 6.1 years after injury, 82.0% of the 103 amputees suffered from phantom sensation, including varying degrees of phantom limb pain in 53.9% of stumps. Phantom phenomena had a higher frequency in the right extremities, but this was not statistically significant (p > 0.01). Of those amputees who had phantom pain or sensation, 51.2% reported that they 'always' had phantom limb sensation; and approximately one-fourth of the subjects (24.6%) 'always' had phantom pain. Among the stumps who reported phantom pain (N=112), the pain was excruciating (38.5%), distressing (34.9%) or discomforting (25.6%). A significant statistical relation between phantom limb sensation and level of amputation was observed (p phantom pain; medical and surgical modalities only bring temporary relief, and less than 1% of the respondents achieve permanent relief through different treatment methods.

  17. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  18. [Tumours of the upper cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández García, Borja Jesús; Isla Guerrero, Alberto; Castaño, Ana; Alvarez Ruiz, Fernando; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral tumours arising in the upper cervical spine are rare. We present our experience in managing these neoplasms. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of patients treated at our institution between January 2000 and June 2011. There were 9 patients with tumours in C1-C2-C3: 2metastases, 3chordomas, 2plasmocytomas, 1chondrosarcoma and 1osteochondroma. All patients complained of neck pain at the time of diagnosis. Three patients underwent an anterior and posterior approach, 3 an exclusively posterior approach and 3 an exclusively anterior surgical approach. Tumour resection was intralesional in 7 cases. Chemo-radiotherapy was used as adjuvant therapy in patients with malignant tumours. Vertebral tumours in the upper cervical spine are usually malignant. Achieving en bloc resection is particularly challenging and is technically unfeasible in many cases. This worsens the prognosis and makes adjuvant treatment very important. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Does upper blepharoplasty affect frontalis tonicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daejin; Son, Daegu; Kim, Minkyung; Harijan, Aram; Yang, Shimo; Lee, Soyoung

    2015-05-01

    Frontalis hypertonicity has long been implicated in patients with significant dermatochalasia or blepharoptosis, as evidenced by eyebrow changes that occur after the resection of redundant skin or after blepharoptosis operation. However, whether upper blepharoplasty affects the forehead muscle has not been reported. Thus, this study investigated electrophysiology of the frontalis muscle and eyebrow morphology in a population of patients undergoing double-eyelid blepharoplasty. Patients wishing to undergo upper blepharoplasty were recruited for this prospective study between June 2011 and February 2012. The subjects were excluded for complaints of visual obstruction, trauma history, and for any underlying medical condition that would affect eyebrow height or electromyogram (EMG) findings. Eyebrow morphology was ascertained in a standardized photogrammetric evaluation, and the frontalis muscle activity was recorded with needle EMG. These assessments were carried out at preoperation and at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Root-mean-square (RMS) indices of various facial expressions were used to normalize the frontalis activity values across individuals. Thirteen patients with a mean age of 55.5 years were recruited. No statistical significance was observed for eyebrow heights at various assessment points. However, EMG recordings have demonstrated a gradual decrease in the proportional RMS index of the frontalis muscle activity. This difference was statistically significant between preoperation and 6 months postoperation (p EMG readings as an input. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard O′Keeffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available.

  1. Exercise, immunology and upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, E M

    1997-03-01

    The literature reveals a paradoxical response of the immune and host defense systems to endurance exercise apparent stimulation following long-term regular training and suppression in response to acute exposure to exhaustive endurance exercise. Several epidemiological surveys have confirmed a clinical manifestation of immunosuppression in the form of increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms following participation in competitive marathon and ultramarathon running events. Prerace training status and racing intensity have been related to the incidence of this symptomatology during the postrace fortnight. Nutritional intervention studies have shown the antioxidant nutrient, vitamin C, to be effective in reducing the incidence of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms following competitive distance events. Laboratory studies have revealed this vitamin to be the first line of defense in neutralizing the auto-oxidative activity of phagocytes. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced neuroendocrine stimulation of the oxidative burst in neutrophils increases the rate of release of reactive oxygen species and that these are, in turn, neutralized by high plasma ascorbate levels. Enhancing intrinsic antioxidant defense by increasing exogenous antioxidant intake is thus theorized to be of long-term benefit to serious endurance athletes engaged in heavy training and competition.

  2. Upper Extremity Assessment in Tetraplegia: The Importance of Differentiating Between Upper and Lower Motor Neuron Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, Anne M; Hoyen, Harry A; Keith, Michael W; Mejia, Melvin; Kilgore, Kevin L; Nemunaitis, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    Scientific advances are increasing the options for improved upper limb function in people with cervical level spinal cord injury (SCI). Some of these interventions rely on identifying an aspect of paralysis that is not uniformly assessed in SCI: the integrity of the lower motor neuron (LMN). SCI can damage both the upper motor neuron and LMN causing muscle paralysis. Differentiation between these causes of paralysis is not typically believed to be important during SCI rehabilitation because, regardless of the cause, the muscles are no longer under voluntary control by the patient. Emerging treatments designed to restore upper extremity function (eg, rescue microsurgical nerve transfers, motor learning-based interventions, functional electrical stimulation) all require knowledge of LMN status. The LMN is easily evaluated using surface electrical stimulation and does not add significant time to the standard clinical assessment of SCI. This noninvasive evaluation yields information that contributes to the development of a lifetime upper extremity care plan for maximizing function and quality of life. Given the relative simplicity of this assessment and the far-reaching implications for treatment and function, we propose that this assessment should be adopted as standard practice for acute cervical SCI. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. What Makes an Upper-Division Course Upper-Division? Differing Perspectives of Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Mary; Lee, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare faculty and student expectations of course content, structure and requirements of lower and upper-division courses. Two groups of participants were recruited: 1) undergraduate psychology majors, and 2) Social Sciences faculty. The survey consisted of a series of questions regarding expectations and…

  4. Mid-upper-arm-circumference and mid-upper-arm circumference z-score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J; Andersen, A; Fisker, A B

    2012-01-01

    Mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) is a simple method of assessing nutritional status in children above 6 months of age. In 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) introduced a MUAC z-score for children above 3 months of age. We evaluated whether MUAC or MUAC z-score had the best ability to identify...

  5. Prospects for an upper Givetian substage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Aboussalam

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available New ammonoid and conodont data from Germany, the Montagne Noire (France and southeastern Morocco document a complex sequence of sedimentary events and faunal changes within an extended Givetian (late Middle Devonian Taghanic Event Interval or Taghanic Biocrisis. Direct association of supposed typical middle Givetian ammonoids, trilobites and corals with upper Givetian marker taxa such as pharciceratids have been found, for example, in Moroccan and French time equivalents of the New York Upper Tully Limestone. The initial and eustatic Taghanic Onlap level is not known to be characterized by the first appearance of any widespread index conodont, goniatite or other taxon. A future upper Givetian substage, therefore, might be based either on the entry of Ozarkodina semialternans or on the first appearance of Schmidtognathus hermanni. The semialternans Zone correlates with a third sedimentary cycle within the Tully Limestone and with the spread of the first Pharciceratidae. Eobeloceratidae (Mzerrebites juvenocostatus and Archoceratidae n. fam. (Atlantoceras. The (Lower hermanni Zone is marked by a post-event transgression which led to a significant conodont radiation and to a further diversification of Pharciceratidae and Eobeloceratidae (Mz. erraticus. Neue Ammonoideen- und Conodonten-Daten aus Deutschland, Frankreich (Montagne Noire und aus Südost-Marokko belegen eine komplexe Abfolge sedimentärer Ereignisse und von Faunenwechseln in einem längerfristigen Taghanic-Event-Intervall bzw. einer Taghanic-Biokrise des Givetiums (oberes Mittel-Devon. Direkte Vergesellschaftungen von Ammonoideen, Trilobiten und Korallen, die früher als typische Mittel-Givetium-Formen angesehen wurden, mit Leitformen des Ober-Givetiums (z. B. Pharciceraten konnten in Marokko und Frankreich in Zeitequivalenten des Oberen Tully-Kalkes von New York nachgewiesen werden. Der initiale und eustatisch bedingte Taghanic Onlap ist bisher nicht durch das Einsetzen eines weit

  6. Upper tropospheric ice sensitivity to sulfate geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Mancini, Eva

    2017-04-01

    In light of the Paris Agreement which aims to keep global warming under 2 °C in the next century and considering the emission scenarios produced by the IPCC for the same time span, it is likely that to remain below that threshold some kind of geoengineering technique will have to be deployed. Amongst the different methods, the injection of sulfur into the stratosphere has received much attention considering its effectiveness and affordability. Aside from the rather well established surface cooling sulfate geoengineering (SG) would produce, the investigation on possible side-effects of this method is still ongoing. For instance, some recent studies have investigated the effect SG would have on upper tropospheric cirrus clouds, expecially on the homogenous freezing mechanisms that produces the ice particles (Kuebbeler et al., 2012). The goal of the present study is to better understand the effect of thermal and dynamical anomalies caused by SG on the formation of ice crystals via homogeneous freezing by comparing a complete SG simulation with a RCP4.5 reference case and with a number of sensitivity studies where atmospheric temperature changes in the upper tropospheric region are specified in a schematic way as a function of the aerosol driven stratospheric warming and mid-lower tropospheric cooling. These changes in the temperature profile tend to increase atmospheric stabilization, thus decreasing updraft and with it the amount of water vapor available for homogeneous freezing in the upper troposphere. However, what still needs to be assessed is the interaction between this dynamical effect and the thermal effects of tropospheric cooling (which would increase ice nucleation rates) and stratospheric warming (which would probably extend to the uppermost troposphere via SG aerosol gravitational settling, thus reducing ice nucleation rates), in order to understand how they combine together. Changes in ice clouds coverage could be important for SG, because cirrus ice

  7. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

     Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general...... or discomfort centred in the upper abdomen with or without nausea, vomiting, heartburn, acid regurgitation, early satiety or bloating. Patients were initially treated according to one of two management strategies. The patient was the unit of randomisation. Strategy 1:   Proton pump inhibitor (40 mg omeprazol......) for two weeks. If symptoms were unchanged after to weeks => referral to endoscopy. Later recurrence of symptoms => endoscopy (> 45 year) or management strategy according to helicobacter pylori status and/or clinical reflux (

  8. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other......) were selected by a risk set sampling. Data on all subjects' drug exposure and past medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and from the County's patient register. Confounders were controlled by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associating use...... significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18-1.05)]. CONCLUSION: Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin....

  9. Critical analysis of upper limb replantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rames Mattar Junior

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The authors analyze the follow-up of results in 62 adultpatients who had traumatic amputations in the upper limb andwho underwent successful replantation procedures from 1994 to2004. Methods: The levels of amputation were in fingers or thumbin 48, hand in 5, wrist in 4, forearm in 2 and arm in 3 patients. Allpatients were treated in a rehabilitation program of specializedhand therapy. A simplified questionnaire was used to evaluate thereturn to work activities using the operated limb, either in theformal or informal economy, and the patient’s satisfaction rateconcerning the surgical procedure. Results: It was noted that 85.5%of patients returned to some work activity using the operated limband 96.8% of patients are satisfied with the results. Conclusions:Patients submitted to successful replantation present a high rateof satisfaction and return to work activities.

  10. Coolant mixing in the HPLWR upper plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wank, Alexander; Schulenberg, Thomas; Class, Andreas G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnik

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a new type of reactor cooled with supercritical water. The cooling water is heated in 3 stages. In the first stage, the evaporator, the water flows to the top, then flows down in superheater 1 before again flowing upward in superheater II. To prevent peak temperatures and enthalpies being passed on from one heating stage to the next, and to homogenize temperature, the water is mixed in two mixing chambers between the heating stages. Mixing in the upper plenum was computed as a reference case by the STAR-CD CFD code. For quantitative evaluation of mixing, passive scalars were added to the flow and evaluated. Further studies will be conducted to improve mixing by appropriate design measures. (orig.)

  11. Emergency readmission following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömdahl, Martin; Helgeson, Johan; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the occurrence, clinical predictors, and associated mortality of all-cause emergency readmissions after acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with AUGIB from an area of 600 000 inhabitants in Sweden admitted in a single institution...... in 2009-2011 were retrospectively identified. All medical records were scrutinized and relevant data (such as comorbid illness and medications, endoscopy, rebleeding, inhospital mortality, and 30-day emergency readmission) were extracted. The Charlson comorbidity index was calculated. RESULTS: A total...... of 174 out of 1056 patients discharged alive following AUGIB (16.5%) had an emergency readmission within 30 days. Nineteen percent of readmissions were because of rebleeding, whereas the rest were because of other reasons, mainly bacterial infections (9.8%) and cardiovascular events (8%). Inhospital...

  12. Corrosive injuries of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Lal Meena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosive injury of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a worldwide clinical problem, mostly occurring in children. Alkaline agents produce deeper injuries whereas acidic agents produce superficial injuries usually. Hoarseness, stridor, and respiratory distress indicate airway injury. Dysphagia, odynophagia, and drooling of saliva suggest esophageal injury whereas abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are indicative of stomach injury. X-rays should be done to rule out perforation. Endoscopy is usually recommended in the first 12–48 h although it is safe up to 96 h after caustic ingestion. Endoscopy should be performed with caution and gentle insufflation. Initial management includes getting intravenous access and replacement of fluids. Hyperemia and superficial ulcerations have excellent recovery while deeper injuries require total parenteral nutrition or feeding jejunostomy. Patients suspected of perforation should be subjected to laparotomy. Common complications after corrosive injury are esophageal stricture, gastric outlet obstruction, and development of esophageal and gastric carcinoma.

  13. Mozambique upper fan: origin of depositional units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droz, L.; Mougenot, D.

    1987-11-01

    The upper Mozambique Fan includes a stable down-stream region, with a north-south channel flanked by thick (1.5 sec two-way traveltime) asymmetric levees, and a migrating upstream region where at least two main feeding paths have been successively dominant. From the Oligocene to early Miocene, the north-south Serpa Pinto Valley acted as the main conduit for the north Mozambique terrigenous sediments. From the middle Miocene, the west-east Zambezi Valley became the dominant path and supplied the fan with sediments transported by the Zambezi River from the central part of Mozanbique. The transfer from one sediment-feeding system to the other is related to the abandonment of the Serpa Pinto Valley because of graben formation along the Davie Ridge, which trapped the sediments, and the increase of the Zambezi River sediment supply because of the creation and erosion of the East African Rift. 13 figures.

  14. Hemospray application in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Lyn A; Stanley, Adrian J; Bergman, Jacques J

    2013-01-01

    in combination with other hemostatic modalities at the endoscopists' discretion. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients (44 men, 19 women), median age 69 (range, 21 to 98) years with NVUGIB requiring endoscopic hemostasis were treated with TC-325. There were 30 patients with bleeding ulcers and 33 with other NVUGIB......BACKGROUND: Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe. GOALS: We present the operating characteristics and performance of TC-325 in the largest registry to date of patients presenting with NVUGIB in everyday...... pathology. Fifty-five (87%) were treated with TC-325 as monotherapy; 47 [85%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 76%-94%] of them achieved primary hemostasis, and rebleeding rate at 7 days was 15% (95% CI, 5%-25%). Primary hemostasis rate for TC-325 in patients with ulcer bleeds was 76% (95% CI, 59%-93%). Eight...

  15. Women in Upper Houses: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Neiva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In analyses of female representation in lower houses, the adoption of quotas, the electoral system and the religious aspect have been identified as the main explanatory variables. In the case of upper houses, I see a relationship between their political strength and women’s presence in them: when they are weak, the presence of female representatives tends to be larger, when they are strong, women’s presence is smaller. Furthermore, the article shows that an analysis based solely on the number of seats held by women is insufficient for one to gather the true dimensions of their participation in politics. Evaluating the role and expressiveness of the institutions in which they are present is also necessary.

  16. Vascular anomalies of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular anomalies of the upper extremity are a surgical challenge to the hand surgeons. The treatment modality varies with respect to the presentation, extent of the lesion, progression and their complications. Based on our experience in treating patients with vascular malformations, a protocol has been formulated for their management, which we have found to be very useful and successful. With the use of the tumescent technique and good planning, haemangiomas are best excised in infancy or early childhood. Investigations like contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been found to be a useful tool in the diagnosis and planning of surgery for venous malformations. Embolisation seems to be a safe option in arteriovenous malformations.

  17. The management of upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, C L; Shajahan, Y; Khoo, E M; Nurjahan, I; Leong, K C; Yap, T G

    2001-06-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections are the commonest reason for consultation in primary care. Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS), the most important bacterial pathogen in this condition, can be cultured from about 30% of patients, more so in children than adults. Clinical features that are predictive of positive GABHS culture are absence of cough, fever, cervical adenopathy, tonsillar enlargement and tonsillar exudate. Use of a sore throat score can help in the detection of streptococcal throat infection. Symptomatic therapies which are useful include anticholinergic, antihistamine, decongestant, humified hot air and Vitamin C. Antibiotics are universally over-prescribed in this condition as a result of high patient expectation and faulty clinical decision making. Oral Penicillin V for 10 days is the drug of choice. Effective intervention to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescription probably require a multifaceted approach targeted at both the patients and the prescribers.

  18. Upper flow regime bedforms on Mediterranean prodeltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgeles, Roger; Cattaneo, Antonio; Puig, Pere; Liquete, Camino; Sultan, Nabil

    2015-04-01

    Most Mediterranean prodeltas show undulated sediment features on the foresets of their Holocene wedges. Using acoustic, geotechnical and hydrographic data as well as hydrodynamic time series we show that the sediment undulations are upper flow regime bedforms rather than sediment deformation. Various processes in the benthic boundary layer can be invoked to explain the variety of features observed across Mediterranean prodeltas displaying such bedforms. The most common mechanism for the genesis of these bedforms are likely sediment resuspension by internal waves and hyperpycnal flows. Evidence suggests that bedforms generated by these two processes probably differ in L/H ratio, with bedforms generated by hyperpycnal flows showing lower values. Additional mechanisms that may induce formation of sedimentary bedforms in Mediterranea prodeltas include waves and derived longshore currents in the shallowest bedform fields, or strong bottom currents in the deepest water bedform fields.

  19. International Experience in Upper Echelon Theory: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerđa Dino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The international experience of top managers is an evolving research within the upper echelon theory; therefore this literature review summarizes everything made so far.

  20. Analysis of Pollution Potential of the Upper San Pedro and Upper Santa Cruz Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincicome, A. D.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Transboundary aquifers along the U.S.-Mexico border are subject to unique demands and constraints, and are a focus of priority assessment under the auspices of the Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program. The Upper Santa Cruz and Upper San Pedro basins in southern Arizona are experiencing rapid population growth and development, and the associated water and environmental resource demands are stressors to water resource sustainability. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed to evaluate groundwater resources within these two basins using DRASTIC (Depth to water, net Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Impact of vadose zone media, and hydraulic Conductivity of the aquifer). DRASTIC analysis is a standardized method developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for evaluating groundwater pollution potential. DRASTIC was used to characterize the potential for contamination of groundwater by land surface sources. Data layers for the DRASTIC analysis were compiled and analyzed separately based on rating methods from DRASTIC. These methods rate each layer on a scale of one to ten, one being the least vulnerable to contamination and ten being the most vulnerable. Weights for each layer were also provided by DRASTIC based on each layer's contribution to the overall vulnerability of the aquifer. These layers were then analyzed using the equation: DRDW+RRRW+ARAw+SRSW+TRTW+IRIW+CRCW = Pollution Potential, where R = rating, and W = weight. This assessment was coupled with current knowledge of groundwater contamination and current land use practices to identify zones of potential concern. This information can be used to better direct city planning, zoning programs, and groundwater monitoring and remediation efforts throughout the Upper Santa Cruz and Upper San Pedro basins.

  1. Nasopharyngeal polymicrobial colonization during health, viral upper respiratory infection and upper respiratory bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingfu; Wischmeyer, Jareth; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-07-01

    We sought to understand how polymicrobial colonization varies during health, viral upper respiratory infection (URI) and acute upper respiratory bacterial infection to understand differences in infection-prone vs. non-prone patients. Nasopharyngeal (NP) samples were collected from 74 acute otitis media (AOM) infection-prone and 754 non-prone children during 2094 healthy visits, 673 viral URI visits and 631 AOM visits. Three otopathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat) were identified by culture. NP colonization rates of multiple otopathogens during health were significantly lower than during viral URI, and during URI they were lower than at onset of upper respiratory bacterial infection in both AOM infection-prone and non-prone children. AOM infection-prone children had higher polymicrobial colonization rates than non-prone children during health, viral URI and AOM. Polymicrobial colonization rates of AOM infection-prone children during health were equivalent to that of non-prone children during viral URI, and during viral URI were equivalent to that of non-prone during AOM infection. Spn colonization was positively associated with NTHi and Mcat colonization during health, but negatively during AOM infection. The infection-prone patients more frequently have multiple potential bacterial pathogens in the NP than the non-prone patients. Polymicrobial interaction in the NP differs during health and at onset of infection. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental effects of coal utilization in the midwest. Volume I. Energy scenarios, technology characterizations, air and water resource impacts, and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    An initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin is presented. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for the period 1975 to 2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. Included are: (1) a characterization of the energy demand and siting scenarios, coal related technologies, and coal resources, and (2) the related impacts on air quality, water availability, water quality, and human health.

  3. Correction of Sunken Upper Eyelids by Anchoring the Central Fat Pad to the Medial Fat Pad during Upper Blepharoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Su Jeon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMany methods have been proposed for the correction of sunken upper eyelids. These methods include surgical treatments, such as micro-fat, dermofat, or fascia-fat grafts, or the use of alloplastic materials. Here, we present our experience of sunken upper eyelid correction involving the simple addition of anchoring the central fat pad to the medial fat pad during upper blepharoplasty.MethodsWe performed 74 cases of upper blepharoplasty with sunken upper eyelid correction between October 2013 and September 2014. The lateral portion of the central fat pad was partially dissected to facilitate anchoring. The medial fat pad was gently exposed and then pulled out to facilitate anchoring. After the rotation of the dissected lateral portion of the central fat pad by 180° to the medial side, it was anchored spreading to the medial fat pad. Photographs taken at 6 months postoperatively were presented to three physicians for objective assessment. Of the 74 patients, 54 patients followed at 6 months postoperatively were included in this retrospective, objective assessment.ResultsSunken eyelids were effectively corrected in 51 of the 54 patients, but 3 had minimal effect because preaponeurotic fat pads had been removed during previous upper blepharoplasty. In addition to correcting sunken eyelids, lateral bulging was corrected and a better definition of the lateral portion of upper lid creases was obtained.ConclusionsAnchoring the central fat pad to the medial fat pad provides an effective means of correcting sunken upper eyelids during upper blepharoplasty.

  4. Urogenital trauma: imaging upper GU trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Stanford M. E-mail: Stanford.M.Goldman@uth.tmc.edu; Sandler, Carl M

    2004-04-01

    Objectives: This article will define the current controversies and concepts in the classification, clinical presentation, imaging approaches and management of upper urinary tract trauma. Materials and methods, results: This review will include the experience of the authors in the field of renal trauma over a 32-year period. Current thinking accepts the view that significant renal trauma is generally present when there is gross hematuria, signs of shock, or other clinical signs of severe injury. In most patients, suspected renal injury will be evaluated as a part of the overall assessment of the patient for suspected intraperitoneal injury. The authors will stress some exceptions to the rule. Conclusions: Most trauma experts now advocate conservative management, unless the patient is unstable or a renal vascular thrombosis or avulsion is suspected. Similarly, penetrating trauma to the kidney in and of itself no longer requires mandatory surgery. In the United States, computed tomography (CT), especially spiral CT, is considered the best diagnostic study, if available. Intravenous pyelography (IVP) is adequate if this is the only imaging modality available and if no concomitant injuries to the abdominal structure are suspected. Ultrasound, although strongly advocated in some countries, can lead to some significant false negatives. The diagnosis and management of unusual problems such as the traumatic AV fistula, the patient with an absent kidney or injury to the congenitally abnormal kidney, the serendipitous renal tumor in a patient with trauma, or serious bleeding after an apparent minor injury (i.e., spontaneous hemorrhage) are also reviewed in this article.

  5. Upper Atmospheric Particulate Monitoring and Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Alan; Sohl, John E.

    2010-10-01

    H.A.R.B.O.R. (High Altitude Reconnaissance Balloon for Outreach and Research) is a student-run program in which high-altitude balloon systems are designed, constructed, and flown by students conducting individual or group research projects. One area of interest is in the sampling of particles in the upper atmosphere. Collecting airborne particulates and studying them under an SEM can answer questions on the origins of airborne particulate matter. We could find explanations for climate change or directly measure pollution caused by smokestacks. The SEM has the capacity to capture images of particulates and determine their composition. I am building a system capable of sampling air up to 30km (100,000 ft). The system will contain a servo-controlled filter system for sampling air captured by the ascent of the balloon. Currently, filter types are being evaluated for capture rate and air flow resistance. A circuit has been built to test the mass throughput of the airflow as the balloon travels its course. A vacuum chamber is being built to simulate the nearspace environment. Testing and simulation should be complete in time to fly a finalized sample return mission in spring 2011.

  6. Palatoglossus coupling in selective upper airway stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Edenharter, Günther; Bas, Murat; Wirth, Markus; Hofauer, Benedikt

    2017-10-01

    Selective upper airway stimulation (sUAS) of the hypoglossal nerve is a useful therapy to treat patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Is it known that multiple obstructions can be solved by this stimulation technique, even at the retropalatal region. The aim of this study was to verify the palatoglossus coupling at the soft palate during stimulation. Single-center, prospective clinical trail. Twenty patients who received an sUAS implant from April 2015 to April 2016 were included. A drug-induced sedated endoscopy (DISE) was performed before surgery. Six to 12 months after activation of the system, patients' tongue motions were recorded, an awake transnasal endoscopy was performed with stimulation turned on, and a DISE with stimulation off and on was done. Patients with a bilateral protrusion of the tongue base showed a significantly increased opening at the retropalatal level compared to ipsilateral protrusions. Furthermore, patients with a clear activation of the geniohyoid muscle showed a better reduction in apnea-hypopnea index. A bilateral protrusion of the tongue base during sUAS seems to be accompanied with a better opening of the soft palate. This effect can be explained by the palatoglossal coupling, due to its linkage of the muscles within the soft palate to those of the lateral tongue body. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:E378-E383, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Transformation of Taiwan's Upper Secondary Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueih-Lirng Laih

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the policy issues circling around the structural "transition" in upper secondary education implicit in the twenty-year increase in secondary and third-level school enrollment rates in Taiwan. This expansion has taken place within a secondary school system which is rigidly divided into both general, i.e., academic, and vocational tracks and into public and private sectors: the majority of students are enrolled in the private vocational sector which is only loosely articulated with the university sector. These features of the school system are analysed against the background of social and economic developments in Taiwan as well as public opinion. The analysis suggests that the present structures of school must be "reformed" in ways that will result in a more unified secondary system with both greater public funding and better articulation of all school types with the third level. The policy options that circle around the possibility of such reforms in the areas of curriculum, examination structures and second level-third level articulation are discussed and a policy framework for the reform of the Taiwan secondary education sector is outlined.

  8. Radiogrammetric analysis of upper limb long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiogrammetry is radiological method of bone mineral density quantification. Besides giving an insight in diagnostics and evolution of metabolic bone disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteitis deformans- Paget's disease, it can also explain some specific biomechanical characteristics of bone structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance and perspectives of radiogrammetry as a scientific model for further inquiry of skeletal system. The work demonstrates mathematical parameters (Ca-Cortical area, CI- Cortical index, GI- Garn's index, ESI- Exton Smith's index of upper limb long bones (humerus, radius, ulna. Two standard radiological projections of bones were taken: antero-posterior (AP and latero-lateral (LL. Correlation with metacarpal and lower limb bones was also performed. The value of the cortical area of humerus is significantly higher comparing with the two other examined bones (Xmean 2,2443 cm2, p < 0.01. Radial bone has the highest values of the relational mathematical parameters, which implicates its higher strength by volumetric unit concerning humerus and ulna. Despite the development of contemporary osteometric procedures (ultrasound densitometry, dual X-ray absorptiometry, digital X-ray radiogrammetry, the classical radiogrammetry sustains its important role in diagnostics of metabolic bone disorders and it can be successfully used for biomechanical inquiry of skeletal system.

  9. Tumor budding in upper gastrointestinal carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Hendrik Koelzer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The basis of personalized medicine in oncology is the prediction of an individual’s risk of relapse and death from disease. The presence of tumor budding (TB at the tumor-host interface of gastrointestinal cancers has been recognized as a hallmark of unfavorable disease biology. TB is defined as the presence of dedifferentiated cells or small clusters of up to five cells at the tumor invasive front and can be observed in aggressive carcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, ampulla, colon and rectum. Presence of TB reproducibly correlates with advanced tumor stage, frequent lymphovascular invasion, nodal and distant metastasis. The UICC has officially recognized TB as additional independent prognostic factor in cancers of the colon and rectum. Recent studies have also characterized TB as a promising prognostic indicator for clinical management of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric adenocarcinoma. However, several important issues have to be addressed for application in daily diagnostic practice: 1 Validation of prognostic scoring systems for tumor budding in large, multi-center studies 2 Consensus on the optimal assessment method 3 Inter-observer reproducibility. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of TB in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract including critical appraisal of perspectives for further study.

  10. Tumor Budding in Upper Gastrointestinal Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor H.; Langer, Rupert; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The basis of personalized medicine in oncology is the prediction of an individual’s risk of relapse and death from disease. The presence of tumor budding (TB) at the tumor–host interface of gastrointestinal cancers has been recognized as a hallmark of unfavorable disease biology. TB is defined as the presence of dedifferentiated cells or small clusters of up to five cells at the tumor invasive front and can be observed in aggressive carcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, ampulla, colon, and rectum. Presence of TB reproducibly correlates with advanced tumor stage, frequent lymphovascular invasion, nodal, and distant metastasis. The UICC has officially recognized TB as additional independent prognostic factor in cancers of the colon and rectum. Recent studies have also characterized TB as a promising prognostic indicator for clinical management of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, and gastric adenocarcinoma. However, several important issues have to be addressed for application in daily diagnostic practice: (1) validation of prognostic scoring systems for TB in large, multi-center studies, (2) consensus on the optimal assessment method, and (3) inter-observer reproducibility. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of TB in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract including critical appraisal of perspectives for further study. PMID:25177546

  11. Novel and Lost Forests in the Upper Midwestern United States, from New Estimates of Settlement-Era Composition, Stem Density, and Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenoff, David J.; Cogbill, Charles V.; Record, Sydne; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Jackson, Stephen T.; Dietze, Michael C.; Dawson, Andria; Matthes, Jaclyn Hatala; McLachlan, Jason S.; Williams, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Background EuroAmerican land-use and its legacies have transformed forest structure and composition across the United States (US). More accurate reconstructions of historical states are critical to understanding the processes governing past, current, and future forest dynamics. Here we present new gridded (8x8km) reconstructions of pre-settlement (1800s) forest composition and structure from the upper Midwestern US (Minnesota, Wisconsin, and most of Michigan), using 19th Century Public Land Survey System (PLSS), with estimates of relative composition, above-ground biomass, stem density, and basal area for 28 tree types. This mapping is more robust than past efforts, using spatially varying correction factors to accommodate sampling design, azimuthal censoring, and biases in tree selection. Changes in Forest Structure We compare pre-settlement to modern forests using US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data to show the prevalence of lost forests (pre-settlement forests with no current analog), and novel forests (modern forests with no past analogs). Differences between pre-settlement and modern forests are spatially structured owing to differences in land-use impacts and accompanying ecological responses. Modern forests are more homogeneous, and ecotonal gradients are more diffuse today than in the past. Novel forest assemblages represent 28% of all FIA cells, and 28% of pre-settlement forests no longer exist in a modern context. Lost forests include tamarack forests in northeastern Minnesota, hemlock and cedar dominated forests in north-central Wisconsin and along the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and elm, oak, basswood and ironwood forests along the forest-prairie boundary in south central Minnesota and eastern Wisconsin. Novel FIA forest assemblages are distributed evenly across the region, but novelty shows a strong relationship to spatial distance from remnant forests in the upper Midwest, with novelty predicted at between 20 to 60km from

  12. Upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness under Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Wal, W. van der; Drury, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Deglaciation during the Holocene on Iceland caused uplift due to glacial isostatic adjustment. Relatively low estimates for the upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness result in rapid uplift responses to the deglaciation cycles on Iceland. The relatively high temperatures of the upper

  13. Cost Analysis of Medications Used in Upper Respiratory Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To conduct a cost analysis, a narrow cost-utility study, for upper respiratory tract infection medications in University Sans Malaysia's clinics. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done for all medical claims of upper respiratory tract infections in the period 2008 - 2009. The study was done in the clinics under ...

  14. Unexplained right upper quadrant abdominal pain? do not forget the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Right upper quadrant abdominal pain is a common reason for consulting a gastroenterologist. Commonly, it portends pathological processes occurring in the liver, gall bladder, or the gut however, unusual causes have been reported. We report cervical intervertebral disc prolapse causing right upper quadrant ...

  15. LATERAL CEPHALOMETRIC RADIOGRAPHY FOR EVALUATION OF UPPER AIRWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miesje Karmiati Purwanegara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influenced of respiration to dentocraniofacial growth and development is still controversial. The accurate radiologic examination is important factor for proper diagnosis. Deviation of upper airway (i.e. nasopharynx, oropharymx and nasal cavity could be evaluated by lateral and anteroposterior cephalometric projection technique. This paper explains several methods to evaluate upper respiratory tract by lateral radiograph.

  16. Upper Gastrointestinal Disease in Nairobi and Nakuru Counties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of gastritis as the major upper gastrointestinal morbidity. Esophageal varices, benign gastric ulcers and esophageal tumors show a significant difference between the two centres. Key Words: Endoscopy, Peptic, Ulcer, Dyspepsia. Introduction. Upper gastrointestinal complaints are a common presentation in many outpatient ...

  17. The effect of upper eyelid blepharoplasty on eyebrow position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, Marijn A.; van der Palen, Job; van der Lei, Berend

    Background: Although upper eyelid blepharoplasty is one of the most frequently performed facial plastic surgical procedures, there is no consensus of opinion about the effect of an upper eyelid blepharoplasty on the position of the eyebrows in a general population. Objectives: This study was

  18. The effect of transradial coronary catheterization on upper limb function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.H. van Leeuwen (Maarten); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); M.J. Lenzen (Mattie); R.W. Selles (Ruud); M.F. Hoefkens (Mirjam F.); F. Zijlstra (Felix); N. van Royen (Niels)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aim of this study was to analyze the change of upper limb function when percutaneous coronary procedures were performed through the radial artery. Background It is currently unknown if upper limb function is affected by transradial (TR) catheterization. Methods Between

  19. Pattern of presentation and management of benign upper urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Upper urinary tract obstruction is a common cause of severe symptoms, recurrent urinary tract infection and deterioration or complete loss of renal function when intervention is not timely. Objective: To document the pattern of presentation and the management options for the benign upper urinary tract ...

  20. Aetiology of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in North-Eastern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aetiology of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in North-Eastern Nigeria: A Retrospective Review of Endoscopic Findings. SK Mustapha, N Ajayi, YB Jibrin, A Shehu. Abstract. Background : Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common life threatening emergency resulting in a large number of hospital admissions.

  1. Rockall score of the acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rockall score of the acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients the experience in Sudan. ... subjective evaluation of outcome of patient treatment. Objectives: To predict the morbidity and mortality in patients presenting with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding at Ibn-Sina Hospital using the Rockall score. Patients and ...

  2. determination of upper mantle conductivity using quiet day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... produces large lateral variation in electrical conductivity. Keywords: Sq, spherical harmonic analysis, conductivity, ionospheric curtent. And upper mantle. 1 . Introduction. The systematic flow of varying electric current in the part of the earth's upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, give rise to a magnetic field ...

  3. International Spinal Cord Injury Upper Extremity Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Bryden, A; Curt, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Upper Extremity Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets, which facilitates consistent collection and reporting of basic upper extremity findings in the SCI population. SETTING: International. METHODS: A first draft...

  4. Orthodontic intervention of an impacted upper left central incisor due ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To present a case of a compound odontoma impeding eruption of the permanent upper left central incisor and to narrate its management. Case history: A 12-year-old girl attended at Muhimbili National Hospital dental clinic complaining of a missing upper anterior tooth. At the age of 3 years the patient sustained injury ...

  5. Upper South Platte Watershed Protection and Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Culver; Cindy Dean; Fred Patten; Jim Thinnes

    2001-01-01

    The Upper South Platte Basin is a critical watershed in Colorado. Nearly 80 percent of the water used by the 1.5 million Denver metropolitan residents comes from or is transmitted through this river drainage. The Colorado Unified Watershed Assessment identified the Upper South Platte River as a Category 1 watershed in need of restoration. Most of the river basin is...

  6. Chronic dehydration and symptomatic upper urinary tract stones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This (uncommon) occurrence of upper tract urolithiasis in young adults in Ibadan maybe related to chronic dehydration exacerbated by religious fasting. Further studies are required to explore this relation- ship,. Keywords: Urolithiasis, Upper Urinary Tract, Young. Adults, Nigeria, Dehydration, Religious fasting.

  7. CASE REPORT CASE SERIES Upper abdominal visceral injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A syndromic pattern of injury is described where a direct blow to the pelvis resulted in rupture of a distant, upper abdominal viscus. Shockwave propagation across the abdomen is the likely explanation for this phenomenon.4 The possibility of injury to an upper abdominal organ should be considered in all cases where there ...

  8. Upper wide-angle viewing system for ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasnier, C.J.; McLean, A.G.; Gattuso, A.; O'Neill, R.; Smiley, M.; Vasquez, J.; Feder, R.; Smith, M.; Stratton, B.; Johnson, D.; Verlaan, A.L.; Heijmans, J.A.C.

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Wide Angle Viewing System (UWAVS) will be installed on five upper ports of ITER. This paper shows major requirements, gives an overview of the preliminary design with reasons for some design choices, examines self-emitted IR light from UWAVS optics and its effect on accuracy, and shows

  9. Isolated primary lymphedema tarda of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Farzaneh; Ravari, Hasan; Kazemzadeh, Gholamhossein; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    Primary lymphedema tarda is considered as a congenital disease with late presentation. Primary lymphedema tarda usually affects lower limbs, and primary lymphedema tarda of the upper limbs usually accompanies lower limb lymphedema. In the current case report, we present an 80-year-old male patient with isolated left upper limb swelling that lymphoscintigraphy imaging proved to be lymphedema.

  10. Virtual Reality Training for Upper Extremity in Subacute Stroke (VIRTUES)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Iris; Skouen, Jan Sture; Hofstad, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of upper extremity virtual reality rehabilitation training (VR) to time-matched conventional training (CT) in the subacute phase after stroke. Methods: In this randomized, controlled, single-blind phase III multicenter trial, 120 participants with upper...

  11. Upper abdominal visceral injury resulting from blunt trauma to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients who sustained severe blunt injury to the pelvis without external injury to the upper abdomen or lower chest, yet who were found to have a ruptured solid upper abdominal viscus, are reported. The first patient on delayed arrival revealed clinical features suggestive of intra-abdominal bleeding and was found to ...

  12. 49 CFR 572.185 - Thorax (upper torso) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Thorax (upper torso) assembly. 572.185 Section 572... Impact Crash Test Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.185 Thorax (upper torso) assembly. (a) The thorax assembly of the dummy must meet the requirements of both (b) and (c) of this section. Section 572...

  13. The management of low-risk acute upper gastrointestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2012-12-04

    Dec 4, 2012 ... The management of low-risk acute upper gastrointestinal ... Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the safety of managing patients with low risk AUGIH ..... assessment after acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Gut 1996;38:316–21. 3. Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, SIGN. Management.

  14. Foreign bodies of the upper digestive tract in Komfo Anokye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foreign bodies of the upper digestive tract in Komfo Anokye teaching hospital. ... Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) ... the foreign body, the management and the outcome of foreign body impaction in the upper digestive tract, in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) between January 2007 and December 2012.

  15. Thrombolysis for acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feinberg, Joshua; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Jakobsen, Janus C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 5% to 10% of all deep vein thromboses occur in the upper extremities. Serious complications of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis, such as post-thrombotic syndrome and pulmonary embolism, may in theory be avoided using thrombolysis. No systematic review has assessed the effects...... of thrombolysis for the treatment of individuals with acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of thrombolysis for the treatment of individuals with acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. SEARCH METHODS: The Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist...... of thrombolytics added to anticoagulation, thrombolysis versus anticoagulation, or thrombolysis versus any other type of medical intervention for the treatment of acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened all records to identify those...

  16. Treatment of congestion in upper respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli O Meltzer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eli O Meltzer1, Fernan Caballero2, Leonard M Fromer3, John H Krouse4, Glenis Scadding51Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center, San Diego, CA and Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, USA; 2Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service, Centro Medico-Docente La Trinidad, Caracas, Venezuela; 3David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 4Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA; 5Department of Allergy and Rhinology, Royal National TNE Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Congestion, as a symptom of upper respiratory tract diseases including seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis, acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and nasal polyposis, is principally caused by mucosal inflammation. Though effective pharmacotherapy options exist, no agent is universally efficacious; therapeutic decisions must account for individual patient preferences. Oral H1-antihistamines, though effective for the common symptoms of allergic rhinitis, have modest decongestant action, as do leukotriene receptor antagonists. Intranasal antihistamines appear to improve congestion better than oral forms. Topical decongestants reduce congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, but local adverse effects make them unsuitable for long-term use. Oral decongestants show some efficacy against congestion in allergic rhinitis and the common cold, and can be combined with oral antihistamines. Intranasal corticosteroids have broad anti-inflammatory activities, are the most potent long-term pharmacologic treatment of congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, and show some congestion relief in rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Immunotherapy and surgery may be used in some cases refractory to pharmacotherapy. Steps in congestion management include (1 diagnosis of the cause(s, (2 patient education and monitoring, (3 avoidance of environmental triggers where possible, (4 pharmacotherapy, and (5 immunotherapy

  17. Pacemakers in the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Antonina; Arena, Salvatore; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Mucciardi, Giuseppe; Galì, Alessandro; Magno, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    Pacemakers in upper urinary tract (UUT) are still under study. We reviewed the role of some cells that seem to be involved in the propulsion of urinary bolus from UUT to the bladder. We focuses on evaluating studies on the mechanisms by which the UUT propels urine to the bladder via pacemaker cells. Electric active pacemaker cells generate pyeloureteric autorhythmicity driving adjacent smooth muscle cells (SMCs); it emphasizes the role of the interstitial cells of Cajal-like cells (ICC-LCs) localized in the UUT. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are now thought to cooperate in conducting and amplifying pacemaker activity in the UUT. These cells produce electrical slow-wave potentials and determine the propagation of peristaltic activity. Identification of ICC-LCs is facilitated by use of c-kit antibodies. Contraction waves arising from the UUT and the propagation of these waves may require the direct involvement of ICC-LCs, as c-kit immunoreactivity appears developmentally at the same time as coordinated unidirectional peristaltic contraction. ICC-LCs observed in the UUT have morphological features similar to those of c-kitpositive ICCs in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition to gastrointestinal motility, ICCs may also play a significant role in the propagation, coordination, and modulation of ureteropelvic peristalsis. Alterations in ICC-LCs are closely associated with a variety of motility disorders and many congenital urological diseases of the UUT such as primary obstructive megaureter, congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and vesicoureteral reflux. These observations open the way for further investigations of this cell type. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mycotic corneal ulcers in upper Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To study the association of various risk factors and epidemiological variables of mycotic keratitis treated at a tertiary referral hospital of upper Assam. Materials and Methods: In this hospital-based prospective study a total of 310 consecutive corneal ulcer cases attending the ophthalmology outpatient department of Assam Medical College were enrolled between April 2007 and March 2009. After clinical and slit-lamp biomicroscopic examination in all suspected cases, smears and culture examination for fungus was done to establish the etiology. Demographic information and associated probable risk factors of individual cases were noted in a predesigned questionnaire. Results: In 188 (60.6% cases fungal etiology could be established. Out of them 67.6% were males. The most commonly affected age group was 41-50 years (25.5%. The maximum (23.4% cases were reported during the paddy harvesting season in Assam (January and February. Fungal element could be demonstrated in 65.2% cases in direct potassium hydroxide (KOH mount. The commonest predisposing factor was corneal injury (74.5%. While diabetes was a significant systemic predisposing factor in mixed bacterial and fungal infections in 11.1% cases, blocked naso-lacrimal duct was the local predisposing factor in 11.1% of cases. Fusarium solani (25% was the commonest isolate followed by Aspergillus species (19%, Curvularia species (18.5% and Penicillium species (15.2%. Yeasts were isolated in 2.7% (n=5 cases. Conclusions : Ocular trauma was the commonest cause of fungal corneal ulcer in Assam and Fusarium solani was the commonest species responsible for it. Most of the mycotic ulcer cases come from rural areas including the tea gardens.

  19. Upper Pennsylvanian coals and associated rocks - depositional environments, sedimentation, paleontology and paleobotany, upper Ohio River valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, A.T.

    1988-03-01

    A number of geologically interesting sites in the upper Ohio River valley will be visited during the North-Central Section of the Geological Society of America's meeting in Akron, OH in April 1988. Sixteen scheduled sites (and three substitutes) have been chosen. They represent the following features: field examples of various types of stratigraphic problems; sedimentologic characteristics of diverse environments; controlling structural or physiographic anomalies of pre-coal-forming peat accumulation surfaces; typical or unusual faunas and floras of terrestrial, brackish or marine origin; and various economic coals demonstrating geologic problems related to their origin, constitution and extraction.

  20. Measuring Upper Limb Capacity in Patients After Stroke : Reliability and Validity of the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, Annemieke; Roorda, Leo D.; Smits, Wendy; Molenaar, Ivo W.; Geurts, Alexander C.

    Houwink A, Roorda LD, Smits W, Molenaar IW, Geurts AC. Measuring upper limb capacity in patients after stroke: reliability and validity of the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011;92:1418-22. Objective: To investigate the interrater reliability and construct validity of the