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Sample records for vessel cladding separate

  1. Residual stresses in weld-clad reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, W.

    1975-01-01

    Cladding of low alloy nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel with austenitic stainless steel introduces in heavy section components high residual stresses which may cause microcrack formation in stress relief heat treatment. In this investigation an attempt is made to contribute to the solution of the stress relief cracking problem by determining quantitatively the magnitude and distribution of the residual stresses after cladding and after subsequent stress relief heat treatment. The distribution of residual stresses was determined on the basis of a combined experimental-mathematical procedure. Heavy section plate specimens of low alloy steel as base material were given an austenitic monolayer-cladding using the techniques of strip electrode and plasma hot wire cladding, respectively. A number of plates was stress relief heat treated. Starting from the cladded surface the thickness of the plates was reduced by subsequent removal of layers of material. The elastic strain reaction to the removal of each layer was measured by strain gauges. From the data obtained the biaxial residual stress distribution was computed as a function of thickness using relations which are derived for this particular case. In summary, lower residual stresses are caused by reduced thickness of the components. As the heat input, is decreased at identical base material thickness, the residual stresses are lowered also. The height of the tensile residual stress peak, however, remains approximataly constant. In stress relief annealed condition the residual stresses in the cladding are in tension; in the base material the residual stresses are negligibly small

  2. Study of cladding toughness in a pressure vessel steel water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulat, P.; Al Mundheri, M.

    1984-12-01

    Toughness of cladding and pressure vessel steel were determined at different temperatures in order to appreciate the participation of cladding resistance against crack propagation. The toughness of cladding is comparable with typical results on austenitic welds. The test on covered CT specimens shows the possibility of having a relatively good prevision of the behaviour of a coated structure

  3. Chemical methods for the use of niobium from pressure vessel cladding as a fast neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnani, Hari

    1986-08-01

    the steel samples from the cladding of a pressure vessel of an operating nuclear power reactor were obtained by scraping. The cladding material of the pressure vessel contained about 0.5 % niobium. It was desired to use the niobium as a dosimeter for estimating fast fluences at the pressure vessel. The weak radiation from the reaction product 93m Nb cannot be measured in the presence of other elements and interfering activities. A method was developed to separate niobium from other metals present; the concentration and yield of niobium were determined spectrophotometrically. The irradiated niobium was electrodeposited from aqueous solutions on copper discs. The amount of the deposited niobium was determined by a radiochemical method which makes use of its own radioactivity - measured with a liquid scintillation counter - and the known starting mass of niobium. It was possible to determine the deposited niobium masses (5 to 200 microgram) with a desired degree of accuracy. The absolute emission rate of X-rays could then be measured without any self-absorption or interference from other activities. The mass of niobium on each preparate and its X-ray emission rate, later on, were used as basic experimental data for the estimation of last neutron doses at the pressure vessel

  4. The influence of residual stresses on small through-clad cracks in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deLorenzi, H.G.; Schumacher, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of cladding residual stresses on the crack driving force for shallow cracks in the wall of a nuclear pressure vessel is investigated. Thermo-elastic-plastic analyses were carried out on long axial through-clad and sub-clad flaws on the inside of the vessel. The depth of the flaws were one and three times the cladding thickness, respectively. An analysis of a semielliptical axial through-clad flaw was also performed. It was assumed that the residual stresses arise due to the difference in the thermal expansion between the cladding and the base material during the cool down from stress relieving temperature to room temperature and due to the subsequent proof test before the vessel is put into service. The variation of the crack tip opening displacement during these loadings and during a subsequent thermal shock on the inside wall is described. The analyses for the long axial flaws suggest that the crack driving force is smaller for this type of flaw if the residual stresses in the cladding are taken into account than if one assumes that the cladding has no residual stresses. However, the analysis of the semielliptical flaw shows significantly different results. Here the crack driving force is higher than when the residual stresses are not taken into account and is maximum in the cladding at or near the clad/base material interface. This suggests that the crack would propagate along the clad/base material interface before it would penetrate deeper into the wall. The elastic-plastic behavior found in the analyses show that the cladding and the residual stresses in the cladding should be taken into acocunt when evaluating the severity of shallow surface cracks on the inside of a nuclear pressure vessel

  5. Fabrication of Separator Demonstration Facility process vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberst, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    The process vessel system is the central element in the Separator Development Facility (SDF). It houses the two major process components, i.e., the laser-beam folding optics and the separators pods. This major subsystem is the critical-path procurement for the SDF project. Details of the vaious parts of the process vessel are given

  6. The significance of cladding material on the integrity of nuclear pressure vessels with cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, Iradj.

    1989-05-01

    The significance of the austenitic cladding layer is reviewed in this literature study. The cladding induced stresses are generally not considered when evaluating the severity of flaws in reactor pressure vessels. It has been shown that this emission may be misleading. The necessity to consider the cladding induced stresses is also emphasized in the latest edition of ASME XI. Contrary to what is commonly assumed, the austenitic cladding displays a charpy V transition region with a low ductility. The interface material (HAZ) is the most influenced region by irradiation, and a transition shift of over 100 degree C may be expected. Because of the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and the base metal, cladding induced stresses can be set up. Even after PWHT, residual stresses of yield magnitude remain in the cladding and the HAZ at ambient temperature. The cladding induced stresses are temperature dependent and decrease as the temperature increases. The cladding induced stresses have a significant influence on small defects near the inside surface of a pressure vessel. For semielliptical surface cracks, the maximum CTOD-value along the crack front is not found at the deepest point, but in the cladding/base metal interface, having a magnitude three times higher than the value in the deepest point. It implies that this type of crack would propagate along the clad/base material interface. At some point in time, the crack will reach a geometry which may cause such a severe condition at the deepest point that it will start to grow in the depth direction as well. The initiation and growth behaviour of such cracks need to be investigated to be able to assess the significance of cladding on the integrity of nuclear pressure vessels. (author) (50 figs., 33 refs.)

  7. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  8. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  9. Effects of irradiation on strength and toughness of commercial LWR vessel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for stainless steel cladding to improve the fracture behavior of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel, particularly during certain overcooling transients, may depend greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and to fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the three-wire series-arc commercial method. Cladding was applied in three layers to provide adequate thickness for the fabrication of test specimens. The three-wire series-arc procedure, developed by Combustion Engineering, Inc., Chattanooga, Tennessee, produced a highly controlled weld chemistry, microstructure, and fracture properties in all three layers of the weld. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288 0 C to fluence levels of 2 and 5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). Postirradiation testing results show that, in the test temperature range from -125 to 288 0 C, the yield strength increased by 8 to 30%, ductility insignificantly increased, while there was almost no change in ultimate tensile strength. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during Charpy impact testing, due to the dominance of delta-ferrite failures at low temperatures. On the upper shelf, energy was reduced, due to irradiation exposure, 15 and 20%, while the lateral expansion was reduced 43 and 41%, at 2 and 5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV), respectively. In addition, radiation damage resulted in 13 and 28 0 C shifts of the Charpy impact transition temperature at the 41-J level for the low and high fluences, respectively

  10. J estimation scheme for cracks near the cladding of a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Faidy, C.

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of flaws near the cladding is an important issue in term of risk of fast fracture of main vessel. This study analyses different K estimation schemes. These different K values are compared with respect to the toughness of the material K IC for different crack situations; the results confirm the validity of the proposal in the French RCC M Code for the plastic zone correction

  11. A finite element elastic-plastic analysis of residual stresses due to clad welding in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalet, C.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1972-01-01

    Residual stresses due to weld deposited cladding on the inside of a typical Westinghouse pressurized water reactor vessel are investigated using an axisymmetric finite element elastic-plastic analysis. At the beginning of the analysis, one head of the weld cladding is assumed to lie on the reactor vessel wall at melting temperature (2600degF), but in the solid phase, while the vessel remains at 300degF (preheat temperature). All material properties used in the calculations are taken as temperature-dependent. Temperature profiles are obtained in the cladding and base metal at several discrete time intervals. These temperatures profiles are used to obtain the stress distribution for the same time intervals. Residual hoop tensile stresses of approximately 25 ksi were found to exist in the cladding. Peak tensile stresses in the hoop direction occur in the base metal near the cladding interface and reach a value of 60 ksi at the end of the transient. The tensile stress decreases very rapidly through the thickness of the base metal and becomes insignificant at about two inches from the inside surface. In order to lower residual stresses, a post-weld heat treatment is performed by uniformly heating the vessel to 1100degF, holding at that temperature for a specified period of time and then cooling slowly. The analysis shows that after this treatment, the peak stresses in the base metal decrease from 60 ksi to 32 ksi, while the stress in the cladding does not change significantly. (author)

  12. Modification of OCA-I for application to a reactor pressure vessel with cladding on the inner surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauter, A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Iskander, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    The computer code OCA-I calculates the temperature distribution through the walls of a cylinder during a thermal transient and then performs a two-dimensional linear-elastic fracture-mechanics analysis to obtain stress-intensity factors for long surface flaws, considering both pressure and thermal loads. The code has been particularly useful in evaluating flaw behavior in reactor pressure vessels during overcooling accidents, but it has not previously treated the stainless steel cladding on the inner surface of the vessel as a discrete region. Although the cladding is quite thin compared with the base material, the large difference in thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion between the two materials results in a significant effect of the cladding on stress-intensity factors for surface cracks. Thus, the cladding was recently included as a discrete region in OCA-I

  13. Reactor pressure vessel behaviour with a small crack in the cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Faidy, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on fracture mechanic analysis of a PWR reactor pressure vessel with a 3.5 mm embedded circumferential crack in the cladding under a small lost of cooling accident transient. Different RTNDT level and effect of irradiation on material properties are considered. The study compares simplified one-dimensional and two-dimensional elastic approach and complete elastoplastic approach using J-parameter. The results show: good correlation between the different elastic approaches, important conservatism of the elastic approach compared to elastoplastic approach, no influence of irradiated material properties. The behavior of a vessel with this type of crack is acceptable for RTNDT less than 135 deg and safety injection temperature of 60 deg

  14. Irradiation experiments on materials for core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Materials degradation due to the aging phenomena is one of the key issues for the life assessment and extension of the light water reactors (LWRs). This presentation introduces JAERI`s activities in the field of LWR material researches which utilize the research and testing reactors for irradiation experiments. The activities are including the material studies for the core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding. These materials are exposed to the neutron/gamma radiation and high temperature water environments so that it is worth reviewing their degradation phenomena as the continuum. Three topics are presented; For the core internal materials, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is the present major concern. At JAERI the effects of alloying elements on IASCC have been investigated through the post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in high-temperature water. The radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is still a significant issue for LWR safety, and at JAERI some factors affecting the embrittlement behavior such as a dose rate have been investigated. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel cladding is one of the limiting factors in fuel rod performance and an in-situ measurement of the corrosion rate in high-temperature water was performed in JMTR. To improve the reliability of experiments and to extent the applicability of experimental techniques, a mutual utilization of the technical achievements in those irradiation experiments is desired. (author)

  15. Sub-critical crack growth and clad integrity in a PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Sharples, J.K.

    1987-10-01

    The possibility of in-service growth of sub-critical defects in a PWR reactor pressure vessel to a critical size which could result in vessel failure was addressed in both the 1976 and 1982 reports of the Light Water Reactor Study Group (LWRSG), under the Chairmanship of Dr W Marshall (now Lord Marshall). An addendum to this report was published by UKAEA in April 1987. The section of the addendum dealing with subcritical crack growth and the related issue of integrity of the stainless steel cladding on the inner vessel surface is reproduced in this report. This section of the LWRSG addendum provides a review of the current status of fatigue crack growth and environmentally assisted cracking research for pressure vessel steels in light water reactor environments, as well as a review of developments in crack growth assessment methods. The review concludes that the alternative assessment procedures now being developed give a more realistic prediction of in service crack growth than the ASME Section XI Appendix A fatigue crack growth curves. (author)

  16. Estimation of residual stresses in reactor pressure vessel steel specimens clad by stainless steel strip electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmoeller, H.A.; Ruge, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The equations to determine a two-dimensional state of residual stress in flat laminated plates are well known from an earlier work by one of the authors. The derivation of these equations leads to a linear, inhomogeneous system of Volterra's integral equations of the second kind. To ascertain the unknown residual stresses from these equations it is necessary to cut down the thickness of the test plate layer by layer. This results in two-dimensional deformation reactions in the rest of the test plate, which can be measured, e.g. by a strain gauge rosette applied to the opposite side of the plate. The above-mentioned stress analysis has been transferred to 86mm thick reactor pressure vessel steel specimens (Type 22NiMoCr 37, DIN-No. 1.6751, similar to ASTM A508, Class 2) double-run clad by austenitic stainless steel strip electrodes (first layer 24/13 Cr-Ni steel, second layer 21/10 Cr-Ni steel). The overall dimensions of the clad specimens investigated amounted to 200 x 200 x (86+4.5+4.5)mm. At the surface of the austenitic cladding there is a two-dimensional tensile normal stress state of about 200N/mm 2 parallel, and about 300N/mm 2 transverse, to the welding direction. The maximum tensile stress was 8mm below the interface (fusion line, material transition) in the parent material. The stress distributions of the specimens investigated, determined on the basis of the above-mentioned combined experimental mathematical procedure, are presented graphically for the as-welded (as-delivered) and annealed (600 0 C/12hr) conditions. (author)

  17. Qualification of the LF-eddy current technique for the inspection of stainless steel cladding and applications on the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.; Becker, R.; Lucht, B.; Mohr, F.; Hartwig, K.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the re-inspection of the reactor pressure vessel of the nuclear power plant, the low-frequency-eddy current technique was implemented during the 1995 outage. Since then, this inspection technique and the testing equipment have seen steady further development. Therefore, optimization of the entire testing system, including qualification based on the 1995 results, was conducted. The eddy current testing system was designed as a ten-channel test system with sensors having separate transmitter and receiver coils. The first qualification of the testing technique and sensors was performed using a single-channel system; a second qualification was then carried out using the new testing electronics. The sensor design allows for a simultaneous detection of surface and subsurface flaws. This assumes that testing is performed simultaneously using four frequencies. Data analysis and evaluation are performed using a digital multi-frequency regression analysis technique The detection limits determined using this technique led to the definition of the following recording limits for testing in which the required signal-to-noise ratio of 6 dB was reliably observed. - Detection of surface connected longitudinal and transverse flaws: - notch, 3 mm deep and 10 mm long, for weave bead cladding; - notch, 2 mm deep and 20 mm long, for strip weld cladding. - Detection of embedded planar longitudinal and transverse flaws: - ligament of 7 mm for 8 mm clad thickness and 3 mm; - ligament for 4 mm clad thickness, notch starting at the carbon steel base material with a length of 20 mm. - Detection of embedded volumetric longitudinal and transverse flaws: - 3 mm diameter side-drilled hole (SDH) for 8 mm clad thickness; ligament, 4 mm. For 4 mm clad thickness: diameter, 2 mm SDH; ligament, 2 mm. All SDHs are 55 mm deep

  18. The analysis of optimal crack ratio for PWR pressure vessel cladding using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Susmikanti; Roziq Himawan; Jos Budi Sulistyo

    2018-01-01

    Several aspects of material failure have been investigated, especially for materials used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) cladding. One aspect that needs to be analyzed is the crack ratio. The crack ratio is a parameter that compares the depth of the gap to its width. The optimal value of the crack ratio reflects the material's resistance to the fracture. Fracture resistance of the material to fracture mechanics is indicated by the value of Stress Intensity Factor (SIF). This value can be obtained from a J-integral calculation that expresses the energy release rate. The detection of the crack ratio is conducted through the calculation of J-integral value. The Genetic Algorithm (GA) is one way to determine the optimal value for a problem. The purpose of this study is to analyze the possibility of fracture caused by crack. It was conducted by optimizing the crack ratio of AISI 308L and AISI 309L stainless steels using GA. Those materials are used for RPV cladding. The minimum crack ratio and J-Integral values were obtained for AISI 308L and AISI 309L. The SIF value was derived from the J-Integral calculation. The SIF value was then compared with the fracture toughness of those material. With the optimal crack ratio, it can be predicted that the material boundaries are protected from damaged events. It can be a reference material for the durability of a mechanical fracture event. (author)

  19. Stress intensity factors for underclad and through clad defects in a reactor pressure vessel submitted to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Menager, Y.; Chapuliot, S.

    2005-01-01

    CEA has launched important work on the development of a Stress Intensity Factors compendium for cracks in a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) taking into account the cladding. The work is performed by Finite Element analysis with a parametric mesh for two types of defects (under clad defect and through clad defect) and a wide range of geometrical and material parameters. In addition, an analytical stress solution for Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) on the RPV is proposed to allow a complete analytical estimation of the stress intensity factor K I for the PTS problem. The results are validated by comparison with a complete 3D finite element calculation performed on a complex and realistic case study

  20. Behavior of underclad cracks in reactor pressure vessels - evaluation of mechanical analyses with tests on cladded mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-01-01

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in the case of a severe transient at the end of the pressure vessel lifetime, because of the radiation embrittlement of the vessel material. Safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. EDF has started a program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and their interpretations. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Several specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C1 3 with stainless steel cladding, containing small artificial defects, are loaded in four-point bending. Experiments are performed at very low temperature to simulate radiation embrittlement and to obtain crack instability by cleavage fracture. Three tests have been performed on mock-ups containing a small underclad crack (with depth about 5 mn) and a fourth test has been performed on one mock-up with a larger crack (depth about 13 mn). In each case, crack instability occurred by cleavage fracture in the base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. Each test is interpreted using linear elastic analysis and elastic-plastic analysis by two-dimensional finite element computations. The fracture are conservatively predicted: the stress intensity factors deduced from the computations (K cp or K j ) are always greater than the base metal toughness. The comparison between the elastic analyses (including two plasticity corrections) and the elastic-plastic analyses shows that the elastic analyses are often conservative. The beneficial effect of the cladding in the analyses is also shown : the analyses are too conservative if the cladding effects is not taken into account. (authors). 9 figs., 6 tabs., 10 refs

  1. Effects of commercial cladding on the fracture behavior of pressure vessel steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Bolt, S.E.; Cook, K.V.; Corwin, W.R.; Oland, B.C.; Nanstad, R.K.; Robinson, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this program is to determine the effect, if any, of stainless steel cladding upon the propagation of small surface cracks subjected to stress states similar to those produced by thermal shock conditions. Preliminary results from testing at temperature 10 deg. C and 60 deg. C below NDT have shown that (1) a tough surface layer (cladding and/or HAZ) has arrested running flaws under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. (author)

  2. Microstructure evolution and liquid phase separation in Ta-O hypermonotectic melts during laser-cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *Hai-ou Yang,

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-layer Ta2O5-containing coating was successfully fabricated by laser cladding on a pure Ta substrate. The maximum thickness of such a coating is about 1.6 mm. The microstructure, phase constitution and elemental distribution in the coating were investigated. Results show that the coating has been metallurgically bonded to the Ta substrate and the microstructure exhibits a graded change along the deposition direction from Ta substrate to the top of coating. In the layers I and II of the graded coating, the microstructure evolution can be confirmed as a result of hypomonotectic reaction, but in the layer Ⅲ it was formed by hypermonotectic reaction. At the top of coating, the microstructure was still homogeneous although liquid phase separation had occurred,which can be attributed to the fact that the O-rich droplets do not have enough time to float at high cooling rate.The theoretical calculation results show that during laser cladding, the solidification time of the melt pool was less than 0.1 s, which fits well with the results from the experiment.

  3. Two separate thoroscopic segmentectomies with vessel sealing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyajima, Masahiro; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Higami, Tetsuya

    2012-04-01

    Total thoracoscopic segmentectomy is an appealing concept in terms of providing a parenchyma-sparing treatment. We describe our technique of two seperate total thoracoscopic segmentectomies by using a vessel sealing system (VSS). A 76-year old female with four gradually enlarging ground glass lesions on the right segment 2 (10 and 3 mm) and segment 6 (8 and 3 mm) was admitted to our institute for surgical diagnosis and treatment. Preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography showed that the A2 is composed of descending A2 and ascending A2, branch of V6 coursed to V2 and B1a originated from B2 and B1b from B3. Two separate segmentectomies were subsequently scheduled. Pulmonary vessel division was performed with VSS after proximal ligation. Intersegmental division by VSS and electrocautery was performed with the use of inflation-deflation demarcation line and the pulmonary veins along the intersegmental plane (V2a and V2c for segment 2 and V6b and V6c for segment 6) as guides to confirm the intersegmental plane after pulmonary artery and bronchial divisions. The intraoperative frozen-section examinations revealed adenocarcinoma in situ. Two separate segmentectomies were successfully completed, with a total operative time of 240 min and blood loss of 30 ml. VSS is a very useful and safe device for intersegmental division and pulmonary vessel division.

  4. CFD Modeling of a Multiphase Gravity Separator Vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Gautham

    2017-05-23

    The poster highlights a CFD study that incorporates a combined Eulerian multi-fluid multiphase and a Population Balance Model (PBM) to study the flow inside a typical multiphase gravity separator vessel (GSV) found in oil and gas industry. The simulations were performed using Ansys Fluent CFD package running on KAUST supercomputer, Shaheen. Also, a highlight of a scalability study is presented. The effect of I/O bottlenecks and using Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) for collective and independent parallel reading of case file is presented. This work is an outcome of a research collaboration on an Aramco project on Shaheen.

  5. CFD Modeling of a Multiphase Gravity Separator Vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Gautham; Khurram, Rooh Ul Amin; Elsaadawy, Ehab

    2017-01-01

    The poster highlights a CFD study that incorporates a combined Eulerian multi-fluid multiphase and a Population Balance Model (PBM) to study the flow inside a typical multiphase gravity separator vessel (GSV) found in oil and gas industry. The simulations were performed using Ansys Fluent CFD package running on KAUST supercomputer, Shaheen. Also, a highlight of a scalability study is presented. The effect of I/O bottlenecks and using Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) for collective and independent parallel reading of case file is presented. This work is an outcome of a research collaboration on an Aramco project on Shaheen.

  6. A new plastic correction for the stress intensity factor of an under-clad defect in a PWR vessel subjected to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2007-01-01

    For the assessment of an under-clad defect in a vessel subjected to a cold pressurised thermal shock, plasticity is considered through the amplification β of the elastic stress intensity factor K I in the ferritic part of the vessel. An important effort has been made recently by CEA to improve the analytical tools in the frame of R and D activities funded by IRSN. The current solution in the French RSE-M code has been developed from fitted F.E. calculation results. A more physical solution is proposed in this paper. This takes into account two phenomena: the amplification of the elastic K I due to plasticity in the cladding and a plastic zone size correction in the ferritic part. The first correction has been established by representing the cladding plasticity by an imposed displacement on the crack faces at the interface between the cladding and the ferritic vessel. The corresponding elastic stress intensity factor is determined from the elastic plane strain asymptotic solution for the opening displacement. Plasticity in the ferritic steel is considered through a classical plastic zone size correction. The application of the solution to axisymmetric defects is first checked. The case of semi-elliptical defects is also investigated. For the correction determined at the interface between the cladding and the ferritic vessel, an amplification of the correction proposed for the deepest point is determined from a fitting of the 3D F.E. calculation results. It is also shown that the proposition of RSE-M, which consists in applying the same β correction at the deepest point and the interface point is not suitable. The applicability to a thermal shock, eventually combined with an internal pressure has been verified. For the deepest point, the proposed correction leads to similar results to the RSE-M method, but presents an extended domain of validity (no limits on the crack length are imposed)

  7. Improvement of the calculation of the stress intensity factors for underclad and through-clad defects in a reactor pressure vessel subjected to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of the stability of a defect in a cladded reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of a nuclear pressure water reactor (PWR) subjected to pressurised thermal shock (PTS) is one main elements of the general safety demonstration. Recently, CEA proposed several improved analytical tools for the analysis of the PTS. First, an analytical solution for the vessel through-thickness temperature variation has been developed to deal with any fluid temperature, taking into account the possible presence of a cladding, in the case of an internal PTS. The associated thermal stress expression has been simplified and a complete linearised solution is given for the thermal loading and also for internal pressure, depending on the main vessel material and on the cladding properties. Finally, a complete compendium is also given for the elastic stresses intensity factor calculation. This paper proposes several improvements of the proposed analytical method to deal with a PTS in a PWR cladded vessel. A variable heat transfer coefficient is now taken into account based on an equivalent fluid temperature variation determination, associated with a constant heat transfer coefficient, to keep the same thermal exchange between the fluid and the inner skin of the vessel obtained with the initial data. A more accurate expression for the linearised stresses due to the internal pressure is given, and a possible effect of residual stresses due to the difference between the operating temperature and the stress-free temperature is also taken into account. Finally, an extension of the domain of definition of the influence functions for the elastic stress intensity factor calculation is given

  8. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  9. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the {delta}-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 Degree-Sign C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the {delta}-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the {gamma}-austenite and {delta}-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  10. NDT studies of laser cladding defects of pure copper on SS316L for in vessel materials for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, S.; Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P.M.; Sarkar, B.

    2015-01-01

    The pure thick copper coatings of 1-3 mm are required for the in-vessel materials for the plasma facing components in fusion reactor systems to extract the very high heat flux in shorter durations (like VDEs) and to protect the in vessel components. Laser cladding technique is one of the potential technique for thick coatings on substrate materials. The present study reports the NDT characterization studies carried on samples of pure copper powder cladded on SS316L substrates of thickness 1 mm - 3 mm , fabricated by CO_2 laser system. Process parameters optimization like laser power, laser travel speed, spot size, powder feed rate and shield gas flow show the effect on quality of final cladding on steel substrates. X-ray radiography and Ultrasonic testing has been carried out thoroughly on the fabricated samples and defects are analyzed. Ultrasonic scan tests using different probes are employed as the interface defects are not thoroughly revealed by radiography. The calibration has been carried out by the test sample plate with known defect size created and various process parameters like amplitude, gain and metal velocity, relevant to specimen are chosen for probes calibration. The interface defects of porosity, lack of penetration, cracks or group porosities are observed in few set of samples developed. Radiography examination revealed the porosity at extreme edges and distributed porosity in the middle for thick cladding. Ultrasonic manual A-scanning with TR probe provides qualitative information about flaw and broadly gives its location of the defects. Samples of 1 mm thick cladding have shown relatively less porosity defects at the interface compared to 3 mm thick samples. (author)

  11. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duriez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, Direction de Prevention des Accidents Majeurs, Centre de Cadarache, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr; Steinbrueck, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, FZK, Institut fuer Materialforschung, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ohai, D.; Meleg, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, INR, Nuclear Material and Corrosion Department, Pitesti, 115400 Mioveni Arges (Romania); Birchley, J.; Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of

  12. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duriez, C.; Steinbrueck, M.; Ohai, D.; Meleg, T.; Birchley, J.; Haste, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of the oxide scale

  13. Fracture mechanics analysis of reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock - The effect of elastic-plastic behavior and stainless steel cladding -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Jae Hwang; Kang, Ki Ju; Jhung, Myung Jo

    2002-01-01

    Performed here is an assessment study for deterministic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressurized thermal shock (PTS). The PTS event means an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. The problems consisting of two transients and 10 cracks are solved and maximum stress intensity factors and maximum allowable nil-ductility reference temperatures are calculated. Their results are compared each other to address the general characteristics between transients, crack types and analysis methods. The effects of elastic-plastic material behavior and clad coating on the inner surface are explored

  14. Analytical expression of the thermal stresses in a vessel or pipe with cladding submitted to any thermal transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Stephane

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes an extension of the known analytical solution for the temperature and stresses in the event of a linear shock in a pipe containing a fluid. The intention is to propose a simple solution for any variation of the temperature in the fluid and to cover the influence of cladding on the inner surface. The approach consists of breaking down the fluid temperature variation into a succession of linear shocks. Using the linear shock resolution approach, it is possible to propose a simple analytical solution, using the same constant (Biot number B, etc.). The proposed solution is compared with finite element analysis: the solution is found to be reliable for any thermal shock or cyclic variation of fluid temperature, and can even replicate the transient regime. The following stage has made it possible to account for the effect of cladding on the inner surface of the piping on temperature distribution. The second part gives analytical expressions for the elastic stresses due to the temperature field alone

  15. Calculation of a thermostressed state for drum-separator vessels in transient regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'in, Yu.V.; Kazakova, T.Yu.; Parafilo, L.M.; Shcherbakov, S.I.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature regime and stressed state of the drum-separator vessel in the transient regime with alternating pressure and water level are investigated using calculations. The temperature fields are calculated by the alternating directions method. Stresses and deformations are calculated by the method of finite elements. The stressed state of the vessel is determined for a series of fixed time moments tausub(i), when the T(tausub(i), r, phi) temperature distribution and P(tausub(i)) internal pressure are known. The methods described are used while developing the calculation program for the temperatures and stressed state (FORTRAN, EC-1050). Given are the calculation results obtained using these programs for the processes following the safety system response at the first block of the Bilibinsk NPP and the processes of power regulation in the ''Sever-2'' facility. The comparison of the obtained calculated curves with the experimental data confirms fitness of the proposed calculated scheme for description of the real processes taking place in the drum-separator vessels in the transient regimes. It is emphasized that the given scheme of solution of the equations describing a thermostressed state of the drum-separator vessels can be used while estimating their operation capacity

  16. Structural cladding /clad structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure in the pr......Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... to analyze, compare, and discuss how these various construction solutions point out strategies for development based on fundamentally different mindsets. The research questions address the following issues: How to learn from traditional construction principles: When do we see limitations of tectonic maneuver......, to ask for more restrictive building codes. As an example, in Denmark there are series of increasing demands in the current building legislations that are focused at enhancing the energy performance of buildings, which consequently foster rigid insulation standards and ask for improvement of air...

  17. Flaw behavior in mechanically loaded clad plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Robinson, G.C.; Oland, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Four-point bend tests on large plate specimens, conforming to ASTM specification for pressure vessel plates, alloy steels, quenched and tempered, Mn-Mo and Mn-Mo-Ni (A533) grade B six clad and two unclad with stainless steels 308, 309 and 312 weld wires, were performed to determine the effect of cladding upon the propagation of small surface cracks subjected to stress states. Results indicated that the tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has enhanced the load-bearing capacity of plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured. The results are interpreted in terms of fracture mechanics. The behavior of flaws in clad reactor pressure vessels is examined in the light of the test results. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  19. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  20. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% δ-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M 23C 6 type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  1. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  2. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-06-01

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the measurement of

  3. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the

  4. Design parameters for the separation of fat from natural whole milk in an ultrasonic litre-scale vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Thomas; Johansson, Linda; Juliano, Pablo; Mawson, Raymond; McArthur, Sally; Manasseh, Richard

    2014-07-01

    The separation of milk fat from natural whole milk has been achieved by applying ultrasonic standing waves (1 MHz and/or 2 MHz) in a litre-scale (5L capacity) batch system. Various design parameters were tested such as power input level, process time, specific energy, transducer-reflector distance and the use of single and dual transducer set-ups. It was found that the efficacy of the treatment depended on the specific energy density input into the system. In this case, a plateau in fat concentration of ∼20% w/v was achieved in the creamed top layer after applying a minimum specific energy of 200 kJ/kg. In addition, the fat separation was enhanced by reducing the transducer reflector distance in the vessel, operating two transducers in a parallel set-up, or by increasing the duration of insonation, resulting in skimmed milk with a fat concentration as low as 1.7% (w/v) using raw milk after 20 min insonation. Dual mode operation with both transducers in parallel as close as 30 mm apart resulted in the fastest creaming and skimming in this study at ∼1.6 g fat/min. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Method of processing spent fuel cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ouchi, Atsuhiro; Imahashi, Hiromichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the residual activity of spent fuel cladding tubes in a short period of time and enable safety storage with simple storage equipments. Constitution: Spent fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys discharged from a nuclear fuel reprocessing step are exposed to a grain boundary embrittling atmosphere to cause grain boundary destruction. This causes grain boundary fractures to the zirconium crystal grains as the matrix of nuclear fuels and then precipitation products precipitated to the grain boundary fractures are removed. The zirconium constituting the nuclear fuel cladding tube and other ingredient elements contained in the precipitation products are separated in this removing step and they are separately stored respectively. As a result, zirconium constituting most part of the composition of the spent nuclear fuel cladding tubes can be stored safely at a low activity level. (Takahashi, M.)

  6. Automatic welding and cladding in heavy fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altamer, A. de

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the automatic welding processes used by an Italian fabricator of pressure vessels for petrochemical and nuclear plant. The automatic submerged arc welding, submerged arc strip cladding, pulsed TIG, hot wire TIG and MIG welding processes have proved satisfactory in terms of process reliability, metal deposition rate, and cost effectiveness for low alloy and carbon steels. An example shows sequences required during automatic butt welding, including heat treatments. Factors which govern satisfactory automatic welding include automatic anti-drift rotator device, electrode guidance and bead programming system, the capability of single and dual head operation, flux recovery and slag removal systems, operator environment and controls, maintaining continuity of welding and automatic reverse side grinding. Automatic welding is used for: joining vessel sections; joining tubes to tubeplate; cladding of vessel rings and tubes, dished ends and extruded nozzles; nozzle to shell and butt welds, including narrow gap welding. (author)

  7. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  8. Experiences in control system design aided by interactive computer programs: temperature control of the laser isotope separation vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavel, D.T.; Pittenger, L.C.; McDonald, J.S.; Cramer, P.G.; Herget, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A robust control system has been designed to regulate temperature in a vacuum vessel. The thermodynamic process is modeled by a set of nonlinear, implicit differential equations. The control design and analysis task exercised many of the computer-aided control systems design software packages, including MATLAB, DELIGHT, and LSAP. The working environment is a VAX computer. Advantages and limitations of the software and environment, and the impact on final controller design is discussed

  9. Experiences in control system design aided by interactive computer programs: Temperature control of the laser isotope separation vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavel, D. T.; Pittenger, L. C.; McDonald, J. S.; Cramer, P. G.; Herget, C. J.

    A robust control system has been designed to regulate temperature in a vacuum vessel. The thermodynamic process is modeled by a set of nonlinear, implicit differential equations. The control design and analysis task exercised many of the computer-aided control systems design software packages, including MATLAB, DELIGHT, AND LSAP. The working environment is a VAX computer. Advantages and limitations of the software and environment, and the impact on final controller design is discussed.

  10. Stone cladding engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camposinhos, Rui de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    .... Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements...

  11. Cladding creepdown under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  12. Laser cladding of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepeleva, L.; Medres, B.; Kaplan, W.D.; Bamberger, M.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study of two different techniques for the application of wear-resistant coatings for contact surfaces of shroud shelves of gas turbine engine blades (GTE) has been conducted. Wear-resistant coatings were applied on In713 by laser cladding with direct injection of the cladding powder into the melt pool. Laser cladding was conducted with a TRUMPF-2500, CW-CO 2 laser. The laser cladding was compared with commercially available plasma cladding with wire. Both plasma and laser cladded zones were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the laser cladded zone has a higher microhardness value (650-820 HV) compared with that of the plasma treated material (420-440 HV). This is a result of the significant reduction in grain size in the case of laser cladding. Unlike the plasma cladded zones, the laser treated material is free of micropores and microcracks. (orig.)

  13. Initial Cladding Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  14. Diffusion in cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Reduction of Bragg-grating-induced coupling to cladding modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Soccolich, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    gratings in a depressed-cladding fiber are compared with simulations. The model gives good agreement with the measured transmission spectrum and accounts for the pronounced coupling to asymmetrical cladding modes, even when the grating is written with the smallest possible blaze. The asymmetry causing...... this is accounted for by the unavoidable attenuation of the UV light. It is found for the considered fiber designs that a high numerical-aperture fiber increases the spectral separation between the Bragg resonance and the onset of cladding-mode losses. A depressed-cladding fiber reduces the coupling strength......We discuss fiber designs that have been suggested for the reduction of Bragg-grating induced coupling to cladding modes. The discussion is based on a theoretical approach that includes the effect of asymmetry in the UV-induced index grating, made by UV-side writing. Experimental results from...

  16. Electra-Clad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    The study relates to the use of building-integrated photovoltaics. The Electra-Clad project sought to use steel-based cladding as a substrate for direct fabrication of a fully integrated solar panel of a design similar to the ICP standard glass-based panel. The five interrelated phases of the project are described. The study successfully demonstrated that the principles of the panel design are achievable and sound. But, despite intensive trials, a commercially realistic solar performance has not been achieved: the main failing was the poor solar conversion efficiency as the active area of the panel was increased in size. The problem lies with the coating used on the steel cladding substrates and it was concluded that a new type of coating will be required. ICP Solar Technologies UK carried out the work under contract to the DTI.

  17. Nuclear fuel cladding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahigashi, Shigeo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To largely improve the durability and the safety of fuel cladding material. Constitution: Diffusion preventive layers, e.g., aluminum or the like are covered on both sides of a zirconium alloy base layer of thin material, and corrosion resistant layers, e.g., copper or the like are covered thereon. This thin plate material is intimately wound in a circularly tubular shape in a plurality of layers to form a fuel cladding tube. With such construction, corrosion of the tube due to fuel and impurity can be prevented by the corrosion resistant layers, and the diffusion of the corrosion resistant material to the zirconium alloy can be prevented by the diffusion preventive layers. Since a plurality of layers are cladded, even if the corrosion resistant layers are damaged or cracked due to stress corrosion, only one layer is damaged or cracked, but the other layers are not affected. (Sekiya, K.)

  18. Grouting aid for controlling the separation of water for cement grout for grouting vertical tendons in nuclear concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schupack, M.

    1976-01-01

    Considerable testing and development work has led to grouting procedures which can successfully grout 60 m and taller tendons in containment structures. The exaggerated water separation phenomena of strand tendons can be controlled by chemical admixtures using proper mixing and pumping procedures. Experience with both vertical six-bar tendons and large capacity strand type tendons are described. History, development work, characteristics of grout using the admixtures, mixing and pumping procedure, full scale tests and practical applications are included. (author)

  19. In-situ crack repair by laser cladding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel vessels subjected to internal water pressure was evaluated. The purpose of this investigation was to develop process parameters for in-situ repair of through-wall cracks in components...

  20. Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel vessels subjected to internal water pressure was evaluated. The purpose of this investigation was to develop process parameters for in-situ repair of through-wall cracks in components...

  1. Estimation of penetration depth of fission products in cladding Hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Moon; Jung, Yang Hong; Yoo, Byong Ok; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2005-01-01

    A disposal and a reprocessing for spent fuel rod with high burnup need de-cladding procedure. Pellet in this rod has been separated from a cladding hull to reduce a radioactivity of hull by chemical and mechanical methods. But fission products and actinides(U,Pu) still remain inside of cladding hull by chemical bonding and fission spike, which is called as 'contamination'. More specific removal of this contamination would have been considered. In this study, the sorts of fission products and penetration depth in hull were observed by EPMA test. To analyze this behavior, SRIM 2000 code was also used as energies of fission products and an oxide thickness of hull

  2. Fuel chemistry and pellet-clad interaction related to high burnup fuel. Proceedings of the technical committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review new developments in clad failures. Major findings regarding the causes of clad failures are presented in this publication, with the main topics being fuel chemistry and fission product behaviour, swelling and pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, cladding failure mechanism at high burnup, thermal properties and fuel behaviour in off-normal conditions. This publication contains 17 individual presentations delivered at the meeting; each of them was indexed separately

  3. Application of YAG laser cladding to the flange seating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Koki; Ninomiya, Kazuyuki; Nezaki, Koji

    1999-01-01

    Stainless cladding on carbon steel is usually conducted by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) or gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). YAG ( Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet) laser welding is superior to these methods of welding in the following respects : (1) The heat affected zone (HAZ) is narrower and there is less distortion. (2) YAG laser cladding has the required chemical compositions, even with possibly fewer welding layers under controlled dilution. (3) Greater welding speed. YAG laser cladding application to vessel flange seating surfaces was examined in this study and the results are discussed. The following objectives were carried out : (1) Determination of welding conditions for satisfactory cladding layers and (2) whether cladding would be adequately possible at a cornered section of a stair-like plate, assuming actual flange shape. (3) Measurement of welding distortion and heat affected zone in carbon steel. The welding conditions for producing no-crack deposit with low dilution in carbon steel were clarified and welding by which cladding at cornered section would be possible was achieved. welding distortion by YAG laser was found less than with GTAW and HAZ made by first layer welding could be tempered appropriately by second layer welding. (author)

  4. Thermal stress intensity factor for an axial crack in a clad cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, An Yu; Deardorf, A.F.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    Many clad pressure vessels have been found to have cracks running through the inside surface cladding and into the base material. Although Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of the clad and base materials are about the same for most of the industrial applications, coefficients of thermal expansion of the two dissimilar materials, clad and base materials, are usually quite different. For example, low alloy ferritic steel is a common base material for reactor pressure vessels (RPV) and the vessels are usually clad with austenitic stainless steel. Young's moduli for the low alloy steel and stainless steel at 350 F are 29,000 ksi and 28,000 ksi, respectively, while their coefficients of thermal expansion are 7.47x10 -6 in/in and 9.50x10 -6 in/in-degree F, respectively. The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion will cause high residual thermal stress even when the entire vessel is at a uniform temperature. This residual stress is one of the primary reasons why so many cracks have been found in the cladded components. In performing reactor pressure vessel integrity evaluation, such as computing probability of brittle fracture of the RPV, it is necessary to calculate stress intensity factors for cracks, which initiate from the clad material and run into the base metal. This paper presents a convenient method of calculating stress intensity factor for an axial crack emanating from the inside surface of a cladded cylinder under thermal loading. A J-integral like line integral was derived and used to calculate the stress intensity factors from finite element stress solutions of the problem

  5. Ultrasonic signal processing and B-SCAN imaging for nondestructive testing. Application to under - cladding - cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, G.

    1988-02-01

    Crack propagation under the stainless steel cladding of nuclear reactor vessels is monitored by ultrasonic testing. This work study signal processing to improve detection and sizing of defects. Two possibilities are examined: processing of each individual signal and simultaneous processing of all the signals giving a B-SCAN image. The bibliographic study of time-frequency methods shows that they are not suitable for pulses. Then decomposition in instantaneous frequency and envelope is used. Effect of interference of 2 close echoes on instantaneous frequency is studies. The deconvolution of B-SCAN images is obtained by the transducer field. A point-by-point deconvolution method, less noise sensitive, is developed. B-SCAN images are processed in 2 phases: interface signal processing and deconvolution. These calculations improve image accuracy and dynamics. Water-stell interface and ferritic-austenitic interface are separated. Echoes of crack top are visualized and crack-hole differentiation is improved [fr

  6. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  7. Automated method for identification and artery-venous classification of vessel trees in retinal vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vinayak S; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Garvin, Mona K; Abramoff, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    The separation of the retinal vessel network into distinct arterial and venous vessel trees is of high interest. We propose an automated method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees in a retinal color image by converting a vessel segmentation image into a vessel segment map and identifying the individual vessel trees by graph search. Orientation, width, and intensity of each vessel segment are utilized to find the optimal graph of vessel segments. The separated vessel trees are labeled as primary vessel or branches. We utilize the separated vessel trees for arterial-venous (AV) classification, based on the color properties of the vessels in each tree graph. We applied our approach to a dataset of 50 fundus images from 50 subjects. The proposed method resulted in an accuracy of 91.44% correctly classified vessel pixels as either artery or vein. The accuracy of correctly classified major vessel segments was 96.42%.

  8. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  9. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report A lloy Development for High Burnup Cladding . Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs

  10. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  11. Containment vessel drain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  12. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  13. Analysis of mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed RPV weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, J [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed outer layer of reactor pressure vessel weld overlay cladding, composed of Cr19Ni10Nb alloy, have been experimentally determined by conventional tensile testing and indentation testing. The constitutive properties of weld overlay cladding are then modelled with two homogenization models of the constitutive properties of elastic-plastic matrix-inclusion composites; numerical and experimental results are then compared. 10 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Analysis of mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed RPV weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed outer layer of reactor pressure vessel weld overlay cladding, composed of Cr19Ni10Nb alloy, have been experimentally determined by conventional tensile testing and indentation testing. The constitutive properties of weld overlay cladding are then modelled with two homogenization models of the constitutive properties of elastic-plastic matrix-inclusion composites; numerical and experimental results are then compared. 10 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  15. CASTI handbook of cladding technology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.; Celant, M.

    2000-01-01

    This updated (2000) CASTI handbook covers all aspects of clad products - the different means of manufacture, properties and applications in various industries. Topics include: an introduction to cladding technology, clad plate, clad pipes, bends, clad fittings, specification requirements of clad products, welding clad products, clad product application and case histories from around the world. Unique to this book is the documentation of case histories of major cladding projects from around the world and how the technology of that day has withstood the demands of time. Filled with over 100 photos and graphics illustrating the various cladding technology examples and products, this book truly documents the most recent technologies in the field of cladding technology used worldwide

  16. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  17. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO 2 and/or H 2 S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  18. Stone cladding engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa Camposinhos, Rui de

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents new methodologies for the design of dimension stone based on the concepts of structural design while preserving the excellence of stonemasonry practice in façade engineering. Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements. Based on the Load and Resistance Factor Design Format (LRDF), minimum slab thickness formulae are presented that take into consideration stress concentrations analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the most commonly used modern anchorage systems. Calculation examples allow designers to solve several anchorage engineering problems in a detailed and objective manner, underlining the key parameters. The design of the anchorage metal parts, either in stainless steel or aluminum, is also presented.

  19. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  20. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  1. Thermal-shock experiments with flawed clad cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Alexander, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The life expectancy of LWR pressure vessels is influenced by a reduction in fracture toughness that is the result of radiation damage. As the fracture toughness decreases, the probability of propagation of preexisting flaws (sharp, crack-like defects) in the wall of the vessel increases. The probability of propagation is also influenced by the type of loading condition and the type of flaws that might exist. A loading condition of particular concern is referred to as pressurized thermal shock (PTS), and a flaw of particular concern for PTS loading conditions is a shallow surface flaw. A sudden cooling (thermal shock) of the inner surface of the vessel results in relatively high tensile stresses and relatively low fracture toughness at the inner surface. In addition, the attenuation of the fast-neutron fluence also results in relatively low fracture toughness at the inner surface. Under some circumstances, this combination of high stress and low toughness at the inner surface makes it possible for very shallow surface flaws to propagate. The PTS issue has been under investigation for quite some time, but thus far possible beneficial effects, other than thermal resistance, of the cladding on the inner surface of the vessel have not been included in the analysis of flaw behavior. This document discusses this effect of cladding on surface flaws and crack propagation

  2. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  3. Incremental value of regional wall motion analysis immediately after exercise for the detection of single-vessel coronary artery disease. Study by separate acquisition, dual-isotope ECG-gated single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shunichi; Sato, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Tani, Shigemasa; Takayama, Tadateru; Uchiyama, Takahisa; Saito, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Although the detection of wall motion abnormalities gives incremental value to myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the diagnosis of extensive coronary artery disease (CAD) and high-grade single-vessel CAD, whether or not it is useful in the diagnosis of mild, single-vessel CAD has not been studied previously. Separate acquisition, dual isotope electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated SPECT was performed in 97 patients with a low likelihood of CAD (Group 1) and 46 patients with single-vessel CAD (Group 2). Mild CAD was defined by stenosis of 50-75% (Group 2a, n=22) and moderate to severe CAD was defined by stenosis ≥76% (Group 2b, n=24). Myocardial perfusion and wall motion were graded by a 5 point-scale, 20-segment model. The sensitivity of myocardial perfusion alone was 50% for Group 2a, 83% for Group 2b and 67% for Group 2 as a whole. The overall specificity was 90%. When the wall motion analysis was combined, the sensitivity was increased to 82% in Group 2a and 92% in Group 2b. The ability to detect a wall motion abnormality immediately after exercise gives incremental diagnostic value to myocardial perfusion SPECT in the identification of mild, single-vessel CAD. (author)

  4. Hygrothermal performance of ventilated wooden cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nore, Kristine

    2009-10-15

    ; temperature, wooden moisture content, time of surface wetness, relative humidity in cavities and wind-driven rain (WDR). Four years have been analysed and recalculated by numerical simulation. The moderate climate of Trondheim provides thorough boundary conditions for hygrothermal analyses of building envelopes. The WDR was measured in the cardinal directions in a free field and on each facade of the test house. Eight WDR gauges were mounted on the west facing wall with the highest amount of WDR. The WDR measurements are provided in a database on the web that is available for the validation of WDR simulations. A statistical analysis investigated which climate parameters contributed most to the fluctuations of the moisture content in the wood. It was found that air temperature, global radiation and wind velocity were the three main parameters. WDR was the fourth most important parameter. WDR only defines moistening and not drying, which might be the reason for not being a determinate parameter for the fluctuations in the moisture content in the wood. The time of wetness was further investigated and compared to WDR. The surface wetness sensor measures describes periods with liquid water moistening more accurately and includes the period with free water on the surface after rain and by condensation. The importance of the wind velocity led to a separate CFD study of the air flow in the cavities when including the bulk wind flow around the test house. The cavity flow is not measured at the test house. The CFD study resulted in a function describing the air change rate of the ventilated cavities dependent on wind velocity, wind direction and cavity opening. The function was tested in WUFI 1D calculations. The calculations showed good correlation with measured data when including air change rate in calculations of cavity temperature and RH. It was intended to measure the moisture profile in the wood cladding with moisture pins, by measuring the electrical resistance in different

  5. Electrical discharge machining for vessel sample removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litka, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Due to aging-related problems or essential metallurgy information (plant-life extension or decommissioning) of nuclear plants, sample removal from vessels may be required as part of an examination. Vessel or cladding samples with cracks may be removed to determine the cause of cracking. Vessel weld samples may be removed to determine the weld metallurgy. In all cases, an engineering analysis must be done prior to sample removal to determine the vessel's integrity upon sample removal. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is being used for in-vessel nuclear power plant vessel sampling. Machining operations in reactor coolant system (RCS) components must be accomplished while collecting machining chips that could cause damage if they become part of the flow stream. The debris from EDM is a fine talclike particulate (no chips), which can be collected by flushing and filtration

  6. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796])

  7. Pin clad strains in Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.

    1979-07-01

    The Phenix reactor has operated for 4 years in a satisfactory manner. The first 2 sub-assembly loadings contained pins clad in solution treated 316. The principal pin strains are: diametral strain (swelling and irradiation creep), ovality and spiral bending of the pin (interaction of wire and pin cluster and wrapper). A pin cluster irradiated to a dose of 80 dpa F reached a pin diameter strain of 5%. This strain is principally due to swelling (low fission gas pressure). The principal parameters governing the swelling are instantaneous dose, time and temperature for a given type of pin cladding. Other types of steel are or will be irradiated in Phenix. In particular, cold-worked titanium stabilised 316 steel should contribute towards a reduction in the pin clad strains and increase the target burn-up in this reactor. (author)

  8. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau, C.; Piron, J.P.; Dumas, J.C.; Bouineau, V.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO 2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  9. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  10. Evaluation of cladding residual stresses in clad blocks by measurements and numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupas, P.; Moinereau, D.

    1996-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessels are internally clad with austenitic stainless steel. This welding operation generates residual stresses which can have an important role in integrity assessments. In order to evaluate these stresses, an experimental and numerical programme has been conducted. The experiments includes cladding operations, macrographic analyses, temperature and residual stresses measurements with different methods. According to these measurements, transversal stresses (perpendicular to the welding direction) and longitudinal stresses (parallel to the welding direction) are highly tensile in stainless steel and they are compressive in the HAZ. Finite element calculations were used to simulate both welding operations and post weld heat treatment. These calculations coupled the thermal, metallurgical and mechanical aspects in a 2D representation. Different models were studied including effect of generalised plane strain, transformation plasticity, creep and tempering. The transversal stresses calculated are similar to the measured ones, but the longitudinal stresses showed to be very sensitive to the model used. As expected because of the two-dimension model, the longitudinal stresses can't be well estimated. More work is needed to improve measurements of stresses in depth (important differences appeared between the different methods). A predictive model would be also very useful to determine the thermal loading which is at present dependant on measurements. A 3D calculation appears to be necessary to evaluate longitudinal stresses. (orig.)

  11. Chemical interaction of fuel and cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirihara, Tomoo; Yamawaki, Michio; Obata, Naomi; Handa, Muneo.

    1983-01-01

    It was attempted to take up the behavior of nuclear fuel in cores and summarize it by the expert committee on the irradiation behavior of nuclear fuel from fiscal 1978 to fiscal 1980 from the following viewpoints. The behavior of nuclear fuel in cores has been treated separately according to each reactor type, accordingly this point is reconsidered. The clearly understood points and the uncertain points are discriminated. It is made more easily understandable for people in other fields of atomic energy. This report is that of the group on the chemical interaction, and the first report of this committee. The chemical interaction as the behavior of fuel in cores is in the unseparable relation to the mechanical interaction, but this relation is not included in this report. The chemical interaction of fuel and cladding tubes under irradiation shows different phenomena in LWRs and FBRs, and is called SCC and FCC, respectively. But this point of causing the difference must be understood to grasp the behavior of fuel. The mutual comparison of oxide fuels for FBRs and LWRs, the stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy tubes, and fuel-cladding chemical interaction in FBRs are reported. (Kako, I.)

  12. Interaction between thorium and potential clad materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, G.B.; Gawde, P.S.; Sengupta, Pranesh

    2005-01-01

    Thorium based fuels are being used for nuclear reactors. The structural stability of fuel-clad assemblies in reactor systems depend upon the nature of interdiffusion reaction between fuel-cladding materials. Interdiffusion reaction thorium and various cladding materials is presented in this paper. (author)

  13. More recent developments for the ultrasonic testing of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiger, H.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic testing method for the inspection from the outside of the areas close to the cladding of the spherical fields of holes of light water reactor pressure vessels is described

  14. Investigation of a weld defect, reactor vessel head Ringhals 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embring, G.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    During the summer-outage 1993 Ringhals unit 2 vessel head was inspected at weld-area of Alloy 182. One major defect was found Two plus two ''boat-samples'' were taken out from the zone between the weld and the stainless cladding. All samples were sent to Studsviks laboratories for detailed investigations. The metallographic and fractographic investigations revealed that the major weld-defect had been there from manufacturing. The defect was located between the Alloy 182-buttering and the pressure vessel steel SA 533 grB cl 1. No indications of PWSCC or IDSCC were found. An inspection programme was defined. Different types of reference blocks were provided by Ringhals in cooperation with ABB TRC. Reference reflectors of type flat bottom hole (FBH) and eroded notches (EDM), with different sizes and separation were manufactured. One weld sample with manufacturing defects -lack of fusion and slag was inclusions- was present. ABB TRC performed UT inspection in the gap between the penetration and the thermal sleeve. Inspection results like defect identification, defect separation and defect sizing accuracy were compared with result from the destructive inspection. No relevant additional defects were found. An analysing and repair program was performed. A special designed disc sealed off the defect area. (authors). 5 figs., 3 refs

  15. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  16. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Desgranges, C.; Toffolon, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  17. Development of high performance cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments of superior next-generation light water reactor are requested on the basis of general view points, such as improvement of safety, economics, reduction of radiation waste and effective utilization of plutonium, until 2030 year in which conventional reactor plants should be renovate. Improvements of stainless steel cladding for conventional high burn-up reactor to more than 100 GWd/t, developments of manufacturing technology for reduced moderation-light water reactor (RMWR) of breeding ratio beyond 1.0 and researches of water-materials interaction on super critical pressure-water cooled reactor are carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Stable austenite stainless steel has been selected for fuel element cladding of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). The austenite stain less has the superiority for anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. A hard spectrum of neutron energy up above 0.1 MeV takes place in core of the reduced moderation-light water reactor, as liquid metal-fast breeding reactor (LMFBR). High performance cladding for the RMWR fuel elements is required to get anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength also. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) of SUS 304 and SUS 316 are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Irradiation tests in LMFBR are intended to obtain irradiation data for damaged quantity of the cladding materials. (M. Suetake)

  18. Ultrasonic signal processing for sizing under-clad flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, R.; Paradiso, T.J.; Lane, S.S.; Quinn, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic digital data were collected from underclad cracks in sample pressure vessel specimen blocks. These blocks were weld cladded under different processes to simulate actual conditions in US Pressure Water Reactors. Each crack was represented by a flaw-echo dynamic curve which is a plot of the transducer motion on the surface as a function of the ultrasonic response into the material. Crack depth sizing was performed by identifying in the dynamic curve the crack tip diffraction signals from the upper and lower tips. This paper describes the experimental procedure, digital signal processing methods used and algorithms developed for crack depth sizing

  19. Investigation of likely causes of white patch formation on irradiated WWER fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Velioukhanov, V.P.; Ioltoukhovski, A.Y.; Pogodin, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The information concerning white patches observed on fuel cladding surfaces has been analytically treated. The analysis shows at least three kinds of the white patch appearance: bright white spots which appear to be loose corrosion product deposits disclosing corrosion pits upon spalling; indistinct streaks with separate pronounced spots 1-2 in dia. The spots seem to be thin superficial deposits; light-coloured dense uniform crud distributed over the surface of fuel claddings and fuel assembly jackets. (author)

  20. Development of high performance cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2010-04-01

    The irradiation test for HANA claddings conducted and a series of evaluation for next-HANA claddings as well as their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests were also carried out at Halden research reactor. The 6th irradiation test have been completed successfully in Halden research reactor. As a result, HANA claddings showed high performance, such as corrosion resistance increased by 40% compared to Zircaloy-4. The high performance of HANA claddings in Halden test has enabled lead test rod program as the first step of the commercialization of HANA claddings. DB has been established for thermal and LOCA-related properties. It was confirmed from the thermal shock test that the integrity of HANA claddings was maintained in more expanded region than the criteria regulated by NRC. The manufacturing process of strips was established in order to apply HANA alloys, which were originally developed for the claddings, to the spacer grids. 250 kinds of model alloys for the next-generation claddings were designed and manufactured over 4 times and used to select the preliminary candidate alloys for the next-generation claddings. The selected candidate alloys showed 50% better corrosion resistance and 20% improved high temperature oxidation resistance compared to the foreign advanced claddings. We established the manufacturing condition controlling the performance of the dual-cooled claddings by changing the reduction rate in the cold working steps

  1. Study of laser cladding nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Wang Xinlin; Huang Guodong

    1998-12-01

    The mechanism of laser cladding is discussed by using heat transfer model of laser cladding, heat conduction model of laser cladding and convective transfer mass model of laser melt-pool. Subsequently the laser cladding speed limit and the influence of laser cladding parameters on cladding layer structure is analyzed. A 5 kW with CO 2 transverse flow is used in the research for cladding treatment of sealing surface of stop valve parts of nuclear power stations. The laser cladding layer is found to be 3.0 mm thick. The cladding surface is smooth and has no such defects as crack, gas pore, etc. A series of comparisons with plasma spurt welding and arc bead welding has been performed. The results show that there are higher grain grade and hardness, lower dilution and better performances of resistance to abrasion, wear and of anti-erosion in the laser cladding layer. The new technology of laser cladding can obviously improve the quality of nuclear valve parts. Consequently it is possible to lengthen the service life of nuclear valve and to raise the safety and reliability of the production system

  2. Underclad cracks growth under fatigue loading in stainless steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.L.; Bodson, F.; Doule, A.; Slama, G.; Bramat, M.; Doucet, J.P.; Maltrud, F.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen induced cracks have been found in HAZ of PWR vessel nozzles under stainless steel cladding. Fatigue tests were performed to collect a large amount of data on the possible propagation of this type of flaws. Tests were conducted in two steps. The aim of the first step was to set up the experimental equipment and to device an adequate method for following cracks during fatigue loading. Clad plates with electroerosion machined slots were used for this purpose. The second step was then undertaken with material taken out of an actual nozzle containing hydrogen induced cracks in the HAZ under stainless steel cladding or flaws simulated by electroerosion machined slots. The test loadings were comparable to in service loadings of the nozzles. Special attention was taken to get representative R ratios. Again for the sake of representativity, the tests were performed at 300 0 C (In service temperature) and the hydrotest was simulated. The main results are: It was possible to follow the whole failure process by combining non-destructive examinations during fatigue testing and fractographic observations of broken specimens. Different striation patterns, before and after air has penetrated the actual embedded cracks were observed. Numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth of actual or simulated defects were consistent with experimental data, provided mainly that defect shape, effect of R ratio and of environment were taken into account. (orig.)

  3. Microbial biofilm growth on irradiated, spent nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.F.; Frank, S.M.; Roberto, F.F.; Pinhero, P.J.; Johnson, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 x 10 3 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments

  4. Laser cladding of quasicrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, F.; Sirkin, H.; Colaco, R.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasicrystals are a new class of ordinated structures with metastable characteristics room temperature. Quasicrystalline phases can be obtained by rapid quenching from the melt of some alloys. In general, quasicrystals present properties which make these alloys promising for wear and corrosion resistant coatings applications. During the last years, the development of quasicrystalline coatings by means of thermal spray techniques has been impulsed. However, no references have been found of their application by means of laser techniques. In this work four claddings of quasicrystalline compositions formed over aluminium substrate, produced by a continuous CO 2 laser using simultaneous powders mixture injection are presented. The claddings were characterized by X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness. (Author) 18 refs

  5. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Schreiner

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database

  6. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  7. Fundamentals and industrial applications of high power laser beam cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruck, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser beam cladding has been refined such that clad characteristics are precisely determined through routine process control. This paper reviews the state of the art of laser cladding optical equipment, as well as the fundamental process/clad relationships that have been developed for high power processing. Major categories of industrial laser cladding are described with examples chose to highlight particular process attributes

  8. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  9. Effect of laser power on clad metal in laser-TIG combined metal cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Akihiro; Hino, Takanori; Matsuda, Jun; Tasoda, Takashi; Yoneda, Masafumi; Katsumura, Munehide; Yano, Tetsuo; Araki, Takao

    2003-03-01

    TIG arc welding has been used to date as a method for clad welding of white metal as bearing material. We propose a new clad welding process that combines a CO2 laser and a TIG arc, as a method for cladding at high speed. We hypothesized that this method would permit appropriate control of the melted quantity of base metal by varying the laser power. We carried out cladding while varying the laser power, and investigated the structure near the boundary between the clad layer and the base metal. Using the laser-TIG combined cladding, we found we were able to control appropriately the degree of dilution with the base metal. By applying this result to subsequent cladding, we were able to obtain a clad layer of high quality, which was slightly diluted with the base metal.

  10. LASER SURFACE CLADDING FOR STRUCTURAL REPAIR

    OpenAIRE

    SANTANU PAUL

    2018-01-01

    Laser cladding is a powder deposition technique, which is used to deposit layers of clad material on a substrate to improve its surface properties. It has widespread application in the repair of dies and molds used in the automobile industry. These molds and dies are subjected to cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and therefore undergo localized damage and wear. The final clad quality and integrity is influenced by various physical phenomena, namely, melt pool morphology, microst...

  11. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    The fabrication of fuel capsules with refractory metal and alloy clads used in nuclear-powered cardiac pacemakers precludes the expedient dissolution of the clad in inorganic acid solutions. An experiment to measure penetration rates of acids on commonly used fuel pellet clads indicated that it is not impossible, but that it would be very difficult to dissolve the multiple cladding. This work was performed because of a suggestion that a 238 PuO 2 -powered pacemaker could be transformed into a terrorism weapon

  12. Laser surface cladding:a literature survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gedda, Hans

    2000-01-01

    This work consists of a literature survey of a laser surface cladding in order to investigate techniques to improve the cladding rate for the process. The high local heat input caused by the high power density of the laser generates stresses and the process is consider as slow when large areas are processed. To avoid these disadvantages the laser cladding process velocity can be increased three or four times by use of preheated wire instead of the powder delivery system. If laser cladding is ...

  13. Modelling cladding response to changing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulkki, Ville; Ikonen, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ltd (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    The cladding of the nuclear fuel is subjected to varying conditions during fuel reactor life. Load drops and reversals can be modelled by taking cladding viscoelastic behaviour into account. Viscoelastic contribution to the deformation of metals is usually considered small enough to be ignored, and in many applications it merely contributes to the primary part of the creep curve. With nuclear fuel cladding the high temperature and irradiation as well as the need to analyse the variable load all emphasise the need to also inspect the viscoelasticity of the cladding.

  14. Pulsed Laser Cladding of Ni Based Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, A.; Stanciu, E. M.; Croitoru, C.; Roata, I. C.; Tierean, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the operational parameters and quality of one step Metco Inconel 718 atomized powder laser cladded tracks, deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrate by means of a 1064 nm high power pulsed laser, together with a Precitec cladding head manipulated by a CLOOS 7 axes robot. The optimization of parameters and cladding quality has been assessed through Taguchi interaction matrix and graphical output. The study demonstrates that very good cladded layers with low dilution and increased mechanical proprieties could be fabricated using low laser energy density by involving a pulsed laser.

  15. Cladding creepdown model for FRAPCON-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Tolli, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents a cladding deformation model developed to analyze cladding creepdown during steady state operation in both a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR). This model accounts for variations in zircaloy cladding heat treatment; cold worked and stress relieved material, typically used in a PWR, and fully recrystallized material, typically used in a BWR. The model calculates cladding creepdown as a function of hoop stress, fast neutron flux, exposure time, and temperature. This report also presents a comparison between cladding creep calculations by this model and corresponding measurements from the KWU/CE program, ORNL HOBBIE experiments, and EPRI/Westinghouse Engineering cooperative project. The comparisons show that the model calculates cladding creep strains well. The analyses of non-fueled rods by FRAPCON-2 show that the cladding creepdown model was correctly incorporated. Also, analysis of a PWR rod test case shows that the FRAPCON-2 code can analyze pellet-cladding mechanical interaction caused by cladding creepdown and fuel swelling

  16. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  17. A New Material Constitutive Model for Predicting Cladding Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Joe; Dunham, Robert [ANATECH Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Rashid, Mark [University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Machiels, Albert [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    An important issue in fuel performance and safety evaluations is the characterization of the effects of hydrides on cladding mechanical response and failure behavior. The hydride structure formed during power operation transforms the cladding into a complex multi-material composite, with through-thickness concentration profile that causes cladding ductility to vary by more than an order of magnitude between ID and OD. However, current practice of mechanical property testing treats the cladding as a homogeneous material characterized by a single stress-strain curve, regardless of its hydride morphology. Consequently, as irradiation conditions and hydrides evolution change, new material property testing is required, which results in a state of continuous need for valid material property data. A recently developed constitutive model, treats the cladding as a multi-material composite in which the metal and the hydride platelets are treated as separate material phases with their own elastic-plastic and fracture properties and interacting at their interfaces with appropriate constraint conditions between them to ensure strain and stress compatibility. An essential feature of the model is a multi-phase damage formulation that models the complex interaction between the hydride phases and the metal matrix and the coupled effect of radial and circumferential hydrides on cladding stress-strain response. This gives the model the capability of directly predicting cladding failure progression during the loading event and, as such, provides a unique tool for constructing failure criteria analytically where none could be developed by conventional material testing. Implementation of the model in a fuel behavior code provides the capability to predict in-reactor operational failures due to PCI or missing pellet surfaces (MPS) without having to rely on failure criteria. Even, a stronger motivation for use of the model is in the transportation accidents analysis of spent fuel

  18. The characterization of activities associated with irradiated fuel element claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, I.L.; Bolus, D.J.; Glover, K.M.; Haynes, J.W.; Mapper, D.; Marwick, A.D.; Waterman, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The object of the present work was to characterise the natures and amounts of the various α and βγ activities associated with cladding hulls. The claddings studied were stainless steel from a Fast Reactor and from an Advanced Gas Reactor and Zircaloy from a Boiling Water Reactor, from a Pressurized Water Reactor and from a Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor. The hulls were examined by the following methods: alpha spectrometry to identify and quantify the α emitters and to estimate their depths of penetration, partial and complete dissolution of hulls followed by gross α counting, α spectrometry and γ spectrometry, fission track autoradiography to determine the distribution of fissile material associated with hulls, neutron activation to determine the total fissile content of the hulls, chemical separations followed by β counting and chemical treatment with various reagents to examine the ease of decontamination

  19. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  20. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Cladding properties under simulated fuel pin transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.W.; Johnson, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the HEDL fuel pin testing program utilizing a recently developed Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) to generate the requisite mechanical property information on irradiated and unirradiated fast reactor fuel cladding under temperature ramp conditions. The test procedure is described, and data are presented

  2. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  3. Development of advanced zirconium fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2007-04-01

    This report includes the manufacturing technology developed for HANA TM claddings, a series of their characterization results as well as the results of their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests which were carried out to develop some fuel claddings for a high burn-up (70,000MWd/mtU) which are competitive in the world market. Some of the HANA TM claddings, which had been manufactured based on the results from the 1st and 2nd phases of the project, have been tested in a research reactor in Halden of Norway for an in-pile performance qualification. The results of the in-pile test showed that the performance of the HANA TM claddings for corrosion and creep was better than 50% compared to that of Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. It was also found that the out-of pile performance of the HANA TM claddings for such as LOCA and RIA in some accident conditions corrosion creep, tensile, burst and fatigue was superior or equivalent to that of the Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. The project also produced the other many data which were required to get a license for an in-pile test of HANA TM claddings in a commercial reactor. The data for the qualification or characterization were provided for KNFC to assist their activities to get the license for the in-pile test of HANA TM Lead Test Rods(LTR) in a commercial reactor

  4. Corrosion characteristics of K-claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Improvement of the corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel claddings is the critical issue for the successful development of the high burn-up fuel. KAERI have developed the K-claddings having a superior corrosion resistance by controlling the alloying element addition and optimizing the manufacturing process. The comparative evaluation of the corrosion resistance for K-claddings and the foreign claddings was performed and the effect of the heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of K-claddings was also examined. Corrosion tests were carried out in the conditions of 360 .deg. C pure water, PWR-simulating loop and 400 .deg. C steam, From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion resistance of K-claddings is superior to those of Zry4 and A claddings and K6 showed a better corrosion resistance than K3. The corrosion behavior of K-cladding was strongly influenced by the final annealing rather than the intermediate annealing, and the corrosion resistance increased with decreasing the final annealing temperature

  5. ''Simulation of the testing of cladded steel pieces by focussed ultrasonic transducers''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadal, J.

    1996-01-01

    The inner surface of vessels of pressurized water reactor is protected from corrosion by a stainless steel cladding hot-layer in many cuts. Therefore, the surface irregularities generate spurious echoes that can either mask or be misinterpreted for echoes from possible defects. Probes are calibrated on a specific reflector (side drilled holes in a steel block). The echo arising from it is used as a reference to quantify echoes measured during an examination. The study aims at simulating echographs of the vessel inspection so as to help the analysis of actual measurements. Three models are developed to compute echoes from cladding surface irregularities, echoes from planar defects and the reference echo, respectively. The radiated field is modelled using the Rayleigh integral, the integration of the incident beam with the cladded surface is treated under Kirchhoffs approximation and the reception of reflected waves involves reciprocity between radiation and reception. An extra physical hypothesis allows a fast algorithm to be developed for simulating the Bscan image obtained by transducer scan. The reference echo is also computed under Kirchhoffs approximation. The field refracted inside the material is modelled by an extension of the Rayleigh integral using the geometrical optics approximation. The model for computing diffracted echoes from crack tips is based upon the Geometric Theory of Diffraction. The model for predicting echoes from cladded surface irregularities has been validated by comparing theoretical predictions with experimental measurements. (author)

  6. Fracture assessment of weld material from a full-thickness clad RPV shell segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Fracture analysis was applied to full-thickness clad beam specimens containing shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) at beginning of life. The beam specimens were fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include gradients of material properties and residual stresses due to welding and cladding applications. Fracture toughness estimates were obtained from load vs load-line displacement and load vs crack-mouth-opening displacement data using finite-element methods and estimation schemes based on the η-factor method. One of the beams experienced a significant amount of precleavage stable ductile tearing. Effects of precleavage tearing on estimates of fracture toughness were investigated using continuum damage models. Fracture toughness results from the clad beam specimens were compared with other deep- and shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) data generated previously from A533 Grade B plate material. Range of scatter for the clad beam data is consistent with that from the laboratory-scale SENB specimens tested at the same temperature

  7. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  8. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  9. Nuclear power plant pressure vessels. Inservice inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The requirements for the planning and reporting of inservice inspections of nuclear power plant pressure vessels are presented. The guide specifically applies to inservice inspections of Safety class 1 and 2 nuclear power plant pressure vessels, piping, pumps and valves plus their supports and reactor pressure vessel internals by non- destructive examination methods (NDE). Inservice inspections according to the Pressure Vessel Degree (549/73) are discussed separately in the guide YVL 3.0. (4 refs.)

  10. Metal-clad waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina

    This work concerns planar optical waveguide sensors for biosensing applications, with the focus on deep-probe sensing for micron-scale biological objects like bacteria and whole cells. In the last two decades planar metal-clad waveguides have been brieflyintroduced in the literature applied...... for various biosensing applications, however a thorough study of the sensor configurations has not been presented, but is the main subject of this thesis. Optical sensors are generally well suited for bio-sensing asthey show high sensitivity and give an immediate response for minute changes in the refractive...... index of a sample, due to the high sensitivity of optical bio-sensors detection of non-labeled biological objects can be performed. The majority of opticalsensors presented in the literature and commercially available optical sensors are based on evanescent wave sensing, however most of these sensors...

  11. Fuel cladding mechanical interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between fuel and cladding may occur as a consequence of two types of phenomenon: i) fuel swelling especially at levels of caesium accumulation, and ii) thermal differential expansion during power changes. Slow overpower ramps which may occur during incidental events are of course one of the circumstances responsible for this second type of fuel cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI). Experiments and analysis of this problem that have been done at C.E.A. allow to determine the main parameters which will fix the level of stress and the risk of damage induced by the fuel in the cladding during overpower transients

  12. Local approach of cleavage fracture applied to a vessel with subclad flaw. A benchmark on computational simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Brochard, J.; Guichard, D.; Bhandari, S.; Sherry, A.; France, C.

    1996-10-01

    A benchmark on the computational simulation of a cladded vessel with a 6.2 mm sub-clad flaw submitted to a thermal transient has been conducted. Two-dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic finite element computations of the vessel have been performed by the different partners with respective finite element codes ASTER (EDF), CASTEM 2000 (CEA), SYSTUS (Framatome) and ABAQUS (AEA Technology). Main results have been compared: temperature field in the vessel, crack opening, opening stress at crack tips, stress intensity factor in cladding and base metal, Weibull stress σ w and probability of failure in base metal, void growth rate R/R 0 in cladding. This comparison shows an excellent agreement on main results, in particular on results obtained with local approach. (K.A.)

  13. Chemical compatibility between cladding alloys and advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, D.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1975-05-01

    The National Advanced Fuels Program requires chemical, mechanical, and thermophysical properties data for cladding alloys. The compatibility behavior of cladding alloys with advanced fuels is critically reviewed. in carbide fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding carburization, diffusion of carbon into the cladding matrix accompanied by carbide precipitation. Carburization changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. The extent of carburization increases in sodium (versus gas) bonded fuels. The depth of carburization increases with increasing sesquicarbide (M 2 C 3 ) content of the fuel. In nitride fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding nitriding, diffusion of nitrogen into the cladding matrix accompanied by nitride precipitation. Nitriding changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. In both carbide and nitride fuel pins, fission products do not migrate appreciably to the cladding and do not appear to contribute to cladding attack. 77 references. (U.S.)

  14. Containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbirohowski-Koscia, K.F.; Roberts, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A concrete containment vessel for nuclear reactors is disclosed that is spherical and that has prestressing tendons disposed in first, second and third sets, the tendons of each set being all substantially concentric and centred around a respective one of the three orthogonal axes of the sphere; the tendons of the first set being anchored at each end at a first anchor rib running around a circumference of the vessel, the tendons of the second set being anchored at each end at a second anchor rib running around a circumference of the sphere and disposed at 90 0 to the first rib, and the tendons of the third set being anchored some to the first rib and the remainder to the second rib. (author)

  15. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  16. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  17. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  18. GSGG edge cladding development: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumitani, T.; Meissner, H.E.; Toratani, H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this project have been: (1) Investigate the possibility of chemical etching of GSGG crystal slabs to obtain increased strength. (2) Design and construct a simplified mold assembly for casting cladding glass to the edges of crystal slabs of different dimensions. (3) Conduct casting experiments to evaluate the redesigned mold assembly and to determine stresses as function of thermal expansion coefficient of cladding glass. (4) Clad larger sizes of GGG slabs as they become available. These tasks have been achieved. Chemical etching of GSGG slabs does not appear possible with any other acid than H 3 PO 4 at temperatures above 300 0 C. A mold assembly has been constructed which allowed casting cladding glass around the edges of the largest GGG slabs available (10 x 20 x 160 mm) without causing breakage through the annealing step

  19. Duplex stainless steel surface bay laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Pineda, Y.; Segovia, F.; Vicente, A.

    2004-01-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most promising techniques to restore damaged surfaces and achieve properties similar to those of the base metal. In this work, duplex stainless steels have been cladded by a nickel alloy under different processing conditions. The influence of the beam speed and defocusing variables ha been evaluated in the microstructure both of the cladding and heat affected zone, HAZ. These results have been correlated to mechanical properties by means of microhardness measurements from cladding area to base metal through the interface. This technique has shown to be very appropriate to obtain controlled mechanical properties as they are determined by the solidification microstructure, originated by the transfer of mass and heat in the system. (Author) 21 refs

  20. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  1. CREEP STRAIN CORRELATION FOR IRRADIATED CLADDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Macheret

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to predict the creep deformation of spent nuclear fuel cladding under the repository conditions, different correlations have been developed. One of them, which will be referred to as Murty's correlation in the following, and whose expression is given in Henningson (1998), was developed on the basis of experimental points related to unirradiated Zircaloy cladding (Henningson 1998, p. 56). The objective of this calculation is to adapt Murty's correlation to experimental points pertaining to irradiated Zircaloy cladding. The scope of the calculation is provided by the range of experimental parameters characterized by Zircaloy cladding temperature between 292 C and 420 C, hoop stress between 50 and 630 MPa, and test time extending to 8000 h. As for the burnup of the experimental samples, it ranges between 0.478 and 64 MWd/kgU (i.e., megawatt day per kilogram of uranium), but this is not a parameter of the adapted correlation

  2. Preliminary assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material in full-thickness clad beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Iskander, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes a testing program that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results form three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the yield strength of the base material. An irradiation-induced increase in yield strength of the weld material could result in a yield stress that exceeds the upper limit where code curves are valid. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may have implications for RPV structural integrity assessments. Analyses of the test data are discussed, including comparisons of measured displacements with finite-element analysis results, applications of toughness estimation techniques, and interpretations of constraint conditions implied by stress-based constraint methodologies. Metallurgical conditions in the region of the cladding heat-affected zone are proposed as a possible explanation for the lower-bound fracture toughness measured with one of the shallow-crack clad beam specimens. Fracture toughness data from the three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack uniaxial beam and cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material

  3. Cladding Heatup Prediction between Spacer Grids for the Downstream Effect Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Since a recirculation sump clogging issue by debris generated from high energy pipe line break had been invoked as GSI-191 in the US, many researches on this issue have been undertaken. Previous researches on this topic are well summarized in Bang et al. Due to comprehensive nature of the issue, it includes many area of research and one of them is the area of downstream effect evaluation. The downstream effect is involved with adverse effects of debris passing the sump screen on the downstream systems, components and piping including core and it can be further divided into an ex-vessel downstream effect and an in-vessel downstream effect. In the ex-vessel downstream effect, focus is laid on plugging of spray nozzle, wearing and abrasion of moving parts of pump and valve and etc. Otherwise, a debris effect on reactor core is focused in the in-vessel downstream effect. Since debris can be ingested in the core or the systems of downstream of sump screen during recirculation, basically the downstream effect influences long-term core cooling phase. With respect to the in-vessel downstream effect, an up-to-date evaluation methodology is well summarized in a topical report submitted to the US nuclear regulatory commission by the pressurized water reactor owners group (PWROG). The report evaluates various aspects of debris ingestion in the core such as blockage at the core inlet, collection of debris on fuel grids, plating-out of fuel, chemical precipitants, protective coatings effect and etc. Most of them are evaluated qualitative manner based on previous research results and geometrical consideration on fuel rod bundles but some of them are also backed up by quantitative calculations to corroborate the qualitative decisions. One of them is a cladding heatup calculation between spacer grids. This is done to demonstrate that the cladding temperature of a fuel rod between grids with debris deposited on the clad surface in a post- LOCA recirculation environment is below

  4. Optimization of metal-clad waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, N.; Horvath, R.; Pedersen, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with the optimization of metal-clad waveguides for sensor applications to achieve high sensitivity for adlayer and refractive index measurements. By using the Fresnel reflection coefficients both the angular shift and the width of the resonances in the sensorgrams are taken...... into account. Our optimization shows that it is possible for metal-clad waveguides to achieve a sensitivity improvement of 600% compared to surface-plasmon-resonance sensors....

  5. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-01-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  6. Laser cladding technology to small diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimagari, H.; Hagiwara, M.; Kojima, T.

    2000-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resistant material coating layers (cladding) on the austenitic stainless steel (type 304 SS) pipe inner surface was developed to prevent SCC (stress corrosion cracking) occurrence. This technology is applicable to a narrow and long distance area from operators, because of the good accessibility of the YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser beam that can be transmitted through an optical fiber. In this method a mixed paste metallic powder and heating-resistive organic solvent are firstly placed on the inner surface of a small pipe, and then a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber irradiates to the pasted area. A mixed paste will be melted and form a cladding layer subsequently. A cladding layer shows as excellent corrosion resistance property. This laser cladding (LC) method had already applied to several domestic nuclear power plants and had obtained a good reputation. This report introduces the outline of laser cladding technology, the developed equipment for practical application in the field, and the circumstance in actual plant application. (orig.)

  7. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  8. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbing [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  9. Clad Degradation- Summary and Abstraction for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Stahl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to develop the summary cladding degradation abstraction that will be used in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Most civilian commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. The model addressed in this report is intended to describe the postulated condition of commercial Zircaloy-clad fuel as a function of postclosure time after it is placed in the repository. Earlier total system performance assessments analyzed the waste form as exposed UO 2 , which was available for degradation at the intrinsic dissolution rate. Water in the waste package quickly became saturated with many of the radionuclides, limiting their release rate. In the total system performance assessments for the Viability Assessment and the Site Recommendation, cladding was analyzed as part of the waste form, limiting the amount of fuel available at any time for degradation. The current model is divided into two stages. The first considers predisposal rod failures (most of which occur during reactor operation and associated activities) and postdisposal mechanical failure (from static loading of rocks) as mechanisms for perforating the cladding. Other fuel failure mechanisms including those caused by handling or transportation have been screened out (excluded) or are treated elsewhere. All stainless-steel-clad fuel, which makes up a small percentage of the overall amount of fuel to be stored, is modeled as failed upon placement in the waste packages. The second stage of the degradation model is the splitting of the cladding from the reaction of water or moist air and UO 2 . The splitting has been observed to be rapid in comparison to the total system performance assessment time steps and is modeled to be instantaneous. After the cladding splits, the rind buildup inside the cladding widens the split, increasing the diffusion area from the fuel rind to the waste package interior. This model report summarizes the

  10. An overview of the HSST Full-Thickness Shallow-Crack Clad Beam Testing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Theiss, T.J.; McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    A testing program is described that will utilize full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow flaws in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow flaws in the beam specimen include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. Fracture toughness tests focusing on shallow flaws in plate and weld material will also provide data for evaluating the relative influence of absolute and normalized crack depth on constraint conditions. Pretest finite-element analyses are described that provide near-tip stress and strain fields for characterization of constraint in the shallow-crack specimens in terms of the Q-stress. Analysis results predict a constraint loss in the shallow-crack clad beam specimen similar to that determined for a previously tested shallow-crack single-edge notch homogeneous bend specimen with the same normalized crack depth

  11. Improvement technique of sensitized HAZ by GTAW cladding applied to a BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasumasa; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Kurosawa, Kouichi; Chiba, Isao; Nomura, Keiichi.

    1995-01-01

    A SCC(Stress Corrosion Cracking)-resistant technique, in which the sleeve installed by expansion is melted by GTAW process without filler metal with outside water cooling, was developed. The technique was applied to ICM (In-Core Monitor) housings of a BWR power plant in 1993. The ICM housings of which materials are type 304 Stainless Steels are sensitized with high tensile residual stresses by welding to the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel). As the result, ICM housings have potential of SCC initiation. Therefore, the improvement technique resistant to SCC was needed. The technique can improve chemical composition of the housing inside and residual stresses of the housing outside at the same time. Sensitization of the housing inner surface area is eliminated by replacing low-carbon with proper-ferrite microstructure clad. High tensile residual stresses of housing outside surface area is improved into compressive side. Compressive stresses of outside surface are induced by thermal stresses which are caused by inside cladding with outside water cooling. The clad is required to be low-carbon metal with proper ferrite and not to have the new sensitized HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) on the surface by cladding. The effect of the technique was qualified by SCC test, chemical composition check, ferrite content measurement and residual stresses measurement etc. All equipment for remote application were developed and qualified, too. The technique was successfully applied to a BWR plant after sufficient training

  12. Influence of specimen design on the ductility of zircaloy cladding: Experiment and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, D. W.; Majumdar, S.; Koss, D. A.; Motta, A. T.

    1999-01-01

    In a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA), a control rod ejection or drop causes a sudden increase in reactor power, which in turn deposits a large amount of energy into the fuel. The resulting thermal expansion and fission gas release loads the cladding into the plastic regime and may cause it to fail. In order to predict cladding survivability, there has been considerable interest and effort in supplementing integral WA tests with separate-effects ring tests of cladding tubes. Such tests can give one insight into failure mechanisms and measure relevant mechanical properties (such as yield strength, uniform elongation, uniaxial stress-strain curve, etc.), for use in computer codes that attempt to predict cladding response during an RIA. The accuracy of such model predictions obviously depends on appropriate and accurate failure data. This study concerns itself with the proper development of ring tensile tests that (i) are similar to the loading conditions present in an RIA, (ii) measure the relevant mechanical properties and (iii) provide insight regarding the influence of the strain paths on the failure mechanisms present if Zircaloy cladding. Based on both experiments and computational modeling, the authors investigate the failure of Zircaloy tubing as a function of specimen geometry, and discuss the limitations of certain ring-test geometries in yielding failure ductility data that are applicable to RIA situations

  13. Modelling anelastic contribution to nuclear fuel cladding creep and stress relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulkki, Ville, E-mail: ville.tulkki@vtt.fi; Ikonen, Timo

    2015-10-15

    In fuel behaviour modelling accurate description of the cladding mechanical response is important for both operational and safety considerations. While accuracy is desired, a certain level of simplicity is needed as both computational resources and detailed information on properties of particular cladding may be limited. Most models currently used in the integral codes divide the mechanical response into elastic and viscoplastic contributions. These have difficulties in describing both creep and stress relaxation, and often separate models for the two phenomena are used. In this paper we implement anelastic contribution to the cladding mechanical model, thus enabling consistent modelling of both creep and stress relaxation. We show that the model based on assumption of viscoelastic behaviour can be used to explain several experimental observations in transient situations and compare the model to published set of creep and stress relaxation experiments performed on similar samples. Based on the analysis presented we argue that the inclusion of anelastic contribution to the cladding mechanical models provides a way to improve the simulation of cladding behaviour during operational transients.

  14. Fuel cladding behavior under rapid loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, K.; Karlsson, J.; Stjärnsäter, J.; Schrire, D.; Ledergerber, G.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Hallstadius, L.

    2016-02-01

    A modified burst test (MBT) was used in an extensive test program to characterize fuel cladding failure behavior under rapid loading conditions. The MBT differs from a normal burst test with the use of a driver tube to simulate the expansion of a fuel pellet, thereby producing a partial strain driven deformation condition similar to that of a fuel pellet expansion in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). A piston/cylinder assembly was used to pressurize the driver tube. By controlling the speed and distance the piston travels the loading rate and degree of sample deformation could be controlled. The use of a driver tube with a machined gauge section localizes deformation and allows for continuous monitoring of the test sample diameter change at the location of maximum hoop strain, during each test. Cladding samples from five irradiated fuel rods were tested between 296 and 553 K and loading rates from 1.5 to 3.5/s. The test rods included variations of Zircaloy-2 with different liners and ZIRLO, ranging in burn-up from 41 to 74 GWd/MTU. The test results show cladding ductility is strongly temperature and loading rate dependent. Zircaloy-2 cladding ductility degradation due to operational hydrogen pickup started to recover at approximately 358 K for test condition used in the study. This recovery temperature is strongly loading rate dependent. At 373 K, ductility recovery was small for loading rates less than 8 ms equivalent RIA pulse width, but longer than 8 ms the ductility recovery increased exponentially with increasing pulse width, consistent with literature observations of loading rate dependent brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition temperature. The cladding ductility was also observed to be strongly loading rate/pulse width dependent for BWR cladding below the BTD temperature and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cladding at both 296 and 553 K.

  15. Accident tolerant fuel cladding development: Promise, status, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, Kurt A.

    2018-04-01

    The motivation for transitioning away from zirconium-based fuel cladding in light water reactors to significantly more oxidation-resistant materials, thereby enhancing safety margins during severe accidents, is laid out. A review of the development status for three accident tolerant fuel cladding technologies, namely coated zirconium-based cladding, ferritic alumina-forming alloy cladding, and silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite cladding, is offered. Technical challenges and data gaps for each of these cladding technologies are highlighted. Full development towards commercial deployment of these technologies is identified as a high priority for the nuclear industry.

  16. A pellet-clad interaction failure criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howl, D.A.; Coucill, D.N.; Marechal, A.J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A Pellet-Clad Interaction (PCI) failure criterion, enabling the number of fuel rod failures in a reactor core to be determined for a variety of normal and fault conditions, is required for safety analysis. The criterion currently being used for the safety analysis of the Pressurized Water Reactor planned for Sizewell in the UK is defined and justified in this paper. The criterion is based upon a threshold clad stress which diminishes with increasing fast neutron dose. This concept is consistent with the mechanism of clad failure being stress corrosion cracking (SCC); providing excess corrodant is always present, the dominant parameter determining the propagation of SCC defects is stress. In applying the criterion, the SLEUTH-SEER 77 fuel performance computer code is used to calculate the peak clad stress, allowing for concentrations due to pellet hourglassing and the effect of radial cracks in the fuel. The method has been validated by analysis of PCI failures in various in-reactor experiments, particularly in the well-characterised power ramp tests in the Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. It is also in accord with out-of-reactor tests with iodine and irradiated Zircaloy clad, such as those carried out at Kjeller in Norway. (author)

  17. Fuel assembly and fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Shinro; Ito, Ken-ichi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cladding tube is a zirconium liner tube formed by lining a pure zirconium layer on the inner side of a zirconium alloy tube. The fuel cladding tube is formed by extrusion molding of a composite billet formed by inserting a pure zirconium billet into a zirconium alloy billet. Accordingly, the pure zirconium layer and the zirconium alloy tube are strongly joined by metal bond. The fuel cladding tube has an external oxide film on the outer surface of the zirconium alloy tube and an internal oxide film on the inner side of the pure zirconium layer. The external oxide film has a thickness preferably of about 1μm. The internal oxide film has a thickness of not more than 10μm, preferably, from 1 to 5μm. With such a constitution, flaws to be formed on both inner and outer surfaces of the cladding tube upon assembling a fuel assembly can be reduced thereby enabling to reduce the amount of hydrogen absorbed to the cladding tube. (I.N.)

  18. Clad buffer rod sensors for liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, C.-K.; Ihara, I.

    1999-01-01

    Clad buffer rods, consisting of a core and a cladding, have been developed for ultrasonic monitoring of liquid metal processing. The cores of these rods are made of low ultrasonic-loss materials and the claddings are fabricated by thermal spray techniques. The clad geometry ensures proper ultrasonic guidance. The lengths of these rods ranges from tens of centimeters to 1m. On-line ultrasonic level measurements in liquid metals such as magnesium at 700 deg C and aluminum at 960 deg C are presented to demonstrate their operation at high temperature and their high ultrasonic performance. A spherical concave lens is machined at the rod end for improving the spatial resolution. High quality ultrasonic images have been obtained in the liquid zinc at 600 deg C. High spatial resolution is needed for the detection of inclusions in liquid metals during processing. We also show that the elastic properties such as density, longitudinal and shear wave velocities of liquid metals can be measured using a transducer which generates and receives both longitudinal and shear waves and is mounted at the end of a clad buffer rod. (author)

  19. Theoretical research on the propagation of the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface of the cermet cladding material structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junru, Yang; Chuanjuan, Song; Minglan, Wang; Yeukan, Zhang; Jing, Sun [College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao (China)

    2016-01-15

    The interface crack propagation problem in the cermet cladding material structure was studied. A comparative propagation property parameter (CP) suitable to judge the propagation direction of the interface crack in the cermet cladding material structure was proposed. The interface crack propagation criterion was established. Theoretical models of the CPs for the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface deflecting separately into the clad, the interface and the substrate were built, and the relations between the CPs and the load action angle, the clad thickness ratio and the load were investigated with an example. The research results show that, under the research conditions, the interface crack will more easily propagate into the clad layer than into the substrate.

  20. Theoretical research on the propagation of the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface of the cermet cladding material structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junru, Yang; Chuanjuan, Song; Minglan, Wang; Yeukan, Zhang; Jing, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The interface crack propagation problem in the cermet cladding material structure was studied. A comparative propagation property parameter (CP) suitable to judge the propagation direction of the interface crack in the cermet cladding material structure was proposed. The interface crack propagation criterion was established. Theoretical models of the CPs for the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface deflecting separately into the clad, the interface and the substrate were built, and the relations between the CPs and the load action angle, the clad thickness ratio and the load were investigated with an example. The research results show that, under the research conditions, the interface crack will more easily propagate into the clad layer than into the substrate

  1. Effects of irradiation on the fracture properties of stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Stainless steel weld overlay cladding was fabricated using the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode, and the three-wire, series-arc methods. Three layers of cladding were applied to a pressure vessel plate to provide adequate thickness for fabrication of test specimens, and irradiations were conducted at temperatures and to fluences relevant to power reactor operation. For the first single-wire method, the first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. The three-wire method used various combinations of types 308, 309, and 304 stainless steel weld wires, and produced a highly controlled weld chemistry, microstructure, and fracture properties in all three layers of the weld. 14 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Capturing reflected cladding modes from a fiber Bragg grating with a double-clad fiber coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiad, Mohamad Diaa; Gagné, Mathieu; Lemire-Renaud, Simon; De Montigny, Etienne; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-03-25

    We present a novel measurement scheme using a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to resolve cladding modes. Direct measurement of the optical spectra and power in the cladding modes is obtained through the use of a specially designed DCFC spliced to a highly reflective FBG written into slightly etched standard photosensitive single mode fiber to match the inner cladding diameter of the DCFC. The DCFC is made by tapering and fusing two double-clad fibers (DCF) together. The device is capable of capturing backward propagating low and high order cladding modes simply and efficiently. Also, we demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure the surrounding refractive index (SRI) with an extremely high sensitivity of 69.769 ± 0.035 μW/RIU and a resolution of 1.433 × 10(-5) ± 8 × 10(-9) RIU between 1.37 and 1.45 RIU. The device provides a large SRI operating range from 1.30 to 1.45 RIU with sufficient discrimination for all individual captured cladding modes. The proposed scheme can be adapted to many different types of bend, temperature, refractive index and other evanescent wave based sensors.

  3. Inspection system for Zircaloy clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, M.E.; Porter, E.H.; Hansen, H.R.

    1975-10-01

    A description is presented of the design, development, and performance of a remote scanning system for nondestructive examination of fuel rods. Characteristics that are examined include microcracking of fuel rod cladding, fuel-cladding interaction, cladding thickness, fuel rod diameter variation, and fuel rod bowing. Microcracking of both the inner and outer fuel rod surfaces and variations in wall thickness are detected by using a pulsed eddy current technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Fuel rod diameter variation and fuel rod bowing are detected by using two linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) and a signal conditioning system. The system's mechanical features include variable scanning speeds, a precision indexing system, and a servomechanism to maintain proper probe alignment. Initial results indicate that the system is a very useful mechanism for characterizing irradiated fuel rods

  4. Fuel cladding mechanical properties for transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.; Hanson, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Out-of-pile simulated transient tests have been conducted on irradiated fast-reactor fuel pin cladding specimens at heating rates of 10 0 F/s (5.6 0 K/s) and 200 0 F/s (111 0 K/s) to generate mechanical property information for use in describing cladding behavior during off-normal events. Mechanical property data were then analyzed, applying the Larson-Miller Parameter to the effects of heating rate and neutron fluence. Data from simulated transient tests on TREAT-tested fuel pins demonstrate that Plant Protective System termination of 3$/s transients prevents significant damage to cladding. The breach opening produced during simulated transient testing is shown to decrease in size with increasing neutron fluence

  5. Laser cladding to select new glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano, L.L.O.; Afonso, C.R.M.; Kiminami, C.S.; Gargarella, P.; Ramasco, B.

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental technique used to analyze the effect of compositional variation and cooling rate in the phase formation in a multicomponent system is the laser cladding. This work have evaluated the use of laser cladding to discover a new bulk metallic glass (BMG) in the Al-Co-Zr system. Coatings with composition variation have made by laser cladding using Al-Co-Zr alloys powders and the samples produced have been characterized by X ray diffraction, microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results did not show the composition variation as expected, because of incomplete melting during laser process. It was measured a composition variation tendency that allowed the glass forming investigation by the glass formation criterion λ+Δh 1/2 . The results have showed no glass formation in the coating samples, which prove a limited capacity of Zr-Co-Al system to form glass (author)

  6. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented

  7. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  8. Facility to separate water and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesel, G.

    1977-01-01

    The water/steam mixture from the pressure vessel e.g. of a BWR is separated by means of centrifugal separators untilizing the natural separation of steam. The steam is supplied to a steam drying vessel and the water to a water collecting tank. These vessels may be combined to a common vessel or connected through additional pipes. From the water collecting tank, arranged below the steam dryer, a feedwater pipe runs back to the pressure vessel. By construction out of individual components cleaning, decontamination, and operating control are essentially simplified. (RW) 891 RW [de

  9. Comparison of corrosion behavior between fusion cladded and explosive cladded Inconel 625/plain carbon steel bimetal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareie Rajani, H.R.; Akbari Mousavi, S.A.A.; Madani Sani, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both explosive and fusion cladding aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. ► Fusion cladding is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance. ► Single-layered fusion coat does not show any repassivation ability. ► Adding more layers enhance the corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625. ► High impact energy spoils the corrosion resistance of explosive cladding Inconel 625. -- Abstract: One of the main concerns in cladding Inconel 625 superalloy on desired substrates is deterioration of corrosion resistance due to cladding process. The present study aims to compare the effect of fusion cladding and explosive cladding procedures on corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 cladding on plain carbon steel as substrate. Also, an attempt has been made to investigate the role of load ratio and numbers of fusion layers in corrosion behavior of explosive and fusion cladding Inconel 625 respectively. In all cases, the cyclic polarization as an electrochemical method has been applied to assess the corrosion behavior. According to the obtained results, both cladding methods aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. However, the fusion cladding process is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance, where the chemical nonuniformity of fusion cladding superalloy issuing from microsegregation, development of secondary phases and contamination of clad through dilution hinders formation of a stable passive layer. Moreover, it is observed that adding more fusion layers can enhance the nonuniform corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625, though this resistance still remains weaker than explosive cladding superalloy. Also, the results indicate that raising the impact energy in explosive cladding procedure drops the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625.

  10. Modelling of pellet-clad interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G.; Lindback, J.E.; Schutte, H.C.; Jernkvist, L.O.; Massih, A.R.; Massih, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method to describe the pellet-clad interaction phenomenon is presented. The method accounts for the mechanical contact between fragmented pellets and the zircaloy clad, as well as for chemical reaction of fission products with zircaloy during power ramps. Possible pellet-clad contact states, soft, hard and friction, are taken into account in the computational algorithm. The clad is treated as an elastic-plastic-viscoplastic material with irradiation hardening. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking is described by using a fracture mechanics-based model for crack propagation. This integrated approach is used to evaluate two power ramp experiments made on boiling water reactor fuel rods in test reactors. The influence of the pellet-clad coefficient of friction on clad deformation is evaluated and discussed. Also, clad deformations, pellet-clad gap size and fission product gas release for one of the ramped rods are calculated and compared with measured data. (authors)

  11. Multilayer cladding with hyperbolic dispersion for plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of plasmonic waveguides with a dielectric core and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings that possess hyperbolic dispersion. The waveguides hyperbolic multilayer claddings show better performance in comparison to conventional plasmonic waveguides. © OSA 2015....

  12. Cladding using a 15 kW CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, E.J.; Verma, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laser alloying or cladding differs little in principle from the traditional forms of weld overlays, but lasers as a heat source offer some distinct advantages. With the selective heating attainable using high power lasers, good metallurgical bond of the clad layer, minimal dilution and typically, a very fine homogeneous microstructure can be obtained in the clad layer. This is a review of work in laser cladding using the 15 kW CO 2 laser. The authors discuss the ability of the laser clad surface to increase the high temperature oxidation resistance of a low-alloy carbon steel (4140). Examples of clads subjected to high- temperature thermal cycling of nickel-20% aluminum and TaC + 4140 clad low-alloy steel and straight high-temperature oxidation of Stellite 6-304L cladding on a 4140 substrate are given

  13. Development of PIE techniques for irradiated LWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Masahiro; Kizaki, Minoru; Sukegawa, Tomohide

    1999-01-01

    For the evaluation of safety and integrity of light water reactors (LWRs), various post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and fuel claddings have been carried out in the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL). In recent years, the instrumented Charpy impact testing machine was remodeled aiming at the improvement of accuracy and reliability. By this remodeling, absorbed energy and other useful information on impact properties can be delivered from the force-displacement curve for the evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement behavior of LWR-RPV steels at one-time striking. In addition, two advanced PIE technologies are now under development. One is the remote machining of mechanical test pieces from actual irradiated pressure vessel steels. The other is development of low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue test technology in order to clarify the post-irradiation fatigue characteristics of structural and fuel cladding materials. (author)

  14. Large-scale thermal-shock experiments with clad and unclad steel cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Flaw behavior trends associated with pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) loading of pressurized-water-reactor pressure vessels have been under investigation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for nearly 20 years. During that time, twelve thermal-shock experiments with thick-walled (152 mm) steel cylinders were conducted as a part of the investigations. The first eight experiments were conducted with unclad cylinders initially containing shallow (8--19 mm) two-dimensional and semicircular inner-surface flaws. These experiments demonstrated, in good agreement with linear elastic fracture mechanics, crack initiation and arrest, a series of initiation/arrest events with deep penetration of the wall, long crack jumps, arrest with the stress intensity factor (K I ) increasing with crack depth, extensive surface extension of an initially short and shallow (semicircular) flaw, and warm prestressing with K I ≤ 0. The remaining four experiments were conducted with clad cylinders containing initially shallow (19--24 mm) semielliptical subclad and surface flaws at the inner surface. In the first of these experiments one of six equally spaced (60 degrees) open-quotes identicalclose quotes subclad flaws extended nearly the length of the cylinder (1,220 mm) beneath the cladding (no crack extension into the cladding) and nearly 50% of the wall, radially. For the final experiment, four of the semielliptical subclad flaws that had not propagated previously were converted to surface flaws, and they experienced extensive extension beneath the cladding with no cracking of the cladding. Information from this series of thermal-shock experiments is being used in the evaluation of the PTS issue

  15. Evaluation of fast experimental reactor claddings, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Makoto; Nagaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yasumasa

    1974-01-01

    Thin-walled fine tubes of Type 316 austenitic stainless steel are used for fuel cladding in Joyo (experimental FBR). The material exhibits the change of the mechanical properties in long-time annealing at high temperature, resulting from the precipitation of carbide in structure. In this connection, the experiment and the results on the changes of the microstructure and mechanical properties (proof stress and hardness) are described. The test specimens are the fuel cladding tubes produced for trial for Joyo core and those for FFTF core made in the U.S.A. They were heated between 400 0 and 850 0 C for 1000 hr in vacuum. (Mori, K.)

  16. Management of cladding hulls and fuel hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from power reactors based on chop-leach technology produces a solid waste product of cladding hulls and other metallic residues. This report describes the current situation in the management of fuel cladding hulls and hardware. Information is presented on the material composition of such waste together with the heating effects due to neutron-induced activation products and fuel contamination. As no country has established a final disposal route and the corresponding repository, this report also discusses possible disposal routes and various disposal options under consideration at present

  17. Inpile (in PWR) testing of cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    As an introduction, the reasons to perform inpile tests are depicted. An overview over general inpile test procedure is given, and test details which are necessary for the development of new alloys for high burnup claddings, like sample geometries and measuring techniques for inpile corrosion testing, are described in detail. Tests for the creep and length change behavior of cladding tubes are described briefly. Finally, conclusions are drawn and literature citations for further test details are given. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  18. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  19. Phosphate-core silica-clad Er/Yb-doped optical fiber and cladding pumped laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O N; Semjonov, S L; Velmiskin, V V; Yatsenko, Yu P; Sverchkov, S E; Galagan, B I; Denker, B I; Dianov, E M

    2014-04-07

    We present a composite optical fiber with a Er/Yb co-doped phosphate-glass core in a silica glass cladding as well as cladding pumped laser. The fabrication process, optical properties, and lasing parameters are described. The slope efficiency under 980 nm cladding pumping reached 39% with respect to the absorbed pump power and 28% with respect to the coupled pump power. Due to high doping level of the phosphate core optimal length was several times shorter than that of silica core fibers.

  20. Mechanical modelling of transient- to- failure SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2014-07-01

    The response of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel rods to transient accident conditions is an important safety concern. During transients the cladding strain caused by the stress due to pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) can lead to failure. Due to the fact that SFR fuel rods are commonly clad with strengthened material made of stainless steel (SS), cladding is usually treated as an elastic-perfectly-plastic material. However, viscoplastic behaviour can contribute to mechanical strain at high temperature (> 1000 K). (Author)

  1. Analysis of coaxial laser micro cladding processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasova, Tatiana Vasilievna; Gvozdeva, Galina Olegovna; Nowotny, Steffen; Ableyeva, Riana R.; Dolzhikova, Evgenia Yu

    2018-01-01

    The laser build-up cladding is a well-known technique for repair, coatings and additive manufacturing tasks. Modern equipment for the laser cladding enables material to be deposited with the lateral resolution of about 100 μm and to manufacture miniature precise parts. However, the micro cladding regimes are unknown. Determination of these regimes is an expensive task as a well-known relation between laser cladding parameters and melt pool dimensions are changing by technology micro-miniaturi...

  2. Electron beam cladding of titanium on stainless steel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomie, Michio; Abe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanori; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental characteristics of electron beam cladding was investigated. Titanium foil of 0.2mm thickness was cladded on stainless steel plate of 3mm thickness by scanning electron beam. Surface roughness and cladded layer were analyzed by surface roughness tester, microscope, scanning electron microscope and electron probe micro analyzer. Electron beam conditions were discussed for these fundamental characteristics. It is found that the energy density of the electron beam is one of the most important factor for cladding. (author)

  3. Reactor water chemistry relevant to coolant-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The report is a summary of the work performed in a frame of a Coordinated Research Program organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1981 till 1986. It consists of a survey on our knowledge on coolant-cladding interaction: the basic phenomena, the relevant parameters, their control and the modelling techniques implemented for their assessment. Based upon the results of this Coordinated Research Program, the following topics are reviewed on the report: role of water chemistry in reliable operation of nuclear power plants; water chemistry specifications and their control; behaviour of fuel cladding materials; corrosion product behaviour and crud build-up in reactor circuits; modelling of corrosion product behaviour. This report should be of interest to water chemistry supervisors at the power plants, to experts in utility engineering departments, to fuel designers, to R and D institutes active in the field and to the consultants of these organizations. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 3 papers included in the Annex of this document. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Polarization effects in silicon-clad optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, R. F.; Batchman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    By changing the thickness of a semiconductor cladding layer deposited on a planar dielectric waveguide, the TE or TM propagating modes may be selectively attenuated. This polarization effect is due to the periodic coupling between the lossless propagating modes of the dielectric slab waveguide and the lossy modes of the cladding layer. Experimental tests involving silicon claddings show high selectivity for either polarization.

  5. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  6. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru.

    1997-01-01

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and γ rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  7. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru

    1997-07-31

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and {gamma} rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  8. Renovation of the sealing planes of WWER-400 reactors pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonicky, P.; Pilat, P.

    2007-01-01

    An article describes technical solution for renovation of the sealing planes of WWER-440 reactor's pressure vessel. Four nickel sealing rings placed in four concentric grooves are providing hermetic sealing between the vessel and the lid of this type of the reactor. Impeccable seal of the reactor's pressure vessel, where the fission reaction takes place, represents a basic security factor for safe electric energy production. Principle of renovation of the reactor's pressure vessel and lid sealing planes is based on mechanical enlargement of defective grooves and following cladding of the new material by TIG welding. Final step for renovation includes machining of new grooves according to geometrical and surface quality requirements (Authors)

  9. Modeling of in-vessel fission product release including fuel morphology effects for severe accident analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.

    1989-10-01

    A new in-vessel fission product release model has been developed and implemented to perform best-estimate calculations of realistic source terms including fuel morphology effects. The proposed bulk mass transfer correlation determines the product of fission product release and equiaxed grain size as a function of the inverse fuel temperature. The model accounts for the fuel-cladding interaction over the temperature range between 770 K and 3000 K in the steam environment. A separate driver has been developed for the in-vessel thermal hydraulic and fission product behavior models that were developed by the Department of Energy for the Modular Accident Analysis Package (MAAP). Calculational results of these models have been compared to the results of the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage tests. The code predictions utilizing the mass transfer correlation agreed with the experimentally determined fractional release rates during the course of the heatup, power hold, and cooldown phases of the high temperature transients. Compared to such conventional literature correlations as the steam oxidation model and the NUREG-0956 correlation, the mass transfer correlation resulted in lower and less rapid releases in closer agreement with the on-line and grab sample data from the Severe Fuel Damage tests. The proposed mass transfer correlation can be applied for best-estimate calculations of fission products release from the UO 2 fuel in both nominal and severe accident conditions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Experimental assessment of fuel-cladding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-29

    A range of fuel concepts designed to better tolerate accident scenarios and reactor transients are currently undergoing fundamental development at national laboratories as well as university and industrial partners. Pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction can be expected to affect fuel failure rates experienced during steady state operation, as well as dramatically impact the response of the fuel form under loss of coolant and other accident scenarios. The importance of this aspect of fuel design prompted research initiated by AFC in FY14 to begin exploratory efforts to characterize this phenomenon for candidate fuelcladding systems of immediate interest. Continued efforts in FY15 and FY17 aimed to better understand and simulate initial pellet-clad interaction with little-to-no pressure on the pellet-clad interface. Reported here are the results from 1000 h heat treatments at 400, 500, and 600°C of diffusion couples pairing UN with a FeCrAl alloy, SiC, and Zr-based cladding candidate sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules. No gross reactions were observed, though trace elemental contaminants were identified.

  11. The measurement of residual stresses in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, G.; Bender, N.

    1978-01-01

    The ring core method, a variation of the hole drilling method for the measurement of biaxial residual stresses, has been extended to measure stresses from depths of about 5 to 25mm. It is now possible to measure the stress profiles of clad material. Examples of measured stress profiles are shown and compared with those obtained with a sectioning technique. (author)

  12. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  13. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  14. Mechanism for iodine cracking of zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of iodine cracking of zirconium cladding is analyzed taking into account the effect of stresses on diffusion. A decisive effect of the stress gradiemt on crack propagation in an agressive medium is shown. The experimental data are compared with the proposed model

  15. Thermodynamics of pellet-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoh, Bunkei; Fuji, Kensho

    1987-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are performed on the U-Zr-Cs-I-O system that is assumed to exist in the fuel-cladding gap of light water reactor (LWR) fuel under pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failure condition. For this purpose a computer program called SOLGASMIX-PV for the calculation of complex multi-component equilibria is used, and the results of postirradiation examination are interpreted. The analysis of the thermodynamics of the system U-Zr-Cs-I-O indicates that cesium and iodine are assumed to be released from fuel pellet into the fuel-cladding gap as CsI, therefore, the Cs/I ratio in fuel-cladding bonding zone is one. The important condensed phases in this region are UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , Cs 2 U 2 O 7 , Cs 2 U 15 O 46 , ZrO 2 and CsI, and the major gaseous species are CsI, I 2 and I. Under this situation where Cs/I ratio is one, cesium-zirconate is not present. If, however, cesium rich phase is partially present then cesium will be associated with zirconium, possibly as Cs 2 ZrO 3 . (author)

  16. Study and Behaviour of Prefabricated Composite Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Avinash, P.; Thiagarajan, N.; Santhi, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The incessant population rise entailed for an expeditious construction at competitive prices that steered the customary path to the light weight structural components. This lead to construction of structural components using ferrocement. The load bearing structural cladding, sizing 3200x900x100 mm, is chosen for the study, which, is analyzed using the software ABAQUS 6.14 in accordance with the IS:875-87 Part1, IS:875-87 Part2, ACI 549R-97, ACI 318R-08 and NZS:3101-06 Part1 standards. The Ferrocement claddings (FCs) are fabricated to a scaled dimension of 400x115x38 mm. The light weight-high strength phenomena are corroborated by incorporating Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Laminates (GFRPL) of thickness 6mm, engineered with the aid of hand layup (wet layup) technique wielding epoxy resin, followed by curing under room temperature. The epoxy resin is employed for fastening ferrocement cladding with the Glass fiber reinforced polymer laminate, with the contemporary methodology. The compressive load carrying capacity of the amalgamated assembly, both in presence and absence of Glass Fibre Reinforced polymer laminates (GFRPL) on either side of Ferrocement cladding, has been experimented.

  17. Method for decontaminating stainless cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To form an oxide film over the surface of stainless cladding tubes and to efficiently remove radioactive materials from the steel surface together with the oxide layer by the use of an acid water solution. Method: After the removal of water from cladding tubes that have passed through the re-processing process, an oxide film is formed on the surface of the cladding tubes by heating over 400 deg C in an oxidizing atmosphere and thereafter washed again in an acid water solution. When the cladding tubes are thus oxidized once, the stainless base metal itself is oxidized, an oxide layer of several 10 μm or more being formed thereon. In consequence, since the oxide layer is far inferior in corrosion resistance to stainless metals, a pickling liquid easily penetrates into the stainless metal through the oxide layer, thereby remarkably promoting the peeling of the layer from the base metal surface and also improving the residual radioactive material removing efficiency together. (Takahashi, M.)

  18. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  19. Evolution of transmission spectra of double cladding fiber during etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Oleg V.; Tian, Fei; Du, Henry

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of optical transmission through a double cladding fiber-optic structure during etching. The structure is formed by a section of SM630 fiber with inner depressed cladding between standard SMF-28 fibers. Its transmission spectrum exhibits two resonance dips at wavelengths where two cladding modes have almost equal propagation constants. We measure transmission spectra with decreasing thickness of the cladding and show that the resonance dips shift to shorter wavelengths, while new dips of lower order modes appear from long wavelength side. We calculate propagation constants of cladding modes and resonance wavelengths, which we compare with the experiment.

  20. Method for automatic filling of nuclear fuel rod cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezold, H.

    1979-01-01

    Prior to welding the zirconium alloy cladding tubes with end caps, they are automatically filled with nuclear fuel tablets and ceramic insulating tablets. The tablets are introduced into magazine drums and led through a drying oven to a discharging station. The empty cladding tubes are removed from this discharging station and filled with tablets. A filling stamp pushes out the columns of tablets in the magazine tubes of the magazine drum into the cladding tube. Weight and measurement of length determine the filled state of the cladding tube. The cladding tubes are then led to the welding station via a conveyor belt. (DG) [de

  1. Fuel cladding interaction with water coolant in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Water coolant chemistry and corrosion processes are important factors in reliable operation of NPP's, as at elevated temperatures water is aggressive towards structural materials. Water regimes for commercial Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors were developed and proved to be satisfactory. Nevertheless, studies of operation experience continue and an amount of new Research and Development work is being conducted for further improvements of technology and better understanding of the physicochemical nature of those processes. In this report information is presented on the IAEA programme on fuel element cladding interaction with water coolant. Some results of this survey and recommendations made by the group of consultants who participated in this work are given as well as recommendations for continuation of this study. Separate abstracts were prepared for 6 papers of this report

  2. Method to produce carbon-cladded nuclear fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturge, D.W.; Meaden, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    In the method charges of micro-spherules of fuel element are designed to have two carbon layers, whereby a one aims to achieve a uniform granulation (standard measurement). Two drums are used for this purpose connected behind one another. The micro-spherules coated with the first layer (phenolformaldehyde resin coated graphite particles) leave the first drum and enter the second one. Following the coating with a second layer, the micro-spherules are introduced into a grain size separator. The spherules that are too small are directly recycled into the second drum and those ones that are too large are recycled into the first drum after removing the graphite layers. The method may also be applied to metal cladded particles to manufacture cermet fuels. (RW) [de

  3. Overview of research trends and problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steels for pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Byung Ha; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2000-01-01

    Cr-Mo low alloy steels have been used for a long time for pressure vessel due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high temperature strength and toughness. The paper reviewed the latest trends on material development and some problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steel for pressure vessel, such as elevated temperature strength, hardenability, synergetic effect between temper and hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen attack and hydrogen induced disbonding of overlay weld-cladding

  4. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, V.; Andersson, Stefan

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill's theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture

  5. Research on laser cladding control system based on fuzzy PID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Yu, Zhengyang

    2017-12-01

    Laser cladding technology has a high demand for control system, and the domestic laser cladding control system mostly uses the traditional PID control algorithm. Therefore, the laser cladding control system has a lot of room for improvement. This feature is suitable for laser cladding technology, Based on fuzzy PID three closed-loop control system, and compared with the conventional PID; At the same time, the laser cladding experiment and friction and wear experiment were carried out under the premise of ensuring the reasonable control system. Experiments show that compared with the conventional PID algorithm in fuzzy the PID algorithm under the surface of the cladding layer is more smooth, the surface roughness increases, and the wear resistance of the cladding layer is also enhanced.

  6. Mechanical test of E110 cladding material oxidized in hydrogen rich steam atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windberg, P.; Perez-Fero, E.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of the fuel cladding under accidental conditions has been studied at the AEKI for more than a decade. Earlier, the effect of oxygen and hydrogen content on the mechanical properties was studied separately. The present experiments can help to understand what kind of processes took place in the cleaning tank at Paks NPP (2003). The purpose of our experiments was to investigate high temperature oxidation of E110 cladding in steam + hydrogen mixture. A high temperature tube furnace was used for oxidation of the samples. The oxidation was carried out at three different temperatures (900 0 C, 1000 0 C, 1100 0 C). The hydrogen content in the steam was varied between 19-36 vol%. The oxygen content of the sample was defined as oxidation ratio. Two sizes (length: 2 and 8 mm) of cladding rings and 100 mm long E110 cladding tubes were oxidized. After the oxidation we made compression and tensile tests for rings, and ballooning experiments for 100 mm long tube. The most important conclusions were the following. Oxidation in H-rich steam atmosphere need longer time to get the same oxidation ratio compared to the steam oxidation without hydrogen. The shorter oxidation time results in a more compact oxide layer. The longer oxidation time leads to a cracked oxide layer. (author)

  7. Fracture behavior of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an RPV wall section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from an RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data

  8. Examination of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Markulin, K.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand of a higher level of safety in the operation of the nuclear power plants requires the utilisation of more precise automated equipment to perform in-service inspections. That has been achieved by technological advances in computer technology, in robotics, in examination probe technology with the development of the advanced inspection technique and has also been due to the considerable and varied experience gained in the performance of such inspections. In-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel, especially Russian-designed WWER-1000 presents one of the most important and extensive examination of nuclear power plants primary circuit components. Such examination demand high standards of inspection technology, quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing advanced technology. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the base metal of vessel and reactor welds, whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual testing is used for examination of the vessel interior. The movement of inspection probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with inspection systems. The successful performance of reactor pressure vessel is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen non-destructive techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state-of-the-art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. This paper presents advanced approach in the reactor pressure vessel in-service inspections and it is especially developed for WWER-1000 nuclear power plants.(author)

  9. Spent fuel cladding containment credit test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1983-01-01

    As an initial step in addressing the effectiveness of breached cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release from the repository during the post-containment period, preliminary scoping tests have been initiated which compare radionuclide releases from spent fuel specimens with artificially induced cladding defects of various severities. The artificially induced defects are all more severe than the typical in-reactor type breaches which are expected to be the principal type of breach entering the repository for terminal storage. These preliminary scoping tests being conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Waste Package Development Program in support of the Tuff repository project at the Nevada Test Site are described. Also included in this presentation are selected initial results from these tests. 22 figures

  10. Creep collapse of TAPS fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Anand, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    Densification of UO 2 can cause axial gaps between fuel pelets and cladding in unsupported (internally) at these regions. An analysis is carried out regarding the possibility of creep collapse in these regions. The analysis is based on Timoshenko's theory of collapse. At various times during the residence of fuel in reactor following parameters are calculated : (1) inelastic collapse of perfectly circular tubes (2) plastic instability in oval tubes (3) effect of creep on ovality. Creep is considered to be a non-linear combination of the following : (a) thermal creep (b) intresenic creep (c) stress aided radiation enhanced (d) stress free growth (4) Critical pressure ratio. The results obtained are compared with G.E. predictions. The results do not predict collapse of TAPS fuel cladding for five year residence time. (author)

  11. Development of Cr Electroplated Cladding Tube for preventing Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Woo, Je Woong; Kim, Sung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Byung Oon; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Metal fuel has been selected as a candidate fuel in the SFR because of its superior thermal conductivity as well as enhanced proliferation resistance in connection with the pyroprocessing. However, metal fuel suffers eutectic reaction (Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction, FCCI) with the fuel cladding made of stainless steel at reactor operating temperature so that cladding thickness gradually reduces to endanger reactor safety. In order to mitigate FCCI, barrier concept has been proposed between the fuel and the cladding in designing fuel rod. Regarding this, KAERI has initiated barrier cladding development to prevent interdiffusion process as well as enhance the SFR fuel performance. Previous study revealed that Cr electroplating has been selected as one of the most promising options because of its technical and economic viability. This paper describes the development status of the Cr electroplating technology for the usage of fuel rod in SFR. This paper summarizes the status of Cr electroplating technology to prevent FCCI in metal fuel rod. It has been selected for the ease of practical application at the tube inner surface. Technical scoping, performance evaluation and optimization have been carried out. Application to the tube inner surface and in-pile test were conducted which revealed as effective.

  12. Assembly and Delivery of Rabbit Capsules for Irradiation of Silicon Carbide Cladding Tube Specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Neutron irradiation of silicon carbide (SiC)-based fuel cladding under a high radial heat flux presents a critical challenge for SiC cladding concepts in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission heating in the fuel provides a high heat flux through the cladding, which, combined with the degraded thermal conductivity of SiC under irradiation, results in a large temperature gradient through the thickness of the cladding. The strong temperature dependence of swelling in SiC creates a complex stress profile in SiCbased cladding tubes as a result of differential swelling. The Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Program within the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is supporting research efforts to improve the scientific understanding of the effects of irradiation on SiC cladding tubes. Ultimately, the results of this project will provide experimental validation of multi-physics models for SiC-based fuel cladding during LWR operation. The first objective of this project is to irradiate tube specimens using a previously developed design that allows for irradiation testing of miniature SiC tube specimens subjected to a high radial heat flux. The previous “rabbit” capsule design uses the gamma heating in the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to drive a high heat flux through the cladding tube specimens. A compressible aluminum foil allows for a constant thermal contact conductance between the cladding tubes and the rabbit housing despite swelling of the SiC tubes. To allow separation of the effects of irradiation from those due to differential swelling under a high heat flux, a new design was developed under the NSUF program. This design allows for irradiation of similar SiC cladding tube specimens without a high radial heat flux. This report briefly describes the irradiation experiment design concepts, summarizes the irradiation test matrix, and reports on the successful delivery of six rabbit capsules to the HFIR. Rabbits of both low and high

  13. LASER CLADDING ON ALUMINIUM BASE ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Pilloz , M.; Pelletier , J.; Vannes , A.; Bignonnet , A.

    1991-01-01

    laser cladding is often performed on iron or titanium base alloys. In the present work, this method is employed on aluminum alloys ; nickel or silicon are added by powder injection. Addition of silicon leads to sound surface layers, but with moderated properties, while the presence of nickel induces the formation of hard intermetallic compounds and then to an attractive hardening phenomena ; however a recovery treatment has to be carried out, in order to eliminate porosity in the near surface...

  14. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The composite of metals and alloys used in the fabrication of 238 Pu cardiac pacemaker fuel capsules resists the effects of high temperatures, high mechanical forces, and chemical corrosives and provides more than adequate protection to the fuel pellet even from deliberate attempts to dissolve the cladding in inorganic acids. This does not imply that opening a pacemaker fuel capsule by inorganic acids is impossible but that it would not be a wise choice

  15. Degradation resistant fuel cladding materials and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Montes, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    GE has been producing the degradation resistant cladding (zirconium liner and zircaloy-2 surface larger) described here with the cooperation of its primary zirconium vendors since the beginning of 1994. Approximately 24 fuel reloads, or in excess of 250,000 fuel rods, have been produced using this material by GE. GE has also produced tubing for one reload of fuel that is currently being produced by its technology affiliate ENUSA. (orig./HP)

  16. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  17. Plasma spheroidization and cladding of powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    With reference to experimental results for nickel and chromium alloys, it is shown that complex alloy powders can be spheroidized in plasma discharges using an argon plasma with hydrogen. The spheroidizing process is accompanied by the reduction of surface oxides, with uniform element distribution within the particles; the granulometric composition of the particles is preserved. It is also shown that plasma technology can be used for producing metal-clad oxide and carbide powders, which improve the performance of cermets and coatings.

  18. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  19. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Griffith, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R and D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental enhancements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and fuel/cladding interaction to allow improved fuel economy via power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an 'accident tolerant' fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. In a staged development approach, the LWRS program will engage stakeholders throughout the development process to ensure commercial viability of the investigated technologies. Applying minimum performance criteria, several of the top-ranked materials and fabrication concepts will undergo a rigorous series of mechanical, thermal and chemical characterization tests to better define their properties and operating potential in a relatively low-cost, nonnuclear test series. A reduced number of options will be recommended for test rodlet fabrication and in-pile nuclear testing under steady-state, transient and accident conditions. (author)

  20. Cladding failure by local plastic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.M.; Deitrich, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    Cladding failure is one of the major considerations in analysis of fast-reactor fuel pin behavior during hypothetical accident transients since time, location and nature of failure govern the early post-failure material motion and reactivity feedback. Out-of-Pile transient burst tests of both irradiated and unirradiated fast-reactor cladding show that local plastic instability, or bulging, often precedes rupture. To investigate the details of cladding bulging, a perturbation analysis of the equations governing the large deformation of a cylindrical shell has been developed. The overall deformation history is assumed to consist of a small perturbation epsilon of the radial displacement superimposed on large axisymmetric displacements. Computations have been carried out using high temperature properties of stainless steel in conjunction with various constitutive theories, including a generalization of the Endochronic Theory of Plasticity in which both time-independent and time-dependent plastic strains are modeled. Although the results of the calculations are all qualitatively similar, it appears that modeling of both time-independent and time-dependent plastic strains is necessary to interpret the transient burst test results. Sources for bulge formation that have been considered include initial geometric imperfections and thermal perturbations due to either eccentric fuel pellets or non-symmetric cooling. (Auth.)

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Clad and Post-cladding Tempered AISI H13 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telasang, Gururaj; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna; Wasekar, Nitin; Padmanabham, G.; Manna, Indranil

    2015-05-01

    This study reports a detailed investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties (wear resistance and tensile strength) of hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel substrate following laser cladding with AISI H13 tool steel powder in as-clad and after post-cladding conventional bulk isothermal tempering [at 823 K (550 °C) for 2 hours] heat treatment. Laser cladding was carried out on AISI H13 tool steel substrate using a 6 kW continuous wave diode laser coupled with fiber delivering an energy density of 133 J/mm2 and equipped with a co-axial powder feeding nozzle capable of feeding powder at the rate of 13.3 × 10-3 g/mm2. Laser clad zone comprises martensite, retained austenite, and carbides, and measures an average hardness of 600 to 650 VHN. Subsequent isothermal tempering converted the microstructure into one with tempered martensite and uniform dispersion of carbides with a hardness of 550 to 650 VHN. Interestingly, laser cladding introduced residual compressive stress of 670 ± 15 MPa, which reduces to 580 ± 20 MPa following isothermal tempering. Micro-tensile testing with specimens machined from the clad zone across or transverse to cladding direction showed high strength but failure in brittle mode. On the other hand, similar testing with samples sectioned from the clad zone parallel or longitudinal to the direction of laser cladding prior to and after post-cladding tempering recorded lower strength but ductile failure with 4.7 and 8 pct elongation, respectively. Wear resistance of the laser surface clad and post-cladding tempered samples (evaluated by fretting wear testing) registered superior performance as compared to that of conventional hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel.

  2. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed

  3. An experimental study on feasibility of ex-vessel cooling through the external guide vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Park, Rae-Jun; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of experiments for assessing the efficacy of ex-vessel cooling through the external guide vessel during a severe accident. Four tests were performed in the LAVA test facility at KAERI, varying the boundary conditions at the outer surface of the vessel. The first test was a dry condition test conducted without cooling the outside of the vessel. On the other hand, in the second test, the cooling of the vessel surface was produced by gravity-driven forced injection of water along the annular gap of 25 mm between the vessel and the external guide vessel. Water flow rate was about 0.85 kg/s and total mass of available water was 300 kg. For the evaluation of the water flow rate effect, the third test was performed with a pool type cooling in the annulus without any circulation of water. These two external cooling tests were performed under elevated pressure of about 1.6 MPa. Finally, the fourth test was conducted under atmospheric pressure to evaluate the effect of system pressure on boiling heat transfer characteristics. In the dry test and the pool type ex-vessel cooling test performed under atmospheric pressure, the vessel was failed by a melt penetration at about 40 degree upper position from the vessel bottom, which is coincident with the boundary of the Al 2 O 3 /Fe melt separated layers. On the other hand, in both of the ex-vessel cooling tests conducted under elevated pressure of about 1.6 MPa, the vessel didn't fail. Compared with the pool boiling test, the vessel experienced effective cooling due to the inlet flow in the forced flow test. Synthesized the results of the tests, it was shown that the heat removal with ex-vessel cooling through the guide vessel is feasible, but the additional evaluations should be performed to guarantee enough thermal margin. (author)

  4. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  5. Impact of reactor water chemistry on cladding performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry may have a major impact on fuel cladding performance in PWRs. If the saturation temperature on the surface of fuel cladding is exceeded, either because of the thermal hydraulics of the system, or because of crud deposition, then LiOH concentration can occur within thick porous oxide films on the cladding. This can degrade the protective film and accelerate the corrosion rate of the cladding. If sufficient boric acid is also present in the coolant then these effects may be mitigated. This is normally the case through most of any reactor fuel cycle. Extensive surface boiling may disrupt this equilibrium because of the volatility of boric acid in steam. Under such conditions severe cladding corrosion can ensue. The potential for such effects on high burnup cladding in CANDU reactors, where bone acid is not present in the primary coolant, is discussed. (author)

  6. Impact of reactor water chemistry on cladding performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B. [University of Toronto, Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Water chemistry may have a major impact on fuel cladding performance in PWRs. If the saturation temperature on the surface of fuel cladding is exceeded, either because of the thermal hydraulics of the system, or because of crud deposition, then LiOH concentration can occur within thick porous oxide films on the cladding. This can degrade the protective film and accelerate the corrosion rate of the cladding. If sufficient boric acid is also present in the coolant then these effects may be mitigated. This is normally the case through most of any reactor fuel cycle. Extensive surface boiling may disrupt this equilibrium because of the volatility of boric acid in steam. Under such conditions severe cladding corrosion can ensue. The potential for such effects on high burnup cladding in CANDU reactors, where bone acid is not present in the primary coolant, is discussed. (author)

  7. Research Progress on Laser Cladding Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Ming-hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and property of amorphous alloy as well as the limitations of the traditional manufacturing methods for the bulk amorphous alloy were briefly introduced in this paper.Combined with characteristics of the laser cladding technique,the research status of the laser cladding Fe-based,Zr-based,Ni-based,Cu-based and Al-based amorphous coatings on the metal substrates were mainly summarized.The effects of factors such as laser processing parameter,micro-alloying element type and content and reinforcing phase on the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also involved.Finally,the main problems and the future research directions of the composition design and control of the laser-cladded amorphous coating,the design and optimization of the laser cladding process,and the basic theory of the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also put forward finally.

  8. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings.

  9. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings

  10. Clad fiber capacitor and method of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2012-12-11

    A clad capacitor and method of manufacture includes assembling a preform comprising a ductile, electrically conductive fiber; a ductile, electrically insulating cladding positioned on the fiber; and a ductile, electrically conductive sleeve positioned over the cladding. One or more preforms are then bundled, heated and drawn along a longitudinal axis to decrease the diameter of the ductile components of the preform and fuse the preform into a unitized strand.

  11. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  12. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  13. Computer analysis of elongation of the WWER fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper description of mechanisms influencing changes of the WWER fuel cladding length and axial forces influencing fuel and cladding are presented. It is shown that shortening of the fuel claddings in case of high burnup can be explained by the change of the fuel and cladding reference state caused by reduction of the fuel rod power level - during reactor outages. It is noted that the presented calculated data are to be reviewed and interpreted as the preliminary results; further work is needed for their confirmation. (authors)

  14. Laser cladding of Zr on Mg for improved corrosion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, R.; Sircar, S.; Mazumder, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of laser cladding of Mg-2wt%Zr, and Mg-5wt%Zr powder mixture onto magnesium. The microstructure of the laser clad was studied. From the microstructural study, the epitaxial regrowth of the clad region on the underlying substrate was observed. Martensite plates of different size were observed in transmission electron microscope for MG-2wt%Zr and Mg-5wt%Zr laser clad. The corrosion properties of the laser clad were evaluated in sea water (3.5% NaCl). The position of the laser claddings in the galvanic series of metals in sea water, the anodic polarization characteristics of the laser claddings and the protective nature and the stability of the passivating film formed have been determined. The formation of pits on the surface of the laser clad subjected to corrosion is reported. The corrosion properties of the laser claddings are compared with that of the commercially used magnesium alloy AZ91B

  15. Rectangular-cladding silicon slot waveguide with improved nonlinear performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zengzhi; Huang, Qingzhong; Wang, Yi; Xia, Jinsong

    2018-04-01

    Silicon slot waveguides have great potential in hybrid silicon integration to realize nonlinear optical applications. We propose a rectangular-cladding hybrid silicon slot waveguide. Simulation result shows that, with a rectangular-cladding, the slot waveguide can be formed by narrower silicon strips, so the two-photon absorption (TPA) loss in silicon is decreased. When the cladding material is a nonlinear polymer, the calculated TPA figure of merit (FOMTPA) is 4.4, close to the value of bulk nonlinear polymer of 5.0. This value confirms the good nonlinear performance of rectangular-cladding silicon slot waveguides.

  16. Stainless steel clad for light water reactor fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, J.E.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    Proper reactor operation and design guidelines are necessary to assure fuel integrity. The occurrence of fuel rod failures for operation in compliance with existing guidelines suggests the need for more adequate or applicable operation/design criteria. The intent of this study is to develop such criteria for light water reactor fuel rods with stainless steel clad and to indicate the nature of uncertainties in its development. The performance areas investigated herein are: long term creepdown and fuel swelling effects on clad dimensional changes and on proximity to clad failure; and short term clad failure possibilities during up-power ramps

  17. Determination of plastic anisotropy of zirconium alloys cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, N.V.; Prasolov, P.F.; Shestak, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Method for determining plastic anisotropy of zurconium alloy cladding is described. It is based on consideration of material as a combination of transversal crystallites with known distribution over orientations. Such approach enables to describe cladding resistance to plastic deformation at arbitrary stressed state, using the results of texture investigations and uniaxial tests of samples, cut out of claddings along three directions. Plastic anisotropy of fuel element claddings 9.15 and 13.6 mm in diameter up to several percents of plastic deformation is shown

  18. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points

  19. Photochemical separation and extraction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yukio; Morimoto, Kyoichi.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a device for separating neptunium and plutonium from highly radioactive liquid wastes, in which valance control by irradiation of UV rays and extraction operation by using an organic solvent can be conducted simultaneously in the same reaction vessel. Namely, a step of irradiating UV rays to the liquid in the reaction vessel to control the valence of predetermined materials and a step of separating the materials by conducting solvent-extraction while stirring with a solvent are conducted simultaneously or successively. Then, facilities for the separation method can be reduced and the operation steps can be simplified. (N.H.)

  20. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  1. Residual stresses due to weld repairs, cladding and electron beam welds and effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior. Annual report, September 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, E.F.

    1978-11-01

    The study is divided into three tasks. Task I is concerned with predicting and understanding the effects of residual stresses due to weld repairs of pressure vessels. Task II examines residual stresses due to an electron beam weld. Task III addresses the problem of residual stresses produced by weld cladding at a nozzle vessel intersection. The objective of Task I is to develop a computational model for predicting residual stress states due to a weld repair of pressure vessel and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the creation of the residual stresses. Experimental data from the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) is used to validate the computational model. In Task II, the residual stress model is applied to the case of an electron beam weld of a compact tension freacture specimen. The results in the form of residual stresses near the weld are then used to explain unexpected fracture behavior which is observed in the testing of the specimen. For Task III, the residual stress model is applied to the cladding process used in nozzle regions of nuclear pressure vessels. The residual stresses obtained from this analysis are evaluated to determine their effect on the phenomena of under-clad cracking

  2. Improvement to reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The vessel described includes a prestressed concrete vessel containing a chamber and a removable cover closing this chamber. The cover is in concrete and is kept in its closed position by main and auxiliary retainers, comprising fittings integral with the concrete of the vessel. The auxiliary retainers pass through the concrete of the cover. This improvement may be applied to BWR, PWR and LMFBR type reactor vessel [fr

  3. Inservice inspection of Halden BWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerli, O.; Hernes, T.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of how the recertification inspection of the 20 years old Halden Reactor pressure vessel was carried out in accordance with the latest ASME-CODES, despite the fact that inspection accessibility was poor. As no volumetric inspection had been carried out since the preservice radiography in 1957, the ultrasonic inspection included the high flux region of all welds. In total 70% of longitudinal welds and 20% of bottom circumferential welds were inspected as well as the bottom nozzle connection. The vessel was not designed with provisions for inservice inspection, the welds are unaccessible from the outside and removal of the lid is virtually impossible. The ultrasonic probes could only be loaded through 77 mm diameter holes in the top lid and remotely positioned inside the vessel. The inspection was performed using 450C and 60OC 1 MHz angle probes and 2.25 MHz normal probes in immersion technique. In a zone around the welds, small regions with lack of bonding between the stainless steel cladding and the boiler steel were revealed. One root defect known and accepted from the preservice radiographs was examined. The defect was found to be 6x30mm as a maximum and well within acceptable limits according to the fracture mechanics analysis method recommended in ASME X1. The inspection required a period of three weeks' work in the reactor hall. (UK)

  4. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  5. DECONTAMINATION OF ZIRCALOY SPENT FUEL CLADDING HULLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T; John Mickalonis, J

    2006-01-01

    The reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generates a Zircaloy cladding hull waste which requires disposal as a high level waste in the geologic repository. The hulls are primarily contaminated with fission products and actinides from the fuel. During fuel irradiation, these contaminants are deposited in a thin layer of zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) which forms on the cladding surface at the elevated temperatures present in a nuclear reactor. Therefore, if the hulls are treated to remove the ZrO 2 layer, a majority of the contamination will be removed and the hulls could potentially meet acceptance criteria for disposal as a low level waste (LLW). Discard of the hulls as a LLW would result in significant savings due to the high costs associated with geologic disposal. To assess the feasibility of decontaminating spent fuel cladding hulls, two treatment processes developed for dissolving fuels containing zirconium (Zr) metal or alloys were evaluated. Small-scale dissolution experiments were performed using the ZIRFLEX process which employs a boiling ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F)/ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) solution to dissolve Zr or Zircaloy cladding and a hydrofluoric acid (HF) process developed for complete dissolution of Zr-containing fuels. The feasibility experiments were performed using Zircaloy-4 metal coupons which were electrochemically oxidized to produce a thin ZrO 2 layer on the surface. Once the oxide layer was in place, the ease of removing the layer using methods based on the two processes was evaluated. The ZIRFLEX and HF dissolution processes were both successful in removing a 0.2 mm (thick) oxide layer from Zircaloy-4 coupons. Although the ZIRFLEX process was effective in removing the oxide layer, two potential shortcomings were identified. The formation of ammonium hexafluorozirconate ((NH 4 ) 2 ZrF 6 ) on the metal surface prior to dissolution in the bulk solution could hinder the decontamination process by obstructing the removal of

  6. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  7. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid

  8. PCI resistant light water reactor fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.P.; Sabol, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    A tubular nuclear fuel element cladding tube is described, the fuel element cladding tube forming the entire fuel element cladding and consisting of: a single continuous wall, the single continuous wall consisting of a single alloy selected from the group consisting of zirconium base alloys, A, B, C, D, and E; the single continuous wall characterized by a cold worked and stress relieved microstructure throughout; wherein the zirconium base alloy A contains 0.2 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.03 - 0.11 w/o sum of Fe and Cr, section 600 ppm O and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy B contains 0.1 - 0.6 w/oo Sn, 0.04 - 0.24 w/o Fe, 0.05 - 0.15 w/o Cr, section 0.08 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy C contains 1.2 - 1.7 w/o Sn, 0.04 - 0.24 w/o Fe, 0.05 - 0.15 w/o Cr, section 0.08 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy D contains 0.15 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.15 - 0.5 w/o Fe, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities; and the zirconium base alloy E contains 0.4 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.1 - 0.3 w/o Fe, 0.03 - 0.07 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities

  9. Weld residual stresses near the bimetallic interface in clad RPV steel: A comparison between deep-hole drilling and neutron diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M.N., E-mail: mjames@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Newby, M.; Doubell, P. [Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd, Lower Germiston Road, Rosherville, Johannesburg (South Africa); Hattingh, D.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Serasli, K.; Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Queen' s Building, University Walk, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Identification of residual stress trends across bimetallic interface in stainless clad RPV. • Comparison between deep hole drilling (DHD – stress components in two directions) and neutron diffraction (ND – stress components in three directions). • Results indicate that both techniques can assess the trends in residual stress across the interface. • Neutron diffraction gives more detailed information on transient residual stress peaks. - Abstract: The inner surface of ferritic steel reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is clad with strip welded austenitic stainless steel primarily to increase the long-term corrosion resistance of the ferritic vessel. The strip welding process used in the cladding operation induces significant residual stresses in the clad layer and in the RPV steel substrate, arising both from the thermal cycle and from the very different thermal and mechanical properties of the austenitic clad layer and the ferritic RPV steel. This work measures residual stresses using the deep hole drilling (DHD) and neutron diffraction (ND) techniques and compares residual stress data obtained by the two methods in a stainless clad coupon of A533B Class 2 steel. The results give confidence that both techniques are capable of assessing the trends in residual stresses, and their magnitudes. Significant differences are that the ND data shows greater values of the tensile stress peaks (∼100 MPa) than the DHD data but has a higher systematic error associated with it. The stress peaks are sharper with the ND technique and also differ in spatial position by around 1 mm compared with the DHD technique.

  10. Weld residual stresses near the bimetallic interface in clad RPV steel: A comparison between deep-hole drilling and neutron diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.N.; Newby, M.; Doubell, P.; Hattingh, D.G.; Serasli, K.; Smith, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Identification of residual stress trends across bimetallic interface in stainless clad RPV. • Comparison between deep hole drilling (DHD – stress components in two directions) and neutron diffraction (ND – stress components in three directions). • Results indicate that both techniques can assess the trends in residual stress across the interface. • Neutron diffraction gives more detailed information on transient residual stress peaks. - Abstract: The inner surface of ferritic steel reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is clad with strip welded austenitic stainless steel primarily to increase the long-term corrosion resistance of the ferritic vessel. The strip welding process used in the cladding operation induces significant residual stresses in the clad layer and in the RPV steel substrate, arising both from the thermal cycle and from the very different thermal and mechanical properties of the austenitic clad layer and the ferritic RPV steel. This work measures residual stresses using the deep hole drilling (DHD) and neutron diffraction (ND) techniques and compares residual stress data obtained by the two methods in a stainless clad coupon of A533B Class 2 steel. The results give confidence that both techniques are capable of assessing the trends in residual stresses, and their magnitudes. Significant differences are that the ND data shows greater values of the tensile stress peaks (∼100 MPa) than the DHD data but has a higher systematic error associated with it. The stress peaks are sharper with the ND technique and also differ in spatial position by around 1 mm compared with the DHD technique

  11. Analysis of pellet cladding mechanical interaction using computational simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berretta, José R.; Suman, Ricardo B.; Faria, Danilo P.; Rodi, Paulo A., E-mail: jose.berretta@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Riscos

    2017-07-01

    During the operation of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), specifically under power transients, the fuel pellet experiences many phenomena, such as swelling and thermal expansion. These dimensional changes in the fuel pellet can enable occurrence of contact it and the cladding along the fuel rod. Thus, pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), due this contact, induces stress increase at the contact points during a period, until the accommodation of the cladding to the stress increases. This accommodation occurs by means of the cladding strain, which can produce failure, if the fuel rod deformation is permanent or the burst limit of the cladding is reached. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of the cladding during the occurrence of PCMI under power transients shall be investigated during the fuel rod design. Considering the Accident Tolerant Fuel program which aims to develop new materials to be used as cladding in PWR, one important design condition to be evaluated is the cladding behavior under PCMI. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of the PCMI on a typical PWR fuel rod geometry with stainless steel cladding under normal power transients using computational simulation (ANSYS code). The PCMI was analyzed considering four geometric situations at the region of interaction between pellet and cladding. The first case, called “perfect fuel model” was used as reference for comparison. In the second case, it was considered the occurrence of a pellet crack with the loss of a chip. The goal for the next two cases was that a pellet chip was positioned into the gap of pellet-cladding, in the situations described in the first two cases. (author)

  12. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cass, R.B.; Ott, K.C.; Peterson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for fabricating superconducting composite wire. It comprises placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within an oxygen-porous metal tube; sealing one end of the tube; igniting the superconductive precursor admixture whereby the superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture; and cross-section reducing the tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of the superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ

  13. Method and device for weld deposit cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to get weld beads of good quality, uniform thickness and faultless transition regions between neighboring beads in weld deposit cladding of metallic workpoeces, it is proposed to use a device in which the electromagnets are arranged adjacent to th zone of molten welding powder and molten metal besides having got suitable supplies for applying the welding powder, the polarity of the magnets being chosen in such a way that the lines of flux between the poles are counteracting the lines of flux surrounding the electrode band because of the welding current. Several variants of arranging the electrodes are presented in detail. (UWI) [de

  14. Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1990-12-01

    Creep, a potential degradation mechanism of Zircaloy cladding after repository disposal of spent nuclear fuel, has been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. Maximum allowable temperatures are 340 degree C (613 K) for typically stressed rods (70--100 MPa) and 300 degree C (573 K) for highly stressed rods (140--160 MPa). 10 refs., 2 figs

  15. Termination of plastic-clad fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nance, W.R.

    1982-03-01

    Optical waveguides are ideal in a nuclear weapon environment because of their resistance to electromagnetic interference. Of the fibers on today's market, plastic-clad silica (PCS) is the most radiation resistant and therfore the best choice. Because terminating PCS is complex, this paper attemps to address the major problems associated with these terminations including selecting the proper connector and optimizing the terminating procedures. The sources of losses in the connectors are summarized and typical loss values are given for four connectors which were tested

  16. CO2 laser cladding of VERSAlloyTM on carbon steel with powder feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae-Do; Kweon, Jin-Wook

    2007-01-01

    Laser cladding processing with metal powder feeding has been experimented on carbon steel with VERSAlloy TM . A special device for the metal powder feeding was designed and manufactured. By adopting proper cladding parameters, good clad layers and sound metallurgical bonding with the base metal were obtained. Analysis indicates that the micro hardness of clad layer and the heat-affected zone increased with increasing of cladding speed. The experimental results showed that VERSAlloy TM cladded well with carbon steel

  17. Thermoelastic analysis for the fuel claddings of the nuclear power reactor at Atucha in the skid's region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Sarmiento, Gustavo; Basombrio, F.G.

    1979-01-01

    For the fuel elements of the Nuclear Power Reactor at Atucha, a two-dimensional thermoelastic analysis has been made in the region of the skids of the fuel cladding, when the gap between them and the fuel rod separator's support becomes zero. In such a case the latter forces exert on the skids an elastic reaction opposite to the cladding's expansion. The internal pressure reaching the yield stress for the cladding material has been calculated, as a function of the initial gap; for several possible fuel rod locations within the separator; for the actual dimensions and also for reduced thickness of the cladding; with a given external pressure and, with a known temperature spatial distribution. The latter has been calculated by solving the heat conduction equation along the fuel element for a certain power level in the reactor. The calculations are made with two FORTRAN IV computer codes developed at C.A.B., using the finite-element method: the NOLICUARM, to solve the nonlinear quasi-harmonic equation, and the ELASTEF 3, for the solution of thermoelastic problems with plane symmetry. (author) [es

  18. Long-range plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    waveguides. We show that the proposed structures support long-range surface plasmon modes, which exist when the permittivity of the core matches the transverse effective permittivity component of the metamaterial cladding. In this regime, the surface plasmon polaritons of each cladding layer are strongly...

  19. Embedded cladding surface thermocouples on Zircaloy-sheathed heater rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.

    1977-06-01

    Titanium-sheathed Type K thermocouples embedded in the cladding wall of zircaloy-sheathed heater rods are described. These thermocouples constitute part of a program intended to characterize the uncertainty of measurements made by surface-mounted cladding thermocouples on nuclear fuel rods. Fabrication and installation detail, and laboratory testing of sample thermocouple installations are included

  20. Corrosion behavior of duplex and reference cladding in NPP Grohnde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besch, O.A.; Yagnik, S.K.; Eucken, C.M.; Bradley, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) Group undertook a lead test assembly (LTA) program in NPP Grohnde PWR in Germany to assess the corrosion performance of duplex and reference cladding. Two identical 16 by 16 LTAs, each containing 32 peripheral test rods, completed four reactor cycles, reaching a peak rod burnup of 46 MWd/kgU. The results from poolside examinations performed at the end of each cycle, together with power histories and coolant chemistry, are reported. Five different cladding materials were characterized during fabrication. The corrosion performance of the cladding materials was tracked in long-term tests in high-pressure, high-temperature autoclaves. The relative ranking of corrosion behavior in such tests corresponded well with the in-reactor corrosion performance. The extent and distribution of hydriding in duplex and reference specimens during the autoclave testing has been characterized. The in-reactor corrosion data indicate that the low-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R2, had an improved corrosion resistance compared to high-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R1. Two types of duplex cladding, D1 (Zr-2.5% Nb) and D2 (Zr-0.4% Fe-0.5% Sn), showed an even further improvement in corrosion resistance compared to R2 cladding. The third duplex cladding, D3 (Zr-4 + 1.0% Nb), had significantly less corrosion resistance, which was inferior to R1. The in-reactor and out-reactor corrosion performances have been ranked

  1. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler

  2. Ruthenium separation device from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayabe, Osao.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently oxidize ruthenium in radioactive wastes and evaporize ruthenium tetraoxide after oxidization thereof, thereby improve the separation and recovery rate. Constitution: The device comprises an oxidization vessel for supplying an oxidizing agent into radioactive wastes to oxidize ruthenium in the wastes into ruthenium tetraoxide, and a distillation vessel for introducing radioactive wastes after oxidization, distillating under heating ruthenium tetraoxide leached into the wastes and evaporizing ruthenium tetraoxide. By dividing the device into the oxidizing vessel and the distillation vessel, the oxidizing treatment and the distilling treatment can individually be operated optimally to improve the separation and recovery rate of ruthenium. (Takahashi, M.)

  3. Instrument for measuring fuel cladding strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    Development work to provide instrumentation for the continuous measurement of strain of material specimens such as nuclear fuel cladding has shown that a microwave sensor and associated instrumentation hold promise. The cylindrical sensor body enclosing the specimen results in a coaxial resonator absorbing microwave energy at frequencies dependent upon the diameter of the specimen. Diametral changes of a microinch can be resolved with use of the instrumentation. Very reasonable values of elastic strain were measured at 75 0 F and 1000 0 F for an internally pressurized 20 percent C.W. 316 stainless steel specimen simulating nuclear fuel cladding. The instrument also indicated the creep strain of the same specimen pressurized at 6500 psi and at a temperature of 1000 0 F for a period of 700 hours. Although the indicated strain appears greater than actual, the sensor/specimen unit experienced considerable oxidation even though an inert gas purge persisted throughout the test duration. By monitoring at least two modes of resonance, the measured strain was shown to be nearly independent of sensor temperature. To prevent oxidation, a second test was performed in which the specimen/sensor units were contained in an evacuated enclosure. The strain of the two prepressurized specimens as indicated by the microwave instrumentation agreed very closely with pre- and post-test measurements obtained with use of a laser interferometer

  4. Material Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cladding materials to Zr-based alloys are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as > 100X improvement (compared to Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H 2 environments at ≥1473 K (1200°C) for short times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti 2 AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. However, commercial Ti 2 AlC that was not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°C in steam and significant TiO 2 , and therefore Ti 2 AlC may be challenging to form as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation-assisted α' formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at > 1400°C are still being evaluated.

  5. Material Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cladding materials to Zr-based alloys are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as > 100X improvement (compared to Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥ 1200°C for short times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. However, commercial Ti2AlC that was not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°C in steam and significant TiO2, and therefore Ti2AlC may be challenging to form as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation-assisted α´ formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at > 1400°C are still being evaluated.

  6. Fuel cladding tube leak detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Makoto.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention can detect even a minute leakage or a continuous leakage during reactor operation. That is, the device of the present invention comprises a detector for analyzing nuclides of gases incorporated in a gas waste processing system, and a calculation device connected to the detector and detecting leakage from a fuel cladding tube by calculation for variation coefficient of long-life nuclides. By using theses devices, radioactivity contained in gases incorporated in the gas waste processing system is analyzed for the nuclides. Among the analized nuclides, if the amount of the long-life nuclides exceeds a predetermined value, it is judged as leakage of the fuel cladding tube. For example, the long-life nuclides include Xe-133. The device of the present invention can certainly detect occurrence of leakage even when it is minute or continues leakage. Accordingly, countermeasures can be taken in an early stage, thereby enabling to contribute improvement for the safety of a nuclear power plant. (I.S.)

  7. Inspection apparatus for a vessel made of magnetic metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.P.; Foster, A.C.; Smith, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Previous systems intended for in-situ inspection of the pressure vessels of nuclear reactors are of uneasy use on encumbered surfaces. Said invention relates to a remote-control device for inspecting vessel walls. It comprises a conveyor able to be propelled, possibly around obstacles, towards any place inside the vessel; said vehicle is provided with magnetic wheels driven by an electric motor and separately controlled. The conveyor is accurately located on the vessel by using an acoustic device involving a triangular method, and consisting in an acoustic signal emitter mounted on the conveyor and at least three receiving transducers mounted on the vessel wall [fr

  8. The ballooning of fuel cladding tubes: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewfelt, R.S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Under some conditions, fuel clad ballooning can result in considerable strain before rupture. If ballooning were to occur during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the resulting substantial blockage of the sub-channel would restrict emergency core cooling. However, circumferential temperature gradients that would occur during a LOCA may significantly limit the average strain at failure. Understandably, the factors that control ballooning and rupture of fuel clad are required for the analysis of a LOCA. Considerable international effort has been spent on studying the deformation of Zircaloy fuel cladding under conditions that would occur during a LOCA. This effort has established a reasonable understanding of the factors that control the ballooning, failure time, and average failure strain of fuel cladding. In this paper, both the experimental and theoretical studies of the fuel clad ballooning are reviewed. (author)

  9. Cladding modes of optical fibers: properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Oleg V; Nikitov, Sergei A; Gulyaev, Yurii V

    2006-01-01

    One of the new methods of fiber optics uses cladding modes for controlling propagation of radiation in optical fibers. This paper reviews the results of studies on the propagation, excitation, and interaction of cladding modes in optical fibers. The resonance between core and cladding modes excited by means of fiber Bragg gratings, including tilted ones, is analyzed. Propagation of cladding modes in microstructured fibers is considered. The most frequently used method of exciting cladding modes is described, based on the application of long-period fiber gratings. Examples are presented of long-period gratings used as sensors and gain equalizers for fiber amplifiers, as well as devices for coupling light into and out of optical fibers. (instruments and methods of investigation)

  10. Cladding failure probability modeling for risk evaluations of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops the methodology to incorporate cladding failure data and associated modeling into risk evaluations of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMRs). Current US innovative designs for metal-fueled pool-type LMRs take advantage of inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms to limit reactor temperature increases in response to classic anticipated-transient-without-scram (ATWS) initiators. Final shutdown without reliance on engineered safety features can then be accomplished if sufficient time is available for operator intervention to terminate fission power production and/or provide auxiliary cooling prior to significant core disruption. Coherent cladding failure under the sustained elevated temperatures of ATWS events serves as one indicator of core disruption. In this paper we combine uncertainties in cladding failure data with uncertainties in calculations of ATWS cladding temperature conditions to calculate probabilities of cladding failure as a function of the time for accident recovery

  11. Study on process of laser cladded nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure and performances of the Co-base alloy coatings that are formed by laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc surfacing on the nuclear valve-sealing surface have been studied and compared. The combination costs of laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc, surfacing have been analyzed and compared. The results showed that the laser cladding processing has the advantages of high efficiency, low energy cost, a little machining allowance, high rate of finished products and low combination cost, compared with plasma spurt welding processing and arc surfacing processing. The laser cladding technology can improve the qualities of nuclear valve parts and increase their service life. Therefore, the laser cladding processing is a new technology with developing potential

  12. Cladding failure probability modeling for risk evaluations of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops the methodology to incorporate cladding failure data and associated modeling into risk evaluations of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMRs). Current U.S. innovative designs for metal-fueled pool-type LMRs take advantage of inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms to limit reactor temperature increases in response to classic anticipated-transient-without-scram (ATWS) initiators. Final shutdown without reliance on engineered safety features can then be accomplished if sufficient time is available for operator intervention to terminate fission power production and/or provide auxiliary cooling prior to significant core disruption. Coherent cladding failure under the sustained elevated temperatures of ATWS events serves as one indicator of core disruption. In this paper we combine uncertainties in cladding failure data with uncertainties in calculations of ATWS cladding temperature conditions to calculate probabilities of cladding failure as a function of the time for accident recovery. (orig.)

  13. Test system to simulate transient overpower LMFBR cladding failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrus, H.G.; Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    One of the HEDL programs has the objective to experimentally characterize fuel pin cladding failure due to cladding rupture or ripping. A new test system has been developed which simulates a transient mechanically-loaded fuel pin failure. In this new system the mechanical load is prototypic of a fuel pellet rapidly expanding against the cladding due to various causes such as fuel thermal expansion, fuel melting, and fuel swelling. This new test system is called the Fuel Cladding Mechanical Interaction Mandrel Loading Test (FCMI/MLT). The FCMI/MLT test system and the method used to rupture cladding specimens very rapidly to simulate a transient event are described. Also described is the automatic data acquisition and control system which is required to control the startup, operation and shutdown of the very fast tests, and needed to acquire and store large quantities of data in a short time

  14. Polarization characteristics of double-clad elliptical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Lit, J W

    1990-12-20

    A scalar variational analysis based on a Gaussian approximation of the fundamental mode of a double-clad elliptical fiber with a depressed inner cladding is studied. The polarization properties and graphic results are presented; they are given in terms of three parameters: the ratio of the major axis to the minor axis of the core, the ratio of the inner cladding major axis to the core major axis, and the difference between the core index and the inner cladding index. The variations of both the spot size and the field intensity with core ellipticity are examined. It is shown that high birefringence and dispersion-free orthogonal polarization modes can be obtained within the single-mode region and that the field intensity distribution may be more confined to the fiber center than in a single-clad elliptical fiber.

  15. Application of Coating Technology for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To commercialize the ATF cladding concepts, various factors are considered, such as safety under normal and accident conditions, economy for the fuel cycle, and developing development challenges, and schedule. From the proposed concepts, it is known that the cladding coating, FeCrAl alloy, and Zr-Mo claddings are considered as a near/mid-term application, whereas the SiC material is considered as a long-term application. Among them, the benefit of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the fuel cycle economy regarding the manufacturing, neutron cross section, and high tritium permeation characteristics. However, the challenge of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the lower oxidation resistance and mechanical strength at high-temperature than other concepts. Another important point is the adhesion property between the Zr-based alloy and coating materials. As an improved coating technology compared to a previous study, a 3D laser coating technology supplied with Cr powders is considered to make a coated cladding because it is possible to make a coated layer on the tubular cladding surface by controlling the 3-diminational axis. We are systematically studying the laser beam power, inert gas flow, cooling of the cladding tube, and powder control as key points to develop 3D laser coating technology. After Cr-coating on the Zr-based cladding, ring compression and ring tensile tests were performed to evaluate the adhesion property between a coated layer and Zr-based alloy tube at room temperature (RT), and a high-temperature oxidation test was conducted to evaluate the oxidation behavior at 1200 .deg. C of the coated tube samples. A 3D laser coating method supplied with Cr powders was developed to decrease the high-temperature oxidation rate in a steam environment through a systematic study for various coating parameters, and a Cr-coated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube of 100 mm in length to the axial direction can be successfully manufactured.

  16. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  17. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  18. Advanced ultrasonic and eddy current examinations of the reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanovic, M.; Zado, V.

    1996-01-01

    In order to improve safety and reliability of nuclear power plant components, the existing examination methods are permanently developed as well as the new methods of examination are implemented. For the same reason, beside referent requirements, complementary NDE methods are utilized. Some examination methods techniques are not required to be used by referent safety codes and standards but they are frequently practiced as additional prevention to the component failure. This article presents the state of the art methods and techniques currently applied for examination of the reactor vessel base material, clad and weld materials. (author)

  19. Bragg grating induced cladding mode coupling due to asymmetrical index modulation in depressed cladding fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Grüne-Nielsen, Lars; Soccolich, C.F.

    1998-01-01

    to reduce this problem. None of these designs seems to give complete solutions. In particular, the otherwise promising depressed cladding design gives a pronounced coupling to one LP01 mode, this has been referred to as a Ghost grating. To find the modes of the fiber we have established a numerical mode......UV-written Bragg gratings find wide spread use as wavelength selective components. In reflection high extinction ratios are routinely obtained. However, coupling to cladding modes gives excess loss on the short wavelength side of the main reflection. Different fiber-designs have been proposed......-solver based on the staircase-approximation method. The Bragg grating causes coupling between the fundamental LP01 mode and higher order LP1p modes that satisfy phase-matching. The coupling strength is determined by the overlap integral of the LP01, the LP1p mode, and the UV-induced index perturbation. For LP0...

  20. Factors affecting the integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel in a pressurized water reactor is normally subjected to temperatures and pressures that preclude propagation of sharp, crack-like defects that might exist in the wall of the vessel. However, if certain postulated accidents, referred to as overcooling accidents, were to occur, the pressure vessel could be subjected to severe thermal shock while the pressure is substantial. As a result, vessels containing high concentrations of copper and nickel, which enhance radiation embrittlement, may possess a potential for extensive propagation of preexistent inner-surface flaws prior to the vessel's normal end of life. A fracture-mechanics analysis for a typical postulated accident and also related thermal-shock experiments indicate that very shallow surface flaws that extend through the cladding into the base material could propagate. This is of particular concern because shallow flaws appear to be the most probable and presumably are the most difficult to detect

  1. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  2. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  3. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, V. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Andersson, Stefan [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill`s theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture. With a 2 page summary in Swedish. 32 refs, 18 figs.

  4. Experimental approach for adhesion strength of ATF cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Hyochan; Yang, Yongsik; In, Wangkee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haksung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The quality of a coating depends on the quality of its adhesion bond strength between the coating and the underlying substrate. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the adhesion properties of the coating. There are many available test methods for the evaluation of coatings adhesion bond strength. Considering these restrictions of the coated cladding, the scratch test is useful for evaluation of adhesion properties compared to other methods. The purpose of the present study is to analyze the possibility of adhesion bond strength evaluation of ATF coated cladding by scratch testing on coatings cross sections. Experimental approach for adhesion strength of ATF coated cladding was investigated in the present study. The scratch testing was chosen as a testing method. Uncoated zircaloy-4 tube was employed as a reference and plasma spray and arc ion coating were selected as a ATF coated claddings for comparison. As a result, adhesion strengths of specimens affect the measured normal and tangential forces. For the future, the test will be conducted for CrAl coated cladding by laser coating, which is the most promising ATF cladding. Computational analysis with finite element method will also be conducted to analyze a stress distribution in the cladding tube.

  5. Investigations on dry sliding of laser cladded aluminum bronze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiße Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the tribological behaviour of laser cladded aluminum bronze tool surfaces for dry metal forming. In a first part of this work a process window for cladding aluminum bronze on steel substrate was investigated to ensure a low dilution. Therefore, the cladding speed, the powder feed rate, the laser power and the distance between the process head and the substrate were varied. The target of the second part was to investigate the influence of different process parameters on the tribological behaviour of the cladded tracks. The laser claddings were carried out on both aluminum bronze and cold work tool steel as substrate materials. Two different particle sizes of the cladding powder material were used. The cladding speed was varied and a post-processing laser remelting treatment was applied. It is shown that the tribological behaviour of the surface in a dry oscillating ball-on-plate test is highly dependent on the substrate material. In the third part a deep drawing tool was additively manufactured by direct laser deposition. Furthermore, the tool was applied to form circular cups with and without lubrication.

  6. The prediction problems of VVER fuel element cladding failure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelykh, S.N.; Maksimov, M.V.; Ryabchikov, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel cladding failure forecasting is based on the fuel load history and the damage distribution. • The limit damage parameter is exceeded, though limit stresses are not reached. • The damage parameter plays a significant role in predicting the cladding failure. • The proposed failure probability criterion can be used to control the cladding tightness. - Abstract: A method for forecasting of VVER fuel element (FE) cladding failure due to accumulation of deformation damage parameter, taking into account the fuel assembly (FA) loading history and the damage parameter distribution among FEs included in the FA, has been developed. Using the concept of conservative FE groups, it is shown that the safety limit for damage parameter is exceeded for some FA rearrangement, though the limits for circumferential and equivalent stresses are not reached. This new result contradicts the wide-spread idea that the damage parameter value plays a minor role when estimating the limiting state of cladding. The necessary condition of rearrangement algorithm admissibility and the criterion for minimization of the probability of cladding failure due to damage parameter accumulation have been derived, for using in automated systems controlling the cladding tightness.

  7. Bending of pipes with inconel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachpitz, Leonardo; Menezes, Carlos Eduardo B; Vieira, Carlos R. Tavares [Primus Processamento de Tubos S.A. (PROTUBO), Macae, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The high-frequency induction bending process, using API pipes coated with Inconel 625 reconciled to a mechanical transformation for a higher degree of resistance, was developed through a careful specification and control of the manufacturing parameters and inherent heat treatments. The effects of this technology were investigated by a qualification process consisting of a sequence of tests and acceptance criteria typically required by the offshore industry, and through the obtained results was proved the effectiveness of this entire manufacturing process, without causing interference in the properties and the quality of the inconel cladding, adding a gain of resistance to the base material, guaranteed by the requirements of the API 5L Standard. (author)

  8. Laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comesaña, R; Quintero, F; Lusquiños, F; Pascual, M J; Boutinguiza, M; Durán, A; Pou, J

    2010-03-01

    Laser cladding by powder injection has been used to produce bioactive glass coatings on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates. Bioactive glass compositions alternative to 45S5 Bioglass were demonstrated to exhibit a gradual wetting angle-temperature evolution and therefore a more homogeneous deposition of the coating over the substrate was achieved. Among the different compositions studied, the S520 bioactive glass showed smoother wetting angle-temperature behavior and was successfully used as precursor material to produce bioactive coatings. Coatings processed using a Nd:YAG laser presented calcium silicate crystallization at the surface, with a uniform composition along the coating cross-section, and no significant dilution of the titanium alloy was observed. These coatings maintain similar bioactivity to that of the precursor material as demonstrated by immersion in simulated body fluid. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Solution treatment of fast reactor claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Makoto; Nagaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Masahiro

    1974-01-01

    The fuel cladding tubes for Joyo (experimental FBR) are required to be a material corresponding to AISI Type 316 and cold-rolled after solution treatment. It is necessary to have no precipitation of carbide and to make the grain size smaller than ASTM No.6. It is very difficult to obtain the fine grains without the precipitation, however. In this connection, the behavior of carbide solution at high temperature and the annealing behavior of the material cold-worked and solution-treated were studied. The following matters are described: the solid solubility line of AISI Type 316; the behavior of carbide at solution treatment temperature; and the annealing behavior of the cold-worked material. (Mori, K.)

  10. Plasma spheroidizing and cladding of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    Arc and high-frequency plasmatrons are used for spheroidizing nickel and chromium-base alloy particles. Different plasma-forming medium compositions are used in the arc variant and the effect of these media on the plasma treatment product is demonstrated. For a high-frequency plasmatron, a long time of plasma contact with the powder leads to the transfer of the part of the material from the treated particles into vaporous state with subsequent condensation at the outlet from the discharge zone. Results of investigations into the formation of metal coatings on oxide and carbide particles during plasma-arc action are also presented. Representative data on the output of particles with coating are obtained and factors, providing for the optimal particle cladding conditions, are indicated

  11. Fuel compliance model for pellet-cladding mechanical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes two aspects of fuel pellet deformation that play significant roles in determining maximum cladding hoop strains during pellet-cladding mechanical interaction: compliance of fragmented fuel pellets and influence of the pellet end-face design on the transmission of axial compressive force in the fuel stack. The latter aspect affects cladding ridge formation and explains several related observations that cannot be explained by the hourglassing model. An empirical model, called the fuel compliance model and representing the above aspects of fuel deformation, has been developed using the results from two Halden experiments and incorporated into the FRAP-T6 fuel performance code

  12. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal-clad...... waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, L.R.; Bottcher, J.H.; Shikakura, S.; Tsai, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. WWER water chemistry related to fuel cladding behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kysela, J; Zmitko, M [Nuclear Research Inst. plc., Rez (Czech Republic); Vrtilkova, V [Nuclear Fuel Inst., Prague (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Operational experience in WWER primary water chemistry and corrosion related to the fuel cladding is reviewed. Insignificant corrosion of fuel cladding was found which is caused by good corrosion resistance of Zr1Nb material and relatively low coolant temperature at WWER-440 reactor units. The differences in water chemistry control is outlined and an attention to the question of compatibility of Zircaloys with WWER water chemistry is given. Some results of research and development in field of zirconium alloy corrosion behaviour are discussed. Experimental facility for in-pile and out-of-pile cladding material corrosion testing is shown. (author). 14 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  15. Physico Chemistry of the Chlorination of Aluminum Claddings in the Framework of HALOX Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Fabiola; De Micco, Georgina; Bohe, Ana; Pasquevich, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The conditioning of spent nuclear fuels from test and research reactors requires a previous physicochemical treatment to stabilize them chemically.A possible way of processing is through what was called in CNEA as Process HALOX (Halogenation and Oxidation).It consists of the selective separation of cladding by halogenation and the subsequent oxidation of the core, previously to insert it into a vitreous matrix.The halogenation aim is to transform the constituents of the 6061aluminum alloy into volatile halides.In this work we present preliminary results of the chlorination of two aluminum alloys: AA 6061 and a type of CuZnAl alloy

  16. CLEAVAGE FRACTURE ANALYSIS OF CLADDED BEAMS WITH AN EMBEDDED FLAW UNDER FOUR-POINT BENDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Shengjun; Williams, Paul T; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2008-01-01

    Semi-large scale embedded flaw beams were tested at Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) Rez in the Czech Republic for the 6th Network for Evaluating Structural Components (NESC-VI) project. The experiments included, among others, a series of semi-large scale tests on cladded beam specimens containing simulated sub-clad flaws. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted numerical studies to analyze the constraint issues associated with embedded flaws using various fracture mechanics methods, including T-Stress, hydrostatic stress based QH stress, and the Weibull stress model. The recently developed local approach using the modified Weibull stress model combined with the Master Curve methodology was also utilized to predict the failure probability (Pf) of semi-large scale beams. For this study, the Weibull statistical model associated with the Master Curve methodology was employed to stochastically simulate the fracture toughness data using the available Master Curve reference temperature T0 for the tested base material from the 'aged' WWER-440 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The study was also conducted to investigate the sensitivity of predicated probability of failure of semi-large scale beams with embedded flaw with different Weibull shape parameters, m

  17. Design of Matched Cladding Fiber with UV-sensitive Cladding for Minimization of Claddingmode Losses in Fiber Bragg Gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Berendt, Martin Ole; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2000-01-01

    The effect on the Bragg-grating-induced cladding-mode coupling of varying the extent of the photosensitive region in a step-index fiber is analyzed. We introduce a figure of merit for the suppression of cladding-mode loss and compare different matched cladding fiber designs. It is found to be adv......The effect on the Bragg-grating-induced cladding-mode coupling of varying the extent of the photosensitive region in a step-index fiber is analyzed. We introduce a figure of merit for the suppression of cladding-mode loss and compare different matched cladding fiber designs. It is found...... to be advantageous to increase the extent of the photosensitive region. However, no significant improvement is obtained by extending the photosensitive region more than approximately 10 mu m into the cladding. This result is not in agreement with a simple analysis that neglects UV absorption, which suggests...... that the radius of the photosensitive region should be close to twice as large. (C) 2000 Academic Press....

  18. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R.

    2009-03-01

    Fracture mechanics properties of fuel claddings are of relevance with respect to fuel rod integrity. The integrity of a fuel rod, in turn, is important for the fuel performance, for the safe handling of fuel rods, for the prevention of leakages and subsequent dissemination of fuel, for the avoidance of unnecessary dose rates, and for safe operation. Different factors can strongly deteriorate the mechanical fuel rod properties: irradiation damage, thermo-mechanical impact, corrosion or hydrogen uptake. To investigate the mechanical properties of fuel rod claddings which are used in Swiss nuclear power plants, PSI has initiated a program for mechanical testing. A major issue was the interaction between specific loading devices and the tested cladding tube, e.g. in the form of bending or friction. Particular for Zircaloy is the hexagonal closed packed structure of the zirconium crystallographic lattice. This structure implies plastic deformation mechanisms with specific, preferred orientations. Further, the manufacturing procedure of Zircaloy claddings induces a specific texture which plays a salient role with respect to the embrittlement by irradiation or integration of hydrogen in the form of hydrides. Both, the induced microstructure as well as the plastic deformation behaviour play a role for the mechanical properties. At PSI, in a first step inactive thin walled Zircaloy tubes and, for comparison reasons, plates were tested. The validity of the mechanical testing of the non standard tube and plate geometries had to be verified. The used Zircaloy-4 cladding tube sections and small plates of the same wall thickness have been notched, fatigue pre-cracked and tensile tested to evaluate the fracture toughness properties at room temperature, 300 o C and 350 o C. The crack propagation has been determined optically. The test results of the plates have been further used to validate FEM calculations. For each sample a complete crack resistance (J-R) curve could be

  19. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R

    2009-03-15

    Fracture mechanics properties of fuel claddings are of relevance with respect to fuel rod integrity. The integrity of a fuel rod, in turn, is important for the fuel performance, for the safe handling of fuel rods, for the prevention of leakages and subsequent dissemination of fuel, for the avoidance of unnecessary dose rates, and for safe operation. Different factors can strongly deteriorate the mechanical fuel rod properties: irradiation damage, thermo-mechanical impact, corrosion or hydrogen uptake. To investigate the mechanical properties of fuel rod claddings which are used in Swiss nuclear power plants, PSI has initiated a program for mechanical testing. A major issue was the interaction between specific loading devices and the tested cladding tube, e.g. in the form of bending or friction. Particular for Zircaloy is the hexagonal closed packed structure of the zirconium crystallographic lattice. This structure implies plastic deformation mechanisms with specific, preferred orientations. Further, the manufacturing procedure of Zircaloy claddings induces a specific texture which plays a salient role with respect to the embrittlement by irradiation or integration of hydrogen in the form of hydrides. Both, the induced microstructure as well as the plastic deformation behaviour play a role for the mechanical properties. At PSI, in a first step inactive thin walled Zircaloy tubes and, for comparison reasons, plates were tested. The validity of the mechanical testing of the non standard tube and plate geometries had to be verified. The used Zircaloy-4 cladding tube sections and small plates of the same wall thickness have been notched, fatigue pre-cracked and tensile tested to evaluate the fracture toughness properties at room temperature, 300 {sup o}C and 350 {sup o}C. The crack propagation has been determined optically. The test results of the plates have been further used to validate FEM calculations. For each sample a complete crack resistance (J-R) curve could

  20. Characteristics of Ni-based coating layer formed by laser and plasma cladding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guojian; Kutsuna, Muneharu; Liu Zhongjie; Zhang Hong

    2006-01-01

    The clad layers of Ni-based alloy were deposited on the SUS316L stainless plates by CO 2 laser and plasma cladding processes. The smooth clad bead was obtained by CO 2 laser cladding process. The phases of clad layer were investigated by an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The microstructures of clad layers belonged to a hypereutectic structure. Primary phases consist of boride CrB and carbide Cr 7 C 3 . The eutectic structure consists of Ni + CrB or Ni + Cr 7 C 3 . Compared with the plasma cladding, the fine microstructures, low dilutions, high Vickers hardness and excellent wear resistance were obtained by CO 2 laser cladding. All that show the laser cladding process has a higher efficiency and good cladding quality

  1. VISA-2, Reactor Vessel Failure Probability Under Thermal Shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, F.; Johnson, K.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: VISA2 (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) was developed to estimate the failure probability of nuclear reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock conditions. The deterministic portion of the code performs heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations for a vessel subjected to a user-specified temperature and pressure transient. The probabilistic analysis performs a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the probability of vessel failure. Parameters such as initial crack size and position, copper and nickel content, fluence, and the fracture toughness values for crack initiation and arrest are treated as random variables. Linear elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to model crack initiation and growth. This includes cladding effects in the heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations. The simulation procedure treats an entire vessel and recognizes that more than one flaw can exist in a given vessel. The flaw model allows random positioning of the flaw within the vessel wall thickness, and the user can specify either flaw length or length-to-depth aspect ratio for crack initiation and arrest predictions. The flaw size distribution can be adjust on the basis of different inservice inspection techniques and inspection conditions. The toughness simulation model includes a menu of alternative equations for predicting the shift in the reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition. 2 - Method of solution: The solution method uses closed form equations for temperatures, stresses, and stress intensity factors. A polynomial fitting procedure approximates the specified pressure and temperature transient. Failure probabilities are calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 30 welds. VISA2 models only the belt-line (cylindrical) region of a reactor vessel. The stresses are a function of the radial (through-wall) coordinate only

  2. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  3. Study on microstructure and high temperature wear resistance of laser cladded nuclear valve clack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang; Chen Zichen

    2002-01-01

    Laser cladding of Co-base alloy on the nuclear valve-sealing surface are performed with a 5 kW CO 2 transverse flowing laser. The microstructure and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating and the plasma cladded coating are studied. The results show that the microstructure, the dilution rate and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating have obvious advantages over the spurt cladding processing

  4. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Plummer, L.K. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless-steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount (≈20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for determining absolute hydrogen concentrations.

  5. Assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material from a full-thickness clad RPV shell segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV shell (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results from three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the base material. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may be implications for RPV integrity assessments. Fracture toughness data from three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack beam cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material. Difficulties with interpreting lower-bound fracture toughness curves constructed from the shallow-crack data are essentially resolved by adopting a single normalizing temperature parameter, namely, the nil-ductility transition temperature (NDT)

  6. Nuclear fuel clad clothed with burnable poison and obtainment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, P.; Netter, P.

    1994-01-01

    This clad has preferentially on its inner surface a boron compound such boron carbide or boron nitrogen deposited by Chemical Vapor Deposition or by Physical Vapor Deposition without any temperature elevation injurious to its mechanical properties. 3 figs

  7. Oxidation during reflood of reactor core with melting cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.; Allison, C.M.; Davis, K.L. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Models were recently developed and incorporated into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for calculating the oxidation of fuel rods during cladding meltdown and reflood. Experiments have shown that a period of intense oxidation may occur when a hot partially oxidized reactor core is reflooded. This paper offers an explanation of the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes that cause this intense period of oxidation. Models for the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes are developed. The models are assessed by simulating a severe fuel damage experiment that involved reflood. The models for cladding meltdown and oxidation were found to improve calculation of the temperature and oxidation of fuel rods during the period in which hot fuel rods are reflooded.

  8. A Multi-Scale Modeling of Laser Cladding Process (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, J; Choi, J

    2006-01-01

    Laser cladding is an additive manufacturing process that a laser generates a melt-pool on the substrate material while a second material, as a powder or a wire form, is injected into that melt-pool...

  9. Neutron-induced helium implantation in GCFR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Poeppel, R.B.; Sevy, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    The neutron-induced implantation of helium atoms on the exterior surfaces of the cladding of a prototypic gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) has been investigated analytically. A flux of recoil helium particles as high as 4.2 x 10 10 He/cm 2 .s at the cladding surface has been calculated at the peak power location in the core of a 300-MWe GCFR. The calculated profile of the helium implantation rates indicates that although some helium is implanted as deep as 20 μm, more than 99% of helium particles are implanted in the first 2-μm-deep layer below the cladding surface. Therefore, the implanted helium particles should mainly affect surface properties of the GCFR cladding

  10. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  11. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Howard T.; Riley, Michael O.; Wolfe, Charles R.; Lyon, Richard E.; Campbell, John H.; Jessop, Edward S.; Murray, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  12. Semipolar III-nitride laser diodes with zinc oxide cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myzaferi, Anisa; Reading, Arthur H; Farrell, Robert M; Cohen, Daniel A; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P

    2017-07-24

    Incorporating transparent conducting oxide (TCO) top cladding layers into III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) improves device design by reducing the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. We investigate using ZnO instead of ITO as the top cladding TCO of a semipolar (202¯1) III-nitride LD. Numerical modeling indicates that replacing ITO with ZnO reduces the internal loss in a TCO clad LD due to the lower optical absorption in ZnO. Lasing was achieved at 453 nm with a threshold current density of 8.6 kA/cm 2 and a threshold voltage of 10.3 V in a semipolar (202¯1) III-nitride LD with ZnO top cladding.

  13. Siemens advance PWR fuel assemblies (HTP) and cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R. B.; Woods, K. N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the key features of the Siemens HTP (High Thermal Performance) fuel design, the current in-reactor performance of this advanced fuel assembly design, and the advanced cladding types available

  14. Cladding axial elongation models for FRAP-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.; Berna, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the cladding axial elongation models developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for use by the FRAP-T6 computer code in analyzing the response of fuel rods during reactor transients in light water reactors (LWR). The FRAP-T6 code contains models (FRACAS-II subcode) that analyze the structural response of a fuel rod including pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). Recently, four models were incorporated into FRACAS-II to calculate cladding axial deformation: (a) axial PCMI, (b) trapped fuel stack, (c) fuel relocation, and (d) effective fuel thermal expansion. Comparisons of cladding axial elongation measurements from two experiments with the corresponding FRAP-T6 calculations are presented

  15. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  16. Second phase precipitation in irradiated Type 316 stainless steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, J.W.

    1978-05-01

    Differences in the phase composition of FFTF fuel cans following irradiation in the General Electric Test Reactor compared to HEDL fuel cans prompted laboratory studies to be conducted using cladding from the same lots of material used to fabricate the fuel pins and on cladding sections removed from the plenum area of the irradiated fuel pins to help establish the cause of the observed differences

  17. Cladding for transverse-pumped solid-state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Fan, Tso Y. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a transverse pumped, solid state laser, a nonabsorptive cladding surrounds a gain medium. A single tranverse mode, namely the Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) sub 00 mode, is provided. The TEM sub 00 model has a cross sectional diameter greater than a transverse dimension of the gain medium but less than a transverse dimension of the cladding. The required size of the gain medium is minimized while a threshold for laser output is lowered.

  18. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any homogeniz......Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any...

  19. Interim report on the creepdown of Zircaloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.; Dodd, C.V.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the creepdown phenomenon in Zircaloy fuel cladding and the methods by which it will be measured and analyzed. Instrumentation for monitoring radial deformation in the cladding is described in detail--in terms of theory, design, and stability. The programs that control the microcomputer are listed, both to document the level of sophistication of the instrumentation and to indicate the flexibility of the test equipment

  20. First results on the effect of fuel-cladding eccentricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panka, I.; Kereszturi, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the traditional fuel-behaviour or hot channel calculations it is assumed that the fuel pellet is centered within the clad. However, in the real life the pellet could be positioned asymmetrically within the clad, which leads to asymmetric gap conductance and therefore it is worthwhile to investigate the magnitude of the effect on maximal fuel temperature and surface heat flux. In this paper our first experiences are presented on this topic. (Authors)

  1. Facility for in-reactor creep testing of fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, E.; Wright, M.G.

    1976-11-01

    A biaxial stress creep test facility has been designed and developed for operation in the WR-1 reactor. This report outlines the rationale for its design and describes its construction and the operating experience with it. The equipment is optimized for the determination of creep data on CANDU fuel cladding. Typical results from Zr-2.5 wt% Nb fuel cladding are used to illustrate the accuracy and reliability obtained. (author)

  2. Oxidation properties of laser clad Nb-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, S.K.; Mazumder, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on laser cladding parameters for non-equilibrium synthesis for several ternary and complex Nb-Al base alloys containing Ti, Cr, Si, Ni, B and C that have been established. Phase transformations occurring below 1500 degrees C have been determined using differential thermal analysis. Ductility of the clads is qualitatively evaluated from the extent of cracking around the microhardness indentations. Oxidation resistance of the clads in flowing air is measured at 800 degrees C, 1200 degrees C and 1400 degrees C and parabolic rate constants are calculated. Microstructure of the clads is studied using optical and scanning electron microscopes. X-ray diffraction and EDX techniques are used for identification of the oxides formed and the phases formed in as clad material. Oxide morphology is studied using SEM. Effect of alloying additions on the ductility and oxidation resistance of the laser clad Nb-Al alloys is discussed. The results are compared with those reported in literature for similar alloys produced by conventional processing methods

  3. Laser cladding: repairing and manufacturing metal parts and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Leo

    2003-03-01

    Laser cladding is presently used to repair high volume aerospace, automotive, marine, rail or general engineering components where excessive wear has occurred. It can also be used if a one-off high value component is either required or has been accidentally over-machined. The ultimate application of laser cladding is to build components up from nothing, using a laser cladding system and a 3D CAD drawing of the component. It is thus emerging that laser cladding can be classified as a special case of Rapid Prototyping (RP). Up to this point in time RP was seen, and is still seen, as in intermediately step between the design stage of a component and a finished working product. This can now be extended so that laser cladding makes RP a one-stop shop and the finished component is made from tool-steel or some alloy-base material. The marriage of laser cladding with RP is an interesting one and offers an alternative to traditional tool builders, re-manufacturers and injection mould design/repair industries. The aim of this paper is to discuss the emergence of this new technology, along with the transference of the process out of the laboratory and into the industrial workplace and show it is finding its rightful place in the manufacturing/repair sector. It will be shown that it can be used as a cost cutting, strategic material saver and consequently a green technology.

  4. Real-time laser cladding control with variable spot size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, J. L.; Montealegre, M. A.; Vidal, F.; Rodríguez, J.; Mann, S.; Abels, P.; Motmans, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser cladding processing has been used in different industries to improve the surface properties or to reconstruct damaged pieces. In order to cover areas considerably larger than the diameter of the laser beam, successive partially overlapping tracks are deposited. With no control over the process variables this conduces to an increase of the temperature, which could decrease mechanical properties of the laser cladded material. Commonly, the process is monitored and controlled by a PC using cameras, but this control suffers from a lack of speed caused by the image processing step. The aim of this work is to design and develop a FPGA-based laser cladding control system. This system is intended to modify the laser beam power according to the melt pool width, which is measured using a CMOS camera. All the control and monitoring tasks are carried out by a FPGA, taking advantage of its abundance of resources and speed of operation. The robustness of the image processing algorithm is assessed, as well as the control system performance. Laser power is decreased as substrate temperature increases, thus maintaining a constant clad width. This FPGA-based control system is integrated in an adaptive laser cladding system, which also includes an adaptive optical system that will control the laser focus distance on the fly. The whole system will constitute an efficient instrument for part repair with complex geometries and coating selective surfaces. This will be a significant step forward into the total industrial implementation of an automated industrial laser cladding process.

  5. Fuel clad chemical interactions in fast reactor MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, R., E-mail: rvis@igcar.gov.in

    2014-01-15

    Clad corrosion being one of the factors limiting the life of a mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel element pin at high burn-up, some aspects known about the key elements (oxygen, cesium, tellurium, iodine) in the clad-attack are discussed and many Fuel–Clad-Chemical-Interaction (FCCI) models available in the literature are also discussed. Based on its relatively superior predictive ability, the HEDL (Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory) relation is recommended: d/μm = ({0.507 ⋅ [B/(at.% fission)] ⋅ (T/K-705) ⋅ [(O/M)_i-1.935]} + 20.5) for (O/M){sub i} ⩽ 1.98. A new model is proposed for (O/M){sub i} ⩾ 1.98: d/μm = [B/(at.% fission)] ⋅ (T/K-800){sup 0.5} ⋅ [(O/M){sub i}-1.94] ⋅ [P/(W cm{sup −1})]{sup 0.5}. Here, d is the maximum depth of clad attack, B is the burn-up, T is the clad inner surface temperature, (O/M){sub i} is the initial oxygen-to-(uranium + plutonium) ratio, and P is the linear power rating. For fuels with [n(Pu)/n(M = U + Pu)] > 0.25, multiplication factors f are recommended to consider the potential increase in the depth of clad-attack.

  6. Development Status of Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding for LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Yang, Jae-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen explosions and the release of radionuclides are caused by severe damage of current nuclear fuels, which are composed of fuel pellets and fuel cladding, during an accident. To reduce the damage to the public, the fuels have to enhance their integrity under an accident environment. Enhanced accident tolerance fuels (ATFs) can tolerate a loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period during design-basis and beyond design-basis events while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations as well as operational transients, in comparison with the current UO{sub 2}-Zr alloy system used in the LWR. Surface modified Zr cladding as a new concept was suggested to apply an enhanced ATF cladding. The aim of the partial ODS treatment is to increase the high-temperature strength to suppress the ballooning/rupture behavior of fuel cladding during an accident event. The target of the surface coating is to increase the corrosion resistance during normal operation and increase the oxidation resistance during an accident event. The partial ODS treatment of Zircaloy-4 cladding can be produced using a laser beam scanning method with Y2O3 powder, and the surface Cr-alloy and Cr/FeCrAl coating on Zircaloy-4 cladding can be obtained after the development of 3D laser coating and arc ion plating technologies.

  7. YAG laser cladding to heat exchanger flange in actual plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshio, Kojima

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to ''Development of YAG Laser Cladding Technology to Heat Exchanger Flange'' presented in ICONE-8. A YAG Laser cladding technology is a permanent repairing and preventive maintenance method for heat exchanger's flange (channel side) seating surface which is degraded by the corrosion in long term operation. The material of this flange is carbon steel, and that of cladding wire is type 316 stainless steel so as to have high corrosion resistance. In former paper above, the soundness of cladding layers were presented to be verified. This channel side flange is bolted with tube sheet (shell side) through metal gasket. As the tube sheet side is already cladded a corrosion resistant material, it needs to apply the repairing and preventive maintenance method to only channel side. In 2000 this technology had been performed to the actual heat exchanger (Residual Heat Removal Heat Exchanger; RHR Hx) flange in domestic nuclear power plant. This paper described the outline, special equipment, and our total evaluation for this actual laser cladding work. And also several technical subjects which we should solve and/or improve for the next project was presented. (author)

  8. Mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction: US interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in LMFBR fuel pins are reviewed and examined in terms of in-pile and out-of-pile data. From this examination several factors are identified which may govern the occurrence of localized deep intergranular penetrations of Type-316SS cladding. Using a plausible mechanistic hypothesis for FCCI, first steps have been taken towards developing a quantitative, physically-meaningful, mathematical method of predicting cladding wastage in operating fuel pins. Both kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of FCCI are considered in the development of this prediction method, together with a fuel chemistry model that describes the evolution of thermochemical conditions at the fuel-cladding gap. On the basis of results from recent fuel pin and laboratory tests a thermal transport mechanism has been proposed to explain the thermal gradient-induced migration of Fe, Cr, and Ni from cladding into the fuel. This mechanism involves chemical transport of the metallic cladding components (as tellurides) in liquid Cs-Te. (author)

  9. Mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction: US interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M G [General Electric Company, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1977-04-01

    Proposed mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in LMFBR fuel pins are reviewed and examined in terms of in-pile and out-of-pile data. From this examination several factors are identified which may govern the occurrence of localized deep intergranular penetrations of Type-316SS cladding. Using a plausible mechanistic hypothesis for FCCI, first steps have been taken towards developing a quantitative, physically-meaningful, mathematical method of predicting cladding wastage in operating fuel pins. Both kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of FCCI are considered in the development of this prediction method, together with a fuel chemistry model that describes the evolution of thermochemical conditions at the fuel-cladding gap. On the basis of results from recent fuel pin and laboratory tests a thermal transport mechanism has been proposed to explain the thermal gradient-induced migration of Fe, Cr, and Ni from cladding into the fuel. This mechanism involves chemical transport of the metallic cladding components (as tellurides) in liquid Cs-Te. (author)

  10. A model for hydrogen pickup for BWR cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hede, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2001-01-01

    It has been observed that rod elongation is driven by the hydrogen pickup but not by corrosion as such. Based on this a non-destructive method to determine clad hydrogen concentration has been developed. The method is based on the observation that there are three different mechanisms behind the rod growth: the effect of neutron irradiation on the Zircaloy microstructure, the volume increase of the cladding as an effect of hydride precipitation and axial pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). The derived correlation is based on the experience of older cladding materials, inspected at hot-cell laboratories, that obtained high hydrogen levels (above 500 ppm) at lower burnup (assembly burnup below 50 MWd/kgU). Now this experience can be applied, by interpolation, on more modern cladding materials with a burnup beyond 50 MWd/kgU by analysis of the rod growth database of the respective cladding materials. Hence, the method enables an interpolation rather than an extrapolation of present day hydrogen pickup database, which improves the reliability and accuracy. Further, one can get a good estimate of the hydrogen pickup during an ongoing outage based on a non-destructive method. Finally, rod growth measurements are normally performed for a large population of rods, hence giving a good statistics compared to examination of a few rods at a hot cell. (author)

  11. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10 −6 on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure

  12. French nuclear plants PWR vessel integrity assessment and life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Production Nucleaire, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Quinot, P. [FRAMATOME, Dept. Bloc Reacteur et Boucles Primaires, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Faidy, C.; Churier-Bossennec, H. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Ingenierie et Service, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel life management of 56 PWR 3 loop and 4 loop reactors units was engaged by the French Utility EDF (Electricite de France) a few years ago and is yet on going on. This paper will present the work carried out within the framework of justifying why the 34 three loop reactor vessels will remain acceptable for operation for a lifetime of at least 40-years. A summary of the measures will be given. An overall review of actions will be presented describing the French approach, using important existing databases, including studies related to irradiation surveillance monitoring program and end of life fluence assessment. The last results obtained are based on generic integrity analyses for all categories of situations (normal upset emergency and faulted conditions) until the end of lifetime, postulating circumferential an radial kinds of flaw located in the stainless steel cladding or shallow sub-cladding area. The results of structural integrity analyses beginning with elastic computations and completed with three-dimensional finite element elastic plastic computations for envelope cases, are compared with code criteria for operating plants. The objective is to evaluate the margins on different parameters as RTNDT (Reference Nil Ductility Transition Temperature), toughness or crack size, to justify the global fitness for service of all these Reactor Pressure Vessels. The paper introduces EDF's maintenance strategy, related to integrity assessment, for those nuclear power plants under operation, based on NDE in-service inspection of the first thirty millimeters in the thickness of the wall and major surveillance programs of the vessels. (author)

  13. French nuclear plants PWR vessel integrity assessment and life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdikian, G.; Quinot, P.; Faidy, C.; Churier-Bossennec, H.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel life management of 56 PWR 3 loop and 4 loop reactors units was engaged by the French Utility EDF (Electricite de France) a few years ago and is yet on going on. This paper will present the work carried out within the framework of justifying why the 34 three loop reactor vessels will remain acceptable for operation for a lifetime of at least 40-years. A summary of the measures will be given. An overall review of actions will be presented describing the French approach, using important existing databases, including studies related to irradiation surveillance monitoring program and end of life fluence assessment. The last results obtained are based on generic integrity analyses for all categories of situations (normal upset emergency and faulted conditions) until the end of lifetime, postulating circumferential an radial kinds of flaw located in the stainless steel cladding or shallow sub-cladding area. The results of structural integrity analyses beginning with elastic computations and completed with three-dimensional finite element elastic plastic computations for envelope cases, are compared with code criteria for operating plants. The objective is to evaluate the margins on different parameters as RTNDT (Reference Nil Ductility Transition Temperature), toughness or crack size, to justify the global fitness for service of all these Reactor Pressure Vessels. The paper introduces EDF's maintenance strategy, related to integrity assessment, for those nuclear power plants under operation, based on NDE in-service inspection of the first thirty millimeters in the thickness of the wall and major surveillance programs of the vessels. (author)

  14. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola ME; Brown T; Heitzenroeder P; Malinowski F; Reiersen W; Sutton L; Goranson P; Nelson B; Cole M; Manuel M; McCorkle D.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120 o vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1-inch of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120 o vessel segments are formed by welding two 60 o segments together. Each 60 o segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8-inch (20.3 cm) wide spacer ''spool pieces''. The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10 -6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02(micro), and its contours must be within 0.188-inch (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006

  15. Carbon 14 distribution in irradiated BWR fuel cladding and released carbon 14 after aqueous immersion of 6.5 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuragi, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tsukishima 1-15-7, Chuo City, Tokyo, 104-0052 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Akagi, M.; Takahashi, R. [TOSHIBA Corporation, Ukishima Cho 4-1, Kawasaki Ward, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Spent fuel cladding which is highly activated and strongly contaminated is expected to be disposed of in an underground repository. A typical activation product in the activated metal waste is carbon 14 ({sup 14}C), which is mainly generated by the {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C reaction and produces a significant exposure dose due to the large inventory, long half-life (5730 years), rapid release rate, and the speciation and consequent migration parameters. In the preliminary Japanese safety case, the release of radionuclides from the metal matrix is regarded as the corrosion-related congruent release, and the cladding oxide layer is regarded as a source of instant release fraction (IRF). In the present work, specific activity of {sup 14}C was measured using an irradiated BWR fuel cladding (Zircaloy-2, average rod burnup of 41.6 GWd/tU) which has an external oxide film having a thickness of 25.3 μm. The {sup 14}C specific activity of the base metal was 1.49*10{sup 4} Bq/g, which in the corresponding burnup is comparable to values in the existing literature, which were obtained from various irradiated claddings. Although the specific activity in oxide was 2.8 times the base metal activity due to the additive generation by the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction, the {sup 14}C abundance in oxide was less than 10% of total inventory. A static leaching test using the cladding tube was carried out in an air-tight vessel filled with a deoxygenated dilute NaOH solution (pH of 12.5) at room temperature. After 6.5 years, {sup 14}C was found in each leachate fraction of gas phase and dissolved organics and inorganics, the total of which was less than 0.01% of the {sup 14}C inventory of the immersed cladding tube. A simple calculation based on the congruent release with Zircaloy corrosion has suggested that the 96.7% of released {sup 14}C was from the external oxide layer and 3.3% was from the base Zircaloy metal. However, both the {sup 14}C abundance and the low leaching rate

  16. Radioactive waste processing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Suzuki, Osamu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a vessel of a reduced weight and with no external leaching of radioactive materials. Constitution: The vessel main body is constituted, for example, with light weight concretes or foamed concretes, particularly, foamed concretes containing fine closed bubbles in the inside. Then, layers having dense texture made of synthetic resin such as polystylene, vinylchloride resin, etc. or metal plate such as stainless plate are integrally disposed to the inner surface of the vessel main body. The cover member also has the same structure. (Sekiya, K.)

  17. Tempest in a vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    As the ASN made some statements about anomalies of carbon content in the EPR vessel bottom and top, the author recalls and comments some technical issues to better understand the information published on this topic. He notably addresses the role of the vessel, briefly indicates its operating conditions, shape and structure, and mechanical components for the top, its material and mechanical properties, and test samples used to assess mechanical properties. He also comments the phenomenon of radio-induced embrittlement, the vessel manufacturing process, and evokes the applicable regulations. He quotes and comments statements made by the ASN and Areva which evoke further assessments of the concerned components

  18. Separation of gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus is described for the separation of a gaseous plasma mixture into components in some of which the original concentration of a specific ion has been greatly increased or decreased, comprising: a source for converting the gaseous mixture into a train of plasma packets; an open-ended vessel with a main section and at least one branch section, adapted to enclose along predetermined tracks the original plasma packets in the main section, and the separated plasma components in the branch sections; drive means for generating travelling magnetic waves along the predetermined tracks with the magnetic flux vector of the waves transverse to each of the tracks; and means for maintaining phase coherence between the plasma packets and the magnetic waves at a value needed for accelerating the components of the packets to different velocities and in such different directions that the plasma of each packet is divided into distinctly separate packets in some of which the original concentration of a specific ion has been greatly increased or decreased, and which plasma packets are collected from the branch sections of the vessels. (author)

  19. TMI-2 reactor-vessel head removal and damaged-core-removal planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, J.A.; Hultman, C.W.; Lewis, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A major milestone in the cleanup and recovery effort at TMI-2 will be the removal of the reactor vessel closure head, planum, and damaged core fuel material. The data collected during these operations will provide the nuclear power industry with valuable information on the effects of high-temperature-dissociated coolant on fuel cladding, fuel materials, fuel support structural materials, neutron absorber material, and other materials used in reactor structural support components and drive mechanisms. In addition, examination of these materials will also be used to determine accident time-temperature histories in various regions of the core. Procedures for removing the reactor vessel head and reactor core are presented

  20. Comparison of fiber lasers based on distributed side-coupled cladding-pumped fibers and double-cladding fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihe; Cao, Jianqiu; Guo, Shaofeng; Chen, Jinbao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-04-01

    We compare both analytically and numerically the distributed side-coupled cladding-pumped (DSCCP) fiber lasers and double cladding fiber (DCF) lasers. We show that, through optimization of the coupling and absorbing coefficients, the optical-to-optical efficiency of DSCCP fiber lasers can be made as high as that of DCF lasers. At the same time, DSCCP fiber lasers are better than the DCF lasers in terms of thermal management.

  1. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  2. The M5 Fuel Rod Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Charquet, D.; Senevat, J.

    1998-01-01

    The large-scale program for the development and irradiation of new Zr alloys started by FRAMATOME and its industrial partners CEZUS and ZIRCOTUBE more than 10 years ago is now enabling FRAGEMA to offer the ternary M5 (ZrNbO) as the cladding material for PWR advanced fuel rods. Compared with the former product (low-tin-Zircaloy-4), this alloy exhibits impressive gains under irradiation at extended burnup (55 GWd/t) relatively to corrosion (factor 3 to 4), hydriding (factor 5 to 6), growth and creep (factor 2 to 3). In this paper, we shall successively address: - the industrial development and manufacturing experience - the corrosion, hydriding, creep and growth performances obtained over a wide range of PWR normal irradiation conditions (France and other countries) up to burnups of 55 GWd/t - The interpretation of these results by means of analytical experiments conducted in test reactors (free growth, creep) and microstructural observations on the irradiated material - and the behaviour under accident (LOCA) and severe environment and irradiation (Li, boiling) conditions. (Author)

  3. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  4. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Eng, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  5. Thermal creep of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; Clevinger, G.S.; Papazoglou, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    Data on the hoop creep characteristics of Zircaloy tubing were collected at temperatures between 600 F and 800 F, and at stress levels ranging from 10 ksi to 25 ksi using internal pressurization tests. At low driving forces, exposures as long as 2000 hours were found insufficient to establish steady state creep. The experimental data at temperatures of 650 F to 800 F correlate well with an exponential stress dependence, and the activation energy for creep was found to be in excellent agreement with that for self-diffusion. The range of stresses and temperatures is too small to study the overall effect of these variables on the activation energy for creep. The experimental steady state creep-rates and those predicted from the creep equation used agree within a factor of 1.3. These correlations imply that the mechanism for hoop creep of Zircaloy-4 cladding is characterized by an activation energy of approximately 60 kcal/mole and an activation area of about 20b 3 . In addition, the exponential stress dependence implies that the activation area for creep is stress-independent. These results suggest that the climb of edge dislocations is the rate controlling mechanism for creep of Zircaloy-4. The transient creep regime was also analysed on the premise that primary creep is directly related to the rate of dispersal of dislocation entanglements by climb. (Auth.)

  6. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs

  7. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  8. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  9. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  10. 2011 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  12. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  13. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  14. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  15. In-vessel tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Ohya, Kaoru; Ashikawa, Naoko; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kato, Daiji; Kawamura, Gakushi; Takayama, Arimichi; Tomita, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ono, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Takizuka, Tomonori; Nakano, Tomohide; Nakamura, Makoto; Hoshino, Kazuo; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi; Saito, Seiki; Takagi, Ikuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Toma, Mitsunori; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Homma, Yuki; Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The in-vessel tritium research is closely related to the plasma-materials interaction. It deals with the edge-plasma-wall interaction, the wall erosion, transport and re-deposition of neutral particles and the effect of neutral particles on the fuel recycling. Since the in-vessel tritium shows a complex nonlinear behavior, there remain many unsolved problems. So far, behaviors of in-vessel tritium have been investigated by two groups A01 and A02. The A01 group performed experiments on accumulation and recovery of tritium in thermonuclear fusion reactors and the A02 group studied theory and simulation on the in-vessel tritium behavior. In the present article, outcomes of the research are reviewed. (author)

  16. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  17. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. Ocean Station Vessel

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean Station Vessels (OSV) or Weather Ships captured atmospheric conditions while being stationed continuously in a single location. While While most of the...

  1. Vessel Sewage Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel sewage discharges are regulated under Section 312 of the Clean Water Act, which is jointly implemented by the EPA and Coast Guard. This homepage links to information on marine sanitation devices and no discharge zones.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  3. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, lead, copper , zinc, silver, nickel, and mercury), solids, and nutrients (USEPA, 2008b; USEPA 2010). Wastewater from... flotation ), and disinfection (using ultraviolet light) as compared to traditional Type II MSDs that use either simple maceration and chlorination, or...Coliform Naval Vessels Oceanographic Vessels Small Cruise Ships 25a Vendor 2 Hamann AG Biological Treatment with Dissolved Air Flotation and

  4. Effects of cold worked and fully annealed claddings on fuel failure behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Hoshino, Hiroaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    1979-12-01

    Described are the results of six differently heat-treated Zircaloy clad fuel rod tests in NSRR experiments. The purpose of the test is to examine the extent of simulating irradiated claddings in mechanical properties by as-cold worked ones and also the effect of fully annealing on the fuel failure bahaviour in a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) condition. As-cold worked cladding does not properly simulated the embrittlement of the irradiated one in a RIA condition, because the cladding is fully annealed before the fuel failure even in the short transient. Therefore, the fuel behaviour such as fuel failure threshold energy, failure mechanism, cladding deformation and cladding oxidation of the fully annealed cladding fuel, as well as that of the as-cold worked cladding fuel, are not much different from that of the standard stress-relieved cladding fuel. (author)

  5. Model-based inversion for the characterization of crack-like defects detected by ultrasound in a cladded component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiat, G.

    2004-03-01

    This work deals with the inversion of ultrasonic data. The industrial context of the study in the non destructive evaluation of the internal walls of French reactor pressure vessels. Those inspections aim at detecting and characterizing cracks. Ultrasonic data correspond to echographic responses obtained with a transducer acting in pulse echo mode. Cracks are detected by crack tip diffraction effect. The analysis of measured data can become difficult because of the presence of a cladding, which surface is irregular. Moreover, its constituting material differs from the one of the reactor vessel. A model-based inverse method uses simulation of propagation and of diffraction of ultrasound taking into account the irregular properties of the cladding surface, as well as the heterogeneous nature of the component. The method developed was implemented and tested on a set of representative cases. Its performances were evaluated by the analysis of experimental results. The precision obtained in the laboratory on experimental cases treated is conform with industrial expectations motivating this study. (author)

  6. Mechanical Property and Oxidation Behavior of ATF cladding developed in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To realize the coating cladding, coating material (Cr-based alloy) as well as coating technology (3D laser coating and arc ion plating combined with vacuum annealing) can be developed to meet the fuel cladding criteria. The coated Zr cladding can be produced after the optimization of coating technologies. The coated cladding sample showed the good oxidation/corrosion and adhesion properties without the spalling and/or severe interaction with the Zr alloy cladding from the various tests. Thus, it is known that the mechanical property and oxidation behavior of coated cladding concept developed in KAERI is reasonable for applying the ATF cladding in LWRs. At the present time various ATF concepts have been proposed and developing in many countries. The ATF concepts with potentially improved accident performance can be summarized to the coating cladding, Mo-Zr cladding, FeCrAl cladding, and SiCf/SiC cladding. Regarding the cladding performance, ATF cladding concepts will be evaluated with respect to the accident scenarios and normal operations of LWRs as well as to the fuel cladding fabrication.

  7. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  8. Problems in manufacturing and transport of pressure vessels of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralovec, J.

    1997-01-01

    Integral water-cooled reactors are typical with eliminating large-diameter primary pipes and placing primary components, i.e. steam generators and pressurizers in reactor vessels. This arrangement leads to reactor pressure vessels of large dimensions: diameters, heights and thick walls and subsequently to great weights. Thus, even medium power units have pressure vessels which are on the very limit of present manufacturing capabilities. Principal manufacturing and inspection operations as well as pertinent equipment are concerned: welding, cladding, heat treatment, machining, shop-handling, non-destructive testing, hydraulic pressure tests etc. Tile transport of such a large and heavy component makes a problem which effects its design as well as the selection of the plant site. Railway, road and ship are possible ways of transport each of them having its advantages and limitations. Specific features and limits of the manufacture and transport of large pressure vessels are discussed in the paper. (author)

  9. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  10. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V{sub 2}C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V{sub 2}C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  11. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  12. A separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopyuk, S.G.; Dyachenko, A.Ye.; Mukhametov, M.N.; Prokopov, O.I.

    1982-01-01

    A separator is proposed which contains separating slanted plates and baffle plates installed at a distance to them at an acute angle to them. To increase the effectiveness of separating a gas and liquid stream and the throughput through reducing the secondary carry away of the liquid drops and to reduce the hydraulic resistance, as well, openings are made in the plates. The horizontal projections of each opening from the lower and upper surfaces of the plate do not overlap each other.

  13. Strength of interface in stainless clad steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohji, Kiyotsugu; Nakai, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Shinji

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical tests were conducted on four kinds of stainless clad steels to establish test methods for determining crack growth resistance of bimaterial interface. In tension tests, smooth specimens and shallow notched specimens were employed. In these tests, all of the smooth specimens were broken in carbon steel, not along the bimaterial interface. On the other hand, most of the shallow notched specimens were broken along the interface, when the notch root was located at the interface. Therefore, the shallow notched specimens were suitable for estimating the strength of the interface in tension tests. For fracture toughness tests, chevron notched specimens are recommended, since pre-fatigue cracks were susceptible to initiate and grow in carbon steel for conventional straight notched specimens. In fatigue crack growth tests, side-grooved and non-side-grooved specimens were employed. Although the side-grooves were machined so that the minimum cross-sectional plane of the specimens coincided with the plane of the bimaterial interface, cracks did not always propagate along the interface. Therefore, the side-grooves were judged not to be effective for cracks to propagate along the bimaterial interface. Both in fracture toughness tests and fatigue tests, the crack growth resistance along bimaterial interface was much lower than the resistance of matrix steels. In all of the mechanical tests conducted, the crack growth resistance along the interface was higher for the normalized material than that for the as-rolled material. The nickel foil inserted between carbon steel and stainless steel improved the growth resistance of interfacial cracks. (author)

  14. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H. [and others

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out.

  15. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out

  16. Expanding plasma jet in a vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutov, Yu.I.; Kravchenko, A.Yu.; Yakovetskij, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical calculations of parameters of a supersonic quasi-neutral argon plasma jet expanding into a cylindrical vacuum vessel and interacting with its inner surface. A modified method of large particles was used, the complex set of hydrodynamic equations being broken into simpler components, each of which describes a separate physical process. Spatial distributions of the main parameters of the argon plasma jet were simulated at various times after the jet entering the vacuum vessel, the parameters being the jet velocity field, the full plasma pressure, the electron temperature, the temperature of heavy particles, and the degree of ionization. The results show a significant effect of plasma jet interaction on the plasma parameters. The jet interaction with the vessel walls may result e.g. in excitation of shock waves and rotational plasma motions. (J.U.)

  17. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  18. Fuel cladding tube and fuel rod for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Mitani, Shinji.

    1995-01-01

    A fuel cladding tube has grooves fabricated, on the surface thereof, with a predetermined difference between crest and bottom (depth of the groove) in the circumferential direction. The cross sectional shape thereof is sinusoidal. The distribution of the grain size of iron crud particles in coolants is within a range about from 2μm to 12μm. If the surface roughness of the fuel cladding tube (depth of the groove) is determined greater than 1.6μm and less than 12.5, iron cruds in coolants can be positively deposited on the surface of the fuel cladding tube. In addition, once deposited iron cruds can be prevented from peeling from the surface of the fuel cladding tube. With such procedures, iron cruds deposited and radioactivated on the fuel cladding tube can be prevented from peeling, to prevent and reduce the increase of radiation dose on the surface of the pipelines without providing any additional device. (I.N.)

  19. The quest for safe and reliable fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The tragic Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident of March, 2011, has brought great unrest and challenge to the nuclear industry, which, in collaboration with universities and nuclear research institutes, is making great efforts to improve the safety in nuclear reactors developing accident tolerant fuels (ATF). This involves the study of different materials to be applied as cladding and, also, the improvement in the fuel properties in order to enhance the fuel performance and safety, specifically under accident conditions. Related to the cladding, iron based alloys and silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been studied as a good alternative. In the case of austenitic stainless steel, there is the advantage that the austenitic stainless steel 304 was used as cladding material in the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) registering a good performance. Then, alternated cladding materials such as iron based alloys (304, 310, 316, 347) should be used to replace the zirconium-based alloys in order to improve safety. In this paper, these cladding materials are evaluated in terms of their physical and chemical properties; among them, strength and creep resistance, thermal conductivity, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. Additionally, these properties are compared with those of conventional zirconium-based alloys, the most used material in actual PWR, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each material concerning to fuel performance and safety contribution. (author)

  20. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction in mixed-oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Weber, J.W.; Devary, J.L.

    1978-10-01

    The character and extent of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) was established for UO 2 -25 wt% PuO 2 clad with 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel irradiated at high cladding temperatures to peak burnups greater than 8 atom %. The data base consists of 153 data sets from fuel pins irradiated in EBR-II with peak burnups to 9.5 atom %, local cladding inner surface temperatures to 725 0 C, and exposure times to 415 equivalent full power days. As-fabricated oxygen-to-metal ratios (O/M) ranged from 1.938 to 1.984 with the bulk of the data in the range 1.96 to 1.98. HEDL P-15 pins provided data at low heat rates, approx. 200 W/cm, and P-23 series pins provided data at higher heat rates, approx. 400 W/cm. A design practice for breeder reactors is to consider an initial reduction of 50 microns in cladding thickness to compensate for possible FCCI. This approach was considered to be a conservative approximation in the absence of a comprehensive design correlation for extent of interaction. This work provides to the designer a statistically based correlation for depth of FCCI which reflects the influences of the major fuel and operating parameters on FCCI

  1. POST CRITICAL HEAT TRANSFER AND FUEL CLADDING OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Caha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of heat transfer coefficient in the post critical heat flux region in nuclear reactor safety is very important. Although the nuclear reactors normally operate at conditions where critical heat flux (CHF is not reached, accidents where dryout occur are possible. Most serious postulated accidents are a loss of coolant accident or reactivity initiated accident which can lead to CHF or post CHF conditions and possible disruption of core integrity. Moreover, this is also influenced by an oxide layer on the cladding surface. The paper deals with the study of mathematical models and correlations used for heat transfer calculation, especially in post dryout region, and fuel cladding oxidation kinetics of currently operated nuclear reactors. The study is focused on increasing of accuracy and reliability of safety limit calculations (e.g. DNBR or fuel cladding temperature. The paper presents coupled code which was developed for the solution of forced convection flow in heated channel and oxidation of fuel cladding. The code is capable of calculating temperature distribution in the coolant, cladding and fuel and also the thickness of an oxide layer.

  2. The characteristics of anodic coating of Al-alloy claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yong; Zou Benhui; Guo Hong; Du Yanhua; Bai Zhiyong; Cai Zhenfang

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum alloy claddings of research reactor fuel elements should be corroded by sodium hydroxide solution and anodized in sulfuric acid solution, but there are often some uneven color phenomena on surfaces, and sometimes regions of 'black and white stripes' appear. In order to study the relationship of colorful stripes on coatings and the surface morphology of aluminum alloy claddings corroded by sodium hydroxide solution, surface microstructures and second phase particles of the aluminum alloy claddings, which were corroded by sodium hydroxide solution, are investigated metallographically and via SEM analysis; Meanwhile, thickness, microstructure, chemical composition and construction of anodic oxidation coatings on aluminum coatings are analyzed. It is shown that: 1) the darker the surface color of corroded aluminum alloy claddings is, the darker of anodic oxidation coating; 2) there are many micro-pores on anodized oxidation coatings, which is much similar to that of corroded aluminum alloy claddings according to the morphology and distribution. So, it can be deduced that the surface morphology of anodic coatings is inherited from the corroded surfaces. (authors)

  3. Laser Cladding of Embedded Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coating Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The accurate real-time monitoring of surface or internal temperatures of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs in hostile environments presents significant benefits to the efficient and safe operation of gas turbines. A new method for fabricating high-temperature K-type thermocouple sensors on gas turbine engines using coaxial laser cladding technology has been developed. The deposition of the thermocouple sensors was optimized to provide minimal intrusive features to the TBC, which is beneficial for the operational reliability of the protective coatings. Notably, this avoids a melt pool on the TBC surface. Sensors were deposited onto standard yttria-stabilized zirconia (7–8 wt % YSZ coated substrates; subsequently, they were embedded with second YSZ layers by the Atmospheric Plasma Spray (APS process. Morphology of cladded thermocouples before and after embedding was optimized in terms of topography and internal homogeneity, respectively. The dimensions of the cladded thermocouple were in the order of 200 microns in thickness and width. The thermal and electrical response of the cladded thermocouple was tested before and after embedding in temperatures ranging from ambient to approximately 450 °C in a furnace. Seebeck coefficients of bared and embedded thermocouples were also calculated correspondingly, and the results were compared to that of a commercial standard K-type thermocouple, which demonstrates that laser cladding is a prospective technology for manufacturing microsensors on the surface of or even embedded into functional coatings.

  4. Experimental Setup with Transient Behavior of Fuel Cladding of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, June-Hyung; Ryu, Woo Seog; Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Sung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Nowadays, in Korea, advanced cladding such as FC92 is developed and its transient behaviors are required for the safety analysis of SFR. Design and safety analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) require understanding fuel pin responses to a wide range of off-normal events. In a loss-of-flow (LOF) or transient over-power (TOP), the temperature of the cladding is rapidly increased above its steady-state service temperature. Transient tests have been performed in sections of fuel pin cladding and a large data base has been established for austenitic stainless steel such as 20% cold-worked 316 SS and ferritic/martensitic steels such as HT9. This paper summarizes the technical status of transient testing facilities and their results. Previous researches showed the transient behaviors of HT9 cladding. For the safety analyses in SFR in Korea, simulated transient tests with newly developed FC92 as well as HT9 cladding are being carried out.

  5. The quest for safe and reliable fuel cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Abe, Alfredo Y., E-mail: eddypino132@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    The tragic Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident of March, 2011, has brought great unrest and challenge to the nuclear industry, which, in collaboration with universities and nuclear research institutes, is making great efforts to improve the safety in nuclear reactors developing accident tolerant fuels (ATF). This involves the study of different materials to be applied as cladding and, also, the improvement in the fuel properties in order to enhance the fuel performance and safety, specifically under accident conditions. Related to the cladding, iron based alloys and silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been studied as a good alternative. In the case of austenitic stainless steel, there is the advantage that the austenitic stainless steel 304 was used as cladding material in the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) registering a good performance. Then, alternated cladding materials such as iron based alloys (304, 310, 316, 347) should be used to replace the zirconium-based alloys in order to improve safety. In this paper, these cladding materials are evaluated in terms of their physical and chemical properties; among them, strength and creep resistance, thermal conductivity, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. Additionally, these properties are compared with those of conventional zirconium-based alloys, the most used material in actual PWR, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each material concerning to fuel performance and safety contribution. (author)

  6. Iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunisholz, L.; Lemaignan, C.

    1984-01-01

    Iodine is considered as one of the major fission products responsible for PCI failure of Zry cladding by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Usual analysis of SCC involves both initiation and growth as sequential processes. In order to analyse initiation and growth independently and to be able to apply the procedures of fracture mechanics to the design of cladding, with respect to SCC, stress corrosion tests of Zry cladding tubes were undertaken with a small fatigue crack (approx. 200 μm) induced in the inner wall of each tube before pressurization. Details are given on the techniques used to induce the fatigue crack, the pressurization test procedure and the results obtained on stress releaved or recrystallized Zry 4 tubings. It is shown that the Ksub(ISCC) values obtained during these experiments are in good agreement with those obtained from large DCB fracture mechanics samples. Conclusions will be drawn on the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to cladding design and related safety analysis. The work now underway is aimed at obtaining better understanding of the initiation step. It includes the irradiation of Zry samples with heavy ions to simulate the effect of recoil fragments implanted in the inner surface of the cladding, that could create a brittle layer of about 10 μm

  7. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  8. Apparatus and method for reprocessing and separating spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Parrish, W.H.; Coops, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for separating and reprocessing spent nuclear fuels includes a separation vessel housing a molten metal solvent in a reaction region, a reflux region positioned above and adjacent to the reaction region, and a porous filter member defining the bottom of the separation vessel in a supporting relationship with the metal solvent. Spent fuels are added to the metal solvent. A non-oxidizing nitrogen-containing gas is introduced into the separation vessel, forming solid actinide nitrides in the metal solvent from actinide fuels, while leaving other fission products in solution. A pressure of about 1.1 to 1.2 atm is applied in the reflux region, forcing the molten metal solvent and soluble fission products out of the vessel, while leaving the solid actinide nitrides in the separation vessel. (author)

  9. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  10. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  11. Study air ingress into the reactor vessel using ICARE/CATHARE V2.0 in case of severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwenaelle Le Dantec; Fichot, F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Safety analyses show that core degradation during a severe reactor accident would not be uniform. This was confirmed by TMI2 examinations. In fact, a central region of the core may overheat, melt and flow down to the lower plenum of the reactor while peripheral regions of the core would remain almost intact. Following rupture of the vessel by molten debris, air may be drawn from the containment by natural convection into the reactor coolant system, and react with the intact rods. Studying air ingress into the reactor vessel is of interest because the interaction of air with Zircaloy cladding can strongly affect the evolution of severe accident scenarios. The main effects are heat generation, increasing clad degradation, fission product release and nitriding. In case of air/steam recirculation in the vessel, significant nitriding of cladding can occur. The resulting ZrN phase is characterized by its brittleness and instability under oxidizing conditions, Oxidation of pre-existing ZrN phase layers has been observed to result in violent oxidation and heat release. Therefore, the first consequence for safety is a risk of strong deflagration in the vessel if a large number of rods on which a substantial layer of ZrN has grown are suddenly in contact with oxygen or steam. The second consequence is a late melting of core materials due to the very exothermic oxidation, leading to a late release of materials out of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In this paper we present an ICARE/CATHARE V2.0 calculation simulating air ingress into the vessel and in particular to describe the nitriding due to natural convection in the reactor vessel. The basic modeling and the necessary extensions of both ICARE and CATHARE are explained. The natural circulation is calculated to predict the regions of oxygen starvation where nitriding takes place. Key words: air ingress, nitriding, ICARE/CATHARE V2.0. (authors)

  12. In situ synthesis of hydroxyapatite coating by laser cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D G; Chen, C Z; Ma, J; Zhang, G

    2008-10-15

    HA bioceramic coatings were synthesized on titanium substrate by laser cladding using cheap calcium carbonate and calcium hydrogen phosphate. The thermodynamic condition for synthesizing HA was calculated by software Matlab 5.0, the microstructure and phase analysis of laser clad HA bioceramic coatings were studied by electron probe microanalyser (EPMA), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The theoretical results show that the Gibbs free enthalpy for the synthesis of HA phase is satisfied, and the presence of HA phase in the clad coatings was then further verified by XRD and the selected area diffraction patterns. When the laser power is 600W and the scanning speed is 3.5mm/s, the compact HA bioceramic coatings were obtained, which have cellular dendritic structure and consist of the phases of HA, alpha-Ca(2)P(2)O(7), CaO and CaTiO(3).

  13. Cladding tube of fuel rod for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hitoshi; Fujie, Kunio; Kuwahara, Heikichi; Hirai, Tadamasa; Kakizaki, Kimio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form a cladding tube wall with tunnels in communication with the exterior through a number of small-diameter openings to rapidly disperse a large quantity of heat thereby providing high density of the fuel rod. Structure: Tunnels adjacent to each other are provided under the skin in contact with cooling liquid of a cladding tube, and a number of openings through which said tunnels and the periphery of the cladding tube are placed in communication are formed, said openings each having its section smaller than that of said tunnel. With this arrangement, the cooling water entered the tunnel through some of small diameter openings absorbs heat of the fuel rod to be vaporized, which is flown out into the cooling water through the other small diameter openings and formed into vapor bubbles which move up for release of heat. (Taniai, N.)

  14. Absorptivity Measurements and Heat Source Modeling to Simulate Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Florian; Eisenbarth, Daniel; Wegener, Konrad

    The laser cladding process gains importance, as it does not only allow the application of surface coatings, but also additive manufacturing of three-dimensional parts. In both cases, process simulation can contribute to process optimization. Heat source modeling is one of the main issues for an accurate model and simulation of the laser cladding process. While the laser beam intensity distribution is readily known, the other two main effects on the process' heat input are non-trivial. Namely the measurement of the absorptivity of the applied materials as well as the powder attenuation. Therefore, calorimetry measurements were carried out. The measurement method and the measurement results for laser cladding of Stellite 6 on structural steel S 235 and for the processing of Inconel 625 are presented both using a CO2 laser as well as a high power diode laser (HPDL). Additionally, a heat source model is deduced.

  15. Performance of refractory alloy-clad fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Cox, C.M.; Millhollen, M.K.

    1984-12-01

    This paper discusses objectives and basic design of two fuel-cladding tests being conducted in support of SP-100 technology development. Two of the current space nuclear power concepts use conventional pin type designs, where a coolant removes the heat from the core and transports it to an out-of-core energy conversion system. An extensive irradiation testing program was conducted in the 1950's and 1960's to develop fuel pins for space nuclear reactors. The program emphasized refractory metal clad uranium nitride (UN), uranium carbide (UC), uranium oxide (UO 2 ), and metal matrix fuels (UCZr and BeO-UO 2 ). Based on this earlier work, studies presented here show that UN and UO 2 fuels in conjunction with several refractory metal cladding materials demonstrated high potential for meeting space reactor requirements and that UC could serve as an alternative but higher risk fuel

  16. Interdiffusion between U-Zr-Mo and stainless steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, J. Y.; Lee, B. S.; Lee, J. T.; Kang, Y. H.

    1998-01-01

    Interdiffusion investigations were carried out at 700 deg C for 200 hours for the diffusion couples assembled with the U-Zr-Mo ternary fuel versus austenitic stainless steel D9 and the U-Zr-Mo ternary fuel versus martensitic stainless steel HT9 respectively to investigate the fuel-cladding compatibility. SEM-EDS analysis was utilized to determine the composition and the penetration depths of the reaction layers. In the case of Fuel/D9 couple, (Fe, Cr, Ni) of the cladding elements formed the precipitates with the Zr, Mo and diminished the U concentration upto 800μ length from the fuel side. Composition of the precipitates was varied with the penetrated elements. In Fuel/HT9 couple, reaction layer was smaller than that of D9 couples and was less affected by cladding elements. The eutectic reaction appeared partially in the Fuel/HT9 diffusion couple

  17. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  18. Probabilistic assessment of spent-fuel cladding breach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foadian, H.; Rashid, Y.R.; Seager, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for determining the probability spent-fuel cladding breach due to normal and accident class B cask transport conditions is introduced. This technique uses deterministic stress analysis results as well as probabilistic cladding material properties, initial flaws, and breach criteria. Best estimates are presented for the probability distributions of irradiated Zircaloy properties such as ductility and fracture toughness, and for fuel rod initial conditions such as manufacturing flaws and PCI part-wall cracks. Example analyses are used to illustrate the implementation of this methodology for a BWR (GE 7 x 7) and a PWR (B ampersand W 15 x 15) assembly. The cladding breach probabilities for each assembly are tabulated for regulatory normal and accident transport conditions including fire

  19. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  20. Compatibility of niobium, titanium, and vanadium metals with LMFBR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1975-10-01

    A series of laboratory capsule annealing experiments were conducted to assess the compatibility of niobium, vanadium, and titanium with 316 stainless steel cladding in the temperature range of 700 to 800 0 C. Niobium, vanadium, and titanium are cantidate oxygen absorber materials for control of oxygen chemistry in LMFBR fuel pins. Capsule examination indicated good compatibility between niobium and 316 stainless steel at 800 0 C. Potential compatibility problems between cladding and vanadium or titanium were indicated at 800 0 C under reducing conditions. In the presence of Pu/sub 0.25/U/sub 0.75/O/sub 1.98/ fuel (Δanti G 02 congruent to -160 kcal/mole) no reaction was observed between vanadium or titanium and cladding at 800 0 C

  1. General considerations on the oxide fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascard, R.

    1977-01-01

    Since the very first experimental irradiations in thermal reactors, performed in view of the future Rapsodie fuel general study, corrosion cladding anomalies were observed. After 10 years of Rapsodie and more than two years of Phenix, performance brought definite confirmation of the chemical reactions between the irradiated fuel and cladding. That is the reason for which the fuel designers express an urgent need for determining the corrosion rates. Semi-empirical laws and mechanisms describing corrosion processes are proposed. Erratic conditions for appearance of the oxide-cladding corrosion are stressed upon. Obviously such a problem can be fully appreciated only by a statistical approach based on a large number of observations on the true LMFBR fuel pins

  2. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced.

  3. Flux Density through Guides with Microstructured Twisted Clad DB Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Baqir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of flux density through a newly proposed twisted clad guide containing DB medium. The inner core and the outer clad sections are usual dielectrics, and the introduced twisted windings at the core-clad interface are treated under DB boundary conditions. The pitch angle of twist is supposed to greatly contribute towards the control over the dispersion characteristics of the guide. The eigenvalue equation for the guiding structure is deduced, and the analytical investigations are made to explore the propagation patterns of flux densities corresponding to the sustained low-order hybrid modes under the situation of varying pitch angles. The emphasis has been put on the effects due to the DB twisted pitch on the propagation of energy flux density through the guide.

  4. Performance of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Hayes, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state testing of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperatures was initiated in EBR-II in November of 1987. At that time U-10 wt. % Zr fuel clad with the low-swelling ferritic/martensitic alloy HT9 was being considered as driver fuel options for both EBR-II and FFTF. The objective of the X447 test described here was to determine the lifetime of HT9 cladding when operated with metallic fuel at beginning of life inside wall temperatures approaching ∼660 degree C. Though stress-temperature design limits for HT9 preclude its use for high burnup applications under these conditions due to excessive thermal creep, the X447 test was carried out to obtain data on high temperature breach phenomena involving metallic fuel since little data existed in that area

  5. Probabilistic assessment of spent-fuel cladding breach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foadian, H.; Rashid, Y.R.; Seager, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a methodology for determining the probability of spent-fuel cladding breach due to normal and accident class B cask transport conditions is introduced. This technique uses deterministic stress analysis results as well as probabilistic cladding material properties, initial flaws, and breach criteria. Best estimates are presented for the probability distributions of irradiated Zircaloy properties such as ductility and fracture toughness, and for fuel rod initial conditions such as manufacturing flaws and PCI part-wall cracks. Example analyses are used to illustrate the implementation of this methodology for a BWR (GE 7 x 7) and a PWR (B and W 15 x 15) assembly. The cladding breach probabilities for each assembly are tabulated for regulatory normal and accident transport conditions including fire

  6. Microparticle Separation by Cyclonic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karback, Keegan; Leith, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    The ability to separate particles based on their size has wide ranging applications from the industrial to the medical. Currently, cyclonic separators are primarily used in agriculture and manufacturing to syphon out contaminates or products from an air supply. This has led us to believe that cyclonic separation has more applications than the agricultural and industrial. Using the OpenFoam computational package, we were able to determine the flow parameters of a vortex in a cyclonic separator in order to segregate dust particles to a cutoff size of tens of nanometers. To test the model, we constructed an experiment to separate a test dust of various sized particles. We filled a chamber with Arizona test dust and utilized an acoustic suspension technique to segregate particles finer than a coarse cutoff size and introduce them into the cyclonic separation apparatus where they were further separated via a vortex following our computational model. The size of the particles separated from this experiment will be used to further refine our model. Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado University of Denver, Dr. Randall Tagg, Dr. Richard Krantz.

  7. Separated type nuclear superheating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, Kazuki.

    1993-01-01

    In a separated type nuclear superheating reactor, fuel assemblies used in a reactor core comprise fuel rods made of nuclear fuel materials and moderator rods made of solid moderating materials such as hydrogenated zirconium. Since the moderating rods are fixed or made detachable, high energy neutrons generated from the fuel rods are moderated by the moderating rods to promote fission reaction of the fuel rods. Saturated steams supplied from the BWR type reactor by the fission energy are converted to high temperature superheated steams while passing through a steam channel disposed between the fuel rods and the moderating rods and supplied to a turbine. Since water is not used but solid moderating materials sealed in a cladding tube are used as moderation materials, isolation between superheated steams and water as moderators is not necessary. Further, since leakage of heat is reduced to improve a heat efficiency, the structure of the reactor core is simplified and fuel exchange is facilitated. (N.H.)

  8. Secondary hydriding of defected zircaloy-clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.; Vaknin, S.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of secondary hydriding in LWR fuel rods is critically reviewed. The current understanding of the process is summarized with emphasis on the sources of hydrogen in the rod provided by chemical reaction of water (steam) introduced via a primary defect in the cladding. As often noted in the literature, the role of hydrogen peroxide produced by steam radiolysis is to provide sources of hydrogen by cladding and fuel oxidation that are absent without fission-fragment irradiation of the gas. Quantitative description of the evolution of the chemical state inside the fuel rod is achieved by combining the chemical kinetics of the reactions between the gas and the fuel and cladding with the transport by diffusion of components of the gas in the gap. The chemistry-gas transport model provides the framework into which therate constants of the reactions between the gases in the gap and the fuel and cladding are incorporated. The output of the model calculation is the H 2 0/H 2 ratio in the gas and the degree of claddingand fuel oxidation as functions of distance from the primary defect. This output, when combined with a criterion for the onset of massive hydriding of the cladding, can provide a prediction of the time and location of a potential secondary hydriding failure. The chemistry-gas transport model is the starting point for mechanical and H-in-Zr migration analyses intended to determine the nature of the cladding failure caused by the development of the massive hydride on the inner wall

  9. Study on the improvement of nuclear fuel cladding reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheem, Karp Soon; Han, Jung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Lee, Deok Hyun

    1987-12-01

    In order to improve the nuclear fuel cladding reliability for high burn-up fuels, the corrosion resistance of laser beam surface treated and β-quenched zircaloys and the mechanical characteristics including fatigue, burst, and out-of-pile PCMI characteristics of heat treated zircaloys were investigated. In addition, the inadiation characteristics of Ko-Ri reactor fuel claddings was examined. It was found that the wasteside corrosion resistance of commercial zircaloys was improved remarkably by laser beam surface treatment. The out-of-pile transient cladding failures were investigated in terms of hoop stress versus time-to-failures by means of mandrel loading units at 25 deg C and 325 deg C. Fatigue characteristics of the β-quenched and as-received zircaloy cladding were investigated by using an internal oil pressurization method which can simulate the load-following operation cycle. The results were in good agreement with the existing data obtained by conventional methods for commercial zircaloys. Burst tests were performed with commercial and the β-quenched zircaloys in high pressure argon gas atmosphere as a function of burst temperature. The burst stress decreased linearly in the α phase region up to 600 deg C and hereafter the decrement of the burst stress decreased gradually with temperature in the β-phase region. For the first time, the burst characteristic of the irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding tubes released from Ko-Ri nuclear power unit 1 was investigated, and attempts were made to trace the cause of cladding failures by examining the failed structure and fret marks by debris. (Author)

  10. Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibre Comprising a Fibre Grating in the Cladding and its Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An optical fibre is provided having a fibre cladding around a longitudinally extending optical propagation core. The cladding has a reflection region of a varying refractive index in the longitudinal direction....

  11. Influence Of The Laser Cladding Strategies On The Mechanical Properties Of Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamikiz, A.; Tabernero, I.; Ukar, E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Delgado, J.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents different experimental results of the mechanical properties of Inconel registered 718 test parts built-up by laser cladding. Recently, turbine manufacturers for aeronautical sector have presented high interest on laser cladding processes. This process allows building fully functional structures on superalloys, such as Inconel registered 718, with high flexibility on complex shapes. However, there is limited data on mechanical properties of the laser cladding structures. Moreover, the available data do not include the influence of process parameters and laser cladding strategies. Therefore, a complete study of the influence of the laser cladding parameters and mainly, the variation of the tensile strength with the laser cladding strategy is presented. The results show that there is a high directionality of mechanical properties, depending on the strategies of laser cladding process. In other words, the test parts show a fiber -like structure that should be considered on the laser cladding strategy selection.

  12. Potential for cladding thermal failure in LWRs during high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Genk, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature increase in the fuel and the cladding during a PCM accident produces film boiling at the cladding surface which may induce zircaloy cladding failure, due to embrittlement, and fuel melting at the centerline of the fuel pellets. Molten fuel may extrude through radial cracks in the fuel and relocate in the fuel-cladding gap. Contact of extruded molten fuel with the cladding, which is at high temperature during film boiling, may induce cladding thermal failure due to melting. An assessment of central fuel melting and molten fuel extrusion into the fuel-cladding gap during a PCM accident is presented. The potential for thermal failure of the zircaloy cladding upon being contacted by molten fuel during such an accident is also analyzed and compared with the applicable experimental evidence

  13. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  14. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  15. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Results of studies on the photochemistry of aqueous Pu solutions and the stability of iodine in liquid and gaseous CO 2 are reported. Progress is reported in studies on: the preparation of macroporous bodies filled with oxides and sulfides to be used as adsorbents; the beneficiation of photographic wastes; the anion exchange adsorption of transition elements from thiosulfate solutions; advanced filtration applications of energy significance; high-resolution separations; and, the examination of the separation agents, octylphenylphosphoric acid (OPPA) and trihexyl phosphate (THP)

  16. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for separating isotopes in which photo-excitation of selected isotope species is used together with the reaction of the excited species with postive ions of predetermined ionization energy, other excited species, or free electrons to produce ions or ion fragments of the selected species. Ions and electrons are produced by an electrical discharge, and separation is achieved through radial ambipolar diffusion, electrostatic techniques, or magnetohydrodynamic methods

  17. Evaluation of integrally finned cladding for LMFBR fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantley, D.A.; Sutherland, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    An integral fin design effectively reduces the coolant temperature gradients within an LMFBR subassembly by redistributing coolant flow so as to reduce the maximum cladding temperature and increase the duct wall temperature. The reduced cladding temperatures are offset by strain concentrations resulting from the fin geometry, so there is little net effect on predicted fuel pin performance. The increased duct wall temperatures, however, significantly reduce the duct design lifetime so that the final conclusion is that the integral fin design is inferior to the standard wire wrap design. This result, however, is dependent upon the material correlations used. Advanced alloys with improved irradiation properties could alter this conclusion

  18. Gap conductance in Zircaloy-clad LWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainscough, J.B.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the procedures currently used to calculate fuel-cladding gap conductance in light water reactor fuel rods containing pelleted UO 2 in Zircaloy cladding, under both steady-state and transient conditions. The relevant theory is discussed together with some of the approximations usually made in performance modelling codes. The state of the physical property data which are needed for heat transfer calculations is examined and some of the relevant in- and out-of-reactor experimental work on fuel rod conductance is reviewed

  19. Comparison of models discribing cladding deformations during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Zipper, R.

    1981-05-01

    This report compares the important models for the determination of cladding deformations during LOCA. In addition to the comparisons of underlying assumptions of different models the same is done for the coefficients applied for the models. In order to assess the predictive capability of the models the calculated results are compared with the experimental results of the individual claddings. It was found out that the results of temperature ramp tests could be calculated better than that of the pressure ramp tests. The calculations revealed that even with the simplified assumption of the model used in TESPA the agreement of the calculated results with those of model NORA was relatively good. (orig.) [de

  20. Synthesis of clad motion experiments interpretation: codes and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, J.; Fortunato, M.; Seiler, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    This communication deals with clad melting and relocation phenomena related to LMFBR safety analysis of loss of flow accidents. We present: - the physical models developed at DSN/CEN Cadarache in single channel and bundle geometry. The interpretation with these models of experiments performed by the STT (CEN Grenoble). It comes out that we have now obtained a good understanding of the involved phenomena in single channel geometry. On the other hand, further studies are necessary for a better knowledge of clad motion phenomena in bundle cases with conditions close to reactor ones

  1. Technical committee meeting on fuel and cladding interaction. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-04-01

    Experiments and experiences concerning fuel-cladding interaction in thermal and fast neutron flux burnup are dealt with. A number of results from in-pile and out-of pile experiments with different fuel pins with cladding made of different stainless steels showed the importance of corrosion process, dependent on the burnup, core temperature, metal-oxide ratio, and other steady state parameters in the core of fast reactors (most frequently LMFBRs). This is of importance for fuel pins design and fabrication. Mixed oxide fuel is treated in many cases.

  2. Evaluation of cost reduction method for manufacturing ODS ferritic claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Mizuta, Shunji; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2000-04-01

    For evaluating the fast reactor system technology, it is important to evaluate the practical feasibility of ODS ferritic claddings, which is the most promising materials to attain the goal of high coolant temperature and more than 150 GWd/t. Based on the results of their technology development, mass production process with highly economically benefit as well as manufacturing cost estimation of ODS ferritic claddings were preliminarily conducted. From the view point of future utility scale, the cost for manufacturing mother tubes has a dominant factor in the total manufacturing cost. The method to reduce the cost of mother tube manufacturing was also preliminarily investigated. (author)

  3. Technical committee meeting on fuel and cladding interaction. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    Experiments and experiences concerning fuel-cladding interaction in thermal and fast neutron flux burnup are dealt with. A number of results from in-pile and out-of pile experiments with different fuel pins with cladding made of different stainless steels showed the importance of corrosion process, dependent on the burnup, core temperature, metal-oxide ratio, and other steady state parameters in the core of fast reactors (most frequently LMFBRs). This is of importance for fuel pins design and fabrication. Mixed oxide fuel is treated in many cases

  4. Method and system for edge cladding of laser gain media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Caird, John Allyn; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene

    2014-03-25

    A gain medium operable to amplify light at a gain wavelength and having reduced transverse ASE includes an input surface and an output surface opposing the input surface. The gain medium also includes a central region including gain material and extending between the input surface and the output surface along a longitudinal optical axis of the gain medium. The gain medium further includes an edge cladding region surrounding the central region and extending between the input surface and the output surface along the longitudinal optical axis of the gain medium. The edge cladding region includes the gain material and a dopant operable to absorb light at the gain wavelength.

  5. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.; Silva, A.T. e.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyses the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  6. Pie technique of LWR fuel cladding fracture toughness test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Shinya; Usami, Koji; Nakata, Masahito; Fukuda, Takuji; Numata, Masami; Kizaki, Minoru; Nishino, Yasuharu

    2006-01-01

    Remote-handling techniques were developed by cooperative research between the Department of Hot Laboratories in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. (NFI) for evaluating the fracture toughness on irradiated LWR fuel cladding. The developed techniques, sample machining by using the electrical discharge machine (EDM), pre-cracking by fatigue tester, sample assembling to the compact tension (CT) shaped test fixture gave a satisfied result for a fracture toughness test developed by NFL. And post-irradiation examination (PIE) using the remote-handling techniques were carried out to evaluate the fracture toughness on BWR spent fuel cladding in the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF). (author)

  7. Irradiation experience with HT9-clad metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The safe and reliable performance of metallic fuel is currently under study and demonstration in the Integral Fast Reactor program. In-reactor tests of HT9-clad metallic fuel have now reached maturity and have all shown good performance characteristics to burnups exceeding 17.5 at. % in the lead assembly. Because this low-swelling tempered martensitic alloy is the cladding of choice for high fluence applications, the experimental observations and performance modelling efforts reported in this paper play an important role in demonstrating reliability

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF LASER CLADDING WEAR-RESISTANT COATING ON TITANIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    RUILIANG BAO; HUIJUN YU; CHUANZHONG CHEN; BIAO QI; LIJIAN ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Laser cladding is an advanced surface modification technology with broad prospect in making wear-resistant coating on titanium alloys. In this paper, the influences of laser cladding processing parameters on the quality of coating are generalized as well as the selection of cladding materials on titanium alloys. The microstructure characteristics and strengthening mechanism of coating are also analyzed. In addition, the problems and precaution measures in the laser cladding are pointed out.

  9. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  10. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  11. Inscription of type I and depressed cladding waveguides in lithium niobate using a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, S; Mittholiya, K; Bhatnagar, A; Bernard, R; Dharmadhikari, J A; Mathur, D; Dharmadhikari, A K

    2017-07-10

    We describe two types of waveguides (type I and depressed cladding) inscribed in lithium niobate using a variable repetition rate (200 kHz-25 MHz), 270 fs duration fiber laser. The type I modification-based waveguides have propagation losses in the range from 1.2 to 10 dB/cm at 1550 nm, depending on experimental parameters. These waveguides are not permanent; they deteriorate over time. Such deterioration of waveguides can be slowed down from 30 days to 100 days by pre-annealing the samples and by writing at a 720 kHz laser repetition rate. The propagation losses measured at 1550 nm show significant improvement for pre-annealed samples. The depressed cladding-inscribed waveguides are permanent, but the propagation loss depends on the number of damage tracks. A track separation of ∼1  μm between adjacent damage tracks yields the lowest propagation loss of 0.5 dB/cm at 1550 nm for a 40 μm diameter waveguide. We observe multimode guidance for sizes in the range of 20-80 μm in these waveguide structures at 1550 nm. Their crystalline nature is found to remain intact, as inferred from second-harmonic generation within the waveguide region.

  12. Pressure vessel integrity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, S.; Doney, R.O.; McDonald, M.S.; Jones, D.P.; Wilson, W.K.; Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on nuclear industry applications. The papers were prepared for technical sessions developed under the sponsorship of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Committees for Codes and Standards, Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, and Materials Fabrication. They were presented at the 1991 Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference in San Diego, California, June 23-27. The primary objective of the sponsoring organization is to provide a forum for the dissemination and discussion of information on development and application of technology for the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping. This publication includes contributions from authors from Australia, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The papers here are organized in six sections, each with a particular emphasis as indicated in the following section titles: Fracture Technology Status and Application Experience; Crack Initiation, Propagation and Arrest; Ductile Tearing; Constraint, Stress State, and Local-Brittle-Zones Effects; Computational Techniques for Fracture and Corrosion Fatigue; and Codes and Standards for Fatigue, Fracture and Erosion/Corrosion

  13. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  14. Vacuum distilling vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reik, H

    1928-12-27

    Vacuum distilling vessel for mineral oil and the like, characterized by the ring-form or polyconal stiffeners arranged inside, suitably eccentric to the casing, being held at a distance from the casing by connecting members of such a height that in the resulting space if necessary can be arranged vapor-distributing pipes and a complete removal of the residue is possible.

  15. Visualization of vessel traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Moving objects are captured in multivariate trajectories, often large data with multiple attributes. We focus on vessel traffic as a source of such data. Patterns appearing from visually analyzing attributes are used to explain why certain movements have occurred. In this research, we have developed

  16. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  17. Reactor vessel stud tensioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malandra, L.J.; Beer, R.W.; Salton, R.B.; Spiegelman, S.R.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner, for facilitating the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud, has gripper jaws which when the tensioner is lowered into engagement with the upper end of the stud are moved inwards to grip the upper end and which when the tensioner is lifted move outward to release the upper end. (author)

  18. Standard recommended practice for examination of fuel element cladding including the determination of the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for the post-irradiation examination of fuel cladding and to achieve better correlation and interpretation of the data in the field of radiation effects. The recommended practice is applicable to metal cladding of all types of fuel elements. The tests cited are suitable for determining mechanical properties of the fuel elements cladding. Various ASTM standards and test methods are cited

  19. Effects of the inner mould material on the aluminium–316L stainless steel explosive clad pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xunzhong; Tao, Jie; Wang, Wentao; Li, Huaguan; Wang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Different mould materials were adopted to evaluate the effect of the constraint on the clad quality. ► The interface characteristics of clad pipe were analyzed for the different clad pipe. ► The clad pipes possess excellent bonding quality. - Abstract: The clad pipe played an important part in the pipeline system of the nuclear power industry. To prepare the clad pipe with even macrosize and excellent bonding quality, in this work, different mould materials were adopted to evaluate the effect of the constraint on the clad quality of the bimetal pipe prepared by explosive cladding. The experiment results indicated that, the dimension uniformity and bonding interface of clad pipe were poor by using low melting point alloy as mould material; the local bulge or the cracking of the clad pipe existed when the SiC powder was utilized. When the steel mould was adopted, the outer diameter of the clad pipe was uniform from head to tail. In addition, the metallurgical bonding was formed. Furthermore, the results of shear test, bending test and flattening test showed that the bonding quality was excellent. Therefore, the Al–316L SS clad pipe could endure the second plastic forming

  20. Electromagnetic separator of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasilin, V.V.; Nezovibatko, Yu.N.; Poklepach, G.S.; Shvets, O.M.; Taran, V.S.; Tereshin, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The progress in the widespread utilization of the PVD methods is determined in many respects by the plasma quality and, therefore, the necessity of an application of plasma separators, in particular magnetic separators. One needs to note that traditional magnetic separators have a number of problems their using, namely their unwieldiness, the presence of the isolated cameras and so on. We have proposed, manufactured and investigated the simple separator of plasma that doesn't require using additional cameras. As a source of metallic plasma the standard cathode vaporizer in the installation 'BULAT 6' was in use. Plasma stream from the cathode flowed through the not protected by isolation spiral solenoid. The solenoid input (from the cathode side) was under floating potential. The solenoid output was connected to the autonomous power supply system. The solenoid was prepared with stride winding and 90 degree turn. The solenoid current was 20-90 A and the solenoid voltage with respect to the vessel (earth) was +15 V. In this case drifting charged particles could freely fly out from the interior solenoid region to its boundary. The glow of the turned flow of plasma was observed during the supplying of the cathode and the solenoid. Plasma flow was separated from the coils and extended along the axis of solenoid. One can assume that this device ensures radial electric with respect to the bulk of plasma (the diameter of the bulk of plasma is comparable with the cathode diameter), the toroidal magnetic field, produced by solenoid, was of an order of 20 Oe. Magnetic field strength was sufficient for the magnetization of electrons, but it was rather small for magnetizing the ions and charged micro-droplets. The experiments carried out with aluminum cathode on the deposition of coatings at the stainless steel substrate have shown the high effectiveness of this separator operation. Coatings without droplets were obtained also on the glass substrate with HF- displacement

  1. Improvement of retinal blood vessel detection using morphological component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Elaheh; Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza

    2015-03-01

    Detection and quantitative measurement of variations in the retinal blood vessels can help diagnose several diseases including diabetic retinopathy. Intrinsic characteristics of abnormal retinal images make blood vessel detection difficult. The major problem with traditional vessel segmentation algorithms is producing false positive vessels in the presence of diabetic retinopathy lesions. To overcome this problem, a novel scheme for extracting retinal blood vessels based on morphological component analysis (MCA) algorithm is presented in this paper. MCA was developed based on sparse representation of signals. This algorithm assumes that each signal is a linear combination of several morphologically distinct components. In the proposed method, the MCA algorithm with appropriate transforms is adopted to separate vessels and lesions from each other. Afterwards, the Morlet Wavelet Transform is applied to enhance the retinal vessels. The final vessel map is obtained by adaptive thresholding. The performance of the proposed method is measured on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. An accuracy of 0.9523 and 0.9590 has been respectively achieved on the DRIVE and STARE datasets, which are not only greater than most methods, but are also superior to the second human observer's performance. The results show that the proposed method can achieve improved detection in abnormal retinal images and decrease false positive vessels in pathological regions compared to other methods. Also, the robustness of the method in the presence of noise is shown via experimental result. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  3. Boron-bearing Influences of 9Cr-0.5Mo-2W-V-Nb Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for a SFR Fuel Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Han, Chang-Hee; Kim, Woo-Gon; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2008-01-01

    Currently the principal materials in a SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor) of Gen-IV nuclear system are considering stainless steels (e.g. austenitic steels and ferritic/martensitic steels) for pressure boundary and structural applications in the primary circuit (cladding, duct, cold and hot leg piping, and pressure vessel). There are sound technical justifications for these material selections, and the adoption of these stainless steels for a wide range of nuclear and non-nuclear applications has generated much industrial technology and experience. However, there are strong incentives to develop advanced materials, especially cladding, for the Gen-IV SFR. The Gen-IV SFR is to have a considerable increase in safety and be economically competitive when compared with the conventional water reactors. To accomplish these objectives, the development of the fuel cladding material should be set forth as a premise because its integrity is directly related to those of the reactor system as well as the fuel in the Gen-IV SFR. Since last year, a R and D program was launched to develop the improved ferritic/martensitic steel for the Gen-IV SFR fuel cladding. Categories of materials considered in the program included 8 - 12% Cr ferritic/ martensitic steels. A strong recommendation was made for the development of a high strength steel equivalent to or superior to ASTM Gr.92 steel to offset the difficulties encountered with commercial available steels of the 8 - 12% Cr group. That is, since fuel cladding in the Gen-IV SFR would operate under higher temperatures than 600 .deg. C, contacting with liquid sodium, and be irradiated by neutrons to as high as 200dpa, the cladding should thus sustain both superior irradiation and temperature stabilities during an operational life. The newly developed advanced steel should overcome the severe drawback; mechanical properties, especially creep, are deteriorated at a higher temperature over 600 .deg. C. In this study, as one of the composition

  4. Separation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A disposal container is described for use in disposal of radioactive waste materials consisting of: top wall structure, bottom wall structure, and circumferential side wall structure interconnecting the top and bottom wall structures to define an enclosed container, separation structure in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure for allowing passage of liquid and retention of solids, inlet port structure in the top wall structure, discharge port structure at the periphery of the container in communication with the outer surface of the separation structure for receiving liquid that passes through the separation structure, first centrifugally actuated valve structure having a normal position closing the inlet port structure and a centrifugally actuated position opening the inlet port structure, second centrifugally actuated valve structure having a normal position closing the discharge port structure and a centrifugally actuated position opening the discharge port structure, and coupling structure integral with wall structure of the container for releasable engagement with centrifugal drive structure

  5. Separable algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the theory of separable algebras over commutative rings. After a thorough introduction to the general theory, the fundamental roles played by separable algebras are explored. For example, Azumaya algebras, the henselization of local rings, and Galois theory are rigorously introduced and treated. Interwoven throughout these applications is the important notion of étale algebras. Essential connections are drawn between the theory of separable algebras and Morita theory, the theory of faithfully flat descent, cohomology, derivations, differentials, reflexive lattices, maximal orders, and class groups. The text is accessible to graduate students who have finished a first course in algebra, and it includes necessary foundational material, useful exercises, and many nontrivial examples.

  6. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor )LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (H SST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication [with a through-wall dimension of ∼6 mm (∼0.24 in.)] was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications [i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m 2 (72 ft 2 ) of cladding surface]. (author)

  7. Equipment stainless steel entire versus steels bimetallics clad or overlay; Utilizacao de equipamentos de processo construidos em aco inoxidavel integral versus acos bimetalicos cladeado ou 'overlay'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Itamar da Silva; Lima, Jadival Carneiro de; Leal, Murilo Fonseca; Cardoso, Amauri dos Santos; Jorjan, Roberto [PETROBRAS S.A., Sao Francisco do Conde, BA (Brazil). Refinaria Landulfo Alves Mataripen (RLAM)

    2008-07-01

    This study does not recommend the use of a pressure vessel made of integral stainless steel, due to the failure mechanisms under stress corrosion assisted by chlorides or polythionic acid. Are presented case studies of literature and analysis of reports of proceedings of RLAM reactors, showing that the materials produced by bimetallic clad overlay or are more appropriate, in terms of integrity, for use in equipment that the internal environment requires austenitic stainless steel specification.

  8. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  9. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batey, W [Dounreay Experimental Reactor Establishment, Thurso, Caithness (United Kingdom); Findlay, J R [AERE, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed.

  10. Underwater cladding with laser beam and plasma arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.A.; Fusaro, R.; Jones, M.G.; Solomon, H.D.; Milian-Rodriguez, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    Two welding processes, plasma arc (transferred arc) (PTA) and laser beam, were investigated to apply cladding to austenitic stainless steels and Inconel 600. These processes have long been used to apply cladding layers , but the novel feature being reported here is that these cladding layers were applied underwater, with a water pressure equivalent to 24 m (80 ft). Being able to apply the cladding underwater is very important for many applications, including the construction of off-shore oil platforms and the repair of nuclear reactors. In the latter case, being able to weld underwater eliminates the need for draining the reactor and removing the fuel. Welding underwater in reactors presents numerous challenges, but the ability to weld without having to drain the reactor and remove the fuel provides a huge cost savings. Welding underwater in reactors must be done remotely, but because of the radioactive corrosion products and neutron activation of the steels, remote welding would also be required even if the reactor is drained and the fuel removed. In fact, without the shielding of the water, the remote welding required if the reactor is drained might be even more difficult than that required with underwater welds. Furthermore, as shall be shown, the underwater welds that the authors have made were of high quality and exhibit compressive rather than tensile residual stresses

  11. Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in irradiated Zircaloy cladding have been investigated by microstructural characterization and analytical modeling, with emphasis on application of the results to understand high-burnup fuel failure under RIA situations. Optical microscopy, SEM, and TEM were conducted on BWR and PWR fuel cladding tubes that were irradiated to fluence levels of 3.3 x 10 21 n cm -2 to 5.9 x 10 21 n cm -2 (E > 1 MeV) and tested in hot cell at 292--325 C in Ar. The morphology, distribution, and habit planes of macroscopic and microscopic hydrides in as-irradiated and posttest cladding were determined by stereo-TEM. The type and magnitude of the residual stress produced in association with oxide-layer growth and dense hydride precipitation, and several synergistic factors that strongly influence axial-splitting behavior were analyzed. The results of the microstructural characterization and stress analyses were then correlated with axial-splitting behavior of high-burnup PWR cladding reported for simulated-RIA conditions. The effects of key test procedures and their implications for the interpretation of RIA test results are discussed

  12. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. T. M.

    2003-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-situ microstructural observations during straining in a field-emission

  13. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, JTM; Pei, YT; Ocelik, [No Value; Sudarshan, TS; Stiglich, JJ; Jeandin, M

    2002-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-sitit microstructural observations during straining in an FEG-ESEM

  14. Pellet clad interaction analysis of AFA 3G fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tong; Shen Caifen; Jiao Yongjun; Lu Huaquan; Zhou Zhou

    2002-01-01

    The author described Pellet Clad Interaction (PCI) analysis of AFA 3G fuel rod during condition II transients for GNPS 18-months alternating equilibrium cycles. It provided PCI technical limit, analytical methods and computer code used in the analyses of condition II transients and thermal-mechanical. Finally, given main calculation results and the conclusion for GNPS 18-months cycles

  15. Cladding and Duct Materials for Advanced Nuclear Recycle Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Todd R.; Busby, J. T.; Klueh, R. L.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2008-01-01

    This is a review article that provides an overview of the reactor core structural materials and clad and duct needs for the GNEP advanced burner reactor design. A short history of previous research on structural materials for irradiation environments is provided. There is also a section describing some advanced materials that may be candidate materials for various reactor core structures

  16. FFTF criteria for run to cladding breach experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Heard, F.J.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1985-12-01

    The review of experiments proposed for irradiation in FFTF resulted in the development of new criteria for run-to-cladding breach experiments. These criteria have allowed irradiation of aggressive experiments without compromising the safety bases for FFTF. This paper consisting of a set of narrated slides, discusses these criteria and related bases

  17. Cooper coatings on stainless steel by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, M.; Estanislau, S.; Cabral, A.; Pecas, P.; Gouveia, H.

    1998-01-01

    Copper laser cladding was performed on AISI 304L stainless steel. Some process parameters like process speed and focal point were analysed and it was established its influence on the quality of the coating. Simple track coating were achieved with good aspect, good adherence and good surface finishing. Therefore a reference basis for further developments related to industrial application, was created. (Author) 14 refs

  18. Underwater laser cladding and seal welding for INCONEL 52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Masataka; Kouno, Wataru; Makino, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    Recently, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed at aged components of nuclear power plants under water environment and high exposure of radiation. Toshiba has been developing both an underwater laser welding directly onto surface of the aged components as maintenance and repair techniques. This paper reports underwater laser cladding and seal welding for INCONEL 52. (author)

  19. Elimination of Start/Stop defects in laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Eekma, M.; Hemmati, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser cladding represents an advanced hard facing technology for the deposition of hard, corrosion and wear resistant layers of controlled thickness onto a selected area of metallic substrate. When a circular geometry is required, the beginning and the end of the laser track coincide in the same

  20. Achilles tests finally nail PWR fuel clad ballooning fears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dore, P.; McMinn, K.

    1992-01-01

    A conclusive series of experiments carried out by AEA Reactor Services at its Achilles rig in the UK has finally allayed fears that fuel clad ballooning is a major safety problem for Sizewell B, Britain's first Pressurized Water Reactor. The experiments are described in this article. (author)

  1. Prediction of cladding life in waste package environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, J.K.; Doering, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Fuel cladding can potentially provide longer containment or slower release of radionuclides from spent fuel after geologic disposal. To predict the amount of benefit that cladding can provide, we surveyed degradation modes and developed a model for creep rupture by diffusion-controlled cavity growth, the mechanism that several authors have concluded is the most important. In this mechanism, voids nucleate on the grain boundaries and grow by diffusion of vacancies along the grain boundaries to the voids. When a certain fraction of the grain boundary area is covered with voids, the material fails. An analytic expression for cladding lifetime is developed. Besides materials constants, the predicted lifetime depends on the temperature history, the hoop stress in the cladding, the spacing between void nuclei, and the micro-structure. The inclusion of microstructure is a significant new feature of the model; this feature is used to help avoid excessive conservatism. The model is applied in a sample calculation for disposal of spent fuel, and the practice of using temperature limits to evaluate repository designs is examined

  2. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batey, W.; Findlay, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed

  3. Production and quality control of fuel cladding tubes for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Katsuhiko; Hagi, Shigeki; Anada, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hideaki; Hyodo, Shigetoshi

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent fabrication technology and corrosion resistance study of fuel cladding tubes for LWRs conducted by Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd. started the research on zircaloy in 1957. In 1980, the factory exclusively for the production of cladding tubes was founded, and the mass production system on full scale was established. Thereafter, the various improvement of the production technology, the development of new products, and the heightening of the performance mainly on the corrosion resistance have been tested and studied. Recently, the works in the production processes were almost automated, and the installation of the production lines advanced, and the stabilization of product quality and the rationalization of costs are promoted. Moreover, the development of the zircaloy cladding tubes having high corrosion resistance has been advanced to cope with the long term cycle operation of LWRs hereafter. The features of zircaloy cladding tubes, the manufacturing processes, the improvement of the manufacturing technology, the improvement of the corrosion resistance and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Semi-empirical corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem Elahi, Waseem; Atif Rana, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in Pressurize Water Reactors (PWRs) bears corrosion due to fast neutron flux, coolant temperature, and water chemistry. The thickness of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube may be decreased due to the increase in corrosion penetration which may affect the integrity of the fuel rod. The tin content and inter-metallic particles sizes has been found significantly in the magnitude of oxide thickness. In present study we have developed a Semiempirical corrosion model by modifying the Arrhenius equation for corrosion as a function of acceleration factor for tin content and accumulative annealing. This developed model has been incorporated into fuel performance computer code. The cladding oxide thickness data obtained from the Semi-empirical corrosion model has been compared with the experimental results i.e., numerous cases of measured cladding oxide thickness from UO 2 fuel rods, irradiated in various PWRs. The results of the both studies lie within the error band of 20μm, which confirms the validity of the developed Semi-empirical corrosion model. Key words: Corrosion, Zircaloy-4, tin content, accumulative annealing factor, Semi-empirical, PWR. (author)

  5. Crack resistance curves determination of tube cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: johannes.bertsch@psi.ch; Hoffelner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-06-30

    Zirconium based alloys have been in use as fuel cladding material in light water reactors since many years. As claddings change their mechanical properties during service, it is essential for the assessment of mechanical integrity to provide parameters for potential rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture mechanics parameters like the fracture toughness K {sub IC} or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral based elastic-plastic fracture toughness J {sub IC} are employed. In claddings with a very small wall thickness the determination of toughness needs the extension of the J-concept beyond limits of standards. In the paper a new method based on the traditional J approach is presented. Crack resistance curves (J-R curves) were created for unirradiated thin walled Zircaloy-4 and aluminium cladding tube pieces at room temperature using the single sample method. The procedure of creating sharp fatigue starter cracks with respect to optical recording was optimized. It is shown that the chosen test method is appropriate for the determination of complete J-R curves including the values J {sub 0.2} (J at 0.2 mm crack length), J {sub m} (J corresponding to the maximum load) and the slope of the curve.

  6. Delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizarro, Luis M.; Fernandez, Silvia; Lafont, Claudio; Mizrahi, Rafael; Haddad, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Crack propagation rates, grown by the delayed hydride cracking mechanism, were measured in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding, according to a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During the first stage of the program a Round Robin Testing was performed on fuel cladding samples provided by Studsvik (Sweden), of the type used in PWR reactors. Crack growth in the axial direction is obtained through the specially developed 'pin load testing' (PLT) device. In these tests, crack propagation rates were determined at 250 C degrees on several samples of the material described above, obtaining a mean value of about 2.5 x 10 -8 m s -1 . The results were analyzed and compared satisfactorily with those obtained by the other laboratories participating in the CRP. At the present moment, similar tests on CANDU and Atucha I type fuel cladding are being performed. It is thought that the obtained results will give valuable information concerning the analysis of possible failures affecting fuel cladding under reactor operation. (author) [es

  7. Advances in appendage joining techniques for PHWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, P.B.; Ray, T.K.; Date, V.G.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes work carried out at the BARC on the development of a technique to join tiny appendages (spacers and bearing pads) to thin cladding (before loading of UO 2 pellets) by resistance welding for PHWR fuel assemblies. The work includes qualifying the process for production environment, designing prototype equipment for regular production and quality monitoring. In the first phase of development, welding of appendages on UO 2 loaded elements was successfully developed, and is being used in production. Welding of appendages on to empty clad tubes is a superior technique for several reasons. Many problems associated with development of welding on empty tubes were resolved. work was initiated, in the second phase of the development task, to select a suitable technique to join appendages on empty clad tubes without any collapse of thin clad. Several alternatives were reviewed and assessed such as laser, full face welding, shim welding and shrink fitting ring spacers. Selection of a method using a mandrel and a modified electrode geometry was fully developed. Results were optimized and process development successfully completed. Appropriate weld monitoring techniques were also reviewed for their adaptation. This technique is useful for 19, 22 as well as 37 element assemblies. (author)

  8. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  9. Statistical mechanical analysis of LMFBR fuel cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, J.-P.; Pay, A.

    1977-01-01

    The most important design requirement on fuel pin cladding for LMFBR's is its mechanical integrity. Disruptive factors include internal pressure from mixed oxide fuel fission gas release, thermal stresses and high temperature creep, neutron-induced differential void-swelling as a source of stress in the cladding and irradiation creep of stainless steel material, corrosion by fission products. Under irradiation these load-restraining mechanisms are accentuated by stainless steel embrittlement and strength alterations. To account for the numerous uncertainties involved in the analysis by theoretical models and computer codes statistical tools are unavoidably requested, i.e. Monte Carlo simulation methods. Thanks to these techniques, uncertainties in nominal characteristics, material properties and environmental conditions can be linked up in a correct way and used for a more accurate conceptual design. First, a thermal creep damage index is set up through a sufficiently sophisticated clad physical analysis including arbitrary time dependence of power and neutron flux as well as effects of sodium temperature, burnup and steel mechanical behavior. Although this strain limit approach implies a more general but time consuming model., on the counterpart the net output is improved and e.g. clad temperature, stress and strain maxima may be easily assessed. A full spectrum of variables are statistically treated to account for their probability distributions. Creep damage probability may be obtained and can contribute to a quantitative fuel probability estimation

  10. Plastic deformation of the cladding of Fortissimo fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbach, G.; Millet, P.; Blanchard, F.

    1979-07-01

    A study of a large number of standard Fortissimo pins, clad in solution treated 316 steel, shows that the plastic strain depends linearly on the fission gas pressure and the dose (in dpaF). The derived modulus of irradiation creep ranges from 1 to 2 x 10 -6 (MPa dpaF) -1 at 450 0 C and increases steadily with temperature. (author)

  11. Clad failure detection in G 3 - operational feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plisson, J.

    1964-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the role and the principles of clad failure detection, the author describes the working conditions and the conclusions reached after 4 years operation of this installation on the reactor G 3. He mentions also the modifications made to the original installation as well as the tests carried out and the experiments under way. (author) [fr

  12. Preliminary study of mechanical behavior for Cr coated Zr-4 Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kim, Hak-Sung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Chan; Yang, Yong-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To decrease the oxidation rate of Zr-based alloy components, many concepts of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) such as Mo-Zr cladding, SiC/SiCf cladding and iron-based alloy cladding are under development. One of the promised concept is the coated cladding which can remarkably increase the corrosion and wear resistance. Recently, KAERI is developing the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding as accident tolerance cladding. To coat the Cr powder on the Zircaloy, 3D laser coating technology has been employed because it is possible to make a coated layer on the tubular cladding surface by controlling the 3-diminational axis. Therefore, for this work, the mechanical integrity of Cr coated Zircaloy should be evaluated to predict the safety of fuel cladding during the operating or accident of nuclear reactor. In this work, the mechanical behavior of the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding has been studied by using finite element analysis (FEA). The ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding was simulated to evaluate the validity of mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr, which were referred from the literatures and experimental reports. In this work, the mechanical behavior of the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding has been studied by using finite element analysis (FEA). The ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding was simulated to evaluate the validity of mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr. The pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) properties of Cr coated Zr-4 cladding were investigated by thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) simulation. The mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr was validated by simulation of ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding.

  13. Hydrogenation and high temperature oxidation of Zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Horváth, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years a new series of experiments started for supporting the new LOCA criteria, considering the proposals of US NRC. The effects which can cause the embrittlement of VVER fuel claddings were reviewed and evaluated in the framework of the project. The purpose of the work was to determine how the fuel cladding’s hydrogen uptake under normal operating conditions, effect the behavior of the cladding under LOCA conditions. As a first step a gas system equipment with gas valves and pressure gauge was built, in which the zirconium alloy can absorb hydrogen under controlled conditions. In this apparatus E110 (produced by electrolytic method, currently used at Paks NPP) and E110G (produced by a new technology) alloys were hydrogenated to predetermined hydrogen contents. According the results of ring compression tests the E110G alloys lose their ductility above 3200 ppm hydrogen content. This limit can be applied to determine the ductile-brittle transition of the nuclear fuel claddings. After the hydrogenation, high temperature oxidation experiments were carried out on the E110G and E110 samples at 1000 °C and 1200 °C. 16 pieces of E110G and 8 samples of E110 with 300 ppm and 600 ppm hydrogen content were tested. The oxidation of the specimens was performed in steam, under isothermal conditions. Based on the ring compression tests load-displacement curves were recorded. The main objective of the compression tests was to determine the ductile-brittle transition. These results were compared to the results of our previous experiments where the samples did not contain hydrogen. The original claddings showed more ductile behavior than the samples with hydrogen content. The higher hydrogen content resulted in a more brittle mechanical behavior. However no significant difference was observed in the oxidation kinetics of the same cladding types with different hydrogen content. The experiments showed that the normal operating hydrogen uptake of the fuel claddings

  14. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing of cracks in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, Anders; Zagbai, Theo

    2006-05-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The present project has been concerned with the modelling of defects in claddings. A cladding is a layer of material that is put on for corrosion protection, in the nuclear power industry this layer is often an austenitic steel that is welded onto the surface. The cladding is usually anisotropic and to some degree it is most likely also inhomogeneous, particularly in that the direction of the anisotropy is varying. This degree of inhomogeneity is unknown but probably not very pronounced so for modelling purposes it may be a valid assumption to take the cladding to be homogeneous. However, another important complicating factor with claddings is that the interface between the cladding and the base material is often corrugated. This corrugation can have large effects on the transmission of ultrasound through the interface and can thus greatly affect the detectability of defects in the cladding. In the present project the only type of defect that is considered is a planar crack that is situated inside the cladding. The investigations are, furthermore, limited to two dimensions, and the crack is then only a straight line. The crack can be arbitrarily oriented and situated, but it must not intersect the interface to the base material. The crack can be surface-breaking, and this is often the case of most practical interest, but it should then be

  15. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing of cracks in claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Anders; Zagbai, Theo [Calmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Mechanics

    2006-05-15

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The present project has been concerned with the modelling of defects in claddings. A cladding is a layer of material that is put on for corrosion protection, in the nuclear power industry this layer is often an austenitic steel that is welded onto the surface. The cladding is usually anisotropic and to some degree it is most likely also inhomogeneous, particularly in that the direction of the anisotropy is varying. This degree of inhomogeneity is unknown but probably not very pronounced so for modelling purposes it may be a valid assumption to take the cladding to be homogeneous. However, another important complicating factor with claddings is that the interface between the cladding and the base material is often corrugated. This corrugation can have large effects on the transmission of ultrasound through the interface and can thus greatly affect the detectability of defects in the cladding. In the present project the only type of defect that is considered is a planar crack that is situated inside the cladding. The investigations are, furthermore, limited to two dimensions, and the crack is then only a straight line. The crack can be arbitrarily oriented and situated, but it must not intersect the interface to the base material. The crack can be surface-breaking, and this is often the case of most practical interest, but it should then be

  16. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  17. Advanced Approach of Reactor Pressure Vessel In-service Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Pajnic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The most important task of every utility operating a nuclear power plant is the continuously keeping of the desired safety and reliability level. This is achieved by the performance of numerous inspections of the components, equipment and system of the nuclear power plant in operation and in particular during the scheduled maintenance periods at re-fueling time. Periodic non-destructive in-service inspections provide most relevant criteria of the integrity of primary circuit pressure components. The task is to reliably detect defects and realistically size and characterize them. One of most important and the most extensive examination is a reactor pressure vessel in-service inspection. That inspection demand high standards of technology and quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT) advanced technology as well as regarding reactor pressure vessel tool and control systems. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the defined sections (reactor welds), whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual inspection is used for examination of the vessel inner surface. The movement of probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with NDT systems. The successful performance is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen NDT techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state of the art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. The advanced approach as presented in this paper offer more flexibility of application (non-destructive tests, local grinding action as well as taking of boat samples

  18. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  19. Development and application of preventive maintenance technique for pipes using laser cladding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakenaka, Hiroaki; Yamadera, Masao; Shiraiwa, Takanori.

    1995-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resisting coating (cladding) on the surface of the material was developed for the purpose of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the austenitic stainless steel (Type 304). In this method, metallic powder paste is applied on the inner surface of pipes, and then a YAG laser beam is irradiated to the paste, which melts and forms a clad with excellent corrosion resistance. Recently, the laser cladding method was practically and successfully applied to the actual nuclear power plant in Japan. This report describes this laser cladding technique, the equipment, and actual works in the field. (author)

  20. Temperature measurements of the aluminium claddings of fuel elements in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1986-01-01

    A method for embedding the sheathed thermocouples in the aluminium claddings of some fuel elements of experimental reactors by ultrasonic welding technique is described. The measurement results of the cladding temperature of fuel elements in reactors are given. By means of this method, the joint between the sheathed thermocouples and the cladding of fuel elements can be made very tight, there are no bulges on the cladding surfaces, and the sheathed thermocouples are embedded strongly and reliably. Therefore an essential means is provided for acquiring the stable and dynamic state data of the cladding temperature of in-core fuel elements

  1. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  2. Thermal gradient effects on the oxidation of Zircaloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Maguire, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    A Thermal Gradient Test Facility (TGTF) has been designed and constructed to measure the thermal gradient effect on pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod cladding. The TGTF includes a heat flux simulator assembly capable of producing a wide range of PWR operating conditions including water flow velocities and temperatures, water chemistry conditions, cladding temperatures, and heat fluxes ranging to 160 W/cm 2 . It is fully instrumented including a large number of thermocouples both inside the water flow channel and inside the cladding. Two test programs are in progress. First, cladding specimens are pre-oxidized in air at 500 deg. C and in 400 deg. C steam for various lengths of time to develop a range of uniform oxide thicknesses from 1 to 60 micrometers. The pre-oxidized specimens are placed in the TGTF to characterize the oxide thermal conductivity under a variety of water flow and heat flux conditions. Second, to overcome the long exposure times required under typical PWR conditions a series of tests with the addition of high concentrations of lithium hydroxide to the water are being considered. Static autoclave tests have been conducted with lithium hydroxide concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 moles per liter at 300, 330, and 360 deg. C for up to 36 hours. Results for zircaloy-4 show a considerable increase in the weight gain for the exposed samples with oxidation rate enhancement factors as high as 70 times that of pure water. Operation of the TGTF with elevated lithium hydroxide levels will yield real-time information concerning the effects of a heat flux on the oxidation kinetics of zircaloy fuel rod cladding. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  4. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  5. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  6. Reactor vessel stud closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelman, S.R.; Salton, R.B.; Beer, R.W.; Malandra, L.J.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner apparatus for enabling the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud. The apparatus is adapted to engage the vessel stud by closing a gripper around an upper end of the vessel stud when the apparatus is seated on the stud. Upon lifting the apparatus, the gripper releases the vessel stud so that the apparatus can be removed

  7. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  8. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  9. Phenomenological vessel burst investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippelein, K.W.; Julisch, P.; Muz, J.; Schiedermaier, J.

    1985-07-01

    Fourteen burst experiments have been carried out using vessels with circumferential and longitudinal flaws, for investigation of the fracture behaviour, i.e. the time-related fracture opening. The vessels had dimensions (outer diameter x wall thickness = 800 x 47 mm) which correspond to the dimensions of the main coolant piping of a 1300 MW e PWR. The test specimens had been made of the base-safe material 20 MnMoNi 55 and of a special, 22 NiMoCr 37 base alloy. The experimental conditions with regard to pressure and temperature have been chosen so as to correspond to normal operating conditions of a PWR (p∝17.5 MPa, T∝300 0 C), i.e. the flaws have been so dimensioned that failure was to be expected at a pressure of p∝17.5 MPa. As a rule, water has been used as the pressure medium, or in some cases air, in order to influence the time-dependent pressure decrease. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations have also been made. In order to determine the impact of a fast propagating crack on the leak-to-fracture curve, which normally is defined by quasistationary experiments, suitable tests have been made with large-volume, cylindrical vessels (outer diameter x wall thickness x length = 3000 x 21 x 14000 mm) made of the material WSt E 43. The leak-before-fracture criterion has been confirmed. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J S

    2015-07-01

    Human vascularized allografts are perfused through blood vessels composed of cells (endothelium, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells) that remain largely of graft origin and are thus subject to host alloimmune responses. Graft vessels must be healthy to maintain homeostatic functions including control of perfusion, maintenance of permselectivity, prevention of thrombosis, and participation in immune surveillance. Vascular cell injury can cause dysfunction that interferes with these processes. Graft vascular cells can be activated by mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to participate in graft inflammation contributing to both ischemia/reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. Different forms of rejection may affect graft vessels in different ways, ranging from thrombosis and neutrophilic inflammation in hyperacute rejection, to endothelialitis/intimal arteritis and fibrinoid necrosis in acute cell-mediated or antibody-mediated rejection, respectively, and to diffuse luminal stenosis in chronic rejection. While some current therapies targeting the host immune system do affect graft vascular cells, direct targeting of the graft vasculature may create new opportunities for preventing allograft injury and loss. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomenology of radiation-induced changes in blood vessels are systematized and authors' experience is generalized. Modern concepts about processes leading to vessel structure injury after irradiation is critically analyzed. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of X-ray vessel injury, consideration of which is not yet sufficiently elucidated in literature

  12. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomeology of radiation changes of blood vessels are systemized and the authors' experience is generalyzed. A critical analysis of modern conceptions on processes resulting in vessel structure damage after irradiation, is given. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of radiation injury of vessels

  13. Reducing the radiotoxicity of PWR cladding hulls by cold-crucible melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthier, P.; Boen, R.; Piccinato, R.; Ladirat, C.

    1994-12-31

    PWR cladding wastes from spent fuel reprocessing plants are highly radiotoxic due to the presence of long-lived alpha-emitting nuclides and certain beta-gamma emitters. Various options are now under consideration for disposal of such wastes. The ``Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique`` is now developing a melting process at Marcoule that promises to diminish their radiotoxicity. Work has focused on two complementary research areas: obtaining a high quality metallic containment matrix and achieving maximum decontamination by concentrating the plutonium and minor actinides together with cesium and strontium in the slag. Vitrification represents a short-term solution for the slag; from a longer-term perspective, this waste form is ideally suited for the SPIN programme. This is an indispensable step toward the possible implementation of an advanced waste management strategy involving actinide separation and transmutation to reduce the long-term nuclear waste disposal hazard. (author). 1 ref., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Reuse of spent fuel cladding Zr by molten salt toward advanced recycle society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Yasuike, Y.; Sato, Nobuaki

    2003-01-01

    Cladding tubes of zircaloy 95% generated from reprocessing process for spent nuclear fuels are to be chopped in about 3 cm length, compacted and solidified with cements. This paper reports the summary of investigation of the present possible techniques for zirconium recovery: (1) electrolysis of molten salts (Zr-chlorides and/or fluorides) and (2) separation as volatile zirconium chlorides (ZrCl 4 ) (chloride volatility process) followed by reaction with metallic magnesium at 900degC to produce sponged Zr (Kroll method). The feasibility are discussed from the point of view of reduction of secondary radioactive wastes, accumulation of such nuclides as Co-60 and Ni-63 in electrolytic basin, radioactivity estimation in the products, and also problems of cleaning and reducing chemicals. (S. Ohno)

  15. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  16. Study on modes of energy action in laser-induction hybrid cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongjun; Zeng Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    The shape and microstructure in laser-induction hybrid cladding were investigated, in which the cladding material was provided by means of three different methods including the powder feeding, cold pre-placed coating (CPPC) and thermal pre-placed coating (TPPC). Moreover, the modes of energy action in laser-induction hybrid cladding were also studied. The results indicate that the cladding material supplying method has an important influence on the shape and microstructure of coating. The influence is decided by the mode of energy action in laser-induction hybrid cladding. During the TPPC hybrid cladding of Ni-based alloy, the laser and induction heating are mainly performed on coating. During the CPPC hybrid cladding of Ni-based alloy, the laser and induction heating are mainly performed on coating and substrate surface, respectively. In powder feeding hybrid cladding, a part of laser is absorbed by the powder particles directly, while the other part of laser penetrating powder cloud radiates on the molten pool. Meanwhile, the induction heating is entirely performed on the substrate. In addition, the wetting property on the interface is improved and the metallurgical bond between the coating and substrate is much easier to form. Therefore, the powder feeding laser-induction hybrid cladding has the highest cladding efficiency and the best bond property among three hybrid cladding methods.

  17. A Novel Method of Modeling the Deformation Resistance for Clad Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jianliang; Yi Youping; Xie Mantang

    2011-01-01

    Because of the excellent thermal conductivity, the clad sheet (3003/4004/3003) of aluminum alloy is extensively used in various heat exchangers, such as radiator, motorcar air conditioning, evaporator, and so on. The deformation resistance model plays an important role in designing the process parameters of hot continuous rolling. However, the complex behaviors of the plastic deformation of the clad sheet make the modeling very difficult. In this work, a novel method for modeling the deformation resistance of clad sheet was proposed by combining the finite element analysis with experiments. The deformation resistance model of aluminum 3003 and 4004 was proposed through hot compression test on the Gleeble-1500 thermo-simulation machine. And the deformation resistance model of clad sheet was proposed through finite element analysis using DEFORM-2D software. The relationship between cladding ratio and the deformation resistance was discussed in detail. The results of hot compression simulation demonstrate that the cladding ratio has great effects on the resistance of the clad sheet. Taking the cladding ratio into consideration, the mathematical model of the deformation resistance for clad sheet has been proved to have perfect forecasting precision of different cladding ratio. Therefore, the presented model can be used to predict the rolling force of clad sheet during the hot continuous rolling process.

  18. A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, O.

    1976-01-01

    A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel comprising a pump mounted in the reactor vessel and driven by a water-cooled electric motor mounted in a housing outside the reactor vessel, the shaft of the pump passing through the reactor-vessel bottom and being coupled to the motor shaft in a member mechanically connected to the bottom of the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the motor housing, the pump shaft being surrounded by a resilient sealing ring, the reactor vessel communicating with the cooling channels of the pump, when the latter is operating, via a slot surrounding the pump hollow cylindrical shaft, characterized in that the slot inner end is used for/forming a circular space surrounding the pump shaft and surrounded by the motorhousing, in which is coaxially mounted a separating cylindral wall, the upper edge of which is tightly applied against the inner wall of the motor-housing to which it is fastened vertically, the inner surface of said wall being turned towards the outer surface of a circular packing-box, the outer surface of said separating wall constituting a separating radical inner surface for a circular chamber through which flow the motor cooling water. (author)

  19. Development of technology for the in-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel metal condition using a magnetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirov, M. B.; Zabruskov, N.Y; Massoud, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The opportunity to perform the inspection of condition of base metal and metal of welded joints of cladded vessels of PWR by non destructive methods is shown. The technique for on-site specimen-free testing is offered on the basis of sharing a kinetic hardness method and magnetic method. The results of studies of magnetic and mechanical properties of vessel steels in various condition after irradiation and thermal processing are submitted. It is shown, that the magnetic properties (first of all coercive force) are sensitive to change of structure of a material. (authors)

  20. Research on Microstructure and Property of TiC-Co Composite Material Made by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The experiment of laser cladding on the surface of 2Cr13 steel was made. Titanium carbide (TiC) powder and Co-base alloy powder were used as cladding material. The microstructure and property of laser cladding layer were tested. The research showed that laser cladding layer had better properties such as minute crystals, deeper layer, higher hardness and good metallurgical bonding with base metal. The structure of cladding was supersaturated solid solution with dispersed titanium carbide. The average hardness of cladding zone was 660HV0.2. 2Cr13 steel was widely used in the field of turbine blades. Using laser cladding, the good wear layer would greatly increase the useful life of turbine blades.