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Sample records for vestibular neuronitis

  1. [Some characteristics of vertigo in vestibular neuronitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Rybina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a detailed clinical analysis of objective neurological symptoms and vertigo in patients with vestibular neuronitis. Diagnostic criteria are specified allowing differentiation between vertigo and dizziness, pathognomonic signs of vestibular neuronitis are outlined. Peripheral location of the pathological process in vestibular neuronitis is suggested. How rotating vertigo is forming in patients with vestibular neuronitis is hypothesized.

  2. Evaluation of Steroid Therapy for Vestibular Neuronitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Sekitani, Toru; Okami, Kenji; Endo, Shiro

    1989-01-01

    The effect of steroid therapy for vestibular neuronitis was evaluated comparing with that of non-steroid therapy. Twelve cases were treated with steroid therapy and fourteen cases ware treated with non-steroid therapy. All cases had no response of caloric test at the onset and underwent therapy within one month since onset. The results ware as follows : Dizziness was significantly reduced by steroid therapy compared with non-steroid therapy. However, there was no difference of subsiding perio...

  3. Herpes encephalitis preceded by ipsilateral vestibular neuronitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Stephen J; Archer, John S

    2005-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed vertigo and jerk nystagmus to the left with normal cerebral imaging. Three days later she developed fever, altered mental state and left medial temporal lobe hypodensity, confirmed on lumbar puncture to be due to herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis. We propose that the patient had vestibular neuronitis caused by HSV-1 that progressed to ipsilateral temporal lobe encephalitis.

  4. Neurons excitability changes in rat medial vestibular nucleus following vestibular neurectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金麟毅

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic excitabilities of acutely isolated medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons of rats with normal labyrinth and with undergoingvestibular compensation from 30 min to 24 h after unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) were compared. In control rats, proportions of type A andB cells were 30 and 70%, respectively, however, the proportion of type A cells increased following UVD. Bursting discharge and irregular firingpatterns were recorded from 2 to 12 h post UVD. The spontaneous discharge rate of neurons in the ipsilesional MVN increased significantly at 2 hpost-UVD and remained high until 12 h post-UVD in both type A and type B cells. Mter-hyperpolarization (AHP) of the MVN neurons decreasedsignificantly from 2 h post-UVD in both types of cells. These results suggest that the early stage of vestibular compensation after peripheralneurectomy is associated with an increase in intrinsic excitability due to reduction of AHP in MVN neurons.

  5. [Vestibular neuronitis: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaper, Dinka; Adamec, Ivan; Gabelić, Tereza; Krbot, Magdalena; Isgum, Velimir; Hajnsek, Sanja; Habek, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of peripheral vertigo. Caloric testing has been the traditional gold standard for detecting a peripheral vestibular deficit, but some recently developed bedside tests (head thrust, head heave, head shake and vibration test) were evaluated as a good alternative with similar sensitivity and specificity. These tests have shown both diagnostic value in the short term and prognostic value in the long term, and have availability and ease of use as an advantage. As an addition to clinical examination, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials can differentiate between involvement of superior and inferior branch of the vestibular nerve, but also between peripheral and central lesions. Although glucocorticoids are currently widely used in the treatment of VN, there is a lack of evidence for the validity of their administration. There are a number of high quality clinical trials that suggest vestibular rehabilitation exercises, which are based on the mechanisms of vestibular compensation, in the managment of VN. This review will focus on the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with VN.

  6. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  7. Control of hair cell excitability by vestibular primary sensory neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Travo, Cécile; Demêmes, Danielle; Lenoir, Marc; Llorens, Jordi; Puel, Jean-Luc; Chabbert, Christian

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In the rat utricle, synaptic contacts between hair cells and the nerve fibers arising from the vestibular primary neurons form during the first week after birth. During that period, the sodium-based excitability that characterizes neonate utricle sensory cells is switched off. To investigate whether the establishment of synaptic contacts was responsible for the modulation of the hair cell excitability, we used an organotypic culture of rat utricle in which the setting ...

  8. Maturation of firing pattern in chick vestibular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, M; Hirsch, J C; Peusner, K D

    2006-08-25

    The principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus are vestibular nucleus neurons participating in the vestibuloocular and vestibulocollic reflexes. In birds and mammals, spontaneous and stimulus-evoked firing of action potentials is essential for vestibular nucleus neurons to generate mature vestibular reflex activity. The emergence of spike-firing pattern and the underlying ion channels were studied in morphologically-identified principal cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from brain slices of late-term embryos (embryonic day 16) and hatchling chickens (hatching day 1 and hatching day 5). Spontaneous spike activity emerged around the perinatal period, since at embryonic day 16 none of the principal cells generated spontaneous action potentials. However, at hatching day 1, 50% of the cells fired spontaneously (range, 3 to 32 spikes/s), which depended on synaptic transmission in most cells. By hatching day 5, 80% of the principal cells could fire action potentials spontaneously (range, 5 to 80 spikes/s), and this activity was independent of synaptic transmission and showed faster kinetics than at hatching day 1. Repetitive firing in response to depolarizing pulses appeared in the principal cells starting around embryonic day 16, when calcium-dependent potassium current modulated both the spontaneous and evoked spike firing activity. Altogether, these in vitro studies showed that during the perinatal period, the principal cells switched from displaying no spontaneous spike activity at resting membrane potential and generating one spike on depolarization to the tonic firing of spontaneous and evoked action potentials.

  9. Infrared laser stimulation of retinal and vestibular neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Fabrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Albert, Emmanuelle S.; Hamel, Christian; Dupeyron, Gérard; Chabbert, Christian; Marc, Isabelle; Dumas, Michel

    2011-03-01

    The study of laser-neuron interaction has gained interest over the last few years not only for understanding of fundamental mechanisms but also for medical applications such as prosthesis because of the non-invasive characteristic of the laser stimulation. Several authors have shown that near infrared lasers are able to stimulate neurons. It is suggested that a thermal gradient induced by the absorption of the laser radiation on cells is the primary effect but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We show in this work that infrared laser radiations provide a possible way for stimulating retinal and vestibular ganglion cells. We describe relevant physical characteristics allowing safe and reproducible neuron stimulations by single infrared pulses. Calcium fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological recordings have been used to measure ionic exchanges at the neuron membrane. The stimulation system is based on a pulsed laser diode beam of a few mW. Effects of three different wavelengths (from 1470 to 1875 nm) and stimulation durations have been investigated. Variations of the stimulation energy thresholds suggest that the main physical parameter is the water optical absorption. Measurements of the temperature at the cell membrane show that a constant temperature rise is required to stimulate neurons, suggesting a photothermal process.

  10. [Some characteristics of optokinetic nystagmus in patients with unilateral vestibular neuronitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Dukor, D M

    2002-01-01

    Optokinetic reflex was studied in 20 patients aged 20-58 years with vestibular neuronitis. In 16 decompensated patients the direction of the optokinetic nystagmus was inversed. This inversion disappeared in development of the compensation. Mean values of the amplitude and speed of the slow phase of optokinetic nystagmus are presented for patients with vestibular neuronitis and 20 healthy subjects in mono- and binocular optokinetic stimulation of various intensity.

  11. Synaptic plasticity in medial vestibular nucleus neurons: comparison with computational requirements of VOR adaptation.

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    John R W Menzies

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain adaptation, a longstanding experimental model of cerebellar learning, utilizes sites of plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and brainstem. However, the mechanisms by which the activity of cortical Purkinje cells may guide synaptic plasticity in brainstem vestibular neurons are unclear. Theoretical analyses indicate that vestibular plasticity should depend upon the correlation between Purkinje cell and vestibular afferent inputs, so that, in gain-down learning for example, increased cortical activity should induce long-term depression (LTD at vestibular synapses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we expressed this correlational learning rule in its simplest form, as an anti-Hebbian, heterosynaptic spike-timing dependent plasticity interaction between excitatory (vestibular and inhibitory (floccular inputs converging on medial vestibular nucleus (MVN neurons (input-spike-timing dependent plasticity, iSTDP. To test this rule, we stimulated vestibular afferents to evoke EPSCs in rat MVN neurons in vitro. Control EPSC recordings were followed by an induction protocol where membrane hyperpolarizing pulses, mimicking IPSPs evoked by flocculus inputs, were paired with single vestibular nerve stimuli. A robust LTD developed at vestibular synapses when the afferent EPSPs coincided with membrane hyperpolarization, while EPSPs occurring before or after the simulated IPSPs induced no lasting change. Furthermore, the iSTDP rule also successfully predicted the effects of a complex protocol using EPSP trains designed to mimic classical conditioning. CONCLUSIONS: These results, in strong support of theoretical predictions, suggest that the cerebellum alters the strength of vestibular synapses on MVN neurons through hetero-synaptic, anti-Hebbian iSTDP. Since the iSTDP rule does not depend on post-synaptic firing, it suggests a possible mechanism for VOR adaptation without compromising gaze-holding and VOR

  12. Effects of Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels in Vestibular Nuclear Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Tag; Jang, Sujeong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Park, Jong-Seong

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects an 8-Br-cGMP on the neuronal activity of rat vestibular nuclear cells. Sprague-Dawley rats aged 14 to 16 days were decapitated under ether anesthesia. After treatment with pronase and thermolysin, the dissociated vestibular nuclear cells were transferred into a chamber on an inverted microscope. Spontaneous action potentials and potassium currents were recorded by standard patch-clamp techniques under current and voltage-clamp modes. Twelve v...

  13. Vestibular neuronitis in pilots: follow-up results and implications for flight safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupak, Avi; Nachum, Zohar; Stern, Yoram; Tal, Dror; Gil, Amnon; Gordon, Carlos R

    2003-02-01

    OBJECTIVES To report our experience over the past 12 years with the evaluation and follow-up of pilots with vestibular neuronitis and to discuss points relevant to flight safety and the resumption of flying duties. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective, consecutive case series.METHODS Eighteen military pilots with vestibular neuronitis were examined and followed up. A complete otoneurological workup was performed, including both physical examination and laboratory evaluation. The latter included electro-oculography (EOG) and a rotatory chair test using the smooth harmonic acceleration protocol. RESULTS The mean patient age was 35 +/- 6 years (range, 23 to 42 y), and the average follow-up period was 20.5 +/- 12.8 months (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]; (range, 11 to 48 mo). Electro-oculography caloric test on presentation documented significant unilateral hypofunction in all patients. Thirteen of the 18 patients (72%) had abnormal smooth harmonic acceleration test results. None of the pilots reported any symptoms on follow-up. However, five (28%) had positive otoneurological examination findings, and eight (44%) still had significant caloric lateralization (>25%). The average caloric hypofunction was reduced from 67.8% +/- 29.3% at onset to 40% +/- 16% (mean +/- SD, vestibular damage on follow-up. In 6 of these 11 cases (55%), the laboratory evaluation revealed vestibular deficits otherwise undiagnosed by the bedside test battery. CONCLUSIONS The vestibular system plays a central role in orientation awareness and is often challenged by flying conditions. The finding that approximately 60% of pilots who have had vestibular neuronitis continue to show signs of vestibular malfunction, despite apparent clinical recovery, emphasizes the need for a complete vestibular evaluation, including specific bedside testing and laboratory examinations, before flying duties can be resumed.

  14. Target neurons of floccular middle zone inhibition in medial vestibular nucleus.

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    Sato, Y; Kanda, K; Kawasaki, T

    1988-04-19

    Unitary activities of 288 neurons were recorded extracellularly in the medial vestibular nucleus (MV) in anesthetized cats. In 19 neurons, located in the rostral part of the MV adjacent to the stria acustica, floccular middle zone stimulation resulted in cessation of spontaneous discharges. Systematic microstimulation in the brainstem during recording of 16 of 19 target neurons of floccular middle zone inhibition revealed that the target neurons projected to the ipsilateral abducens nucleus (ABN), and not to the contralateral ABN nor the oculomotor nucleus. The conjugate ipsilateral horizontal eye movement elicited by middle zone stimulation may be mediated by this pathway to motoneurons and internuclear neurons in the ipsilateral ABN. In additional experiments, the MV neurons responding antidromically to ipsilateral ABN stimulation and orthodromically to ipsilateral 8 nerve stimulation were recorded extracellularly. In only 7 of 36 recorded neurons, middle zone stimulation depressed the orthodromic and spontaneous activities. Many neurons were free of floccular inhibition. As to the route of floccular inhibitory control over the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during visual-vestibular stimulation, we propose that the interaction of target and VOR relay neurons takes place at the ipsilateral ABN and modulates the VOR, in addition to well known Ito's proposal that the interaction of the floccular output and the VOR takes place at secondary vestibular neurons and modulates the VOR.

  15. Molecular developmental neurobiology of formation, guidance and survival of primary vestibular neurons

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    Fritzsch, B.

    2003-10-01

    Untangling the molecular and physiological interactions that generate the proper connections of the primary vestibular neurons in normal gravity requires two parallel approaches. One approach needs to use mutant mice to delineate the molecular basis of developmental mechanisms that govern ear development, including formation and differentiation of neurons and establishment of their peripheral and central connections. Beyond that and in addition to it, we need physiological investigations using microgravity and/or hypergravity, as well as absence of otoconia, to understand the role played by vestibular stimuli to fine tune connections of primary and secondary vestibular neurons. This paper provides an overview of some of the molecular mechanisms uncovered over the last few years that guide development, differentiation and survival of primary vestibular neurons of the mammalian ear. Briefly, several genes that are essential for primary neuron formation have been identified, all genes that govern embryonic survival are known and the first genes and mechanisms that guide formation of proper connections are being revealed. While still incomplete, the progress has been astounding and the completion of the mouse genome project will further accelerate the pace. Such data pave the way to put the research on the influence of altered gravity stimulation within a molecular framework.

  16. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng; Wang, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases. PMID:24688447

  17. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases.

  18. Convergent properties of vestibular-related brain stem neurons in the gerbil

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    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Three classes of vestibular-related neurons were found in and near the prepositus and medial vestibular nuclei of alert or decerebrate gerbils, those responding to: horizontal translational motion, horizontal head rotation, or both. Their distribution ratios were 1:2:2, respectively. Many cells responsive to translational motion exhibited spatiotemporal characteristics with both response gain and phase varying as a function of the stimulus vector angle. Rotationally sensitive neurons were distributed as Type I, II, or III responses (sensitive to ipsilateral, contralateral, or both directions, respectively) in the ratios of 4:6:1. Four tested factors shaped the response dynamics of the sampled neurons: canal-otolith convergence, oculomotor-related activity, rotational Type (I or II), and the phase of the maximum response. Type I nonconvergent cells displayed increasing gains with increasing rotational stimulus frequency (0.1-2.0 Hz, 60 degrees /s), whereas Type II neurons with convergent inputs had response gains that markedly decreased with increasing translational stimulus frequency (0.25-2.0 Hz, +/-0.1 g). Type I convergent and Type II nonconvergent neurons exhibited essentially flat gains across the stimulus frequency range. Oculomotor-related activity was noted in 30% of the cells across all functional types, appearing as burst/pause discharge patterns related to the fast phase of nystagmus during head rotation. Oculomotor-related activity was correlated with enhanced dynamic range compared with the same category that had no oculomotor-related response. Finally, responses that were in-phase with head velocity during rotation exhibited greater gains with stimulus frequency increments than neurons with out-of-phase responses. In contrast, for translational motion, neurons out of phase with head acceleration exhibited low-pass characteristics, whereas in-phase neurons did not. Data from decerebrate preparations revealed that although similar response types could

  19. Vestibular neuronitis: a review of a common cause of vertigo in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, C W

    1993-01-01

    Vestibular neuronitis is an interesting condition characterized by the acute onset of vertigo, nausea and vomiting, in the absence of hearing loss or tinnitus. There is often evidence of a recent or concurrent upper respiratory tract infection. The disease follows a benign course of between two days and six weeks. It often occurs in epidemics. Following the acute attack, mild transitory episodes of dizziness may recur over a period of 12 to 18 months. Clinical and histopathological evidence s...

  20. Inputs from regularly and irregularly discharging vestibular nerve afferents to secondary neurons in squirrel monkey vestibular nuclei. III. Correlation with vestibulospinal and vestibuloocular output pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; Goldberg, J. M.; Highstein, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. A previous study measured the relative contributions made by regularly and irregularly discharging afferents to the monosynaptic vestibular nerve (Vi) input of individual secondary neurons located in and around the superior vestibular nucleus of barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Here, the analysis is extended to more caudal regions of the vestibular nuclei, which are a major source of both vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways. As in the previous study, antidromic stimulation techniques are used to classify secondary neurons as oculomotor or spinal projecting. In addition, spinal-projecting neurons are distinguished by their descending pathways, their termination levels in the spinal cord, and their collateral projections to the IIIrd nucleus. 2. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded intracellularly from secondary neurons as shocks of increasing strength were applied to Vi. Shocks were normalized in terms of the threshold (T) required to evoke field potentials in the vestibular nuclei. As shown previously, the relative contribution of irregular afferents to the total monosynaptic Vi input of each secondary neuron can be expressed as a %I index, the ratio (x100) of the relative sizes of the EPSPs evoked by shocks of 4 x T and 16 x T. 3. Antidromic stimulation was used to type secondary neurons as 1) medial vestibulospinal tract (MVST) cells projecting to spinal segments C1 or C6; 2) lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) cells projecting to C1, C6; or L1; 3) vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) cells projecting both to the IIIrd nucleus and by way of the MVST to C1 or C6; and 4) vestibuloocular (VOR) neurons projecting to the IIIrd nucleus but not to the spinal cord. Most of the neurons were located in the lateral vestibular nucleus (LV), including its dorsal (dLV) and ventral (vLV) divisions, and adjacent parts of the medial (MV) and descending nuclei (DV). Cells receiving quite different proportions of their direct inputs

  1. Reconsidering the role of neuronal intrinsic properties and neuromodulation in vestibular homeostasis

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    Mathieu eBeraneck

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The sensorimotor transformations performed by central vestibular neurons (2°VN constantly adapt as the animal faces conflicting sensory information or sustains injuries. In order to ensure the homeostasis of vestibular-related functions, neural changes could in part rely on the regulation of 2°VN intrinsic properties. Here, we review evidence which demonstrates modulation and plasticity of 2°VN intrinsic properties. We first present partition of rodents 2°VN into distinct subtypes, namely type A and type B. Then, we focus on the respective properties of each type and their putative roles in vestibular functions. The intrinsic properties of 2°VN can be swiftly modulated by a wealth of neuromodulators, to adapt rapidly, for example, to temporary changes of the ecophysiological surroundings. To illustrate how intrinsic excitability can rapidly be modified in physiological conditions and therefore be targeted in the clinic, we present the modulation of vestibular reflexes in relation to the neuromodulatory fluctuation of the sleep/wake cycle. On the other hand, intrinsic properties can also be slowly yet deeply modified in response to major perturbations as is the case following a unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL. We revisit the experimental evidence which demonstrate that drastic alterations of the 2°VN intrinsic properties occur following UL, however with a slow dynamic, more on par with the compensation of dynamic deficits than static ones. Data are interpreted in the framework of a distributed process which progress from the global, large scale coping mechanisms (e.g. changes in behavioural strategies to the local, small scale ones (e.g. changes in intrinsic properties. Within this framework, the compensation of dynamic deficits improves with time as deeper modifications are engraved within the finer parts of the vestibular-related networks. Finally, we propose perspectives and working hypotheses to pave the way for future research aiming at

  2. VESTIBULAR VERTIGO

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    The authors consider the cardinal causes of vestibular vertigo, a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuroni-tis, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular diseases. It gives brief data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these diseases. The diagnosis of the latter is largely based on a patientKhs complaints and medical history data and frequently requires no additional instrumental study. The currently available treatments for ...

  3. VESTIBULAR VERTIGO

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    M V Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the cardinal causes of vestibular vertigo, a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuroni-tis, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular diseases. It gives brief data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these diseases. The diagnosis of the latter is largely based on a patientKhs complaints and medical history data and frequently requires no additional instrumental study. The currently available treatments for various diseases manifesting as vestibular vertigo are analyzed. Vestibular exercises and rehabilitation maneuvers that are effective in benign positional vertigo are noted to play an important role. In addition, methods for drug stimulation of vestibular compensation in central and peripheral vestibulopathies are described.

  4. Vestibular Neuronitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up to several months. People do not have tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and hearing is usually ... Videos News HealthDay Sinus Trouble Can Lead to Depression, Lost Work FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- ...

  5. Fos expression in neurons of the rat vestibulo-autonomic pathway activated by sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation

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    Gay R Holstein

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system sends projections to brainstem autonomic nuclei that modulate heart rate and blood pressure in response to changes in head and body position with regard to gravity. Consistent with this, binaural sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS in humans causes vasoconstriction in the legs, while low frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz sGVS causes a rapid drop in heart rate and blood pressure in anesthetized rats. We have hypothesized that these responses occur through activation of vestibulo-sympathetic pathways. In the present study, c-Fos protein expression was examined in neurons of the vestibular nuclei and rostral ventrolateral medullary region (RVLM that were activated by low frequency sGVS. We found c-Fos-labeled neurons in the spinal, medial and superior vestibular nuclei (SpVN, MVN and SVN, respectively and the parasolitary nucleus. The highest density of c-Fos-positive vestibular nuclear neurons was observed in MVN, where immunolabeled cells were present throughout the rostro-caudal extent of the nucleus. C-Fos expression was concentrated in the parvocellular region and largely absent from magnocellular MVN. C-Fos-labeled cells were scattered throughout caudal SpVN, and the immunostained neurons in SVN were restricted to a discrete wedge-shaped area immediately lateral to the IVth ventricle. Immunofluorescence localization of c-Fos and glutamate revealed that approximately one third of the c-Fos-labeled vestibular neurons showed intense glutamate-like immunofluorescence, far in excess of the stain reflecting the metabolic pool of cytoplasmic glutamate. In the RVLM, which receives a direct projection from the vestibular nuclei and sends efferents to preganglionic sympathetic neurons in the spinal cord, we observed an approximately 3-fold increase in c-Fos labeling in the sGVS-activated rats. We conclude that localization of c-Fos protein following sGVS is a reliable marker for sGVS-activated neurons of the vestibulo

  6. Fos expression in neurons of the rat vestibulo-autonomic pathway activated by sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Yakushin, Sergei B; Cohen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular system sends projections to brainstem autonomic nuclei that modulate heart rate and blood pressure in response to changes in head and body position with regard to gravity. Consistent with this, binaural sinusoidally modulated galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS) in humans causes vasoconstriction in the legs, while low frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) sGVS causes a rapid drop in heart rate and blood pressure in anesthetized rats. We have hypothesized that these responses occur through activation of vestibulo-sympathetic pathways. In the present study, c-Fos protein expression was examined in neurons of the vestibular nuclei and rostral ventrolateral medullary region (RVLM) that were activated by low frequency sGVS. We found c-Fos-labeled neurons in the spinal, medial, and superior vestibular nuclei (SpVN, MVN, and SVN, respectively) and the parasolitary nucleus. The highest density of c-Fos-positive vestibular nuclear neurons was observed in MVN, where immunolabeled cells were present throughout the rostro-caudal extent of the nucleus. c-Fos expression was concentrated in the parvocellular region and largely absent from magnocellular MVN. c-Fos-labeled cells were scattered throughout caudal SpVN, and the immunostained neurons in SVN were restricted to a discrete wedge-shaped area immediately lateral to the IVth ventricle. Immunofluorescence localization of c-Fos and glutamate revealed that approximately one third of the c-Fos-labeled vestibular neurons showed intense glutamate-like immunofluorescence, far in excess of the stain reflecting the metabolic pool of cytoplasmic glutamate. In the RVLM, which receives a direct projection from the vestibular nuclei and sends efferents to preganglionic sympathetic neurons in the spinal cord, we observed an approximately threefold increase in c-Fos labeling in the sGVS-activated rats. We conclude that localization of c-Fos protein following sGVS is a reliable marker for sGVS-activated neurons of the vestibulo

  7. Fate-mapping the mammalian hindbrain: segmental origins of vestibular projection neurons assessed using rhombomere-specific Hoxa2 enhancer elements in the mouse embryo.

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    Pasqualetti, Massimo; Díaz, Carmen; Renaud, Jean-Sébastien; Rijli, Filippo M; Glover, Joel C

    2007-09-05

    As a step toward generating a fate map of identified neuron populations in the mammalian hindbrain, we assessed the contributions of individual rhombomeres to the vestibular nuclear complex, a major sensorimotor area that spans the entire rhombencephalon. Transgenic mice harboring either the lacZ or the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter genes under the transcriptional control of rhombomere-specific Hoxa2 enhancer elements were used to visualize rhombomere-derived domains. We labeled functionally identifiable vestibular projection neuron groups retrogradely with conjugated dextran-amines at successive embryonic stages and obtained developmental fate maps through direct comparison with the rhombomere-derived domains in the same embryos. The fate maps show that each vestibular neuron group derives from a unique rostrocaudal domain that is relatively stable developmentally, suggesting that anteroposterior migration is not a major contributor to the rostrocaudal patterning of the vestibular system. Most of the groups are multisegmental in origin, and each rhombomere is fated to give rise to two or more vestibular projection neuron types, in a complex pattern that is not segmentally iterated. Comparison with studies in the chicken embryo shows that the rostrocaudal patterning of identified vestibular projection neuron groups is generally well conserved between avians and mammalians but that significant species-specific differences exist in the rostrocaudal limits of particular groups. This mammalian hindbrain fate map can be used as the basis for targeting genetic manipulation to specific subpopulations of vestibular projection neurons.

  8. Orexin excites rat inferior vestibular nuclear neurons via co-activation of OX1 and OX 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Orexin deficiency results in cataplexy, a motor deficit characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone, strongly indicating an active role of central orexinergic system in motor control. However, effects of orexin on neurons in central motor structures are still largely unknown. Our previous studies have revealed that orexin excites neurons in the cerebellar nuclei and lateral vestibular nucleus, two important subcortical motor centers for control of muscle tone. Here, we report that both orexin-A and orexin-B depolarizes and increases the firing rate of neurons in the inferior vestibular nucleus (IVN), the largest nucleus in the vestibular nuclear complex and holding an important position in integration of information signals in the control of body posture. TTX does not block orexin-induced excitation on IVN neurons, suggesting a direct postsynaptic action of the neuropeptide. Furthermore, bath application of orexin induces an inward current on IVN neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. SB334867 and TCS-OX2-29, specific OX1 and OX2 receptor antagonists, blocked the excitatory effect of orexin, and [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]-orexin B, a selective OX2 receptor agonist, mimics the orexin-induced inward current on IVN neurons. qPCR and immunofluorescence results show that both OX1 and OX2 receptor mRNAs and proteins are expressed and localized in the rat IVN. These results demonstrate that orexin excites the IVN neurons by co-activation of both OX1 and OX2 receptors, suggesting that via the direct modulation on the IVN, the central orexinergic system may actively participate in the central vestibular-mediated postural and motor control.

  9. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  10. Betahistine produces post-synaptic inhibition of the excitability of the primary afferent neurons in the vestibular endorgans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, E; Chávez, H; Valli, P; Benvenuti, C; Vega, R

    2001-01-01

    Betahistine has been used to treat several vestibular disorders of both central and peripheral origin. The objective of this work was to study the action of betahistine in the vestibular endorgans. Experiments were done in wild larval axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Multiunit extracellular recordings were obtained from the semicircular canal nerve using a suction electrode. Betahistine (10 microM to 10 mM; n = 32) inhibited the basal spike discharge of the vestibular afferent neurons with an IC50 of 600 microM. To define the site of action of betahistine, its interactions with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (3 microM) and with the cholinergic antagonists atropine (10 microM; n = 3) and d-tubocurarine (10 microM; n = 3) were studied. The action of betahistine when co-administered with these drugs was the same as that in control experiments, indicating that its effects did not include nitric oxide production or the activation of cholinergic receptors. In contrast, 0.01-1 mM betahistine reduced the excitatory action of kainic acid (10 microM; n = 6) and quiscualic acid (1 microM; n = 13). These results indicate that the action of betahistine on the spike discharge of afferent neurons seems to be due to a post-synaptic inhibitory action on the primary afferent neuron response to the hair cell neurotransmitter.

  11. Histamine Excites Rat Superior Vestibular Nuclear Neurons via Postsynaptic H1 and H2 Receptors in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Xing Zhuang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The superior vestibular nucleus (SVN, which holds a key position in vestibulo-ocular reflexes and nystagmus, receives direct hypothalamic histaminergic innervations. By using rat brainstem slice preparations and extracellular unitary recordings, we investigated the effect of histamine on SVN neurons and the underlying receptor mechanisms. Bath application of histamine evoked an excitatory response of the SVN neurons, which was not blocked by the low-Ca2+/high-Mg2+ medium, indicating a direct postsynaptic effect of the amine. Selective histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine and H2 receptor agonist dimaprit, rather than VUF8430, a selective H4 receptor agonist, mimicked the excitation of histamine on SVN neurons. In addition, selective H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine and H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine, but not JNJ7777120, a selective H4 receptor antagonist, partially blocked the excitatory response of SVN neurons to histamine. Moreover, mepyramine together with ranitidine nearly totally blocked the histamine-induced excitation. Immunostainings further showed that histamine H1 and H2 instead of H4 receptors existed in the SVN. These results demonstrate that histamine excites the SVN neurons via postsynaptic histamine H1 and H2 receptors, and suggest that the central histaminergic innervation from the hypothalamus may actively bias the SVN neuronal activity and subsequently modulate the SVN-mediated vestibular functions and gaze control.

  12. [Vestibular neuronitis in a teenager with sickle cell disease. Treatment is urgent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runel-Belliard, C; Lesprit, E; Quinet, B; Wiener-Vacher, S; Saizou, C; Grimprel, E

    2008-09-01

    Vestibular syndrome is not frequently described in patients with sickle cell disease. We report the case of a teenager with sickle cell disease who had a vestibular syndrome with vertigo that successfully responded to exchange transfusion. We discuss guidelines and review the literature in view of this case report. Sensorineural disorders should be considered as stroke syndromes. They require urgent treatment consisting of exchange transfusion or maintaining optimal hydration associated with blood withdrawal. Treatment of vestibular syndrome in sickle cell disease is urgent.

  13. [Examination of dynamic body balance using the body tracking test in cases of vestibular neuronitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomoe; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Ohwada, Satoko; Takazawa, Rio; Ikemiyagi, Yoshihiro; Shigeta, Fuyuko

    2008-09-01

    Body Tracking Test (BTT) is a testing method of the dynamic body balance function wherein movement of the center of gravity in accordance with a moving visual target stimulus is examined to evaluate the tracking function of the body. The objects were the patients who were diagnosed as having vestibular neuronitis at the Department of Otolaryngology in Toho University medical center Sakura hospital, and were undergoing hospital treatment. Lateral BTT was performed in 31 subjects, and antero-posterior (A-P) BTT in 45 subjects. Although gaze nystagmus was noted, inspection was enforced when a standing position posture was possible. In lateral BTT, the average (cm/second) horizontal direction body sway speed was compared, however, no clear lateral difference was noted. In the antero-posterior (A-P) BTT, it inquired using the direction body sway average center displacement (cm) of X. Deviation was seen by the affected side in stabilometry. Deviation was seen by the unaffected side in the antero-posterior (A-P) BTT. This phenomenon differs from the deviation pattern until now and is considered to involve participation of the higher centers.

  14. Kv3.3 immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of the rat with focus on the medial vestibular nucleus: targeting of Kv3.3 neurones by terminals positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth Elizabeth; Corns, Laura; Edwards, Ian James; Deuchars, Jim

    2010-07-23

    Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels are important in shaping neuronal excitability and are abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene exhibiting a unique expression pattern. Mice lacking the gene encoding for the Kv3.3 subunit exhibit motor deficits. Furthermore, mutations in this gene have been linked to the human disease spinocerebellar ataxia 13, associated with cerebellar and extra-cerebellar symptoms such as imbalance and nystagmus. Kv subunit localisation is important in defining their functional roles and thus, we investigated the distribution of Kv3.3-immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of rats with particular focus on the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN). Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was widespread in the vestibular nuclei and was detected in somata, dendrites and synaptic terminals. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was observed in distinct neuronal populations and dual labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN revealed 28.5+/-1.9% of NeuN labelled MVN neurones were Kv3.3-positive. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity co-localised presynaptically with the synaptic vesicle marker SV2, parvalbumin, the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT2 and the glycine transporter GlyT2. VGluT1 terminals were scarce within the MVN (2.5+/-1.1 per 50 microm(2)) and co-localisation was not observed. However, 85.4+/-9.4% of VGluT1 terminals targeted and enclosed Kv3.3-immunoreactive somata. Presynaptic Kv3.3 co-localisation with the GABAergic marker GAD67 was also not observed. Cytoplasmic GlyT2 labelling was observed in a subset of Kv3.3-positive neurones. Electron microscopy confirmed a pre- and post-synaptic distribution of the Kv3.3 protein. This study provides evidence supporting a role for Kv3.3 subunits in vestibular processing by regulating neuronal excitability pre- and post-synaptically.

  15. [The influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in the patients presenting with an unilateral lesion in a peripheral vestibular neuron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhac, S A; Pleshko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in 20 patients with vestibular neuronitis (at the stages of decompensation and subcompensation) and in 30 healthy subjects by the electronystagmographic technique. The sinusoidal (program 1) and eccentric (program 2) rotation was applied with the angular velocity of 10 degrees/s (stimulus 1, rotation rate 0.04 Hz), 30 degrees/s (stimulus II, rotation rate 0.12 Hz), 60 degrees/s (stimulus III) and oscillation periods of 18, 6, and 3 s respectively. No significant changes in the parameters of the vesicular reflex were observed in the patients with vestibular neuronitis and control subjects studied in the phase of decompensation under programs 1 and 2 . The study of the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis in the subcompensation phase (program 2) revealed a significant increase of nystagmus intensity on the affected side compared with the respective parameters estimated in the framework of program 1 (pvestibular labyrinth dysfunction in the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis at the stage of decompensation.

  16. Mechanisms of sustained high firing rates in two classes of vestibular nucleus neurons: differential contributions of resurgent Na, Kv3, and BK currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittis, Aryn H; Moghadam, Setareh H; du Lac, Sascha

    2010-09-01

    To fire at high rates, neurons express ionic currents that work together to minimize refractory periods by ensuring that sodium channels are available for activation shortly after each action potential. Vestibular nucleus neurons operate around high baseline firing rates and encode information with bidirectional modulation of firing rates up to several hundred Hz. To determine the mechanisms that enable these neurons to sustain firing at high rates, ionic currents were measured during firing by using the action potential clamp technique in vestibular nucleus neurons acutely dissociated from transgenic mice. Although neurons from the YFP-16 line fire at rates higher than those from the GIN line, both classes of neurons express Kv3 and BK currents as well as both transient and resurgent Na currents. In the fastest firing neurons, Kv3 currents dominated repolarization at all firing rates and minimized Na channel inactivation by rapidly transitioning Na channels from the open to the closed state. In slower firing neurons, BK currents dominated repolarization at the highest firing rates and sodium channel availability was protected by a resurgent blocking mechanism. Quantitative differences in Kv3 current density across neurons and qualitative differences in immunohistochemically detected expression of Kv3 subunits could account for the difference in firing range within and across cell classes. These results demonstrate how divergent firing properties of two neuronal populations arise through the interplay of at least three ionic currents.

  17. [Effects of steroid therapy on long-term canal prognosis and activity in the daily life of vestibular neuronitis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, T; Okumura, S; Takeda, N; Nishiike, S; Uno, A; Fukushima, M; Kubo, T

    2001-11-01

    We studied 28 patients with vestibular neuronitis treated at our hospital between 1997 and 1999. To determine the effects of steroid therapy on long-term canal prognosis and daily activity, we examined caloric tests and gave questionnaires to 12 steroid-treated and 16 nonsteroid-treated patients 2 years after onset. We found that canal improvement was 50% in the nonsteroid-treated group and 75% in the steroid-treated one. In cases with severe canal paresis (CP > or = 60%), canal improvement was 33% in the nonsteroid-treated group and 67% in the steroid-treated one. Steroid therapy at the acute stage of this disease significantly reduced the duration of spontaneous nystagmus and handicap in daily life due to dizziness induced by head and body movement, decreasing mood disturbance.

  18. VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valer'evich Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular disorders are a frequent abnormality that physicians of various specialties have to encounter. Vestibular and equilibrium disorders are particularly common in elderly patients. In this case they are frequently a cause of falls and various injuries. Vestibular rehabilitation is the most important component of treatment for vestibular and equilibrium disorders. The paper considers the basic mechanisms of vestibular compensation, discusses vestibular rehabilitation procedures by doing routine exercises and by using various biofeedback crunches. In particular, it describes the principle of operation of a posturography platform, a SwayStar system for the diagnosis and therapy of vestibular disorders, and a Brainport device for vestibular rehabilitation. The current methods for drug stimulation of vestibular compensation are discussed. Vestibular rehabilitation used in the complex therapy of equilibrium disorders is stressed to considerably enhance therapeutic effectiveness, to cause a reduction in the risk of falls, and to increase quality of life in patients with vestibular disorders

  19. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  20. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes.

  1. 大鼠传出性前庭神经元的定量研究%Quantitative study of efferent vestibular system neurons in wistar rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏建; 黄玮; 王广科; 马崧; 方志慧

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the morphology,distribution and the number of efferent vestibular neurons in wistar rat brainstems. Methods Totally 20 wistar rats were divided into experiment group( 10 Wistar rats) and control group (10 wistar rats). A retrograde neuron tracing method using micro - flurosphere( MFS) was delivered into the oval window. Five days after surgery, the animals were sacrificed by intracardial perfusion of saline followed by mixed aldehyde fixative. The brainslem were extracted, pastfixed for 2 hours and stored overnight. By means of a vibratome, the section were obtained and observed under the fluorescence microscope and the laser scanning confocal microscopy. Results The efferent vestibular neurons located bilaterally, with more somas in the brainstem contralateral to the labyrinth injection site. The distribution of the Micro - florosphere labelled neuron cell were mainly observed in three location. The first location was in the lateral portion of the facial nerve genu, the neurons was shaped mainly in oval shape and the size was mainly in 10 ~ 15μm. The second location was in the medial of the facial nerve genu,the neurons was shaped mainly in oval or round shape and the size was mainly in 5 - 15μm. The third location is in the reticular nucleus, the neurons was shaped mainly in polygonal shape and the size was mainly in 20 ~30μm.. Conclusions The distribution of efferent vestibular neurons was mainly in the lateral and medial portion of the facial nerve genu and the reticular nucleus.%目的 利用逆行荧光示踪剂研究前庭传出性神经元在脑干的分布、大小、数量和形态.方法 Wistar大鼠20只随机分为二组,实验组10只动物,在外周前庭注射红色逆行荧光示踪剂;对照组10只动物在外周前庭注射生理盐水.5d后处死动物,行脑干连续冰冻切片,在荧光显微镜及激光共聚焦显微镜下观察荧光细胞的分布、大小、数量及形态.结果 Wistar大鼠前庭传出神经

  2. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vert...

  3. A biophysical model examining the role of low-voltage-activated potassium currents in shaping the responses of vestibular ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, Ariel E; Kalluri, Radha

    2016-08-01

    The vestibular nerve is characterized by two broad groups of neurons that differ in the timing of their interspike intervals; some fire at highly regular intervals, whereas others fire at highly irregular intervals. Heterogeneity in ion channel properties has been proposed as shaping these firing patterns (Highstein SM, Politoff AL. Brain Res 150: 182-187, 1978; Smith CE, Goldberg JM. Biol Cybern 54: 41-51, 1986). Kalluri et al. (J Neurophysiol 104: 2034-2051, 2010) proposed that regularity is controlled by the density of low-voltage-activated potassium currents (IKL). To examine the impact of IKL on spike timing regularity, we implemented a single-compartment model with three conductances known to be present in the vestibular ganglion: transient sodium (gNa), low-voltage-activated potassium (gKL), and high-voltage-activated potassium (gKH). Consistent with in vitro observations, removing gKL depolarized resting potential, increased input resistance and membrane time constant, and converted current step-evoked firing patterns from transient (1 spike at current onset) to sustained (many spikes). Modeled neurons were driven with a time-varying synaptic conductance that captured the random arrival times and amplitudes of glutamate-driven synaptic events. In the presence of gKL, spiking occurred only in response to large events with fast onsets. Models without gKL exhibited greater integration by responding to the superposition of rapidly arriving events. Three synaptic conductance were modeled, each with different kinetics to represent a variety of different synaptic processes. In response to all three types of synaptic conductance, models containing gKL produced spike trains with irregular interspike intervals. Only models lacking gKL when driven by rapidly arriving small excitatory postsynaptic currents were capable of generating regular spiking.

  4. BASIC CONCEPTS IN UNDERSTANDING RECOVERY OF FUNCTION IN VESTIBULAR REFLEX NETWORKS DURING VESTIBULAR COMPENSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenna ePeusner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and input-output connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically-defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically-defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically-defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation.

  5. Vestibular interactions in the thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eCamp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the vast majority of all information en route to the cerebral cortex must first pass through the thalamus. The long held view that the thalamus serves as a simple hi fidelity relay station for sensory information to the cortex, however, has over recent years been dispelled. Indeed, multiple projections from the vestibular nuclei to thalamic nuclei (including the ventrobasal nuclei, and the geniculate bodies- regions typically associated with other modalities- have been described. Further, some thalamic neurons have been shown to respond to stimuli presented from across sensory modalities. For example, neurons in the rat anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei of the thalamus respond to visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and somatosensory stimuli and integrate this information to compute heading within the environment. Together, these findings imply that the thalamus serves crucial integrative functions, at least in regard to vestibular processing, beyond that imparted by a simple relay. In this mini review we outline the vestibular inputs to the thalamus and provide some clinical context for vestibular interactions in the thalamus. We then focus on how vestibular inputs interact with other sensory systems and discuss the multisensory integration properties of the thalamus.

  6. Major diseases manifesting by vestibular vertigo: Treatment and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Betahistine hydrochloride is the drug of choice for the treatment of vestibular vertigo in the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. Effective combination therapy regimens that contain, along with drugs from other pharmacological groups, betahistine hydrochloride that improves blood circulation in the vestibular structures, accelerates vestibular compensation, and prevents recurrent dizzy spells, have been elaborated to treat central v...

  7. Vestibular schowanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoume Rouzbahani

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular Schowanoma is one of the most common Intracranial Tumors which has elicited from the Schwann cells in the upper part of vestibular branch of 8th nerve and can affect the cochlear branch too. This benign capsulated tumor  is mostly unilateral. Schowanoma is relatively slow growing. In the current article we have presented the case of a 51 year-old woman complaining Right ear Tinnitus accompanying with numbness of the right side of the face without any sign of vertigo or imbalance. MRI and Auditory Brain stem Responses (ABR studies demonstrated right side vestibular Schowanoma next to cerebellopontine Angle (CPA. The audiological and imaging findings have been brought here in details.

  8. Movement Symmetries and the Mammalian Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Gin; Boyle, Richard

    2000-03-01

    Unity of movement requires vertebrates to have an ability to symmetrize along the midline. For example, human erect stance involves symmetry with respect to gravity. The mammalian vestibular system provides a mechanism for maintaining symmetries, which is also open to influence and adaptation by the rest of the organism. The vestibular system includes the inner ear endorgans and central nuclei, along with projections to oculomotor, cerebellar, thalamic, and spinal motor centers. The vestibular endorgans - the semicircular canals and the otoliths - use sensory hairs to register inertia. The vestibular endorgans are right-left symmetric and the semicircular canals form an approximately orthogonal coordinate system for angular motion. Primary afferent axons project from the endorgans to the vestibular nuclei (and a few other places). The vestibular nuclei integrate vestibular, visual, and somatosensory signals, along with a proposed copy of the voluntary motor command and signals from other central structures. The relationship between the canals and the otoliths gives rise to symmetries among neurons, in the organization among the several vestibular nuclei, and in the projections from the vestibular nuclei. These symmetries organize the space of body movements so that functional relationships are maintained in spite of the many free variables of body movement. They also provide a foundation for adaptive reinterpretation of the relationship between canal and otolith signals, for example in freefall.

  9. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  10. Major diseases manifesting by vestibular vertigo: Treatment and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Parfenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Betahistine hydrochloride is the drug of choice for the treatment of vestibular vertigo in the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. Effective combination therapy regimens that contain, along with drugs from other pharmacological groups, betahistine hydrochloride that improves blood circulation in the vestibular structures, accelerates vestibular compensation, and prevents recurrent dizzy spells, have been elaborated to treat central vestibular vertigo in migraine-associated dizziness and in acute cerebrovascular accident. Of great importance is a combination of drug therapy and the current rehabilitation methods for vestibular diseases, which contribute to prompter and complete recovery of vestibular function. Biofeedback instrumental rehabilitation techniques using a stabilographic platformare highly effective. Successful treatment depends on the correctness of the established diagnosis. The diagnosis of peripheral and central vestibular vertigo frequently poses challenges. The essential reason for this is physicians’ unawareness about outpatient methods for the diagnosis of major vestibular diseases when the patient is at a doctor. It is important to follow a vestibular system study protocol since the use and correct assessment of diagnostic tests in most cases make it possible to estimate the degree of vestibular analyzer injury and to make an accurate diagnosis. The paper describes the diseases that are the most common causes of vestibular vertigo. The most effective methods for their treatment and current rehabilitation methods are discussed.

  11. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  12. 前庭神经元炎引起眩晕的诊断、鉴别诊断及治疗原则%The diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapeutic principle of vestibular neuronitis induced vertigo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘钢; 翟翔

    2005-01-01

    @@ 前庭神经元炎(vestibular neuronitis)亦称为病毒性迷路炎、流行性神经迷路炎、急性迷路炎或前庭麻痹症.炎症仅限局于前庭系统,耳蜗和中枢神经系统均属正常,是一种不伴有听力障碍的眩晕病.好发于20~60岁的成人,病前常有上呼吸道感染史,可分为急性和慢性两种.

  13. Implantes vestibulares

    OpenAIRE

    Aedo Sánchez,Cristian; Délano Reyes,Paul H

    2013-01-01

    La lesión o hipofunción vestibular bilateral (HVB) es un cuadro clínico que provoca oscilopsias y desequilibrio incapacitante que se agrava en oscuridad. Algunas de las causas de HVB son el uso de drogas ototóxicas, enfermedad de Ménière bilateral, enfermedades autoinmunes y degeneración espinocerebelar. El manejo de esta discapacidad es complejo y muchas veces la rehabilitación no logra los objetivos deseados. Una de las alternativas terapéuticas futuras para la HVB y aún en plena fase exper...

  14. [Vestibular migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars Juul; Kirchmann, Malene; Friis, Morten

    2015-12-14

    Dizziness caused by migraine, vestibular migraine (VM), has been highly debated over the last three decades. The co-morbidity of migraine and dizziness is higher than a random concurrence. One third of the patients with migraine and dizziness have VM. Recently, The International Headache Society approved VM as a diagnostic entity and the diagnostic criteria for VM appear in the appendix for The International Classification of Headache Disorders. VM is common but often underdiagnosed. Treatment follows migraine management guidelines although evidence is sparse.

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreta Ungureanu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been also made, have been retrospectively analyzed. Results: Anamnestic data and the results of evaluation permitted classification of peripheric vestibular pathology according to topo-lesional and etiological criteria. The most frequently diagnosed diseases were: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière syndrome and vestibular neuronitis. Conclusions: Testing of the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes through videonystagmoscopy and, respectively, computerized dynamic posturography, besides tonal vocal audiometry and precocious auditive potentials, is especially important for a positive diagnosis and etiological differentiation of vestibular syndromes.

  16. Rehabilitation in vestibular system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of combination treatment in a patient with vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation is indicated for different diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The goal of vestibular rehabilitation is to ensure gaze stabilization, to train postural stability, and to reduce subjective vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on the stimulation of vestibular adaptation, sensory substitution, and habituation. Vestibular suppressants, inadequate mobility, anxiety, and depression decelerate vestibular compensation whereas early activation, mobility, and betaserc use accelerate it.

  17. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 and 2. Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease. Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely.In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine. In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve. In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers. In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of the

  18. Current drug treatments for vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There has recently been significant progress in the treatment of different diseases accompanied by dizziness. First and foremost, this is due to the development of highly effective medical positioning maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and to their introduction into practice. At the same time, drug treatments for vertigo are being continued under development. The paper considers the current methods of symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment for different diseases of the vestibular system. It gives data on current medicinal approaches to the treatment of vestibular neuronitis, Mеniеre's disease, migraine-associated vertigo, and central vestibulopathies. Furthermore, prospects for the use of drugs together with vestibular exercises to stimulate central vestibular compensation are discussed.

  19. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad; V. A. Parfenov; N N Yakhno

    2014-01-01

    Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate ...

  20. Electrical vestibular stimulation after vestibular deafferentation and in vestibular schwannoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Tin Aw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibular reflexes, evoked by human electrical (galvanic vestibular stimulation (EVS, are utilized to assess vestibular function and investigate its pathways. Our study aimed to investigate the electrically-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR output after bilateral and unilateral vestibular deafferentations to determine the characteristics for interpreting unilateral lesions such as vestibular schwannomas. METHODS: EVOR was recorded with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye movements evoked by bipolar 100 ms-step at EVS intensities of [0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0] mA and unipolar 100 ms-step at 5 mA EVS intensity. Five bilateral vestibular deafferented (BVD, 12 unilateral vestibular deafferented (UVD, four unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS patients and 17 healthy subjects were tested with bipolar EVS, and five UVDs with unipolar EVS. RESULTS: After BVD, bipolar EVS elicited no eVOR. After UVD, bipolar EVS of one functioning ear elicited bidirectional, excitatory eVOR to cathodal EVS with 9 ms latency and inhibitory eVOR to anodal EVS, opposite in direction, at half the amplitude with 12 ms latency, exhibiting an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry. The eVOR patterns from UVS were consistent with responses from UVD confirming the vestibular loss on the lesion side. Unexpectedly, unipolar EVS of the UVD ear, instead of absent response, evoked one-third the bipolar eVOR while unipolar EVS of the functioning ear evoked half the bipolar response. CONCLUSIONS: The bidirectional eVOR evoked by bipolar EVS from UVD with an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry and the 3 ms latency difference between normal and lesion side may be useful for detecting vestibular lesions such as UVS. We suggest that current spread could account for the small eVOR to 5 mA unipolar EVS of the UVD ear.

  1. Intrinsic membrane properties of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons and their responses to simulated vestibular input signals%大鼠前庭内侧核神经元的内在膜特性及其对前庭模拟传入信号的反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏交; 孔维佳; 朱云; 周彦; 张宇; 郭长凯

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察大鼠前庭内侧核神经元的膜特性及其对前庭外周模拟传入信号的放电反应,探讨前庭系统生理功能的可能机制.方法 运用红外微分干涉相差技术,可视状态下对前庭内侧核神经元进行全细胞记录,按平均动作电位形状对神经元分型,比较不同类型神经元膜特性的差异.向胞内注入刺激电流以模拟头部作直线加速和匀速旋转运动时外周前庭的传入信号,观察神经元的放电反应.结果 在大鼠前庭内侧核神经元可记录到放电活动,在低钙高镁人工脑脊液中放电活动仍然存在.神经元可被分为有单相后超极化及A样整流的A型(33%),有双相后超极化的B型(63%),以及同时具有或不具有以上特征的其他型(4%);A、B型神经元的部分主动膜特性存在明显差异,对同样的模拟传入信号可作出不同的反应.结论 大鼠前庭内侧核神经元的放电基于其内在膜特性的自发活动;大部分神经元的放电表现为典型的A型或B型,但仍有少量非典型放电存在;A、B型神经元膜特性和放电反应特性的差异是它们执行不同生理功能的基础.%Objective To study the membrane properties of rat medial vestibular nucleus(MVN) neurons and their firing responses to simulated input signals of peripheral vestibular system, and to discuss how the intrinsic membrane properties contribute to physiologic functions in central vestibular system. Methods By using infrared differential interference contrast technique, whole-cell recordings were made from rat MVN neurons under direct observation. On the basis of their averaged action potential shapes, the MVN neurons were classified. Linear and non-linear currents were put into the neurons to simulate the input signals of peripheral vestibular system. The differences of intrinsic membrane properties and firing response dynamics were observed between two types. Results The discharge activities were recorded in MVN

  2. Experimental vestibular pharmacology: a minireview with special reference to neuroactive substances and antivertigo drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, I; Ito, J; Takahashi, H; Sasa, M; Takaori, S

    1984-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators involved in the function of vestibular nuclei were reviewed with special reference to drugs used for treatment of motion sickness and vertigo. Biochemical, histochemical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated that acetylcholine is a transmitter candidate from the afferent vestibular nerve to the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN), because acetylcholine satisfies most criteria for a chemical transmitter in the central nervous system. It is unlikely, however, that monoamines such as noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin are transmitters in the vestibular neurons, since cell bodies and nerve terminals containing the monoamines have not been detected yet in the vestibular nuclei. Although histamine and H1-receptor blockers inhibit neuron activities in the vestibular nuclei, it is unclear at present whether histaminergic system is directly related to the function of vestibular neurons. It has been established that GABA is an inhibitory transmitter from the cerebellar Purkinje cells to the LVN neurons. Diazepam is considered to enhance the GABA effect on the LVN, thereby modifying the vestibular neuronal firing. Enkephalin-containing cell bodies and nerve terminals are found in the medial vestibular nucleus, and a few substance P-containing neurons have been observed in the vestibular nuclei. However, the functional role of these peptides on the vestibular system remains to be determined. Unlike histamine H1-receptor blockers, vasodilators such as cinnarizine, ifenprodil and adenosine triphosphate, which are effective in treatment of vertigo, produce an enhancement of responsiveness of neuron activities in the vestibular nuclei, probably as a result of an increase in blood flow in the brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Vestibular perception following acute unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN acutely (2 days after onset and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks. Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s(2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s(2. We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any 'perceptual noise' added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced - asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  4. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa, Badr E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years. Provisional videonystagmography (VNG results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41 had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23% were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus. Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  5. Central vestibular dysfunction in an otorhinolaryngological vestibular unit: incidence and diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Badr E; Kahky, Ayman O El; Kader, Hisham M Abdel; Rizk, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years). Provisional videonystagmography (VNG) results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41) had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23%) were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus). Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  6. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in The VOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which can be distorted in case of peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain.In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e. different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies.

  7. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies.

  8. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies. PMID:27065839

  9. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  10. Vestibular function testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lang, E E

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular symptoms of vertigo, dizziness and dysequilibrium are common complaints which can be disabling both physically and psychologically. Routine examination of the ear nose and throat and neurological system are often normal in these patients. An accurate history and thorough clinical examination can provide a diagnosis in the majority of patients. However, in a subgroup of patients, vestibular function testing may be invaluable in arriving at a correct diagnosis and ultimately in the optimal treatment of these patients.

  11. Vestibular compensation: the neuro-otologist's best friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Michel; Helmchen, Christoph; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Why vestibular compensation (VC) after an acute unilateral vestibular loss is the neuro-otologist's best friend is the question at the heart of this paper. The different plasticity mechanisms underlying VC are first reviewed, and the authors present thereafter the dual concept of vestibulo-centric versus distributed learning processes to explain the compensation of deficits resulting from the static versus dynamic vestibular imbalance. The main challenges for the plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) during a post-lesion critical period are neural protection, structural reorganization and rebalance of VN activity on both sides. Data from animal models show that modulation of the ipsilesional VN activity by the contralateral drive substitutes for the normal push-pull mechanism. On the other hand, sensory and behavioural substitutions are the main mechanisms implicated in the recovery of the dynamic functions. These newly elaborated sensorimotor reorganizations are vicarious idiosyncratic strategies implicating the VN and multisensory brain regions. Imaging studies in unilateral vestibular loss patients show the implication of a large neuronal network (VN, commissural pathways, vestibulo-cerebellum, thalamus, temporoparietal cortex, hippocampus, somatosensory and visual cortical areas). Changes in gray matter volume in these multisensory brain regions are structural changes supporting the sensory substitution mechanisms of VC. Finally, the authors summarize the two ways to improve VC in humans (neuropharmacology and vestibular rehabilitation therapy), and they conclude that VC would follow a "top-down" strategy in patients with acute vestibular lesions. Future challenges to understand VC are proposed.

  12. Vestibular effects of lidocaine intratympanic injection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H H; Kim, M J; Jo, Y K; Kim, J Y; Han, G C

    2014-11-01

    When lidocaine is locally delivered into the inner ear, it rapidly paralyzes the peripheral vestibular afferent neurons and induces unilateral vestibular loss. The goals of this study were to explore the possibility of developing intratympanic injection (IT) of lidocaine as a modality for treating acute vertigo. To evaluate the minimum concentration required, latent time, action duration, and possibility of lidocaine IT readministration to the vestibular system, we compared the development of horizontal nystagmus after IT of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10% lidocaine solutions in rats. To identify the induction of vestibular compensation, c-Fos-like protein expression was observed in the vestibular nucleus. Results of our investigation showed that lidocaine IT concentrations greater than 4% induced vestibular hyporeflexia in the injected ear. In order to induce hyporeflexia 4 and 6% lidocaine solutions could also be repeatedly injected. Regardless of concentration, effects of the lidocaine IT dissipated gradually over time. Our findings could be used to develop novel methods for symptom control in vestibular disorder patients.

  13. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  14. Ondansetron reduces lasting vestibular deficits in a model of severe peripheral excitotoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen, Jonas; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Broussy, Audrey; Saleur, Aurélie; Brugeaud, Aurore; Chabbert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is a neuroinflammatory, peripheral vestibular pathology leading to chronic deficits and long-term disability. While current corticosteroid-based therapy does not appear to positively influence the long term outcome for the patient, a recent clinical pilot study suggested a functional vestibuloprotective effect of the anti-emetic ondansetron in the treatment of vestibular neuritis. We here demonstrate that systemic post-insult administration of ondansetron in a novel rat model of severe excitotoxic vestibular insult reproduces the clinically demonstrated functional benefits. This ondansetron-conferred reduction of functional deficits stems from the protection of synapses between sensory hair cells and primary neurons from excitotoxically induced lesion.

  15. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; M. Fusconi; DE VIRGILIO, A.; G. Pagliuca; Marinelli, C.; M. De Vincentiis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a su...

  16. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  17. New Insights into Pathophysiology of Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, and nucleus raphe magnus) are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory–inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs, and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic mechanisms of VM

  18. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate vestibular compensation. Adequate vestibular compensation allows a patient to get rid of dizziness and unsteadiness even though vestibular system injury is irreversible. Some medications are able to enhance the efficiency of vestibular rehabilitation. At the same time, the optimal duration of treatment for the most common vestibular disorders has not beenadequately explored. The paper gives the results of an observational program, whose purpose was to determine the optimal duration of vestibular rehabilitation in combination with the use of tanakan in patients with non-progressive unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder.Patients and methods. Data on 46 patients aged 19 to 70 years who underwent vestibular rehabilitation and took tanakan for vertigo caused by vestibular neuronitis (n = 44, labyrinthitis (n =1, or Ramsay Hunt syndrome (n = 1 were analyzed. All the patients were examined four times. The symptoms were recorded and the histories of disease were considered. The degree of vestibular disorders, including vertigo, was assessed when collecting complaints. The symptoms of vertigo were objectivized using its vertigo rating scale and five-point subjective rating scale for vertigo. All the patients underwent standard somatic and neurological examinations and videonystagmography. During the first visit after diagnosis, vestibular exercises were chosen for the patients and tanakan was used in a dose of 40 mg thrice daily to accelerate

  19. [The vestibular system: from structure to function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, M

    1994-02-01

    The two vestibular receptors, right and left, hidden in the petrous part of the temporal bone with the cochlear receptors, receive information from angular and linear movements of the head and transform them into a nerve message sent to the nuclei of the brainstem, which are connected directly on the one hand to the oculomotor nuclei, at the origin of the oculovestibular reflex (induction of nystagmus), and on the other hand, to the spinal motor neurons, at the origin of the vestibulospinal reflex. These reflexes are associated with responses to visual and somaesthetic information for maintenance or return to the standing position, which characterises the function of equilibrium. Vertigo and disorders of balance reflect a conflict of information between these two labyrinths, or between the vestibular apparatus and the messages issued by other captors, and sometimes also dysfunction of central nervous system treatment of information or a lesion of the effector motor systems.

  20. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  1. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  2. Vestibular Deficits Following Concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Division of Emergency Medicine, Sports Medicine, and Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, and Sports Medicine, Somerset, NJ, performed a retrospective cohort study of 247 patients ages 5-18 years with concussion referred from July 2010 to Dec 2011; 81% of patients showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical examination.

  3. Audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a rare, but important cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Patients with asymmetric hearing loss, or unilateral tinnitus should be evaluated expeditiously, to prevent further neurological damage. Audiologic diagnostics Audiologic diagnostics represents the basic diagnosis for early detection of vestibular schwannoma. Patients with vestibular schwannomas may present with a variety of clinical features, including retrocochlear pattern of sensorineural hearing loss. Supraliminary audiometry, tympano- metry, stapedius reflex and otoacoustic emissions as well as vestibular response to caloric testing are methods for selection of patients with suspicion of this tumor. Conclusion The golden standard for audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma is BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials. Patients with pathological findings of BAEP should undergo MRI of the posterior fossa. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is the best and final tool for making a diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma.

  4. [Gaze-evoked suppression of the vestibular-ocular reflex in patients with posterior cervical sympathetic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhachev, S A; Pleshko, I V

    2009-01-01

    This vestibulometric (sinusoidal rotation) study included patients with posterior cervical sympathetic syndrome (n=40) and with vestibular neuronitis (n=20) as well as 20 healthy subjects of the control group. Vestibular dysfunction was induced by the method proposed by de Klein. The patients with posterior cervical sympathetic syndrome in the decompensation phase displayed abnormal gaze-evoked suppression of the vestibular-ocular reflex when their head movements lined up with sinusoidal rotation. This symptom is considered to be of primary value for the diagnosis of vestibular dysfunction in these patients.

  5. Spatial Cognition, Body Representation and Affective Processes: The Role of Vestibular Information beyond Ocular Reflexes and Control of Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred W Mast

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: 1 Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths, body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals, in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. 2 Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. 3 Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are – at least in part – associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  6. Spatial cognition, body representation and affective processes: the role of vestibular information beyond ocular reflexes and control of posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred W.; Preuss, Nora; Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: (1) Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths), body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals), in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. (2) Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. (3) Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are—at least in part—associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood. PMID:24904327

  7. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study t...... targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored....

  8. Distribution of 5-HT1F receptors in monkey vestibular and trigeminal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba Usman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence of serotonergic involvement in vestibular pathway contributions to migraine and balance disorders is compelling. Serotonergic 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors are expressed extensively in inner ear ganglia of monkeys and rats. The serotonergic 5-HT1F receptor is also a target of triptans. This study describes its distribution in vestibular and trigeminal ganglia of monkeys. Methods: Using primary polyclonal antibodies raised against oligopeptides specific for the human 5-HT1F receptor, neuronal somatic area and intensity of immunoreactive vestibular and trigeminal ganglia were quantified. Results and Discussion: Virtually all vestibular and considerable trigeminal ganglia showed positive 5-HT1F receptor immunoreactivity. Inferior and superior vestibular ganglia staining appeared confined to distinct cell regions, varying considerably among cells of different sizes: more intense in small, punctate in some medium and regionally polarized in some large cells. Analyses of average somatic vestibular neuronal immunoreactive intensity identified mainly medium sized cells with high standard deviation of intensity corresponding to punctately-stained cells. Less variability occurred in somatic intensity staining and cellular distribution among 5-HT1F receptor immunopositive trigeminal ganglia. Most exhibited similar punctate staining patterns, higher mean somatic immunoreactive intensity and larger neuronal somatic size proportions per size distribution subpopulation compared to vestibular ganglia size distribution populations. Centrally directed vestibular ganglion neuronal processes, cochlear inner hair cells, vestibular hair cells and blood vessels in vestibular maculae and cristae were immunoreactive. The 5-HT1F receptor expression in vestibular ganglia shows complex variable staining intensity patterns associated with cell size of immunopositive neurons, not seen in immunopositive trigeminal ganglia and not previously evident with 5

  9. An electronic prosthesis mimicking the dynamic vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkel, Andrei M.

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports our progress toward development of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis. The sensing element of the prosthesis is a custom designed one-axis MEMS gyroscope. Similarly to the natural semicircular canal, the microscopic gyroscope senses angular motion of the head and generates voltages proportional to the corresponding angular accelerations. Then, voltages are sent to the pulse generating unit where angular motion is translated into voltage pulses. The voltage pulses are converted into current pulses and are delivered through specially designed electrodes, conditioned to stimulate the corresponding vestibular nerve branch. Our preliminary experimental evaluations of the prosthesis on a rate table indicate that the device's output matches the average firing rate of vestibular neurons to those in animal models reported in the literature. The proposed design is scalable; the sensing unit, pulse generator, and the current source can be potentially implemented on a single chip using integrated MEMS technology.

  10. Response dynamics and tilt versus translation discrimination in parietoinsular vestibular cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2011-03-01

    The parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC) is a large area in the lateral sulcus with neurons that respond to vestibular stimulation. Here we compare the properties of PIVC cells with those of neurons in brain stem, cerebellum, and thalamus. Most PIVC cells modulated during both translational and rotational head motion. Translation acceleration gains showed a modest decrease as stimulus frequency increased, with a steeper slope than that reported previously for thalamic and cerebellar nuclei neurons. Response dynamics during yaw rotation were similar to those reported for vestibular neurons in brain stem and thalamus: velocity gains were relatively flat through the mid-frequency range, increased at high frequencies, and decreased at low frequencies. Tilt dynamics were more variable: PIVC neurons responsive only to rotation had gains that decreased with increased frequency, whereas neurons responsive during both translation and rotation (convergent neurons) actually increased their modulation magnitude at high frequencies. Using combinations of translation and tilt, most PIVC neurons were better correlated with translational motion; only 14% were better correlated with net acceleration. Thus, although yaw rotation responses in PIVC appear little processed compared with other central vestibular neurons, translation and tilt responses suggest a further processing of linear acceleration signals in thalamocortical circuits.

  11. Altered cupular mechanics: a cause of peripheral vestibular disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Kai; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Jijiwa, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Yoshio; Watanabe, Satoru; Scherer, Hans

    2002-06-01

    It has taken many decades to arrive at today's concept of cupula mechanics in the stimulation of endolymphatic flows on the hair cells in the ampullae of the semicircular canal. While Steinhausen assumed free swing-door movement of the cupula in the 1930s, Hillman was the first to demonstrate firm cupula attachment to the ampulla wall as a physiological necessity in the 1970s. In contrast to the present clinical concepts of acute peripheral vestibular functional disorders (circulatory disturbances, viral or bacterial infection, altered electrolytes in the endolymph), this study examines the extent to which an impaired attachment mechanism can trigger peripheral vestibular disorders. For this purpose, we used a pigeon model (n = 8), in which mechanical detachment of the cupula from the ampulla wall was achieved by means of a targeted pressure increase in the ampulla of the lateral semicircular canal. In two additional animals the labyrinth was completely destroyed on one side in order to directly compare partial and complete vestibular disorders. In this way partial damage to the lateral semicircular canal ampulla presents a clinical picture whose symptoms are very similar to those of an idiopathic vestibular disorder in humans. Their intensity and course of compensation differ markedly from the symptoms of complete vestibular destruction. Subsequent histological examination revealed that the hair cells remained intact during the experimental detachment of the cupula. Our results thus show that only altered cupula mechanics seem to trigger the clinical picture of a peripheral vestibular disorder. This may result in completely new approaches to differential diagnosis and the therapy of vestibular neuronitis.

  12. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people.

  13. Aging in the vestibular nuclear complex of the male golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus): anatomic and morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J A; Suárez, C; Navarro, A; Díaz, C; Alvarez, J C; González del Rey, C; Tolivia, J

    2007-08-01

    To study the effects of senescence on the vestibular nuclear complex twenty brainstems from male golden hamsters between 3 and 27 months-old were used and the possible variations in the number of neurons, neuronal morphology and nuclear volume were studied. The neuron profiles were drawn with a camera lucida and Abercrombie's method was used to estimate the total number of neurons. The test of Kolmogorov-Smirnov with the correction of Lilliefors was used to evaluate the fit of our data to a normal distribution and a regression analysis was done to decide if the variation of our data with age was statistically significant. The results of the present study are relevant only for male animals and the effect of senescence could be different in female vestibular nuclear complex. Aging affects the volume of the superior and lateral vestibular nuclei, as well as the nuclear neuronal diameter of the medial vestibular nucleus, but no significant neuronal loss has been appreciated in vestibular nuclear complex related with age. During the aging process we have observed that the distribution of neurons within the vestibular nuclei of the golden hamster does not show important changes and most of their morphometric parameters do not vary significantly.

  14. Incomplete segregation of endorgan-specific vestibular ganglion cells in mice and rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklad, A.; Fritzsch, B.

    1999-01-01

    The endorgan-specific distribution of vestibular ganglion cells was studied in neonatal and postnatal rats and mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) and dextran amines for retrograde and anterograde labeling. Retrograde DiI tracing from the anterior vertical canal labeled neurons scattered throughout the whole superior vestibular ganglion, with denser labeling at the dorsal and central regions. Horizontal canal neurons were scattered along the dorsoventral axis with more clustering toward the dorsal and ventral poles of this axis. Utricular ganglion cells occupied predominantly the central region of the superior vestibular ganglion. This utricular population overlapped with both the anterior vertical and horizontal canals' ganglion cells. Posterior vertical canal neurons were clustered in the posterior part of the inferior vestibular ganglion. The saccular neurons were distributed in the two parts of the vestibular ganglion, the superior and inferior ganglia. Within the inferior ganglion, the saccular neurons were clustered in the anterior part. In the superior ganglion, the saccular neurons were widely scattered throughout the whole ganglion with more numerous neurons at the posterior half. Small and large neurons were labeled from all endorgans. Examination of the fiber trajectory within the superior division of the vestibular nerve showed no clear lamination of the fibers innervating the different endorgans. These results demonstrate an overlapping pattern between the different populations within the superior ganglion, while in the inferior ganglion, the posterior canal and saccular neurons show tighter clustering but incomplete segregation. This distribution implies that the ganglion cells are assigned for their target during development in a stochastic rather than topographical fashion.

  15. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2010-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 µm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle......, and crista ampullaris of the lateral ampulla were examined by light microscopy and computer-generated three-dimensional imaging. In the second group, ultrathin sections including venules and VDCs were examined by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: A microvascular network was observed in close...

  16. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  17. Role of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials testing in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enass Sayed Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: cVEMP is a useful complementary tool for testing vestibular function in vestibular migraine. Reduced cVEMP amplitude or absent response were the most frequent features in vestibular migraine. The saccule and or the sacculo-collic pathway are affected in vestibular migraine, with more tendencies for peripheral vestibular dysfunction in our patient group.

  18. The vestibular system implements a linear-nonlinear transformation in order to encode self-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Corentin; Schneider, Adam D; Chacron, Maurice J; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well established that the neural code representing the world changes at each stage of a sensory pathway, the transformations that mediate these changes are not well understood. Here we show that self-motion (i.e. vestibular) sensory information encoded by VIIIth nerve afferents is integrated nonlinearly by post-synaptic central vestibular neurons. This response nonlinearity was characterized by a strong (~50%) attenuation in neuronal sensitivity to low frequency stimuli when presented concurrently with high frequency stimuli. Using computational methods, we further demonstrate that a static boosting nonlinearity in the input-output relationship of central vestibular neurons accounts for this unexpected result. Specifically, when low and high frequency stimuli are presented concurrently, this boosting nonlinearity causes an intensity-dependent bias in the output firing rate, thereby attenuating neuronal sensitivities. We suggest that nonlinear integration of afferent input extends the coding range of central vestibular neurons and enables them to better extract the high frequency features of self-motion when embedded with low frequency motion during natural movements. These findings challenge the traditional notion that the vestibular system uses a linear rate code to transmit information and have important consequences for understanding how the representation of sensory information changes across sensory pathways.

  19. The vestibular system implements a linear-nonlinear transformation in order to encode self-motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corentin Massot

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that the neural code representing the world changes at each stage of a sensory pathway, the transformations that mediate these changes are not well understood. Here we show that self-motion (i.e. vestibular sensory information encoded by VIIIth nerve afferents is integrated nonlinearly by post-synaptic central vestibular neurons. This response nonlinearity was characterized by a strong (~50% attenuation in neuronal sensitivity to low frequency stimuli when presented concurrently with high frequency stimuli. Using computational methods, we further demonstrate that a static boosting nonlinearity in the input-output relationship of central vestibular neurons accounts for this unexpected result. Specifically, when low and high frequency stimuli are presented concurrently, this boosting nonlinearity causes an intensity-dependent bias in the output firing rate, thereby attenuating neuronal sensitivities. We suggest that nonlinear integration of afferent input extends the coding range of central vestibular neurons and enables them to better extract the high frequency features of self-motion when embedded with low frequency motion during natural movements. These findings challenge the traditional notion that the vestibular system uses a linear rate code to transmit information and have important consequences for understanding how the representation of sensory information changes across sensory pathways.

  20. The Vestibular System Implements a Linear–Nonlinear Transformation In Order to Encode Self-Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Corentin; Schneider, Adam D.; Chacron, Maurice J.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well established that the neural code representing the world changes at each stage of a sensory pathway, the transformations that mediate these changes are not well understood. Here we show that self-motion (i.e. vestibular) sensory information encoded by VIIIth nerve afferents is integrated nonlinearly by post-synaptic central vestibular neurons. This response nonlinearity was characterized by a strong (∼50%) attenuation in neuronal sensitivity to low frequency stimuli when presented concurrently with high frequency stimuli. Using computational methods, we further demonstrate that a static boosting nonlinearity in the input-output relationship of central vestibular neurons accounts for this unexpected result. Specifically, when low and high frequency stimuli are presented concurrently, this boosting nonlinearity causes an intensity-dependent bias in the output firing rate, thereby attenuating neuronal sensitivities. We suggest that nonlinear integration of afferent input extends the coding range of central vestibular neurons and enables them to better extract the high frequency features of self-motion when embedded with low frequency motion during natural movements. These findings challenge the traditional notion that the vestibular system uses a linear rate code to transmit information and have important consequences for understanding how the representation of sensory information changes across sensory pathways. PMID:22911113

  1. Spiral and vestibular ganglion estimates in archival temporal bones obtained by design based stereology and Abercrombie methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Gail; Geiger, Christopher; Lopez, Ivan A; Ishiyama, Akira

    2011-03-15

    The objective of this study was to make direct comparisons of the estimates of spiral and vestibular neuronal number in human archival temporal bone specimens using design-based stereology with those using the assumption-based Abercrombie method. Archival human temporal bone specimens from subjects ranging in age from 16 to 80 years old were used. The number of spiral and vestibular ganglia neurons within the counting areas was estimated using the stereology-optical disector technique and compared with estimates obtained using the assumption-based Abercrombie method on the same specimens. Using the optical disector method, there was an average of 41,480 (coefficient of variation=0.12) spiral ganglia neurons and 28,930 (coefficient of variation=0.15) vestibular ganglia neurons. The mean coefficient of error was 0.076 for the spiral ganglion estimates, and 0.091 for the vestibular ganglion estimates. Using the Abercrombie correction method of two-dimensional analysis, an average of 23,110 (coefficient of variation of 0.08) spiral ganglia neurons, and 16,225 vestibular ganglia neurons (coefficient of variation of 0.15) was obtained. We found that there was a large disparity between the estimates with a significant 44% underestimation of the spiral and vestibular ganglion counts obtained using the Abercrombie method when compared with estimates using the optical disector method.

  2. Effects of caloric vestibular stimulation on serotoninergic system in the media vestibular nuclei of guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Fu-rong; LIU Jun-xiu; LI Xue-pei; MAO Jian-jun; ZHANG Qun-dan; JIA Hong-bo; MAO Lan-quan; ZHAO Rui

    2007-01-01

    Background Anatomic and electrophysiological studies have revealed that the neurons located in the media vestibular nuclei (MVN) receive most of the sensory vestibular input coming from the ipsilateral labyrinth and the responses of MVN neurons to caloric stimulation directly reflect changes in primary vestibular afferent activity. The aim of this study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) release in the MVN during the period of vertigo induced by caloric stimulation.Methods We used an in vivo microdialysis technique to examine the effects of caloric stimulation on the serotoninergic system in MVN. Twenty four guinea pigs were randomly divided into the groups of irrigation of the ear canal with hot water (n=6), ice water (n=6) and 37℃ water (n=4), and the groups of irrigation of the auricle with hot water (n=4) and ice water (n=4), according to different caloric vestibular stimulation. We examined the animal's caloric nystagmus with a two-channel electronystagmographic recorder (ENG), and meanwhile examine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) level in the MVN with microdialysis technique after caloric stimulation. Results In the caloric test the hot water (44℃) irrigation of the right external auditory canal induced horizontal nystagmus towards the right side lasting about 60 seconds and the ice water irrigation of the right external auditory canal induced it towards the left side lasting for about 90 seconds. No nystagmus was induced by 37℃ water irrigation of the external ear canal. Therefore, it was used as a negative control stimulation to the middle ear. The MVN 5-HT levels significantly increased in the first 5-minute collecting interval and increased to 254% and 189% of the control group in the second collecting interval in response to caloric vestibular stimulation with ice water and hot water respectively. The serotonin release was not distinctly changed by the irrigation of the auricle with ice water

  3. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  4. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  5. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

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    Esther Bernal Valls

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a representative way, what evidences this is a profitable process for this kind of patients. The good results suggest that vestibular exercises permit a postural stability and a decrease in the perception of disequilibrium.

  6. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Manso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD (experimental group or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p > 0.005 regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p < 0.05 in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p < 0.05 in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders.

  7. Vestibular Barre Syndrome and Lieou

    OpenAIRE

    Aniya, Julio; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Barré syndrome and Lieou of vestibular origin, is characterized by a vertiginous symptomatology box , accompanied by disorders of neuro- vegetative type ; which is often confused with Meniere's Syndrome and other neurolóciccs entities. The cause of this condition lies in a cervical disc disease at C5- C6 level of understanding that phenomena on the sympathetic peri -arterial -cervical vertebral artery disorders will produce reflections at the maze , preferably ; or of the vestibular nuclei . ...

  8. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  9. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  10. Differential diagnosis and treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint that leads patients to visit physicians of various specialties. Diseases resulting in vestibular vertigo are very diverse and may be caused by lesion of both the central parts of the vestibular system and the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In many cases, its diagnosis can be made from complaints and a history of disease and special bedside tests requiring no sophisticated equipment. Management of vestibular vertigo should aim at treating the underlying disease; vestibular dilators as symptomatic therapy can be effective for several days. Vestibular exercises the efficiency of which can be enhanced by betahistine and other drugs accelerating vestibular compensation should be further needed. Data on the efficacy of betaver (betahistine in patients with vestibular vertigo are given.

  11. Processing of vestibular inputs by the medullary lateral tegmental field of conscious cats: implications for generation of motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Andrew A; Moy, Jennifer D; DeMayo, William M; Puterbaugh, Sonya R; Miller, Daniel J; Catanzaro, Michael F; Yates, Bill J

    2013-03-01

    The dorsolateral reticular formation of the caudal medulla, the lateral tegmental field (LTF), participates in generating vomiting. LTF neurons exhibited complex responses to vestibular stimulation in decerebrate cats, indicating that they received converging inputs from a variety of labyrinthine receptors. Such a convergence pattern of vestibular inputs is appropriate for a brain region that participates in generating motion sickness. Since responses of brainstem neurons to vestibular stimulation can differ between decerebrate and conscious animals, the current study examined the effects of whole-body rotations in vertical planes on the activity of LTF neurons in conscious felines. Wobble stimuli, fixed-amplitude tilts, the direction of which moves around the animal at a constant speed, were used to determine the response vector orientation, and also to ascertain whether neurons had spatial-temporal convergence (STC) behavior (which is due to the convergence of vestibular inputs with different spatial and temporal properties). The proportion of LTF neurons with STC behavior in conscious animals (25 %) was similar to that in decerebrate cats. Far fewer neurons in other regions of the feline brainstem had STC behavior, confirming findings that many LTF neurons receive converging inputs from a variety of labyrinthine receptors. However, responses to vertical plane vestibular stimulation were considerably different in decerebrate and conscious felines for LTF neurons lacking STC behavior. In decerebrate cats, most LTF neurons had graviceptive responses to rotations, similar to those of otolith organ afferents. However, in conscious animals, the response properties were similar to those of semicircular canal afferents. These differences show that higher centers of the brain that are removed during decerebration regulate the labyrinthine inputs relayed to the LTF, either by gating connections in the brainstem or by conveying vestibular inputs directly to the region.

  12. Evidence for a role of orexin/hypocretin system in vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities in rats

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    Leilei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3, 3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL on the orexin-A (OXA labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.. The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v. on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48 and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  13. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage

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    Bill J Yates

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that nonlabyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  14. Auditory function in vestibular migraine

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    John Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM is a vestibular syndrome seen in patients with migraine and is characterized by short spells of spontaneous or positional vertigo which lasts between a few seconds to weeks. Migraine and VM are considered to be a result of chemical abnormalities in the serotonin pathway. Neuhauser′s diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine is widely accepted. Research on VM is still limited and there are few studies which have been published on this topic. Materials and Methods: This study has two parts. In the first part, we did a retrospective chart review of eighty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with vestibular migraine and determined the frequency of auditory dysfunction in these patients. The second part was a prospective case control study in which we compared the audiological parameters of thirty patients diagnosed with VM with thirty normal controls to look for any significant differences. Results: The frequency of vestibular migraine in our population is 22%. The frequency of hearing loss in VM is 33%. Conclusion: There is a significant difference between cases and controls with regards to the presence of distortion product otoacoustic emissions in both ears. This finding suggests that the hearing loss in VM is cochlear in origin.

  15. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

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    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  16. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

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    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  17. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  18. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  19. [The level of beta-endorphin, chronic stress, and depression associated with vestibular pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunel'skaia, N L; Guseva, A L; Chistov, S D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence and the severity of manifestations of anxiety and depression in the patients presenting with vestibular dysfunction making use of the psychometric scales and taking into consideration variations in the plasma beta-endorphin level as a biochemical marker before and after medicamental and physical rehabilitative treatment. A total of 8 patients presenting with stage I-III Meniere's disease and 8 patients suffering from dyscirculatory encephalopathy concomitant with vestibular ataxic syndrome were available for the observation. We separately analysed the results of examination of two patients with vestibular neuronitis and two others presenting with vestibular migraine. It was shown that the degree of anxiety and depression correlated with the plasma beta-endorphin level whereas its correlation with the severity of vestibular oculomotor and vestibular motor disorders during the inter-bout periods was not documented. It was demonstrated that the plasma beta-endorphin level was many times higher than the normal value of 20 ng/l in the patients with the well apparent vegetative symptoms accompanied by dizziness and the patients suffering from vegetative migraine.

  20. Betahistine treatment improves the recovery of static symptoms in patients with unilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Christine; Lopez, Christophe; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Dumitrescu, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel; Borel, Liliane

    2011-04-01

    Vestibular loss induces a combination of postural, oculomotor, and perceptive symptoms that are compensated over time. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of betahistine dihydrochloride on vestibular compensation. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in Menière's disease patients who underwent a curative unilateral vestibular neurotomy (UVN). The effects of betahistine treatment were investigated on a broad spectrum of vestibular-induced changes resulting from vestibular loss: body sway, head orientation, ocular cyclotorsion, spontaneous nystagmus, verticality perception, and self-evaluation of the postural stability. The time course of the recovery was compared in 16 patients who received either a placebo or betahistine (24 mg b.i.d.) from 3 days up to 3 months after UVN. Patients were examined before (day -1) and after UVN (days 7, 30, and 90). Results indicate that betahistine reduces the time to recovery by 1 month or more depending on the tested functions. Betahistine was effective as soon as 4 days after treatment administration, and the effect remained during the whole compensation period (up to 3 months). The observed clinical effects may be attributed to an action of betahistine in rebalancing the neuronal activity between contralateral vestibular nuclei.

  1. Dual task interference during gait in patients with unilateral vestibular disorders

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    Nascimbeni Alberto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular patients show slower and unsteady gait; they have also been shown to need greater cognitive resources when carrying out balance and cognitive dual tasks (DT. This study investigated DT interference during gait in a middle-aged group of subjects with dizziness and unsteadiness after unilateral vestibular neuronitis and in a healthy control group. Methods Fourteen individuals with subacute unilateral vestibular impairment after neuronitis and seventeen healthy subjects performed gait and cognitive tasks in single and DT conditions. A statistical gait analysis system was used and spatio-temporal parameters were considered. The cognitive task, consisting of backward counting by three, was tape recorded and the number of right figures was then calculated. Results Both patients and controls showed a more conservative gait during DT and between groups significant differences were not found. A significant decrease in cognitive performance during DT was found only in the vestibular group. Conclusions Results suggest that less attentional resources are available during gait in vestibular patients compared to controls, and that a priority is given in keeping up the motor task to the detriment of a decrease of the cognitive performance during DT.

  2. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2015-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  3. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2016-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  4. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

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    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years. They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%, hearing difficulties (47.3%, dizziness (36.8%, headache (26.3%, intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%, and earache (15.7%. Seven musicians (37.0% showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%. There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  5. Projections from the lateral vestibular nucleus to the spinal cord in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Bácskai, Timea; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated the projections from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVe) to the spinal cord using retrograde and anterograde tracers. Retrogradely labeled neurons were found after fluoro-gold injections into both the cervical and lumbar cord, with a smaller number of labeled neurons seen after lumbar cord injections. Labeled neurons in the LVe were found in clusters at caudal levels of the nucleus, and a small gap separated these clusters from labeled neurons in the spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe). In the anterograde study, BDA-labeled fiber tracts were found in both the ventral and ventrolateral funiculi on the ipsilateral side. These fibers terminated in laminae 6-9. Some fibers were continuous with boutons in contact with motor neurons in both the medial and lateral motor neuron columns. In the lumbar and sacral segments, some collaterals from the ipsilateral vestibulospinal tracts were found on the contralateral side, and these fibers mainly terminated in laminae 6-8. The present study reveals for the first time the fiber terminations of the lateral vestibular nucleus in the mouse spinal cord and therefore enhances future functional studies of the vestibulospinal system.

  6. SIMULTANEOUSLY OPTICAL RECORDING OF MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN POPULATION VESTIBULAR GANGLION NEURONS%光学方法同步记录成群前庭神经节细胞膜电位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仕明; 姜泗长; 杨伟炎; 顾瑞; 山下敏夫

    2002-01-01

    目的:采用电压敏感染料和多位点光学成像系统研究前庭神经节细胞(vestibular ganglion cells,VGCs)电生理特性.方法:自新生小鼠内耳分离并培养的VGCs,用吸光性电压敏感染料RH155染色后,多个或成群VGCs被同时成像于16×16 记录单元 Photodiode arrays ( PDA)光学成像系统.结果:用高钾溶液灌流刺激时发现当VGCs膜电位变化时,膜表面的光吸收增强,光吸收度为0.23 %±0.08 %.并且所记录的光学反应具有波长特性.另外,在本实验条件下,光损伤和染料的药毒性副作用不明显或者可忽略不计.结论:光学记录可以同步观测多个和成群VGCs膜电位变化,是电生理研究的新方法.

  7. Distributive characteristics of projection from vestibular nuclei to nucleus raphe magnus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyu Sun; Yulin Dong; Fuxing Zhang; Jianhua Qiu; Yunqing Li

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morphological studies have confirmed that vestibular nuclei accepts serotoninergic projections from nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus raphes pallidus, etc. But it is still unclear whether there is bi-directional association between vestibular nuclei and nucleus raphe magnus.OBJECTIVE: To observe the characteristics of projective fibers from vestibular nuclei to nucleus raphe magnus using tetramethyl rhodamine (TMR) in rats, so as to provide more sufficient morphological evidence of neural association from vestibular nuclei. DESIGN: An observational experiment. SETTING: Department of Anatomy (K.K. Leung Brain Research Center), the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. MATERIALS: Eighteen male SD rats of clean degree, weighing 250-280 g, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the laboratory of Department of Anatomy (K.K. Leung Brain Research Center), the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from September 2006 to January 2007. All the rats were anesthetized with intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital sodium, then according to the coordinates on the rat brain atlas, 0.1 μL TMR (100 g/L) was injected into nucleus raphes magnus via the tip of glass microtubule by means of microinjection. Seven days later, the rats were anesthetized, then perfused and fixed to remove brain, and then frozen coronal brain sections were prepared.The retrogradely labeled neurons in the injected and projected sites were observed under fluorescence microscope. Light filters with evoked wave length of 540-553 nm and emission wave length≥1 580 nm were selected to observe the orange TMR-labeled neurons. All the sections were observed and counted under the fluorescence microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Characteristics and number of retrogradely labeled neurons at different sites of nuclei. RESULTS: Totally 18 SD rats were enrolled, 9 of them were

  8. Action mechanism of betahistine in the vestibular end organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, H; Vega, R; Valli, P; Mira, E; Benvenuti, C; Guth, P S; Soto, E

    2001-06-01

    Betahistine has been used to treat several vestibular disorders of both central and peripheral origin. The objective of this work was to study the betahistine action mechanism at the vestibular end organs. Experiments were carried out in wild larval axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Multiunit extracellular recordings were obtained from the semicircular canal nerve using a suction electrode. Betahistine (10 microM to 10 mM, n = 32) inhibited the basal spike discharge of the vestibular afferent neurons with an IC50 of 600 microM. To define the site of action of betahistine, its interactions with antagonists of nitric oxide sintethizing enzyme, cholinergic drugs, and excitatory amino acids were studied. Betahistine 1 mM (n = 5) was coadministered with NG-nitro-L-arginine 3 microM. The action of betahistine remained as in control experiments. Betahistine 1 mM reduced the excitatory action of carbachol (200 microM, n = 5) in a 30 +/- 3.4%. Cholinergic antagonists atropine (10 microM, n = 3) and d-tubocurarine (10 microM, n = 3) did not modify betahistine actions. Betahistine 1 mM also reduced kainic acid (10 microM, n = 4) excitatory action in 45.5 +/- 9.8%. These results corroborate that betahistine has a peripheral inhibitory action in the spike discharge of the afferent neurons in the vestibule. This action seems to involve neither NO production nor modifications in the release of acetylcholine from the efferent fibers. The inhibitory action of betahistine seems to be due to a postsynaptic binding site on the afferent neurons.

  9. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular (VOR and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC, it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarises and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  10. Evaluation of cochleo-vestibular functions in patients with auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namea M. Ismail

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Patients with auditory neuropathy could also have vestibular neuropathy. Vestibular neuropathy could be classified into three groups: superior vestibular neuropathy, inferior vestibular neuropathy and superior/inferior vestibular neuropathy.

  11. DARA vestibular equipment onboard MIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, P; Kellig, A; Hoffmann, H U; Ruyters, G

    1998-01-01

    In space, the weightless environment provides a different stimulus to the otolith organs of the vestibular system, and the resulting signals no longer correspond with the visual and other sensory signals sent to the brain. This signal conflict causes disorientation. To study this and also to understand the vestibular adaptation to weightlessness, DARA has developed scientific equipment for vestibular and visuo-oculomotoric investigations. Especially, two video-oculography systems (monocular--VOG--and binocular--BIVOG, respectively) as well as stimuli such as an optokinetic stimulation device have successfully been employed onboard MIR in the frame of national and European missions since 1992. The monocular VOG was used by Klaus Flade during the MIR '92 mission, by Victor Polyakov during his record 15 months stay onboard MIR in 1993/94 as well as by Ulf Merbold during EUROMIR '94. The binocular version was used by Thomas Reiter and Sergej Avdeyev during the 6 months EUROMIR '95 mission. PIs of the various experiments include H. Scherer and A. Clarke (FU Berlin), M. Dieterichs and S. Krafczyk (LMU Munchen) from Germany as well as C.H. Markham and S.G. Diamond from the United States. Video-Oculography (VOG) is a technique for examining the function of the human balance system located in the inner ear (vestibular system) and the visio-oculomotor interactions of the vestibular organ. The human eye movements are measured, recorded and evaluated by state-of-the-art video techniques. The method was first conceived and designed at the Vestibular Research Laboratory of the ENT Clinic in Steglitz, FU Berlin (A. Clarke, H. Scherer). Kayser-Threde developed, manufactured and tested the facilities for space application under contract to DARA. Evaluation software was first provided by the ENT Clinic, Berlin, later by our subcontractor Sensomotoric Instruments (SMI), Teltow. Optokinetic hardware to support visuo-oculomotoric investigations, has been shipped to MIR for EUROMIR '95

  12. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy for the dizzy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L H; Chee, N W C

    2005-05-01

    A customised vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) programme is an important treatment modality in patients with vestibular dysfunction resulting in motion-provoked vertigo, oscillopsia (gaze instability), disequilibrium and gait disturbances. We discuss in this paper the patient selection criteria for VRT, rehabilitation strategies for unilateral and bilateral vestibular deficits, and some of the compelling evidence to support the use of VRT in treating such patients.

  14. Epidemiology and natural history of vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma. A treatm......This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma....... A treatment strategy based on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing also is discussed....

  15. Vertigo with a Vestibular Dysfunction in Children During Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzięciołowska-Baran, E A; Gawlikowska-Sroka, A

    2015-01-01

    Sudden balance disorders with violent vegetative symptoms (nausea and vomiting) pose a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. In children vertigo/dizziness with symptoms of vestibular dysfunction is rare, but as vascular etiology is unlikely in children such symptoms arouse concern. This article presents two cases of this type of vertigo. The patients were two boys (6 and 9 years old). They came down with similar symptoms: sudden dizziness, disabled walking, nausea and vomiting, spontaneous nystagmus, and a positive Romberg test. The onset of the balance disorder was preceded by respiratory infection: common cold with symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membrane in the nose and throat. Laboratory tests revealed increased levels of C-reactive protein only in the older boy. Neuroinfection and a displacement process were ruled out. Videonystagmography revealed vestibular dysfunction and vestibular neuronitis on the left side.

  16. 光学记录蜗核和前庭核核团神经元电活动%Optical Recording of Population Neuronal Activity in Cochlear Nucleus and Vestibular Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仕明; 杨伟炎; 顾瑞; 韩东一; 山下敏夫

    2003-01-01

    目的在神经细胞群的水平上研究脑干蜗核(cochlear nucleus,CN)和前庭核(vestibular nucleus,VN)神经元电活动.方法自新生小鼠(1~5天)制备离体脑干切片,用吸光性电压敏感染料RH155染色20分钟.采用光学记录膜电位(optical recording membrane potential)技术,观察电刺激位听神经(第8颅神经,nⅧ)后脑干CN和VN的神经电活动.结果①电刺激nⅧ断端后光学记录显示兴奋传导至CN和VN核团(n=40);②CN和VN神经兴奋有激发延迟(onset latency)和高峰延迟(peak latency);③所记录的光学信号具有光吸收波长特性,表明光学记录的可靠性;④光学信号包括峰样快反应信号(spike-likefast signal)和持续较长时间的慢反应信号(slow signal);⑤连续刺激nⅧ后发现慢反应信号大小递减,为突触疲劳(synaptic faiigue)现象.结论本研究表明光学记录膜电位方法可以在神经细胞群的水平上直观观察脑干蜗核和前庭核神经电活动的时空二维方式及其兴奋性突触传递过程,为听觉和平衡觉中枢生理研究提供了新的手段.

  17. [Effect of retroauricular galvanic stimulation on the central vestibular system--immunohistochemical evaluation of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, K; Sekitani, T

    1990-03-01

    The changes of the neurotransmitter (GABA) distribution in the brain stem of the rats by retroauricular galvanic stimulation were investigated using immunohistochemical method. Twenty-one rats were divided into two groups: the control group which received no galvanic stimulation, and the galvanically stimulated group which received anodal galvanic stimulation (unipolar monoauricular, 5 mA in intensity, 500 msec of duration, 1 Hz in frequency) for 30 minutes. The specimens obtained as usual strict procedure for histological investigation were stained immunohistochemically using antisera against GABA. The results were as follows: 1. In the control group, GABA-like immunoreactivity was observed in all four main vestibular nuclei. In the superior, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei GABA-like immunoreactivity was found in the small cells and the terminals. Giant cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus were surrounded by GABA immunoreactive terminals. 2. In the galvanically stimulated group GABA-like immunoreactivity showed recognizable laterality in the lateral vestibular nucleus where GABA-like immunoreactivity surrounding giant cells showed more intensive on the side ipsilateral to the stimulation compared with the opposite side. On the other hand GABA-like immunoreactivity showed no laterality in the superior, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei. 3. It can be concluded that the retroauricular galvanic stimulation cause some changes in the inhibitory activity of the lateral vestibulo-spinal tract and of the spinal motor neuron.

  18. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geisler, HC; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control,

  19. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular informati

  20. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  1. Special (vestibular training of servicemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonin V.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that conditions of professional activity of airmobile servicemen require from them, in addition to excellent proficiency in military armament and materiel, high level of physical qualities and movement coordination development. It is essential to have high practice of vestibular apparatus, which helps to resist such negative feature as air sickness. The essences of term air sickness, its negative consequences for professional activity are highlighted. Possible tendencies of work in terms of enhancing organism resistance to air sickness (according to the analysis of publications and practical experience are investigated.

  2. Vestibular and oculomotor physiology; Proceedings of the International Meeting, New York, NY, September 22-25, 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B.

    1981-01-01

    Papers are presented showing recent progress in the understanding of the processing of visual and vestibular signals by the central nervous system to produce eye movements and postural responses. Specific topics include the directional sensitivity of hair cells to hair bundle deflection, the effects of gravity on rotatory nystagmus, the reticulovestibular organization associated with horizontal fast eye movement, the pathways controlling the extraocular eye muscles, the organization of visual-vestibular interaction in vestibular neurons, motion sickness due to vision reversal in stroboscopic light, and vestibular habituation during sinusoidal rotation. Attention is also given to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulocollic and cervicocollic reflexes, visual mossy fiber inputs to the flocculus, directional plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the relation of active head rotation with eye-head coordination, instability in the optokinetic-vestibular system as an explanation for periodic alternating nystagmus, the effects of visual and nonvisual fixation on vestibular nystagmus, interaction of saccades with the vestibulo-ocular reflex, and the role of the plantar mechanoreceptor in equilibrium control.

  3. Vestibular and Oculomotor Physiology: International Meeting of the Barany Society. Volume 374. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-06

    al.: Accuracy of Gaze 581 cerebellar degeneration in 4 patients, and parenchymatous cerebellar degenera- tion associated with chronic alcoholism in 1...Vestibulospinal Neurons to Neck and Macular Vestibular Inputs in the Presence or Absence of the Paleocerebellum. By R. BOYLE and 0 . POMPEIANO...hysteresis between opposite phases of stimulation. Stimuli of saturating intensity significantly fatigue the transduction process. Finally, slow drift in

  4. Projection neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2014-06-15

    Changes in head position and posture are detected by the vestibular system and are normally followed by rapid modifications in blood pressure. These compensatory adjustments, which allow humans to stand up without fainting, are mediated by integration of vestibular system pathways with blood pressure control centers in the ventrolateral medulla. Orthostatic hypotension can reflect altered activity of this neural circuitry. Vestibular sensory input to the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway terminates on cells in the vestibular nuclear complex, which in turn project to brainstem sites involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, including the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medullary regions (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). In the present study, sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was used to activate this pathway, and activated neurons were identified through detection of c-Fos protein. The retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold was injected into the RVLM or CVLM of these animals, and immunofluorescence studies of vestibular neurons were conducted to visualize c-Fos protein and Fluoro-Gold concomitantly. We observed activated projection neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in the caudal half of the spinal, medial, and parvocellular medial vestibular nuclei. Approximately two-thirds of the cells were ipsilateral to Fluoro-Gold injection sites in both the RVLM and CVLM, and the remainder were contralateral. As a group, cells projecting to the RVLM were located slightly rostral to those with terminals in the CVLM. Individual activated projection neurons were multipolar, globular, or fusiform in shape. This study provides the first direct demonstration of the central vestibular neurons that mediate the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex.

  5. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  6. Neural correlates of motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex: dynamic regulation of multimodal integration in the macaque vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Soroush G; Minor, Lloyd B; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2010-07-28

    Motor learning is required for the reacquisition of skills that have been compromised as a result of brain lesion or disease, as well as for the acquisition of new skills. Behaviors with well characterized anatomy and physiology are required to yield significant insight into changes that occur in the brain during motor learning. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is well suited to establish connections between neurons, neural circuits, and motor performance during learning. Here, we examined the linkage between neuronal and behavioral VOR responses in alert behaving monkeys (Macaca mulatta) during the impressive recovery that occurs after unilateral vestibular loss. We show, for the first time, that motor learning is characterized by the dynamic reweighting of inputs from different modalities (i.e., vestibular vs extravestibular) at the level of the single neurons that constitute the first central stage of vestibular processing. Specifically, two types of information, which did not influence neuronal responses before the lesion, had an important role during compensation. First, unmasked neck proprioceptive inputs played a critical role in the early stages of this process demonstrated by faster and more substantial recovery of vestibular responses in proprioceptive sensitive neurons. Second, neuronal and VOR responses were significantly enhanced during active relative to passive head motion later in the compensation process (>3 weeks). Together, our findings provide evidence linking the dynamic regulation of multimodal integration at the level of single neurons and behavioral recovery, suggesting a role for homeostatic mechanisms in VOR motor learning.

  7. Effects of microgravity on vestibular development and function in rats: genetics and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, A. E.; Fritzsch, B.; Alberts, J. R.; Bruce, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Our anatomical and behavioral studies of embryonic rats that developed in microgravity suggest that the vestibular sensory system, like the visual system, has genetically mediated processes of development that establish crude connections between the periphery and the brain. Environmental stimuli also regulate connection formation including terminal branch formation and fine-tuning of synaptic contacts. Axons of vestibular sensory neurons from gravistatic as well as linear acceleration receptors reach their targets in both microgravity and normal gravity, suggesting that this is a genetically regulated component of development. However, microgravity exposure delays the development of terminal branches and synapses in gravistatic but not linear acceleration-sensitive neurons and also produces behavioral changes. These latter changes reflect environmentally controlled processes of development.

  8. Recovery of vestibular ocular reflex function and balance control after a unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, J H J

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD) on balance control for stance and gait tests. Because a UPVD is normally defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) tests, we compared recovery observed in balance control with patterns of recovery in VOR function. Two general types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis (AVN) and vestibular neurectomy. The latter was subdivided into vestibular loss after cerebellar pontine angle tumor surgery during which a vestibular neurectomy was performed, and vestibular loss following neurectomy to eliminate disabling Ménière's disease. To measure balance control, body-worn gyroscopes, mounted near the body's center of mass (CoM), were used. Measurement variables were the pitch (anterior-posterior) and roll (lateral) sway angles and angular velocities of the lower trunk/pelvis. Both patient groups showed balance deficits during stance tasks on foam, especially with eyes closed when stable balance control is normally highly dependent on vestibular inputs. Deficits during gait were also present and were more profound for complex gait tasks such as tandem gait than simple gait tasks. Major differences emerged between the groups concerning the severity of the deficit and its recovery. Generally, the effects of acute neuritis on balance control were more severe but recovered rapidly. Deficits due to vestibular neurectomy were less severe, but longer lasting. These results mostly paralleled recovery of deficits in VOR function. However, questions need to be raised about the effect on balance control of the two modes of neural plasticity occurring in the vestibular system following vestibular loss due to neuritis: one mode being the limited central compensation for the loss, and the second mode being some restoration of peripheral vestibular function. Future work will need to correlate deficits in balance control during stance and gait more exactly with VOR deficits and carefully

  9. Migration of R28 Retinal Precursor Cells into Cochlear and Vestibular Organs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Dalian; Gail Seigel; Richard Salvi

    2006-01-01

    Damaged hair cells and neurons in the inner ear generally can not be replaced in mammals. The loss of these cells causes permanent functional disorders in both the cochlear and vestibular systems. Transplantation of retinal precursor cells, R28 cells, into inner ear tissue may help replace missing cells. The aim of the current project was to induce R28 cell transdifferentiation into cochlear and vestibular cell types under culture conditions. The first part was related to R28 cell labeling with DiI fluorescence that would help identify and track R28 cells. The second part involved co-culturing R28 cells in cochlear and vestibular organotropic cultures or isolated spiral ganglion neurons. The results suggest that R28 cells have the potential to differentiate into supporting cell types and spiral ganglion neurons in serum free medium, probably under the influence of diffusible signals from inner ear tissues. This information is useful for future efforts in inducing stem cell differentiation in the inner ear to replace lost sensory and neural cells.

  10. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the inner ear. The tumor comes from an overproduction of Schwann cells—the cells that normally wrap ... begin to develop new therapies to control the overproduction of Schwann cells in individuals with vestibular schwannoma. ...

  11. Sensory Dissociation in Vestibular Function Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolmachev Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The project aims to create а solution to the problem of early diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders, accompanied by imbalance, and to develop rehabilitation methods for patients with vestibular disorders. The balanced upright position is a result of interaction between vestibular system, skeleton and muscles, visual, and proprioceptive systems. Postural abnormalities are caused by morphological or functional alteration of the components of the equilibrioception system. These disorders weaken the ability of the central nervous system to process vestibular, visual and proprioceptive signals, which are responsible for the sense of balance. Moreover, it also decreases the plasticity of the nervous system, resulting in adaptation disfunctionality. Unfortunately, premorbid detection of vestibular dysfunctions is quite a complicated test because available methods to evaluate postural reflexes have low sensitivity and specifity. Consequently, the development of methods to assess functional state of the equilibrioception system becoming viable in order to detect neurodegenerative disorders as early as possible, to control treatment and rehabilitation procedures.

  12. Fast-Growing Vestibular Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; De Donato, Giuseppe; Piccirillo, Enrico; Russo, Alessandra; Sanna, Mario

    2000-01-01

    A case of a Jehovah's witness affected by an intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma with an extremely fast growth rate is presented. Nine months after presentation, the tumor reached 23 mm in the cerebellopontine angle. A partial removal through a retrosigmoid approach was planned. Because of the presence of a dominant high jugular bulb masquering the internal auditory canal, the intracanalicular portion of the tumor was left in place. The residual tumor grew 12 mm in 2 months. Even after a gross total removal through a middle cranial fossa approach, the tumor recurred, reaching the size of 30 mm in 17 months. A modified transcochlear approach was then performed, and the patient was free of disease at the last radiologic follow-up, 8 months after the surgery. We illustrate our strategy in treating this aggressive benign lesion with unusual behavior. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17171109

  13. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent’s central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology. PMID:21734302

  14. Current treatment options in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eObermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed even despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are only now emerging.This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations.To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcommings. There is an on-going a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial. Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion.

  15. Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Callum J; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2012-11-01

    The same pattern of vestibular afferent feedback may signify a loss of balance or a change in body orientation, depending upon the initial head posture. To resolve this ambiguity and generate an appropriate motor response, the CNS must transform vestibular information from a head-centred reference frame into relevant motor coordinates. But what if the reference frame is continuously moving? Here, we ask if this neural transformation process is continuously updated during a voluntary change in head posture. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to induce a sensation of head roll motion in blindfolded subjects marching on the spot. When head orientation was fixed, this caused unconscious turning behaviour that was maximal during neck flexion, minimal with the head level and reversed direction with neck extension. Subjects were then asked to produce a continuous voluntary change in head pitch, while GVS was applied. As the neck moved from full flexion into extension, turn velocity was continuously modulated and even reversed direction, reflecting the pattern observed during the head-fixed condition. Hence, an identical vestibular input resulted in motor output which was dynamically modulated by changes in head pitch. However, response magnitude was significantly reduced, suggesting possible suppression of vestibular input during voluntary head movement. Nevertheless, these results show that the CNS continuously reinterprets vestibular exafference to account for ongoing voluntary changes in head posture. This may explain why the head can be moved freely without losing the sense of balance and orientation.

  16. Effects of gentamicin on guinea pig vestibular ganglion function and on substance P and neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Te; Young, Yi-Ho; Cheng, Po-Wen; Lue, June-Horng

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that following intratympanic gentamicin application in the guinea pigs, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were absent regardless of stimulation mode using either air-conducted sound (ACS) stimuli or galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS). Ultrastructurally, both type I hair cells and their calyx terminals were distorted in the saccular macula. However, little is known about the toxic effects of gentamicin on the vestibular ganglion (VG). In this study, absent ACS- and GVS-VEMPs were noted in all the gentamicin-treated ears (100%), which were confirmed by the substantial loss of sensory hair cells in the saccular macula. Moreover, dramatic up-regulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expression was detected in the ipsilateral VG neurons. The mean percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-LI) neurons in the treated VG (81.8±1.9%) was significantly higher than that in the control VG (68.6±3.3%). Conversely, the mean percentage of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive (NPY-LI) neurons in the treated VG (13.7±3.8%) was dramatically lower than that in the control VG (49.0±3.8%). Double labeling results shown 82% of SP-LI and 16% of NPY-LI neurons coexpressed with GAP-43, suggested that SP accumulating coincided with NPY decreasing in regenerating VG neurons after gentamicin treatment. Overall, the changes in SP and NPY expression in VG neurons after gentamicin treatment were like to those in the superior cervical ganglion following sympathectomy.

  17. Changes in the histaminergic system during vestibular compensation in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighilet, Brahim; Trottier, Suzanne; Mourre, Christiane; Lacour, Michel

    2006-06-15

    To determine how the histaminergic system is implicated in vestibular compensation, we studied the changes in histidine decarboxylase (HDC; the enzyme synthesizing histamine) mRNA regulation in the tuberomammillary (TM) nuclei of cats killed 1 week, 3 weeks and 3 months after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN). We also used one- and two-step bilateral vestibular neurectomized (BVN) cats to determine whether HDC mRNA regulation depended on the asymmetrical vestibular input received by the TM nuclei neurons. In addition, we analysed the HDC mRNA changes in the TM nuclei and the recovery of behavioural functions in UVN cats treated with thioperamide, a pure histaminergic drug. Finally, we quantified binding to histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) in the medial vestibular nucleus (VN) by means of a histamine H3R agonist ([3H]N-alpha-methylhistamine) in order to further investigate the sites and mechanisms of action of histamine in this structure. This study shows that UVN increases HDC mRNA expression in the ipsilateral TM nucleus at 1 week. This increased expression persisted 3 weeks after UVN, and regained control values at 3 months. HDC mRNA expression was unchanged in the one-step BVN cats but showed mirror asymmetrical increases in the two-step BVN compared to the 1 week UVN cats. Three weeks' thioperamide treatment induced a bilateral HDC mRNA up-regulation in the UVN cats, which was higher than in the untreated UVN group. Binding to histamine H3Rs in the MVN showed a strong bilateral decrease after thioperamide treatment, while it was reduced ipsilaterally in the UVN cats. That such changes of the histaminergic system induced by vestibular lesion and treatment may play a functional role in vestibular compensation is strongly supported by the behavioural data. Indeed, spontaneous nystagmus, posture and locomotor balance were rapidly recovered in the UVN cats treated with thioperamide. These results demonstrate that changes in histamine levels are related to

  18. Vestibular function and quality of life in vestibular schwannoma: does size matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eWagner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS frequently suffer from disabling vestibular symptoms. This prospective follow-up study evaluates vestibular and auditory function and impairment of quality of life due to vertigo, dizziness and imbalance in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma of different sizes before/ after microsurgical or radiosurgical treatment. Methods. 38 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were included. 22 received microsurgery, 16 cyberknife radiosurgery. Two follow-ups took place after a median of 50 and 186.5 days. Patients received a standardized neuro-ophthalmological examination, electronystagmography with bithermal caloric testing, and pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was evaluated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. Patient data was grouped and analyzed according to the size of the VS (group 1: < 20mm vs group 2: ≥ 20mm. Results. In group 1, the median loss of vestibular function was +10.5% as calculated by Jongkees Formula (range –43;+52; group 2: median + 36%, range –56; +90. The median change of DHI scores was –9 in group 1 (range –68;30 and +2 in group 2 (–54;+20. Median loss of hearing was 4dB (-42;93 in group 1 and 12dB in group 2 (5;42.Conclusions. Loss of vestibular function in vestibular schwannoma clearly correlates with tumor size. However, loss of vestibular function was not strictly associated with a long-term deterioration of quality of life. This may be due to central compensation of vestibular deficits in long-standing large tumors. Loss of hearing before treatment was significantly influenced by the age of the patient but not by tumor size. At follow-up 1 and 2, hearing was significantly worse in those patients with a large VS and after microsurgical treatment.

  19. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  20. Neurosensory Differentiation and Innervation Patterning in the Human Fetal Vestibular End Organs between the Gestational Weeks 8–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Chacko, Lejo; Pechriggl, Elisabeth J.; Fritsch, Helga; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Blumer, Michael J. F.; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Glueckert, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Balance orientation depends on the precise operation of the vestibular end organs and the vestibular ganglion neurons. Previous research on the assemblage of the neuronal network in the developing fetal vestibular organ has been limited to data from animal models. Insights into the molecular expression profiles and signaling moieties involved in embryological development of the human fetal inner ear have been limited. We present an investigation of the cells of the vestibular end organs with specific focus on the hair cell differentiation and innervation pattern using an uninterrupted series of unique specimens from gestational weeks 8–12. Nerve fibers positive for peripherin innervate the entire fetal crista and utricle. While in rodents only the peripheral regions of the cristae and the extra-striolar region of the statolithic organs are stained. At week 9, transcription factors PAX2 and PAX8 were observed in the hair cells whereas PAX6 was observed for the first time among the supporting cells of the cristae and the satellite glial cells of the vestibular ganglia. Glutamine synthetase, a regulator of the neurotransmitter glutamate, is strongly expressed among satellite glia cells, transitional zones of the utricle and supporting cells in the sensory epithelium. At gestational week 11, electron microscopic examination reveals bouton contacts at hair cells and first signs of the formation of a protocalyx at type I hair cells. Our study provides first-hand insight into the fetal development of the vestibular end organs as well as their pattern of innervation by means of immunohistochemical and EM techniques, with the aim of contributing toward our understanding of balance development. PMID:27895556

  1. Neurosensory Differentiation and Innervation Patterning in the Human Fetal Vestibular End Organs between the Gestational Weeks 8-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Chacko, Lejo; Pechriggl, Elisabeth J; Fritsch, Helga; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Blumer, Michael J F; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Glueckert, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Balance orientation depends on the precise operation of the vestibular end organs and the vestibular ganglion neurons. Previous research on the assemblage of the neuronal network in the developing fetal vestibular organ has been limited to data from animal models. Insights into the molecular expression profiles and signaling moieties involved in embryological development of the human fetal inner ear have been limited. We present an investigation of the cells of the vestibular end organs with specific focus on the hair cell differentiation and innervation pattern using an uninterrupted series of unique specimens from gestational weeks 8-12. Nerve fibers positive for peripherin innervate the entire fetal crista and utricle. While in rodents only the peripheral regions of the cristae and the extra-striolar region of the statolithic organs are stained. At week 9, transcription factors PAX2 and PAX8 were observed in the hair cells whereas PAX6 was observed for the first time among the supporting cells of the cristae and the satellite glial cells of the vestibular ganglia. Glutamine synthetase, a regulator of the neurotransmitter glutamate, is strongly expressed among satellite glia cells, transitional zones of the utricle and supporting cells in the sensory epithelium. At gestational week 11, electron microscopic examination reveals bouton contacts at hair cells and first signs of the formation of a protocalyx at type I hair cells. Our study provides first-hand insight into the fetal development of the vestibular end organs as well as their pattern of innervation by means of immunohistochemical and EM techniques, with the aim of contributing toward our understanding of balance development.

  2. NEUROSENSORY DIFFERENTIATION AND INNERVATION PATTERNING IN THE HUMAN FOETAL VESTIBULAR END ORGANS BETWEEN THE GESTATIONAL WEEKS 8 TO 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejo Johnson Chacko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Balance orientation depends on the precise operation of the vestibular end organs and the vestibular ganglion neurons. Previous research on the assemblage of the neuronal network in the developing foetal vestibular organ has been limited to data from animal models. Insights into the molecular expression profiles and signalling moieties involved in embryological development of the human foetal inner ear have been limited. We present an investigation of the cells of the vestibular end organs with specific focus on the hair cell differentiation and innervation pattern using an uninterrupted series of unique specimens from gestational weeks 8 to 12.Nerve fibres positive for peripherin innervate the entire foetal crista and utricle. While in rodents only the peripheral regions of the cristae and the extra-striolar region of the statolithic organs are stained. At week nine, transcription factors PAX2 and PAX8 were observed in the hair cells whereas PAX6 was observed for the first time among the supporting cells of the cristae and the satellite glial cells of the vestibular ganglia. Glutamine synthetase, a regulator of the neurotransmitter glutamate, is strongly expressed among satellite glia cells, transitional zones of the utricle and supporting cells in the sensory epithelium. At gestational week 11, electron microscopic examination reveals bouton contacts at hair cells and first signs of the formation of a protocalyx at type I hair cells.Our study provides first-hand insight into the foetal development of the vestibular end organs as well as their pattern of innervation by means of immunohistochemical and EM techniques, with the aim of contributing towards our understanding of balance development.

  3. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick A Forbes; Gunter P Siegmund; Schouten, Alfred C.; Jean-Sébastien eBlouin

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwid...

  4. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituatio...

  5. Influence of testosterone on synaptic transmission in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: estrogenic and androgenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Di Mauro, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2010-12-15

    In brainstem slices of young male rat, we investigated the influence of the neuroactive steroid testosterone (T) on the synaptic responses by analyzing the field potential evoked in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. T induced three distinct and independent long-term synaptic changes: fast long-lasting potentiation (fLP), slow long-lasting potentiation (sLP) and long-lasting depression (LD). The fLP was mediated by 17β-estradiol (E(2)) since it was abolished by blocking the estrogen receptors (ERs) or the enzyme converting T to E(2). Conversely, sLP and LD were mediated by 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) since they were prevented by blocking the androgen receptors (ARs) or the enzyme converting T to DHT. Therefore, the synaptic effects of T were mediated by its androgenic or estrogenic metabolites. The pathways leading to estrogenic and androgenic conversion of T might be co-localized since, the occurrence of fLP under block of androgenic pathway, and that of sLP and LD under estrogenic block, were higher than those observed without blocks. In case of co-localization, the effect on synaptic transmission should depend on the prevailing enzymatic activity. We conclude that circulating and neuronal T can remarkably influence synaptic responses of the vestibular neurons in different and opposite ways, depending on its conversion to estrogenic or androgenic metabolites.

  6. Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36-80 had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03. Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques.

  7. Vestibular stimulation for management of premenstrual syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Minu; Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to observe the effectiveness of vestibular stimulation in the management of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Materials and Methods: The present study was an experimental study; twenty female participants of age group 18–30 years were recruited in the present study. Conventional swing was used to administer vestibular stimulation. Variables were recorded before and after vestibular stimulation and compared. Results: Depression and stress scores are significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Anxiety scores decreased followed by vestibular stimulation. However, it is no statistically significant. Serum cortisol levels significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. WHOQOL-BREF-transformed scores were not significantly changed followed by the intervention. However, psychological domain score (T2) and social relationships domain score (T3) were increased followed by intervention. Systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. No significant change was observed in diastolic pressure and pulse rate. Pain score was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Mini mental status examination scores and spatial and verbal memory score were significantly improved followed by intervention. Conclusion: The present study provides preliminary evidence for implementing vestibular stimulation for management of PMS as a nonpharmacological therapy. Hence, we recommend further well-controlled, detailed studies in this area with higher sample size. PMID:28250680

  8. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  9. Origin of vestibular dysfunction in Usher syndrome type 1B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    It is still debated to what extent the vestibular deficits in Usher patients are due to either central vestibulocerebellar or peripheral vestibular problems. Here, we determined the origin of the vestibular symptoms in Usher 1B patients by subjecting them to compensatory eye movement tests and by in

  10. Can a finding of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials contribute to vestibular migraine diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Vešligaj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate differences in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP results with patients suffering from vestibular migraine and healthy people, taking into consideration values of threshold and latency of occurrence of the characteristic wave complex, size of amplitude, and interaural amplitude ratio. According to the results, determine the importance and usefulness of VEMP in vestibular migraine diagnostics. Methods A total number of 62 subjects were included in the study, 32 of them belonging to a group of patients suffering from vestibular migraine (VM, while other 30 were in a control group of healthy subjects. Information was collected during the diagnostic evaluation. General and otoneurological history of patients and bedside tests, audiological results, videonystagmography and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP were made. Results There was a difference in an interaural ratio of amplitudes in the experimental and control groups, but it was not found to be clinically significant. By ToneBurst 500 Hz method, the interaural amplitude ratio higher than 35% was measured in 46.97% subjects, while the response was totally unilaterally missing in 28.8% patients. Conclusion Even the sophisticated method as cVEMP does not give the ultimate result confirming the vestibular migraine diagnosis, and neither do other diagnostic methods. cVEMP result can contribute to the completion of full mosaic of vestibular migraine diagnostics.

  11. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been...

  12. Vestibular-related frontal cortical areas and their roles in smooth-pursuit eye movements: representation of neck velocity, neck-vestibular interactions and memory-based smooth-pursuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuro eFukushima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Smooth-pursuit eye movements are voluntary responses to small slow-moving objects in the fronto-parallel plane. They evolved in primates, who possess high-acuity foveae, to ensure clear vision about the moving target. The primate frontal cortex contains two smooth-pursuit related areas; the caudal part of the frontal eye fields (FEF and the supplementary eye fields (SEF. Both areas receive vestibular inputs. We review functional differences between the two areas in smooth-pursuit. Most FEF pursuit neurons signal pursuit parameters such as eye velocity and gaze-velocity, and are involved in cancelling the vestibulo-ocular reflex by linear addition of vestibular and smooth-pursuit responses. In contrast, gaze-velocity signals are rarely represented in the SEF. Most FEF pursuit neurons receive neck velocity inputs, while discharge modulation during pursuit and trunk-on-head rotation adds linearly. Linear addition also occurs between neck velocity responses and vestibular responses during head-on-trunk rotation in a task-dependent manner. During cross-axis pursuit-vestibular interactions, vestibular signals effectively initiate predictive pursuit eye movements. Most FEF pursuit neurons discharge during the interaction training after the onset of pursuit eye velocity, making their involvement unlikely in the initial stages of generating predictive pursuit. Comparison of representative signals in the two areas and the results of chemical inactivation during a memory-based smooth-pursuit task indicate they have different roles; the SEF plans smooth-pursuit including working memory of motion-direction, whereas the caudal FEF generates motor commands for pursuit eye movements. Patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease were asked to perform this task, since impaired smooth-pursuit and visual working memory deficit during cognitive tasks have been reported in most patients. Preliminary results suggested specific roles of the basal ganglia in memory

  13. Functional stochastic resonance in human baroreflex induced by 1/f-type noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    We hypothesized that 1/f noise is more beneficial than the conventional white noise in optimizing the brain's response to a weak input signal, and showed that externally added 1/f noise outperforms white noise in sensitizing human baroreflex centers in the brain. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor, while adding either 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem by electrically stimulating the bilateral vestibular afferents cutaneously. This stochastic galvanic vestibular stimulation, activating the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway in the brain stem, optimized covariance between weak input signals and the heart rate responses both with 1/f and white noise. Further, the optimal noise level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than that with white noise, suggesting the functional benefit of 1/f noise for the neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  14. RECORDING OF VESTIBULAR EVOKED MYOGENIC POTENTIALS

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    A. A. Sazgar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that loud clicks evoke myogenic potentials in the tonically contracting sternocleidomastoid muscles. Studies have suggested that these potentials are of vestibular origin, especially of the saccule and inferior vestibular nerve. A pilot study was undertaken in our hospital to record vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP for the first time in Iran. Eighteen healthy volunteers (32 ears without history of otologic or vestibular disorders were subjected to the VEMP test. Twenty-one patients (26 ears with unilateral (6 patients and bilateral (5 patients high frequency sensorineural hearing loss with unknown etiology, acoustic neuroma (1 patient, Meniere’s disease (4 patients and unilateral low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint (5 patients were also enrolled in this study. VEMP response to clicks was obtained from 84.4% of ears of healthy subjects. These subjects demonstrated short latency waves to click stimuli during tonic neck flexor activation. Mean latencies of first positive (p13 and first negative (n23 potentials in healthy subjects were 12.45 ± 1.9 ms and 20.8 ± 3.5 ms, respectively. Median latencies of these two potentials were 12.1 and 19.3 ms, respectively. We could record VEMP in 5 patients with unilateral and all patients with high and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint. In the patient with acoustic neuroma VEMP was absent on the affected side. This technique may offer a new method to evaluate otolith and sacculocollic pathways in human.

  15. Vestibular schwannoma: anatomical, medical and surgical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ul Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "acoustic" is a misnomer, as the tumor rarely arises from the acoustic (or cochlear division of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The correct medical term is vestibular schwannoma, because it involves the vestibular portion of the 8th cranial nerve. They are benign, rather rare tumors. They expand in size and grow larger; they can push against the brain. While the tumor does not actually invade the brain, the pressure of the tumor can displace brain tissue. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 178-182

  16. PLCγ-activated signalling is essential for TrkB mediated sensory neuron structural plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha-Sanchez Sonia M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vestibular system provides the primary input of our sense of balance and spatial orientation. Dysfunction of the vestibular system can severely affect a person's quality of life. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of vestibular neuron survival, maintenance, and innervation of the target sensory epithelia is fundamental. Results Here we report that a point mutation at the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ docking site in the mouse neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB (Ntrk2 specifically impairs fiber guidance inside the vestibular sensory epithelia, but has limited effects on the survival of vestibular sensory neurons and growth of afferent processes toward the sensory epithelia. We also show that expression of the TRPC3 cation calcium channel, whose activity is known to be required for nerve-growth cone guidance induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is altered in these animals. In addition, we find that absence of the PLCγ mediated TrkB signalling interferes with the transformation of bouton type afferent terminals of vestibular dendrites into calyces (the largest synaptic contact of dendrites known in the mammalian nervous system on type I vestibular hair cells; the latter are normally distributed in these mutants as revealed by an unaltered expression pattern of the potassium channel KCNQ4 in these cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate a crucial involvement of the TrkB/PLCγ-mediated intracellular signalling in structural aspects of sensory neuron plasticity.

  17. The nucleus of the optic tract. Its function in gaze stabilization and control of visual-vestibular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B.; Reisine, H.; Yokota, J. I.; Raphan, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Electrical stimulation of the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) induced nystagmus and after-nystagmus with ipsilateral slow phases. The velocity characteristics of the nystagmus were similar to those of the slow component of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and to optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN), both of which are produced by velocity storage in the vestibular system. When NOT was destroyed, these components disappeared. This indicates that velocity storage is activated from the visual system through NOT. 2. Velocity storage produces compensatory eye-in-head and head-on-body movements through the vestibular system. The association of NOT with velocity storage implies that NOT helps stabilize gaze in space during both passive motion and active locomotion in light with an angular component. It has been suggested that "vestibular-only" neurons in the vestibular nuclei play an important role in generation of velocity storage. Similarities between the rise and fall times of eye velocity during OKN and OKAN to firing rates of vestibular-only neurons suggest that these cells may receive their visual input through NOT. 3. One NOT was injected with muscimol, a GABAA agonist. Ipsilateral OKN and OKAN were lost, suggesting that GABA, which is an inhibitory transmitter in NOT, acts on projection pathways to the brain stem. A striking finding was that visual suppression and habituation of contralateral slow phases of vestibular nystagmus were also abolished after muscimol injection. The latter implies that NOT plays an important role in producing visual suppression of the VOR and habituating its time constant. 4. Habituation is lost after nodulus and uvula lesions and visual suppression after lesions of the flocculus and paraflocculus. We postulate that the disappearance of vestibular habituation and of visual suppression of vestibular responses after muscimol injections was due to dysfacilitation of the prominent NOT-inferior olive pathway, inactivating climbing fibers from

  18. From ear to uncertainty: Vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarise the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, can modulate cognitive function.

  19. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patient...

  20. Vestibular function tests for vestibular migraine: clinical implication of video head impulse and caloric tests

    OpenAIRE

    Woo Seok Kang; Sang Hun Lee; Chan Joo Yang; Joong Ho Ahn; Jong Woo Chung; Hong Ju Park

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patient...

  1. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction  Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective  The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of th...

  2. Vestibular Dysfunctions in Cochlear Implant Patients; A Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in response to click or short tone burst stimuli have been used as a clinical test for distinguish saccule and inferior vestibular nerve diseases. Different studies show that cochlear implant could have inverse effects on vestibular structures. We aimed to investigate vestibular evoked myogenic potential in unilateral cochlear implanted individuals in compare to normal individuals.Methods: Thirty-three unilateral cochlear implanted patients (mean age 19.96 years and 30 normal hearing individuals (mean age 24-27 years as control group were enrolled in this cross- sectional study. Absolute latencies and amplitudes of myogenic potential responses were measured and compared in both groups.Results: Myogenic potential recorded in both ears of all controls were normal. No response could be recorded in 16 patients (48.48% from both ears. In three patients, responses were recorded in both ears though the amplitude of waves was reduced in implanted ear. Unilateral response could be recorded in 14 patients only in their non-implanted ear.Conclusion: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential test is a useful tool for assessing saccular function in cochlear implant patients. Damages of osseous spiral lamina and basilar membrane after cochlear implantation could result in dysfunctions of vestibular organs specially saccule. It seems that saccule could be easily damaged after cochlear implantation. This would cause absence or reduced amplitudes in myogenic potential.

  3. Interaural difference values of vestibular evoked myogenic.

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    Marziyeh Moallemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a neurologic disease, which often is associated with a unilateral headache. Vestibular abnormalities are common in migraine. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs assess otolith function in particular functional integrity of the saccule and the inferior vestibular nerve. We used VEMP to evaluate if the migraine headache can affect VEMP asymmetry parameters. A total of 25 patients with migraine (22 females and 3 males who were diagnosed according to the criteria of IHS-1988 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group consisted of 26 healthy participants (18 female and 8 male, without neurotological symptoms and history of migraine. The short tone burst (95 dB nHL, 500 Hz was presented to ears. VEMP was recorded with surface electromyography over the contracted ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM muscle. Although current results showed that the amplitude ratio is greater in migraine patients than normal group, there was no statistical difference between two groups in mean asymmetry parameters of VEMP. Asymmetry measurements in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials probably are not indicators of unilateral deficient in saccular pathways of migraine patients.

  4. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

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    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. CONCLUSION: VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism.

  5. Perspectives in vestibular diagnostics and therapy [

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    Ernst, Arneborg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Vestibular diagnostics and therapy ist the mirror of technological, scientific and socio-economics trends as are other fields of clinical medicine. These trends have led to a substantial diversification of the field of neurotology.The improvements in diagnostics have been characterized by the introduction of new receptor testing tools (e.g., VEMPs, progress in imaging (e.g., the endolymphatic hydrops and in the description of central-vestibular neuroplasticity. The etiopathology of vestibular disorders has been updated by geneticists (e.g., the description of the COCH gene mutations, the detection of structural abnormalities (e.g., dehiscence syndromes and related disorders (e.g. migraine-associated vertigo. The therapeutic options were extended by re-evaluation of techniques known a long time ago (e.g., saccus exposure, the development of new approaches (e.g., dehiscence repair and the introduction of new drug therapy concepts (e.g., local drug delivery. Implantable, neuroprosthetic solutions have not yet reached experimental safety and validity and are still far away. However, externally worn neuroprosthetic solution were introduced in the rehab of vestibular disorders (e.g., VertiGuard system.These and related trends point into a medical future which is characterized by presbyvertigo as classical sign of the demographic changes ahead, by shortage of financial resources and a medico-legally over-regulated, even hostile environment for physicians in clinical medicine.

  6. Excitatory pathways from the vestibular nuclei to the NTS and the PBN and indirect vestibulo-cardiovascular pathway from the vestibular nuclei to the RVLM relayed by the NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi-Ling; Ma, Wen-Ling; Wang, Jun-Qin; Li, Yi-Qian; Li, Min

    2008-11-13

    Previous studies have confirmed the existence of vestibulo-sympathetic pathways in the central nervous system. However, the exact pathways and neurotransmitters underlying this reflex are unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the vestibulo-cardiovascular responses are a result of activated glutamate receptors in the caudal vestibular nucleus. We also attempt to verify the indirect excitatory pathways from the vestibular nucleus (VN) to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) using a tracing method combined with a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluTs) immunofluorescence. In anesthetized rats, unilateral injection of l-glutamate (5 nmol) into the medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) and spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe) slightly increased the mean arterial pressure (MVe: 93.29+/-11.58 to 96.30+/-11.66, SpVe: 91.72+/-15.20 to 95.48+/-17.16). Local pretreatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist MK-801 (2 nmol) significantly attenuated the pressor effect of L-glutamate injected into the MVe compared to the contralateral self-control. After injection of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the MVe and SpVe, and fluorogold (FG) into the RVLM, some BDA-labeled fibres and terminals in the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) were immunoreactive for VGluT1 and VGluT2. Several BDA-labeled fibres were closely apposed to FG-labeled neurons in the NTS. These results suggested that activation of caudal vestibular nucleus neurons could induce pressor response and NMDA receptors might contribute to this response in the MVe. The glutamatergic VN-NTS and VN-PBN pathways might exist, and the projections from the VN to the RVLM relayed by the NTS comprise an indirect vestibulo-cardiovascular pathway in the brain stem.

  7. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  8. Vestibular loss and balance training cause similar changes in human cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Nadine; Hüfner, Katharina; Stephan, Thomas; Linn, Jennifer; Kremmyda, Olympia; Brandt, Thomas; Flanagin, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss suffer from severe balance deficits during normal everyday movements. Ballet dancers, figure skaters, or slackliners, in contrast, are extraordinarily well trained in maintaining balance for the extreme balance situations that they are exposed to. Both training and disease can lead to changes in the diffusion properties of white matter that are related to skill level or disease progression respectively. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to compare white matter diffusivity between these two study groups and their age- and sex-matched controls. We found that vestibular patients and balance-trained subjects show a reduction of fractional anisotropy in similar white matter tracts, due to a relative increase in radial diffusivity (perpendicular to the main diffusion direction). Reduced fractional anisotropy was not only found in sensory and motor areas, but in a widespread network including long-range connections, limbic and association pathways. The reduced fractional anisotropy did not correlate with any cognitive, disease-related or skill-related factors. The similarity in FA between the two study groups, together with the absence of a relationship between skill or disease factors and white matter changes, suggests a common mechanism for these white matter differences. We propose that both study groups must exert increased effort to meet their respective usual balance requirements. Since balance training has been shown to effectively reduce the symptoms of vestibular failure, the changes in white matter shown here may represent a neuronal mechanism for rehabilitation.

  9. Functional and anatomic alterations in the gentamicin-damaged vestibular system in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, MLYM; Segenhout, HM; Dijk, T; Stokroos, [No Value; van der Want, TJL; Albers, FWJ

    2004-01-01

    Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to investigate the expected functional and morphologic effect of gentamicin on the vestibular system simultaneously by measurement of vestibular evoked potentials and electron microscopic evaluation. Background: Vestibular short-latency evoked potentials to

  10. Rizatriptan reduces vestibular-induced motion sickness in migraineurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Joseph M; Marcus, Dawn A; Balaban, Carey D

    2011-02-01

    A previous pilot study suggested that rizatriptan reduces motion sickness induced by complex vestibular stimulation. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study we measured motion sickness in response to a complex vestibular stimulus following pretreatment with either rizatriptan or a placebo. Subjects included 25 migraineurs with or without migraine-related dizziness (23 females) aged 21-45 years (31.0 ± 7.8 years). Motion sickness was induced by off-vertical axis rotation in darkness, which stimulates both the semicircular canals and otolith organs of the vestibular apparatus. Results indicated that of the 15 subjects who experienced vestibular-induced motion sickness when pretreated with placebo, 13 showed a decrease in motion sickness following pretreatment with rizatriptan as compared to pretreatment with placebo (P rizatriptan, reduces vestibular-induced motion sickness by influencing serotonergic vestibular-autonomic projections.

  11. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction

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    Rafaela Maia Quitschal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. METHOD: This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. RESULTS: For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. CONCLUSION: Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

  12. Galvanic vestibular stimulation impairs cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the rat hippocampus but not spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiwen; Geddes, Lisa; Sato, Go; Stiles, Lucy; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a method of activating the peripheral vestibular system using direct current that is widely employed in clinical neurological testing. Since movement is recognized to stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis and movement is impossible without activation of the vestibular system, we speculated that activating the vestibular system in rats while minimizing movement, by delivering GVS under anesthesia, would affect hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and spatial memory. Compared with the sham control group, the number of cells incorporating the DNA replication marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), was significantly reduced in the bilateral hippocampi in both the cathode left-anode right and cathode right-anode left stimulation groups (P ≤ 0.0001). The majority of the BrdU(+ve) cells co-expressed Ki-67, a marker for the S phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that these BrdU(+ve) cells were still in the cell cycle; however, there was no significant difference in the degree of co-labeling between the two stimulation groups. Single labeling for doublecortin (DCX), a marker of immature neurons, showed that while there was no significant difference between the different groups in the number of DCX(+ve) cells in the right dentate gryus, in the left dentate gyrus there was a significant decrease in the cathode left-anode right group compared with the sham controls (P ≤ 0.03). Nonetheless, when animals were tested in place recognition, object exploration and Morris water maze tasks, there were no significant differences between the GVS groups and the sham controls. These results suggest that GVS can have striking effects on cell proliferation and possibly neurogenesis in the hippocampus, without affecting spatial memory.

  13. How vestibular stimulation interacts with illusory hand ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Christophe; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Blanke, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Artificial stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system has been shown to improve ownership of body parts in neurological patients, suggesting vestibular contributions to bodily self-consciousness. Here, we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) interferes with the mechanisms underlying ownership, touch, and the localization of one's own hand in healthy participants by using the "rubber hand illusion" paradigm. Our results show that left anodal GVS increases illusory ow...

  14. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Patatas, Olívia Helena Gomes [UNIFESP; Ganança, Cristina Freitas; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular re...

  15. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  16. Experiment M131. Human vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The lower susceptibility to vestibular stimulation aloft, compared with that on ground under experimental conditions, is attributed to a precondition, namely, either there is no need to adapt, or, as exemplified by the Skylab 3 pilot, adaptation to weightlessness is achieved. Findings in some of the astronauts emphasize the distinction between two categories of vestibular side effects: immediate reflex phenomena (illusions, sensations of turning, etc.), and delayed epiphenomena that include the constellation of symptoms and syndromes comprising motion sickness. The drug combinations 1-scopolamine and d-amphetamine and promethazine hydrochloride and ephedrine sulfate are effective in prevention and treatment of motion sickness. It is concluded that prevention of motion sickness in any stressful motion environment involves selection, adaptation, and the use of drugs.

  17. The vestibular system of the owl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, K. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Five owls were given vestibular examinations, and two of them were sacrificed to provide serial histological sections of the temporal bones. The owls exhibited a curious variability in the postrotatory head nystagmus following abrupt deceleration; sometimes a brisk nystagnus with direction opposite to that appropriate to the stimulus would occur promptly after deceleration. It was found also that owls can exhibit a remarkable head stability during angular movement of the body about any axis passing through the skull. The vestibular apparatus in the owl is larger than in man, and a prominent crista neglecta is present. The tectorial membrane, the cupula, and the otolithic membranes of the utricle, saccule, and lagena are all attached to surfaces in addition to the surfaces hearing hair cells. These attachments are very substantial in the utricular otolithic membrane and in the cupula.

  18. Inferior vestibular neuritis in a fighter pilot: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Su Jiang; Jia, Hong Bo; Xu, Po; Zheng, Ying Juan

    2013-06-01

    Spatial disorientation in airplane pilots is a leading factor in many fatal flying accidents. Spatial orientation is the product of integrative inputs from the proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual systems. One condition that can lead to sudden pilot incapacitation in flight is vestibular neuritis. Vestibular neuritis is commonly diagnosed by a finding of unilateral vestibular failure, such as a loss of caloric response. However, because caloric response testing reflects the function of only the superior part of the vestibular nerve, it cannot detect cases of neuritis in only the inferior part of the nerve. We describe the case of a Chinese naval command fighter pilot who exhibited symptoms suggestive of vestibular neuritis but whose caloric response test results were normal. Further testing showed a unilateral loss of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We believe that this pilot had pure inferior nerve vestibular neuritis. VEMP testing plays a major role in the diagnosis of inferior nerve vestibular neuritis in pilots. We also discuss this issue in terms of aeromedical concerns.

  19. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

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    Shubham Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF. This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth.

  20. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti; Márcio Cavalcante Salmito; Juliana Antoniolli Duarte; Karina Cavalcanti Sumi; Juliana Caminha Simões; Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients h...

  1. Galvanic vestibular stimulation: a novel modulatory countermeasure for vestibular-associated movement disorders

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    Carlos V. Rizzo-Sierra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion sickness or kinetosis is the result of the abnormal neural output originated by visual, proprioceptive and vestibular mismatch, which reverses once the dysfunctional sensory information becomes coherent. The space adaptation syndrome or space sickness relates to motion sickness; it is considered to be due to yaw, pith, and roll coordinates mismatch. Several behavioural and pharmacological measures have been proposed to control these vestibular-associated movement disorders with no success. Galvanic vestibular stimulation has the potential of up-regulating disturbed sensory-motor mismatch originated by kinetosis and space sickness by modulating the GABA-related ion channels neural transmission in the inner ear. It improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent proprioceptive volleys, which would ultimately modulate the motor output restoring the disordered gait, balance and human locomotion due to kinetosis, as well as the spatial disorientation generated by gravity transition.

  2. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: an overview Potencial evocado miogênico vestibular: uma visão geral

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Cal; Fayez Bahmad Jr

    2009-01-01

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test is a relatively new diagnostic tool that is in the process of being investigated in patients with specific vestibular disorders. Briefly, the VEMP is a biphasic response elicited by loud clicks or tone bursts recorded from the tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscle, being the only resource available to assess the function of the saccule and the lower portion of the vestibular nerve. AIM: In this review, we shall highlight the histo...

  3. Assessment of vestibular function by videonystagmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitte, E; Sémont, A

    1995-01-01

    Videonystagmoscopy has been used to subjectively observe the responses of the vestibular system in a population of patients with vestibular deficits. These results were compared with those of a control group of healthy, age-matched volunteers. The videonystagmoscopy device is made of one or two CCD cameras mounted on lightproof goggles, allowing a subjective observation of ocular movements on a video monitor. The eye movements, as well as the position of the head in space, can be recorded on videotape. The eyes are illuminated by infrared light emitting diodes placed on each side of the camera lens. The subjects are seated on a manually driven Barany chair. Subjects went through a protocol of passive roll head tilt on each side, followed by a slow, whole body rotation of 180 degrees amplitude, clockwise and counterclockwise, and then a head shaking test (HST). The eyes were subjectively observed, and we focussed on: torsional eye movements during head tilt, nystagmus when the rotation had stopped, and nystagmus induced by HST. With this simple and noninvasive examining procedure, screening of vestibular function at the bedside or during E.N.T. clinical investigations is possible.

  4. Calyx and dimorphic neurons of mouse Scarpa's ganglion express histamine H3 receptors

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    Zucca Gianpiero

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histamine-related drugs are commonly used in the treatment of vertigo and related vestibular disorders. The site of action of these drugs however has not been elucidated yet. Recent works on amphibians showed that histamine H3 receptor antagonists, e.g. betahistine, inhibit the afferent discharge recorded from the vestibular nerve. To assess the expression of H3 histamine receptors in vestibular neurons, we performed mRNA RT-PCR and immunofluorescence experiments in mouse Scarpa's ganglia. Results RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of H3 receptor mRNA in mouse ganglia tissue. H3 protein expression was found in vestibular neurons characterized by large and roundish soma, which labeled for calretinin and calbindin. Conclusion The present results are consistent with calyx and dimorphic, but not bouton, afferent vestibular neurons expressing H3 receptors. This study provides a molecular substrate for the effects of histamine-related antivertigo drugs acting on (or binding to H3 receptors, and suggest a potential target for the treatment of vestibular disorders of peripheral origin.

  5. Nystagmus induced by electrical stimulation of the vestibular and prepositus hypoglossi nuclei in the monkey: evidence for site of induction of velocity storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, J.; Reisine, H.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    regions of ventral MVN and LVN, rostral descending vestibular nucleus and the marginal zone between MVN and PPH. Vestibular-only (VO), vestibular plus saccade (VPS) and tonic vestibular pause (TVP) units were identified by extracellular recording. Stimulation near type I lateral and vertical canal-related VO units elicited typical "storage" responses with after-nystagmus in 23 of 29 tracks (79%). Stimulus responses were more complex from the region of neurons with oculomotor-related signals, i.e., TVP or VPS cells, although after-nystagmus was also elicited from these sites. Effects of vestibular nerve and nucleus stimulation were compared.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  6. Vetibular Neuronitis Characteristics of Its Neurotological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Neurotological follow-up observations were conducted on 38 out of 43 cases of vestibular neuronitis treated between 1972 and 1983. The observation period was one year and three months in average ranging form one month to nine year and four months, and seventeen cases were followed for more then one year. The tests used for evalution in this series were the following; spontaneous nystagmus, head positional nystagmus, a caloric test and a computed galvanic body sway test conducted by Yamaguchi ...

  7. Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation enhances spatial memory in cognitive impairment-induced by intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel Ghahraman, Mansoureh; Zahmatkesh, Maryam; Pourbakht, Akram; Seifi, Behjat; Jalaie, Shohreh; Adeli, Soheila; Niknami, Zohreh

    2016-04-01

    There are several anatomical connections between vestibular system and brain areas construct spatial memory. Since subliminal noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has been demonstrated to enhance some types of memory, we speculated that application of noisy GVS may improve spatial memory in a rat model of intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ)-induced cognitive impairment. Moreover, we attempted to determine the effect of repeated exposure to GVS on spatial memory performance. The spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze test. The groups received 1 (ICV-STZ/GVS-I) or 5 (ICV-STZ/GVS-II) sessions, each lasting 30 min, of low amplitude noisy GVS, or no GVS at all (Control, ICV-saline, ICV-STZ/noGVS). Hippocampal morphological changes investigated with cresyl violet staining and the immediate early gene product c-Fos, as a neuronal activity marker, was measured. Hippocampal c-Fos positive cells increased in both GVS stimulated groups. We observed significantly improved spatial performance only in ICV-STZ/GVS-II group. Histological evaluation showed normal density in ICV-STZ/GVS-II group whereas degeneration observed in ICV-STZ/GVS-I group similar to ICV-STZ/noGVS. The results showed the improvement of memory impairment after repeated exposure to GVS. This effect may be due in part to frequent activation of the vestibular neurons and the hippocampal regions connected to them. Our current study suggests the potential role of GVS as a practical method to combat cognitive decline induced by sporadic Alzheimer disease.

  8. Can Electrical Vestibular Noise Be Used for the Treatment of Brain Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kwak, Shin

    2005-11-01

    The therapy currently available for the treatment of degenerative neurological diseases is far from satisfactory, and a novel therapeutic strategy, especially for pharmacologically unresponsive patients, would be welcomed. The vestibular nerves are known to influence neuronal circuits in the medullary cardiovascular areas and, through the cerebellar vermis, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. By means of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), it may now be possible to ameliorate blunted responsiveness of degenerated neuronal circuits in the brains of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and/or Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, through a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. We evaluate the effect of 24-hour noisy GVS on long-term heart rate dynamics in seven MSA patients, and on daytime locomotor activity dynamics in twelve patients with either PD or levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism. Short-range heart rate variability and long-range anti-correlation of trunk activity are significantly increased by the noisy GVS compared with sham stimulation, suggestive of improved autonomic and motor responsiveness. The noisy GVS is effective in boosting the neuro-degenerative brains of MSA and/or PD patients, including those unresponsive to standard levodopa therapy.

  9. Head movements evoked in alert rhesus monkey by vestibular prosthesis stimulation: implications for postural and gaze stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E Mitchell

    Full Text Available The vestibular system detects motion of the head in space and in turn generates reflexes that are vital for our daily activities. The eye movements produced by the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR play an essential role in stabilizing the visual axis (gaze, while vestibulo-spinal reflexes ensure the maintenance of head and body posture. The neuronal pathways from the vestibular periphery to the cervical spinal cord potentially serve a dual role, since they function to stabilize the head relative to inertial space and could thus contribute to gaze (eye-in-head + head-in-space and posture stabilization. To date, however, the functional significance of vestibular-neck pathways in alert primates remains a matter of debate. Here we used a vestibular prosthesis to 1 quantify vestibularly-driven head movements in primates, and 2 assess whether these evoked head movements make a significant contribution to gaze as well as postural stabilization. We stimulated electrodes implanted in the horizontal semicircular canal of alert rhesus monkeys, and measured the head and eye movements evoked during a 100 ms time period for which the contribution of longer latency voluntary inputs to the neck would be minimal. Our results show that prosthetic stimulation evoked significant head movements with latencies consistent with known vestibulo-spinal pathways. Furthermore, while the evoked head movements were substantially smaller than the coincidently evoked eye movements, they made a significant contribution to gaze stabilization, complementing the VOR to ensure that the appropriate gaze response is achieved. We speculate that analogous compensatory head movements will be evoked when implanted prosthetic devices are transitioned to human patients.

  10. Evidence for cognitive vestibular integration impairment in idiopathic scoliosis patients

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    Mercier Pierre

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is characterized by a three-dimensional deviation of the vertebral column and its etiopathogenesis is unknown. Various factors cause idiopathic scoliosis, and among these a prominent role has been attributed to the vestibular system. While the deficits in sensorimotor transformations have been documented in idiopathic scoliosis patients, little attention has been devoted to their capacity to integrate vestibular information for cognitive processing for space perception. Seated idiopathic scoliosis patients and control subjects experienced rotations of different directions and amplitudes in the dark and produced saccades that would reproduce their perceived spatial characteristics of the rotations (vestibular condition. We also controlled for possible alteration of the oculomotor and vestibular systems by measuring the subject's accuracy in producing saccades towards memorized peripheral targets in absence of body rotation and the gain of their vestibulo-ocular reflex. Results Compared to healthy controls, the idiopathic scoliosis patients underestimated the amplitude of their rotations. Moreover, the results revealed that idiopathic scoliosis patients produced accurate saccades to memorized peripheral targets in absence of body rotation and that their vestibulo-ocular reflex gain did not differ from that of control participants. Conclusion Overall, results of the present study demonstrate that idiopathic scoliosis patients have an alteration in cognitive integration of vestibular signals. It is possible that severe spine deformity developed partly due to impaired vestibular information travelling from the cerebellum to the vestibular cortical network or alteration in the cortical mechanisms processing the vestibular signals.

  11. Facial myokymia as a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma.

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    Joseph B

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Facial myokymia is a rare presenting feature of a vestibular schwannoma. We present a 48 year old woman with a large right vestibular schwannoma, who presented with facial myokymia. It is postulated that facial myokymia might be due to a defect in the motor axons of the 7th nerve or due to brain stem compression by the tumor.

  12. Vestibular and proprioceptive influences on trunk movements during quiet standing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, C.G.; Kung, U.M.; Honegger, F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Alfen, N. van; Bloem, B.R.; Allum, J.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We characterized upper trunk and pelvis motion in normal subjects and in subjects with vestibular or proprioceptive loss, to document upper body movement modes in the pitch and roll planes during quiet stance. Six bilateral vestibular loss (VL), six bilateral lower-leg proprioceptive loss (PL) and 2

  13. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

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    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  14. Vestibular function and temporal bone imaging in DFNB1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, A.M.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Peters, T.A.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Kremer, H.; Verbist, B.M.; Pennings, R.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    DFNB1 is the most prevalent type of hereditary hearing impairment known nowadays and the audiometric phenotype is very heterogeneous. There is, however, no consensus in literature on vestibular and imaging characteristics. Vestibular function and imaging results of 44 DFNB1 patients were evaluated i

  15. Vestibular vertigo in emergency neurology and cervical osteochondrosis

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    T S Barykova

    2010-01-01

    had acute peripheral vestibular pathology that required cerebral stroke or hemorrhage to be ruled out according to clinical data in most cases. Intermittent, recurrent, short-term vestibular crisis in the examined group of patients is temporarily or clinically unrelated to an exacerbation of cervical osteochondrosis.

  16. How vestibular stimulation interacts with illusory hand ownership.

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    Lopez, Christophe; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Blanke, Olaf

    2010-03-01

    Artificial stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system has been shown to improve ownership of body parts in neurological patients, suggesting vestibular contributions to bodily self-consciousness. Here, we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) interferes with the mechanisms underlying ownership, touch, and the localization of one's own hand in healthy participants by using the "rubber hand illusion" paradigm. Our results show that left anodal GVS increases illusory ownership of the fake hand and illusory location of touch. We propose that these changes are due to vestibular interference with spatial and/or temporal mechanisms of visual-tactile integration leading to an enhancement of visual capture. As only left anodal GVS lead to such changes, and based on neurological data on body part ownership, we suggest that this vestibular interference is mediated by the right temporo-parietal junction and the posterior insula.

  17. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

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    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  18. Congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction in childhood: an overlooked entity.

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    Weiss, Avery H; Phillips, James O

    2006-07-01

    We report five children with previously unrecognized vestibular dysfunction detected by clinical examination and confirmed by quantitative vestibular testing. Patient 1 presented with fluctuating visual acuity and intermittent nystagmus. Patient 2 had congenital hearing loss associated with imbalance, delayed motor development, and cyclic vomiting. Patient 3 had neurotrophic keratitis with an intermittent head tilt, imbalance, and motor delays. Patient 4 showed ataxia and eye movement abnormalities following traumatic brain injury and had reading difficulties. Patient 5 had episodic vertigo and eye movement abnormalities from infancy. Clinical vestibular testing emphasized spontaneous nystagmus, rapid head thrust, and assessment of post-rotatory nystagmus. Quantitative vestibular testing included the sinusoidal chair rotation and velocity step tests, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, post-head-shake nystagmus, and computerized platform posturography. Pediatric neurologists encounter children with congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction, which can be recognized on the basis of relevant history and clinical abnormalities of the ocular-ocular reflex.

  19. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

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    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T A K; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of "optimal" stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high baseline

  20. Neural network model of vestibular nuclei reaction to onset of vestibular prosthetic stimulation

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    Jack eDigiovanna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of ‘optimal’ stimulation configurations for humans. Here we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time-point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate and pulse amplitude modulation. Pulse amplitude modulation was more effective than pulse rate modulation for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost pulse amplitude modulation. Co-modulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both

  1. Vestibular characterization in the menstrual cycle Caracterização vestibular no ciclo menstrual

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    Cintia Ishii

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal disorders in the menstrual cycle can affect labyrinthine fluid homeostasis, causing balance and hearing dysfunctions. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical prospective. AIM: compare the results from vestibular tests in young women, in the premenstrual and postmenstrual periods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: twenty women were selected with ages ranging from 18 to 35 years, who were not using any kind of contraceptive method for at least six months, and without vestibular or hearing complaints. The test was carried out in each subject before and after the menstrual period, respecting the limit of ten days before or after menstruation. RESULTS: there was a statistically significant difference in the menstrual cycle phases only in the following vestibular tests: calibration, saccadic movements, PRPD and caloric-induced nystagmus. We also noticed that age; a regular menstrual cycle; hearing loss or dizziness cases in the family; and premenstrual symptoms such as tinnitus, headache, sleep disorders, anxiety, nausea and hyperacusis can interfere in the vestibular test. CONCLUSION: there are differences in the vestibular tests of healthy women when comparing their pre and postmenstrual periods.As alterações hormonais do ciclo menstrual podem comprometer a homeostase dos fluidos labirínticos, gerando alterações no equilíbrio e na audição. FORMA DO ESTUDO: Clínico prospectivo. OBJETIVO: Comparar os resultados dos testes do exame vestibular em mulheres jovens, nos períodos pré e pós-menstrual. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram selecionadas vinte mulheres, entre dezoito e trinta e cinco anos, que não fizessem uso de qualquer tipo de anticoncepcional, com audição normal e sem queixas vestibulares. O exame vestibular foi realizado em cada participante no período pré e no período pós-menstrual, em ordem aleatória, e respeitando o limite de até dez dias antes do início da menstruação e até dez dias após o início da menstruação. RESULTADO: Foi observada

  2. Plasticity of histamine H3 receptor expression and binding in the vestibular nuclei after labyrinthectomy in rat

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    Karlstedt Kaj

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rat, deafferentation of one labyrinth (unilateral labyrinthectomy results in a characteristic syndrome of ocular and motor postural disorders (e.g., barrel rotation, circling behavior, and spontaneous nystagmus. Behavioral recovery (e.g., diminished symptoms, encompassing 1 week after unilateral labyrinthectomy, has been termed vestibular compensation. Evidence suggesting that the histamine H3 receptor plays a key role in vestibular compensation comes from studies indicating that betahistine, a histamine-like drug that acts as both a partial histamine H1 receptor agonist and an H3 receptor antagonist, can accelerate the process of vestibular compensation. Results Expression levels for histamine H3 receptor (total as well as three isoforms which display variable lengths of the third intracellular loop of the receptor were analyzed using in situ hybridization on brain sections containing the rat medial vestibular nucleus after unilateral labyrinthectomy. We compared these expression levels to H3 receptor binding densities. Total H3 receptor mRNA levels (detected by oligo probe H3X as well as mRNA levels of the three receptor isoforms studied (detected by oligo probes H3A, H3B, and H3C showed a pattern of increase, which was bilaterally significant at 24 h post-lesion for both H3X and H3C, followed by significant bilateral decreases in medial vestibular nuclei occurring 48 h (H3X and H3B and 1 week post-lesion (H3A, H3B, and H3C. Expression levels of H3B was an exception to the forementioned pattern with significant decreases already detected at 24 h post-lesion. Coinciding with the decreasing trends in H3 receptor mRNA levels was an observed increase in H3 receptor binding densities occurring in the ipsilateral medial vestibular nuclei 48 h post-lesion. Conclusion Progressive recovery of the resting discharge of the deafferentated medial vestibular nuclei neurons results in functional restoration of the static postural and

  3. Labyrinthectomy and Vestibular Neurectomy for Intractable Vertiginous Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Alfredo Vega; Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia Vales; Arévalo, Rodrigo Jácome; Diaz, Marite Palma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy are considered the surgical procedures with the highest possibility of controlling medically untreatable incapacitating vertigo. Ironically, after 100 years of the introduction of both transmastoid labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy, the choice of which procedure to use rests primarily on the evaluation of the hearing and of the surgical morbidity. Objective To review surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy for the treatment of incapacitating vestibular disorders. Data Sources PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis In this review we describe and compare surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy. A contrast between surgical and chemical labyrinthectomy is also examined. Proper candidate selection, success in vertigo control and complication rates are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Conclusions Vestibular nerve section and labyrinthectomy achieve high and comparable rates of vertigo control. Even though vestibular neurectomy is considered a hearing sparing surgery, since it is an intradural procedure, it carries a greater risk of complications than transmastoid labyrinthectomy. Furthermore, since many patients whose hearing is preserved with vestibular nerve section may ultimately lose that hearing, the long-term value of hearing preservation is not well established. Although the combination of both procedures, in the form of a translabyrinthine vestibular nerve section, is the most certain way to ablate vestibular function for patients with no useful hearing and disabling vertigo, some advocate for transmastoid labyrinthectomy alone, considering that avoiding opening the subarachnoid space minimizes the possible intracranial complications. Chemical labyrinthectomy may be considered a safer alternative, but the risks of hearing loss when hearing preservation is desired are also high. PMID:28382129

  4. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

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    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; Reschke, M. F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  5. Vestibular and cerebellar contribution to gaze optimality.

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    Sağlam, Murat; Glasauer, Stefan; Lehnen, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss have large gaze variability and experience disturbing oscillopsia, which impacts physical and social functioning, and quality of life. Gaze variability and oscillopsia in these patients are attributed to a deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex, i.e. impaired online feedback motor control. Here, we assessed whether the lack of vestibular input also affects feed-forward motor learning, i.e. the ability to choose optimal movement parameters that minimize variability during active movements such as combined eye-head gaze shifts. A failure to learn from practice and reshape feed-forward motor commands in response to sensory error signals to achieve appropriate movements has been proposed to explain dysmetric gaze shifts in patients with cerebellar ataxia. We, therefore, assessed the differential roles of both sensory vestibular information and the cerebellum in choosing optimal movement kinematics. We have previously shown that, in the course of several gaze shifts, healthy subjects adjust the motor command to minimize endpoint variability also when movements are experimentally altered by an increase in the head moment of inertia. Here, we increased the head inertia in five patients with chronic complete bilateral vestibular loss (aged 45.4±7.1 years, mean±standard deviation), nine patients with cerebellar ataxia (aged 56.7±12.6 years), and 10 healthy control subjects (aged 39.7±6.3 years) while they performed large (75° and 80°) horizontal gaze shifts towards briefly flashed targets in darkness and, using our previous optimal control model, compared their gaze shift parameters to the expected optimal movements with increased head inertia. Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss failed to update any of the gaze shift parameters to the new optimum with increased head inertia. Consequently, they displayed highly variable, suboptimal gaze shifts. Patients with cerebellar ataxia updated some movement parameters to

  6. Effects of betahistine on the spatiotemporal response properties of vestibulospinal neurons to labyrinthine volleys.

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    Barresi, Massimo; Bruschini, Luca; Li Volsi, Guido; Manzoni, Diego

    2005-05-16

    Betahistine, a drug used in the treatment of vestibular disorders, speeds-up the recovery from hemilabyrinthectomy in experimental animals, likely through the activation of histamine receptors. In order to better understand the mechanism of action of this drug we investigated, in adult, urethane anesthetized rats, whether betahistine modifies the spatial (directional) and temporal response properties of vestibular nuclear neurons to the labyrinthine input, as well as the convergence of different labyrinthine signals on single units. Extracellular single-unit activity was recorded from the caudal, spinal-projecting region of the vestibular nuclei during tilt of the animal, before and after i.p. injection of betahistine. The two orthogonal directions of maximal and minimal response to tilt, as well as the corresponding gains were determined for each neuron. Betahistine reduced the maximal response gain of units showing larger basal values of this parameter and increased it in neurons with smaller basal values, while the minimal response gain was on the average raised. These changes led to a significant decrease in the spatial specificity of the neurons, suggesting that betahistine affects the process of spatiotemporal convergence on vestibular units, likely through a rearrangement of the various inputs. This could be related to the effect of the drug on vestibular compensation.

  7. The frog vestibular system as a model for lesion-induced plasticity: basic neural principles and implications for posture control

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    Francois M Lambert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of behavioral consequences after unilateral labyrinthectomy have a long tradition in the quest of determining rules and limitations of the CNS to exert plastic changes that assist the recuperation from the loss of sensory inputs. Frogs were among the first animal models to illustrate general principles of regenerative capacity and reorganizational neural flexibility after a vestibular lesion. The continuous successful use of the latter animals is in part based on the easy access and identifiability of nerve branches to inner ear organs for surgical intervention, the possibility to employ whole brain preparations for in vitro studies and the limited degree of freedom of postural reflexes for quantification of behavioral impairments and subsequent improvements. Major discoveries that increased the knowledge of post-lesional reactive mechanisms in the central nervous system include alterations in vestibular commissural signal processing and activation of cooperative changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs to disfacilitated neurons. Moreover, the observed increase of synaptic efficacy in propriospinal circuits illustrates the importance of limb proprioceptive inputs for postural recovery. Accumulated evidence suggests that the lesion-induced neural plasticity is not a goal-directed process that aims towards a meaningful restoration of vestibular reflexes but rather attempts a survival of those neurons that have lost their excitatory inputs. Accordingly, the reaction mechanism causes an improvement of some components but also a deterioration of other aspects as seen by spatio-temporally inappropriate vestibulo-motor responses, similar to the consequences of plasticity processes in various sensory systems and species. The generality of the findings indicate that frogs continue to form a highly amenable vertebrate model system for exploring molecular and physiological events during cellular and network reorganization after a loss of

  8. Analysis of signal processing in vestibular circuits with a novel light-emitting diodes-based fluorescence microscope.

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    Direnberger, Stephan; Banchi, Roberto; Brosel, Sonja; Seebacher, Christian; Laimgruber, Stefan; Uhl, Rainer; Felmy, Felix; Straka, Hans; Kunz, Lars

    2015-05-01

    Optical visualization of neural network activity is limited by imaging system-dependent technical tradeoffs. To overcome these constraints, we have developed a powerful low-cost and flexible imaging system with high spectral variability and unique spatio-temporal precision for simultaneous optical recording and manipulation of neural activity of large cell groups. The system comprises eight high-power light-emitting diodes, a camera with a large metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor and a high numerical aperture water-dipping objective. It allows fast and precise control of excitation and simultaneous low noise imaging at high resolution. Adjustable apertures generated two independent areas of variable size and position for simultaneous optical activation and image capture. The experimental applicability of this system was explored in semi-isolated preparations of larval axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) with intact inner ear organs and central nervous circuits. Cyclic galvanic stimulation of semicircular canals together with glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-uncaging caused a corresponding modulation of Ca(2+) transients in central vestibular neurons. These experiments revealed specific cellular properties as well as synaptic interactions between excitatory and inhibitory inputs, responsible for spatio-temporal-specific sensory signal processing. Location-specific GABA-uncaging revealed a potent inhibitory shunt of vestibular nerve afferent input in the predominating population of tonic vestibular neurons, indicating a considerable impact of local and commissural inhibitory circuits on the processing of head/body motion-related signals. The discovery of these previously unknown properties of vestibular computations demonstrates the merits of our novel microscope system for experimental applications in the field of neurobiology.

  9. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

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    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  10. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  11. STATE ANXIETY, SUBJECTIVE IMBALANCE AND HANDICAP IN VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA

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    Yougan Saman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEvidence is emerging of a significant clinical and neuro-anatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. Aims1.To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit.2.To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. MethodsTwo separate cohorts Vestibular Schwannoma (VS patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric responses and questionnaire assessment (Vertigo handicap Questionnaire, Vertigo Symptom Scale, State Trait Anxiety InventoryFifteen post resection Vestibular schwannoma patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1. Forty-five patients with VS in-situ and with preserved vestibular function formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2. Experiment 1: VS subjects (N=15 with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a State anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterwards with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1. Experiment 2: State anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1 N=26 and without balance symptoms (Group 2 N=11 (Aim 2. The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER.ResultsIn experiment 1, a significant difference (p<0.01 was found when comparing

  12. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease.

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    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research including major findings that have advanced our understanding of how this system exerts its influence on reflexive and cognitive challenges encountered during daily life. In particular, we highlight the contributions of different animal models and the advantage of using a comparative research approach. Cross-species comparisons have established that the morpho-physiological properties underlying vestibular signal processing are evolutionarily inherent, thereby disclosing general principles. Based on the documented success of this approach, we suggest that future research employing a balanced spectrum of standard animal models such as fish/frog, mouse and primate will optimize our progress in understanding vestibular processing in health and disease. Moreover, we propose that this should be further supplemented by research employing more "exotic" species that offer unique experimental access and/or have specific vestibular adaptations due to unusual locomotor capabilities or lifestyles. Taken together this strategy will expedite our understanding of the basic principles underlying vestibular computations to reveal relevant translational aspects. Accordingly, studies employing animal models are indispensible and even mandatory for the development of new treatments, medication and technical aids (implants) for patients with vestibular pathologies.

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy: review of indications, mechanisms, and key exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals.

  14. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  15. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  16. Basic problems in the diagnosis and treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic problems in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases accompanied by vertigo. In particular, it discusses the specific features of vertigo terminology, the overestimation of the value of cerebrovascular diseases and degenerative cervical spine changes in the development of vertigo and the underestimation of a role of peripheral vestibular diseases and psychogenic disorders in the genesis of different forms of vertigo. Emphasis is placed on the importance of vestibular exercises in the complex treatment of diseases manifesting themselves as vertigo. In addition, the possibilities of drug-induced stimulation of vestibular compensation are discussed.

  17. [The significance of vestibular function assessment in sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Rui

    2015-11-01

    Hearing loss caused by cochlear damage is the main symptom of sudden deafness (SD). Some patients also suffer from vestibular symptoms. In recent years, more attention has been paid to the vestibular dysfunction in patients with SD. The lesions could involve the whole inner ear in SD patients with and without vertigo. Comprehensive evaluation of vestibular function may help us understand the extent of lesions in sudden deafness and analyze the pathogenesis of disease. A less involvement of inner ear lesion may indicate a better hearing recovery.

  18. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  19. Vestibular function tests for vestibular migraine: clinical implication of video head impulse and caloric tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Seok Kang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT, caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP, and sensory organization test (SOT at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11% exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19% exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38% exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11% exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27% exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78% no longer required medication (CR, while 18 (22% still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively. Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  20. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  1. Behavioral Assessment of the Aging Mouse Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Dababneh, Edward; Quail, Stephanie L.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related decline in balance performance is associated with deteriorating muscle strength, motor coordination and vestibular function. While a number of studies show changes in balance phenotype with age in rodents, very few isolate the vestibular contribution to balance under either normal conditions or during senescence. We use two standard behavioral tests to characterize the balance performance of mice at defined age points over the lifespan: the rotarod test and the inclined balance beam test. Importantly though, a custom built rotator is also used to stimulate the vestibular system of mice (without inducing overt signs of motion sickness). These two tests have been used to show that changes in vestibular mediated-balance performance are present over the murine lifespan. Preliminary results show that both the rotarod test and the modified balance beam test can be used to identify changes in balance performance during aging as an alternative to more difficult and invasive techniques such as vestibulo-ocular (VOR) measurements. PMID:25045963

  2. LITERACY SENSES: WRITING IN VESTIBULAR (ENTRANCE EXAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wilson da Costa Coelho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to pose a reflection on explicit or underlying literacy practices in a literacy event such as the Brazilian university entrance exams (vestibular using, as an object of study, the essays written during that event. We aim to understand the educated writing culture, or Brazilian literacy, in its very extreme, that is, the end of High School, based on Bakhtin’s theory of enunciation. Despite pedagogical measures focused on elaborate (argumentative writing in view of college assessment exams and ENEM (National High School Exam, we know how unsatisfactory its results still are, in terms of the school literacy practices, which still remains to be sufficiently reflected on. It is also worth highlighting that we understand writing (school writing more as a set of social practices than as a set of skills alone.

  3. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for 4 consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and one-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy.

  4. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation in the elderly complaining of dizziness

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Oliveira, Andréa; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP).; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa M.; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP).; Bohlsen, Yara Aparecida; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP).; Vargas, Ana Laura; Instituto de Estudos Avançados da Audição.

    2014-01-01

    Changes of body balance are among the most common complaints of the elderly. Vestibular rehabilitation is one of the most effective methods in the recovery of the body balance. The objective to investigate the effects of vestibular rehabilitation in body balance of a group of elderly people with dizziness complain through dizziness handicap inventory. The sample was comprised of 10 seniors (6 women and 4 men) with mean age of 68.9 years. The elderly complaining of dizziness showed high score ...

  5. [Membrane model of the cupula of the vestibular semicircular canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A V; Shipov, A A; Sirenko, S P

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of the time-course variations of the cupula of the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus is presented. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data which suggests that the cupular matter has viscosity-elasticity properties. Their role in the functioning of the vestibular apparatus is discussed in qualitative terms. The applicability of the membrane model to the description of the time-course variations of the cupula is considered.

  6. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: sergioanat.morf@epm.br; Smith, Ricardo Luiz [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Isotani, Sadao [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Alonso, Luis Garcia [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Anadao, Carlos Augusto [Otorhinolaryngology Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Prates, Jose Carlos [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm{sup 2} of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm{sup 2}, 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant.

  7. Termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the spinal vestibular nucleus in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Bácskai, T; Paxinos, G

    2015-05-21

    The present study investigated the vestibulospinal system which originates from the spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe) with both retrograde and anterograde tracer injections. We found that fluoro-gold (FG) labeled neurons were found bilaterally with a contralateral predominance after FG injections into the upper lumbar cord. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the rostral SpVe traveled in the medial part of the ventral funiculus ipsilaterally and the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally in the cervical cord. They mainly terminated in laminae 5-8, and 10 of the ipsilateral spinal cord. The contralateral side had fewer fibers and they were found in laminae 6-8, and 10. In the thoracic cord, fibers were also found to terminate in bilateral intermediolateral columns. In the lumbar and lower cord, fibers were mainly found in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally and they terminated predominantly in laminae 3-7 contralaterally. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the caudal SpVe did not travel in the medial part of the ventral funiculus but in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally. They mainly terminated in laminae 3-8 and 10 contralaterally. The present study is the first to describe the termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the SpVe in the spinal cord. It will lay the anatomical foundation for those who investigate the physiological role of vestibulospinal fibers and potentially target these fibers during rehabilitation after stroke, spinal cord injury, or vestibular organ injury.

  8. Ongoing cell death and immune influences on regeneration in the vestibular sensory organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchol, M. E.; Matsui, J. I.; Simkus, E. L.; Ogilive, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Hair cells in the vestibular organs of birds have a relatively short life span. Mature hair cells appear to die spontaneously and are then quickly replaced by new hair cells that arise from the division of epithelial supporting cells. A similar regenerative mechanism also results in hair cell replacement after ototoxic damage. The cellular basis of hair cell turnover in the avian ear is not understood. We are investigating the signaling pathways that lead to hair cell death and the relationship between ongoing cell death and cell production. In addition, work from our lab and others has demonstrated that the avian inner ear contains a resident population of macrophages and that enhanced numbers of macrophages are recruited to sites of hair cells lesions. Those observations suggest that macrophages and their secretory products (cytokines) may be involved in hair cell regeneration. Consistent with that suggestion, we have found that treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone reduces regenerative cell proliferation in the avian ear, and that certain macrophage-secreted cytokines can influence the proliferation of vestibular supporting cells and the survival of statoacoustic neurons. Those results suggest a role for the immune system in the process of sensory regeneration in the inner ear.

  9. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  10. [Vestibularly displaced flap with bone augmentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalian, V L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve esthetic gingival contours with the help of less traumatic mucogingival surgeries. 9 Patients were operated with horizontal deficiencies in 9 edentulous sites, planned to be restored with fixed partial dentures. In all cases there was lack of keratinized tissues. Temporary bridges were fabricated to all patients. Before surgery the bridges were removed and the abutment teeth were additionally cleaned with ultrasonic device. A horizontal incision was made from lingual (palatal) side between the abutment teeth, which was connected with two vertical releasing incisions to the mucogingival junction from the vestibular side. The horizontal incision was made on a distance 6-10 mm from the crest of the alveolar ridge. A partial thickness flap in the beginning 3-5 mm, then a full thickness flap up to the mucogingival junction, then a partial thickness flap was made. The flap was mobilized and displaced vestibularly. In the apical part the cortical bone was perforated, graft material was put and the flap was sutured. In all 9 cases the horizontal defect was partially or fully eliminated. The width of the keratinized tissues was also augmented in all cases. The postoperative healing was without complications, discomfort and painless. The donor sites also healed without complications. The application of Solcoseryl Dental Adhesive Paste 3 times a day for 7-10 days helped for painless healing of the donor site. The offered method of soft tissue and bone augmentation is effective in the treatment of horizontal defects of edentulous alveolar ridges of not big sizes. It makes possible to achieve esthetic results without traumatizing an additional donor-site.

  11. Preservation of auditory and vestibular function after surgical removal of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. O.; Brackmann, D. E.; Hitselberger, W. E.; Purdy, J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) surgery continues to improve rapidly. Advances can be attributed to several fields, but the most important contributions have arisen from the identification of the genes responsible for the dominant inheritance of neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) and the development of magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement for the early anatomic confirmation of the pathognomonic, bilateral vestibular schwannomas in NF2. These advances enable early diagnosis and treatment when the tumors are small in virtually all subjects at risk for NF2. The authors suggest that advising young NF2 patients to wait until complications develop, especially hearing loss, before diagnosing and operating for bilateral eighth nerve schwannomas may not always be in the best interest of the patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of preservation of both auditory and vestibular function in a patient after bilateral vestibular schwannoma excision.

  12. Pattern of hair cell loss and delayed peripheral neuron degeneration in inner ear by a high-dose intratympanic gentamicin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintao Yu; Dalian Ding; Fengjun Wang; Haiyan Jiang; Hong Sun; Richard Salvi

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics (AmAn) and delayed peripheral ganglion neuron death in the inner ear, experimental animal models were widely used with several different approaches including AmAn systemic injections, combination treat-ment of AmAn and diuretics, or local application of AmAn. In these approaches, systemic AmAn treatment alone usually causes incomplete damage to hair cells in the inner ear. Co-administration of diuretic and AmAn can completely destroy the cochlear hair cells, but it is impossible to damage the vestibular system. Only the approach of AmAn local application can selectively eliminate most sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Therefore, AmAn local application is more suitable for studies for complete hair cell destructions in cochlear and vestibular system and the following delayed peripheral ganglion neuron death. In current studies, guinea pigs were unilaterally treated with a high concentration of gentamicin (GM, 40 mg/ml) through the tympanic membrane into the middle ear cavity. Auditory functions and vestibular functions were measured before and after GM treatment. The loss of hair cells and delayed degeneration of ganglion neurons in both cochlear and vestibular system were quantified 30 days or 60 days after treatment. The results showed that both auditory and vestibular functions were completely abolished after GM treatment. The sensory hair cells were totally missing in the cochlea, and severely destroyed in vestibular end-organs. The delayed spiral ganglion neuron death 60 days after the deafening procedure was over 50%. However, no obvious pathological changes were observed in vestibular ganglion neurons 60 days post-treatment. These results indicated that a high concentration of gentamycin delivered to the middle ear cavity can destroy most sensory hair cells in the inner ear that subsequently causes the delayed spiral ganglion neuron degeneration. This model might be useful for studies

  13. The neuronal organization of horizontal semicircular canalactivated inhibitory vestibulocollic neurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isu, N; Sakuma, A; Hiranuma, K; Uchino, H; Sasaki, S; Imagawa, M; Uchino, Y

    1991-01-01

    1. The somatic location and axonal projections of inhibitory vestibular nucleus neurons activated by the horizontal semicircular canal nerve (HCN) were studied in anesthetized cats. Cats were anesthetized with ketamine hydrochloride and pentobarbital sodium. 2. Intracellular recordings were obtained from 11 neck extensor motoneurons which were identified by antidromic activation from the dosal rami (DR) in the C1 segment. Stimulation of the ipsilateral (i-) HCN and the ipsilateral abducens (AB) nucleus evoked IPSPs in the motoneurons. These IPSPs were fully or partially occluded when they were evoked simultaneously. 3. Intracellular recordings were obtained from 8 AB motoneurons. Stimulation of the i-HCN and the i-C1DR motoneuron pool evoked IPSPs in the AB motoneurons. These IPSPs were also partially occluded when they were evoked simultaneously, which implied that some HCN-activated neurons inhibit both i-AB motoneurons and ipsilateral neck motoneurons. 4. Unit activity was extracellularly recorded from 30 vestibular neurons that were activated monosynaptically by i-HCN stimulation. Their axonal projections were determined by stimulating the i-AB nucleus and the i-C1DR motoneuron pool. Eight neurons were activated by both stimuli, and were termed vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) neurons. Their axonal branching was examined by means of local stimulation in and around the i-AB nucleus and the i-C1DR motoneuron pool. Eighteen neurons were antidromically activated from the i-C1DR motoneuron pool but not from the i-AB nucleus. These were termed vestibulo-collic (VC) neurons. Four neurons were activated from the i-AB nucleus but not from the ventral funiculus in the C1 segment, and were termed vestibulo-ocular (VO) neurons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Inverse U-shaped curve for age dependency of torsional eye movement responses to galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Klaus; Naessl, Andrea; Schneider, Erich; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2003-07-01

    To investigate age dependent changes we analysed torsional eye movement responses to binaural and monaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in 57 healthy subjects (20-69 years old). GVS (1-3 mA) induced torsional eye movements consisting of static torsion toward the anode (amplitude 1-6 degrees ) and superimposed torsional nystagmus (slow phase velocity 0.5-3 degrees /s, quick phase amplitude 0.5-2 degrees, nystagmus frequency 0.75-1.5 s-1). Static ocular torsion and torsional nystagmus increased from the third to the sixth decade and decreased in older subjects, e.g. slow phase velocity increased from 1.5 degrees /s (20-29 years) to 2.9 degrees /s (50-59 years) and decreased to 2.5 degrees /s for the seventh decade (60-69 years). Thus, an inverse U-shaped curve was found for the dependence of torsional eye movement responses on age. All structures relevant for vestibular function degenerate with age, but at varying times. Since hair cell loss precedes those seen in the vestibular nerve and Scarpa's ganglion, the decrease in hair cell counts could be compensated for by increased sensitivity of afferent nerve fibres or central mechanisms. Increased sensitivity could thus maintain normal function despite reduced peripheral input. As GVS acts at the vestibular nerve (thereby bypassing the hair cells), electrical stimulation should be more efficient in subjects with the beginning of hair cell degeneration, as seen in our data up to the sixth decade. The degeneration of nerve fibres, ganglion cells and central neurons becomes evident at older ages. Thus, the compensatory increase in sensitivity breaks down and GVS-induced eye movements decline-a finding that is reflected by the inverse U-shaped curve for age dependency presented in this study.

  15. Current treatment of nasal vestibular stenosis with CO2-laser surgery: prolonged vestibular stenting versus intraoperative mitomycin application. A case series of 3 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schijndel, Olaf; van Heerbeek, Niels; Ingels, Koen J A O

    2014-12-01

    These case studies describe three cases of unilateral nasal vestibular stenoses caused by chemical cauterization. Each case was treated with CO2-laser surgery together with intraoperative topic application of mitomycin or prolonged vestibular stenting for prevention of restenosis. Two patients received intraoperative mitomycin application and one patient received prolonged vestibular stenting. Results were documented using high-resolution photographs. The follow up period ranged from 1 year and 3 months to 4 years and 9 months. All patients improved after CO2-laser surgery. No complications were reported. We consider CO2-laser surgery for relief of nasal vestibular stenosis as a feasible surgical technique for relieve of nasal vestibular stenosis. Prolonged vestibular stenting seems to be an important factor for the prevention of restenosis in which the value of intraoperative mitomycin application without prolonged vestibular stenting remains uncertain.

  16. Avaliação vestibular no tremor essencial Vestibular evaluation in the essential tremor

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    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o tremor essencial é familial em cerca de 50% dos casos, com uma herança autossômica, possui início insidioso e é lentamente progressivo. PROCEDIMENTOS: avaliou-se no Setor de Otoneurologia de um Hospital Particular em fevereiro de 2007, uma paciente do sexo feminino, branca, 59 anos, casada, artista plástica, com história de tremor na cabeça desde os dois anos de idade (sic. A paciente relata queixa de tontura há vários meses de origem súbita sem acompanhamento de náusea e/ou queda. Nega perda de força muscular e formigamento em membros superiores e inferiores, rebaixamento da acuidade auditiva e zumbido. A paciente relata que um de seus filhos possuiu tremor nas mãos há dois anos e avós maternos e paternos com Parkinson. Realizaram-se os seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica e avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: observaram-se os seguintes achados ao exame vestibular: nistagmo de posicionamento com características centrais, nistagmo espontâneo presente com os olhos abertos, nistagmo semi-espontâneo do tipo múltiplo e hiper-reflexia em valor absoluto à prova calórica 20ºC (OD e OE. CONCLUSÃO: o exame vestibular mostrou-se sensível e importante para captar alterações em provas que sugerissem envolvimento do sistema nervoso central.BACKGROUND: essential tremors are family-related in about 50% of the cases with an autosomal inheritance and they register an insidious beginning with a slow progression. PROCEDURE: a 59 year old, white female patient, married and whose occupation is a plastic artist with a history of head tremors since she was two years (sic old was evaluated in the Otoneurology sector of a private hospital, during the period from February 2007. The patient had been complaining of dizziness from unknown origin for several months without accompanying nausea and/or falls. She denied any loss of muscular strength or tingling in her upper and lower

  17. Prevalence of Vestibular Disorder in Older People Who Experience Dizziness

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    Chau, Allan T.; Menant, Jasmine C.; Hübner, Patrick P.; Lord, Stephen R.; Migliaccio, Americo A.

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people, it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological, and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim is to accurately identify the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy-six participants aged 51–92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years) were tested using the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for htDVA score, DHI score, sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1–2 Hz with peak velocity at 30°/s) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase, transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150°/s2 to a constant velocity rotation of 50°/s) VOR gain and time constant (TC), optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain, and TC (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50°/s). We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38 and 1% of participants, respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5–1 Hz), and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction. PMID:26733940

  18. Prevalence of vestibular disorder in older people who experience dizziness

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    Allan T Chau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim was to accurately identify the prevalence of: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV, peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy six participants aged 51 to 92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years were tested using the Head Thrust Dynamic Visual Acuity (htDVA test, Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for: htDVA score; DHI score; sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1 - 2 Hz with peak-velocity at 30deg/s Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR gain and phase; transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150deg/s/s to a constant velocity rotation of 50deg/s VOR gain and time constant; OptoKinetic Nystagmus (OKN gain and time constant (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50deg/s. We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38% and 1% of participants respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5 - 1 Hz and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction.

  19. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

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    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  20. Avaliação do controle postural na hipofunção vestibular unilateral

    OpenAIRE

    Rafaela Maia Quitschal; Jackeline Yumi Fukunaga; Maurício Malavasi Ganança; Heloísa Helena Caovilla

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.METHOD:This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tet...

  1. Quantification of vestibular-induced eye movements in zebrafish larvae

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    Mo Weike

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular reflexes coordinate movements or sensory input with changes in body or head position. Vestibular-evoked responses that involve the extraocular muscles include the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, a compensatory eye movement to stabilize retinal images. Although an angular VOR attributable to semicircular canal stimulation was reported to be absent in free-swimming zebrafish larvae, recent studies reveal that vestibular-induced eye movements can be evoked in zebrafish larvae by both static tilts and dynamic rotations that tilt the head with respect to gravity. Results We have determined herein the basis of sensitivity of the larval eye movements with respect to vestibular stimulus, developmental stage, and sensory receptors of the inner ear. For our experiments, video recordings of larvae rotated sinusoidally at 0.25 Hz were analyzed to quantitate eye movements under infrared illumination. We observed a robust response that appeared as early as 72 hours post fertilization (hpf, which increased in amplitude over time. Unlike rotation about an earth horizontal axis, rotation about an earth vertical axis at 0.25 Hz did not evoke eye movements. Moreover, vestibular-induced responses were absent in mutant cdh23 larvae and larvae lacking anterior otoliths. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a functional vestibulo-oculomotor circuit in 72 hpf zebrafish larvae that relies upon sensory input from anterior/utricular otolith organs.

  2. Prediction of Balance Compensation After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

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    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Frère, Julien; Perrin, Philippe P; Beurton, Renaud; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2016-06-01

    Background Balance compensation after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is under the influence of specific preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Objective To prospectively identify potential prognostic factors for balance recovery, we compared the respective influence of these preoperative characteristics on balance compensation after VS surgery. Methods In 50 patients scheduled for VS surgical ablation, we measured postural control before surgery (BS), 8 (AS8) days after, and 90 (AS90) days after surgery. Based on factors found previously in the literature, we evaluated age, body mass index and preoperative physical activity (PA), tumor grade, vestibular status, and preference for visual cues to control balance as potential prognostic factors using stepwise multiple regression models. Results An asymmetric vestibular function was the sole significant explanatory factor for impaired balance performance BS, whereas the preoperative PA alone significantly contributed to higher performance at AS8. An evaluation of patients' balance recovery over time showed that PA and vestibular status were the 2 significant predictive factors for short-term postural compensation (BS to AS8), whereas none of these preoperative factors was significantly predictive for medium-term postoperative postural recovery (AS8 to AS90). Conclusions We identified specific preoperative patient and vestibular function characteristics that may predict postoperative balance recovery after VS surgery. Better preoperative characterization of these factors in each patient could inform more personalized presurgical and postsurgical management, leading to a better, more rapid balance recovery, earlier return to normal daily activities and work, improved quality of life, and reduced medical and societal costs.

  3. Recent Advances in the Understanding of Vestibular Migraine

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    Jong-Hee Sohn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1% of the general population and 10% of patients with migraine suffer from vestibular migraine (VM. However, this condition remains relatively unknown; therefore, it is often underdiagnosed despite the recent adoption of international diagnostic criteria for VM. The diagnosis of VM is based on the symptoms, degree, frequency, and duration of the vestibular episodes, a history of migraine, the temporal association of migraine symptoms with vestibular episodes in at least 50% of cases, and the exclusion of other causes. Physical examination and laboratory findings are usually normal in patients with VM but can be used to rule out other vestibular disorders with similar symptoms. The pathophysiology of VM remains incompletely understood; however, several mechanisms link the trigeminal system, which is activated during migraine attacks, and the vestibular system. Because few controlled trials have specifically investigated VM, the treatment options for this order are largely the same as those for migraine and include antiemetics for severe acute attacks, pharmacological migraine prophylaxis, and lifestyle changes.

  4. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  5. Morphology and electrophysiology of the vestibular organ in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, Markus Lee Yang Murti

    2003-01-01

    To obtain more information about the anatomy and function of the vestibular organ in normal and pathological conditions, evaluation methods are needed. For experimental purposes, the vestibular organ of the guinea pig is often used as a model for the human vestibular organ. The purpose of the resear

  6. BETAHISTINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE IN CANINE PERIPHERAL VESTIBULAR SYNDROME DICLORIDRATO DE BETAISTINA NA SÍNDROME VESTIBULAR PERIFÉRICA CANINA

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    Tatiana Champion

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular disease is a common syndrome in small animals that  may resulst of central or peripheral disease. The pathophysiology of peripheral vestibular syndrome is unknown, however it can be related to an abnormal dynamic of endolymphatic fluid or neuritis of the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve.  The recovery of neurological sings is slow and, in chronic cases, the neurological deficits can be irreversible. In veterinary medicine, thera are few medical options to treat this condition, however, in Medicine, betahistine dihydrochloride is used to treat peripheral vestibular disorders. These drug  was used in four dogs with vestibular syndrome. The results showed clinical improvement in 7 to 10 days of treatment and completed recovery in 20 to 30 days, followed by the cure. One year after the treatment, the dogs did not have recurrence of the syndrome. This report shows the use of betahistine dihydrochloride in dogs with peripheral vestibular syndrome, with rapid clinical recover, without laboratorial abnormalities or recurrence of the clinical signs .The results encourage the use of betahistine dihydrochloride in the treatment of  peripheral vestibular disorders in small animals.

    KEY WORDS: Betahistine, dog, vestibular syndrome.
    A síndrome vestibular periférica é uma condição clínica comum em cães. Várias doenças podem causar essa síndrome. Entretanto, sua patofisiologia ainda é pouco conhecida. As alterações clínicas geralmente são autolimitantes, a recuperação pode ser longa e, em casos crônicos, os déficits neurológicos podem ser irreversíveis. Em medicina veterinária, há poucas opções terapêuticas. Na Medicina, o dicloridrato de betaístina é amplamente utilizado. Essa medicação foi empregada em seis cães com síndrome vestibular periférica. Os resultados mostraram melhora clínica com sete a dez dias de tratamento e recuperação quase completa entre vinte e trinta dias. Este

  7. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

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    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  8. The effects of aging on clinical vestibular evaluations

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    Maxime eMaheu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders are common issues for aging populations due to the effects of normal aging on peripheral vestibular structures. These changes affect the results of vestibular function evaluations and make the interpretation of these results more difficult. The objective of this article is to review the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant vestibular measures. We will first focus on otolith function assessment methods cVEMP and oVEMP, then the caloric and vHIT methods for semi-circular canals assessment. cVEMP and oVEMP are useful methods, though research on the effects of age for some parameters are still inconclusive. vHIT results are largely independent of age as compared to caloric stimulation and should therefore be preferred for the evaluation of the semi-circular canals function.

  9. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  10. Auditory evoked potentials in peripheral vestibular disorder individuals

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    Matas, Carla Gentile

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The auditory and vestibular systems are located in the same peripheral receptor, however they enter the CNS and go through different ways, thus creating a number of connections and reaching a wide area of the encephalon. Despite going through different ways, some changes can impair both systems. Such tests as Auditory Evoked Potentials can help find a diagnosis when vestibular alterations are seen. Objective: describe the Auditory Evoked Potential results in individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo with Peripheral Vestibular Disorders and in normal individuals having the same complaint. Methods: Short, middle and long latency Auditory Evoked Potentials were performed as a transversal prospective study. Conclusion: individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo can show some changes in BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential, MLAEP (Medium Latency Auditory Evoked Potential and P300.

  11. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation in the elderly complaining of dizziness

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    Andréa Paz-Oliveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes of body balance are among the most common complaints of the elderly. Vestibular rehabilitation is one of the most effective methods in the recovery of the body balance. The objective to investigate the effects of vestibular rehabilitation in body balance of a group of elderly people with dizziness complain through dizziness handicap inventory. The sample was comprised of 10 seniors (6 women and 4 men with mean age of 68.9 years. The elderly complaining of dizziness showed high score in the DHI in the physical, functional and emotional aspects in the condition pre-VR and these values decreased after vestibular rehabilitation program. Complaints of dizziness also decreased after the implementation of the programmee.  

  12. Correlation between vestibular habituation and postural recovery in cerebellar patients.

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    Suarez, H; Caffa, C; Macadar, O

    1992-01-01

    Vestibular habituation was studied in normal subjects and in patients with cerebellar disease using a stimulation paradigm proposed in this paper. Six caloric stimuli were repeated daily in the same ear during six days and electronystagmographic responses at the beginning and the end of that period were compared. The normal behaviour was a clear reduction of the response across time. Two groups of cerebellar patients were identified by their ability to recover from positional imbalance after treatment. Compensated patients responded to repeated caloric stimulation in the same way as normal subjects. Conversely, uncompensated patients increased their response after the stimulation paradigm. The role played by the cerebellum in vestibular plasticity is discussed together with the observed correlation between vestibular habituation and the ability for postural recovery to occur.

  13. Does betahistine treatment have additional benefits to vestibular rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Hale; Celebisoy, Nese; Kirazli, Yesim; Bilgen, Cem; Eyigor, Sibel; Gode, Sercan; Akyuz, Aycan; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-dose betahistine treatment added to vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on the disability, balance and postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. The VR group (group 1, n = 24) and the VR + betahistine group (group 2, n = 23) were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were evaluated before and after an 8-week customized VR in terms of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory, DHI), dynamic balance [Dynamic Gait Index (DGI)] and postural stability (static posturography). In group 1 and group 2, differences between DHI, DGI and falling index score on static posturography before and after the exercise program were significant (p betahistine + VR have a positive effect on disability and balance in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. Betahistine treatment added to VR was effective in increasing postural stability.

  14. Sensory substitution in bilateral vestibular a-reflexic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Bart B G T; Selen, Luc P J; Verhagen, Wim I M; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have balance problems in darkness, but maintain spatial orientation rather effectively in the light. It has been suggested that these patients compensate for vestibular cues by relying on extravestibular signals, including visual and somatosensory cues, and integrating them with internal beliefs. How this integration comes about is unknown, but recent literature suggests the healthy brain remaps the various signals into a task-dependent reference frame, thereby weighting them according to their reliability. In this paper, we examined this account in six patients with bilateral vestibular a-reflexia, and compared them to six age-matched healthy controls. Subjects had to report the orientation of their body relative to a reference orientation or the orientation of a flashed luminous line relative to the gravitational vertical, by means of a two-alternative-forced-choice response. We tested both groups psychometrically in upright position (0°) and 90° sideways roll tilt. Perception of body tilt was unbiased in both patients and controls. Response variability, which was larger for 90° tilt, did not differ between groups, indicating that body somatosensory cues have tilt-dependent uncertainty. Perception of the visual vertical was unbiased when upright, but showed systematic undercompensation at 90° tilt. Variability, which was larger for 90° tilt than upright, did not differ between patients and controls. Our results suggest that extravestibular signals substitute for vestibular input in patients’ perception of spatial orientation. This is in line with the current status of rehabilitation programs in acute vestibular patients, targeting at recognizing body somatosensory signals as a reliable replacement for vestibular loss. PMID:25975644

  15. Exploration of Circadian Rhythms in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Loss.

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    Tristan Martin

    Full Text Available New insights have expanded the influence of the vestibular system to the regulation of circadian rhythmicity. Indeed, hypergravity or bilateral vestibular loss (BVL in rodents causes a disruption in their daily rhythmicity for several days. The vestibular system thus influences hypothalamic regulation of circadian rhythms on Earth, which raises the question of whether daily rhythms might be altered due to vestibular pathology in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate human circadian rhythmicity in people presenting a total bilateral vestibular loss (BVL in comparison with control participants.Nine patients presenting a total idiopathic BVL and 8 healthy participants were compared. Their rest-activity cycle was recorded by actigraphy at home over 2 weeks. The daily rhythm of temperature was continuously recorded using a telemetric device and salivary cortisol was recorded every 3 hours from 6:00AM to 9:00PM over 24 hours. BVL patients displayed a similar rest activity cycle during the day to control participants but had higher nocturnal actigraphy, mainly during weekdays. Sleep efficiency was reduced in patients compared to control participants. Patients had a marked temperature rhythm but with a significant phase advance (73 min and a higher variability of the acrophase (from 2:24 PM to 9:25 PM with no correlation to rest-activity cycle, contrary to healthy participants. Salivary cortisol levels were higher in patients compared to healthy people at any time of day.We observed a marked circadian rhythmicity of temperature in patients with BVL, probably due to the influence of the light dark cycle. However, the lack of synchronization between the temperature and rest-activity cycle supports the hypothesis that the vestibular inputs are salient input to the circadian clock that enhance the stabilization and precision of both external and internal entrainment.

  16. Plasticity during vestibular compensation: the role of saccades

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    Hamish Gavin MacDougall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focussed on one major aspect of compensation: the recent behavioural findings concerning oculomotor responses in human vestibular compensation and their possible implications for recovery after unilateral vestibular loss (UVL. New measurement techniques have provided new insights into how patients recover after UVL and have given clues for vestibular rehabilitation. Prior to this it has not been possible to quantify the level of function of all the peripheral vestibular sense organs. Now it is. By using vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials to measure utricular and saccular function and by new video head impulse testing to measure semicircular canal function to natural values of head accelerations. With these new video procedures it is now possible to measure both slow phase eye velocity and also saccades during natural head movements. The present evidence is that there is little or no recovery of slow phase eye velocity responses to natural head accelerations. It is doubtful as to whether the modest changes in slow phase eye velocity to small angular accelerations are functionally effective during compensation. On the other hand it is now clear that saccades can play a very important role in helping patients compensate and return to a normal lifestyle. Preliminary evidence suggests that different patterns of saccadic response may predict how well patients recover. It may be possible to train patients to produce more effective saccadic patterns in the first days after their unilateral loss. Some patients do learn new strategies, new behaviours, to conceal their inadequate VOR but when those strategies are prevented from operating by using passive, unpredictable, high acceleration natural head movements, as in the head impulse test, their vestibular loss can be demonstrated. It is those very strategies which the tests exclude, which may be the cause of their successful compensation.

  17. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss

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    Nicholas J. Cutfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz and low level (30 Hz control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution

  18. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  19. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances L Meredith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  20. Experimental hemispherectomy and hemicerebellectomy and their influence on vestibular habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, H; Pawlak-Osińska, K; Osiński, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of hemispherectomy and hemicerebellectomy on acquisition and retention of vestibular habituation in pigeons. The habituation training was performed using a rotatory test. The frequency of head nystagmus and postural reflexes was examined before and after acquisition of habituation and some days later, for the evaluation of the retention process. Our results suggested that the hemispherectomy did not inhibit the acquisition of habituation but retention of this phenomenon was shorter at that time. The hemicerebellectomy made it impossible to reveal the vestibular habituation.

  1. Why do subjective vertigo and dizziness persist over one year after a vestibular vertigo syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Christoph; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Tschan, Regine; Dieterich, Marianne

    2009-05-01

    The overlap and interlinkage of dizzy symptoms in patients with psychiatric and vestibular vertigo/dizziness disorders is the subject of an ongoing debate. In a one-year follow up in 68 patients with vestibular vertigo syndromes, the persistency of vertigo and dizziness symptoms was examined and correlated with vestibular parameters and results from a psychiatric evaluation. Patients with vestibular migraine showed poorest improvement of vertigo and dizziness symptoms over time. In addition, patients who developed anxiety or depressive disorder after the onset of the vestibular disorder showed poor improvement and high persistency of symptoms.

  2. Surgical outcome in cystic vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Suresh; Baldawa, Sachin S.; Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Menon, Girish; Vikas, Vazhayil; Sudhir, Jayanand B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cystic vestibular schwannomas (VS) form a rare subgroup that differs from the solid variant clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. These tumors also vary in their surgical outcome and carry a different risk of post-operative complications. We analyzed our series of 64 patients with cystic VS and discuss the technical difficulties related to total excision of these tumors and focus on complication avoidance. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of cystic VS surgically managed over a span of 11 years. The case records were evaluated to record the clinical symptoms and signs, imaging findings, surgical procedure, complications, and follow-up data. Post-operative facial nerve palsy was analyzed with respect to tumor size and tumor type. Results: Progressive hearing impairment was the most common initial symptom (76.6%). Atypical initial symptoms were present in 15 patients (23.4%). Preoperatively, 78% patients had good facial nerve function (HB grade 1, 2) and 22% had intermediate (HB grade 3, 4) to poor (HB grade 5 and 6) function. Mean tumor size was 4.1 cm. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 53 patients (83%). The facial nerve was anatomically intact but thinned out after tumor excision in 38 patients (59.4%). Ninety percent patients had either intermediate or poor facial nerve function at follow-up. Poor facial nerve outcome was associated with giant tumors and peripherally located, thin-walled cystic tumors. Conclusion: Resection of cystic VS is complicated by peritumoral adhesions of the capsule to the nerve. Extensive manipulation of the nerve in order to dissect the tumor–nerve barrier results in worse facial nerve outcome. The outcome is worse in peripherally located, thin-walled cystic VS as compared to centrally located, thick-walled cystic tumors. Subtotal excision may be justified, especially in tumors with dense adhesion of the cyst wall to the facial nerve in order to preserve nerve integrity. PMID:27366248

  3. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation Qualidade de vida de indivíduos submetidos à reabilitação vestibular

    OpenAIRE

    Olívia Helena Gomes Patatas; Cristina Freitas Ganança; Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2009-01-01

    Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular re...

  4. Directional sensitivity of anterior, posterior, and horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular neurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettler, S C; Baker, J F

    2001-10-01

    Neurons subserving the vestibulo-ocular reflex transform the directionality and timing of input from semicircular canals into commands that are appropriate to rotate the eyes in a compensatory fashion. In order to assess the degree to which this transformation is evident in vestibular nucleus neurons of alert cats, we recorded the extracellular discharge properties of 138 second-order vestibular neurons in the superior and medial vestibular nucleus, including 64 neurons identified as second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons by antidromic responses to oculomotor nucleus stimulation and short-latency orthodromic responses to labyrinth stimulation (1.3 ms or less). Neuronal response gains and phases were recorded during 0.5-Hz sinusoidal oscillations about many different horizontal axes and during vertical axis rotations to define neuronal response directionality more precisely than in past studies. Neurons with spatial responses similar to anterior semicircular canal afferents were found to have more diverse maximal activation direction vectors than neurons with responses resembling those of posterior or horizontal canal afferents. The mean angle from neuron response vector to the axis of the nearest canal or canal pair was 19 degrees for anterior canal second-order neurons (n=28) and 20 degrees for anterior canal second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons (n=18), compared with 11 degrees for posterior canal second-order neurons (n=43) and 11 degrees for posterior canal second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons (n=25). Only two second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons (3%) showed a marked dependence of response phase on rotation direction, which is indicative of convergent inputs that differ in both dynamics and directionality. This suggests that spatiotemporal convergence is uncommon in the three-neuron vestibulo-ocular reflex arc of the cat. Neuron vectors included many that were closely aligned with canal axes and several that were better aligned with oblique or superior rectus

  5. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation Qualidade de vida de indivíduos submetidos à reabilitação vestibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívia Helena Gomes Patatas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular rehabilitation and the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory - DHI before and after vestibular rehabilitation. Results from this questionnaire were correlated with gender, age, vestibular assessment and the presence of vertigo. RESULTS: all the DHI scores reduced significantly after vestibular rehabilitation. There were no differences among genders; adults and elderly patients; irritative peripheral vestibular syndromes; deficiency syndromes and normal exams; the presence or absence of vertigo. CONCLUSION: all the individuals had improvements in their quality of life after customized vestibular rehabilitation.Desordens do equilíbrio comprometem atividades sociais, familiares e profissionais. A reabilitação vestibular pode reduzir o impacto dessas desordens na qualidade de vida dos indivíduos vertiginosos. OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência da reabilitação vestibular sobre a qualidade de vida dos indivíduos, correlacionando-a com gênero, idade, resultado da vectoeletronistagmografia computadorizada e presença de vertigem. Forma de Estudo: Retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Vinte e dois indivíduos foram submetidos à reabilitação vestibular personalizada e ao Dizziness Handicap Inventory - DHI brasileiro - pré e pós-reabilitação vestibular. Os resultados desse questionário foram correlacionados com as variáveis gênero, idade, avaliação vestibular e presença de tontura do tipo vertigem. RESULTADOS: Todos os escores do DHI diminu

  6. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Čada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI, the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p<0.05. This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896.

  7. Differential expression of otoferlin in brain, vestibular system, immature and mature cochlea of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Nicola; Braig, Claudia; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Engel, Jutta; Winter, Harald; Ruth, Peter; Blin, Nikolaus; Pfister, Markus; Kalbacher, Hubert; Knipper, Marlies

    2006-12-01

    Mutations of the human otoferlin gene lead to an autosomal recessive nonsyndromic form of prelingual, sensorineural deafness (deafness autosomal recessive 9, DFNB9). Several studies have demonstrated expression of otoferlin in the inner ear and brain, and suggested a role of otoferlin in Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis. So far, otoferlin expression profiles were solely based on the detection of mRNA. Here, we analysed the expression of otoferlin protein and mRNA using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and RT-PCR in neonatal and mature Wistar rat tissue. In agreement with previous studies, otoferlin expression was found in the brain and in inner and vestibular hair cells. Otoferlin mRNA and protein was, however, also detected in mature outer hair cells of low-frequency processing cochlear turns and in auditory nerve fibres. In outer, inner and vestibular hair cells, otoferlin was subcellularly localized at a considerable distance from the presumed active release sites. Double-staining with the synaptic ribbon marker, C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2), or the presynaptic Ca(2+)-channel, Ca(v)1.3, both assumed to mark the sites of vesicle fusion and transmitter release, did not colocalize with otoferlin expression and thus do not necessarily support a selected role of otoferlin in Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis. The widespread distribution of otoferlin in neurons, nerve fibres and hair cells, and its subcellular distribution extending beyond the regions of synaptic vesicle fusion, i.e. coenrichment with the cytosolic Golgi matrix protein 130 (GM130) in inner hair cells or the early endosomal autoantigen 1 (EEA1) in outer hair cells support instead the idea of a more ubiquitous role of otoferlin in early/recycling endosome trans-Golgi network dynamics.

  8. Stimulus Characteristics for Vestibular Stochastic Resonance to Improve Balance Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrado, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Studies have shown that imperceptible stochastic vestibular electrical stimulation, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the amplitude characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standard balance task of standing on a block of foam with their eyes closed. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system using constant current stimulation through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. Amplitude of the signals varied in the range of 0-700 microamperes. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block, and inertial motion sensors were placed on the torso and head. Balance performance with stimulation was significantly greater (10%-25%) than with no stimulation. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-300 microamperes. Optimization of the amplitude of the stochastic signals for maximizing balance performance will have a significant impact on development of vestibular SR as a unique system to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long-duration space flight or in patients with balance disorders.

  9. Treatment of Vestibular Dysfunction Using a Portable Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Project Role: Research Engineer Nearest person month worked: 3 Contribution to Project: no change Has there been a change in the active other...dysfunction we will optimize stimulation using a portable stochastic noise electrical stimulator and determine the effectiveness of subsensory electrical ...stochastic noise electrical stimulator to improve driving performance and determine what effect subsensory electrical stimulation has on vestibular

  10. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin practice Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, goes over a checklist. The two men are in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  11. Congenital nasal piriform aperture stenosis with vestibular abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Smitha; Raghavan, Ashok [Sheffield Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bateman, Neil [Sheffield Children' s Hospital, ENT Department, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    We present a neonate with congenital nasal piriform aperture stenosis associated with an abnormal vestibular aperture. Radiological evaluation with CT is essential to confirm the diagnosis and delineate the anatomy for surgical planning. Extension of the scan field of view to include the petrous temporal bone is essential to identify associated abnormalities of the vestibule. (orig.)

  12. Asymmetric vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in unilateral Meniere patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, C. M.; Wit, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were measured in 22 unilateral MeniSre patients with monaural and binaural stimulation with 250 and 500 Hz tone bursts. For all measurement situations significantly lower VEMP amplitudes were on average measured at the affected side compared to the unaff

  13. What is the real incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Mirko; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present the incidence of vestibular schwannoma (VS) in Denmark, compare the incidence with that of previous periods, and discuss the real incidence of VS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Prospective registration of all diagnosed VS in Denmark, with a population of 5.1 to 5.2 million...

  14. 前庭神经鞘瘤%Vestibular schwannoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦德让

    2003-01-01

    @@ 前庭神经鞘瘤(vestibular schwannoma,VS)亦称听神经瘤(acoustic neuroma),是颅内较为常见的良性肿瘤之一,约占颅内良性肿瘤的10%,占小脑桥脑角(cerebellopontine angle,CPA)肿瘤的65%~72%.

  15. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hear...

  16. Sociodemographic factors and vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) (or acoustic neuroma) accounts for about 5%-6% of all intracranial tumors; little is known about the etiology. We investigated the association between various sociodemographic indicators and VS in a cohort of 3.26 million Danish residents, with 1087 cases identified in 35...

  17. Increasing annual incidence of vestibular schwannoma and age at diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Caye-Thomasen, Per;

    2004-01-01

    During the last 26 years the annual number of diagnosed vestibular schwannomas (VS) has been increasing. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse this increase. Since 1976, 1446 new cases of VS have been diagnosed at the authors' centre. Special focus was on the age at diagnosis, the loca...

  18. Treatment of Vestibular Dysfunction Using a Portable Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Vestibular symptoms seem to be a common problem with ~20% of veterans complaining of dizziness and those with dizziness demonstrating increased...follow up with phone calls • ~229 Veterans evaluated at the WRIISC screened positive for dizziness – 25 letters per week will be mailed to this

  19. Glutamatergic Signaling at the Vestibular Hair Cell Calyx Synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Pyott, Sonja J.; Yu, Zhou; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery a unique postsynaptic terminal, the calyx, completely covers the basolateral walls of type I hair cells and receives input from multiple ribbon synapses. To date, the functional role of this specialized synapse remains elusive. There is limited data supporting glutamaterg

  20. Reabilitação vestibular no tratamento da tontura e do zumbido Vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of dizziness and tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a efetividade dos exercícios de reabilitação vestibular na melhora do zumbido e da tontura por meio de avaliação pré e pós-aplicação do questionário Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI e Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI, ambos adaptados à população brasileira. MÉTODOS: Avaliaram-se seis pacientes (dois do sexo masculino e quatro do sexo feminino, na faixa etária de 43 a 70 anos. Os pacientes foram submetidos aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia e aplicação dos questionários pré e pós-reabilitação vestibular, utilizando-se o protocolo de Cawthorne e Cooksey. RESULTADOS: a com relação às queixas mais referidas, observou-se desequilíbrio à marcha (83,3%, dor de cabeça (66,6% e depressão (66,6%; b no exame vestibular todos os pacientes apresentaram alteração na prova calórica, sendo a maior freqüência das síndromes vestibulares periféricas irritativas (83,3%; c constataram-se no exame vestibular dois casos de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa, dois casos de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa unilateral; um caso de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa bilateral e um caso de síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária unilateral; d na aplicação do DHI, observou-se melhora nos aspectos: funcional e emocional, mantendo-se inalterado o aspecto físico; e na aplicação do THI, observou-se melhora em todos os aspectos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: O protocolo utilizado de reabilitação vestibular promoveu diminuição do zumbido e da tontura, melhorando a qualidade de vida dos pacientes.PURPOSE: To verify the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation exercises in the improvement of tinnitus and dizziness through an evaluation carried out before and after the administration of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (DHI questionnaires, both adapted to the

  1. Spatial orientation of the vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T.; Dai, M.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    1. A simplified three-dimensional state space model of visual vestibular interaction was formulated. Matrix and dynamical system operators representing coupling from the semicircular canals and the visual system to the velocity storage integrator were incorporated into the model. 2. It was postulated that the system matrix for a tilted position was a composition of two linear transformations of the system matrix for the upright position. One transformation modifies the eigenvalues of the system matrix while another rotates the pitch and roll eigenvectors with the head, while maintaining the yaw axis eigenvector approximately spatially invariant. Using this representation, the response characteristics of the pitch, roll, and yaw eye velocity were obtained in terms of the eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. 3. Using OKAN data obtained from monkeys and comparing to the model predictions, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix were identified as a function of tilt to the side or of tilt to the prone positions, using a modification of the Marquardt algorithm. The yaw eigenvector for right-side-down tilt and for downward pitch cross-coupling was approximately 30 degrees from the spatial vertical. For the prone position, the eigenvector was computed to be approximately 20 degrees relative to the spatial vertical. For both side-down and prone positions, oblique OKN induced along eigenvector directions generated OKAN which decayed to zero along a straight line with approximately a single time constant. This was verified by a spectral analysis of the residual sequence about the straight line fit to the decaying data. The residual sequence was associated with a narrow autocorrelation function and a wide power spectrum. 4. Parameters found using the Marquardt algorithm were incorporated into the model. Diagonal matrices in a head coordinate frame were introduced to represent the direct pathway and the coupling of the visual system to the integrator. Model

  2. Correlação entre resultado do exame vestibular e queixas psicológicas autorrelatadas de pacientes com sintomas vestibulares Correlation between vestibular test results and self-reported psychological complaints of patients with vestibular symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léia Gonçalves Gurgel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatores cognitivos e emocionais podem afetar o equilíbrio, portanto, condições psiquiátricas são comuns em pacientes otoneurológicos. O tratamento dado ao sujeito vertiginoso pode ser mais influenciado pelo sofrimento e comportamento da doença do que pela gravidade da patologia orgânica. OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar a associação entre os resultados do exame vestibular e queixa psicológica autorrelatada, em indivíduos atendidos no ano de 2009, no serviço de audiologia de um hospital em Porto Alegre. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo, descritivo-exploratório, consultando-se a base de dados dos softwares VecWin® e VecWin® 2 da marca Neurograff®. Foram investigados os resultados do exame vestibular, as queixas referentes aos sintomas psicológicos relatados espontaneamente e idade, sexo e queixa de vertigem e/ou tontura. O trabalho foi realizado em três etapas: agrupamento, exclusão/inclusão e quantificação. CONCLUSÃO: A faixa etária da amostra, o sexo e a presença ou ausência de vertigem e/ou tontura não foram variáveis de influência sobre o resultado do exame vestibular. Houve associação significativa entre a presença de queixa psicológica autorrelatada e o resultado normal do exame vestibular. Assim, é fundamental que os profissionais deem atenção às questões psicológicas relatadas pelo indivíduo na ocasião da anamnese vestibular.Cognitive and emotional factors may affect balance; psychiatric conditions are a common component in patient dizziness. The treatment of patients with vertigo may be affected to a greater degree by the suffering due to this disease than by the severity of organic changes. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate associations between vestibular test results and self-reported psychological complaints in patients evaluated during 2009 in an audiology unit at a hospital in Porto Alegre. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive

  3. Paciente com cefaleia e síndrome vestibular periférica: relato de caso Patient with headache and peripheral vestibular dysfunction: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Maria Rossi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: a Reabilitação Vestibular constitui-se numa opção de tratamento para pacientes portadores de síndrome vestibular periférica e cefaleia. PROCEDIMENTOS: o paciente, do sexo feminino com 26 anos de idade apresentava síndrome vestibular periférica acompanhada de crises de cefaleia. Foi realizada avaliação e terapia fonoaudiológica com exercícios de habituação vestibular além de fisioterapia e dieta recomendada pelo nutricionista. RESULTADOS: no período de 3 meses com reabilitação vestibular realizada semanalmente observou-se melhora no quadro vertiginoso e da cefaleia da paciente. CONCLUSÕES: evidenciou-se boa eficácia clínica para o tratamento desta paciente através da reabilitação vestibular com exercícios de habituação vestibular. Salienta-se a eficácia da reabilitação para a melhora na qualidade de vida da paciente e minimização das crises de cefaleia.BACKGROUND: vestibular rehabilitation is an option for treating peripheral vestibular syndrome and headache patients. PROCEDURES: the patient is a 29-year old woman and has Peripheral Vestibular Syndrome along with headache attacks. Evaluation and Phonoaudiological therapy with exercises of habituation tests with physical and nutritional therapy were carried out. RESULTS: in 3 month period with weekly vestibular rehabilitation therapy, we observed an improvement in the condition of the patient's vertigo and migraine. CONCLUSIONS: it was evident that the patient's treatment through the rehabilitation test with habituation test exercises had good efficiency. Please note the effectiveness of the rehabilitation for the improvement in the patient's life quality and minimization of headache attacks.

  4. Multiple types of cerebellar target neurons and their circuitry in the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Minyoung; Moghadam, Setareh H; Sekirnjak, Chris; Bagnall, Martha W; Kolkman, Kristine E; Jacobs, Richard; Faulstich, Michael; du Lac, Sascha

    2011-07-27

    The cerebellum influences behavior and cognition exclusively via Purkinje cell synapses onto neurons in the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. In contrast with the rich information available about the organization of the cerebellar cortex and its synaptic inputs, relatively little is known about microcircuitry postsynaptic to Purkinje cells. Here we examined the cell types and microcircuits through which Purkinje cells influence an oculomotor behavior controlled by the cerebellum, the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, which involves only two eye muscles. Using a combination of anatomical tracing and electrophysiological recordings in transgenic mouse lines, we identified several classes of neurons in the medial vestibular nucleus that receive Purkinje cell synapses from the cerebellar flocculus. Glycinergic and glutamatergic flocculus target neurons (FTNs) with somata densely surrounded by Purkinje cell terminals projected axons to the ipsilateral abducens and oculomotor nuclei, respectively. Of three additional types of FTNs that were sparsely innervated by Purkinje cells, glutamatergic and glycinergic neurons projected to the contralateral and ipsilateral abducens, respectively, and GABAergic neurons projected to contralateral vestibular nuclei. Densely innervated FTNs had high spontaneous firing rates and pronounced postinhibitory rebound firing, and were physiologically homogeneous, whereas the intrinsic excitability of sparsely innervated FTNs varied widely. Heterogeneity in the molecular expression, physiological properties, and postsynaptic targets of FTNs implies that Purkinje cell activity influences the neural control of eye movements in several distinct ways. These results indicate that the cerebellum regulates a simple reflex behavior via at least five different cell types that are postsynaptic to Purkinje cells.

  5. Hair cell specific NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in vestibular end organs: potential role of purinergic signaling in vestibular sensory transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Mary G; Thorne, Peter R; Housley, Gary D; Robson, Simon C; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2012-01-01

    A complex extracellular nucleotide signalling system acting on P2 receptors is involved in regulation of cochlear function in the mammalian inner ear. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) are ectonucleotidases that regulate P2 receptor signalling pathways in mammalian tissues by hydrolysing extracellular nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. All enzymes from the CD39/ENTPD family (NTPDase1-8) are expressed in the adult rat cochlea, but their expression and distribution in the vestibular end organ is unknown. This report demonstrates selective expression of NTPDase6 by rat vestibular hair cells. Hair cells transducing both angular acceleration (crista ampullaris) and static head position (maculae of the utricle and saccule) exhibited strong immunolabelling with a bias towards the sensory pole and in particular, the hair cell bundle. NTPDase6 is an intracellular enzyme that can be released in a soluble form from cell cultures and shows an enzymatic preference for nucleoside 5'-diphosphates, such as guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The main function of NTPDase6 may be the regulation of nucleotide levels in cellular organelles by regulating the conversion of nucleotides to nucleosides. NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in the vestibular end organ could be linked to the regulation of P2 receptor signalling and sensory transduction, including maintenance of vestibular hair bundles.

  6. The vestibular evoked response to linear, alternating, acceleration pulses without acoustic masking as a parameter of vestibular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, MLYM; Segenhout, JM; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    2001-01-01

    In this study, short latency vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) were recorded in five guinea pigs in response to alternating linear acceleration pulses with and without acoustic masking. A steel bolt was implanted in the skull and coupled to a shaker. Linear acceleration pulses (n = 400) in upward

  7. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  8. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  9. Current treatment of nasal vestibular stenosis with CO2-laser surgery; prolonged vestibular stenting versus intraoperative mitomycin application. A case series of 3 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, O. van; Heerbeek, N. van; Ingels, K.J.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    These case studies describe three cases of unilateral nasal vestibular stenoses caused by chemical cauterization. Each case was treated with CO2-laser surgery together with intraoperative topic application of mitomycin or prolonged vestibular stenting for prevention of restenosis. Two patients recei

  10. Schwanoma vestibular como causa de surdez súbita Vestibular schwannoma presenting as sudden hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo M. Kosugi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A Surdez Súbita (SS é um sintoma causado por mais de 60 doenças diferentes, dentre elas, o Schwanoma Vestibular (SV. Shaia & Sheehy (1976 apresentaram uma incidência de 1% de SV em 1220 casos de SS. Não há características específicas para o diagnóstico do SV, sendo a ressonância magnética (RM o exame de escolha. OBJETIVO: Verificar a real incidência de SV em casuísticas de SS com a realização de RM. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo com a realização de RM com contraste de gadolínio em todos os pacientes com SS do serviço de urgência em Otorrinolaringologia do Hospital São Paulo no período de abril de 2001 a maio de 2003. RESULTADOS: Foram realizados exames de RM em 49 pacientes que apresentaram SS, sendo diagnosticados 3 (6,1% casos de SV. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência real de SV em casuísticas de SS pode ser maior do que o classicamente descrito na literatura, devido ao subdiagnóstico pela não-utilização da RM de rotina nestes casos.The sudden Hearing Loss (SHL is a symptom caused by more than 60 different diseases, including Vestibular Schwannoma (VS. Shaia & Sheehy (1976 presented a study with 1,220 cases of SHL reporting 1% incidence of VS. There is no specific characteristic for the diagnosis of VS and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the gold standard exam to diagnose such disease. AIM: To determine the real incidence of VS presenting as SHL performing MRI in all patients with SHL. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort. MATERIL AND METHOD: Prospective study in which MRI with gadolinium was performed in all patients with SHL in the Emergency Service of Sao Paulo Hospital from April 2001 through May 2003. RESULTS: MRI was performed in 49 patients with symptoms of SHL, with three cases (6.1% of VS found. CONCLUSION: The real incidence of VS presenting as SHL may be greater than that mentioned in conventional reports probably because MRI had not been performed in all patients with

  11. TO ASSESS THE VESTIBULAR AND AUDITORY FUNCTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY IN COMPARISON WITH PATIENTS OF UNCOMPLICATED DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant N

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The inner ear dysfunction occurs in diabetes mellitus. The typical hearing loss described is a progressive, bilateral sensori - neural deafness of gradual onset which affects predominantly the higher frequencies. The causes are an angiopathy of the inner ear, neuronal degeneration, and electrolyte imbalance. Although the relationship between diabetes and vestibulo - cochlear dysfunction has been studied by various investi gators, the exact relationship between various complications of diabetes and inner ear dysfunction requires further detailed study. Surprisingly the incidence of hearing loss in diabetes with complications is on the rise, which creates an interest to study the vestibulo - cochlear functions in diabetic nephropathy. This was a prospective study to assess the vestibular and auditory functions in patients with diabetic nephropathy in comparison with patients of uncomplicated diabetes mellitus. The aim of this st udy is to assess the vestibular and auditory functions in patients with diabetic nephropathy in comparison with patients of uncomplicated diabetes mellitus. This study includes 60 patients, 30 patients with uncomplicated diabetes mellitus were categorized in the group I and 30 patients with diabetic nephropathy were categorized in group II.

  12. A multicolor carbocyanine dye analysis of the development of the vestibular projections from canal and otolithic endorgans of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.; Maklad, A.

    The vestibular apparatus of the ear consists of two distinct sensory organs, the angular acceleration perceiving canal organs and the gravity and linear acceleration sensing utricle and saccule. Previous work has shown that microgravity or hypergravity affects the pattern of movement of pregnant rats and thus the way the ear is stimulated. Understanding how this activity affects the pattern of projections requires a more detailed understanding of the central projections, in particular during development. We report data generated with a technique using old and new carbocyanine dyes. The properties of these dyes to diffuse in the lipid bilayer of aldehyde fixed neurons make them ideal for such studies. Our data show that the initial projection develops prior to the onset of functional input from the endorgans and is likely governed exclusively by genetic developmental programs. However, our data also provide two aspects of the neonatal segregation that might be influenced by activity. One of these areas o continued segregation is in thef brainstem, specifically the rostral part of the medial vestibular nucleus. The other part is in the cerebellum, specifically the nodulus and flocculus. These areas show more overlap in the embryos that progressively is reduced during further development suggesting the possible influence of activity in this process. Supported by NASA (NAG 2-1353).

  13. Role of the insula and vestibular system in patients with chronic subjective dizziness: An fMRI study using sound-evoked vestibular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole eIndovina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence, long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD.We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC.We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients

  14. A neuroscientific account of how vestibular disorders impair bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eLopez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of vestibular disorders on balance, oculomotor control and self-motion perception have been extensively described in humans and animals. More recently, vestibular disorders have been related to cognitive deficits in spatial navigation and memory tasks. Less frequently, abnormal bodily perceptions have been described in patients with vestibular disorders. Altered forms of bodily self-consciousness include distorted body image and body schema, disembodied self-location (out-of-body experience, altered sense of agency, as well as more complex experiences of dissociation and detachment from the self (depersonalization. In this article, I suggest that vestibular disorders create sensory conflict or mismatch in multisensory brain regions, producing perceptual incoherence and abnormal body and self perceptions. This hypothesis is based on recent functional mapping of the human vestibular cortex, showing vestibular projections to the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and in several multisensory areas found to be crucial for bodily self-consciousness.

  15. A neuroscientific account of how vestibular disorders impair bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of vestibular disorders on balance, oculomotor control, and self-motion perception have been extensively described in humans and animals. More recently, vestibular disorders have been related to cognitive deficits in spatial navigation and memory tasks. Less frequently, abnormal bodily perceptions have been described in patients with vestibular disorders. Altered forms of bodily self-consciousness include distorted body image and body schema, disembodied self-location (out-of-body experience), altered sense of agency, as well as more complex experiences of dissociation and detachment from the self (depersonalization). In this article, I suggest that vestibular disorders create sensory conflict or mismatch in multisensory brain regions, producing perceptual incoherence and abnormal body and self perceptions. This hypothesis is based on recent functional mapping of the human vestibular cortex, showing vestibular projections to the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and in several multisensory areas found to be crucial for bodily self-consciousness.

  16. Reabilitação vestibular: tendências e indicações

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Clarissa Stefani; Pereira,Érico Felden; Rossi, Angela Garcia; Daronco, Luciane Sanchotene Etchepare

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular rehabilitation, generally recommended for the treatment of dysfunctions in the vestibular system, has been prescribed for people with other problems related to balance and to spacial orientation. This study, with a bibliographic basis, had as objective to make a synthesis of the studies about vestibular rehabilitation that are focused in other morbidities besides the vestibulopathies, pointing out the tendencies of investigations and the main results, specially the ones with in...

  17. Effect of propolis on vestibular compensation following unilateral labyrinthectomy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金麟毅

    2008-01-01

    Unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) results in the vestibular syndrome including nausea, vomiting, vertigo, spontaneous nystagrnus (SN) and postural disturbance which abate over time in a process of behavioral recovery known as vestibular compensation. In order to investigate the effect of propolis on bestibular compensation, SN and expression of c-Fos protein in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) were measured in unilateral labyrinthectomized Sprague-Dawley rats with pretreatment of propolis.

  18. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Vardy, Alistair N; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between-muscle differences. Two hypotheses were evaluated: 1) that muscle-specific motor-unit properties influence the bandwidth of vestibular reflexes; and 2) that frequency responses of vestibular reflexes differ between neck, back, and lower limb muscles because of neural filtering. Subjects were exposed to electrical vestibular stimuli over bandwidths of 0-25 and 0-75 Hz while recording activity in sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, erector spinae, soleus, and medial gastrocnemius muscles. Coherence between stimulus and muscle activity revealed markedly larger vestibular reflex bandwidths in neck muscles (0-70 Hz) than back (0-15 Hz) or lower limb muscles (0-20 Hz). In addition, vestibular reflexes in back and lower limb muscles undergo low-pass filtering compared with neck-muscle responses, which span a broader dynamic range. These results suggest that the wider bandwidth of head-neck biomechanics requires a vestibular influence on neck-muscle activation across a larger dynamic range than lower limb muscles. A computational model of vestibular afferents and a motoneuron pool indicates that motor-unit properties are not primary contributors to the bandwidth filtering of vestibular reflexes in different muscles. Instead, our experimental findings suggest that pathway-dependent neural filtering, not captured in our model, contributes to these muscle-specific responses. Furthermore, gain-phase discontinuities in the neck-muscle vestibular reflexes provide evidence of destructive interaction between different reflex components, likely via indirect vestibular-motor pathways.

  19. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignaux, G. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C. [INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Montpellier, F-34090,France (France); Machado, M.L. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Denise, P. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Comoz, F. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Hitier, M. [CHRU Caen, Service d' Otorhinolaryngologie, Caen, F-14000,France (France); Landemore, G. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Philoxène, B. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Besnard, S., E-mail: besnard-s@phycog.org [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France)

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  20. Determination of the functional status of vestibular apparatus at children aged 5-6 years old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiseenko E.K.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The physiological methods of determination of the functional state of vestibular analyzer are considered. The indexes of systole and diastole pressure, frequencies of heart-throbs, are chosen. Methods were used before and after standard vestibular irritation. Research was conducted on the base of child's preschool establishment. In it took part 120 children in age 5 - 6 years. Insufficient development of vestibular analyzer is set for children. Selected exercise for the improvement of spatial orientation and statodynamic stability.

  1. Betahistine in the treatment of tinnitus in patients with vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ganança,Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena [UNIFESP; Gazzola, Juliana Maria [UNIFESP; Ganança, Cristina Freitas; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Betahistine is a medicine used to treat vestibular disorders that has also been used to treat tinnitus. AIM: To assess the effects of betahistine on tinnitus in patients with vestibular disorders. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Retrospective data were collected from patient records for individuals presenting with vestibular dysfunction and tinnitus. Patients included had received betahistine 48 mg/day and clinical outcomes were compared with a control group comprising individuals who were unable to rec...

  2. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Bo He; Chun-Jiang Yu; Hong-Ming Ji; Yan-Ming Qu; Ning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS),as a method for predicting hearing prognosis,has not been systematically considered.The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN).This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test,and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation.Methods:A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively.Each patient received a caloric test,vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test,and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week,3,and 6 months,postoperatively.All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach.During the operation,the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon.Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.Results:The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106,35.80%).These patients were not subsequently evaluated.In 26 patients (nine females,seventeen males),tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females,24 males),tumors arose from the IVN.Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors,the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study.Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors,whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors.Conclusions:Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN.These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery.Using this information,we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients.

  3. Pediatric fibromyalgia and dizziness: evaluation of vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusy, L M; Harvey, S A; Beste, D J

    1999-08-01

    Twelve children with fibromyalgia and complaints of chronic dizziness were evaluated with both clinical office maneuvers of vestibular function and laboratory tests composed of electronystagmography and sinusoidal harmonic acceleration rotary chair testing. All test results were normal for spontaneous nystagmus with or without visual fixation, oculocephalic reflex, dynamic visual acuity, head-shaking nystagmus, Quix test, and Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Electronystagmography test results were essentially normal for saccades, gaze, Dix-Hallpike, pendular tracking, and caloric evaluation. Rotary chair testing was normal in all 12 patients. These findings suggest that central (brainstem) and peripheral vestibular (inner ear) mechanisms do not account for the complaints of dizziness in the pediatric patient with fibromyalgia. The common musculoskeletal abnormalities of fibromyalgia may affect their proprioceptive orientation, therefore giving them a sense of imbalance.

  4. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the "I". Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where "I" experience the world) and self-location (the feeling where "I" am located in space). We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation showing vestibular contributions to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss the role for four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction, parietoinsular vestibular cortex, ventral intraparietal region, and medial superior temporal region. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is critical in linking multisensory signals from the body (personal and peripersonal space) with external (extrapersonal) space. Therefore, the vestibular system plays a critical role for neural representations of spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  5. Focal increase of blood flow in the cerebral cortex of man during vestibular stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olsen, T S; Roland, P E

    1985-01-01

    This study is an attempt to reveal projection areas for vestibular afferents to the human brain. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured over 254 cortical regions during caloric vestibular stimulation with warm water (44 degrees C). rCBF was measured when the external auditory...... meatus was irrigated with water at body temperature as a control to vestibular stimulation. During vestibular stimulation there was only a single cortical area, located in the superior temporal region, which showed a consistent focal activation in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated side...

  6. Interaction of brain areas of visual and vestibular simultaneous activity with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Justina, Hellen M; Gamba, Humberto R; Lukasova, Katerina; Nucci-da-Silva, Mariana P; Winkler, Anderson M; Amaro, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Static body equilibrium is an essential requisite for human daily life. It is known that visual and vestibular systems must work together to support equilibrium. However, the relationship between these two systems is not fully understood. In this work, we present the results of a study which identify the interaction of brain areas that are involved with concurrent visual and vestibular inputs. The visual and the vestibular systems were individually and simultaneously stimulated, using flickering checkerboard (without movement stimulus) and galvanic current, during experiments of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-four right-handed and non-symptomatic subjects participated in this study. Single visual stimulation shows positive blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses (PBR) in the primary and associative visual cortices. Single vestibular stimulation shows PBR in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, inferior parietal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and lobules V and VI of the cerebellar hemisphere. Simultaneous stimulation shows PBR in the middle and inferior frontal gyri and in the precentral gyrus. Vestibular- and somatosensory-related areas show negative BOLD responses (NBR) during simultaneous stimulation. NBR areas were also observed in the calcarine gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus and precuneus during simultaneous and single visual stimulations. For static visual and galvanic vestibular simultaneous stimulation, the reciprocal inhibitory visual-vestibular interaction pattern is observed in our results. The experimental results revealed interactions in frontal areas during concurrent visual-vestibular stimuli, which are affected by intermodal association areas in occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes.

  7. Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation in Hemi-Spatial Neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemi-spatial neglect is an attentional disorder in which the sufferer fails to acknowledge or respond to stimuli appearing in contralesional space. In recent years, it has become clear that a measurable reduction in contralesional neglect can occur during galvanic vestibular stimulation, a technique by which transmastoid, small amplitude current induces lateral, attentional shifts via asymmetric modulation of the left and right vestibular nerves. However, it remains unclear whether this reduction persists after stimulation is stopped. To estimate longevity of effect, we therefore conducted a double-blind, randomized, dose-response trial involving a group of stroke patients suffering from left-sided neglect (n=52, mean age=66 years. To determine whether repeated sessions of galvanic vestibular stimulation more effectively induce lasting relief than a single session, participants received 1, 5, or 10 sessions, each lasting 25mins, of sub-sensory, left-anodal right-cathodal noisy direct current (mean amplitude=1mA. Ninety five percent confidence intervals indicated that all three treatment arms showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-stimulation baseline and the final day of stimulation on the primary outcome measure, the conventional tests of the Behavioural Inattention Test. More remarkably, this change (mean change=28%, SD=18 was still evident 1month later. Secondary analyses indicated an allied increase of 20% in median Barthel Index score, a measure of functional capacity, in the absence of any adverse events or instances of participant non-compliance. Together these data suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation, a simple, cheap technique suitable for home-based administration, may produce lasting reductions in neglect that are clinically important. Further protocol optimization is now needed ahead of a larger effectiveness study.

  8. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magneto-hydrodynamic Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) in individuals with unilateral deficits in labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into the mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with a different pattern of nystagmus consistent with their unilateral deficit in labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7 T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). Eye movements were recorded using infrared video-oculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV) was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24659983

  9. Prevalence of vestibular dysfunction and associated factors in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Ja-Won; Chang, Mun Young; Woo, Sook-Young; Kim, Seonwoo; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the nationwide prevalence of dizziness and vestibular dysfunction in the Korean population and determine the associated factors. Design Cross-sectional analysis of a nationwide health survey. Methods We obtained data from the 2009 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the South Korean civilian, non-institutionalised population aged 40 years and older (N=3267). A field survey team performed interviews and phys...

  10. Comparative anatomy of the vestibular nuclear complex in submammalian vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A synopsis of the literature on the natural history of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) in lower vertebrates is presented in an attempt to assess the knowledge available. The review discloses that there is considerable descriptive information that is widely dispersed in the literature. However, information about the topology, number, and cellular composition of the cell groups that compose the VNC is sketchy. Major cytological and hodological information is still needed to establish which parts of the VNC actually are homologous.

  11. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Kevin Ward

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS in individuals with unilateral loss of labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with differences consistent with their residual labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. Eye movements were recorded using infrared videooculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology.

  12. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  13. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  14. Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Mast, Fred W; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Purchases are driven by consumers' product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

  15. Measurement of oscillopsia induced by vestibular Coriolis stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Jeffrey; Oman, Charles M; Harris, Laurence R

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for measuring the time constant of head-movement-contingent oscillopsia (HMCO) produced by vestibular Coriolis stimulation. Subjects briskly rotated their heads around pitch or roll axes whilst seated on a platform rotating at constant velocity. This induced a cross-coupled vestibular Coriolis illusion. Simultaneous with the head movement, a visual display consisting of either a moving field of white dots on a black background or superimposed on a subject-stationary horizon, or a complete virtual room with conventional furnishings appeared. The scene's motion was driven by a simplified computer model of the Coriolis illusion. Subjects either nulled (if visual motion was against the illusory body rotation) or matched (if motion was in the same direction as the illusory motion) the sensation with the exponentially slowing scene motion, by indicating whether its decline was too fast or too slow. The model time constant was approximated using a staircase technique. Time constants comparable to that of the Coriolis vestibular ocular reflex were obtained. Time constants could be significantly reduced by adding subject-stationary visual elements. This technique for measuring oscillopsia might be used to quantify adaptation to artificial gravity environments. In principle more complex models can be used, and applied to other types of oscillopsia such as are experienced by BPPV patients or by astronauts returning to Earth.

  16. Enxaqueca associada a disfunção auditivo-vestibular Migraine associated with auditory-vestibular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cal

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A associação de distúrbios da audição e equilíbrio com enxaqueca é reconhecida desde a Grécia antiga quando Aretaeus da Capadócia em 131 a.C., fez uma descrição precisa e com detalhes desta ocorrência durante uma crise de enxaqueca. Uma revisão ampla das manifestações otoneurológicas da enxaqueca é apresentada, usando as mais recentes publicações com respeito à epidemiologia, apresentação clínica, fisiopatologia, métodos diagnósticos e manejo desta síndrome. OBJETIVO: Descrever a entidade clínica "Enxaqueca associada a Disfunção Auditivo-vestibular" no intuito de ajudar médicos otorrinolaringologistas e neurologistas no diagnóstico e no manejo clínico dessa doença. COMENTÁRIOS FINAIS: Uma forte associação existe entre sintomas otoneurológicos e enxaqueca, sendo a enxaqueca associada a disfunção auditivo-vestibular a causa mais comum de vertigem episódica espontânea (não-posicional. Os sintomas podem variar bastante entre pacientes tornando um desafio diagnóstico para o otorrinolaringologista. Esta entidade geralmente se apresenta com ataques de vertigem espontâneos ou posicionais, durando de segundos a dias com sintomas de enxaqueca associados. Uma melhor elucidação da ligação entre os mecanismos vestibulares centrais e os mecanismos da enxaqueca em si, além da descoberta de defeitos em canais iônicos em algumas causas de enxaqueca, ataxia e vertigem, podem levar a um entendimento maior da fisiopatologia da enxaqueca associada a disfunção auditivo-vestibular.The association between hearing and balance disorders with migraine is known since the times of the ancient Greeks, when Aretaeus from Cappadocia in 131 B.C, made an accurate and detailed description of this occurrence during a migraine episode. We present a broad review of migraine neurotological manifestations, using the most recent publications associated with epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and

  17. Reabilitação vestibular em idosos com Parkinson Vestibular rehabilitation in elderly patients with Parkinson

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    Jackeline Martins-Bassetto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a efetividade dos exercícios de reabilitação vestibular (RV por meio de avaliação pré e pós-aplicação do questionário Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI - adaptação brasileira. MÉTODOS: avaliaram-se oito pacientes (três do sexo feminino e cinco do sexo masculino, na faixa etária de 48 a 71 anos, encaminhados da Associação Paranaense de Parkinson para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia da Universidade Tuiuti do Paraná. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos e submetidos aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, avaliação otorrinolaringológica, avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia (VENG e aplicação do questionário DHI - adaptação brasileira pré e pós RV utilizando-se os protocolos de Cawthorne e Cooksey (grupo A e Herdman (grupo B. RESULTADOS: a conforme as queixas otoneurológicas referidas na anamnese, observou-se a prevalência da tontura (100,0%, tremor (100,0% e desvio de marcha (75,0&; b no exame vestibular, todos os pacientes (100,0% apresentaram alteração, sendo a maior freqüência das síndromes vestibulares periféricas deficitárias (62,5%; c houve melhora significativa dos aspectos funcional (p = 0,020470 e emocional (p = 0,013631 após a realização dos exercícios de RV utilizando-se o protocolo de Cawthorne e Cooksey e do aspecto emocional (p=0,007316 utilizando-se o protocolo de Herdman. CONCLUSÃO: comparando-se os dois protocolos utilizados, verificou-se uma melhora significativa dos pacientes do grupo A, submetidos ao protocolo de Cawthorne e Cooksey (p=0.0231.PURPOSE: to check the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation exercises (RV by means of an evaluation of a pre and post application of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI questionnaire (Brazilian version. METHODS: eight patients were evaluated (three female and five male, in the age group varying from 48 to 71, referred from the Paraná Association of Parkinson to the Otoneurological Laboratory

  18. Pre-adaptation to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation is associated with enhanced sensorimotor performance in novel vestibular environments

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    Steven T Moore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance on a visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular stimulation was assessed in nine healthy subjects. Four subjects had previously been adapted to 120 minutes exposure to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS over 12 weekly sessions of 10 minutes; the remaining five subjects had never experienced GVS. Subjects were seated in a flight simulator and asked to null the roll motion of a visual bar presented on a screen using a joystick. Both the visual bar and the simulator cabin were moving in roll with a pseudorandom (sum of sines waveform that were uncorrelated. The cross correlation coefficient, which ranges from 1 (identical waveforms to 0 (unrelated waveforms, was calculated for the ideal (perfect nulling of bar motion and actual joystick input waveform for each subject. The cross correlation coefficient for the GVS-adapted group (0.90 [SD 0.04] was significantly higher (t[8]=3.162; p=0.013 than the control group (0.82 [SD 0.04], suggesting that prior adaptation to GVS was associated with an enhanced ability to perform the visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular noise.

  19. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells

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    Giancarlo eRusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD is to convert glutamate in -aminobutyric acid (GABA.GAD exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67,.that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  20. Sensory vestibular contributions to constructing internal models of self-motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrea M.; Shaikh, Aasef G.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2005-09-01

    The ability to navigate in the world and execute appropriate behavioral and motor responses depends critically on our capacity to construct an accurate internal representation of our current motion and orientation in space. Vestibular sensory signals are among those that may make an essential contribution to the construction of such 'internal models'. Movement in a gravitational environment represents a situation where the construction of internal models becomes particularly important because the otolith organs, like any linear accelerometer, sense inertial and gravitational accelerations equivalently. Otolith afferents thus provide inherently ambiguous motion information, as they respond identically to translation and head reorientation relative to gravity. Resolution of this ambiguity requires the nonlinear integration of linear acceleration and angular velocity cues, as predicted by the physical equations of motion. Here, we summarize evidence that during translations and tilts from upright the firing rates of brainstem and cerebellar neurons encode a combination of dynamically processed semicircular canal and otolith signals appropriate to construct an internal model representation of the computations required for inertial motion detection.

  1. Achados vestibulares em usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Vestibular findings in hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Paulin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar os achados vestibulares em pacientes com perda auditiva neurossenssorial usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual. MÉTODOS: vinte pacientes, 11 do sexo feminino e nove do sexo masculino, com idades entre 39 e 85 anos, com perda auditiva neurossenssorial bilateral de grau moderado e severo foram atendidos em uma Instituição de Ensino Superior e submetidos a uma anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliação audiológica, imitanciometria e ao exame vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: a dos 20 pacientes avaliados, 18 (90% apresentaram queixa de zumbido, 15 (75% queixa de tontura e oito (40% queixa de cefaléia; b houve predomínio de alteração na prova calórica e no sistema vestibular periférico; c o resultado do exame vestibular esteve alterado em 14 pacientes (70%, sendo, oito casos (40% de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa e seis casos (30% de síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária; d verificou-se diferença significativa entre o resultado do exame vestibular e o tempo de uso do aparelho de amplificação sonora individual; e dos cinco pacientes que não referiram nenhum sintoma vestibular, quatro (80% apresentaram alteração no exame. CONCLUSÃO: ressalta-se a sensibilidade e importância do estudo funcional do sistema do equilíbrio neste tipo de população, uma vez que podem ocorrer alterações na avaliação labiríntica independente da presença de sintomas.PURPOSE: to check vestibular findings in patients with sensoneural hearing loss, hearing aid users. METHODS: 20 patients (eleven females and nine males aging from 39 to 85-year-old with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, from moderate to severe degrees, were attended in a higher education institution evaluated by medical history, otological inspections, complete basic conventional audiological evaluations, acoustic impedance tests and vectoeletronystagmography. RESULTS: a from the 20 evaluated

  2. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis.

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    Matteo eCandidi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical-cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (Vestibular Neuritis – VN- and Benign Paroxysmal positional Vertigo – BPPV with respect to healthy matched controls (C. We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: i mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and ii mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations.

  3. Effect of different modes of therapy on vestibular and balance dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease

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    Wafaa Abdel-Hay El-Kholy

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Since patients with PD receiving physiotherapy in conjunction with medical treatment showed better control of their vestibular and balance functions, efforts should be directed to start physiotherapy including vestibular rehabilitation as early as possible in order to improve balance, thus increasing independence in daily life activities.

  4. The effect of changes in perilymphatic K+ on the vestibular evoked potential in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, C. M.; Wit, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect on the functioning of the vestibular system of a rupture of Reissner's membrane, artificial endolymph was injected in scala media of ten guinea pigs and vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs), evoked by vertical acceleration pulses, were measured. Directly after injection of

  5. Three Dimensional Vestibular Ocular Reflex Testing Using a Six Degrees of Freedom Motion Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dits, J.; Houben, M.M.J.; Steen, J. van der

    2013-01-01

    The vestibular organ is a sensor that measures angular and linear accelerations with six degrees of freedom (6DF). Complete or partial defects in the vestibular organ results in mild to severe equilibrium problems, such as vertigo, dizziness, oscillopsia, gait unsteadiness nausea and/or vomiting. A

  6. Temporal bone studies of the human peripheral vestibular system. Aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, K; Velázquez-Villaseñor, L; Rauch, S D; Glynn, R J; Wall, C; Merchant, S N

    2000-05-01

    Quantitative assessments of vestibular hair cells and Scarpa's ganglion cells were performed on 17 temporal bones from 10 individuals who had well-documented clinical evidence of aminoglycoside ototoxicity (streptomycin, kanamycin, and neomycin). Assessment of vestibular hair cells was performed by Nomarski (differential interference contrast) microscopy. Hair cell counts were expressed as densities (number of cells per 0.01 mm2 surface area of the sensory epithelium). The results were compared with age-matched normal data. Streptomycin caused a significant loss of both type I and type II hair cells in all 5 vestibular sense organs. In comparing the ototoxic effect on type I versus type II hair cells, there was greater type I hair cell loss for all 3 cristae, but not for the maculae. The vestibular ototoxic effects of kanamycin appeared to be similar to those of streptomycin, but the small sample size precluded definitive conclusions from being made. Neomycin did not cause loss of vestibular hair cells. Within the limits of this study (maximum postototoxicity survival time of 12 months), there was no significant loss of Scarpa's ganglion cells for any of the 3 drugs. The findings have implications in several clinical areas, including the correlation of vestibular test results to pathological findings, the rehabilitation of patients with vestibular ototoxicity, the use of aminoglycosides to treat Meniere's disease, and the development of a vestibular prosthesis.

  7. A simple model for the generation of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; Kingma, CM

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the mechanism by which the vestibular evoked myogenic potential is generated. Methods: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential generation is modeled by adding a large number of muscle motor unit action potentials. These action potentials occur randomly in time along a 100 ms long

  8. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Dakin, C.J.; Vardy, A.N.; Happee, R.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between

  9. Impaired Vestibular Function and Low Bone Mineral Density: Data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Robin T; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; Anson, Eric; du Lac, Sascha; Ferrucci, Luigi; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that experimentally induced vestibular ablation leads to a decrease in bone mineral density, through mechanisms mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. Loss of bone mineral density is a common and potentially morbid condition that occurs with aging, and we sought to investigate whether vestibular loss is associated with low bone mineral density in older adults. We evaluated this question in a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), a large, prospective cohort study managed by the National Institute on Aging (N = 389). Vestibular function was assessed with cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs), a measure of saccular function. Bone mineral density was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). In two-way t test analysis, we observed that individuals with reduced vestibular physiologic function had significantly lower bone mineral density. In adjusted multivariate linear regression analyses, we observed that older individuals with reduced vestibular physiologic function had significantly lower bone mineral density, specifically in weight-bearing hip and lower extremity bones. These results suggest that the vestibular system may contribute to bone homeostasis in older adults, notably of the weight-bearing hip bones at greatest risk of osteoporotic fracture. Further longitudinal analysis of vestibular function and bone mineral density in humans is needed to characterize this relationship and investigate the potential confounding effect of physical activity.

  10. [Betahistine in the treatment of vestibular and coordination disturbances in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, N F; Chugunova, M A; Kunel'skaia, N L; Shagaev, A S; Boĭko, A N; Gusev, E I

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of the efficacy trial of betahistine (Vestibo) based on the complex clinical/instrumental examination (stabilometric, vestibulometric) in 40 patients with multiple sclerosis of different severity of vestibular and coordination dysfunction. We demonstrated the clinical efficacy and safety of using this drug as one of the areas of symptomatic therapy in treatment vestibular and coordination disturbances in multiple sclerosis.

  11. Reabilitação vestibular: utilidade clínica em pacientes com esclerose múltipla Vestibular rehabilitation: clinical benefits to patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi analisar a eficácia do exercício de reabilitação vestibular em dois casos de esclerose múltipla remitente-recorrente. Ambos os casos foram encaminhados do Hospital de Clínicas para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia de uma instituição de ensino e foram submetidos aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliação vestibular e aplicação do Dizziness Handicap Inventory pré e pós reabilitação vestibular utilizando-se o protocolo de Cawthorne e Cooksey. No primeiro caso, gênero feminino, 35 anos, tempo de doença de seis anos, referiu tontura há três anos, de intensidade moderada de ocorrência frequente, cefaléia, quedas, desvio de marcha à direita e sensação de desmaio (sic. Apresentou no exame labiríntico, síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária bilateral. No segundo caso, gênero feminino, 49 anos, tempo de doença de dois anos, referiu desvio de marcha à direita, dificuldade e/ou dor ao movimento do pescoço, formigamento de extremidade e alteração vocal. Apresentou no exame labiríntico, síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária à direita. Houve melhora significativa em ambos os casos dos aspectos físico, funcional e emocional do Dizziness Handicap Inventory após a realização da reabilitação vestibular. O protocolo utilizado promoveu melhora na qualidade de vida e auxiliou no processo de compensação vestibular.The aim of the present study was to analyze the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation exercises in two cases of remittent-recurrent multiple sclerosis. Both cases were referred from the Clinics Hospital to the Laboratory of Otoneurology of the same institution and were submitted to the following procedures: anamnesis, otological inspection, vestibular evaluation, and application of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory before and after vestibular rehabilitation using the Cawthorne and Cooksey protocol. The first case was a 35-year-old female

  12. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders: psychophysics and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F

    2015-04-01

    Although vestibular disorders are common and often disabling, they remain difficult to diagnose and treat. For these reasons, considerable interest has been focused on developing new ways to identify peripheral and central vestibular abnormalities and on new therapeutic options that could benefit the numerous patients who remain symptomatic despite optimal therapy. In this review, I focus on the potential utility of psychophysical vestibular testing and vestibular prosthetics. The former offers a new diagnostic approach that may prove to be superior to the current tests in some circumstances; the latter may be a way to provide the brain with information about head motion that restores some elements of the information normally provided by the vestibular labyrinth.

  13. Controlled Vestibular Stimulation, Standardization Of A Physiological Method To Release Stress In College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailesh, Kumar Sai; Mukkadan, J K

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to standardize optimal vestibular stimulation and to investigate its impact on anxiety levels in college students. Vestibular stimulation was achieved by swinging on a swing (Back to front direction) and the participants were advised to adjust frequency, duration and intensity, according to comfort. Frequency, intensity and duration were recorded manually. The anxiety status was assessed by using Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) before and after vestibular stimulation. It has been observed that the anxiety status was significantly decreased after vestibular stimulation. There is a need for future study with larger sample size to substantiate the therapeutic validity of vestibular stimulation as a physiological treatment for stress relief and stress related disorders among college students.

  14. Vestibular-somatosensory interactions: effects of passive whole-body rotation on somatosensory detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Raffaella Ferrè

    Full Text Available Vestibular signals are strongly integrated with information from several other sensory modalities. For example, vestibular stimulation was reported to improve tactile detection. However, this improvement could reflect either a multimodal interaction or an indirect interaction driven by vestibular effects on spatial attention and orienting. Here we investigate whether natural vestibular activation induced by passive whole-body rotation influences tactile detection. In particular, we assessed the ability to detect faint tactile stimuli to the fingertips of the left and right hand during spatially congruent or incongruent rotations. We found that passive whole-body rotations significantly enhanced sensitivity to faint shocks, without affecting response bias. Critically, this enhancement of somatosensory sensitivity did not depend on the spatial congruency between the direction of rotation and the hand stimulated. Thus, our results support a multimodal interaction, likely in brain areas receiving both vestibular and somatosensory signals.

  15. Comparative assessment of vestibular, optokinetic, and optovestibular stimulation in the development of experimental motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsnev, E I; Kuz'min, M P; Zakharova, L N

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of vestibular, optokinetic, and optovestibular stimulation to experimental motion sickness was evaluated in 29 volunteer subjects. Vestibular stimulation (Coriolis effect) was found to induce the most significant vestibular-autonomic disorders. Optokinetic stimulation (pseudo-Coriolis effect) and optovestibular stimulation could provoke such disorders only in susceptible subjects. In quantitative terms, optokinetic and optovestibular stimulation were less effective than vestibular Coriolis stress. Nystagmic reactions of susceptible subjects to the three types of stimulation differed significantly from those of tolerant subjects. This may be important from the theoretical point of view because susceptibility to motion sickness and responses to vestibular and optokinetic stimulation may be universal and associated with the general CNS mechanism, i.e. inhibition mechanism. The identified correlation between the duration of postoptokinetic illusion and motion sickness susceptibility may be used to differentiate susceptible and tolerant subjects.

  16. Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) related with recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzari, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal related to the bony labyrinth of the inner ear and represents the non-sensory components of the endolymph-filled, closed, membranous labyrinth. The association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss with a large or enlarged vestibular aqueduct is well known as the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). The enlarged VA (EVA) comprises abnormalities not only in the structure of the inner ear, but also in the physiology of the auditory and vestibular systems. The clinical picture of this clinical entity is variable [Yetiser S, Kertment M, Ozkaptan Y. Vestibular disturbance in patients with Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS). Acta Otolaryngol (StochK) 1999;119: 641-646]. Signs and symptoms of the auditory impairment are more commonly described in the literature: hearing loss ranges from mild to profound, arising from fluctuating to stepwise progressive or sudden. Vestibular disturbances, ranging from mild imbalance to episodic vertigo, are rarely described in the literature. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a labyrinthine disorder with a typical behavior: intense crises of rotational vertigo induced by postural changes of the head, with short duration and usually good responsiveness to rehabilitative maneuvers. These maneuvers are effective in about 80% of patients with BPPV. BPPV often recurs. About 1/3 of patients have a recurrence in the first year after treatment, and by five years, about half of all patients have a recurrence. Vestibular aqueduct has been demonstrated by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT), however, CT scans cannot show the membranous labyrinth itself. On MR images it is not the vestibular aqueduct that is visualized but its contents, the endolymphatic duct and sac, and can show the abnormalities of the fluid spaces related to the membranous labyrinth. It is proposed that recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is related with volumetric abnormalities

  17. Right-sided dominance of the bilateral vestibular system in the upper brainstem and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Marianne; Kirsch, V; Brandt, T

    2017-03-18

    MRI diffusion tensor imaging tractography was performed on the bilateral vestibular brainstem pathways, which run from the vestibular nuclei via the paramedian and posterolateral thalamic subnuclei to the parieto-insular vestibular cortex. Twenty-one right-handed healthy subjects participated. Quantitative analysis revealed a rope-ladder-like system of vestibular pathways in the brainstem with crossings at pontine and mesencephalic levels. Three structural types of right-left fiber distributions could be delineated: (1) evenly distributed pathways at the lower pontine level from the vestibular nuclei to the pontine crossing, (2) a moderate, pontomesencephalic right-sided lateralization between the pontine and mesencephalic crossings, and (3) a further increase of the right-sided lateralization above the mesencephalic crossing leading to the thalamic vestibular subnuclei. The increasing lateralization along the brainstem was the result of an asymmetric number of pontine and mesencephalic crossing fibers which was higher for left-to-right crossings. The dominance of the right vestibular meso-diencephalic circuitry in right-handers corresponds to the right-hemispheric dominance of the vestibular cortical network. The structural asymmetry apparent in the upper brainstem might be interpreted in relation to the different functions of the vestibular system depending on their anatomical level: a symmetrical sensorimotor reflex control of eye, head, and body mediated by the lower brainstem; a lateralized right-sided upper brainstem-thalamic function as part of the dominant right-sided cortical/subcortical vestibular system that enables a global percept of body motion and orientation in space.

  18. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Kristin N; Kalayjian, Zaven K; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A; Fridman, Gene Y; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C; Andreou, Andreas G

    2016-04-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45±0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 μs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68-130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9-16.7 °/s for the MVP2 and 2.0-14.2 °/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference ( t-test, p=0.34), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2.

  19. Postural threat influences vestibular-evoked muscular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Shannon B; Cleworth, Taylor W; Horslen, Brian C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Inglis, J Timothy; Carpenter, Mark G

    2017-02-01

    Standing balance is significantly influenced by postural threat. While this effect has been well established, the underlying mechanisms of the effect are less understood. The involvement of the vestibular system is under current debate, and recent studies that investigated the effects of height-induced postural threat on vestibular-evoked responses provide conflicting results based on kinetic (Horslen BC, Dakin CJ, Inglis JT, Blouin JS, Carpenter MG. J Physiol 592: 3671-3685, 2014) and kinematic (Osler CJ, Tersteeg MC, Reynolds RF, Loram ID. Eur J Neurosci 38: 3239-3247, 2013) data. We examined the effect of threat of perturbation, a different form of postural threat, on coupling (cross-correlation, coherence, and gain) of the vestibulo-muscular relationship in 25 participants who maintained standing balance. In the "No-Threat" conditions, participants stood quietly on a stable surface. In the "Threat" condition, participants' balance was threatened with unpredictable mediolateral support surface tilts. Quiet standing immediately before the surface tilts was compared to an equivalent time from the No-Threat conditions. Surface EMG was recorded from bilateral trunk, hip, and leg muscles. Hip and leg muscles exhibited significant increases in peak cross-correlation amplitudes, coherence, and gain (1.23-2.66×) in the Threat condition compared with No-Threat conditions, and significant correlations were observed between threat-related changes in physiological arousal and medium-latency peak cross-correlation amplitude in medial gastrocnemius (r = 0.408) muscles. These findings show a clear threat effect on vestibular-evoked responses in muscles in the lower body, with less robust effects of threat on trunk muscles. Combined with previous work, the present results can provide insight into observed changes during balance control in threatening situations.

  20. The modified ampullar approach for vestibular implant surgery: Feasibility and its first application in a human with a long-term vestibular loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess, for the first time in a human with a long-term vestibular loss, a modified approach to the ampullae and the feasibility of evoking a VOR by ampullar stimulation.Material and methods: Peroperative stimulation of the ampullae, using the ampullar approach, was performed under full anaesthesia during cochlear implantation in a 21-year old female patient, who had experienced bilateral vestibular areflexia and sensorineural hearing loss for almost twenty years. Results: The modified ampullar approach was performed successfully with as minimally invasive surgery as possible. Ampullar stimulation evoked eye movements containing vectors congruent with the stimulated canal. As expected, the preliminary electrophysiological data were influenced by the general anaesthesia, which resulted in current spread and reduced maximum amplitudes of eye movement. Nevertheless, they confirm the feasibility of ampullar stimulation.Conclusion: The modified ampullar approach provides safe access to the ampullae using as minimally invasive surgery as possible. For the first time in a human with long-term bilateral vestibular areflexia, it is shown that the VOR can be evoked by ampullar stimulation, even when there has been no vestibular function for almost twenty years. This approach should be considered in vestibular surgery, as it provides safe access to one of the most favourable stimulus locations for development of a vestibular implant.

  1. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  2. Astronaut Charles Conrad checks out Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Conrad is in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC. The reference sphere with a magnetic rod is used by the astronaut to indicate body orientation non-visually. The litter chair in which he is seated can be rotated by a motor at its base or, when not being rotated, can tilt forward, backward or to either side.

  3. VESTIBULAR PERCEPTUAL THRESHOLDS INCREASE ABOVE THE AGE OF 40

    OpenAIRE

    María Carolina Bermúdez Rey; Torin K Clark; Wei Wang; Tania Leeder; Yong Bian; Dan M Merfeld

    2016-01-01

    We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M) ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation), inferior-superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation), and roll tilt. A large subset of this populati...

  4. Vestibular Perceptual Thresholds Increase above the Age of 40

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez Rey, María Carolina; Torin K Clark; Wang, Wei; Leeder, Tania; Bian, Yong; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M) ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation), inferior–superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation), and roll tilt. A large subset of this populati...

  5. Vestibular Perceptual Thresholds Increase above the Age of 40

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez Rey, María Carolina; Torin K Clark; Wang, Wei; Leeder, Tania; Bian, Yong; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M) ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation), inferior–superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation), and roll tilt. A large subset of this populati...

  6. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiGiovanna Jack

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of vestibular neuronitis.%前庭神经炎的诊治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子明; 张素珍; 杨伟炎; 韩东一

    2006-01-01

    本文对前庭神经炎的临床表现、发病原因、类型以及前庭神经炎的鉴别诊断进行了阐述.对于前庭神经炎的神经损伤定位方法、前庭神经炎治疗的现代观念进行了分析总结,并提出了目前诊断、治疗中存在的问题.

  8. Vestibular syndrome in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla / Síndrome vestibular em tamanduá-bandeira (Myrmecophaga tridactyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luís Martins

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular syndrome is a well-defined disease in domestic animals but little known in wild ones. Here this affection of central origin is described in a caquetic adult female giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, which presented circling behavior, extensor hypermetry in thoracic limbs, head tilt and spontaneous horizontal and positional vertical nystagmus. The animal received tube feeding twice daily and dexamethasone was given subcutaneous once daily at the dosis of 6mg/kg, with a progressive improvement of health after the second day of treatment. Dose was reduced to a half from fourth to sixth day, and to a quarter on seventh day, when the animal died. On the fifth day, however, circle deambulation had ceased and hypermetry, head tilt and nystagmus were reduced. Treating vestibular syndrome is a challenge in wild animal practice. Treatment is affected by hyporexia and anorexia, making difficult the animals´ health improvement, which generally present muscle atrophy.A síndrome vestibular é uma afecção bem descrita em animais domésticos e pouco relatada em selvagens. Este relato descreveu essa afecção de origem central em uma fêmea adulta de tamanduá-bandeira (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, caquética, apresentando deambulação em círculos, hipermetria extensora nos membros torácicos, desvio da cabeça e nistagmo espontâneo horizontal e posicional vertical. O animal foi alimentado por sonda oral, 2x/dia e instituiu-se tratamento com dexametasona subcutânea na dose 6mg/kg, 1x/dia, com melhora progressiva a partir da segunda administração. A dose foi diminuída pela metade do quarto ao sexto dia, e reduzida novamente à metade no sétimo dia, quando ocorreu óbito. Entretanto, no quinto dia de tratamento, a deambulação em círculos foi interrompida, e a hipermetria, desvio da cabeça e nistagmo diminuídos. O tratamento de animais selvagens com síndrome vestibular é um desafio e é prejudicado pela hiporexia ou anorexia

  9. Prevalence of hydrocephalus in 157 patients with vestibular schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogg, Jeffrey M.; Ahn, S.H.; Tung, G.A. [Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Reinert, S.E. [Rhode Island Hospital, Lifespan Medical Computing, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Noren, G. [Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of hydrocephalus in patients with vestibular schwannoma. A second objective was to investigate possible etiologies for hydrocephalus in this population by attempting to correlate the incidence and severity of hydrocephalus with tumor volume and extent of fourth ventricular compression. The MRI examinations of 157 adult patients with vestibular schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor size was quantified, and the presence of accompanying hydrocephalus was assessed, categorized as communicating type or non-communicating type and then rated as mild, moderate or severe (grades 1-3). Next, the degree of fourth ventricular distortion caused by tumor mass effect was evaluated and categorized as mild, moderate or severe (grades 1-3). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to test the relationships between tumor volume and (1) the extent of fourth ventricular effacement and (2) severity of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus was present in 28/157 (18%) cases and was categorized as mild in 11/28 (39%), moderate in 15/28 (54%) and severe in 2/28 (7%). Communicating-type hydrocephalus was present in 17/28 (61%) and non-communicating type in 11/28 (39%). There was a positive correlation between the grade of non-communicating hydrocephalus and tumor volume (r=0.38; P<0.001) and between the severity of fourth ventricular compression and extent of hydrocephalus in this group(r=0.43; P<0.001). (orig.)

  10. Mefloquine damage vestibular hair cells in organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongzhen; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Stolzberg, Daniel; Salvi, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Mefloquine is an effective and widely used anti-malarial drug; however, some clinical reports suggest that it can cause dizziness, balance, and vestibular disturbances. To determine if mefloquine might be toxic to the vestibular system, we applied mefloquine to organotypic cultures of the macula of the utricle from postnatal day 3 rats. The macula of the utricle was micro-dissected out as a flat surface preparation and cultured with 10, 50, 100, or 200 μM mefloquine for 24 h. Specimens were stained with TRITC-conjugated phalloidin to label the actin in hair cell stereocilia and TO-PRO-3 to visualize cell nuclei. Some utricles were also labeled with fluorogenic caspase-3, -8, or -9 indicators to evaluate the mechanism of programmed cell death. Mefloquine treatment caused a dose-dependent loss of utricular hair cells. Treatment with 10 μM caused a slight reduction, 50 μM caused a significant reduction, and 200 μM destroyed nearly all the hair cells. Hair cell nuclei in mefloquine-treated utricles were condensed and fragmented, morphological features of apoptosis. Mefloquine-treated utricles were positive for the extrinsic initiator caspase-8 and intrinsic initiator caspase-9 and downstream executioner caspase-3. These results indicate that mefloquine can induce significant hair cell degeneration in the postnatal rat utricle and that mefloquine-induced hair cell death is initiated by both caspase-8 and caspase-9.

  11. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  12. Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Challenges and Opportunities for Multidisciplinarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Luzeiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are two very prevalent conditions in general population. The coexistence of both in the same subject is a significant clinical challenge, since it is not always possible to understand whether they are causally related or associated by chance, requiring different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this review we analyze and summarize the actual knowledge about vestibular migraine (VM, focusing on the new concepts proposed by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3-beta and by the Bárány Society and also addressing the former concepts, which are still present in clinical practice. We conclude that clinical studies using a multidisciplinary approach are crucial in this field, since different specialists observe the same pathology with different eyes. Clinical presentation of VM is variable in what concerns vestibular symptoms temporal relation with migraine headache, as well as in their accompanying manifestations. Biomarkers, either genomics or functional, and molecular imaging techniques will be helpful to clarify many aspects of the complexity of this entity, helping to define to what extent can VM be considered a separate and independent clinical entity.

  13. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroze Kancharu Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: To investigate saccular damage in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL with or without vertigo and to evaluate the saccular damage according to the hearing loss and presence or absence of vertigo. Materials and Methods: All tests done in this study were performed in the audio vestibular unit of ENT department from September 2009 to November 2010. Statistical Analysis Used: The association between the severity of hearing loss and changes in the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP recordings were assessed using descriptive statistics. The pattern of VEMP in different diseases and also the behavior of VEMP in presence or absence of vertigo were evaluated using SPSS 15. Results: Among 27 patients there were 11 cases of idiopathic SSNHL. Out of nine unaffected ears, 88% had normal and 12% had absent VEMP. Whereas out of 13 affected ears, only 53.9% had normal VEMP. Among all the 54 ears, 17 ears had normal hearing. In this group 76.47% had normal VEMP. The group with hearing loss > 90 dB had 61.53% absent VEMP. Conclusions: In patients with unilateral SSNHL, there was a tendency for the affected ear to have absent VEMP indicating the saccular involvement. The extent of saccular damage did not correspond to the amount of hearing loss or presence or absence of vertigo.

  14. Early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma by the vestibular test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haid, T.; Rettinger, G.; Berg, M.; Wigand, M.E.

    1981-11-01

    In a series of 390 cases with suspicion of acoustic neurinomas 78 such tumors could be diagnosed, including 12 early stage neurinomas. This relatively high detection quote of small neurinomas is due to a special diagnostical programme: Every patient with unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss, independent of vertigo anamnesis or of the result of X-rays must be further examined by a vestibular test. All 78 patients with acoustic neuroma had pathological vestibular findings. The positional test turned out to be the most sensitive examination in the early diagnosis of acoustic neuromas and yields a still higher incidence than the thermic test: 95% of the patients with a neuroma showed pathological findings in the positional test. Every patient suffering from an unidentified unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss combined with a pathological result in the positional test must be further checked by a cisternomeatography or computerized tomography using airinsufflation. Every fifth of these patients showed typical signs of an acoustic neuroma in the neuroradiological tests. 68 neuromas are operated today and verfied histologically, 10 patients are still waiting for surgical treatment.

  15. The significance of motion sickness in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Ogata, M; Miura, M

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the significance of motion sickness in the vestibular system, we compared the findings of experimental motion sickness between different kinds of subjects, some of which were already reported. Subjects were healthy adults, healthy children between the ages of 4 and 15 years, and patients with congenital and acquired labyrinthine loss. They were asked to walk while wearing horizontally and vertically reversing goggles. Equilibrium ataxia as well as motion sickness were evoked by horizontal reversal, but not by vertical reversal in healthy subjects. Kindergarten children exhibited severe ataxia, but little nausea. The frequency of severe ataxia decreased during growth, inversely as the frequency of nausea syndrome increased. Although a patient with acquired loss became severely ataxic, a patient with congenital loss did not show any ataxia at all. The present study suggests that vestibular cues are indispensable to the ego-spatial relationship in the brain, and once the ego-spatial relationship becomes inadequate, discomfort acts as a safety device to brake uncontrollable actions. Then, perception of the outer world may automatically adjust voluntary actions by affecting motor commands. The importance of visual cues for representing an alternative framework may differ between congenital and acquired labyrinthine loss.

  16. Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Challenges and Opportunities for Multidisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Leonel; Gonçalves, Freire; Pavão Martins, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are two very prevalent conditions in general population. The coexistence of both in the same subject is a significant clinical challenge, since it is not always possible to understand whether they are causally related or associated by chance, requiring different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this review we analyze and summarize the actual knowledge about vestibular migraine (VM), focusing on the new concepts proposed by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3-beta and by the Bárány Society and also addressing the former concepts, which are still present in clinical practice. We conclude that clinical studies using a multidisciplinary approach are crucial in this field, since different specialists observe the same pathology with different eyes. Clinical presentation of VM is variable in what concerns vestibular symptoms temporal relation with migraine headache, as well as in their accompanying manifestations. Biomarkers, either genomics or functional, and molecular imaging techniques will be helpful to clarify many aspects of the complexity of this entity, helping to define to what extent can VM be considered a separate and independent clinical entity. PMID:28082766

  17. The Relationship between Vestibular Function and Topographical Memory in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Henry Previc

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research during the past two decades has demonstrated an important role of the vestibular system in topographical orientation and memory and the network of neural structures associated with them. Almost all of the supporting data have come from animal or human clinical studies, however. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the link between vestibular function and topographical memory in normal elderly humans. Twenty-five participants aged 70 to 85 years who scored from mildly impaired to normal on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment received three topographical memory tests: the Camden Topographical Recognition Memory Test (CTMRT, a computerized topographical mental rotation test (TMRT, and a virtual pond maze (VPM. They also received six vestibular or oculomotor tests: optokinetic nystagmus (OKN, visual pursuit (VP, actively generated vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, the sensory orientation test (SOT for posture, and two measures of rotational memory (error in degrees, or RMº, and correct directional recognition, or RM→. The only significant bivariate correlations were among the three vestibular measures primarily assessing horizontal canal function (VOR, RMº, and RM→. A multiple regression analysis showed significant relationships between vestibular and demographic predictors and both the TMRT (R=.78 and VPM (R=.66 measures. The significant relationship between the vestibular and topographical memory measures supports the theory that vestibular loss may contribute to topographical memory impairment in the elderly.

  18. Spatio-temporal pattern of vestibular information processing after brief caloric stimulation

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    Marcelli, Vincenzo [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Department of Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: fabrizio.esposito@unina.it; Aragri, Adriana [Department of Neurological Sciences, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Furia, Teresa; Riccardi, Pasquale [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Tosetti, Michela; Biagi, Laura [I.R.C.S.S. ' Stella Maris' , Pisa (Italy); Marciano, Elio [Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Di Salle, Francesco [Department of Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); I.R.C.S.S. ' Stella Maris' , Pisa (Italy); Department of Neurosciences, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    Processing of vestibular information at the cortical and subcortical level is essential for head and body orientation in space and self-motion perception, but little is known about the neural dynamics of the brain regions of the vestibular system involved in this task. Neuroimaging studies using both galvanic and caloric stimulation have shown that several distinct cortical and subcortical structures can be activated during vestibular information processing. The insular cortex has been often targeted and presented as the central hub of the vestibular cortical system. Since very short pulses of cold water ear irrigation can generate a strong and prolonged vestibular response and a nystagmus, we explored the effects of this type of caloric stimulation for assessing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) dynamics of neural vestibular processing in a whole-brain event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment. We evaluated the spatial layout and the temporal dynamics of the activated cortical and subcortical regions in time-locking with the instant of injection and were able to extract a robust pattern of neural activity involving the contra-lateral insular cortex, the thalamus, the brainstem and the cerebellum. No significant correlation with the temporal envelope of the nystagmus was found. The temporal analysis of the activation profiles highlighted a significantly longer duration of the evoked BOLD activity in the brainstem compared to the insular cortex suggesting a functional de-coupling between cortical and subcortical activity during the vestibular response.

  19. Vestibular compensation in the cat: the role of the histaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, M; Tighilet, B

    2000-01-01

    Histamine is thought to be involved in the recovery of vestibular function as histaminergic medications are effective in vestibular-related syndromes. We conducted studies in the cat to assess the effects of betahistine (a histamine-like substance) on the behavioural recovery process after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN). We also investigated histamine immunoreactivity changes in the vestibular and tuberomammillary nuclei of betahistine-treated lesioned cats compared with untreated and unlesioned cats. Betahistine strongly accelerated the behavioural recovery process after UVN, with a time benefit of approximately 2 weeks for both static posture (support surface) and dynamic equilibrium function (locomotor balance) compared with untreated animals. A bilateral decrease in histamine immunoreactivity was seen in both acute and compensated UVN cats; this effect was strongly accentuated with betahistine treatment. In conclusion, the results indicate that vestibular lesion reduces histamine staining due to an increase in histamine release in the vestibular and tuberomammillary nuclei that promote vestibular recovery. Betahistine dihydrochloride should contribute to this process by acting on both the presynaptic histamine H3 and postsynaptic histamine H1 receptors.

  20. Vestibular implantation and longitudinal electrical stimulation of the semicircular canal afferents in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James O; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Jameyson, Elyse; Phillips, Christopher M; Nowack, Amy L; Golub, Justin S; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2015-06-01

    Animal experiments and limited data in humans suggest that electrical stimulation of the vestibular end organs could be used to treat loss of vestibular function. In this paper we demonstrate that canal-specific two-dimensionally (2D) measured eye velocities are elicited from intermittent brief 2 s biphasic pulse electrical stimulation in four human subjects implanted with a vestibular prosthesis. The 2D measured direction of the slow phase eye movements changed with the canal stimulated. Increasing pulse current over a 0-400 μA range typically produced a monotonic increase in slow phase eye velocity. The responses decremented or in some cases fluctuated over time in most implanted canals but could be partially restored by changing the return path of the stimulation current. Implantation of the device in Meniere's patients produced hearing and vestibular loss in the implanted ear. Electrical stimulation was well tolerated, producing no sensation of pain, nausea, or auditory percept with stimulation that elicited robust eye movements. There were changes in slow phase eye velocity with current and over time, and changes in electrically evoked compound action potentials produced by stimulation and recorded with the implanted device. Perceived rotation in subjects was consistent with the slow phase eye movements in direction and scaled with stimulation current in magnitude. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the vestibular end organ in human subjects provided controlled vestibular inputs over time, but in Meniere's patients this apparently came at the cost of hearing and vestibular function in the implanted ear.

  1. Vestibular activation differentially modulates human early visual cortex and V5/MT excitability and response entropy.

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    Seemungal, Barry M; Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC.

  2. Improving Sensorimotor Function and Adaptation using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

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    Galvan, R. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during adaption to G-transitions that occur when entering and exiting microgravity. Post space flight, these sensorimotor disturbances can include postural and gait instability, visual performance changes, manual control disruptions, spatial disorientation, and motion sickness, all of which can hinder the operational capabilities of the astronauts. Crewmember safety would be significantly increased if sensorimotor changes brought on by gravitational changes could be mitigated and adaptation could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate and develop the use of electrical stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a countermeasure to augment sensorimotor function and facilitate adaptation. For this project, SVS will be applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes at imperceptible amplitude levels. We hypothesize that SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through the phenomena of stochastic resonance, which occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. In line with the theory of stochastic resonance, a specific optimal level of SVS will be found and tested for each subject [1]. Three experiments are planned to investigate the use of SVS in sensory-dependent tasks and performance. The first experiment will aim to demonstrate stochastic resonance in the vestibular system through perception based motion recognition thresholds obtained using a 6-degree of freedom Stewart platform in the Jenks Vestibular Laboratory at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. A range of SVS amplitudes will be applied to each subject and the subjectspecific optimal SVS level will be identified as that which results in the lowest motion recognition threshold, through previously established, well developed methods [2,3,4]. The second experiment will investigate the use of optimal SVS in facilitating sensorimotor adaptation to system

  3. The effect of habituation and plane of rotation on vestibular perceptual responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, E A; Okada, T; Jáuregui-Renaud, K; Bronstein, A M

    2000-01-01

    A technique was applied to assess vestibular sensation without reference to external spatial, position cues. The stimuli were stopping responses to velocity-steps of 90 deg/s in the dark. Subjects indicated their perceived angular velocity by turning a flywheel connected to a tachogenerator. Two separate experiments were conducted. In one, subjects were rotated in yaw about an earth-vertical axis before and after prolonged rotational or visual (optokinetic) stimuli. In the second experiment, subjects were rotated in roll supine, with either the head ('roll centred') or the feet ('roll eccentric') on the axis of rotation. The two aims of the paper were to (i) examine the effect of repetitive vestibular and optokinetic stimulation on the time constant of decay of vestibular sensation in yaw; (ii) to compare vestibular sensation responses to rotation in roll both with and without the addition of a Z-axis centrifugal force. The pre-habituation sensation response in yaw decayed exponentially with a median time constant of 12.8 s. The duration of the sensation responses were significantly reduced following both prolonged vestibular and optokinetic stimulation. The reduction in vestibular responses following prolonged visual and vestibular stimuli, 1) is likely to occur in velocity storage mechanisms mediating ocular and perceptual responses, 2) may represent a mechanism for reducing the disorientating consequences of visual-vestibular conflict and 3) supports the use of optokinetic stimuli as a treatment for vestibular patients. The time constant of the sensation responses in roll was shorter and not significantly influenced by head position: 5.7 s in the head-centred position compared to 4.7 s in the eccentric head position. Therefore, perceptual as well as ocular responses to rotation in roll are determined primarily by cupula dynamics and not influenced by velocity storage.

  4. Effects of conventional versus multimodal vestibular rehabilitation on functional capacity and balance control in older people with chronic dizziness from vestibular disorders: design of a randomized clinical trial

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    Ricci Natalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several protocols designed to treat vestibular disorders that focus on habituation, substitution, adaptation, and compensation exercises. However, protocols that contemplate not only vestibular stimulation but also other components that are essential to the body balance control in older people are rare. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of two vestibular rehabilitation protocols (conventional versus multimodal on the functional capacity and body balance control of older people with chronic dizziness due to vestibular disorders. Methods/design A randomized, single-blind, controlled clinical trial with a 3 months follow-up period will be performed. The sample will be composed of older individuals with a clinical diagnosis of chronic dizziness resulting from vestibular disorders. The subjects will be evaluated at baseline, post-treatment and follow-up. Primary outcomes will be determined in accordance with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (functional capacity and the Dynamic Gait Index (body balance. Secondary outcomes include dizziness features, functional records, body balance control tests, and psychological information. The older individuals (minimum sample n = 68 will be randomized to either the conventional or multimodal Cawthorne&Cooksey protocols. The protocols will be performed during individual 50-minute sessions, twice a week, for 2 months (a total of 16 sessions. The outcomes of both protocols will be compared according to the intention-to-treat analysis. Discussion Vestibular rehabilitation through the Cawthorne&Cooksey protocol has already proved to be effective. However, the addition of other components related to body balance control has been proposed to improve the rehabilitation of older people with chronic dizziness from vestibular disorders. Trial registration ACTRN12610000018011

  5. Partial Recovery of Audiological, Vestibular, and Radiological Findings following Spontaneous Intralabyrinthine Haemorrhage

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    Thomas Pézier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and sudden vestibular loss vary widely between units. With the increasing access to both magnetic resonance imaging and objective vestibular testing, our understanding of the various aetiologies at hand is increasing. Despite this, the therapeutic options are limited and without a particularly strong evidence base. We present a rare, yet increasingly diagnosed, case of intralabyrinthine haemorrhage (ILH together with radiological, audiological, and vestibular test results. Of note, this occurred spontaneously and has shown partial recovery in all the mentioned modalities.

  6. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  7. Telefones celulares: influência nos sistemas auditivo e vestibular Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems

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    Aracy Pereira Silveira Balbani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Os sistemas de telecomunicações emitem radiofreqüência, uma radiação eletromagnética invisível. Telefones celulares transmitem microondas (450900 MHz no sistema analógico e 1,82,2 GHz no sistema digital, muito próximo à orelha do usuário. Esta energia é absorvida pela pele, orelha interna, nervo vestibulococlear e superfície do lobo temporal. OBJETIVO: Revisar a literatura sobre influência dos telefones celulares na audição e equilíbrio. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. METODOLOGIA: Foram pesquisados artigos nas bases Lilacs e Medline sobre a influência dos telefones celulares nos sistemas auditivo e vestibular, publicados de 2000 a 2005, e também materiais veiculados na Internet. RESULTADOS: Os estudos sobre radiação do telefone celular e risco de neurinoma do acústico apresentam resultados contraditórios. Alguns autores não encontram maior probabilidade de aparecimento do tumor nos usuários de celulares, enquanto outros relatam que a utilização de telefones analógicos por 10 anos ou mais aumenta o risco para o tumor. A exposição aguda às microondas emitidas pelo celular não influencia a atividade das células ciliadas externas da cóclea, in vivo e in vitro, a condução elétrica no nervo coclear, nem a fisiologia do sistema vestibular em humanos. As próteses auditivas analógicas são mais suscetíveis à interferência eletromagnética dos telefones celulares digitais. CONCLUSÃO: Não há comprovação de lesão cocleovestibular pelos telefones celulares.Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service very close to the user’s ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. AIM: literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. STUDY DESIGN: systematic

  8. A função vestibular em indivíduos usuários de implante coclear Vestibular function in cochlear implant users

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    Ariane Solci Bonucci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de alteração no equilíbrio no período pós-cirúrgico ao implante coclear varia de 31 a 75%. OBJETIVO: Analisar a função vestibular no período pré e pós-operatório da cirurgia de implante coclear. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Avaliou-se a função vestibular, por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia, de 38 pacientes, no pré e pós-cirúrgico de implante coclear. RESULTADOS: A principal queixa de desequilíbrio apresentada pelos pacientes foi a tontura, seguida pela vertigem postural e pela vertigem não-postural. Dos 38 pacientes avaliados, 13% deixaram de apresentar desequilíbrio após a cirurgia de implante coclear e apenas 5% referiram piora. Houve uma melhora na sintomatologia vestibular em 13% dos pacientes, sendo que esta possibilidade pode estar relacionada ao fenômeno de compensação vestibular e pela estimulação elétrica. Entretanto, foi observada na prova calórica uma piora na funcionalidade do sistema vestibular, tanto na orelha implantada como na orelha não-implantada. Assim, não há tendência de maior comprometimento na orelha implantada. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo demonstrou que o implante coclear pode comprometer o sistema vestibular em ambas as orelhas. Entretanto, a sintomatologia vestibular ocorre em menor proporção, podendo haver melhora no desequilíbrio após a cirurgia do implante coclear.Balance alterations in the postoperative of cochlear implant surgeries varies from 31 to 75%. AIM: to analyze vestibular function in the pre and postoperative periods of cochlear implanted individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: the vestibular function was assessed, through electronystagmography, in 38 patients, in the pre and postoperative of cochlear implant procedures. RESULTS: The main complaint of unbalance reported by patients was dizziness, followed by postural vertigo and non-postural vertigo. Results: 13% of the patients did not show any balance disorder following cochlear implant surgery and just 5% showed symptoms

  9. Posturografia em idosos com distúrbios vestibulares e quedas

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    Camila Macedo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A posturografia estática e dinâmica tem sido usada para analisar a habilidade de idosos com disfunção vestibular em manter o equilíbrio corporal em diferentes condições de conflitos sensoriais. O objetivo do exame é quantificar a velocidade de oscilação e o deslocamento do centro de pressão nas condições de conflitos visual, somatossensorial e interação visuo-vestibular, e o limite de estabilidade. Objetivo: Analisar a literatura referente ao controle do equilíbrio corporal em idosos com distúrbios vestibulares por meio de posturografia computadorizada estática e dinâmica. Métodos: Revisão nas bases de dados LILACS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scielo, Cochrane, ISI Web of Knowledge e bibliotecas virtuais de teses e dissertações, utilizando as palavras-chave “Idoso”, “Equilíbrio Postural”, “Avaliação”, “Controle Postural”, “Quedas”, “Posturografia”, “Vestibular” e/ou “Tontura” de publicações dos últimos vinte anos. Resultados: Há vários modelos de posturografias que mensuram as respostas posturais e o risco de quedas em indivíduos idosos, perante os diferentes estímulos sensoriais, incluindo a tecnologia de realidade virtual. Os idosos com desequilíbrio corporal, tontura, e/ou com histórico de quedas apresentam pior desempenho que idosos sem queixas, sem histórico de quedas e indivíduos mais jovens. Conclusão: A posturografia é uma valiosa ferramenta para análise quantitativa do controle postural, permitindo a identificação das condições sensoriais nas quais os idosos vestibulopatas apresentam maior instabilidade.

  10. Bilateral vestibular hypofunction: Insights in etiologies, clinical subtypes and diagnostics

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    F. eLucieer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the different etiologies and clinical subtypes of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH and the value of diagnostic tools in the diagnostic process of BVH.Materials and methods: A retrospective case review was performed on 154 patients diagnosed with BVH in a tertiary referral center, between 2013 and 2015. Inclusion criteria comprised 1 imbalance and/or oscillopsia during locomotion, and 2 summated slow phase velocity of nystagmus of less than 20 degrees per second during bithermal caloric tests.Results:The definite etiology of BVH was determined in 47% of the cases and the probable etiology in 22%. In 31%, the etiology of BVH remained idiopathic. BVH resulted from more than 20 different etiologies. In the idiopathic group, the percentage of migraine was significantly higher compared to the non-idiopathic group (50% versus 11%, p<0.001. Among all patients, 23.4% were known with autoimmune disorders in their medical history. All 4 clinical subtypes (recurrent vertigo with BVH, rapidly progressive BVH, slowly progressive BVH and slowly progressive BVH with ataxia were found in this population. Slowly progressive BVH with ataxia comprised only 4.5% of the cases. The head impulse test was abnormal in 94% of the cases. The torsion swing test was abnormal in 66%. Bilateral normal hearing to moderate hearing loss was found in 49%. Blood tests did not often contribute to the determination of the etiology of the disease. Abnormal cerebral imaging was found in 21 patients.Conclusion:BVH is a heterogeneous condition with various etiologies and clinical characteristics. Migraine seems to play a significant role in idiopathic BVH and auto-immunity could be a modulating factor in the development of BVH. The distribution of etiologies of BVH probably depends on the clinical setting. In the diagnostic process of BVH, the routine use of some blood tests can be reconsidered and a low-threshold use of audiometry and cerebral imaging is

  11. Nonlinear high-order mode locking in stochastic sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael; Afghan, Muhammad; Neiman, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Excitable systems demonstrate various mode locking regimes when driven by periodic external signals. With noise taken into account, such regimes represent complex nonlinear responses which depend crucially on the frequency and amplitude of the periodic drive as well as on the noise intensity. We study this using a computational model of a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron in combination with the turtle vestibular sensory system as an experimental model. A bifurcation analysis of the model is performed. Extracellular recordings from primary vestibular afferent neurons with two types of stimuli are used in the experimental study. First, mechanical stimuli applied to the labyrinth allow us to study the responses of the entire system, including transduction by the hair cells and spike generation in the primary afferents. Second, a galvanic stimuli applied directly to an afferent are used to study the responses of afferent spike generator directly. The responses to galvanic stimuli reveal multiple high-order mode locking regimes which are well reproduced in numerical simulation. Responses to mechanical stimulation are characterized by larger variability so that fewer mode-locking regimes can be observed.

  12. The effects of vestibular stimulation and fatigue on postural control in classical ballet dancers.

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    Hopper, Diana M; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Newnham, Prudence J; Edwards, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.

  13. Vestibulo-Oculomotor Reflex Recording Using the Scleral Search Coil Technique. Review of Peripheral Vestibular Disorders

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    Boleas-Aguirre, Marisol; Migliaccio, Amerio A.; Carey, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to review vestibulo-oculomotor reflex (VOR) studies on several peripheral vestibular disorders (Ménière’s disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, superior canal dehiscence syndrome, and vestibular neuroma), using the scleral search coil (SSC) technique. Head movements are detected by vestibular receptors and the elicited VOR is responsible for compensatory 3 dimensional eye movements. Therefore, to study the VOR it is necessary to assess the direction and velocity of 3 dimensional head, and eye movements. This can be achieved using the SSC technique. Interaction between a scleral search coil and an alternating magnetic field generates an electrical signal that is proportional to eye position. Ideally, eye rotation axis is aligned with head rotation axis and VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) for horizontal and vertical head rotations is almost 1. The VOR gain, however, for torsional head rotations is smaller and about 0.7. PMID:17683700

  14. Problems of space biology. Volume 50: Nystagmometry for evaulation of the status of the vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, M. M.; Kislyakov, V. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of nystagmometry are studied, primarily those in which the study of hystagmus serves as a means to learn about the vestibular apparatus. Along with exhaustive published material, the monograph presents data from many years of research on the physioloigical mechanisms of nystagmus, the features of nystagmus when vestibular stimulation is combined with optokinetic, the pole of vertibular afferentation asymmetry in the asymmetry of reactions to optokinetic stimulus, a nystagmometric approach to studying the hydrodynamic interaction among semicircular canals, as well as several other questions. A great deal of attention is given to methods of recording nystagmus, calibrating nystagmograms, quantitative evaluation of nystagmographic material, new nystagmometric characteristics and diagnostic techniques. A diagnostic model is proposed which makes it possible to obtain important information on the condition of the vestibular system from results of vestibular testing.

  15. The effect of changes in perilymphatic K+ on the vestibular evoked potential in the guinea pig.

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    Kingma, C M; Wit, H P

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effect on the functioning of the vestibular system of a rupture of Reissner's membrane, artificial endolymph was injected in scala media of ten guinea pigs and vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs), evoked by vertical acceleration pulses, were measured. Directly after injection of a sufficient volume to cause rupture, all ears showed a complete disappearance of VsEP, followed by partial recovery. To investigate the effect of perilymphatic potassium concentration on the vestibular sensory and neural structures, different concentrations of KCl were injected directly into the vestibule. The KCl injections resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of VsEP, followed by a dose-dependent slow recovery. This animal model clearly shows a disturbing effect of a higher than normal K(+) concentration in perilymph on the vestibular and neural structures in the inner ear. Potassium intoxication is the most probable explanation for the observed effects. It is one of the explanations for Menière attacks.

  16. Lack of effects of astemizole on vestibular ocular reflex, motion sickness, and cognitive performance in man

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    Kohl, Randall L.; Homick, Jerry L.; Cintron, Nitza; Calkins, Dick S.

    1987-01-01

    Astemizole was orally administered to 20 subjects in a randomized, double-blind design to assess the efficacy of this peripherally active antihistamine as an antimotion sickness drug possessing no central side-effects. Measures of vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) were made to evaluate the agent as a selective vestibular depressant. Following one week of orally administered astemizole (30 mg daily), a Staircase Profile Test, a VOR test, and a variety of tests of cognitive performance were administered. These tests revealed no statistically significant effects of astemizole. This leads to the conclusion that, although the drug probably reaches the peripheral vestibular apparatus in man by crossing the blood-vestibular barrier, a selective peripheral antihistamine (H1) action is inadequate to control motion sickness induced through cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation in a rotating chair.

  17. SYSTEM FOR MEASURING KINEMATICS OF VESTIBULAR SYSTEM MOVEMENTS IN NEUROLOGICAL PRACTICE

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    Petr Volf

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the design of a system for studying kinematics of movement of the vestibular system. Up to now there has not existed a system which would enable to measure the kinematic quantities of movement of the individual parts of the vestibular system within its coordinate system. The proposed system removes these deficiencies by suitable positioning of five gyro-accelerometric units on the helmet. The testing of the system took place under two conditions, during Unilateral Rotation on Barany Chair and Head Impulse Test. During the testing, the system justified its application because the results show that the kinematic quantities of the movement of the left and right labyrinths of the vestibular system differ. The introduced device is mainly intended for application in clinical neurology with the aim to enable the physician to measure all linear and angular accelerations of the vestibular system during medical examinations.

  18. [Enhanced variability of the thermal test with patients with vestibular disease (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, U

    1982-01-01

    The reproducibility of nystagmus-intensity was measured with patients with peripheral vestibular disease, and with healthy persons, by a fivefold repetition of the same thermal stimulus. Variability of the data of the patients was considerably higher than of the healthy persons. Thus, the "normal" data have only a restricted value. Therefore, interpretation of thermal tests is more difficult for patients with an eventual vestibular disease. The origin of the enhanced variability seems to be the weakness of the reaction per se, because strong stimuli and hence strong reactions with healthy persons, have a lower relative standard deviation. Furthermore, tonic fluctuation in the diseased vestibular system is probable, as healthy ears of patients with unilateral vestibular disease show increased variability. An improvement of the method of the test is necessary. This can, for instance be achieved by an examination with eyes open under Frenzel's glasses and by repeated, by short and by strong stimuli.

  19. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, L.

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival. We are studying two aspects of this vestibular adaptation: (1) How does long-term exposure to microgravity and hypergravity affect the development of vestibular afferents? (2) How does short- term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during launch and landing, affect the vestibular system. During space flight the gravistatic receptors in the otolith organs are effectively unloaded. In hypergravity conditions they are overloaded. However, the angular acceleration receptors of the semicircular canals receive relatively normal stimulation in both micro- and hypergravity.Rat embryos exposed to microgravity from gestation day 10 (prior to vestibular function) until gestation day 20 (vestibular system is somewhat functional) showed that afferents from the posterior vertical canal projecting to the medial vestibular nucleus developed similarly in microgravity, hypergravity, and in controls . However, afferents from the saccule showed delayed development in microgravity as compared to development in hypergravity and in controls. Cerebellar plasticity is crucial for modification of sensory-motor control and learning. Thus we explored the possibility that strong vestibular stimuli would modify cerebellar motor control (i.e., eye movement, postural control, gut motility) by altering the morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To study the effects of short-term exposures to strong vestibular stimuli we focused on structural changes in the vestibulo-cerebellum that are caused by strong vestibular stimuli. Adult mice were exposed to various combinations of constant and/or rapidly changing angular and linear accelerations for 8.5 min (the time length of shuttle launch). Our data shows that these stimuli cause intense excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, inducing up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

  20. A compact equipment package for vestibular experiments during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. H.; Teiwes, W.; Scherer, H.

    A compact measurement and stimulus equipment package for vestibular testing is described. The package is designed on a modular concept so that a customized version can be assembled for each experimental situation. Although primarily conceived for space-related research, the equipment has also been introduced successfully into the clinical diagnostic procedure. An essential function of the equipment is the recording and evaluation of eye movements. This is performed by a video-based measurement system which permits evaluation of horizontal, vertical and torsional components of eye movement. Objective testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in all three orthogonal planes is therefore possible. Furthermore evaluation of the otolithic function in weightlessness is made feasible by the possibility of measuring dynamic ocular counterrolling. Some applications of the equipment are described.

  1. Human Vestibular Function, Rotating Litter Chair - Skylab Experiment M131

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows the Rotating Litter Chair, a major component of Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). The experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. The M131 experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  2. [A caloric vestibular test with increased positive evidence (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzeja, A; Strauss, P; Kapell, H

    1979-12-01

    A decrease of the variance of a caloric test would increase the importance of the statement of this test. An important source of variance are the differences concerning the timecourse of the induced heat wave, determined by the different anatomic conditions in the petrous bone, particularly the pneumatisation. A constant temperature gradient is obtained by the irigation in a pessimum position with the head flexed 30 degrees to the front. This temperature gradient evokes immediately a constant maximum vestibular stimulus after having reflected the head 90 degrees to the back. Comparing this new method with the traditional irrigation, one can state an important reduction of variance. The dependence of the nystagumus response on caloric irrigation of the petrous bone demands a X-ray-examination according to the technique of Schüller before starting with the caloric examination. In case of differences between the right and left sides the described test would be necessary in our opinion.

  3. Calcification of vestibular schwannoma: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcification rarely occurs in vestibular schwannoma (VS, and only seven cases of calcified VS have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a 48-year-old man with VS, who had a history of progressive left-sided hearing loss for 3 years. Neurological examination revealed that he had left-sided hearing loss and left cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography angiography showed a mass with calcification in the left cerebellopontine angle (CPA. The tumor was successfully removed via suboccipital craniotomy, and postoperative histopathology showed that the tumor was a schwannoma. We reviewed seven cases of calcified VS that were previously reported in the literature, and we analyzed and summarized the characteristics of these tumors, including the calcification, texture, and blood supply. We conclude that calcification in VS is associated with its texture and blood supply, and these characteristics affect the surgical removal of the tumor.

  4. Betahistine dihydrochloride in the treatment of peripheral vestibular vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Eugenio; Guidetti, G; Ghilardi, L; Fattori, B; Malannino, N; Maiolino, L; Mora, R; Ottoboni, S; Pagnini, P; Leprini, M; Pallestrini, E; Passali, D; Nuti, D; Russolo, M; Tirelli, G; Simoncelli, C; Brizi, S; Vicini, C; Frasconi, P

    2003-02-01

    The present study compares the efficacy and safety of betahistine dihydrochloride to that of a placebo in recurrent vertigo resulting from Meniere's disease (MD) or in paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV) of probable vascular origin. The design was double-blind, multicentre and parallel-group randomised. Eleven Italian centres enrolled 144 patients: 75 of the patients were treated with betahistine (41 MD/34 PPV) and 69 with placebos (40 MD/29 PPV). The betahistine dosage was 16 mg twice per day for 3 months. Compared to the placebo, betahistine had a significant effect on the frequency, intensity and duration of vertigo attacks. Associated symptoms and the quality of life also were significantly improved by betahistine. Both the physician's judgement and the patient's opinion on the efficacy and acceptability of the treatment were in agreement as to the superiority of betahistine. The effective and safe profile of betahistine in the treatment of vertigo due to peripheral vestibular disorders was confirmed.

  5. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Elderly Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    N. Saki; Bayat, A; S. Nikakhlagh; F. Memari; G. Mirmomeni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Vertigo in the elderly is relatively common, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy is an important therapeutic option in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on vertigo symptoms in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional analytic design, 46 patients older than 60 ye...

  6. Manual therapy with and without vestibular rehabilitation for cervicogenic dizziness: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lystad Reidar P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manual therapy is an intervention commonly advocated in the management of dizziness of a suspected cervical origin. Vestibular rehabilitation exercises have been shown to be effective in the treatment of unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders, and have also been suggested in the literature as an adjunct in the treatment of cervicogenic dizziness. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence for manual therapy, in conjunction with or without vestibular rehabilitation, in the management of cervicogenic dizziness. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted in the databases Scopus, Mantis, CINHAL and the Cochrane Library for terms related to manual therapy, vestibular rehabilitation and cervicogenic dizziness. Included studies were assessed using the Maastricht-Amsterdam criteria. Results A total of fifteen articles reporting findings from thirteen unique investigations, including five randomised controlled trials and eight prospective, non-controlled cohort studies were included in this review. The methodological quality of the included studies was generally poor to moderate. All but one study reported improvement in dizziness following either unimodal or multimodal manual therapy interventions. Some studies reported improvements in postural stability, joint positioning, range of motion, muscle tenderness, neck pain and vertebrobasilar artery blood flow velocity. Discussion Although it has been argued that manual therapy combined with vestibular rehabilitation may be superior in the treatment of cervicogenic dizziness, there are currently no observational and experimental studies demonstrating such effects. A rationale for combining manual therapy and vestibular rehabilitation in the management of cervicogenic dizziness is presented. Conclusion There is moderate evidence to support the use of manual therapy, in particular spinal mobilisation and manipulation, for cervicogenic dizziness. The evidence

  7. Cochlear Implantation in Isolated Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome: Report of Three Cases and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhananga,Rabindra; Natarajan, Kiran; Devarasetty, AmarNath; Kameswaran, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) is characterized by the enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct associated with sensorineural hearing loss. It is the most common radiographically detectable inner ear anomaly in congenital hearing loss. LVAS may occur as an isolated anomaly or in association with other inner ear malformations. Objective To report three cases of isolated LVAS with a focus on preoperative assessment, surgical issues, and short-term postoperative follow-u...

  8. Changes in the Vestibular System with Age: An Abstracted Bibliography. Volume 2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-20

    where the foetal labyrinth is danaged or malformed in utero. This is a convenient clinical manifestation on which to begin early investigation of...Histology FINDINGS: ".,.stndy of the mjelination process revealed that myelination begins earlier for the vestibular nerve than for the cochlear nerve: by...the fifty- third day of gestation 64% of the vestibular fibers have already passed the pranyeliin stage whereas for the cochlear nerve this prcmyelin

  9. SYSTEM FOR MEASURING KINEMATICS OF VESTIBULAR SYSTEM MOVEMENTS IN NEUROLOGICAL PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Volf; Patrik Kutílek; Jiří Hozman; Rudolf Černý; Tomáš Koukolík; Jan Hejda

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the design of a system for studying kinematics of movement of the vestibular system. Up to now there has not existed a system which would enable to measure the kinematic quantities of movement of the individual parts of the vestibular system within its coordinate system. The proposed system removes these deficiencies by suitable positioning of five gyro-accelerometric units on the helmet. The testing of the system took place under two conditions, during Unilateral Rotat...

  10. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  11. Diagnóstico e tratamento das principais síndromes vestibulares Diagnosis and treatment of the most frequent vestibular syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mizuta Kozoroski Kanashiro

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo foram identificar as síndromes vestibulares mais comuns nos ambulatórios de vertigem, suas características clínicas e semiológicas, e observar a resposta ao tratamento específico. Foram estudados retrospectivamente 515 pacientes atendidos em ambulatórios de duas instituições e avaliados aspectos da anamnese, exame físico e a resposta ao tratamento. As síndromes mais freqüentes foram: vertigem de posicionamento paroxística benigna (VPPB (28,5%, vertigem postural fóbica (11,5%, vertigem central (10,1%, neurite vestibular (9,7%, doença de Menière (8,5%, enxaqueca (6,4%. Houve boa resposta ao tratamento nos pacientes com enxaqueca (78,8%, VPPB (64%, neurite vestibular (62%, doença de Menière (54,5% e paroxismia vestibular (54,5%, enquanto pacientes com nistagmo para baixo e vestibulopatia bilateral não tiveram resposta satisfatória (52,6% e 42,8% respectivamente. As síndromes vestibulares foram diagnosticadas através da anamnese e exame físico com testes clínicos específicos para avaliação da função vestibular. A identificação destas síndromes permitiu o tratamento adequado levando a uma boa evolução.The aims of this study were to identify the most common vestibular syndromes in a dizziness unit, and to observe their clinical aspects and response to treatment. Five hundred and fifteen patients were studied retrospectively in two institutions. Aspects of anamnesis, physical examination and the response to treatment were evaluated. The most frequent syndromes were: benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (VPPB (28.5%, phobic postural vertigo (11.5%, central vertigo (10.1%, vestibular neuritis (9.7%, Menière disease (8.5%, and migraine (6.4%. A good response to treatment was observed in most patients with migraine (78.8%, VPPB (64%, vestibular neuritis (62%, Menière disease (54.5% and vestibular paroxismia (54.5%. On the other hand, patients with downbeat nystagmus and bilateral vestibulopathy

  12. Posturografia com estímulos de realidade virtual nas diferentes disfunções vestibulares Posturography with virtual reality stimuli in different vestibular dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Eiji Inoue Yamamoto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o equilíbrio corporal e quantificar possíveis alterações na posturografia estática do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM em pacientes com disfunção vestibular. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo, com prontuários de 100 pacientes com topodiagnóstico de disfunção vestibular periférica ou central e 100 indivíduos hígidos compondo o Grupo Controle, de ambos os gêneros, entre 7 a 86 anos. Para a posturografia foi utilizado o equipamento Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM, da Medicaa®. Foram analisados os parâmetros limite de estabilidade, área de elipse e velocidade de oscilação em dez condições sensoriais. RESULTADOS: A média dos valores do limite de estabilidade, da área de elipse e da velocidade de oscilação do Grupo Experimental foi significativa em relação ao Grupo Controle em todas as condições. A média dos parâmetros do gênero feminino do Grupo Experimental foi significativa em relação ao do Grupo Controle em todas as condições avaliadas. Os pacientes com disfunção vestibular central obtiveram maiores valores que os pacientes com disfunção vestibular periférica nas variáveis área de elipse e velocidade de oscilação, porém menor valor da área do limite de estabilidade. CONCLUSÃO: A posturografia com estímulos de realidade virtual foi um método de avaliação eficaz para detectar alterações relacionadas às variáveis limite de estabilidade, área de elipse e velocidade de oscilação, uma vez que o Grupo Controle obteve melhor desempenho, tanto entre os grupos quanto entre os gêneros. Entre as disfunções vestibulares, os indivíduos com acometimento periférico obtiveram melhor desempenho do que os indivíduos com disfunção vestibular central em todas as variáveis analisadas na posturografia.PURPOSE: To assess body balance and to quantify possible alterations over the static posturography of the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM in patients with vestibular dysfunction

  13. Avaliação vestibular em mulheres com disfunção temporomandibular Vestibular evaluation in women with temporomandibular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o comportamento vestibular em pacientes com disfunção temporomandibular. MÉTODOS: avaliaram-se 27 pacientes do sexo feminino, na faixa etária de 30 a 53 anos, encaminhadas do Centro de Diagnóstico e Tratamento da Articulação Temporomandibular para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia da Universidade Tuiuti do Paraná. Realizaram-se os seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica e avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: as queixas mais freqüentes foram: dificuldade ou dor ao movimento do pescoço (77,7%, dor irradiada para ombro/braço (77,7%, zumbido e formigamento de extremidade superior (77,7%, tontura e dor de cabeça (66,6%, ansiedade (55,5%, sensação de cabeça oca (51,8%, agitação durante o sono (51,8% e depressão (51,8%. O exame vestibular esteve alterado em 20 pacientes (74,0% na prova calórica. Houve freqüência de alteração no sistema vestibular periférico. Houve predomínio das síndromes vestibulares periféricas deficitárias. CONCLUSÃO: ressalta-se a importância de se estudar a relação do sistema vestibular com a disfunção temporomandibular uma vez que observamos, na presente pesquisa, um número elevado de alteração no exame labiríntico.PURPOSE: to evaluate the vestibular functioning in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. METHODS: 27 female patients were evaluated, with age varying from 30 to 53-year-old, referred from the Centre of Diagnosis and Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction to the Otoneurological Laboratory of Tuiuti University of Paraná. The following exams were carried out: anamnesis, otoscopy and vestibular evaluations through vectoelectronystagmography. RESULTS: the most frequent complaints were: difficulty or pain with movement of the neck (77.7%, pain irradiated to the shoulder/arm (77.7%, tinnitus and paresthesia of superior extremities (77.7% in each one, dizziness and headaches (66,6%, anxiety (55

  14. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric test results in individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujeet, Kumar Sinha; Niraj, Kumar Singh; Animesh, Barman; Rajeshwari, G; Sharanya, R

    2014-01-01

    Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder is a type of hearing loss where outer hair cell function are normal (as evidenced by the preservation of OAEs and cochlear microphonics), whereas auditory nerve functions are abnormal (as evidenced by abnormal auditory brainstem evoked potentials beginning with wave I of the ABR) and acoustic reflexes to ipsilateral and contralateral tones are absent. It is likely that in cases with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder not only the cochlear nerve, but also the vestibular nerves might get involved. The present study was conducted with an aim of finding out the inferior and superior vestibular nerve involvement through cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and Caloric test results respectively in individuals with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorders. Total 26 participants who fulfilled the criteria of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder participated for the study. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials results showed absence of responses from most of the subjects also caloric responses showed bilateral hypofunctional responses in most of the participants, which is suggestive of involvement of both the inferior as well as superior vestibular nerve in individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders. Additionally there was no association between the pattern and degree of hearing loss to caloric test results and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials results findings.

  15. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Benjamin J; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Giddings, Neil A; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R; Demakas, John J; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2009-12-18

    Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities.We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  16. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbanks Robert K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities. We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  17. Long-term mobile phone use and the risk of vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas grow in the region within the brain where most of the energy by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from using mobile phones is absorbed. The authors used 2 Danish nationwide cohort studies, one a study of all adult Danes subscribing for a mobile phone in 1995 or earlier...... reported holding their mobile phone to the right ear. Vestibular schwannomas in long-term male subscribers were not of larger size than expected. Overall, no evidence was found that mobile phone use is related to the risk of vestibular schwannoma. Because of the usually slow growth of vestibular schwannoma...... and one on sociodemographic factors and cancer risk, and followed subjects included in both cohorts for occurrence of vestibular schwannoma up to 2006 inclusively. In this study including 2.9 million subjects, a long-term mobile phone subscription of =11 years was not related to an increased vestibular...

  18. Long-term mobile phone use and the risk of vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas grow in the region within the brain where most of the energy by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from using mobile phones is absorbed. The authors used 2 Danish nationwide cohort studies, one a study of all adult Danes subscribing for a mobile phone in 1995 or earlier...... and one on sociodemographic factors and cancer risk, and followed subjects included in both cohorts for occurrence of vestibular schwannoma up to 2006 inclusively. In this study including 2.9 million subjects, a long-term mobile phone subscription of ≥11 years was not related to an increased vestibular...... reported holding their mobile phone to the right ear. Vestibular schwannomas in long-term male subscribers were not of larger size than expected. Overall, no evidence was found that mobile phone use is related to the risk of vestibular schwannoma. Because of the usually slow growth of vestibular schwannoma...

  19. Betahistine in the treatment of tinnitus in patients with vestibular disorders Betaistina no tratamento do zumbido em pacientes com distúrbios vestibulares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Malavasi Ganança

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Betahistine is a medicine used to treat vestibular disorders that has also been used to treat tinnitus. AIM: To assess the effects of betahistine on tinnitus in patients with vestibular disorders. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Retrospective data were collected from patient records for individuals presenting with vestibular dysfunction and tinnitus. Patients included had received betahistine 48 mg/day and clinical outcomes were compared with a control group comprising individuals who were unable to receive betahistine due to gastritis, ulcers, pregnancy, asthma or hypersensitivity to the drug. Patients underwent control of any aggravating factors and also standard vestibular exercises as a basis for treatment. The intensity, frequency and duration of tinnitus were assessed on the first day of dosing and after 120 days of treatment. Clinical improvement was defined as a total or partial reduction of tinnitus after treatment. RESULTS: Clinical improvement was observed in 80/262 (30. 5% of patients treated with betahistine and 43/252 (17. 1% of control patients. Betahistine significantly (pA betaistina é um medicamento utilizado no tratamento de distúrbios da função vestibular, que também tem sido utilizado para tratar o zumbido. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da betaistina sobre o zumbido de pacientes com distúrbios vestibulares. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram coletados dados retrospectivos de pacientes com vestibulopatia e zumbido. Os pacientes incluídos receberam 48 mg/dia de betaistina ao dia e os resultados clínicos foram comparados com os de um grupo controle, que incluiu indivíduos impossibilitados de receber betaistina devido à gastrite, úlceras, gravidez, asma ou hipersensibilidade ao medicamento. Os pacientes realizaram controle de fatores agravantes e exercícios de reabilitação vestibular, como tratamento de base para a vestibulopatia. A intensidade, frequência e duração do zumbido foram avaliadas no primeiro dia e após 120 dias de

  20. A connection between neurovascular conflicts within the cerebellopontine angle and vestibular neuritis, a case controlled cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Loader, B.; Linauer, I.; Korkesch, S.; Krammer-Effenberger, I.; Zielinski, V.; Schibany, N.; Kaider, A.; Vyskocil, E.; Tscholakoff, D.; Franz, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This retrospective, observer blinded case-control study aims to compare the prevalence of neurovascular conflicts (NVCs) of the vestibulocochlear nerve and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in patients presenting with clinical signs of acute vestibular neuritis with and without subsequent objective vestibular function loss (VFL). 58 acute cases of clinically suspected acute vestibular neuritis were investigated with same day cranial MRI at a tertiary referral centre and c...

  1. Head Stabilization Measurements As a Potential Evaluation Tool for Comparison of Persons with TBI and Vestibular Dysfunction with Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Persons with TBI and Vestibular Dysfunction with Healty Controls 5a. Contract Number: 5b. Grant Number: R116 5c. Program Element Number: 5d...large percentage of persons with traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) incur some type of vestibular dysfunction requiring vestibular physical therapy. These...the group having a TBI did not show the same patterned motion as the control group but over time and with training, more closely resembled that of the

  2. Velocity dependence of vestibular information for postural control on tilting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Fay B; Kluzik, JoAnn; Hlavacka, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Vestibular information is known to be important for postural stability on tilting surfaces, but the relative importance of vestibular information across a wide range of surface tilt velocities is less clear. We compared how tilt velocity influences postural orientation and stability in nine subjects with bilateral vestibular loss and nine age-matched, control subjects. Subjects stood on a force platform that tilted 6 deg, toes-up at eight velocities (0.25 to 32 deg/s), with and without vision. Results showed that visual information effectively compensated for lack of vestibular information at all tilt velocities. However, with eyes closed, subjects with vestibular loss were most unstable within a critical tilt velocity range of 2 to 8 deg/s. Subjects with vestibular deficiency lost their balance in more than 90% of trials during the 4 deg/s condition, but never fell during slower tilts (0.25-1 deg/s) and fell only very rarely during faster tilts (16-32 deg/s). At the critical velocity range in which falls occurred, the body center of mass stayed aligned with respect to the surface, onset of ankle dorsiflexion was delayed, and there was delayed or absent gastrocnemius inhibition, suggesting that subjects were attempting to actively align their upper bodies with respect to the moving surface instead of to gravity. Vestibular information may be critical for stability at velocities of 2 to 8 deg/s because postural sway above 2 deg/s may be too fast to elicit stabilizing responses through the graviceptive somatosensory system, and postural sway below 8 deg/s may be too slow for somatosensory-triggered responses or passive stabilization from trunk inertia.

  3. Functional Brain Activation in Response to a Clinical Vestibular Test Correlates with Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; DeDios, Yiri; Kofman, Igor S.; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain fMRI activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: Skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either a vestibulo-spinal reflex [saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)], or an ocular muscle response [utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)]. Research suggests that the skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for subjects than the high decibel tones required to elicit VEMPs. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of brain activity. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that pneumatically powered skull taps would elicit a similar pattern of brain activity as shown in previous studies. Our results provide the first evidence of using pneumatically powered skull taps to elicit vestibular activity inside the MRI scanner. A conjunction analysis revealed that skull taps elicit overlapping activation with auditory tone bursts in the canonical vestibular cortical regions. Further, our postural control assessments revealed that greater amplitude of brain activation in response to vestibular stimulation was associated with better balance control for both techniques. Additionally, we found that skull taps elicit more robust vestibular activity compared to auditory tone bursts, with less reported aversive effects, highlighting the utility of this approach for future clinical and basic science research. PMID:28344549

  4. The effects of the cerebral, cerebellar and vestibular systems on the head stabilization reflex.

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    Bademkiran, Fikret; Uludag, Burhanettin; Guler, Ayse; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-05-01

    The head stabilization reflex (HSR) is a brain stem reflex which appears in the neck muscles in response to sudden head position changes and brings the head to its previous position. The reflex mechanism has not been understood. The afferent fibers come from cervical muscle spindles, vestibular structures, and the accessory nerve, the efferents from the accessory nerve. In this study, we aim to investigate the roles of supraspinal neural structures and the vestibular system on the HSR. The patient group consisted of 86 patients (33 cerebral cortical lesion, 14 cerebellar syndrome and 39 vestibular inexcitability or hypoexcitability); the control group was composed of 32 healthy volunteers. Concentric needle electrodes were inserted into the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the accessory nerves were stimulated with the electrical stimulator. A reflex response of about 45-55 ms was obtained from the contralateral SCM muscle. 50 % of cases had bilateral loss whereas 37 % of cases with unilateral cerebellar lesions had an ipsilateral reflex loss. Bilateral HSR loss was detected in 84 % of cases with bilateral cerebellar lesions. Bilateral reflex loss was observed in 70 % of patients with unilateral cortical lesions and 94 % of those with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Ipsilateral HSR loss was observed in 55 % of cases with unilateral vestibular dysfunction. It was discovered that supraspinal structures and the vestibular system may have an excitatory effect on HSR. This effect may be lost in supra-segmental and vestibular dysfunctions. The localization value of HSR was found to be rather poor in our study.

  5. Avaliação do efeito da cafeína no teste vestibular Evaluation of the caffeine effect in the vestibular test

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    Lilian Felipe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Há controvérsias sobre a interferência da cafeína no teste vestibular. O café é a fonte mais rica em cafeína. Enquanto em alguns serviços os pacientes são orientados a suspender a ingestão de café 24 a 48 horas antes da realização do teste, outros não consideram necessária a suspensão da ingestão dessa bebida. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da cafeína no resultado do teste vestibular. FORMA DE ESTUDO: clínico com coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo comparativo, transversal, pareado. O teste vestibular foi realizado em duplicidade, com intervalo máximo de cinco dias entre um e outro exame. No primeiro teste, os pacientes foram orientados a não ingerir café 24 horas antes do exame; no segundo teste, os pacientes foram orientados a beber café como de costume. Todos os participantes tinham indicação clínica de se submeter ao teste vestibular e tinham o hábito de tomar café. RESULTADOS: Participaram do estudo 19 mulheres com idade média de 49,5 anos. O consumo médio de café foi de três xícaras por dia. As queixas de ansiedade e cefaléia foram associadas ao teste realizado com suspensão do café. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante nos resultados dos exames realizados com e sem ingestão de café. CONCLUSÃO: A ingestão moderada de café não interferiu no resultado do teste vestibular. Considerando ser recomendável que o paciente esteja tranqüilo ao se submeter ao teste vestibular e que a meia-vida da cafeína é de apenas seis horas, sugerimos que a orientação para a suspensão súbita e completa da ingestão moderada de café antes do teste vestibular para os indivíduos habituados à ingestão diária seja reavaliada.Exist controversy about the interference of the caffeine in the vestibular test. Coffee is the richest source of caffeine. While in some services, the patients were orient to suspend the ingestion of caffeine 24 to 48 hours before the vestibular test, other not consider

  6. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-04-01

    Objetivo: O objetivo deste relato de caso é descrever uma causa incomum de vestibulopatia periférica associada à perda auditiva unilateral em paciente idoso pós- cateterismo de urgência.Relato de caso: Paciente do gênero masculino, 82 anos, submetido à correção de aneurisma roto de aorta abdominal, no intra-operatório sofreu infarto agudo do miocárdio necessitando de angioplastia primária. Após alta hospitalar refere queixa de hipoacusia acentuada à direita e vertigem incapacitante, sem sinais neurológicos focais. Ao exame clínico otorrinolaringológico apresentava: Teste de Weber lateralizado para a esquerda, nistagmo espontâneo para a esquerda , marcha oscilante, leve disbasia e ataxia, índex-nariz e diadococinesia normais, Teste de Romberg com oscilação sem queda e Fukuda com desvio lateral para a direita. O exame audiométrico evidenciava anacusia à direita e perda neurossensorial à esquerda em agudos, arreflexia vestibular à direita na prova calórica e, na tomografia computadorizada dos ossos temporais e tronco-encefálico, presença de haste metálica atravessando o osso temporal direito, a partir da veia jugular interna e bulbo jugular, atravessando os canais semicirculares posterior, superior e vestíbulo, projetando-se em lobo temporal. O diagnóstico radiológico foi lesão traumática por guia endovascular metálico durante cateterismo de urgência e a conduta, considerando que o paciente não havia compensado o equilíbrio, foi reabilitação vestibular.Conclusão: Queixas de tontura no paciente idoso devem ser criteriosamente avaliadas diante do seu histórico clínico patológico pois os antecedentes de doenças e tratamentos prévios, em geral, direcionam as hipóteses diagnósticas porém podem trazer alterações inesperadas.

  7. Temporoparietal encoding of space and time during vestibular-guided orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, Diego; Quadir, Shamim; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Malhotra, Paresh A; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Seemungal, Barry M

    2016-02-01

    When we walk in our environment, we readily determine our travelled distance and location using visual cues. In the dark, estimating travelled distance uses a combination of somatosensory and vestibular (i.e., inertial) cues. The observed inability of patients with complete peripheral vestibular failure to update their angular travelled distance during active or passive turns in the dark implies a privileged role for vestibular cues during human angular orientation. As vestibular signals only provide inertial cues of self-motion (e.g., velocity, °/s), the brain must convert motion information to distance information (a process called 'path integration') to maintain our spatial orientation during self-motion in the dark. It is unknown, however, what brain areas are involved in converting vestibular-motion signals to those that enable such vestibular-spatial orientation. Hence, using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping techniques, we explored the effect of acute right hemisphere lesions in 18 patients on perceived angular position, velocity and motion duration during whole-body angular rotations in the dark. First, compared to healthy controls' spatial orientation performance, we found that of the 18 acute stroke patients tested, only the four patients with damage to the temporoparietal junction showed impaired spatial orientation performance for leftward (contralesional) compared to rightward (ipsilesional) rotations. Second, only patients with temporoparietal junction damage showed a congruent underestimation in both their travelled distance (perceived as shorter) and motion duration (perceived as briefer) for leftward compared to rightward rotations. All 18 lesion patients tested showed normal self-motion perception. These data suggest that the cerebral cortical regions mediating vestibular-motion ('am I moving?') and vestibular-spatial perception ('where am I?') are distinct. Furthermore, the congruent contralesional deficit in time (motion duration) and position

  8. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate

  9. [Neuronal network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  10. Plasticity of the histamine H3 receptors after acute vestibular lesion in the adult cat.

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    Brahim eTighilet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN many molecular and neurochemical mechanisms underlie the neurophysiological reorganizations occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN complex, as well as the behavioral recovery process. As a key regulator, the histaminergic system appears to be a likely candidate because drugs interfering with histamine (HA neurotransmission facilitate behavioral recovery after vestibular lesion. This study aimed at analyzing the post-lesion changes of the histaminergic system by quantifying binding to histamine H3 receptors (H3R (mediating namely histamine autoinhibition using a histamine H3 receptor agonist ([3H]N-α−methylhistamine. Experiments were done in brain sections of control cats (N=6 and cats submitted to UVN and killed 1 (N=6 or 3 (N=6 weeks after the lesion.UVN induced a bilateral decrease in binding density of the agonist [3H]-Nα−Methylhistamine to H3R in the tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN at one week postlesion, with a predominant down-regulation in the ipsilateral TMN. The bilateral decrease remained at the three weeks survival time and became symmetric. Concerning brainstem structures, binding density in the VN, the prepositus hypoglossi, the subdivisions of the inferior olive (IO decreased unilaterally on the ipsilateral side at one week and bilaterally 3 weeks after UVN. Similar changes were observed in the subdivisions of the solitary nucleus (SN only one week after the lesion. These findings indicate vestibular lesion induces plasticity of the histamine H3R, which could contribute to vestibular function recovery.

  11. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

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    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  12. The vestibular implant: frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Nguyen, T A Khoa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Cavuscens, Samuel; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Stokroos, Robert; Kingma, Herman; Perez-Fornos, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR) elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency. Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in seven patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the "natural" VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies. A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the "natural" VOR. Other characteristics of the (e)VOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry) showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited) frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the "normal" vestibular system.

  13. Reliability-Based Weighting of Visual and Vestibular Cues in Displacement Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Horst, Arjan C; Koppen, Mathieu; Selen, Luc P J; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-01-01

    When navigating through the environment, our brain needs to infer how far we move and in which direction we are heading. In this estimation process, the brain may rely on multiple sensory modalities, including the visual and vestibular systems. Previous research has mainly focused on heading estimation, showing that sensory cues are combined by weighting them in proportion to their reliability, consistent with statistically optimal integration. But while heading estimation could improve with the ongoing motion, due to the constant flow of information, the estimate of how far we move requires the integration of sensory information across the whole displacement. In this study, we investigate whether the brain optimally combines visual and vestibular information during a displacement estimation task, even if their reliability varies from trial to trial. Participants were seated on a linear sled, immersed in a stereoscopic virtual reality environment. They were subjected to a passive linear motion involving visual and vestibular cues with different levels of visual coherence to change relative cue reliability and with cue discrepancies to test relative cue weighting. Participants performed a two-interval two-alternative forced-choice task, indicating which of two sequentially perceived displacements was larger. Our results show that humans adapt their weighting of visual and vestibular information from trial to trial in proportion to their reliability. These results provide evidence that humans optimally integrate visual and vestibular information in order to estimate their body displacement.

  14. Central adaptation to repeated galvanic vestibular stimulation: implications for pre-flight astronaut training.

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    Valentina Dilda

    Full Text Available Healthy subjects (N = 10 were exposed to 10-min cumulative pseudorandom bilateral bipolar Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS on a weekly basis for 12 weeks (120 min total exposure. During each trial subjects performed computerized dynamic posturography and eye movements were measured using digital video-oculography. Follow up tests were conducted 6 weeks and 6 months after the 12-week adaptation period. Postural performance was significantly impaired during GVS at first exposure, but recovered to baseline over a period of 7-8 weeks (70-80 min GVS exposure. This postural recovery was maintained 6 months after adaptation. In contrast, the roll vestibulo-ocular reflex response to GVS was not attenuated by repeated exposure. This suggests that GVS adaptation did not occur at the vestibular end-organs or involve changes in low-level (brainstem-mediated vestibulo-ocular or vestibulo-spinal reflexes. Faced with unreliable vestibular input, the cerebellum reweighted sensory input to emphasize veridical extra-vestibular information, such as somatosensation, vision and visceral stretch receptors, to regain postural function. After a period of recovery subjects exhibited dual adaption and the ability to rapidly switch between the perturbed (GVS and natural vestibular state for up to 6 months.

  15. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders.

  16. Quality of life questionnaire application in patients before and after vestibular rehabilitation

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    Nishino, Lucia Kazuko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conventional vestibular tests are not efficient instruments to evaluate the level of commitment in the life quality of a patient with dizziness. The quality of life questionnaire specific for dizziness, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, was translated and validated into Portuguese intending to get over this difficulty in quantifying the vertiginous patient symptoms. Objective: This study aims at comparing the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory results before and after personalized vestibular rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with chronic vertigo from benign paroxist positional vertigo and chronic vertigo from other causes. Method: Retrospective study of 30 medical records; all of which were submitted to the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory before and after the personalized vestibular rehabilitation treatment. Results: In the total scores average of vestibular pre-rehabilitation, the benign paroxist positional vertigo had a score of 47.93±24.46 and the chronic vertigo for other causes of 54.40±20.97. At discharge, the benign paroxist positional vertigo scores average was of 6.13±7.22 and in the chronic vertigo from other causes, the scores average was of 26.13±20.51. Conclusion: The commitment of the life quality of individuals with dizziness, both for chronic vertigo from other causes and benign paroxist positional vertigo, was very similar, confirming an important commitment. The vestibular rehabilitation effect for both cases was also efficient and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory was an efficient instrument to evaluate the vertiginous case evolution.

  17. Modeling Human Control of Self-Motion Direction With Optic Flow and Vestibular Motion.

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    Zaal, Peter M T; Nieuwenhuizen, Frank M; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of visual and motion stimuli on the manual control of one's direction of self-motion. In a flight simulator, subjects conducted an active target-following disturbance-rejection task, using a compensatory display. Simulating a vehicular control task, the direction of vehicular motion was shown on the outside visual display in two ways: an explicit presentation using a symbol and an implicit presentation, namely, through the focus of radial outflow that emerges from optic flow. In addition, the effects of the relative strength of congruent vestibular motion cues were investigated. The dynamic properties of human visual and vestibular motion perception paths were modeled using a control-theoretical approach. As expected, improved tracking performance was found for the configurations that explicitly showed the direction of self-motion. The human visual time delay increased with approximately 150 ms for the optic flow conditions, relative to explicit presentations. Vestibular motion, providing higher order information on the direction of self-motion, allowed subjects to partially compensate for this visual perception delay, improving performance. Parameter estimates of the operator control model show that, with vestibular motion, the visual feedback becomes stronger, indicating that operators are more confident to act on optic flow information when congruent vestibular motion cues are present.

  18. Effects of modafinil on vestibular function during 24 hour sleep deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Hao; XIE Sujiang; JIA Hongbo; WEI Sihuang; JING Baisheng

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of modafinil,a new wake-promoting agent,on vestibular function during 24 h sleep deprivation(SD)so as to provide experimental evidence for the rational use of this drug among air crew.Eight young,healthy male volunteers were exposed to two 24 h periods of continuous wakefulness during the crossover experiment.Initially,200 mg dose of modafinil was given.and one week later,a matching placebo was administered.The SD time started from 08:00 of the first day to 08:00 of the second day.Drugs were given at 0:00 on the second day.Vestibular function was tested at 21:00 on the first day and 1,3,5,7 h after drug administration.The accuracy of saccade tracking and gains in visual-vestibular optokinetic reflex(VVOR)and optokinetic nystagmus(OKN)in the placebo group decreased during 24 h SD,especially at 01:00-05:00 on the second day,while OKN gains in the modafinil group increased significantly.There were no significant difierences in the other vestibular functional indices between the modafinil group and placebo group.The 24 h SD can influence vestibular function to a certain degree,but modafinil may improve OKN.

  19. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas and their clinical significance

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    Pandey Rakesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective was to determine the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas as well as to determine predictive factors for estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity. Materials and methods The study included 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas operated from January 2006 to June 2009. The clinical details were noted from the medical case files. Formaldehyde-fixed parafiin-embedded archival vestibular schwannomas specimens were used for the immunohistochemical assessment of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Results Neither estrogen nor progesterone receptors could be detected in any of our cases by means of well known immunohistochemical method using well documented monoclonal antibodies. In the control specimens, a strongly positive reaction could be seen. Conclusion No estrogen and progesterone receptor could be found in any of our 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas. Hence our study does not support a causative role of estrogen and progesterone in the growth of vestibular schwannoma as well as hormonal manipulation in the treatment of this tumor.

  20. Effect of vestibular stimulation on auditory and visual reaction time in relation to stress

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    Archana Rajagopalan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to provide scientific evidence and for beneficial effects of vestibular stimulation for the management of stress-induced changes in auditory and visual reaction time (RT. A total of 240 healthy college students of the age group of 18-24 of either gender were a part of this research after obtaining written consent from them. RT for right and left response was measured for two auditory stimuli (low and high pitch and visual stimuli (red and green were recorded. A significant decrease in the visual RT for green light and red light was observed and stress-induced changes was effectively prevented followed by vestibular stimulation. Auditory RT for high pitch right and left response was significantly decreased and stress-induced changes was effectively prevented followed by vestibular stimulation. Vestibular stimulation is effective in boosting auditory and visual RT and preventing stress-induced changes in RT in males and females. We recommend incorporation of vestibular stimulation by swinging in our lifestyle for improving cognitive functions.

  1. Improvement of vestibular compensation by Levo-sulpiride in acute unilateral labyrinthine dysfunction.

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    Zanetti, D; Civiero, N; Balzanelli, C; Tonini, M; Antonelli, A R

    2004-04-01

    L-sulpiride is the levorotatory enantiomer of sulpiride, a neuroleptic of the family of benzamide derivatives; it has a characteristic antagonist effect on central DA2 dopaminergic receptors and dopamine DA1 "autoreceptors". Its efficacy in the symptomatic control of acute vertigo spells has been recognized, apart from its well-known antiemetic, antidyspeptic and anti-depressant properties, at high dosages. To establish objective parameters of the results of its clinical application, a randomized prospective study was started comparing the effects of the drug in a group of 87 patients with vertigo of peripheral origin, with those in a control group treated with other vestibular suppressants. The drug was administered via the intravenous route, 25 mg t.i.d., for the first 3 days, then by oral administration, with the same schedule and dosage, for a further 7 days. After clinical evaluation of vestibular signs and symptoms, electronystagmographic recordings of rotatory tests were obtained, at admission and were then controlled after 6 months. A subjective Visual Analogue Scale was also delivered daily to the patients in order to monitor symptomatic improvements. When compared to conventional treatments, L-sulpiride appeared to induce a statistically significant faster recovery in unilateral vestibular lesions. An unexpected favourable outcome of treatment was the facilitation of spontaneous vestibular compensation, in terms of lesser residual labyrinthine dysfunction and reduction of recurrent vertigo attacks during the 6 months follow-up. The mechanisms of action of the drug and its interaction with the vestibular system are discussed.

  2. Vestibular signal processing in a subject with somatosensory deafferentation: The case of sitting posture

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    Teasdale Normand

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vestibular system of the inner ear provides information about head translation/rotation in space and about the orientation of the head with respect to the gravitoinertial vector. It also largely contributes to the control of posture through vestibulospinal pathways. Testing an individual severely deprived of somatosensory information below the nose, we investigated if equilibrium can be maintained while seated on the sole basis of this information. Results Although she was unstable, the deafferented subject (DS was able to remain seated with the eyes closed in the absence of feet, arm and back supports. However, with the head unconsciously rotated towards the left or right shoulder, the DS's instability markedly increased. Small electrical stimulations of the vestibular apparatus produced large body tilts in the DS contrary to control subjects who did not show clear postural responses to the stimulations. Conclusion The results of the present experiment show that in the lack of vision and somatosensory information, vestibular signal processing allows the maintenance of an active sitting posture (i.e. without back or side rests. When head orientation changes with respect to the trunk, in the absence of vision, the lack of cervical information prevents the transformation of the head-centered vestibular information into a trunk-centered frame of reference of body motion. For the normal subjects, this latter frame of reference enables proper postural adjustments through vestibular signal processing, irrespectively of the orientation of the head with respect to the trunk.

  3. Up, Down, Near, Far: An Online Vestibular Contribution to Distance Judgement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Kokkinara, Elena; Csépe, Valéria; Swapp, David; Haggard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Whether a visual stimulus seems near or far away depends partly on its vertical elevation. Contrasting theories suggest either that perception of distance could vary with elevation, because of memory of previous upwards efforts in climbing to overcome gravity, or because of fear of falling associated with the downwards direction. The vestibular system provides a fundamental signal for the downward direction of gravity, but the relation between this signal and depth perception remains unexplored. Here we report an experiment on vestibular contributions to depth perception, using Virtual Reality. We asked participants to judge the absolute distance of an object presented on a plane at different elevations during brief artificial vestibular inputs. Relative to distance estimates collected with the object at the level of horizon, participants tended to overestimate distances when the object was presented above the level of horizon and the head was tilted upward and underestimate them when the object was presented below the level of horizon. Interestingly, adding artificial vestibular inputs strengthened these distance biases, showing that online multisensory signals, and not only stored information, contribute to such distance illusions. Our results support the gravity theory of depth perception, and show that vestibular signals make an on-line contribution to the perception of effort, and thus of distance. PMID:28085939

  4. Vestibular schwannoma in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-03-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal MRI as a screening method. Of the 295 patients with SSNHL, VS was found in 12 (4%). All patients had intrameatal or small to medium-sized tumors. There were three cases with SSNHL in one ear and an incidental finding of intracanalicular VS in the contralateral ear. There were four cases of VS that showed good recovery from SSNHL with corticosteroid treatment. There were two cases that mimicked labyrinthitis with hearing loss and vertigo. A greater number of cases than expected of VS were detected in patients with SSNHL, as a result of increasing widespread use of MRI. Various unusual findings in these patients were identified. MRI would seem to be mandatory in all cases of SSNHL.

  5. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  6. Functional testing of the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eRamat

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The experimental assessment of the vestibulo-ocular-reflex (VOR gain provides an objective and quantitative measure of VOR performance which is nonetheless difficult to correlate with its efficiency in everyday living conditions. We developed the Head Impulse Testing Device (HITD based on an inertial sensing system allowing to investigate the functional performance of the VOR by testing its gaze stabilization ability in response to head impulses at different head angular accelerations. HITD results on a population of 39 vestibular patients were compared to those of 22 controls. Overall the sensitivity of the HITD was 92% against the results of the clinical head impulse test and 83% against the clinical diagnosis, while the specificity was 58% against the clinical head impulse test and 83% against the diagnosis. The HITD appears to be a very promising tool for detecting abnormal VOR performance while providing information on the functional performance of the rotational VOR. As compared to the usual testing devices the HITD tests higher frequencies and accelerations that characterize head movements in everyday life activities and provides a functional assessment that is more likely to be related to the subject’s self-feeling.

  7. Socio-demographic distribution of vestibular schwannomas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stepanidis, Karen; Kessel, Marie; Caye-Thomasen, Per;

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are diagnosed less frequently in the remote parts of Denmark, whereas the diagnostic age and tumor size is the same across the different socio-demographic areas of Denmark. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether VSs are diagnosed equally often in different socio-demographic...... of socio-demographic areas elaborated by Demarks Statistic. RESULTS: The mean national incidence increased almost linearly over the time period from 6.1 per million per year in the first period from 1976 to 1984, to 22.1 per million per year in the last period from 2003 to 2012. There was a lower incidence...... at the end of the period in the remote areas compared with the other socio-demographic areas (1976-1984, p = 0.05 and 2003-2011, p = 0.001). The mean age at diagnosis increased during the period, from 52.6 years in the first period to 58.6 years in the last period. There was no significant difference...

  8. Visuo-vestibular interaction in the reconstruction of travelled trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, R J V; Berthoz, A

    2004-01-01

    We recently published a study of the reconstruction of passively travelled trajectories from optic flow. Perception was prone to illusions in a number of conditions, and was not always veridical in the others. Part of the illusionary reconstructed trajectories could be explained by assuming that subjects base their reconstruction on the ego-motion percept built during the stimulus' initial moments. In the current paper, we test this hypothesis using a novel paradigm: if the final reconstruction is governed by the initial percept, providing additional, extra-retinal information that modifies the initial percept should predictably alter the final reconstruction. The extra-retinal stimulus was tuned to supplement the information that was under-represented or ambiguous in the optic flow; the subjects were physically displaced or rotated at the onset of the visual stimulus. A highly asymmetric velocity profile (high acceleration, very low deceleration) was used. Subjects were required to guide an input device (in the form of a model vehicle; we measured position and orientation) along the perceived trajectory. We show for the first time that a vestibular stimulus of short duration can influence the perception of a much longer-lasting visual stimulus. Perception of the ego-motion translation component in the visual stimulus was improved by a linear physical displacement, perception of the ego-motion rotation component by a physical rotation. This led to a more veridical reconstruction in some conditions, but to a less veridical reconstruction in other conditions.

  9. Ocular Motor Function in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Amir Hossein Ghazizadeh Hashemi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with bilateral weakness (BW have many difficulties in gaze stability that interfere with their normal function. The aim of this study was to evaluate ocular motor functions in patients with BW to better understand the problem of gaze instability in these patients.   Materials and Methods: Patients were referred from the Otolaryngology Department for Vestibular Assessment to our clinic between November 2014 and March 2015. We assessed ocular motor function (gaze, saccade, and smooth pursuit in patients over the age of 18 years with BW, as verified by a caloric test.   Results: Seventy-eight patients completed all the tests. The mean age of patients was 51.9 (±15.9 years, and 47 (60% were female. Abnormal results were found in five (6.4%, 32 (41%, and seven (9% patients with respect to gaze, smooth pursuit, and saccade, respectively. There were positive but relatively weak relationships between age and ocular motor results.   Conclusion:  Patients with BW suffer from dizziness and unsteadiness. These patients have abnormal function in ocular motor (especially smooth pursuit tests. The ocular motor dysfunction is responsible for gaze instability in static positions such as standing.

  10. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in miniature pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Shi; Yan Zhang; Ya Li; Shiwei Qiu; Shili Zhang; Yaohan Li; Na Yuan; Yuehua Qiao; Shiming Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To report detection of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in the miniature pig. Methods:Potentials evoked by 1000 Hz tone bursts were recorded from neck extensor muscles and the masseter muscles in normal adult Bama miniature pigs anesthetized with 3%pentobarbital sodium and Carbachol II. Results:The latency of the first positive wave P from neck extensor muscles was 7.65 ± 0.64 ms, with an amplitude of 1.66 ± 0.34 uv and a rate of successful induction of 75%at 80 dB SPL. The latency of potentials evoked from the masseter muscles was 7.60 ± 0.78 ms, with an amplitude of 1.31 ± 0.28 uv and a rate successful induction of 66%at 80 dB SPL. Conclusion:The latencies and thresholds of VEMPs recorded from the neck extensor muscle and the masseter muscle appear to be comparable in normal adult Bama miniature pigs, although the amplitude recorded from the neck extensor muscle seems to be higher than that from the masseter muscle. However, because of their usually relatively superficial and easily accessible location, as well as their large volume and strong contractions, masseter muscles may be better target muscles for recording myogenic potentials.

  11. Results achieved in the treatment of patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freigang, Bernd; Rudolf, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Personal experience gathered with the treatment of 264 vestibular schwannoma (VS) at the Magdeburg University ENT Hospital is analysed. ABR Audiometry is useful as a screening, even though it yielded false-negative values in 12.7% (n = 33) for intrameatal VS and 16.9% for all VS, despite accurate evaluation. Latency increases of Waves I, III and V and their intraaural comparison exhibited a statistically significant difference for the VS levels proposed by TOS. The mean of intrameatal VS too was found to have longer latencies compared with the normal-hearing ears of the patients. In the individual case, with threshold hearing normal, anamnestic findings as well as otoneurological evidence provide an early indication for enhanced MRI, CISS imaging, or individual 3D reconstruction of the pontocerebellar cisterna. Adopting intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve and the cochlea as well as the Pars acustica by means of far-field and near-field electrodes, a good facial 'mobility' was achieved in 95.3%, and a useful audition (AAO-HNS Types A and B) in 60%. Monitoring is beneficial as it enhances the reliability and improves the subtle preparation during surgery. The power of hearing improved postoperatively within six months and remained at a good level over two years. From our perspective, otorhinolaryngologists are the right specialists to attend to VS.

  12. [Changes in taste ability in patients with vestibular schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessert, P; Grüttner, C; van Ewijk, R; Haxel, B

    2014-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are rare tumors that can cause different symptoms due to their anatomical relationship to the cranial nerves in the inner auditory canal. So far little data is known to the effect of VS on the somatosensory function of the intermediate nerve. This study aimed to investigate the taste function of patients suffering from single sided VS. Therefore the well validated psychophysical test "Taste Strips" has been used. 26 patients who consulted our outpatient clinic at a university hospital could be included in the study. All patients were asked carefully for their medical history. A full ENT examination was done. Each side of the anterior two thirds of the tongue was tested separately using the Taste Strips. The average age was 52 years with both gender equally represented. Throughout all age groups the taste score was lower on the tumor vs. the non affected side. Testing for significance just failed the level of 0.05. No correlation between tumor size and location of the tumor with the taste score could be detected. Only 2 patients complained of taste dysfunction. They had a taste score below the 10. percentile of their age group on tumor while normal scores on the non affected side. To sum up a decreased taste score on the tumor side vs. the non affected side could be confirmed. Only 8% of the patients complained of taste disturbance as a symptom. That supports the observation that taste is a whole mouth experience and dysfunction can be compensated.

  13. Long-term socio-economic impact of vestibular schwannoma for patients under observation and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2003-01-01

    This study describes and compares the long-term socio-economic impact for patients diagnosed with a vestibular schwannoma and either operated on or observed. A consecutive sample of patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma in Denmark and either operated on (748 patients) or observed by the w...

  14. Long-term socio-economic impact of vestibular schwannoma for patients under observation and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    This study describes and compares the long-term socio-economic impact for patients diagnosed with a vestibular schwannoma and either operated on or observed. A consecutive sample of patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma in Denmark and either operated on (748 patients) or observed...

  15. Potenciais miogênicos evocados vestibulares: metodologias de registro em homens e cobaias Vestibular evoked myogenic potential: recording methods in humans and guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cabral de Oliveira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O potencial miogênico evocado vestibular (VEMP é um teste clínico que avalia a função vestibular através de um reflexo vestíbulo-cervical inibitório captado nos músculos do corpo em resposta à estimulação acústica de alta intensidade. OBJETIVO: Verificar e analisar os diversos métodos de registro dos potenciais miogênicos evocados vestibulares no homem e em cobaias. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Realizou-se busca eletrônica nas bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO e COCHRANE. RESULTADOS: Foram verificadas divergências quanto às formas de registro dos potenciais miogênicos evocados vestibulares, relacionadas com os seguintes fatores: posição do paciente no momento do registro, tipo de estímulo sonoro utilizado (clicks ou tone bursts, parâmetros para a promediação dos estímulos (intensidade, freqüência, tempo de apresentação, filtros, ganho de amplificação das respostas e janelas para captação dos estímulos, tipo de fone utilizado e forma de apresentação dos estímulos (monoaural ou binaural, ipsi ou contralateral. CONCLUSÃO: Não existe consenso na literatura quanto ao melhor método de registro dos potenciais evocados miogênicos vestibulares, havendo necessidade de pesquisas mais específicas para comparação entre estes registros e a definição de um modelo padrão para a utilização na prática clínica.The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP is a clinical test that assess the vestibular function by means of an inhibitory vestibulo-neck reflex, recorded in body muscles in response to high intensity acoustic stimuli. AIM: To check and analyze the different methods used to record VEMPs in humans and in guinea pigs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We researched the following databases: MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO and COCHRANE. RESULTS: we noticed discrepancies in relation to the ways used to record the vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in relation to the following factors: patient position at the time of recording

  16. The Molecular Biology of Vestibular Schwannomas and Its Association with Hearing Loss: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Celis-Aguilar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the most common symptom in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS. In the past, compressive mechanisms caused by the tumoral mass and its growth have been regarded as the most likely causes of the hearing loss associated with VS. Interestingly, new evidence proposes molecular mechanisms as an explanation for such hearing loss. Among the molecular mechanisms proposed are methylation of TP73, negative expression of cyclin D1, expression of B7-H1, increased expression of the platelet-derived growth factor A, underexpression of PEX5L, RAD54B, and PSMAL, and overexpression of CEA. Many molecular mechanisms are involved in vestibular schwannoma development; we review some of these mechanisms with special emphasis on hearing loss associated with vestibular schwannoma.

  17. Mouse models for pendrin-associated loss of cochlear and vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangemann, Philine

    2013-01-01

    The human gene SLC26A4 and the mouse ortholog Slc26a4 code for the protein pendrin, which is an anion exchanger expressed in apical membranes of selected epithelia. In the inner ear, pendrin is expressed in the cochlea, the vestibular labyrinth and the endolymphatic sac. Loss-of-function and hypo-functional mutations cause an enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA) and sensorineural hearing loss. The relatively high prevalence of SLC26A4 mutations provides a strong imperative to develop rational interventions that delay, ameliorate or prevent pendrin-associated loss of cochlear and vestibular function. This review summarizes recent studies in mouse models that have been developed to delineate the role of pendrin in the physiology of hearing and balance and that have brought forward the concept that a temporally and spatially limited therapy may be sufficient to secure a life-time of normal hearing in children bearing mutations of SLC26A4.

  18. Short latency vestibular potentials evoked by electrical round window stimulation in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordure, P; Desmadryl, G; Uziel, A; Sans, A

    1989-11-01

    Short-latency potentials evoked by round window electrical stimulation were recorded in guinea pig by means of vertex-pinna skin electrodes using averaging techniques. Constant current shocks of 20 microseconds or 50 microseconds (25-300 microA) were used to evoke both auditory and vestibular brain-stem potentials. Pure auditory potentials, comparable to those evoked by acoustic clicks, were obtained by 20 microseconds electrical stimuli and disappeared during an auditory masking procedure made with a continuous white noise (110 dB SPL). Short latency potentials labeled V1, V2 and V3 were obtained by 50 microseconds electrical stimuli during an auditory masking procedure. This response disappeared after specific vestibular neurectomy, whereas the auditory response evoked by acoustic clicks or by electrical stimulation remained unchanged, suggesting that these latter potentials had a vestibular origin.

  19. Exercise gaming - a motivational approach for older adults with vestibular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smærup, Michael; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon;

    2016-01-01

    , but their knowledge and understanding of the training programme were insufficient. The participants asked for a greater variation in the exercises and asked for closer contact with the physiotherapist. When Mitii is used for vestibular rehabilitation, the system has some limitations. Conclusions The modest level...... understanding of the training programme with supplying information on the parts of the vestibular system addressed by the training. Implications for Rehabilitation Computer-assisted technologies should generate feedback on the quality of user performance and inform the patient of the relevance of the exercise......Purpose The purpose of the study was to identify possible reasons for a modest level of exercise compliance during computer-assisted training for vestibular rehabilitation. Method Qualitative design and analysis of 14 semi-structured interviews with seven participants before and after a period...

  20. Percentage of vestibular dysfunction in 361 elderly citizens responding to a newspaper advertisement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Michael Smærup; Grönvall, Erik; Mørch, Marianne Metz

    2011-01-01

    Percentage of Vestibular Dysfunction in 361 Elderly Citizens Responding to a Newspaper Advertisement. Brandt M, Grönvall E, Henriksen JJ, Larsen SB, Læssøe U, Mørch MM, Damsgaard EM Introduction Elderly patients with vestibular dysfunction have an eight-fold increased risk of falling compared...... advertisement. Method To recruit elderly citizens with dizziness we advertised in a local newspaper. A telephone interview with the respondents was done by a physiotherapist (PT). If the PT concluded that the reason for the dizziness could be vestibular dysfunction the citizen was invited to further...... Department, Aarhus University Hospital. Results 361 elderly citizens responded to the advertisement. 8 patients had alcohol problems, 14 had significantly impaired vision, 42 had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, 49 didn’t want to participate, 50 had evidence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV...

  1. Application of multivariate statistics to vestibular testing: discriminating between Meniere's disease and migraine associated dizziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitri, P. S.; Wall, C. 3rd; Oas, J. G.; Rauch, S. D.

    2001-01-01

    Meniere's disease (MD) and migraine associated dizziness (MAD) are two disorders that can have similar symptomatologies, but differ vastly in treatment. Vestibular testing is sometimes used to help differentiate between these disorders, but the inefficiency of a human interpreter analyzing a multitude of variables independently decreases its utility. Our hypothesis was that we could objectively discriminate between patients with MD and those with MAD using select variables from the vestibular test battery. Sinusoidal harmonic acceleration test variables were reduced to three vestibulo-ocular reflex physiologic parameters: gain, time constant, and asymmetry. A combination of these parameters plus a measurement of reduced vestibular response from caloric testing allowed us to achieve a joint classification rate of 91%, independent quadratic classification algorithm. Data from posturography were not useful for this type of differentiation. Overall, our classification function can be used as an unbiased assistant to discriminate between MD and MAD and gave us insight into the pathophysiologic differences between the two disorders.

  2. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  3. Reporting success rates in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas: are we accounting for the natural history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; Lau, Tsz; Vasan, Rohit; Danner, Christopher; Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry; Agazzi, Siviero

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is generally accepted as one of the best treatment options for vestibular schwannomas. We question whether growth control is an accurate measure of success in vestibular schwannoma treatment. We aim to clarify the success rate of stereotactic radiosurgery and adjust the reported results to the benign natural history of untreated tumors. All articles were taken from a PubMed search of the English literature from the years 2000-2011. Inclusion criteria were articles containing the number of patients treated, radiation technique, average tumor size, follow-up time, and percentage of tumors growing during follow-up. Data were extracted from 19 articles. Success rates were adjusted using published data that 17% to 30% of vestibular schwannomas grow. The average reported success rate for stereotactic radiosurgery across all articles was 95.5%. When considering 17% or 30% natural growth without intervention, the adjusted success rates became 78.2% and 86.9% respectively. These rates were obtained by applying the natural history growth percentages to any tumors not reported to be growing before radiosurgical intervention. Success in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas with stereotactic radiosurgery is often defined as lack of further growth. Recent data on the natural growth history of vestibular schwannomas raise the question of whether this is the best definition of success. We have identified a lack of continuity regarding the reporting of success and emphasize the importance of the clarification of the success of radiosurgery to make informed decisions regarding the best treatment options for vestibular schwannoma.

  4. The Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test of Vestibular Function—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S.; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A 100-Hz bone-conducted vibration applied to either mastoid induces instantaneously a predominantly horizontal nystagmus, with quick phases beating away from the affected side in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). The same stimulus in healthy asymptomatic subjects has little or no effect. This is skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN), and it is a useful, simple, non-invasive, robust indicator of asymmetry of vestibular function and the side of the vestibular loss. The nystagmus is precisely stimulus-locked: it starts with stimulation onset and stops at stimulation offset, with no post-stimulation reversal. It is sustained during long stimulus durations; it is reproducible; it beats in the same direction irrespective of which mastoid is stimulated; it shows little or no habituation; and it is permanent—even well-compensated UVL patients show SVIN. A SVIN is observed under Frenzel goggles or videonystagmoscopy and recorded under videonystagmography in absence of visual-fixation and strong sedative drugs. Stimulus frequency, location, and intensity modify the results, and a large variability in skull morphology between people can modify the stimulus. SVIN to 100 Hz mastoid stimulation is a robust response. We describe the optimum method of stimulation on the basis of the literature data and testing more than 18,500 patients. Recent neural evidence clarifies which vestibular receptors are stimulated, how they cause the nystagmus, and why the same vibration in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) causes a nystagmus beating toward the affected ear. This review focuses not only on the optimal parameters of the stimulus and response of UVL and SCD patients but also shows how other vestibular dysfunctions affect SVIN. We conclude that the presence of SVIN is a useful indicator of the asymmetry of vestibular function between the two ears, but in order to identify which is the affected ear, other information and careful clinical judgment are

  5. Labyrinthitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial labyrinthitis; Serous labyrinthitis; Neuronitis - vestibular; Vestibular neuronitis; Viral neurolabyrinthitis; Vestibular neuritis; Labyrinthitis - vertigo: Labyrinthitis - dizziness; Labyrinthitis - vertigo; Labyrinthitis - hearing loss

  6. Determine Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J.J.; Mulavara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface [1]. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training applications customized to each crewmember. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds [2]. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s long sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. Comparison of threshold of motion detection obtained from joystick data versus body sway suggests that perceptual thresholds were significantly lower. In the balance task, subjects stood on an unstable surface and had to maintain balance

  7. Rapid relief of thalamic pain syndrome induced by vestibular caloric stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Vilayanur S; McGeoch, Paul D; Williams, Lisa; Arcilla, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    Central post-stroke pain syndrome develops in a minority of patients following a stroke. The most usual causative lesion involves the lateral thalamus. The classic presentation is of severe, unrelenting pain that involves the entire contralateral half of the body. It is largely refractory to current treatments. We found that in two patients with this condition their pain was substantially improved by vestibular caloric stimulation, whereas placebo procedures had no effect. We proposed that this is because vestibular stimulation activates the posterior insula, which in turn inhibits the generation of pain in the anterior cingulate.

  8. Research progress of the relationship between abnormal vestibular reflexes and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Lin Yang; Jian Zhao; Jie Shao; Fei Wang; Xian-Chao Wei; Hai-Jian Ni; Ming Li

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is an agnogenic structural scoliosis occurring in adolescence, and the main diagnostic criteria is coronal Cobb angle >10°in total spine X-ray. Studies have shown that AIS may be associated with abnormal postural reflexes, vestibular system is an important component of postural reflexes and its mechanism in the occurrence and development of scoliosis has received wide attention in recent years. In the study, the research progress on the role of abnormal vestibular reflexes in the pathogenesis of AIS was mainly introduced to help the clinicians better understand the pathogenesis of AIS and provide new ideas for AIS study.

  9. Case Report of Vestibularly evoked Visual Hallucinations in a Patient with Cortical Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Ognyan I

    2016-08-01

    Previous work has shown that caloric vestibular stimulation may evoke elementary visual hallucinations in healthy humans, such as different colored lines or dots. Surprisingly, the present case report reveals that the same stimulation can evoke visual hallucinations in a patient with cortical blindness, but with fundamentally different characteristics. The visual hallucinations evoked were complex and came from daily life experiences. Moreover, they did not include other senses beyond vision. This case report suggests that in conditions of cerebral pathology, vestibular-visual interaction may stimulate hallucinogenic subcortical, or undamaged cortical structures, and arouse mechanisms that can generate visual images exclusively.

  10. The Intimate Relationship between Vestibular Migraine and Meniere Disease: A Review of Pathogenesis and Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan F. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM has only recently been recognized as a distinct disease entity. One reason is that its symptoms overlap greatly with those of other vestibular disorders, especially Meniere disease (MD. The pathophysiology of neither VM nor MD is entirely elucidated. However, there are many theories linking migraine to both disorders. We reviewed the current understanding of migraine, VM, and MD and described how VM and MD are similar or different from each other in terms of pathophysiology and presentation, including hypotheses that the two share a common etiology and/or are variants of the same disease.

  11. Effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and stimulation on hearing in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post-implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/s, with pulse frequency modulated from 48 to 222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5-10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ∼5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2-14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  12. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance in a Discordant Sensory Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, D. R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Layne, C. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges incurred when readapting to a gravitational environment. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training has been proposed as a countermeasure to improve locomotor performance during re-adaptation, and it is suggested that the benefits of SA training may be further enhanced by improving detection of weak sensory signals via mechanisms such as stochastic resonance when a non-zero level of stochastic white noise based electrical stimulation is applied to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of using SVS to improve short-term adaptation in a sensory discordant environment during performance of a locomotor task.

  13. Effects of physiotherapy on balance and unilateral vestibular hypofunction in vertiginous elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha Júnior,Paulo Roberto; Peres, Amanda da Silva; Garbi, Fernando Pereira; Frizzo,Ana Cláudia Figueiredo; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia

    2014-01-01

    Background: We aimed to analyze the effect of a physical therapy protocol on unilateral vestibular hypofunction and overall balance in elderly with vertigo. Methods: The study included nine subjects, four male subjects (68.5 ± 11.09 years old) and five females (72.4 ± 7.09 years old). It was used the performance-oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), to evaluate the balance and the Unterberger – Fukuda test for analysis of unilateral vestibular dysfunction through rotations and displacements of...

  14. Preliminary evidence of improved gaze stability following exercise in two children with vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Jennifer; Rine, Rose Marie

    2006-11-01

    Despite impaired gaze stability and reading in children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and vestibular hypofunction (VH), there are no reports of intervention. We examined the effect of visual-vestibular exercises in two children on dynamic visual acuity (DVA), critical print size (CPS) and reading acuity (RA) using an ABA design. Improvement in CPS and RA was seen in both subjects. DVA improved only in the subject with acquired versus congenital VH. These results suggest that although exercise improves reading acuity, age at the time of lesion affects the improvement of DVA in children with SNHL and BVH.

  15. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and the individual with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haybach, P J

    1994-01-01

    Individuals with chronic vestibular dysfunction may have unmet physiological or safety needs on a chronic basis. Their inability to fulfill the basic needs and progress to higher needs can lead to a patient population with many psychosocial problems. Very often such problems are ignored or unrecognized or are misdiagnosed, and treated inappropriately. This disruption in the individual's life can lead to an inability to progress as a human being. Nursing assessment and appropriate interventions should be developed to treat psychosocial problems in this patient population. The nursing profession should serve patients with vestibular dysfunction through direct care, teaching, counseling, support group facilitation, and research into appropriate interventions.

  16. Vestibular Perceptual Thresholds Increase above the Age of 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez Rey, María Carolina; Clark, Torin K.; Wang, Wei; Leeder, Tania; Bian, Yong; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M) ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation), inferior–superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation), and roll tilt. A large subset of this population (99 of 105) also performed a modified Romberg test of standing balance. Despite the relatively large population (54F/51M), we found no difference between thresholds of male and female subjects. After pooling across sex, we found that thresholds increased above the age of 40 for all five motion directions investigated. The data were best modeled by a two-segment age model that yielded a constant baseline below an age cutoff of about 40 and a threshold increase above the age cutoff. For all subjects who passed all conditions of the balance test, the baseline thresholds were 0.97°/s for yaw rotation, 0.66°/s for 1-Hz roll tilt, 0.35°/s for 0.2-Hz roll tilt, 0.58 cm/s for y-translation, and 1.24 cm/s for z-translation. As a percentage of the baseline, the fitted slopes (indicating the threshold increase each decade above the age cutoff) were 83% for z-translation, 56% for 1-Hz roll tilt, 46% for y-translation, 32% for 0.2-Hz roll tilt, and 15% for yaw rotation. Even taking age and other factors into consideration, we found a significant correlation of balance test failures with increasing roll-tilt thresholds.

  17. The caloric vestibular nystagmus during short lasting microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveld, W. J.; de Jong, H. A. A.; Kortschot, H. W.

    In human subjects the caloric vestibular test was conducted during parabolic flight. The ear irrigation was performed from 35 secs. till 5 secs. before the onset of microgravity. Nystagmography covered a 10-minutes period, including three parabolic manoeuvres of the aircraft. a. The slow phase velocity (SPV) of the caloric nystagmus increased proportionally with the value of the g-force. Introduction of microgravity induced an exponential decrease of the SPV decay. b. The nystagmus disappeared completely in microgravity, but SPV decay showed a specific time constant. c. The averaged time constant values of the caloric nystagmus SPV decay after sudden onset of microgravity and the averaged time constant of the SPV decay following a sudden stop after sustained rotation during 0-g appeared to be on the same level (10.2 s. and 10.6 s.). d. These two averaged time constant values obtained during shortlasting microgravity proved to be on a lower level than those time constants (15.5 secs.; 15.9 secs.) found in ground-based conditions. e. Because of the similarities in the characteristics of both SPV decay's and their accompanying time constants, a common working mechanism of cupular stimulation is likely. Most probably a fluid movement (or pressure) provokes a cupula deflexion followed by a cupula reflexion, either caused by a sudden stop after a sustained rotation or by a sudden onset of microgravity after g-load calorization. The present results support the Bárány convection theory with regard the endolymph stimulatory properties following the caloric test.

  18. VESTIBULAR PERCEPTUAL THRESHOLDS INCREASE ABOVE THE AGE OF 40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carolina Bermúdez Rey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in 105 healthy humans (54F/51M ranging from 18 to 80 years of age. Direction-recognition thresholds were measured using standard methods. The motion consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration at 0.2 Hz for roll tilt and 1.0 Hz for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis, inter-aural earth-horizontal translation (y-translation, inferior-superior earth-vertical translation (z-translation, and roll tilt. A large subset of this population (99 of 105 also performed a modified Romberg test of standing balance. Despite the relatively large population (54F/51M, we found no difference between thresholds of male and female subjects. After pooling across sex, we found that thresholds increased above the age of 40 for all five motion-directions investigated. The data were best modeled by a two-segment age model that yielded a constant baseline below an age cut-off of about 40 and a threshold increase above the age cut-off. For all subjects who passed all conditions of the balance test, the baseline thresholds were 0.97˚/s for yaw rotation, 0.66˚/s for 1Hz roll tilt, 0.35˚/s for 0.2Hz roll tilt, 0.58cm/s for y-translation, and 1.24cm/s for z-translation. As a percentage of the baseline, the fitted slopes (indicating the threshold increase each decade above the age cut-off were 83% for z-translation, 56% for 1Hz roll tilt, 46% for y-translation, 32% for 0.2Hz roll tilt, and 15% for yaw rotation. Even taking age and other factors into consideration, we found a significant correlation of balance test failures with increasing roll tilt thresholds.

  19. Morphological evidence for local microcircuits in rat vestibular maculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that intramacular, unmyelinated segments of vestibular afferent nerve fibers and their large afferent endings (calyces) on type I hair cells branch. Many of the branches (processes) contain vesicles and are presynaptic to type II hair cells, other processes, intramacular nerve fibers, and calyces. This study used serial section transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction methods to document the origins and distributions of presynaptic processes of afferents in the medial part of the adult rat utricular macula. The ultrastructural research focused on presynaptic processes whose origin and termination could be observed in a single micrograph. Results showed that calyces had 1) vesiculated, spine-like processes that invaginated type I cells and 2) other, elongate processes that ended on type II cells pre- as well as postsynaptically. Intramacular, unmyelinated segments of afferent nerve fibers gave origin to branches that were presynaptic to type II cells, calyces, calyceal processes, and other nerve fibers in the macula. Synapses with type II cells occurred opposite subsynaptic cisternae (C synapses); all other synapses were asymmetric. Vesicles were pleomorphic but were differentially distributed according to process origin. Small, clear-centered vesicles, approximately 40-60 nm in diameter, predominated in processes originating from afferent nerve fibers and basal parts of calyces. Larger vesicles approximately 70-120 nm in diameter having approximately 40-80 nm electron-opaque cores were dominant in processes originating from the necks of calyces. Results are interpreted to indicate the existence of a complex system of intrinsic feedforward (postsynaptic)-feedback (presynaptic) connections in a network of direct and local microcircuits. The morphological findings support the concept that maculae dynamically preprocess linear acceleratory information before its transmission to the central nervous system.

  20. General artificial neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeratu, Vasile; Schiopu, Paul; Degeratu, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the authors present a model of artificial neuron named the general artificial neuron. Depending on application this neuron can change self number of inputs, the type of inputs (from excitatory in inhibitory or vice versa), the synaptic weights, the threshold, the type of intensifying functions. It is achieved into optoelectronic technology. Also, into optoelectronic technology a model of general McCulloch-Pitts neuron is showed. The advantages of these neurons are very high because we have to solve different applications with the same neural network, achieved from these neurons, named general neural network.