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Sample records for vesicular glutamate release

  1. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

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    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  2. Characterization of depolarization-coupled release of glutamate from cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells using DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) to distinguish between the vesicular and cytoplasmic pools

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    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2003-01-01

    Release of preloaded [3H]D-aspartate in response to depolarization induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or the endogenous agonist glutamate was characterized using cultured glutamatergic cerebellar granule neurons. Release from the vesicular and the cytoplasmic glutamate pools, respectively, wa...

  3. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

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    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  4. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  5. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

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    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered vesicular glutamate transporter expression in human temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Van Liefferinge, J.; Jensen, C.J.; Albertini, G.; Bentea, E.; Demuyser, T.; Merckx, E.; Aronica, E.; Smolders, I.; Massie, A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are responsible for loading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Altered VGLUT protein expression has been suggested to affect quantal size and glutamate release under both physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated mRNA and

  7. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Li; Fayez K. Ghishan; Liqun Bai

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas,skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestivesystem have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  8. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

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    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  9. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

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    Randi G Bjaelde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30, which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1 cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1 and vesicular transport (nocodazole. These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ∼90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50% or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8% and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells.

  10. Local anesthetics inhibit glutamate release from rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes.

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    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chung, Chih-Yang; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Shieh, Jiann-Sing; Wang, Su-Jane

    2013-09-01

    Local anesthetics have been widely used for regional anesthesia and the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Recent studies have also demonstrated that low-dose systemic local anesthetic infusion has neuroprotective properties. Considering the fact that excessive glutamate release can cause neuronal excitotoxicity, we investigated whether local anesthetics might influence glutamate release from rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Results showed that two commonly used local anesthetics, lidocaine and bupivacaine, exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of 4-AP-evoked release of glutamate. The effects of lidocaine or bupivacaine on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca²⁺ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor dl-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on the action of lidocaine or bupivacaine. Both lidocaine and bupivacaine reduced the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca²⁺]C but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of lidocaine or bupivacaine on evoked glutamate release was prevented by blocking the Ca(v)2.2 (N-type) and Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but it was not affected by blocking of the ryanodine receptors or the mitochondrial Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchange. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) also prevented the action of lidocaine or bupivacaine. These results show that local anesthetics inhibit glutamate release from rat cortical nerve terminals. This effect is linked to a decrease in [Ca²⁺]C caused by Ca²⁺ entry through presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels and the suppression of the PKA and PKC signaling cascades. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small-azo-dyes as potent Vesicular Glutamate Transporters inhibitors.

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    Favre-Besse, Franck-Cyril; Poirel, Odile; Bersot, Tiphaine; Kim-Grellier, Elodie; Daumas, Stephanie; El Mestikawy, Salah; Acher, Francine C; Pietrancosta, Nicolas

    2014-05-06

    Vesicular Glutamate Transporters (VGLUTs) allow the loading of presynapic glutamate vesicles and thus play a critical role in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. VGLUTs have proved to be involved in several major neuropathologies and directly correlated to clinical dementia in Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly VGLUT represent a key biological target or biomarker for neuropathology treatment or diagnostic. Yet, despite the pivotal role of VGLUTs, their pharmacology appears quite limited. Known competitive inhibitors are restricted to some dyes as Trypan Blue (TB) and glutamate mimics. This lack of pharmacological tools has heavily hampered VGLUT investigations. Here we report a rapid access to small molecules that combine benefits of TB and dicarboxylic quinolines (DCQs). Their ability to block vesicular glutamate uptake was evaluated. Several compounds displayed low micromolar inhibitory potency when size related compounds are thirty to forty times less potent (i.e. DCQ). We then confirmed the VGLUT selectivity by measuring the effect of the series on vesicular monoamine transport and on metabotropic glutamate receptor activity. These inhibitors are synthesized in only two steps and count among the best pharmacological tools for VGLUTs studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of astrocytes in depolarization-coupled release of glutamate in cerebellar cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    to AMPA (30 microM) in the presence of cyclothiazide (50 microM) to block desensitization, was of a vesicular origin. Pulses of 55 mM K+ caused a DL-TBOA resistant efflux of preloaded D-[3H]aspartate from astrocytes, indicating that this release was not mediated by glutamate transporters. The results...

  13. Synaptic vesicles are capable of synthesizing the VGLUT substrate glutamate from α-ketoglutarate for vesicular loading.

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    Takeda, Kouji; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Takahashi, Kento; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    2012-04-01

    Synaptic vesicle loading of glutamate is a pivotal step in glutamate synaptic transmission. The molecular machinery responsible for this step is comprised of v-type proton-pump ATPase and a vesicular glutamate transporter. Recent evidence indicates that synaptic vesicles are endowed with glycolytic ATP-synthesizing enzymes, providing energy for immediate use by vesicle-bound proton-pump ATPase. In this study, we provide evidence that synaptic vesicles are also capable of synthesizing the vesicular glutamate transporter substrate glutamate, from α-ketoglutarate and l-aspartate (as the amino group donor); glutamate thus produced is taken up into vesicles. We also report a finding that α-ketoglutarate-derived glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles and aspartate aminotransferase are inhibited by 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylate. Evidence is given that this is a selective inhibitor for aspartate aminotransferase. These observations provide insight into understanding the nerve endings' mechanism for high efficiency in glutamate transmission. Finding this inhibitor may have implications for further experimentation on the role of α-ketoglutarate-derived glutamate in glutamate transmission. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Vesicular glutamate transporters use flexible anion and cation binding sites for efficient accumulation of neurotransmitter.

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    Preobraschenski, Julia; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Jahn, Reinhard

    2014-12-17

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) accumulate the neurotransmitter glutamate in synaptic vesicles. Transport depends on a V-ATPase-dependent electrochemical proton gradient (ΔμH+) and requires chloride ions, but how chloride acts and how ionic and charge balance is maintained during transport is controversial. Using a reconstitution approach, we used an exogenous proton pump to drive VGLUT-mediated transport either in liposomes containing purified VGLUT1 or in synaptic vesicles fused with proton-pump-containing liposomes. Our data show that chloride stimulation can be induced at both sides of the membrane. Moreover, chloride competes with glutamate at high concentrations. In addition, VGLUT1 possesses a cation binding site capable of binding H+ or K+ ions, allowing for proton antiport or K+ / H+ exchange. We conclude that VGLUTs contain two anion binding sites and one cation binding site, allowing the transporter to adjust to the changing ionic conditions during vesicle filling without being dependent on other transporters or channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synaptopathy under conditions of altered gravity: changes in synaptic vesicle fusion and glutamate release.

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    Krisanova, N V; Trikash, I O; Borisova, T A

    2009-12-01

    Glutamate release and synaptic vesicle heterotypic/homotypic fusion were characterized in brain synaptosomes of rats exposed to hypergravity (10 G, 1h). Stimulated vesicular exocytosis determined as KCl-evoked fluorescence spike of pH-sensitive dye acridine orange (AO) was decreased twice in synaptosomes under hypergravity conditions as compared to control. Sets of measurements demonstrated reduced ability of synaptic vesicles to accumulate AO ( approximately 10% higher steady-state baseline level of AO fluorescence). Experiments with preloaded l-[(14)C]glutamate exhibited similar amount of total glutamate accumulated by synaptosomes, equal concentration of ambient glutamate, but the enlarged level of cytoplasmic glutamate measuring as leakage from digitonin-permeabilized synaptosomes in hypergravity. Thus, it may be suggested that +G-induced changes in stimulated vesicular exocytosis were a result of the redistribution of intracellular pool of glutamate, i.e. a decrease in glutamate content of synaptic vesicles and an enrichment of the cytoplasmic glutamate level. To investigate the effect of hypergravity on the last step of exocytosis, i.e. membrane fusion, a cell-free system consisted of synaptic vesicles, plasma membrane vesicles, cytosolic proteins isolated from rat brain synaptosomes was used. It was found that hypergravity reduced the fusion competence of synaptic vesicles and plasma membrane vesicles, whereas synaptosomal cytosolic proteins became more active to promote membrane fusion. The total rate of homo- and heterotypic fusion reaction initiated by Ca(2+) or Mg(2+)/ATP remained unchanged under hypergravity conditions. Thus, hypergravity could induce synaptopathy that was associated with incomplete filling of synaptic vesicles with the neuromediator and changes in exocytotic release.

  16. Osthole and imperatorin, the active constituents of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, facilitate glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

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    Wang, Su-Jane; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Wei-Jan

    2008-12-01

    We examined the effects of osthole and imperatorin, two active compounds of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, on the release of glutamate from rat hippocampal synaptosomes and investigated the possible mechanism. The results showed that osthole or imperatorin significantly facilitated 4-aminopridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate release in a concentration-dependent manner. The facilitatory action of osthole or imperatorin was blocked by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, not by the glutamate transporter inhibitor l-transpyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (l-trans-PDC), indicating that the release facilitation by osthole or imperatorin results from a enhancement of vesicular exocytosis and not from an increase of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Examination of the effect of osthole and imperatorin on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] revealed that the facilitation of glutamate release could be attributed to an increase in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, omega-conotoxin MVIIC, a wide-spectrum blocker of the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, significantly suppressed the osthole or imperatorin-mediated facilitation of glutamate release, but intracellular Ca(2+) release inhibitor dantrolene had no effect. Osthole or imperatorin did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-AP-mediated depolarization; thus, the facilitation of 4-AP-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release produced by osthole or imperatorin was not due to it decreasing synaptosomal excitability. In addition, osthole or imperatorin-mediated inhibition of 4-AP-evoked release was prevented by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors. Furthermore, osthole or imperatorin increased 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of PKC. Together, these results suggest that osthole or imperatorin effects a facilitation of glutamate release from nerve terminals by positively modulating N-and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel activation through a signaling cascade involving PKC.

  17. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

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    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  18. Amiodarone reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampual synaptosomes

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    Chia Yu Chang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Decreased brain glutamate level has emerged as a new therapeutic approach for epilepsy. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of amiodarone, an anti-arrhythmic drug with antiepileptic activity, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, amiodarone reduced 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation. Amiodarone did not affect the 4-aminopyridine-evoked depolarization of the synaptosomal membrane potential or the Na+ channel activator veratridine-evoked glutamate release, indicating that the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release is not caused by a decrease in synaptosomal excitability. The inhibitory effect of amiodarone on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was markedly decreased in synaptosomes pretreated with the Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, or the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 and KT5720. However, the intracellular Ca2+-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157 had no effect on the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, amiodarone reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that amiodarone reduces Ca2+ influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, subsequently reducing the Ca2+-calmodulin/protein kinase A cascade to inhibit the evoked glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

  19. Essential roles of aspartate aminotransferase 1 and vesicular glutamate transporters in β-cell glutamate signaling for incretin-induced insulin secretion.

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    Naoya Murao

    Full Text Available Incretins (GLP-1 and GIP potentiate insulin secretion through cAMP signaling in pancreatic β-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. We recently proposed a mechanistic model of incretin-induced insulin secretion (IIIS that requires two critical processes: 1 generation of cytosolic glutamate through the malate-aspartate (MA shuttle in glucose metabolism and 2 glutamate transport into insulin granules by cAMP signaling to promote insulin granule exocytosis. To directly prove the model, we have established and characterized CRISPR/Cas9-engineered clonal mouse β-cell lines deficient for the genes critical in these two processes: aspartate aminotransferase 1 (AST1, gene symbol Got1, a key enzyme in the MA shuttle, which generates cytosolic glutamate, and the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and VGLUT3, gene symbol Slc17a7, Slc17a6, and Slc17a8, respectively, which participate in glutamate transport into secretory vesicles. Got1 knockout (KO β-cell lines were defective in cytosolic glutamate production from glucose and showed impaired IIIS. Unexpectedly, different from the previous finding that global Slc17a7 KO mice exhibited impaired IIIS from pancreatic islets, β-cell specific Slc17a7 KO mice showed no significant impairment in IIIS, as assessed by pancreas perfusion experiment. Single Slc17a7 KO β-cell lines also retained IIIS, probably due to compensatory upregulation of Slc17a6. Interestingly, triple KO of Slc17a7, Slc17a6, and Slc17a8 diminished IIIS, which was rescued by exogenously introduced wild-type Slc17a7 or Slc17a6 genes. The present study provides direct evidence for the essential roles of AST1 and VGLUTs in β-cell glutamate signaling for IIIS and also shows the usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for studying β-cells by simultaneous disruption of multiple genes.

  20. Toluene-induced, Ca2+-dependent vesicular catecholamine release in rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239425952; Vijverberg, H.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068856474

    2002-01-01

    Acute effects of toluene on vesicular catecholamine release from intact PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells have been investigated using carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry. The frequency of vesicles released is low under basal conditions and is enhanced by depolarization. Toluene causes an increase in

  1. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the rat dental pulp and trigeminal ganglion following inflammation.

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    Eun Sun Yang

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that peripheral glutamate signaling mechanism is involved in the nociceptive transmission during pathological conditions. However, little is known about the glutamate signaling mechanism and related specific type of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT in the dental pulp following inflammation. To address this issue, we investigated expression and protein levels of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the dental pulp and trigeminal ganglion (TG following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA application to the rat dental pulp by light microscopic immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis.The density of VGLUT2- immunopositive (+ axons in the dental pulp and the number of VGLUT2+ soma in the TG increased significantly in the CFA-treated group, compared to control group. The protein levels of VGLUT2 in the dental pulp and TG were also significantly higher in the CFA-treated group than control group by Western blot analysis. The density of VGLUT1+ axons in the dental pulp and soma in the TG remained unchanged in the CFA-treated group.These findings suggest that glutamate signaling that is mediated by VGLUT2 in the pulpal axons may be enhanced in the inflamed dental pulp, which may contribute to pulpal axon sensitization leading to hyperalgesia following inflammation.

  2. Nanoscale distribution of presynaptic Ca(2+) channels and its impact on vesicular release during development.

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    Nakamura, Yukihiro; Harada, Harumi; Kamasawa, Naomi; Matsui, Ko; Rothman, Jason S; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Silver, R Angus; DiGregorio, David A; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-07

    Synaptic efficacy and precision are influenced by the coupling of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) to vesicles. But because the topography of VGCCs and their proximity to vesicles is unknown, a quantitative understanding of the determinants of vesicular release at nanometer scale is lacking. To investigate this, we combined freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling of Cav2.1 channels, local [Ca(2+)] imaging, and patch pipette perfusion of EGTA at the calyx of Held. Between postnatal day 7 and 21, VGCCs formed variable sized clusters and vesicular release became less sensitive to EGTA, whereas fixed Ca(2+) buffer properties remained constant. Experimentally constrained reaction-diffusion simulations suggest that Ca(2+) sensors for vesicular release are located at the perimeter of VGCC clusters (<30 nm) and predict that VGCC number per cluster determines vesicular release probability without altering release time course. This "perimeter release model" provides a unifying framework accounting for developmental changes in both synaptic efficacy and time course. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Amiodarone reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampual synaptosomes.

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    Chang, Chia Yu; Hung, Chi Feng; Huang, Shu Kuei; Kuo, Jinn Rung; Wang, Su Jane

    2017-03-01

    Decreased brain glutamate level has emerged as a new therapeutic approach for epilepsy. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of amiodarone, an anti-arrhythmic drug with antiepileptic activity, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, amiodarone reduced 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation. Amiodarone did not affect the 4-aminopyridine-evoked depolarization of the synaptosomal membrane potential or the Na+ channel activator veratridine-evoked glutamate release, indicating that the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release is not caused by a decrease in synaptosomal excitability. The inhibitory effect of amiodarone on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was markedly decreased in synaptosomes pretreated with the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, or the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 and KT5720. However, the intracellular Ca2+-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157 had no effect on the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, amiodarone reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that amiodarone reduces Ca2+ influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, subsequently reducing the Ca2+-calmodulin/protein kinase A cascade to inhibit the evoked glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Curcumin inhibits glutamate release in nerve terminals from rat prefrontal cortex: possible relevance to its antidepressant mechanism.

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    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Chou; Wang, Su-Jane

    2011-08-15

    There is abundant evidence suggesting the relevance of glutamate to depression and antidepressant mechanisms. Curcumin, a major active compound of Curcuma longa, has been reported to have the biological function of antidepressant. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of curcumin on endogenous glutamate release in nerve terminals of rat prefrontal cortex and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that curcumin inhibited the release of glutamate that was evoked by exposing synaptosomes to the K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). This phenomenon was blocked by the chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions, and by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-β-benzyl-oxyaspartate (DL-TBOA). Further experiments demonstrated that curcumin decreased depolarization-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](C), whereas it did not alter the resting membrane potential or 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of curcumin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by blocking the Ca(v)2.2 (N-type) and Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking intracellular Ca(2+) release or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. These results suggest that curcumin inhibits evoked glutamate release from rat prefrontocortical synaptosomes by the suppression of presynaptic Ca(v)2.2 and Ca(v)2.1 channels. Additionally, we also found that the inhibitory effect of curcumin on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was completely abolished by the clinically effective antidepressant fluoxetine. This suggests that curcumin and fluoxetine use a common intracellular mechanism to inhibit glutamate release from rat prefrontal cortex nerve terminals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vesicular glutamate transporters play a role in neuronal differentiation of cultured SVZ-derived neural precursor cells.

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    Eduardo H Sánchez-Mendoza

    Full Text Available The role of glutamate in the regulation of neurogenesis is well-established, but the role of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs in controlling adult neurogenesis is unknown. Here we investigated the implication of VGLUTs in the differentiation of subventricular zone (SVZ-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs. Our results show that NPCs express VGLUT1-3 and EAAT1-3 both at the mRNA and protein level. Their expression increases during differentiation closely associated with the expression of marker genes. In expression analyses we show that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are preferentially expressed by cultured SVZ-derived doublecortin+ neuroblasts, while VGLUT3 is found on GFAP+ glial cells. In cultured NPCs, inhibition of VGLUT by Evans Blue increased the mRNA level of neuronal markers doublecortin, B3T and MAP2, elevated the number of NPCs expressing doublecortin protein and promoted the number of cells with morphological appearance of branched neurons, suggesting that VGLUT function prevents neuronal differentiation of NPCs. This survival- and differentiation-promoting effect of Evans blue was corroborated by increased AKT phosphorylation and reduced MAPK phosphorylation. Thus, under physiological conditions, VGLUT1-3 inhibition, and thus decreased glutamate exocytosis, may promote neuronal differentiation of NPCs.

  6. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 Expression in the Rat Pineal Gland: Detailed Analysis of Expression Pattern and Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hisano, Setsuji

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, is closely related physiologically to circadian rhythm, sleep and reproduction, and also psychiatrically to mood disorders in humans. Under circadian control, melatonin secretion is modulated via nocturnal autonomic (adrenergic) stimulation to the gland, which expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v), glutamatergic markers. Expression of VGLUT2 gene and protein in the intact gland has been reported to exhibit a rhythmic change during a day. To study VGLUT2 expression is under adrenergic control, we here performed an in vitro experiment using dispersed pineal cells of rats. Stimulation of either β-adrenergic receptor or cAMP production to the pineal cells was shown to increase mRNA level of VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 and VGLUT1v. Because an ability of glutamate to inhibit melatonin production was previously reported in the cultured gland, it is likely that pineal VGLUT2 transports glutamate engaged in the inhibition of melatonin production.

  7. Palmitoylethanolamide Inhibits Glutamate Release in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

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    Tzu-Yu Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, an endogenous fatty acid amide displaying neuroprotective actions, on glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes was investigated. PEA inhibited the Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate, which was triggered by exposing synaptosomes to the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine. This release inhibition was concentration dependent, associated with a reduction in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and not due to a change in synaptosomal membrane potential. The glutamate release-inhibiting effect of PEA was prevented by the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA or the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, not affected by the intracellular Ca2+ release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157, and partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281. Based on these results, we suggest that PEA exerts its presynaptic inhibition, likely through a reduction in the Ca2+ influx mediated by Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channels, thereby inhibiting the release of glutamate from rat cortical nerve terminals. This release inhibition might be linked to the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the suppression of the protein kinase A pathway.

  8. Modulation of vesicular catecholamine release from rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Intercellular communication is of vital importance for the nervous system, since the nervous system is the main coordinating system in animals. Nerve cell communication is initiated by the release of chemical messengers, neurotransmitters, from the presynaptic nerve cell. The neurotransmitters, such

  9. Methamphetamine promotes habitual action and alters the density of striatal glutamate receptor and vesicular proteins in dorsal striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Teri M; Corbit, Laura H; Brown, Robert A; Balleine, Bernard W

    2017-07-14

    Goal-directed actions are controlled by the value of the consequences they produce and so increase when what they produce is valuable and decrease when it is not. With continued invariant practice, however, goal-directed actions can become habits, controlled not by their consequences but by antecedent, reward-related states and stimuli. Here, we show that pre-exposure to methamphetamine (METH) caused abnormally rapid development of habitual control. Furthermore, these drug-induced habits differed strikingly from conventional habits; we found that they were insensitive both to changes in reward value and to the effects of negative feedback. In addition to these behavioral changes, METH exposure produced bidirectional changes to synaptic proteins in the dorsal striatum. In the dorsomedial striatum, a structure critical for goal-directed action, METH exposure was associated with a reduction in glutamate receptor and glutamate vesicular proteins, whereas in the dorsolateral striatum, a region that has previously been implicated in habit learning, there was an increase in these proteins. Together, these results indicate that METH exposure promotes habitual control of action that appears to be the result of bidirectional changes in glutamatergic transmission in the circuits underlying goal-directed and habit-based learning. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Reduced Glutamate Release in Adult BTBR Mouse Model of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongen; Ma, Yuehong; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Liu, Jianrong; Chang, Qiaoqiao; Hu, Fengyun; Yu, Li

    2016-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by impairments in social and communication abilities, as well as by restricted and repetitive behaviors. The BTBR T + Itpr3 tf (BTBR) mice have emerged as a well characterized and widely used mouse model of a range of ASD-like phenotype, showing deficiencies in social behaviors and unusual ultrasonic vocalizations as well as increased repetitive self-grooming. However, the inherited neurobiological changes that lead to ASD-like behaviors in these mice are incompletely known and still under active investigation. The aim of this study was to further evaluate the structure and neurotransmitter release of the glutamatergic synapse in BTBR mice. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as a control strain because of their high level of sociability. The important results showed that the evoked glutamate release in the cerebral cortex of BTBR mice was significantly lower than in B6 mice. And the level of vesicle docking-related protein Syntaxin-1A was reduced in BTBR mice. However, no significant changes were observed in the number of glutamatergic synapse, level of synaptic proteins, density of dendritic spine and postsynaptic density between BTBR mice and B6 mice. Overall, our results suggest that abnormal vesicular glutamate activity may underlie the ASD relevant pathology in the BTBR mice.

  11. Increased gene expression of selected vesicular and glial glutamate transporters in the frontal cortex in rats exposed to voluntary wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graban, J; Hlavacova, N; Jezova, D

    2017-10-01

    Though positive effects of exercise on mood and well being are well recognised, the central regulatory mechanisms are still not fully understood. The present study was aimed to testing the hypothesis that voluntary wheel running activates the gene expression of glutamate transporters in the brain cortex of rats. The animals were assigned to the control and voluntary wheel running groups. Voluntary wheel running rats had free access to a stainless steel activity wheel for 3 weeks. The daily running distance gradually increased to 6.21 ± 1.05 km by day 21. Vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) mRNA levels in the frontal cortex were significantly elevated in the group of running animals compared to the values in sedentary controls, while the expression of other vesicular transporters were unchanged. The concentrations of mRNA coding for glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), but not glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) were increased by running. Voluntary wheel running resulted in an elevation of plasma corticosterone and increased expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the frontal cortex. In conclusion, chronic voluntary wheel running results in increased gene expression of VGLUT3 and GLT-1 in the brain cortex without changes in other glutamate transporter subtypes.

  12. Decreased expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and complexin II mRNAs in schizophrenia: further evidence for a synaptic pathology affecting glutamate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, S L; Harrison, P J

    2005-03-01

    Synaptic protein gene expression is altered in schizophrenia. In the hippocampal formation there may be particular involvement of glutamatergic neurons and their synapses, but overall the profile remains unclear. In this in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) study, we examined four informative synaptic protein transcripts: vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2, complexin I, and complexin II, in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPFC), superior temporal cortex (STC), and hippocampal formation, in 13 subjects with schizophrenia and 18 controls. In these areas, VGLUT1 and complexin II are expressed primarily by excitatory neurons, whereas complexin I is mainly expressed by inhibitory neurons. In schizophrenia, VGLUT1 mRNA was decreased in hippocampal formation and DPFC, complexin II mRNA was reduced in DPFC and STC, and complexin I mRNA decreased in STC. Hippocampal VGLUT1 mRNA declined with age selectively in the schizophrenia group. VGLUT2 mRNA was not quantifiable due to its low level. The data provide additional evidence for a synaptic pathology in schizophrenia, in terms of a reduced expression of three synaptic protein genes. In the hippocampus, the loss of VGLUT1 mRNA supports data indicating that glutamatergic presynaptic deficits are prominent, whereas the pattern of results in temporal and frontal cortex suggests broadly similar changes may affect inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The impairment of synaptic transmission implied by the synaptic protein reductions may contribute to the dysfunction of cortical neural circuits that characterises the disorder.

  13. Temperature differentially facilitates spontaneous but not evoked glutamate release from cranial visceral primary afferents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Fawley

    Full Text Available Temperature is fundamentally important to all biological functions including synaptic glutamate release. Vagal afferents from the solitary tract (ST synapse on second order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and glutamate release at this first central synapse controls autonomic reflex function. Expression of the temperature-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 receptor separates ST afferents into C-fibers (TRPV1+ and A-fibers (TRPV1-. Action potential-evoked glutamate release is similar between C- and A-fiber afferents, but TRPV1 expression facilitates a second form of synaptic glutamate release in C-fibers by promoting substantially more spontaneous glutamate release. The influence of temperature on different forms of glutamate release is not well understood. Here we tested how temperature impacts the generation of evoked and spontaneous release of glutamate and its relation to TRPV1 expression. In horizontal brainstem slices of rats, activation of ST primary afferents generated synchronous evoked glutamate release (ST-eEPSCs at constant latency whose amplitude reflects the probability of evoked glutamate release. The frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in these same neurons measured the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. We measured both forms of glutamate from each neuron during ramp changes in bath temperature of 4-5 °C. Spontaneous glutamate release from TRPV1+ closely tracked with these thermal changes indicating changes in the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. In the same neurons, temperature changed axon conduction registered as latency shifts but ST-eEPSC amplitudes were constant and independent of TRPV1 expression. These data indicate that TRPV1-operated glutamate release is independent of action potential-evoked glutamate release in the same neurons. Together, these support the hypothesis that evoked and spontaneous glutamate release originate from two pools of vesicles that are

  14. VGluT2 expression in painful Achilles and patellar tendinosis: evidence of local glutamate release by tenocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alexander; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND The pathogenesis of chronic tendinopathy is unclear. We have previously measured high intratendinous levels of glutamate in patients with tendinosis, suggesting potential roles of glutamate in the modulation of pain, vascular function, and degenerative changes including apoptosis of tenocytes. However, the origin of free glutamate found in tendon tissue is completely unknown. METHODS Surgical biopsies of pain-free normal tendons and tendinosis tendons (Achilles and patellar) were examined immunohistochemically using antibodies against vesicular glutamate transporters (VGluT1 and VGluT2), as indirect markers of glutamate release. In situ hybridization for VGluT2 mRNA was also conducted. RESULTS Specific immunoreactions for VGluT2, but not VGluT1, could be consistently detected in tenocytes. However, there were interindividual variations in the levels of immunoreactivity. The level of immunoreaction for VGluT2 was higher in tendinosis tendons compared to normal tendon (ptendinosis, including tenocyte proliferation and apoptosis, extracellular matrix metabolism, nociception and blood flow. PMID:18050306

  15. Extrasynaptic vesicular transmitter release from the somata of substantia nigra neurons in rat midbrain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, E H; Marty, A; Schulte, A; Chow, R H

    1998-05-15

    Substantia nigra neurons release dopamine from their somatodendritic regions. A long-unresolved question is whether this release occurs by exocytosis or by a nonvesicular mechanism. We used carbon fiber microelectrodes in a brainstem slice to assay secretion from single cell bodies that had been cleared of connective tissue. Amperometry at the carbon fiber microelectrodes revealed unitary events in approximately 90% of cells in resting conditions. These events had charge integrals ranging from a few femtocoulombs to several hundred femtocoulombs (fC). Local glutamate application enhanced the event frequency by 3.5-fold on average and up to 10-fold in highly responsive cells, although the mean charge integral was not modified. Local application of a high K+-containing saline had effects similar to those of glutamate. The frequency of resting and stimulated amperometric events was much lower at 21-22 degreesC than at 32-35 degreesC. The addition of Cd2+ (50 microM), a blocker of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, to the bath solution blocked the stimulatory effects of glutamate. These results suggest that dopamine is released from the somata of substantia nigra neurons by exocytosis and that this mechanism is regulated by neuronal electrical activity. More generally, this study demonstrates the applicability of carbon fiber microelectrodes to the measurement of quantal monoamine secretion in brain slices.

  16. Maturation of calcium-dependent GABA, glycine, and glutamate release in the glycinergic MNTB-LSO pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alamilla

    Full Text Available The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB is a key nucleus in high-fidelity temporal processing that underlies sound localization in the auditory brainstem. While the glycinergic principal cells of the MNTB project to all primary nuclei of the superior olive, during development the projection from MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is of interest because this immature inhibitory projection is known to undergo tonotopic refinement during an early postnatal period, and because during this period individual MNTB terminals in the LSO transiently release glycine GABA and glutamate. Developmental changes in calcium-dependent release are understood to be required to allow various auditory nuclei to follow high frequency activity; however, little is known about maturation of calcium-dependent release in the MNTB-LSO pathway, which has been presumed to have less stringent requirements for high-fidelity temporal following. In acute brainstem slices of rats age postnatal day 1 to 15 we recorded whole-cell responses in LSO principal neurons to electrical stimulation in the MNTB in order to measure sensitivity to external calcium, the contribution of different voltage-gated calcium channel subtypes to vesicular release, and the maturation of these measures for both GABA/glycine and glutamate transmission. Our results establish that release of glutamate at MNTB-LSO synapses is calcium-dependent. Whereas no significant developmental changes were evident for glutamate release, GABA/glycine release underwent substantial changes over the first two postnatal weeks: soon after birth L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs together mediated release, but after hearing onset P/Q-type VGCCs predominated. Blockade of P/Q-type VGCCs reduced the estimated quantal number for GABA/gly and glutamate transmission at P5-8 and the frequency of evoked miniature glycinergic events at P12-15, without apparent effects on spontaneous release of

  17. Complement selectively elicits glutamate release from nerve endings in different regions of mammal central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merega, Elisa; Di Prisco, Silvia; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Severi, Paolo; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Our study was aimed at investigating whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could, in addition to its well-documented post-synaptic activity, also pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in central nervous system (CNS). Complement (dilution 1 : 10 to 1 : 10000) elicited the release of preloaded [(3) H]-d-aspartate ([(3) H]d-ASP) and endogenous glutamate from mouse cortical synaptosomes in a dilution-dependent manner. It also evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse hippocampal, cerebellar, and spinal cord synaptosomes, as well as from rat and human cortical nerve endings, but left unaltered the release of GABA, [(3) H]noradrenaline or [(3) H]acetylcholine. Lowering external Na(+) (from 140 to 40 mM) or Ca(2+) (from 1.2 to 0.1 mM) ions prevented the 1 : 300 complement-evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse cortical synaptosomes. Complement-induced releasing effect was unaltered in synaptosomes entrapped with the Ca(2+) ions chelator 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N', tetra-acetic acid or with pertussis toxin. Nifedipine,/ω-conotoxin GVIA/ω-conotoxin MVIIC mixture as well as the vesicular ATPase blocker bafilomycin A1 were also inefficacious. The excitatory amino acid transporter blocker DL-threo-ß-benzyloxyaspartic acid, on the contrary, reduced the complement-evoked releasing effect in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings, where it was accounted for by carrier-mediated release. Our observations afford new insights into the molecular events accounting for immune and CNS crosstalk. We investigated whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our data provide evidence that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings

  18. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses between the BTBR mice with low level sociability and B6 mice with high level sociability. The results revealed that the number of excitatory synapse colocalized with pre- and post-synaptic marker was not different between aged BTBR and B6 mice. The aged BTBR mice had a normal structure of dendritic spine and the expression of Shank3 protein in the brain as well as that in B6 mice. The baseline and KCl-evoked glutamate release from the cortical synaptoneurosome in aged BTBR mice was lower than that in aged B6 mice. Overall, the data indicate that there is a link between disturbances of the glutamate transmission and autism. These findings provide new evidences for the hypothesis of excitation/inhibition imbalance in autism. Further work is required to determine the cause of this putative abnormality.

  19. Coexpression of glutamate vesicular transporter (VGLUT1) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) proteins in fetal rat hippocampal neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Neelima; Das, Mainak; Edwards, Darin; Stancescu, Maria; Kang, Jung-Fong; Hickman, James J

    2010-09-01

    A very small population of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactive cells is observed in all layers of the adult hippocampus. This is the intrinsic source of the hippocampal cholinergic innervation, in addition to the well-established septo-hippocampal cholinergic projection. This study aimed at quantifying and identifying the origin of this small population of ChAT-immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus at early developmental stages, by culturing the fetal hippocampal neurons in serum-free culture and on a patternable, synthetic silane substrate N-1 [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] diethylenetriamine. Using this method, a large proportion of glutamatergic (glutamate vesicular transporter, VGLUT1-immunoreactive) neurons, a small fraction of GABAergic (GABA-immunoreactive) neurons, and a large proportion of cholinergic (ChAT-immunoreactive) neurons were observed in the culture. Interestingly, most of the glutamatergic neurons that expressed glutamate vesicular transporter (VGLUT1) also co-expressed ChAT proteins. On the contrary, when the cultures were double-stained with GABA and ChAT, colocalization was not observed. Neonatal and adult rat hippocampal neurons were also cultured to verify whether these more mature neurons also co-express VGLUT1 and ChAT proteins in culture. Colocalization of VGLUT1 and ChAT in these relatively more mature neurons was not observed. One possible explanation for this observation is that the neurons have the ability to synthesize multiple neurotransmitters at a very early stage of development and then with time follows a complex, combinatorial strategy of electrochemical coding to determine their final fate.

  20. Patchy distributions of myelin and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 align with cytochrome oxidase blobs and interblobs in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockoff, Emily C; Balaram, Pooja; Kaas, Jon H

    2014-01-01

    Blobs are a modular component of the primary visual cortex (area 17) of all primates, but not of other mammals closely related to primates. They are characterized as an even distribution of patches, puffs, or blobs of dense cytochrome oxidase (CO) expression in layer III of area 17, and are now known to differ from surrounding, nonblob cortex in thalamic, intrinsic, and extrastriate connections. Previous studies have also recognized a blob-like pattern of myelin-dense patches in layer III of area 17 of primates, and more recently the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT)-2 isoform of the VGLUT family has been found to selectively distribute to layer III patches in a similar blob-like pattern. Here, we sought to determine if the blob-like patterns all identify the same modular structures in area 17 of primates by staining alternate brain sections cut parallel to the surface of area 17 of a prosimian primate (Otolemur garnettii) for CO, myelin, and VGLUT2. By aligning the sections from the three preparations, we provide clear evidence that the three preparations all identify the same modular blob structures. The results provide a further understanding of the functional nature of the blobs by demonstrating that their higher level of CO activity is related to thalamic inputs from the lateral geniculate nucleus that use VGLUT2 as their main glutamate transporter, and via myelinated axons. PMID:26097384

  1. No release of interstitial glutamate in experimental human model of muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, M.; Jørgensen, M.; Stallknecht, Bente

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate may be released from muscle nociceptors and thereby contribute to mechanisms underlying acute and chronic muscle pain. In vivo concentration of glutamate during muscle pain has not previously been studied in either animals or humans. In the present study, we aimed to study the in vivo...... flow increased significantly over time in response to infusion of chemical mixture and placebo (p = 0.001). However, we found no difference in changes in muscle blood flow between chemical mixture and placebo (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates no signs of increased release...... of glutamate from myofascial nociceptors during and after acute experimentally induced muscle pain and tenderness....

  2. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  3. Patchy distributions of myelin and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 align with cytochrome oxidase blobs and interblobs in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockoff EC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emily C Rockoff,1 Pooja Balaram,1 Jon H Kaas1,2 1Department of Psychology, 2Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Blobs are a modular component of the primary visual cortex (area 17 of all primates, but not of other mammals closely related to primates. They are characterized as an even distribution of patches, puffs, or blobs of dense cytochrome oxidase (CO expression in layer III of area 17, and are now known to differ from surrounding, nonblob cortex in thalamic, intrinsic, and extrastriate connections. Previous studies have also recognized a blob-like pattern of myelin-dense patches in layer III of area 17 of primates, and more recently the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT-2 isoform of the VGLUT family has been found to selectively distribute to layer III patches in a similar blob-like pattern. Here, we sought to determine if the blob-like patterns all identify the same modular structures in area 17 of primates by staining alternate brain sections cut parallel to the surface of area 17 of a prosimian primate (Otolemur garnettii for CO, myelin, and VGLUT2. By aligning the sections from the three preparations, we provide clear evidence that the three preparations all identify the same modular blob structures. The results provide a further understanding of the functional nature of the blobs by demonstrating that their higher level of CO activity is related to thalamic inputs from the lateral geniculate nucleus that use VGLUT2 as their main glutamate transporter, and via myelinated axons. Keywords: columns, modules, visual cortex, primates, prosimians

  4. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modifies the expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Mathieu; Carcenac, Carole; Drui, Guillaume; Boulet, Sabrina; El Mestikawy, Salah; Savasta, Marc

    2013-12-05

    It has been suggested that glutamatergic system hyperactivity may be related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) import glutamate into synaptic vesicles and are key anatomical and functional markers of glutamatergic excitatory transmission. Both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 have been identified as definitive markers of glutamatergic neurons, but VGLUT 3 is also expressed by non glutamatergic neurons. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are thought to be expressed in a complementary manner in the cortex and the thalamus (VL/VM), in glutamatergic neurons involved in different physiological functions. Chronic high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the neurosurgical therapy of choice for the management of motor deficits in patients with advanced PD. STN-HFS is highly effective, but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. This study examines the effect of STN-HFS on VGLUT1-3 expression in different brain nuclei involved in motor circuits, namely the basal ganglia (BG) network, in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats. Here we report that: 1) Dopamine(DA)-depletion did not affect VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 expression but significantly decreased that of VGLUT2 in almost all BG structures studied; 2) STN-HFS did not change VGLUT1-3 expression in the different brain areas of normal rats while, on the contrary, it systematically induced a significant increase of their expression in DA-depleted rats and 3) STN-HFS reversed the decrease in VGLUT2 expression induced by the DA-depletion. These results show for the first time a comparative analysis of changes of expression for the three VGLUTs induced by STN-HFS in the BG network of normal and hemiparkinsonian rats. They provide evidence for the involvement of VGLUT2 in the modulation of BG cicuits and in particular that of thalamostriatal and thalamocortical pathways suggesting their key role in its therapeutic effects for alleviating PD motor symptoms.

  5. Systemic Pregabalin Attenuates Sensorimotor Responses and Medullary Glutamate Release in Inflammatory Tooth Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Noriyuki; Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Coderre, Terence J.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application to the tooth pulp of the inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0~1.2 %), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (ANOVA, ppregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial inflammatory pain states. PMID:22609939

  6. Asynchronous presynaptic glutamate release enhances neuronal excitability during the post-spike refractory period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iremonger, Karl J; Bains, Jaideep S

    2016-02-15

    Many excitatory synapses in the brain release glutamate with both synchronous and asynchronous components. Immediately following an action potential, neurons display a reduced excitability due to the post-spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP). This gives rise to a relative refractory period. When an action potential is evoked by glutamate synaptic input possessing asynchronous release, the delayed glutamate release events act to depolarize the neuron during the AHP and overcome the relative refractory period. These results demonstrate a new role for asynchronous release in regulating post-spike excitability and the relative refractory period in central neurons. Post-spike afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) functionally inhibit neuronal excitability for tens to hundreds of milliseconds following each action potential. This imposes a relative refractory period during which synaptic excitation is less effective at evoking spikes. Here we asked whether some synapses have mechanisms in place that allow them to overcome the AHP and drive spiking in target cells during this period of reduced excitability. We examined glutamate synapses onto oxytocin and vasopressin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These synapses can display pronounced asynchronous glutamate release following a single presynaptic spike, with the time course of release being similar to that of the post-spike AHP. To test whether asynchronous release is more effective at overcoming the relative refractory period, we evoked a single action potential with either a brief synchronous depolarization or an asynchronous potential and then assessed excitability at multiple time points following the spike. Neurons receiving asynchronous depolarizing synaptic inputs had a shorter relative refractory period than those receiving synchronous depolarizations. Our data demonstrate that synapses releasing glutamate in an asynchronous and delayed manner are ideally adapted to counter the AHP. By

  7. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc- Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells.

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    Ajit G Thomas

    Full Text Available The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc- is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the

  8. Ischemic damage in hippocampal CA1 is dependent on glutamate release and intact innervation from CA3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, H; Jørgensen, M B; Sandberg, M

    1989-01-01

    The removal of glutamatergic afferents to CA1 by destruction of the CA3 region is known to protect CA1 pyramidal cells against 10 min of transient global ischemia. To investigate further the pathogenetic significance of glutamate, we measured the release of glutamate in intact and CA3-lesioned CA1...... hippocampal tissue. In intact CA1 hippocampal tissue, glutamate increased sixfold during ischemia; in the CA3-lesioned CA1 region, however, glutamate only increased 1.4-fold during ischemia. To assess the neurotoxic potential of the ischemia-induced release of glutamate, we injected the same concentration...... of glutamate into the CA1 region as is released during ischemia in normal, CA3-lesioned, and ischemic CA1 tissue. We found that this particular concentration of glutamate was sufficient to destroy CA1 pyramids in the vicinity of the injection site in intact and CA3-lesioned CA1 tissue when administered during...

  9. Glutamate stimulation of (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from dissociated cell cultures of rat ventral mesencephalon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, H.; Welner, S.; Quirion, R.; Boksa, P.

    1989-04-01

    In dissociated cell cultures of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon preloaded with (3H)dopamine, glutamate (10(-5)-10(-3) M) stimulated the release of (3H)dopamine. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was Ca2+ dependent and was blocked by the glutamate antagonist, cis-2,3-piperidine dicarboxylic acid. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was not due to glutamate neurotoxicity because (1) glutamate did not cause release of a cytosolic marker, lactate dehydrogenase, and (2) preincubation of cultures with glutamate did not impair subsequent ability of the cells to take up or release (3H)dopamine. Thus, these dissociated cell cultures appear to provide a good model system to characterize glutamate stimulation of dopamine release. Release of (3H)dopamine from these cultures was stimulated by veratridine, an activator of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels, and this stimulation was blocked by tetrodotoxin. However, glutamate-stimulated (3H)dopamine release was not blocked by tetrodotoxin or Zn2+. Substitution of NaCl in the extracellular medium by sucrose, LiCl, or Na2SO4 had no effect on glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release; however, release was inhibited when NaCl was replaced by choline chloride or N-methyl-D-glucamine HCl. Glutamate-stimulated (3H)-dopamine release was well maintained (60-82% of control) in the presence of Co2+, which blocks Ca2+ action potentials, and was unaffected by the local anesthetic, lidocaine. These results are discussed in terms of the receptor and ionic mechanisms involved in the stimulation of dopamine release by excitatory amino acids.

  10. Bacopa monnieri (Brahmi) improved novel object recognition task and increased cerebral vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 in sub-chronic phencyclidine rat model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyabhan, Pritsana; Wannasiri, Supaporn; Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn

    2016-12-01

    Reduced vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) and 2 (VGLUT2) indicate glutamatergic hypofunction leading to cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. However, VGLUT3 involvement in cognitive dysfunction has not been reported in schizophrenia. Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri) might be a new treatment and prevention for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia by acting on cerebral VGLUT3 density. We aimed to study cognitive enhancement- and neuroprotective-effects of Brahmi on novel object recognition and cerebral VGLUT3 immunodensity in sub-chronic (2 mg/kg, Bid, ip) phencyclidine (PCP) rat model of schizophrenia. Rats were assigned to three groups for cognitive enhancement effect study: Group 1, Control; Group 2, PCP administration; Group 3, PCP+Brahmi. A neuroprotective-effect study was also carried out. Rats were again assigned to three groups: Group 1, Control; Group 2, PCP administration; Group 3, Brahmi+PCP. Discrimination ratio (DR) representing cognitive ability was obtained from a novel object recognition task. VGLUT3 immunodensity was measured in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and cornu ammonis fields 1-3 (CA1-3) using immunohistochemistry. We found reduced DR in the PCP group, which occurred alongside VGLUT3 reduction in all brain areas. PCP+Brahmi showed higher DR score with increased VGLUT3 immunodensity in the prefrontal cortex and striatum. Brahmi+PCP group showed a higher DR score with increased VGLUT3 immunodensity in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and CA1-3. We concluded that reduced cerebral VGLUT3 was involved in cognitive deficit in PCP-administrated rats. Receiving Brahmi after PCP restored cognitive deficit by increasing VGLUT3 in the prefrontal cortex and striatum. Receiving Brahmi before PCP prevented cognitive impairment by elevating VGLUT3 in prefrontal cortex, striatum and CA1-3. Therefore, Brahmi could be a new frontier of restoration and prevention of cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Simultaneous measurement of glutamate and dopamine release from isolated guinea pig cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halmos, Gyorgy; Lendvai, Balázs; Gáborján, Anita; Baranyi, Mária; Szabó, László Z; Csokonai Vitéz, Lajos

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate is proved to be a neurotransmitter in the mammalian cochlea, transmitting signals between the inner hair cells and the afferent cochlear nerve terminals. The transmission in this synapse is modulated by the lateral olivocochlear efferent fibers by releasing dopamine and other

  12. Cannabinoids negatively modulate striatal glutamate and dopamine release and behavioural output of acute D-amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissidis, A; Chouliara, O; Galanopoulos, A; Naxakis, G; Papahatjis, D; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Z; Antoniou, K

    2014-08-15

    The cannabinoid system plays a regulatory role in neurotransmission and is involved in the central actions of psychostimulants. This complex interaction between the cannabinoid system and psychostimulants represents a potential pharmacological target for psychosis and addiction. However, most studies have focused on cocaine, therefore, it is unclear whether these findings can be extended to other psychostimulants such as the amphetamines. The present study investigated the effects of WIN55,212-2, a synthetic cannabinoid and SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, on D-amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and extracellular dopamine and glutamate release in the striatum. Rats were either observed for locomotor activity or glutamate and dopamine neurotransmitter release in the striatum using in vivo microdialysis following intraperitoneal co-administration of D-amphetamine with WIN55,212-2 or SR141716A. Our results demonstrated that d-amphetamine per se induced hyperlocomotion and enhanced dopamine and glutamate release, as expected. WIN55,212-2 dampened these effects when co-administered with d-amphetamine, while alone it displayed its characteristic biphasic motor profile coupled with increases in dopamine and decreases in glutamate release. SR141716A at high doses reduced D-amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and completely reversed enhanced dopamine and glutamate release but alone had no effect. These findings validate the capacity of the cannabinoid system to modulate amphetamine-induced behaviour and its neurochemical output, in a state-dependent manner, providing insight into aspects of the neurobiological substrate that underlies amphetamines' psychotogenic and addictive properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Methodology for Rapid Measures of Glutamate Release in Rat Brain Slices Using Ceramic-Based Microelectrode Arrays: Basic Characterization and Drug Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Jorge E.; Pomerleau, François; Huettl, Peter; Johnson, Kirk W.; Offord, James; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive excitability or hyperexcitability of glutamate-containing neurons in the brain has been proposed as a possible explanation for anxiety, stress-induced disorders, epilepsy, and some neurodegenerative diseases. However, direct measurement of glutamate on a rapid time scale has proven to be difficult. Here we adapted enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEA) capable of detecting glutamate in vivo, to assess the effectiveness of hyperexcitability modulators on glutamate release in brain slices of the rat neocortex. Using glutamate oxidase coated ceramic MEAs coupled with constant voltage amperometry, we measured resting glutamate levels and synaptic overflow of glutamate after K+ stimulation in brain slices. MEAs reproducibly detected glutamate on a second-by-second time scale in the brain slice preparation after depolarization with high K+ to evoke glutamate release. This stimulus-evoked glutamate release was robust, reproducible, and calcium dependent. The K+-evoked glutamate release was modulated by ligands to the a2δ subunit of voltage sensitive calcium channels (PD-0332334 and PD-0200390). Meanwhile, agonists to Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors (LY379268 and LY354740), which are known to alter hyperexcitability of glutamate neurons, attenuated K+-evoked glutamate release but did not alter resting glutamate levels. This new MEA technology provides a means of directly measuring the chemical messengers involved in glutamate neurotransmission and thereby helping to reveal the role multiple glutamatergic system components have on glutamate signaling. PMID:21664606

  14. The release of glutamate from cortical neurons regulated by BDNF via the TrkB/Src/PLC-γ1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zitao; Fan, Jin; Ren, Yongxin; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Guoyong

    2013-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the regulation of cortical neurons by influencing the release of glutamate. However, the specific mechanisms are unclear. Hence, we isolated and cultured the cortical neurons of Sprague Dawley rats. Specific inhibitors of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ1, Akt, and MEK1/2 (i.e., K252a, PP2, U73122, LY294002, and PD98059, respectively) were used to treat cortical neurons and to detect the glutamate release from cortical neurons stimulated with BDNF. BDNF significantly increased glutamate release, and simultaneously enhanced phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ, Akt, and Erk1/2. For BDNF-stimulated cortical neurons, K252a inhibited glutamate release and inhibited the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ, Erk1/2, and Akt (P PLC-γ1 (P 0.05). U73122 inhibited the glutamate release from BDNF-stimulated cortical neurons, but had no influence on the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, Erk1/2, or Akt (P > 0.05). LY294002 and PD98059 did not affect the BDNF-stimulated glutamate release and did not inhibit the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, or PLC-γ1. In summary, BDNF stimulated the glutamate release from cortical neurons via the TrkB/Src/PLC-γ1 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Age-related changes in glutamate release in the CA3 and dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Michelle L.; Quintero, Jorge E.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    The present studies employed a novel microelectrode array recording technology to study glutamate release and uptake in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal subregions in anesthetized young, late-middle aged and aged male Fischer 344 rats. The mossy fiber terminals in CA3 showed a significantly decreased amount of KCl-evoked glutamate release in aged rats compared to both young and late-middle-aged rats. Significantly more KCl-evoked glutamate release was seen from perforant path terminals in the DG of late-middle-aged rats compared young and aged rats. The DG of aged rats developed an increased glutamate uptake rate compared to the DG of young animals, indicating a possible age-related change in glutamate regulation to deal with increased glutamate release that occurred in late-middle age. No age-related changes in resting levels of glutamate were observed in the DG, CA3 and CA1. Taken together, these data support dynamic changes to glutamate regulation during aging in subregions of the mammalian hippocampus that are critical for learning and memory. PMID:19535175

  16. Inhibition of breast cancer-cell glutamate release with sulfasalazine limits cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungard, Robert G; Seidlitz, Eric P; Singh, Gurmit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer in bone is frequently a result of metastases from distant sites, particularly from the breast, lung, and prostate. Pain is a common and often severe pathological feature of cancers in bone, and is a significant impediment to the maintenance of quality of life of patients living with bone metastases. Cancer cell lines have been demonstrated to release significant amounts of the neurotransmitter and cell-signalling molecule l-glutamate via the system xC(-) cystine/glutamate antiporter. We have developed a novel mouse model of breast cancer bone metastases to investigate the impact of inhibiting cancer cell glutamate transporters on nociceptive behaviour. Immunodeficient mice were inoculated intrafemorally with the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, then treated 14days later via mini-osmotic pumps inserted intraperitoneally with sulfasalazine, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, or vehicle. Both sulfasalazine and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine attenuated in vitro cancer cell glutamate release in a dose-dependent manner via the system xC(-) transporter. Animals treated with sulfasalazine displayed reduced nociceptive behaviours and an extended time until the onset of behavioural evidence of pain. Animals treated with a lower dose of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine did not display this reduction in nociceptive behaviour. These results suggest that a reduction in glutamate secretion from cancers in bone with the system xC(-) inhibitor sulfasalazine may provide some benefit for treating the often severe and intractable pain associated with bone metastases. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NMDAR-mediated calcium transients elicited by glutamate co-release at developing inhibitory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Kalmbach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Before hearing onset, the topographic organization of the inhibitory sound localization pathway from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is refined by means of synaptic silencing and strengthening. During this refinement period MNTB-LSO synapses not only release GABA and glycine but also release glutamate. This co-released glutamate can elicit postsynaptic currents that are predominantly mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs. To gain a better understanding of how glutamate contributes to synaptic signaling at developing MNTB-LSO inhibitory synapse, we investigated to what degree and under what conditions NMDARs contribute to postsynaptic calcium responses. Our results demonstrate that MNTB-LSO synapses can elicit compartmentalized calcium responses along aspiny LSO dendrites. These responses are significantly attenuated by the NMDARs antagonist APV. APV, however, has no effect on somatically recorded electrical postsynaptic responses, indicating little, if any, contribution of NMDARs to spike generation. Small NMDAR-mediated calcium responses were also observed under physiological levels of extracellular magnesium concentrations indicating that MNTB-LSO synapses activate magnesium sensitive NMDAR on immature LSO dendrites. In Fura-2 AM loaded neurons, blocking GABAA and glycine receptors decreased NMDAR contribution to somatic calcium responses suggesting that GABA and glycine, perhaps by shunting backpropagating action potentials, decrease the level of NMDAR activation under strong stimulus conditions.

  18. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release.Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability.Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress

  19. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

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    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  20. Cytoplasmic fungal lipases release fungicides from ultra-deformable vesicular drug carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gero Steinberg

    Full Text Available The Transfersome® is a lipid vesicle that contains membrane softeners, such as Tween 80, to make it ultra-deformable. This feature makes the Transfersome® an efficient carrier for delivery of therapeutic drugs across the skin barrier. It was reported that TDT 067 (a topical formulation of 15 mg/ml terbinafine in Transfersome® vesicles has a much more potent antifungal activity in vitro compared with conventional terbinafine, which is a water-insoluble fungicide. Here we use ultra-structural studies and live imaging in a model fungus to describe the underlying mode of action. We show that terbinafine causes local collapse of the fungal endoplasmic reticulum, which was more efficient when terbinafine was delivered in Transfersome® vesicles (TFVs. When applied in liquid culture, fluorescently labeled TFVs rapidly entered the fungal cells (T(1/2~2 min. Entry was F-actin- and ATP-independent, indicating that it is a passive process. Ultra-structural studies showed that passage through the cell wall involves significant deformation of the vesicles, and depends on a high concentration of the surfactant Tween 80 in their membrane. Surprisingly, the TFVs collapsed into lipid droplets after entry into the cell and the terbinafine was released from their interior. With time, the lipid bodies were metabolized in an ATP-dependent fashion, suggesting that cytosolic lipases attack and degrade intruding TFVs. Indeed, the specific monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor URB602 prevented Transfersome® degradation and neutralized the cytotoxic effect of Transfersome®-delivered terbinafine. These data suggest that (a Transfersomes deliver the lipophilic fungicide Terbinafine to the fungal cell wall, (b the membrane softener Tween 80 allows the passage of the Transfersomes into the fungal cell, and (c fungal lipases digest the invading Transfersome® vesicles thereby releasing their cytotoxic content. As this mode of action of Transfersomes is independent of the

  1. Potentiation of insulin release in response to amino acid methyl esters correlates to activation of islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A; Hedeskov, C J

    1986-01-01

    Column perifusion of mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the ability of amino acids and their methyl esters to influence insulin release and activate islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In the absence of L-glutamine, L-serine and the methyl ester of L-phenylalanine, but neither L...... glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed that only the two methyl esters of L-phenylalanine and L-serine activated the enzyme. It is concluded that the mechanism by which methyl esters of amino acids potentiate insulin release is most likely to be mediated by the activation of pancreatic beta-cell glutamate...

  2. Hesperidin inhibits glutamate release and exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity induced by kainic acid in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Ying; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Ying Chou; Chou, Shang Shing Peter; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-09-01

    The citrus flavonoid hesperidin exerts neuroprotective effects and could cross the blood-brain barrier. Given the involvement of glutamate neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, this study was conducted to evaluate the potential role of hesperidin in glutamate release and glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus of rats. In rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), hesperidin inhibited the release of glutamate and elevation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration evoked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of hesperidin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and blocking the activity of Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels or protein kinase C. In hippocampal slice preparations, whole-cell patch clamp experiments showed that hesperidin reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude, indicating the involvement of a presynaptic mechanism. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainic acid (KA, 15 mg/kg) elevated the extracellular glutamate levels and caused considerable neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 area. These KA-induced alterations were attenuated by pretreatment with hesperidin (10 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.) before administering the KA. These results demonstrate that hesperidin inhibits evoked glutamate release in vitro and attenuates in vivo KA-induced neuronal death in the hippocampus. Our findings indicate that hesperidin may be a promising candidate for preventing or treating glutamate excitotoxicity related brain disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  4. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  5. Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy A Wise

    Full Text Available Intravenous injections of cocaine HCl are habit-forming because, among their many actions, they elevate extracellular dopamine levels in the terminal fields of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. This action, thought to be very important for cocaine's strong addiction liability, is believed to have very short latency and is assumed to reflect rapid brain entry and pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, while intravenous cocaine HCl has almost immediate effects on behavior and extracellular dopamine levels, recent evidence suggests that its central pharmacological effects are not evident until 10 or more seconds after IV injection. Thus the immediate effects of a given intravenous cocaine injection on extracellular dopamine concentration and behavior appear to occur before there is sufficient time for cocaine to act centrally as a dopamine uptake inhibitor. To explore the contribution of peripheral effects of cocaine to the early activation of the dopamine system, we used brain microdialysis to measure the effects of cocaine methiodide (MI--a cocaine analogue that does not cross the blood brain barrier--on glutamate (excitatory input to the dopamine cells. IP injections of cocaine MI were ineffective in cocaine-naïve animals but stimulated ventral tegmental glutamate release in rats previously trained to lever-press for cocaine HCl. This peripherally triggered glutamate input was sufficient to reinstate cocaine-seeking in previously trained animals that had undergone extinction of the habit. These findings offer an explanation for short-latency behavioral responses and immediate dopamine elevations seen following cocaine injections in cocaine-experienced but not cocaine-naïve animals.

  6. Amyloid-β1–42 Slows Clearance of Synaptically Released Glutamate by Mislocalizing Astrocytic GLT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, Annalisa; Meabon, James S.; Woltjer, Randall L.; Sullivan, Jane M.; Diamond, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    GLT-1, the major glutamate transporter in the adult brain, is abundantly expressed in astrocytic processes enveloping synapses. By limiting glutamate escape into the surrounding neuropil, GLT-1 preserves the spatial specificity of synaptic signaling. Here we show that the amyloid-β peptide Aβ1–42 markedly prolongs the extracellular lifetime of synaptically released glutamate by reducing GLT-1 surface expression in mouse astrocytes and that this effect is prevented by the vitamin E derivative Trolox. These findings indicate that astrocytic glutamate transporter dysfunction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and suggest possible mechanisms by which several current treatment strategies could protect against the disease. PMID:23516295

  7. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, enhances glial d-serine and L-glutamate release in rat frontal cortex and primary cultured astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Shunske; Yamamura, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Deficient transmission at the glutamate NMDA receptor is considered a key component of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the release of the endogenous NMDA receptor partial agonist, d-serine, remain to be clarified. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We determined the interaction between antipsychotic drugs (clozapine and haloperidol) and transmission-modulating toxins (tetanus toxin, fluorocitrate, tetrodotoxin) on the release of L-glutamate and d-serine in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely moving rats, using microdialysis, and primary cultures of astrocytes using extreme high-pressure liquid chromatography. KEY RESULTS Release of L-glutamate and d-serine in the mPFC and in cultured astrocytes was inhibited by tetanus toxin (a synaptobrevin inhibitor) and fluorocitrate (a glial toxin), whereas tetrodotoxin (a voltage-sensitive Na+ blocker) inhibited depolarization-induced L-glutamate release in the mPFC without affecting that of d-serine. Clozapine (1 and 5 mg·kg−1), but not haloperidol (0.5 and 1 mg·kg−1), dose-dependently increased L-glutamate and d-serine release from both astrocytes and mPFC. Clozapine-induced release of L-glutamate and d-serine was also reduced by tetanus toxin and fluorocitrate. Tetrodotoxin reduced clozapine-induced mPFC L-glutamate release but not that of d-serine. Clozapine-induced L-glutamate release preceded clozapine-induced d-serine release. MK-801 (a NMDA receptor antagonist) inhibited the delayed clozapine-induced L-glutamate release without affecting that of d-serine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Clozapine predominantly activated glial exocytosis of d-serine, and this clozapine-induced d-serine release subsequently enhances neuronal L-glutamate release via NMDA receptor activation. The enhanced d-serine associated glial transmission seems a novel mechanism of action of clozapine but not haloperidol. PMID:21880034

  8. Pituitary Adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide orchestrates neuronal regulation of the astrocytic glutamate-releasing mechanism system xc (.).

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    Kong, Linghai; Albano, Rebecca; Madayag, Aric; Raddatz, Nicholas; Mantsch, John R; Choi, SuJean; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate signaling is achieved by an elaborate network involving neurons and astrocytes. Hence, it is critical to better understand how neurons and astrocytes interact to coordinate the cellular regulation of glutamate signaling. In these studies, we used rat cortical cell cultures to examine whether neurons or releasable neuronal factors were capable of regulating system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate-releasing mechanism that is expressed primarily by astrocytes and has been shown to regulate synaptic transmission. We found that astrocytes cultured with neurons or exposed to neuronal-conditioned media displayed significantly higher levels of Sxc activity. Next, we demonstrated that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) may be a neuronal factor capable of regulating astrocytes. In support, we found that PACAP expression was restricted to neurons, and that PACAP receptors were expressed in astrocytes. Interestingly, blockade of PACAP receptors in cultures comprised of astrocytes and neurons significantly decreased Sxc activity to the level observed in purified astrocytes, whereas application of PACAP to purified astrocytes increased Sxc activity to the level observed in cultures comprised of neurons and astrocytes. Collectively, these data reveal that neurons coordinate the actions of glutamate-related mechanisms expressed by astrocytes, such as Sxc, a process that likely involves PACAP. A critical gap in modeling excitatory signaling is how distinct components of the glutamate system expressed by neurons and astrocytes are coordinated. In these studies, we found that system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate release mechanism expressed by astrocytes, is regulated by releasable neuronal factors including PACAP. This represents a novel form of neuron-astrocyte communication, and highlights the possibility that pathological changes involving astrocytic Sxc may stem from altered neuronal activity. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Dentate gyrus-CA3 glutamate release/NMDA transmission mediates behavioral despair and antidepressant-like responses to leptin.

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    Wang, X; Zhang, D; Lu, X-Y

    2015-04-01

    Compelling evidence supports the important role of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of major depression and also as a target for rapid-acting antidepressants. However, the functional role of glutamate release/transmission in behavioral processes related to depression and antidepressant efficacy remains to be elucidated. In this study, glutamate release and behavioral responses to tail suspension, a procedure commonly used for inducing behavioral despair, were simultaneously monitored in real time. The onset of tail suspension stress evoked a rapid increase in glutamate release in hippocampal field CA3, which declined gradually after its offset. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors by intra-CA3 infusion of MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reversed behavioral despair. A subpopulation of granule neurons that innervated the CA3 region expressed leptin receptors and these cells were not activated by stress. Leptin treatment dampened tail suspension-evoked glutamate release in CA3. On the other hand, intra-CA3 infusion of NMDA blocked the antidepressant-like effect of leptin in reversing behavioral despair in both the tail suspension and forced swim tests, which involved activation of Akt signaling in DG. Taken together, these results suggest that the DG-CA3 glutamatergic pathway is critical for mediating behavioral despair and antidepressant-like responses to leptin.

  10. Dentate gyrus–CA3 glutamate release/NMDA transmission mediates behavioral despair and antidepressant-like responses to leptin

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    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Di; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence supports the important role of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of major depression and also as a target for rapid-acting antidepressants. However, the functional role of glutamate release/transmission in behavioral processes related to depression and antidepressant efficacy remains to be elucidated. In this study, glutamate release and behavioral responses to tail suspension, a procedure commonly used for inducing behavioral despair, were simultaneously monitored in real time. The onset of tail suspension stress evoked a rapid increase in glutamate release in hippocampal field CA3, which declined gradually after its offset. Blockade of NMDA receptors by intra-CA3 infusion of MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reversed behavioral despair. The CA3 was innervated by granule neurons expressing the leptin receptor (LepRb) in the dentate gyrus (DG), representing a subpopulation of granule neurons that were devoid of stress-induced activation. Leptin treatment dampened tail suspension-evoked glutamate release in CA3. On the other hand, intra-CA3 infusion of NMDA blocked the antidepressant-like effect of leptin in reversing behavioral despair in both the tail suspension and forced swim tests, which involved activation of Akt signaling in DG. Together, these results suggest that the DG-CA3 glutamatergic pathway is critical for mediating behavioral despair and antidepressant-like responses to leptin. PMID:25092243

  11. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) is co-stored with PACAP in projections from the rat melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Anna Iversen; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    The retinal ganglion cell layer of the eye comprises a subtype of cells characterized by their intrinsic photosensitivity and expression of melanopsin (ipRGCs). These cells regulate a variety of non-image-forming (NIF) functions such as light entrainment of circadian rhythms, acute suppression......-localized in their projections in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the intergeniculate leaflet, and the olivary pretectal nucleus. We conclude that there is evidence to support the use of glutamate and PACAP as neurotransmitters in NIF photoperception by rat ipRGCs, and that these neurotransmitters are co-stored and probably...

  12. Enhancement of Glutamate Release by l-Fucose Changes Effects of Glutamate Receptor Antagonists on Long-Term Potentiation in the Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Henry; Schroeder, Helmut; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Krug, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies l-fucose has been shown to facilitate long-term memory formation and to enhance and prolong long-term potentiation (LTP). To search for possible presynaptic or postsynaptic mechanisms that are affected by l-fucose, we examined the effect of l-fucose on (1) inhibition of LTP induction via glutamate receptors by antagonists, (2) paired-pulse facilitation, and (3) presynaptic transmitter release. Coapplication of 0.2 mm l-fucose with the competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), or coapplication of 0.2 mml-fucose in the presence of an inhibitor for class I/II metabotropic glutamate receptors, (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), reversed LTP blockade in the CA1-region of hippocampal slices. In contrast, l-fucose had no effect on the LTP blockade by the noncompetitive NMDA ion-channel blocker (5R,10S)-(+)-5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5, 10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801). Paired-pulse facilitation, which is a primarily presynaptic phenomenon of short-term plasticity, was decreased in the presence of 0.2 mm l-fucose. Furthermore, l-fucose enhanced the K+-stimulated release of [3H]-d-aspartate from preloaded hippocampal slices in a concentration-dependent manner. These observations demonstrate an influence of l-fucose on transmitter release that in turn can increase transmitter availability at postsynaptic glutamate receptors. This effect of l-fucose may contribute to the LTP facilitation seen in vitro and in vivo as well as to improvement in memory formation. PMID:10940323

  13. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc− Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death

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    Trista L. Thorn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc− contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc− expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes—either cultured alone or with neurons—to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc− mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  14. Differential triggering of spontaneous glutamate release by P/Q-, N- and R-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolyuk, Yaroslav S; Alder, Felicity G; Surges, Rainer; Pavlov, Ivan Y; Timofeeva, Yulia; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Volynski, Kirill E

    2013-12-01

    The role of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in spontaneous miniature neurotransmitter release is incompletely understood. We found that stochastic opening of P/Q-, N- and R-type VGCCs accounts for ∼50% of all spontaneous glutamate release at rat cultured hippocampal synapses, and that R-type channels have a far greater role in spontaneous than in action potential-evoked exocytosis. VGCC-dependent miniature neurotransmitter release (minis) showed similar sensitivity to presynaptic Ca2+ chelation as evoked release, arguing for direct triggering of spontaneous release by transient spatially localized Ca(2+) domains. Experimentally constrained three-dimensional diffusion modeling of Ca2+ influx-exocytosis coupling was consistent with clustered distribution of VGCCs in the active zone of small hippocampal synapses and revealed that spontaneous VGCCs openings can account for the experimentally observed VGCC-dependent minis, although single channel openings triggered release with low probability. Uncorrelated stochastic VGCC opening is therefore a major trigger for spontaneous glutamate release, with differential roles for distinct channel subtypes.

  15. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores.

  16. Antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin A involves alterations in AMPA receptor expression and glutamate release in spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Yao, LingLing; Ni, Linhui; Wang, Li; Hu, XingYue

    2017-08-15

    The use of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for various clinical therapeutic applications is increasing. It is widely believed that peripheral therapeutic or toxic effects of BTX-A are exclusively mediated by SNAP-25 cleavage. There is growing evidence of long-distance retrograde axonal transport of BTX-A on entering the central nervous system, subsequent to a local injection of the toxin. However, the prevalence of central antinociceptive effects after BTX-A peripheral application and its underlying mechanisms are unclear. Our results show that (1) BTX-A can undergo retrograde axonal transport to the dorsal horn after peripheral application; (2) Peripheral pretreatment with BTX-A decreases the expression and function of AMPA receptors in the spinal cord dorsal horn neurons; (3) Peripheral pretreatment with BTX-A does not change basal glutamate release, but decreases the effect of formalin-evoked release of glutamate in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons. These results suggest that peripheral application of BTX-A can change AMPA receptor expression in, and glutamate release from, spinal dorsal horn neurons, which may have significance in its central antinociceptive effects. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits.

  18. Ligand- and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels differentially regulate the mode of vesicular neuropeptide release in mammalian sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeshi; Wu, Qihui; Hu, Meiqin; Liu, Bin; Chai, Zuying; Huang, Rong; Wang, Yuan; Xu, Huadong; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Lianghong; Wang, Changhe; Zhou, Zhuan

    2017-06-20

    Neuropeptides released from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons play essential roles in the neurotransmission of sensory inputs, including those underlying nociception and pathological pain. Neuropeptides are released from intracellular vesicles through two modes: a partial release mode called "kiss-and-run" (KAR) and a full release mode called "full fusion-like" (FFL). Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we traced the release of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein-tagged neuropeptide Y (pHluorin-NPY) from individual dense-core vesicles in the soma and axon of single DRG neurons after Ca2+ influx through either voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) or ligand-gated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. We found that Ca2+ influx through VGCCs stimulated FFL and a greater single release of neuropeptides. In contrast, Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 channels stimulated KAR and a pulsed but prolonged release of neuropeptides that was partially mediated by Dynamin 1, which limits fusion pore expansion. Suppressing the Ca2+ gradient to an extent similar to that seen after TRPV1 activation abolished the VGCC preference for FFL. The findings suggest that by generating a steeper Ca2+ gradient, VGCCs promote a more robust fusion pore opening that facilitates FFL. Thus, KAR and FFL release modes are differentially regulated by the two principal types of Ca2+-permeable channels in DRG neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  19. Motor axon synapses on renshaw cells contain higher levels of aspartate than glutamate.

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    Dannette S Richards

    Full Text Available Motoneuron synapses on spinal cord interneurons known as Renshaw cells activate nicotinic, AMPA and NMDA receptors consistent with co-release of acetylcholine and excitatory amino acids (EAA. However, whether these synapses express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs capable of accumulating glutamate into synaptic vesicles is controversial. An alternative possibility is that these synapses release other EAAs, like aspartate, not dependent on VGLUTs. To clarify the exact EAA concentrated at motor axon synapses we performed a quantitative postembedding colloidal gold immunoelectron analysis for aspartate and glutamate on motor axon synapses (identified by immunoreactivity to the vesicular acetylcholine transporter; VAChT contacting calbindin-immunoreactive (-IR Renshaw cell dendrites. The results show that 71% to 80% of motor axon synaptic boutons on Renshaw cells contained aspartate immunolabeling two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling. Moreover, VAChT-IR synapses on Renshaw cells contained, on average, aspartate immunolabeling at 2.5 to 2.8 times above the average neuropil level. In contrast, glutamate enrichment was lower; 21% to 44% of VAChT-IR synapses showed glutamate-IR two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling and average glutamate immunogold density was 1.7 to 2.0 times the neuropil level. The results were not influenced by antibody affinities because glutamate antibodies detected glutamate-enriched brain homogenates more efficiently than aspartate antibodies detecting aspartate-enriched brain homogenates. Furthermore, synaptic boutons with ultrastructural features of Type I excitatory synapses were always labeled by glutamate antibodies at higher density than motor axon synapses. We conclude that motor axon synapses co-express aspartate and glutamate, but aspartate is concentrated at higher levels than glutamate.

  20. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, enhances glial D-serine and L-glutamate release in rat frontal cortex and primary cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Shunske; Yamamura, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-03-01

    Deficient transmission at the glutamate NMDA receptor is considered a key component of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the release of the endogenous NMDA receptor partial agonist, D-serine, remain to be clarified. We determined the interaction between antipsychotic drugs (clozapine and haloperidol) and transmission-modulating toxins (tetanus toxin, fluorocitrate, tetrodotoxin) on the release of L-glutamate and D-serine in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely moving rats, using microdialysis, and primary cultures of astrocytes using extreme high-pressure liquid chromatography. Release of L-glutamate and D-serine in the mPFC and in cultured astrocytes was inhibited by tetanus toxin (a synaptobrevin inhibitor) and fluorocitrate (a glial toxin), whereas tetrodotoxin (a voltage-sensitive Na(+) blocker) inhibited depolarization-induced L-glutamate release in the mPFC without affecting that of D-serine. Clozapine (1 and 5 mg·kg(-1)), but not haloperidol (0.5 and 1 mg·kg(-1)), dose-dependently increased L-glutamate and D-serine release from both astrocytes and mPFC. Clozapine-induced release of L-glutamate and D-serine was also reduced by tetanus toxin and fluorocitrate. Tetrodotoxin reduced clozapine-induced mPFC L-glutamate release but not that of D-serine. Clozapine-induced L-glutamate release preceded clozapine-induced D-serine release. MK-801 (a NMDA receptor antagonist) inhibited the delayed clozapine-induced L-glutamate release without affecting that of D-serine. Clozapine predominantly activated glial exocytosis of D-serine, and this clozapine-induced D-serine release subsequently enhances neuronal L-glutamate release via NMDA receptor activation. The enhanced D-serine associated glial transmission seems a novel mechanism of action of clozapine but not haloperidol. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

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    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  2. Repeated phencyclidine administration alters glutamate release and decreases GABA markers in the prefrontal cortex of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Nurith; Kuczenski, Ronald; Behrens, M. Margarita; Markou, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Repeated phencyclidine (PCP) administration induces cognitive disruptions resembling those seen in schizophrenia. Alterations in glutamate transmission and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been implicated in these PCP-induced deficits, as well as in cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. PCP-induced cognitive deficits are reversed by chronic treatment with the atypical antipsychotic clozapine in rats. We investigated the effects of a single injection vs. repeated administration of PCP on glutamate levels in the PFC using in vivo microdialysis. Furthermore, we examined how these PCP regimens affect GABA neuronal markers in the PFC. Finally, we investigated the effects of clozapine on disruptions in glutamate levels and GABA neuronal markers induced by repeated PCP administration. Acute PCP administration (2 mg/kg) increased extracellular PFC glutamate; this increase appeared blunted, but was not eliminated, after repeated PCP pretreatment. PCP administration also strongly decreased levels of parvalbumin and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (two markers of GABA function) in the PFC, an effect that was maintained after a 10 day drug-free washout period and unaltered by the resumption of repeated PCP injections. All of the observed PCP effects were attenuated by chronic treatment with clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic that has partial effectiveness on cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that abnormal cortical glutamate transmission, possibly driven by pathological changes in GABA function in parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons, may underlie some of the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. A better understanding of glutamate and GABA dysregulation in schizophrenia may uncover new treatment targets for schizophrenia-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:21238466

  3. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-05

    Neuron-astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (-astrocyte) within the same culture dish. -Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform and arrival time of axonal

  4. Positive allosteric modulators of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor potentiate glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex of freely-moving rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Upton, B A; Mikkelsen, J D

    2016-01-01

    such studies have been performed in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that PAMs’ potentiation of glutamate release in prefrontal cortex depends upon the level of endogenous cholinergic activity. NMDA stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell (0.05–0.30 μg in 0.5 μL) increased extracellular choline (0.87 ± 0.......15 – 1.73 ± 0.31 μM) and glutamate (0.15 μg, 3.79 ± 0.87 μM) in medial prefrontal cortex, and the glutamate release was prevented by local infusions of MLA (6.75 μg, 0.19 ± 0.06 μM). The lower dose (1 mg/kg) of AVL3288 (type I) potentiated the glutamate release to a greater degree after the high dose...

  5. Activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptors enhances glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus of prenatally restraint stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Jérôme; Gatta, Eleonora; Reynaert, Marie-Line; Marrocco, Jordan; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Soichot, Marion; Deruyter, Lucie; Camp, Gilles Van; Bouwalerh, Hammou; Fagioli, Francesca; Pittaluga, Anna; Allorge, Delphine; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2015-12-01

    Oxytocin receptors are known to modulate synaptic transmission and network activity in the hippocampus, but their precise function has been only partially elucidated. Here, we have found that activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptor with the potent agonist, carbetocin, enhanced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus with no effect on GABA release. This evidence paved the way for examining the effect of carbetocin treatment in "prenatally restraint stressed" (PRS) rats, i.e., the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy. Adult PRS rats exhibit an anxious/depressive-like phenotype associated with an abnormal glucocorticoid feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and, remarkably, with a reduced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus. Chronic systemic treatment with carbetocin (1mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 2-3 weeks) in PRS rats corrected the defect in glutamate release, anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, and abnormalities in social behavior, in the HPA response to stress, and in the expression of stress-related genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. Of note, carbetocin treatment had no effect on these behavioral and neuroendocrine parameters in prenatally unstressed (control) rats, with the exception of a reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor gene in the amygdala. These findings disclose a novel function of oxytocin receptors in the hippocampus, and encourage the use of oxytocin receptor agonists in the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders in adult life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Systemic pregabalin attenuates facial hypersensitivity and noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in medullary dorsal horn in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Varathan, Vidya; Miyamoto, Makiko; Chiang, C.Y.; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Sessle, Barry J.; Coderre, Terence J.

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in treating many neuropathic pain conditions. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pregabalin suppresses facial mechanical hypersensitivity and evoked glutamate release in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Nociceptive mechanical sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively, and then post-operatively 1 h following pregabalin or vehicle (saline) treatment on post-operative days 2 and 5 following infraorbital nerve transection (IONX). In addition, an in vivo microdialysis probe was inserted into the exposed medulla post-operatively and dialysate samples were collected. Glutamate release was then evoked by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp, and the effects of pregabalin or vehicle were examined on the MDH glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations in the dialysated samples were determined by HPLC, and data analysed by ANOVA. IONX animals (but not control animals) showed facial mechanical hypersensitivity for several days post-operatively. In addition, tooth pulp stimulation with MO evoked a transient release of glutamate in the MDH in IONX animals. Compared to vehicle, administration of pregabalin significantly attenuated the facial mechanical hypersensitivity as well as the MO-evoked glutamate release in MDH. This study provides evidence in support of recent findings pointing to the usefulness of pregabalin in the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.1 PMID:23454190

  7. Evidence for a role of glutamate as an efferent transmitter in taste buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Catherine B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate has been proposed as a transmitter in the peripheral taste system in addition to its well-documented role as an umami taste stimulus. Evidence for a role as a transmitter includes the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptors in nerve fibers and taste cells, as well as the expression of the glutamate transporter GLAST in Type I taste cells. However, the source and targets of glutamate in lingual tissue are unclear. In the present study, we used molecular, physiological and immunohistochemical methods to investigate the origin of glutamate as well as the targeted receptors in taste buds. Results Using molecular and immunohistochemical techniques, we show that the vesicular transporters for glutamate, VGLUT 1 and 2, but not VGLUT3, are expressed in the nerve fibers surrounding taste buds but likely not in taste cells themselves. Further, we show that P2X2, a specific marker for gustatory but not trigeminal fibers, co-localizes with VGLUT2, suggesting the VGLUT-expressing nerve fibers are of gustatory origin. Calcium imaging indicates that GAD67-GFP Type III taste cells, but not T1R3-GFP Type II cells, respond to glutamate at concentrations expected for a glutamate transmitter, and further, that these responses are partially blocked by NBQX, a specific AMPA/Kainate receptor antagonist. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry confirm the presence of the Kainate receptor GluR7 in Type III taste cells, suggesting it may be a target of glutamate released from gustatory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that glutamate may be released from gustatory nerve fibers using a vesicular mechanism to modulate Type III taste cells via GluR7.

  8. Echinacoside Inhibits Glutamate Release by Suppressing Voltage-Dependent Ca2+ Entry and Protein Kinase C in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wei Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The glutamatergic system may be involved in the effects of neuroprotectant therapies. Echinacoside, a phenylethanoid glycoside extracted from the medicinal Chinese herb Herba Cistanche, has neuroprotective effects. This study investigated the effects of echinacoside on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes. Echinacoside inhibited Ca2+-dependent, but not Ca2+-independent, 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release in a concentration-dependent manner. Echinacoside also reduced the 4-aminopyridine-evoked increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration but did not alter the synaptosomal membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of echinacoside on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was prevented by ω-conotoxin MVIIC, a wide-spectrum blocker of Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channels, but was insensitive to the intracellular Ca2+ release-inhibitors dantrolene and 7-chloro-5-(2-chloropheny-1,5-dihydro-4,1-benzothiazepin-2(3H-one (CGP37157. Furthermore, echinacoside decreased the 4-aminopyridine-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C, and protein kinase C inhibitors abolished the effect of echinacoside on glutamate release. According to these results, we suggest that the inhibitory effect of echinacoside on evoked glutamate release is associated with reduced voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and subsequent suppression of protein kinase C activity.

  9. Shiga toxin type-2 (Stx2 induces glutamate release via phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway in murine neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko eObata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC can cause central nervous system (CNS damage resulting in paralysis, seizures, and coma. The key STEC virulence factors associated with systemic illness resulting in CNS impairment are Shiga toxins (Stx. While neurons express the Stx receptor globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 in vivo, direct toxicity to neurons by Stx has not been studied. We used murine neonatal neuron cultures to study the interaction of Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2 with cell surface expressed Gb3. Single molecule imaging three dimensional STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy - Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (3D STORM-TIRF allowed visualization and quantification of Stx2-Gb3 interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stx2 increases neuronal cytosolic Ca2+, and NMDA-receptor inhibition blocks Stx2-induced Ca2+ influx, suggesting that Stx2-mediates glutamate release. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-specific inhibition by Wortmannin reduces Stx2-induced intracellular Ca2+ indicating that the PI3K signaling pathway may be involved in Stx2-associated glutamate release, and that these pathways may contribute to CNS impairment associated with STEC infection.

  10. Postnatal Administration of Allopregnanolone Modifies Glutamate Release but Not BDNF Content in Striatum Samples of Rats Prenatally Exposed to Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol consumption during pregnancy may induce profound changes in fetal CNS development. We postulate that some of the effects of ethanol on striatal glutamatergic transmission and neurotrophin expression could be modulated by allopregnanolone, a neurosteroid modulator of GABAA receptor activity. We describe the acute pharmacological effect of allopregnanolone (65 μg/kg, s.c. administered to juvenile male rats (day 21 of age on the corticostriatal glutamatergic pathway, in both control and prenatally ethanol-exposed rats (two ip injections of 2.9 g/kg in 24% v/v saline solution on gestational day 8. Prenatal ethanol administration decreased the K+-induced release of glutamate regarding the control group. Interestingly, this effect was reverted by allopregnanolone. Regarding BDNF, allopregnanolone decreases the content of this neurotrophic factor in the striatum of control groups. However, both ethanol alone and ethanol plus allopregnanolone treated animals did not show any change regarding control values. We suggest that prenatal ethanol exposure may produce an alteration of GABAA receptors which blocks the GABA agonist-like effect of allopregnanolone on rapid glutamate release, thus disturbing normal neural transmission. Furthermore, the reciprocal interactions found between GABAergic neurosteroids and BDNF could underlie mechanisms operating during the neuronal plasticity of fetal development.

  11. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sialic acid cotransporter, is present in hippocampal synaptic vesicles and pineal SLMVs. RNA interference of sialin expression decreased exocytosis of aspartate and glutamate in pinealocytes. Proteoliposomes containing purified sialin actively accumulated aspartate and glutamate to a similar extent when inside positive membrane potential is imposed as the driving force. Sialin carrying a mutation found in people suffering from Salla disease (R39C) was completely devoid of aspartate and glutamate transport activity, although it retained appreciable H+/sialic acid cotransport activity. These results strongly suggest that sialin possesses dual physiological functions and acts as a vesicular aspartate/glutamate transporter. It is possible that people with Salla disease lose aspartergic (and also the associated glutamatergic) neurotransmission, and this could provide an explanation for why Salla disease causes severe neurological defects. PMID:18695252

  12. Lesions of nucleus accumbens affect morphine-induced release of ascorbic acid and GABA but not of glutamate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji Y; Yang, Jing Y; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian Y; Song, Wu; Su, Guang Y; Dong, Ying X; Wu, Chun F

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that local perfusion of morphine causes an increase of extracellular ascorbic acid (AA) levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of freely moving rats. Lines of evidence showed that glutamatergic and GABAergic were associated with morphine-induced effects on the neurotransmission of the brain, especially on the release of AA. In the present study, the effects of morphine on the release of extracellular AA, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) in the NAc following bilateral NAc lesions induced by kainic acid (KA) were studied by using the microdialysis technique, coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) and fluorescent detection (HPLC-FD). The results showed that local perfusion of morphine (100 µM, 1 mM) in NAc dose-dependently increased AA and GABA release, while attenuated Glu release in the NAc. Naloxone (0.4 mM) pretreated by local perfusion to the NAc, significantly blocked the effects of morphine. After NAc lesion by KA (1 µg), morphine-induced increase in AA and GABA were markedly eliminated, while decrease in Glu was not affected. The loss effect of morphine on AA and GABA release after KA lesion could be recovered by GABA agonist, musimol. These results indicate that morphine-induced AA release may be mediated at least by µ-opioid receptor. Moreover, this effect of morphine possibly depend less on the glutamatergic afferents, but more on the GABAergic circuits within this nucleus. Finally, AA release induced by local perfusion of morphine may be GABA-receptor mediated and synaptically localized in the NAc. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sia...

  14. Neuroprotective effects of the novel glutamate transporter inhibitor (-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid, which preferentially inhibits reverse transport (glutamate release) compared with glutamate reuptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Simona; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Landucci, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    on the three hEAAT subtypes. (-)-HIP-A maintained the remarkable property, previously reported with the racemates, of inhibiting synaptosomal glutamate-induced [3H]D-aspartate release (reverse transport) at concentrations significantly lower than those inhibiting [3H]L-glutamate uptake. New data suggest...... that the noncompetitive-like interaction described previously is probably the consequence of an insurmountable, long-lasting impairment of EAAT's function. Some minutes of preincubation are required to induce this impairment, the duration of preincubation having more effect on inhibition of glutamate-induced release than...... of glutamate uptake. In organotypic rat hippocampal slices and mixed mouse brain cortical cultures, TBOA, but not (-)-HIP-A, had toxic effects. Under ischemic conditions, a neuroprotective effect was found with 10 to 30 microM (-)-HIP-A, but not with 10 to 30 microM TBOA or 100 microM (-)-HIP-A. The effect...

  15. Critical role of peripheral drug actions in experience-dependent changes in nucleus accumbens glutamate release induced by intravenous cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies reveal that cocaine experience results in persistent neuroadaptive changes within glutamate (Glu) synapses in brain areas associated with drug reward. However, it remains unclear whether cocaine affects Glu release in drug-naive animals and how it is altered by drug experience. By using high-speed amperometry with enzyme-based and enzyme-free biosensors in freely moving rats, we show that an initial intravenous cocaine injection at a low self-administering dose (1 mg/kg) induces rapid, small and transient Glu release in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAc), which with subsequent injections rapidly becomes a much stronger, two-component increase. Using cocaine-methiodide, cocaine’s analogue that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, we confirm that the initial cocaine-induced Glu release in the NAc has a peripheral neural origin. Unlike cocaine, Glu responses induced by cocaine-methiodide rapidly habituate following repeated exposure. However, after cocaine experience this drug induces cocaine-like Glu responses. Hence, the interoceptive actions of cocaine, which essentially precede its direct actions in the brain, play a critical role in experience-dependent alterations in Glu release, cocaine-induced neural sensitization and may contribute to cocaine addiction. PMID:24111505

  16. A role for glutamate transporters in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runhild Gammelsaeter

    Full Text Available In the brain, glutamate is an extracellular transmitter that mediates cell-to-cell communication. Prior to synaptic release it is pumped into vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs. To inactivate glutamate receptor responses after release, glutamate is taken up into glial cells or neurons by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs. In the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, glutamate is proposed to act as an intracellular messenger, regulating insulin secretion from β-cells, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. By immunogold cytochemistry we show that insulin containing secretory granules express VGLUT3. Despite the fact that they have a VGLUT, the levels of glutamate in these granules are low, indicating the presence of a protein that can transport glutamate out of the granules. Surprisingly, in β-cells the glutamate transporter EAAT2 is located, not in the plasma membrane as it is in brain cells, but exclusively in insulin-containing secretory granules, together with VGLUT3. In EAAT2 knock out mice, the content of glutamate in secretory granules is higher than in wild type mice. These data imply a glutamate cycle in which glutamate is carried into the granules by VGLUT3 and carried out by EAAT2. Perturbing this cycle by knocking down EAAT2 expression with a small interfering RNA, or by over-expressing EAAT2 or a VGLUT in insulin granules, significantly reduced the rate of granule exocytosis. Simulations of granule energetics suggest that VGLUT3 and EAAT2 may regulate the pH and membrane potential of the granules and thereby regulate insulin secretion. These data suggest that insulin secretion from β-cells is modulated by the flux of glutamate through the secretory granules.

  17. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  18. Activity-dependent volume transmission by transgene NPY attenuates glutamate release and LTP in the subiculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Lin, En-Ju D

    2008-01-01

    governing the release and action of transgene NPY in neuronal circuitries. Using whole-cell recordings from subicular neurons, we show that in animals transduced by recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector carrying the NPY gene, transgene NPY is released during high-frequency activation of CA1...

  19. Effect of phenylsuccinate on potassium- and ischemia-induced release of glutamate in rat hippocampus monitored by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, T; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of glutamate in rat hippocampus during physiological conditions, elevated extracellular K+ and global ischemia was followed by microdialysis and subsequent determination of glutamate by HPLC. The effect of phenylsuccinate, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial dicarbox...

  20. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  1. Biocompatible molecularly imprinted polymers for the voltage regulated uptake and release of L-glutamate in neutral pH solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Hauff, E; Fuchs, Kathrin; Hellmann, D Ch; Parisi, J.; Weiler, R.; Burkhardt, C; Kraushaar, U; Guenther, E

    2010-01-01

    A biocompatible device for the voltage dependent uptake and release of the neural transmitter L-glutamate in neutral pH solutions is demonstrated. The device consists of a gold electrode coated with molecularly imprinted, overoxidised polypyrrole (oPPy). It is shown here that oPPy can behave as an

  2. Cortical Regulation of Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Dendritic Remodeling in Parkinsonism: Modulation of Glutamate Release Reverses Dopamine Depletion–Induced Dendritic Spine Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Bonnie G.; Neely, M. Diana

    2010-01-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if decortication reverses or prevents dopamine depletion–induced spine loss by placing motor cortex lesions 4 weeks after, or at the time of, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the SN. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after cortical lesions. Motor cortex lesions significantly reversed the loss of MSN spines elicited by dopamine denervation; a similar effect was observed in the prevention experiment. We then determined if modulating glutamate release in organotypic cocultures prevented spine loss. Treatment of the cultures with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to suppress corticostriatal glutamate release completely blocked spine loss in dopamine-denervated cultures. These studies provide the first evidence to show that MSN spine loss associated with parkinsonism can be reversed and point to suppression of corticostriatal glutamate release as a means of slowing progression in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20118184

  3. Thiamine deficiency results in release of soluble factors that disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential and downregulate the glutamate transporter splice-variant GLT-1b in cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhala, Shivraj S; Wang, Dongmei; Hazell, Alan S

    2014-06-06

    Loss of astrocytic glutamate transporters is a major feature of both thiamine deficiency (TD) and Wernicke's encephalopathy. However, the underlying basis of this process is not well understood. In the present study we have investigated the possibility of release of astrocytic soluble factors that might be involved in the regulation of the glutamate transporter GLT-1b in these cells. Treatment of naïve astrocytes with conditioned media from astrocytes exposed to TD conditions resulted in a progressive decrease in glutamate uptake over 24 h. Immunoblotting and flow cytometry measurements indicated this was accompanied by a 20-40% loss of GLT-1b. Astrocytes exposed to either TD or TD conditioned media showed increased disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential compared to control cells, and treatment of astrocytes with TD resulted in an increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and elevated levels of phospho-IκB fragment, indicative of increased activation of NF-κB. Inhibition of TNF-α activity with the use of a neutralizing antibody blocked the increased NF-κB activation, while inhibition of NF-κB ameliorated the decrease in GLT-1b and reversed the decrease in glutamate uptake occurring with TD treatment. Together, these findings indicate that astrocytes exposed to TD conditions show responses suggesting that soluble factors released by these cells under conditions of TD play a regulatory role in terms of glutamate transport function and mitochondrial integrity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Modulation of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine Release by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Studies in Rat Brain Slices in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Ersin; Young, Andrew M J

    2017-02-15

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, phencyclidine, induces behavioral changes in rodents mimicking symptoms of schizophrenia, possibly mediated through dysregulation of glutamatergic control of mesolimbic dopamine release. We tested the hypothesis that NMDA receptor activation modulates accumbens dopamine release, and that phencyclidine pretreatment altered this modulation. NMDA caused a receptor-specific, dose-dependent decrease in electrically stimulated dopamine release in nucleus accumbens brain slices. This decrease was unaffected by picrotoxin, making it unlikely to be mediated through GABAergic neurones, but was decreased by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (RS)-α-methyl-4-sulfonophenylglycine, indicating that NMDA activates mechanisms controlled by these receptors to decrease stimulated dopamine release. The effect of NMDA was unchanged by in vivo pretreatment with phencyclidine (twice daily for 5 days), with a washout period of at least 7 days before experimentation, which supports the hypothesis that there is no enduring direct effect of PCP at NMDA receptors after this pretreatment procedure. We propose that NMDA depression of accumbal dopamine release is mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors located pre- or perisynaptically, and suggest that NMDA evoked increased extrasynaptic spillover of glutamate is sufficient to activate these receptors that, in turn, inhibit dopamine release. Furthermore, we suggest that enduring functional changes brought about by subchronic phencyclidine pretreatment, modeling deficits in schizophrenia, are downstream effects consequent on chronic blockade of NMDA receptors, rather than direct effects on NMDA receptors themselves.

  5. Transient inactivation of the ventral hippocampus in neonatal rats impairs the mesolimbic regulation of prefrontal glutamate release in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Jørgensen, Christinna Vangsgaard; Mikkelsen, J D

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia (SZ) reflect maturational disruptions within a neural system that includes the ventral hippocampus (VH), nucleus accumbens (NAc), basal forebrain, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). A better understanding of these changes may reveal drug targets for more efficacious...... cognition enhancers. We have utilized an animal model in which the above distributed system is altered, during a sensitive period of development, by transiently inactivating the VH and its efferent projections. We determined the ability of NAc shell activation to evoke prefrontal glutamate release in adult......-sensitive microelectrode. There were no differences in basal glutamate levels among the groups tested (overall 1.41 ± 0.26 uM). However, the dose-related stimulation of prefrontal glutamate levels seen in control rats treated with saline on PD7 (4.31 ± 0.22 μM after 0.15 μg) was markedly attenuated in rats treated...

  6. Effects of N-Acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) Peptidase Inhibition on Release of Glutamate and Dopamine in Prefrontal Cortex and Nucleus Accumbens in Phencyclidine Model of Schizophrenia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Bzdega, Tomasz; Olszewski, Rafal T.; Moffett, John R.; Neale, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    The “glutamate” theory of schizophrenia emerged from the observation that phencyclidine (PCP), an open channel antagonist of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor, induces schizophrenia-like behaviors in humans. PCP also induces a complex set of behaviors in animal models of this disorder. PCP also increases glutamate and dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, brain regions associated with expression of psychosis. Increased motor activation is among the PCP-induced behaviors that have been widely validated as models for the characterization of new antipsychotic drugs. The peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) activates a group II metabotropic receptor, mGluR3. Polymorphisms in this receptor have been associated with schizophrenia. Inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, an enzyme that inactivates NAAG following synaptic release, reduce several behaviors induced by PCP in animal models. This research tested the hypothesis that two structurally distinct NAAG peptidase inhibitors, ZJ43 and 2-(phosphonomethyl)pentane-1,5-dioic acid, would elevate levels of synaptically released NAAG and reduce PCP-induced increases in glutamate and dopamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. NAAG-like immunoreactivity was found in neurons and presumptive synaptic endings in both regions. These peptidase inhibitors reduced the motor activation effects of PCP while elevating extracellular NAAG levels. They also blocked PCP-induced increases in glutamate but not dopamine or its metabolites. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 blocked these behavioral and neurochemical effects of the peptidase inhibitors. The data reported here provide a foundation for assessment of the neurochemical mechanism through which NAAG achieves its antipsychotic-like behavioral effects and support the conclusion NAAG peptidase inhibitors warrant further study as a novel antipsychotic therapy aimed at mGluR3. PMID:22570482

  7. Crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom induces the release of glutamate from cerebrocortical synaptosomes via N and P/Q calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomeo, Rosangela da Silva; Gonçalves, Ana Paula de Faria; da Silva, Carolina Nunes; de Paula, André Tunes; Costa Santos, Danielle Oliveira; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; de Lima, Maria Elena

    2014-07-01

    Crotoxin (Crtx), the main toxin in the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake, is a heterodimer with a basic subunit, CB, and an acidic subunit, CA. CB is a phospholipase A2 that depends on CA to specifically bind to the cell membrane. This toxin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) causing chronic seizure effects and other cytotoxic effects. Here, we report its action on glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Aiming at a better understanding of the mechanism of action of Crtx, calcium channel blockers were used and internalization studies were performed in cerebellar granule neurons. Our results show that Crtx induces calcium-dependent glutamate release via N and P/Q calcium channels. In addition, the CB subunit of Crtx is shown to be internalized. This internalization does not depend on the presence of CA subunit neither on the PLA2 activity of CB. A correlation between CB internalization and glutamate release remains to be established. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura Frendrup

    2016-01-01

    The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate–glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back t...

  9. Bmal1 knockdown suppresses wake and increases immobility without altering orexin A, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, or glutamate decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akladious, Afaf; Azzam, Sausan; Hu, Yufen; Feng, Pingfu

    2018-02-14

    To determine the effect of Bmal1 knockdown (KD) on sleep, activity, immobility, hypothalamic levels of orexin, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), and GABAergic glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). We used Bmal1 siRNA, or control siRNA intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection to knock down Bmal1 in C57BL/6 mice. Sleep polysomnography, wheel-running activity, and tail suspension test were performed. Polysomnographic (PSG) recordings in both groups were preceded by ICV injection made during both the light phase and the dark phase. We also measured brain orexin A and CRH using an ELISA and measured GAD using immunoblotting. Compared with control group, Bmal1 KD group had reduced wheel activity and increased immobility. Compared with control, the Bmal1 KD group had reduced wheel activity and increased immobility. During the first 24 hours after treatment, we observed that control siRNA induced a much greater increase in sleep during the dark phase, which was associated with lower orexin levels. However, beginning 24 hours after treatment, we observed an increase in sleep and a decrease in time spent awake during the dark phase in the Bmal1 KD group. These changes were not associated with changes in brain levels of orexin A, CRH, or GAD. Bmal1 KD led to reduced activity, increased immobility, and dramatic reduction in time spent awake as well as an increase in sleep during the dark phase. Early after injection, there was a slight change in sleep but brain levels of orexin, CRH, and GAD remain unchanged. Control siRNA also affected sleep associated with changes in orexin levels. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Striatal Synaptosomes from Hdh140Q/140Q Knock-in Mice have Altered Protein Levels, Novel Sites of Methionine Oxidation, and Excess Glutamate Release after Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Kimm, Jeffrey S.; McClory, Hollis; Ansong, Kwadwo A.; Yohrling, George; Kwak, Seung; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Synaptic connections are disrupted in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Synaptosomes from postmortem brain are ideal for synaptic function studies because they are enriched in pre- and post-synaptic proteins important in vesicle fusion, vesicle release, and neurotransmitter receptor activation. Objective: To examine striatal synaptosomes from 3, 6 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice for levels of synaptic proteins, methionine oxidation, and glutamate release. Methods: We used Western blot analysis, glutamate release assays, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results: Striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had less DARPP32, syntaxin 1 and calmodulin compared to WT. Striatal synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had lower levels of DARPP32, alpha actinin, HAP40, Na+/K+-ATPase, PSD95, SNAP-25, TrkA and VAMP1, VGlut1 and VGlut2, increased levels of VAMP2, and modifications in actin and calmodulin compared to WT. More glutamate released from vesicles of depolarized striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q than from age matched WT mice but there was no difference in glutamate release in synaptosomes of 3 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q mice. LC-MS/MS of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice striatal synaptosomes revealed that about 4% of total proteins detected (>600 detected) had novel sites of methionine oxidation including proteins involved with vesicle fusion, trafficking, and neurotransmitter function (synaptophysin, synapsin 2, syntaxin 1, calmodulin, cytoplasmic actin 2, neurofilament, and tubulin). Altered protein levels and novel methionine oxidations were also seen in cortical synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice. Conclusions: Findings provide support for early synaptic dysfunction in Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice arising from altered protein levels, oxidative damage, and impaired glutamate neurotransmission and suggest that study of synaptosomes could be of

  11. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Bac T. Nguyen; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  12. Localized infusions of the partial alpha 7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 evoke rapid and transient increases in prefrontal glutamate release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Mikkelsen, J D; Bruno, J P

    2013-01-01

    that inhibited (threo-beta-benzyl-oxy-aspartate (TβOA), 100.0μM) or facilitated (ceftriaxalone, 200mg/kg, i.p.) excitatory amino acid transporters. TβOA slowed both the clearance (s) and rate of clearance (μM/s) by 10-fold, particularly at the mid-late stages of the return to baseline. Ceftriaxone reduced......The ability of local infusions of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetycholine receptor (α7 nAChR) partial agonist SSR180711 to evoke glutamate release in prefrontal cortex was determined in awake rats using a microelectrode array. Infusions of SSR180711 produced dose-dependent increases in glutamate levels...

  13. Binding and potential-triggered release of L-glutamate with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole in neutral pH solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, I.; Greb, H.; Janssen-Bienhold, U.; Parisi, J.; Weiler, R.; von Hauff, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are interesting for potential-regulated trafficking of molecules. In this study, we investigate the binding properties of l-glutamate (Glu) in molecularly imprinted polypyrrole (MIPPy) in neutral pH solutions. We prepared MIPPy by electrochemically depositing

  14. Enhanced pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn contributes to calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein-mediated spinal sensitization and behavioral hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickenson Anthony H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nerve injury-induced expression of the spinal calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ1 has been shown to mediate behavioral hypersensitivity through a yet identified mechanism. We examined if this neuroplasticity modulates behavioral hypersensitivity by regulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in injury-free transgenic mice overexpressing the Cavα2δ1 proteins in neuronal tissues. The transgenic mice exhibited hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia similar to the spinal nerve ligation injury model. Intrathecally delivered antagonists for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA/kainate receptors, but not for the metabotropic glutamate receptors, caused a dose-dependent allodynia reversal in the transgenic mice without changing the behavioral sensitivity in wild-type mice. This suggests that elevated spinal Cavα2δ1 mediates allodynia through a pathway involving activation of selective glutamate receptors. To determine if this is mediated by enhanced spinal neuronal excitability or pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn, we examined wide-dynamic-range (WDR neuron excitability with extracellular recording and glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents with whole-cell patch recording in deep-dorsal horn of the Cavα2δ1 transgenic mice. Our data indicated that overexpression of Cavα2δ1 in neuronal tissues led to increased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory post synaptic currents mediated mainly by AMPA/kainate receptors at physiological membrane potentials, and also by NMDA receptors upon depolarization, without changing the excitability of WDR neurons to high intensity stimulation. Together, these findings support a mechanism of Cavα2δ1-mediated spinal sensitization in which elevated Cavα2δ1 causes increased pre-synaptic glutamate release that leads to reduced excitation thresholds of post-synaptic dorsal

  15. Effects of experimental tooth clenching on pain and intramuscular release of 5-HT and glutamate in patients with myofascial TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andreas; Ghafouri, Bijar; Gerdle, Björn; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 pain-free controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-minute repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. A significant effect of group (Prelease of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  16. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, inhibits cocaine-induced seizures in mice: Possible role of the mTOR pathway and reduction in glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobira, Pedro H; Vilela, Luciano R; Gonçalves, Bruno D C; Santos, Rebeca P M; de Oliveira, Antonio C; Vieira, Luciene B; Aguiar, Daniele C; Crippa, José A; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa, has therapeutic potential for certain psychiatric and neurological disorders. Studies in laboratory animals and limited human trials indicate that CBD has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties. Its effects against cocaine neurotoxicity, however, have remained unclear. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that CBD protects against cocaine-induced seizures and investigated the underlying mechanisms. CBD (30 mg/kg) pre-treatment increased the latency and reduced the duration of cocaine (75 mg/kg)-induced seizures in mice. The CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (1 and 3mg/kg), and the CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630 (2 and 4 mg/kg), failed to reverse this protective effect, suggesting that alternative mechanisms are involved. Synaptosome studies with the hippocampus of drug-treated animals revealed that cocaine increases glutamate release, whereas CBD induces the opposite effect. Finally, the protective effect of this cannabinoid against cocaine-induced seizure was reversed by rapamycin (1 and 5mg/kg), an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) intracellular pathway. In conclusion, CBD protects against seizures in a model of cocaine intoxication. These effects possibly occur through activation of mTOR with subsequent reduction in glutamate release. CBD should be further investigated as a strategy for alleviating psychostimulant toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 3H-D-aspartate release from cerebellar granule neurons is differentially regulated by glutamate- and K(+)-stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Rehder, V; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1992-01-01

    transmitter release was dependent on an intact cytoskeleton or not, the colchicine-like drug Nocodazole, which also blocks transport of vesicles, was used. K(+)-stimulated transmitter release consisted for the major part (around 70%) of a Ca(2+)-dependent, Nocodazole sensitive release component and this K...

  18. Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter for gastrin releasing peptide-sensitive and insensitive itch-related synaptic transmission in mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Itch sensation is one of the major sensory experiences of human and animals. Recent studies have proposed that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP is a key neurotransmitter for itch in spinal cord. However, no direct evidence is available to indicate that GRP actually mediate responses between primary afferent fibers and dorsal horn neurons. Here we performed integrative neurobiological experiments to test this question. We found that a small population of rat dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with increases in calcium signaling. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that a part of superficial dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with the increase of action potential firing in adult rats and mice, and these dorsal horn neurons received exclusively primary afferent C-fiber inputs. On the other hands, few Aδ inputs receiving cells were found to be GRP positive. Finally, we found that evoked sensory responses between primary afferent C fibers and GRP positive superficial dorsal horn neurons are mediated by glutamate but not GRP. CNQX, a blocker of AMPA and kainate (KA receptors, completely inhibited evoked EPSCs, including in those Fos-GFP positive dorsal horn cells activated by itching. Our findings provide the direct evidence that glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter between C fibers and GRP positive dorsal horn neurons. Our results will help to understand the neuronal mechanism of itch and aid future treatment for patients with pruritic disease.

  19. Enhanced benzodiazepine and ethanol actions on cerebellar GABA(A) receptors mediating glutamate release in an alcohol-sensitive rat line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, G; Bonanno, G; Raiteri, L; Sarviharju, M; Korpi, E R; Raiteri, M

    1999-09-01

    Granule cell axon terminals of rat cerebellum possess benzodiazepine-insensitive GABA(A) receptors mediating glutamate release. We have investigated the ability of benzodiazepines, ethanol and furosemide to modulate the function of these receptors in the cerebellum of alcohol-tolerant (AT) and alcohol-nontolerant (ANT) rats. AT and ANT synaptosomes, prelabeled with [3H]D-aspartate, were superfused with GABA and various drugs during the K+ -depolarization. GABA similarly enhanced [3H]D-aspartate overflow in AT (EC50 = 1.7 microM) and ANT (EC50 = 3.9 microM) rats in a bicuculline-sensitive manner. Diazepam or zolpidem, at 0.1 microM, potentiated GABA at the GABA(A) receptor of ANT rats, but were ineffective at the AT receptor. Zolpidem acted with great potency (EC50 = 13.6 nM). Ethanol, added at 50 mM, potentiated GABA in ANT rats, but it was inactive at the GABA(A) receptor of the AT cerebellum. Furosemide significantly inhibited the effect of GABA in ANT, but not in AT synaptosomes. Our results show that one GABA(A) receptor (the receptor sited on granule cell terminals which mediates glutamate release) exhibits functional responses to diazepam and ethanol that differ between AT and ANT rats. However, the data with zolpidem and furosemide differ from previous results obtained with membranes of the granule cell layer suggesting that distinct GABA(A) receptor subtypes may exist on axon terminals versus soma/dendrites of granule cells.

  20. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia...... and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N]glutamine...... (0.25 mM), and [(15)N]ammonia (0.3 mM) were used as precursors and cell extracts were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Labeling from [(15)N]alanine in glutamine, aspartate, and glutamate in cerebellar cocultures was independent of depolarization of the neurons. Employing glutamine with the amino group...

  1. Aging results in attenuated gonadotropin releasing hormone-luteinizing hormone axis responsiveness to glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Swerdloff, R S; Sinha Hakim, A P; Lue, Y H; Wang, C

    1998-02-01

    Reproductive aging in the Brown Norway rat occurs because of testicular as well as hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. Excitatory amino acids (EAA) participate in the regulation of pulsatile secretion of hypothalamic GnRH and pituitary LH. In the present study, we studied the EAA-GnRH-LH axis for possible age-related alterations in prepubertal (35 days), young (3-4 months), middle-aged (12-13 months) and old (21-23 months) rats. In the first experiment, an intra-atrial cannula was implanted in rats of different ages to evaluate the pituitary response to small, physiological intravenous bolus administration of GnRH (0.5 or 1.0 nmol/100 g body weight). The results showed no age-related significant differences in in-vivo serum LH or FSH responsiveness to GnRH. In a second experiment, blood samples for the gonadotropins were withdrawn immediately before and 10 min after an iv injection of the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 5 mg/kg, a dose that induces a physiological LH pulse in young rats). Administration of NMDA induced significant increases in LH and prolactin in all groups of animals (P<0.05) and a significant FSH response in young and middle-aged but not old rats. NMDA-induced LH, FSH and prolactin release was higher (P<0.05) in prepubertal rats than in all other age groups. Compared with young rats, NMDA-induced increase in plasma LH and prolactin was lower (P<0.05) in old rats. In the third experiment, to ascertain whether this reduced LH response to NMDA in old rats was exerted at the hypothalamic level, the effects of NMDA on GnRH release in vitro from preoptic area-medial basal hypothalamus (POA-MBH) fragments were compared among rats of different ages. GnRH efflux in response to NMDA was significantly attenuated with increasing age. GnRH release in vitro was higher in prepubertal and lower in old than in young rats (P<0.05). Lastly, we measured amino acid concentrations in hypothalamic tissue (POA-MBH fragments). Prepubertal rats had

  2. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone d,l polylactide nanoparticles (TRH-NPs) protect against glutamate toxicity in vitro and kindling development in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Michael C; Aldouby, Yanir; Domb, Abraham J; Kubek, Michael J

    2009-12-15

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is reported to have anticonvulsant effects in animal seizure models and certain intractable epileptic patients. However, its duration of action is limited by rapid tissue metabolism and the blood brain barrier. Direct nose-brain delivery of neuropeptides in sustained-release biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) is a promising mode of therapy for enhancing CNS bioavailability. Bioactivity/neuroprotection of d,l polylactide nanoparticles containing TRH was assessed against glutamate toxicity in cultured rat fetal hippocampal neurons. Subsequently, we utilized the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy to determine if intranasal administration of nanoparticles containing TRH (TRH-NPs) could inhibit kindling development. Animals received daily treatments of either blank (control) or TRH-NPs for 7 days before initiation of kindling. On day 8 and each day thereafter until either fully kindled or until day 20, the animals received daily treatments before receiving a kindling stimulus 3 h later. Afterdischarge duration (ADD) was assessed via electroencephalographs recorded from electrodes in the basolateral amygdalae and behavioral seizure stereotypy was simultaneously recorded digitally. Intranasal application of TRH-NPs resulted in a significant reduction in seizure ADD as kindling progressed, while the number of stimulations required to reach stage V seizures and to become permanently kindled was significantly greater in TRH-NP-treated subjects. Additionally, delay to clonus was significantly prolonged while clonus duration was reduced indicating a less severe seizure in TRH-NP-treated subjects. Our results provide proof of principle that intranasal delivery of sustained-release TRH-NPs may be neuroprotective and can be utilized to suppress seizures and perhaps epileptogenesis.

  3. Mechanistic study of competitive releases of H2O, NH3 and CO2 from deprotonated aspartic and glutamic acids: Role of conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier Saint Hilaire, Pierre; Warnet, Anna; Gimbert, Yves; Hohenester, Ulli Martin; Giorgi, Gianluca; Olivier, Marie-Françoise; Fenaille, François; Colsch, Benoît; Junot, Christophe; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-15

    The aims of this study were to highlight the impact of minor structural differences (e.g. an aminoacid side chain enlargement by one methylene group), on ion dissociation under collision-induced dissociation conditions, and to determine the underlying chemical mechanisms. Therefore, we compared fragmentations of deprotonated aspartic and glutamic acids generated in negative electrospray ionization. Energy-resolved mass spectrometry breakdown curves were recorded and MS3 experiments performed on an Orbitrap Fusion for high-resolution and high-mass accuracy measurements. Activated fragmentations were performed using both the resonant and non-resonant excitation modes (i.e., CID and HCD, respectively) in order to get complementary information on the competitive and consecutive dissociative pathways. These experiments showed a specific loss of ammonia from the activated aspartate but not from the activated glutamate. We mainly focused on this specific observed loss from aspartate. Two different mechanisms based on intramolecular reactions (similar to those occurring in organic chemistry) were proposed, such as intramolecular elimination (i.e. Ei-like) and nucleophilic substitution (i.e. SNi-like) reactions, respectively, yielding anions as fumarate and α lactone from a particular conformation with the lowest steric hindrance (i.e. with antiperiplanar carboxyl groups). The detected deaminated aspartate anion can then release CO2 as observed in the MS3 experimental spectra. However, quantum calculations did not indicate the formation of such a deaminated aspartate product ion without loss of carbon dioxide. Actually, calculations displayed the double neutral (NH3+CO2) loss as a concomitant pathway (from a particular conformation) with relative high activation energy instead of a consecutive process. This disagreement is apparent since the concomitant pathway may be changed into consecutive dissociations according to the collision energy i.e., at higher collision energy

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We...... are particularly interested in the regulation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A (5-HT2A R). This receptor form a functional complex with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) and is recruited to the cell membrane by the corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF-R1). The effect of BDNF on gene...... expression for all these receptors, as well as a number of immediate-early genes, was pharmacologically characterized in primary neurons from rat frontal cortex. BDNF increased CRF-R1 mRNA levels up to fivefold, whereas mGluR2 mRNA levels were proportionally downregulated. No effect on 5-HT2A R mRNA was seen...

  5. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  6. Two glutamic acid residues in the DNA-binding domain are engaged in the release of STAT1 dimers from DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Verena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In interferon-γ-stimulated cells, the dimeric transcription factor STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 recognizes semi-palindromic motifs in the promoter regions of cytokine-driven target genes termed GAS (gamma-activated sites. However, the molecular steps that facilitate GAS binding and the subsequent liberation of STAT1 homodimers from these promoter elements are not well understood. Results Using a mutational approach, we identified two critical glutamyl residues within the DNA-binding domain adjacent to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA which efficiently release phospho-STAT1 from DNA. The release of STAT1 dimers from DNA enhances transcriptional activity on both interferon-driven reporter and endogenous target genes. A substitution of either of the two glutamic acid residues broadens the repertoire of putative binding sites on DNA and enhances binding affinity to GAS sites. However, despite elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylation and a prolonged nuclear accumulation period, the STAT1 DNA-binding mutants show a significantly reduced transcriptional activity upon stimulation of cells with interferon-γ. This reduced transcriptional response may be explained by the deposition of oligomerized STAT1 molecules outside GAS sites. Conclusions Thus, two negatively charged amino acid residues in the DNA-binding domain are engaged in the liberation of STAT1 from DNA, resulting in a high dissociation rate from non-GAS sites as a key feature of STAT1 signal transduction, which positively regulates cytokine-dependent gene expression probably by preventing retention at transcriptionally inert sites.

  7. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate...... or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism....... Discussions of stoichiometry, the relative role of glutamate vs. GABA and pathological conditions affecting the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycling are presented. Furthermore, a section is devoted to the accompanying ammonia homeostasis of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle, examining the possible means...

  8. Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT): appearance of an actress on the stage of purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori; Hiasa, Miki; Sakamoto, Shohei; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi

    2017-06-14

    Vesicular storage of ATP is one of the processes initiating purinergic chemical transmission. Although an active transport mechanism was postulated to be involved in the processes, a transporter(s) responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP remained unidentified for some time. In 2008, SLC17A9, the last identified member of the solute carrier 17 type I inorganic phosphate transporter family, was found to encode the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) that is responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP. VNUT transports various nucleotides in a membrane potential-dependent fashion and is expressed in the various ATP-secreting cells. Mice with knockout of the VNUT gene lose vesicular storage and release of ATP from neurons and neuroendocrine cells, resulting in blockage of the initiation of purinergic chemical transmission. Thus, VNUT plays an essential role in the vesicular storage and release of ATP. The VNUT knockout mice exhibit resistance for neuropathic pain and a therapeutic effect against diabetes by way of increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, VNUT inhibitors and suppression of VNUT gene expression may be used for therapeutic purposes through suppression of purinergic chemical transmission. This review summarizes the studies to date on VNUT and discusses what we have learned about the relevance of vesicular ATP release as a potential drug target.

  9. Dynamic changes in extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the lateral septum during social play behavior in juvenile rats: Implications for sex-specific regulation of social play behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredewold, Remco; Schiavo, Jennifer K.; van der Hart, Marieke; Verreij, Michelle; Veenema, Alexa H.

    2015-01-01

    Social play is a motivated and rewarding behavior that is displayed by nearly all mammals and peaks in the juvenile period. Moreover, social play is essential for the development of social skills and is impaired in social disorders like autism. We recently showed that the lateral septum (LS) is involved in the regulation of social play behavior in juvenile male and female rats. The LS is largely modulated by GABA and glutamate neurotransmission, but their role in social play behavior is unknown. Here, we determined whether social play behavior is associated with changes in the extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the LS and to what extent such changes modulate social play behavior in male and female juvenile rats. Using intracerebral microdialysis in freely behaving rats, we found no sex difference in extracellular GABA concentrations, but extracellular glutamate concentrations are higher in males than in females under baseline condition and during social play. This resulted in a higher glutamate/GABA concentration ratio in males versus females and thus, an excitatory predominance in the LS of males. Furthermore, social play behavior in both sexes is associated with significant increases in extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the LS. Pharmacological blockade of GABA-A receptors in the LS with bicuculline (100 ng/0.5 µl, 250 ng/0.5 µl) dose-dependently decreased the duration of social play behavior in both sexes. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors) in the LS with AP-5 + CNQX (2 mM+0.4 mM/0.5 µl, 30 mM+3 mM/0.5 µl) dose-dependently decreased the duration of social play behavior in females, but did not alter social play behavior in males. Together, these data suggest a role for GABA neurotransmission in the LS in the regulation of juvenile social play behavior in both sexes, while glutamate neurotransmission in the LS is involved in the sex-specific regulation of juvenile

  10. The amino acid transporters of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle and their impact on insulin and glucagon secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eJenstad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication is pivotal in optimising and synchronising cellular responses to keep internal homeostasis and to respond adequately to external stimuli. In the central nervous system (CNS, glutamatergic and GABAergic signals are postulated to be dependent on the glutamate/GABA-glutamine (GGG cycle for vesicular loading of neurotransmitters, for inactivating the signal and for the replenishment of the neurotransmitters. Islets of Langerhans release the hormones insulin and glucagon, but share similarities with CNS cells in for example transcriptional control of development and differentiation, and chromatin methylation. Interestingly, proteins involved in the CNS in secretion of the neurotransmitters and emitting their responses as well as the regulation of these processes, are also found in islet cells. Moreover, high levels of glutamate, GABA and glutamine and their respective vesicular and plasma membrane transporters have been shown in the islet cells and there is emerging support for these amino acids and their transporters playing important roles in the maturation and secretion of insulin and glucagon. In this review, we will discuss the feasibility of recent data in the field in relation to the biophysical properties of the transporters (Slc1, Slc17, Slc32 and Slc38 and physiology of hormone secretion in islets of Langerhans.

  11. SDF 1-alpha (CXCL12) triggers glutamate exocytosis from astrocytes on a millisecond time scale: imaging analysis at the single-vesicle level with TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Corrado; Marchaland, Julie; Regazzi, Romano; Bezzi, Paola

    2008-07-31

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. A number of papers, during the past few years, have suggested that they have physiological functions in addition to their roles in neuroinflammatory diseases. In this context, the best evidence concerns the CXC-chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1alpha or CXCL12) and its receptor CXCR4, whose signalling cascade is also implicated in the glutamate release process from astrocytes. Recently, astrocytic synaptic like microvesicles (SLMVs) that express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) and are able to release glutamate by Ca2+-dependent regulated exocytosis, have been described both in tissue and in cultured astrocytes. Here, in order to elucidate whether SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 system can participate to the brain fast communication systems, we investigated whether the activation of CXCR4 receptor triggers glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes. By using total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy and the membrane-fluorescent styryl dye FM4-64, we adapted an imaging methodology recently developed to measure exocytosis and recycling in synaptic terminals, and monitored the CXCR4-mediated exocytosis of SLMVs in astrocytes. We analyzed the co-localization of VGLUT with the FM dye at single-vesicle level, and observed the kinetics of the FM dye release during single fusion events. We found that the activation of CXCR4 receptors triggered a burst of exocytosis on a millisecond time scale that involved the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. These results support the idea that astrocytes can respond to external stimuli and communicate with the neighboring cells via fast release of glutamate.

  12. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontob...

  13. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  14. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 enhances interleukin (IL)-1beta-stimulated release of IL-6 in cultured human astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, E.; Gorter, J. A.; Rozemuller, A. J.; Yankaya, B.; Troost, D.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human astrocytes express mRNA and receptor protein for group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Whether these receptors can influence the inflammatory and immune response and can modulate the capacity of astrocytes to produce inflammatory

  15. The Influence of Glutamate on Axonal Compound Action Potential In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelela, Ahmed; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background  Our previous experiments demonstrated modulation of the amplitude of the axonal compound action potential (CAP) by electrical stimulation. To verify assumption that glutamate released from axons could be involved in this phenomenon, the modification of the axonal CAP induced by glutamate was investigated. Objectives  The major objective of this research is to verify the hypothesis that axonal activity would trigger the release of glutamate, which in turn would interact with specific axonal receptors modifying the amplitude of the action potential. Methods  Segments of the sciatic nerve were exposed to exogenous glutamate in vitro, and CAP was recorded before and after glutamate application. In some experiments, the release of radioactive glutamate analog from the sciatic nerve exposed to exogenous glutamate was also evaluated. Results  The glutamate-induced increase in CAP was blocked by different glutamate receptor antagonists. The effect of glutamate was not observed in Ca-free medium, and was blocked by antagonists of calcium channels. Exogenous glutamate, applied to the segments of sciatic nerve, induced the release of radioactive glutamate analog, demonstrating glutamate-induced glutamate release. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that axolemma contains components necessary for glutamatergic neurotransmission. Conclusion  The proteins of the axonal membrane can under the influence of electrical stimulation or exogenous glutamate change membrane permeability and ionic conductance, leading to a change in the amplitude of CAP. We suggest that increased axonal activity leads to the release of glutamate that results in changes in the amplitude of CAPs.

  16. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Johansen, Maja L.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of neuronal glutamate from a-ketoglutarate for neurotransmission necessitates an amino group nitrogen donor; however, it is not clear which amino acid(s) serves this role. Thus, the ability of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, to act as amino...... group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 µ......]valine was able to maintain the amount of vesicular glutamate during synaptic activity. This indicates that, among the BCAAs, only valine supports the increased need for synthesis of vesicular glutamate. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  17. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor....... This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  18. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    . This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lumeng J; Wall, Brian A; Wangari-Talbot, Janet; Chen, Suzie

    2017-03-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are widely known for their roles in synaptic signaling. However, accumulating evidence suggests roles of mGluRs in human malignancies in addition to synaptic transmission. Somatic cell homeostasis presents intriguing possibilities of mGluRs and glutamate signaling as novel targets for human cancers. More recently, aberrant glutamate signaling has been shown to participate in the transformation and maintenance of various cancer types, including glioma, melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer, indicating that genes encoding mGluRs, GRMs, can function as oncogenes. Here, we provide a review on the interactions of mGluRs and their ligand, glutamate, in processes that promote the growth of tumors of neuronal and non-neuronal origins. Further, we discuss the evolution of riluzole, a glutamate release inhibitor approved for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but now fashioned as an mGluR1 inhibitor for melanoma therapy and as a radio-sensitizer for tumors that have metastasized to the brain. With the success of riluzole, it is not far-fetched to believe that other drugs that may act directly or indirectly on other mGluRs can be beneficial for multiple applications. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, 5 years on'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of spinal cord glutamate transporter during normal sensory transmission and pathological pain states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephens Robert L

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glutamate is a neurotransmitter critical for spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and for generation and maintenance of spinal states of pain hypersensitivity via activation of glutamate receptors. Understanding the regulation of synaptically and non-synaptically released glutamate associated with pathological pain is important in exploring novel molecular mechanisms and developing therapeutic strategies of pathological pain. The glutamate transporter system is the primary mechanism for the inactivation of synaptically released glutamate and the maintenance of glutamate homeostasis. Recent studies demonstrated that spinal glutamate transporter inhibition relieved pathological pain, suggesting that the spinal glutamate transporter might serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of pathological pain. However, the exact function of glutamate transporter in pathological pain is not completely understood. This report will review the evidence for the role of the spinal glutamate transporter during normal sensory transmission and pathological pain conditions and discuss potential mechanisms by which spinal glutamate transporter is involved in pathological pain.

  1. Depersonalization disorder may be related to glutamate receptor activation imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikwer, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Low-dose ketamine administration mimics, both clinically and on gross neuroimaging, depersonalization disorder. The perceptual effects of ketamine may be due to secondary stimulation of glutamate release and lamotrigine, possibly by inhibited glutamate release, may reduce some of ketamine's so-called dissociative effects. However, lamotrigine does not seem to be useful in the treatment of depersonalization disorder. Glutamate release in prefrontal cortex is increased by subanaesthetic doses of ketamine, resulting in increased inhibition, possibly via intercalated GABAerg cells, of projections from amygdala, affecting structures critically involved in depersonalization. I speculate that, in depersonalization disorder, the increased glutamate activity in prefrontal cortex is due to intrinsic imbalance, resulting in long-term potentiation, at the postsynaptic glutamate receptors on the GABAerg interneurons while the same receptor abnormality at the synapses on the intercalated GABAerg cells of the amygdala result in long-term depression in the case of either normal or high glutamate release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vesicular secretion of auxin: Evidences and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, Frantisek; Schlicht, Markus; Volkmann, Dieter; Mancuso, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin is secreted in root apices via phospholipase Dzeta2 (PLDzeta2) activity which produces specific population of phosphatidic acid that stimulates secretion of vesicles enriched with auxin. These vesicles were reported to be localized at plant synapses which are active in auxin secretion, especially at the transition zone of the root apex. There are several implications of this vesicular secretion of auxin. In root apices, auxin emerges as plant neurotransmitter-like signal molecule which coordinates activities of adjacent cells via electric and chemical signaling. Putative quantal release of auxin after electrical stimulation, if confirmed, would be part of neuronal communication between plant cells. As auxin transport across plant synapses is tightly linked with integrated sensory perception of environment, especially of omnipresent gravity and light, this process is proposed to mediate the plant perception of environment. These neuronal features allow sessile plants to integrate multitude of sensory signals into the adaptive behavior of whole plants and the animal-like exploratory behavior of growing roots.

  3. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin may alter LH release patterns by abolishing sex differences in GABA/glutamate cell number and modifying the transcriptome of the male anteroventral periventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino Sans, Javier; Clements, Kelsey J; Suvorov, Alexander; Krishnan, Sudha; Adams, Hillary L; Petersen, Sandra L

    2016-08-04

    Developmental exposure to arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands abolishes sex differences in a wide range of neural structures and functions. A well-studied example is the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a structure that controls sex-specific luteinizing hormone (LH) release. In the male, testosterone (T) secreted by the developing testes defeminizes LH release mechanisms; conversely, perinatal AhR activation by 2,3,7,8,-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) blocks defeminization. To better understand developmental mechanisms altered by TCDD exposure, we first verified that neonatal TCDD exposure in male rats prevented the loss of AVPV GABA/glutamate neurons that are critical for female-typical LH surge release. We then used whole genome arrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) to compare AVPV transcriptomes of males treated neonatally with TCDD or vehicle. Our bioinformatics analyses showed that TCDD enriched gene sets important for neuron development, synaptic transmission, ion homeostasis, and cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, upstream regulatory analysis suggests that both estrogen receptors (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) regulate genes targeted by TCDD. Of the 23 mRNAs found to be changed by TCDD at least 2-fold (pdefeminization of LH release patterns. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic restraint stress causes anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, downregulates glucocorticoid receptor expression, and attenuates glutamate release induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Richards, Misty C; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    Stress and the resulting increase in glucocorticoid levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. We investigated the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS: 6 hours × 28 days) on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats and on the possible changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent neural function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We observed significant reductions in body weight gain, food intake and sucrose preference from 1 week after the onset of CRS. In the 5th week of CRS, we conducted open-field (OFT), elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced swim tests (FST). We observed a decrease in the number of entries into open arms during the EPM (anxiety-like behavior) and increased immobility during the FST (depression-like behavior). When the PFC was removed after CRS and subject to western blot analysis, the GR expression reduced compared with control, while the levels of BDNF and its receptors remained unchanged. Basal glutamate concentrations in PFC acute slice which were measured by high performance liquid chromatography were not influenced by CRS. However, BDNF-induced glutamate release was attenuated after CRS. These results suggest that reduced GR expression and altered BDNF function may be involved in chronic stress-induced anxiety--and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Sulkowski

    Full Text Available The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs, the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1 and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST. Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs, including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  6. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rossana C.N., E-mail: rossana.melo@ufjf.edu.br [Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, ICB, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Rua José Lourenço Kelmer, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Weller, Peter F. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  7. Increased expression of cystine/glutamate antiporter in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villoslada Pablo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendrocyte and tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS. Intriguingly, glutamate level in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients is elevated, a feature which may be related to the pathophysiology of this disease. In addition to glutamate transporters, levels of extracellular glutamate are controlled by cystine/glutamate antiporter xc-, an exchanger that provides intracellular cystine for production of glutathione, the major cellular antioxidant. The objective of this study was to analyze the role of the system xc- in glutamate homeostasis alterations in MS pathology. Methods Primary cultures of human monocytes and the cell line U-937 were used to investigate the mechanism of glutamate release. Expression of cystine glutamate exchanger (xCT was quantified by quantitative PCR, Western blot, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in monocytes in vitro, in animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS, and in samples of MS patients. Results and discussion We show here that human activated monocytes release glutamate through cystine/glutamate antiporter xc- and that the expression of the catalytic subunit xCT is upregulated as a consequence of monocyte activation. In addition, xCT expression is also increased in EAE and in the disease proper. In the later, high expression of xCT occurs both in the central nervous system (CNS and in peripheral blood cells. In particular, cells from monocyte-macrophage-microglia lineage have higher xCT expression in MS and in EAE, indicating that immune activation upregulates xCT levels, which may result in higher glutamate release and contribution to excitotoxic damage to oligodendrocytes. Conclusions Together, these results reveal that increased expression of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc- in MS provides a link between inflammation and excitotoxicity in demyelinating diseases.

  8. LONG-TERM HOMEOSTASIS OF EXTRACELLULAR GLUTAMATE IN THE RAT CEREBRAL CORTEX ACROSS SLEEP AND WAKING STATES

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Michael B; Douglas, Christopher L.; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal firing patterns, neuromodulators, and cerebral metabolism change across sleep waking states, and the synaptic release of glutamate is critically involved in these processes. Extrasynaptic glutamate can also affect neural function and may be neurotoxic, but whether and how extracellular glutamate is regulated across sleep-waking states is unclear. To assess the effect of behavioral state on extracellular glutamate at high temporal resolution, we recorded glutamate concentration in pre...

  9. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  10. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp.

  11. Vesicular stomatitis forecasting based on Google Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhou, GuangYa; Chen, Qin

    2018-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock. The main feature of VS is irregular blisters that occur on the lips, tongue, oral mucosa, hoof crown and nipple. Humans can also be infected with vesicular stomatitis and develop meningitis. This study analyses 2014 American VS outbreaks in order to accurately predict vesicular stomatitis outbreak trends. Methods American VS outbreaks data were collected from OIE. The data for VS keywords were obtained by inputting 24 disease-related keywords into Google Trends. After calculating the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, it was found that there was a relationship between outbreaks and keywords derived from Google Trends. Finally, the predicted model was constructed based on qualitative classification and quantitative regression. Results For the regression model, the Pearson correlation coefficients between the predicted outbreaks and actual outbreaks are 0.953 and 0.948, respectively. For the qualitative classification model, we constructed five classification predictive models and chose the best classification predictive model as the result. The results showed, SN (sensitivity), SP (specificity) and ACC (prediction accuracy) values of the best classification predictive model are 78.52%,72.5% and 77.14%, respectively. Conclusion This study applied Google search data to construct a qualitative classification model and a quantitative regression model. The results show that the method is effective and that these two models obtain more accurate forecast. PMID:29385198

  12. VGLUTs and Glutamate Synthesis—Focus on DRG Neurons and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Malet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter in the nervous system, including in sensory neurons that convey pain sensation from the periphery to the brain. It is now well established that a family of membrane proteins, termed vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs, serve a critical function in these neurons: they incorporate glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUTs have a central role both under normal neurotransmission and pathological conditions, such as neuropathic or inflammatory pain. In the present short review, we will address VGLUTs in the context of primary afferent neurons. We will focus on the role of VGLUTs in pain triggered by noxious stimuli, peripheral nerve injury, and tissue inflammation, as mostly explored in transgenic mice. The possible interplay between glutamate biosynthesis and VGLUT-dependent packaging in synaptic vesicles, and its potential impact in various pain states will be presented.

  13. Carbon fiber ultramicrodic electrode electrodeposited with over-oxidized polypyrrole for amperometric detection of vesicular exocytosis from pheochromocytoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Shengwei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Juntao; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-06

    Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells' communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 µm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE), which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA) solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 µA·µM(-1)·µm(-2) using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax) and the released charge (Q) of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ~562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research.

  14. Carbon Fiber Ultramicrodic Electrode Electrodeposited with Over-Oxidized Polypyrrole for Amperometric Detection of Vesicular Exocytosis from Pheochromocytoma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells’ communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 µm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE, which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 µA·µM−1·µm−2 using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax and the released charge (Q of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ~562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research.

  15. Carbon Fiber Ultramicrodic Electrode Electrodeposited with Over-Oxidized Polypyrrole for Amperometric Detection of Vesicular Exocytosis from Pheochromocytoma Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Shengwei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Juntao; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells' communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 μm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE), which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA) solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 μA·μM−1·μm−2 using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax) and the released charge (Q) of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ∼562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research. PMID:25569759

  16. Rat odontoblasts may use glutamate to signal dentin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yi Sul; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Won, Jong Hwa; Vang, Hue; Oh, Seog Bae; Ro, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-10-29

    Accumulating evidence indicates that odontoblasts act as sensor cells, capable of triggering action potentials in adjacent pulpal nociceptive axons, suggesting a paracrine signaling via a currently unknown mediator. Since glutamate can mediate signaling by non-neuronal cells, and peripheral axons may express glutamate receptors (GluR), we hypothesized that the expression of high levels of glutamate, and of sensory receptors in odontoblasts, combined with an expression of GluR in adjacent pulpal axons, is the morphological basis for odontoblastic sensory signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the expression of glutamate, the thermo- and mechanosensitive ion channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TWIK-1-related K+channel (TREK-1), and the glutamate receptor mGluR5, in a normal rat dental pulp, and following dentin injury. We also examined the glutamate release from odontoblast in cell culture. Odontoblasts were enriched with glutamate, at the level as high as in adjacent pulpal axons, and showed immunoreactivity for TRPV1, TRPA1, and TREK-1. Pulpal sensory axons adjacent to odontoblasts expressed mGluR5. Both the levels of glutamate in odontoblasts, and the expression of mGluR5 in nearby axons, were upregulated following dentin injury. The extracellular glutamate concentration was increased significantly after treating of odontoblast cell line with calcium permeable ionophore, suggesting glutamate release from odontoblasts. These findings lend morphological support to the hypothesis that odontoblasts contain glutamate as a potential neuroactive substance that may activate adjacent pulpal axons, and thus contribute to dental pain and hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. How Glutamate Is Managed by the Blood–Brain Barrier

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    Richard A. Hawkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A facilitative transport system exists on the blood–brain barrier (BBB that has been tacitly assumed to be a path for glutamate entry to the brain. However, glutamate is a non-essential amino acid whose brain content is much greater than plasma, and studies in vivo show that glutamate does not enter the brain in appreciable quantities except in those small regions with fenestrated capillaries (circumventricular organs. The situation became understandable when luminal (blood facing and abluminal (brain facing membranes were isolated and studied separately. Facilitative transport of glutamate and glutamine exists only on the luminal membranes, whereas Na+-dependent transport systems for glutamate, glutamine, and some other amino acids are present only on the abluminal membrane. The Na+-dependent cotransporters of the abluminal membrane are in a position to actively transport amino acids from the extracellular fluid (ECF into the endothelial cells of the BBB. These powerful secondary active transporters couple with the energy of the Na+-gradient to move glutamate and glutamine into endothelial cells, whereupon glutamate can exit to the blood on the luminal facilitative glutamate transporter. Glutamine may also exit the brain via separate facilitative transport system that exists on the luminal membranes, or glutamine can be hydrolyzed to glutamate within the BBB, thereby releasing ammonia that is freely diffusible. The γ-glutamyl cycle participates indirectly by producing oxoproline (pyroglutamate, which stimulates almost all secondary active transporters yet discovered in the abluminal membranes of the BBB.

  18. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  19. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Zhe Wu [Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  1. Effect of diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) on glutamate level in hippocampus preparation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, T; Ishihara, T; Baba, A; Iwata, H

    1990-04-01

    To assess the functional interaction between Zn2+ and glutamate in hippocampus, diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone), a Zn2+ chelator, was used to alter the glutamate level in hippocampus in vitro and in vivo. Dithizone at the concentration of 1 microM stimulated high K(+)- and veratrine-induced release of [3H]glutamate both in the presence and absence of Ca2+ from rat hippocampal slices preloaded with [3H]glutamate without affecting the release of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid and [3H]acetylcholine. Metal chelators other than dithizone did not evoke the [3H]glutamate release at the concentration of 10 microM. Two weeks after the intrahippocampal injection of 20 micrograms of dithizone, both Zn2+ and glutamate levels of the hippocampus significantly decreased with no change in the levels of other metals, amino acids, monoamines and acetylcholine.

  2. History of glutamate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Chiaki

    2009-09-01

    In 1907 Kikunae Ikeda, a professor at the Tokyo Imperial University, began his research to identify the umami component in kelp. Within a year, he had succeeded in isolating, purifying, and identifying the principal component of umami and quickly obtained a production patent. In 1909 Saburosuke Suzuki, an entrepreneur, and Ikeda began the industrial production of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG). The first industrial production process was an extraction method in which vegetable proteins were treated with hydrochloric acid to disrupt peptide bonds. l-Glutamic acid hydrochloride was then isolated from this material and purified as MSG. Initial production of MSG was limited because of the technical drawbacks of this method. Better methods did not emerge until the 1950s. One of these was direct chemical synthesis, which was used from 1962 to 1973. In this procedure, acrylonitrile was the starting material, and optical resolution of dl-glutamic acid was achieved by preferential crystallization. In 1956 a direct fermentation method to produce glutamate was introduced. The advantages of the fermentation method (eg, reduction of production costs and environmental load) were large enough to cause all glutamate manufacturers to shift to fermentation. Today, total world production of MSG by fermentation is estimated to be 2 million tons/y (2 billion kg/y). However, future production growth will likely require further innovation.

  3. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  4. Quantitative Chemical Measurements of Vesicular Transmitters with Electrochemical Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchan; Dunevall, Johan; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-10-18

    Electrochemical cytometry adds a new dimension to our ability to study the chemistry and chemical storage of transmitter molecules stored in nanometer vesicles. The approach involves the adsorption and subsequent rupture of vesicles on an electrode surface during which the electroactive contents are quantitatively oxidized (or reduced). The measured current allows us to count the number of molecules in the vesicles using Faraday's law and to correlate this to the amount of molecules released when single exocytosis events take place at communicating cells. The original format for this method involved a capillary electrophoresis separation step to singly address each vesicle, but we have more recently discovered that cellular vesicles tend to adsorb to carbon electrodes and spontaneously as well as stochastically rupture to give mostly single vesicle events. This approach, called impact electrochemical cytometry, even though the impact is perhaps not the important part of this process, has been studied and the vesicle rupture appears to be at the interface between the vesicle and the electrode and is probably driven by electroporation. The pore size and rate of content electrolysis are a function of the pore diameter and the presence of a protein core in the vesicles. In model liposomes with no protein, events appear extremely rapidly as the soft nanoparticles impact the electrode and the contents are oxidized. It appears that the proteins decorating the surface of the vesicle are important in maintaining a gap from the electrode and when this gap is closed electroporation takes place. Models of the event response times suggest the pores formed are small enough so we can carry out these measurements at nanotip electrodes and we have used this to quantify the vesicle content in living cells in a mode we call intracellular impact electrochemical cytometry. The development of electrochemical cytometry allows comparison between vesicle content and vesicular release and

  5. Glutamate may be an efferent transmitter that elicits inhibition in mouse taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijen A Huang

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that l-glutamate may be an efferent transmitter released from axons innervating taste buds. In this report, we determined the types of ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors present on taste cells and that underlie this postulated efferent transmission. We also studied what effect glutamate exerts on taste bud function. We isolated mouse taste buds and taste cells, conducted functional imaging using Fura 2, and used cellular biosensors to monitor taste-evoked transmitter release. The findings show that a large fraction of Presynaptic (Type III taste bud cells (∼50% respond to 100 µM glutamate, NMDA, or kainic acid (KA with an increase in intracellular Ca(2+. In contrast, Receptor (Type II taste cells rarely (4% responded to 100 µM glutamate. At this concentration and with these compounds, these agonists activate glutamatergic synaptic receptors, not glutamate taste (umami receptors. Moreover, applying glutamate, NMDA, or KA caused taste buds to secrete 5-HT, a Presynaptic taste cell transmitter, but not ATP, a Receptor cell transmitter. Indeed, glutamate-evoked 5-HT release inhibited taste-evoked ATP secretion. The findings are consistent with a role for glutamate in taste buds as an inhibitory efferent transmitter that acts via ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors.

  6. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

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    Chao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS. Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca2+ release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca2+ release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca2+ overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca2+ release and ER stress.

  7. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  8. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  9. Effects of Bee Venom on Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Neuronal and Glial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Min; Yang, Eun Jin; Choi, Sun-Mi; Kim, Seon Hwy; Baek, Myung Gi; Jiang, Jing Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bee venom (BV), which is extracted from honeybees, is used in traditional Korean medical therapy. Several groups have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of BV in osteoarthritis both in vivo and in vitro. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Changes in glutamate release and uptake due to alterations in the activity of glutamate transporters have been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzh...

  10. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    -500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP...... of extracellular glutamate independently of the GDH expression level. Moreover, increased intracellular glutamate content was observed in the GDH-deficient cells after a 2-hr incubation in the presence of 100 µM glutamate. It is significant that GDH-deficient cells exhibited an increased utilization of glucose...

  11. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Bannai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses.

  12. Fabrication of Implantable, Enzyme-Immobilized Glutamate Sensors for the Monitoring of Glutamate Concentration Changes in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Tina T.-C. Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate sensors based on the immobilization of glutamate oxidase (GlutOx were prepared by adsorption on electrodeposited chitosan (Method 1 and by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (Method 2 on micromachined platinum microelectrodes. It was observed that glutamate sensors prepared by Method 1 have faster response time (<2 s and lower detection limit (2.5 ± 1.1 μM compared to that prepared by Method 2 (response time: <5 sec and detection limit: 6.5 ± 1.7 μM; glutamate sensors prepared by Method 2 have a larger linear detection range (20–352 μM and higher sensitivity (86.8 ± 8.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 12 compared to those prepared by Method 1 (linear detection range: 20–217 μM and sensitivity: 34.9 ± 4.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 8. The applicability of the glutamate sensors in vivo was also demonstrated. The glutamate sensors were implanted into the rat brain to monitor the stress-induced extracellular glutamate release in the hypothalamus of the awake, freely moving rat.

  13. Amphetamine elicits opposing actions on readily releasable and reserve pools for dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan P Covey

    Full Text Available Amphetamine, a highly addictive drug with therapeutic efficacy, exerts paradoxical effects on the fundamental communication modes employed by dopamine neurons in modulating behavior. While amphetamine elevates tonic dopamine signaling by depleting vesicular stores and driving non-exocytotic release through reverse transport, this psychostimulant also activates phasic dopamine signaling by up-regulating vesicular dopamine release. We hypothesized that these seemingly incongruent effects arise from amphetamine depleting the reserve pool and enhancing the readily releasable pool. This novel hypothesis was tested using in vivo voltammetry and stimulus trains of varying duration to access different vesicular stores. We show that amphetamine actions are stimulus dependent in the dorsal striatum. Specifically, amphetamine up-regulated vesicular dopamine release elicited by a short-duration train, which interrogates the readily releasable pool, but depleted release elicited by a long-duration train, which interrogates the reserve pool. These opposing actions of vesicular dopamine release were associated with concurrent increases in tonic and phasic dopamine responses. A link between vesicular depletion and tonic signaling was supported by results obtained for amphetamine in the ventral striatum and cocaine in both striatal sub-regions, which demonstrated augmented vesicular release and phasic signals only. We submit that amphetamine differentially targeting dopamine stores reconciles the paradoxical activation of tonic and phasic dopamine signaling. Overall, these results further highlight the unique and region-distinct cellular mechanisms of amphetamine and may have important implications for its addictive and therapeutic properties.

  14. Amphetamine Elicits Opposing Actions on Readily Releasable and Reserve Pools for Dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Dan P.; Juliano, Steven A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine, a highly addictive drug with therapeutic efficacy, exerts paradoxical effects on the fundamental communication modes employed by dopamine neurons in modulating behavior. While amphetamine elevates tonic dopamine signaling by depleting vesicular stores and driving non-exocytotic release through reverse transport, this psychostimulant also activates phasic dopamine signaling by up-regulating vesicular dopamine release. We hypothesized that these seemingly incongruent effects arise from amphetamine depleting the reserve pool and enhancing the readily releasable pool. This novel hypothesis was tested using in vivo voltammetry and stimulus trains of varying duration to access different vesicular stores. We show that amphetamine actions are stimulus dependent in the dorsal striatum. Specifically, amphetamine up-regulated vesicular dopamine release elicited by a short-duration train, which interrogates the readily releasable pool, but depleted release elicited by a long-duration train, which interrogates the reserve pool. These opposing actions of vesicular dopamine release were associated with concurrent increases in tonic and phasic dopamine responses. A link between vesicular depletion and tonic signaling was supported by results obtained for amphetamine in the ventral striatum and cocaine in both striatal sub-regions, which demonstrated augmented vesicular release and phasic signals only. We submit that amphetamine differentially targeting dopamine stores reconciles the paradoxical activation of tonic and phasic dopamine signaling. Overall, these results further highlight the unique and region-distinct cellular mechanisms of amphetamine and may have important implications for its addictive and therapeutic properties. PMID:23671560

  15. Extracellular striatal dopamine and glutamate after decortication and kainate receptor stimulation, as measured by microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, I; Sarre, S; Vanhaesendonck, C; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    1996-06-01

    Disruption of corticostriatal glutamate input in the striatum decreased significantly extracellular striatal glutamate and dopamine levels. Local administration of 300 microM concentration of excitatory receptor agonist kainic acid increased significantly extracellular striatal dopamine in intact freely moving rats. These findings support the hypothesis that glutamate exerts a tonic facilitatory effect on striatal dopamine release. The effect of kainic acid on extracellular striatal glutamate concentration in intact rats was a biphasic increase. The first glutamate increase can be explained by stimulation of presynaptic kainate receptors present on corticostriatal glutamatergic nerve terminals; the second increase is probably the result of a continuous interaction of the different striatal neurotransmitters after disturbance of their balance. Release of dopamine and glutamate was modulated differently in the intact striatum and in the striatum deprived of corticostriatal input. Dopamine release in the denervated striatum after kainate receptor stimulation was significantly lower than in intact striatum, confirming the so-called cooperativity between glutamate and kainic acid. Loss of presynaptic kainate receptors on the glutamatergic nerve terminals after decortication resulted in a loss of effect of kainic acid on glutamate release in denervated striatum. Aspartate showed no significant changes in this study.

  16. Tratamiento actual de la litiasis vesicular Current treatment of vesicular lithiasis

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    Oscar García Rodríguez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento quirúrgico de la litiasis vesicular ha cambiado en los últimos años. La incorporación de las nuevas conductas en la práctica médica diaria no siempre es inmediata. Se argumentan las razones relativas a cuándo operar a un paciente con cálculos en la vesícula biliar, y se documenta cómo este procedimiento se reserva fundamentalmente para los pacientes sintomáticos, considerando el dolor como el síntoma por excelencia. También se expone cómo se ha enfrentado este cambio.Surgical treatment of vesicular lithiasis has changed in past years. The addition of the new techniques in daily medical practice not always is immediate. Reasons relative to when to operate a patient presenting with gall bladder calculi are argued and documenting how this procedure is mainly reserved for symptomatic patients where pain is considered as a symptom par excellence . Also, it is exposed how this change has been faced.

  17. The role of malate in the synthesis of glutamate in Pisum arvense roots

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    Genowefa Kubik-Dorosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo and in vitro activities of NADH-dependent glutamate synthase in excised Pisum arvense roots increased several-fold under the influence of malate while pyruvate oxaloacctate. citrate and succinate inhibited this entyme. The plastids isolated from Pisum arvense root,. ahen incubated with glutamine and α-ketoglutarate, released glutamate into the medium Malate clearly stimulated this process. Albizziin (25 mM completely reduced the presence of glutamate in the incubation mixture. These results indicate that reduced pyridine nucleotides arising in P. arvense root plastids during oxidation of malic acid may constitute the indispensable source of electrons for glutamic acid synthesis.

  18. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfman, W.B.; Perrault, J. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  19. Inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, J.J.; Wagner, R.R.

    1981-04-01

    DNA synthesis in mouse myeloma (MPC-11) cells and L cells was rapidly and progressively inhibited by infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). No significant difference in cellular DNA synthesis inhibition was noted between synchronized and unsynchronized cells, nor did synchronized cells vary in their susceptibility to VSV infection after release from successive thymidine and hydroxyurea blocks. Cellular RNA synthesis was inhibited to about the same extent as DNA synthesis, but cellular protein synthesis was less affected by VSV at the same multiplicity of infection. The effect of VSV on cellular DNA synthesis could not be attributed to degradation of existing DNA or to decreased uptake of deoxynucleoside triphosphates, nor were DNA polymerase and thymidine kinase activities significantly different in VSV-infected and uninfected cell extracts. Analysis by alkaline sucrose gradients of DNA in pulse-labeled uninfected and VSV-infected cells indicated that VSV infection did not appear to influence DNA chain elongation. Cellular DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited by infection with the VSV polymerase mutant tsG114(I) at the restrictive temperature or by infection with defective-interfering VSV DI-011 (5' end of the genome), but DI-HR-LT (3' end of genome) exhibited initially rapid but not prolonged inhibition of MPC-11 cell DNA synthesis. DNA synthesis inhibitory activity of wild-type VSV was only slowly and partially inactivated by very large doses of UV irradiation. These data suggest that, as in the effect of VSV on cellular RNA synthesis inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by VSV requires transcription of a small segment of the viral genome.

  20. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA.......g., IC(50) = 300 microM for (2R,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5d)]. The two unsaturated analogs (S)- (7a) and (R)-(E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7b) turned out to be a weak AMPA receptor agonist and a weak mixed NMDA/AMPA receptor antagonist, respectively....

  1. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  2. Exogenous glutamate induces short and long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Pessia, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-08

    In rat brain stem slices, high concentrations of exogenous glutamate induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of the field potentials evoked in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. At low concentrations, glutamate can also induce short-term potentiation (STP), indicating that LTP and STP are separate events depending on the level of glutamatergic synapse activation. LTP and STP are prevented by blocking NMDA receptors and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Conversely, blocking platelet-activating factor (PAF) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors only prevents the full development of LTP. Moreover, in the presence of blocking agents, glutamate causes transient inhibition, suggesting that when potentiation is impeded, exogenous glutamate can activate presynaptic mechanisms that reduce glutamate release.

  3. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  4. Sodium-stimulated glutamate transport in osmotically shocked cells and membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, K M; Frank, L

    1974-03-01

    Three phenotypically distinct strains of Escherichia coli B were studied: one in which the transport of glutamate was strongly stimulated by sodium, one in which the transport was relatively independent of sodium, and one which did not transport glutamate. Membrane vesicle preparations from the three strains followed the behavior of whole cells with respect to sodium-stimulated transport. Although glutamate-binding material could be released from cells by osmotic shock, its affinity for glutamate was not significantly influenced by sodium. Furthermore, the shocked cells retained sodium-stimulated transport. The accumulated results suggest that the sodium-activated glutamate transport system resides in the cytoplasmic membrane and that releasable binding protein(s) is not intimately involved in its function.

  5. Tratamiento actual de la litiasis vesicular Current treatment of vesicular lithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar García Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    El tratamiento quirúrgico de la litiasis vesicular ha cambiado en los últimos años. La incorporación de las nuevas conductas en la práctica médica diaria no siempre es inmediata. Se argumentan las razones relativas a cuándo operar a un paciente con cálculos en la vesícula biliar, y se documenta cómo este procedimiento se reserva fundamentalmente para los pacientes sintomáticos, considerando el dolor como el síntoma por excelencia. También se expone cómo se ha enfrentado este cambio.Surgical t...

  6. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  7. Transcellular communication at the immunological synapse: a vesicular traffic-mediated mutual exchange [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Finetti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell’s ability to communicate with the extracellular environment, with other cells, and with itself is a crucial feature of eukaryotic organisms. In the immune system, T lymphocytes assemble a specialized structure upon contact with antigen-presenting cells bearing a peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand, known as the immunological synapse (IS. The IS has been extensively characterized as a signaling platform essential for T-cell activation. Moreover, emerging evidence identifies the IS as a device for vesicular traffic-mediated cell-to-cell communication as well as an active release site of soluble molecules. Here, we will review recent advances in the role of vesicular trafficking in IS assembly and focused secretion of microvesicles at the synaptic area in naïve T cells and discuss the role of the IS in transcellular communication.

  8. Substrate and Cation Binding Mechanism of Glutamate Transporter Homologs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate transporters and their homologs are membrane proteins that transport glutamate and aspartate together with sodium ions and/or protons. Human glutamate transporters remove the neurotransmitter glutamate after signal transmission. Therefore, glutamate transporters play a great role in

  9. Stochastic Model of Maturation and Vesicular Exchange in Cellular Organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical organization of membrane-bound organelles along intracellular transport pathways relies on vesicular exchange between organelles and on biochemical maturation of the organelle content by specific enzymes. The relative importance of each mechanism in controlling organelle dynamics remains controversial, in particular for transport through the Golgi apparatus. Using a stochastic model, we show that full maturation of membrane-bound compartments can be seen as the stochastic escape from a steady-state in which export is dominated by vesicular exchange. We show that full maturation can contribute a significant fraction of the total out-flux for small organelles such as endosomes and Golgi cisternae.

  10. Enhancement of absorption and hepatoprotective potential through soya-phosphatidylcholine-andrographolide vesicular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pushpendra Kumar; Khurana, Navneet; Pounikar, Yogesh; Gajbhiye, Asmita; Kharya, Murli Dhar

    2013-06-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a medicinal herb used extensively for various ailments and contains therapeutically active phytoconstituent, andrographolide (AN). Although hepatoprotective activity of AN is established, but their bioavailability is restricted due to its rapid clearance. The aim of this study, therefore, was to formulate AN herbosomes (ANH) through complexation with naturally occurring soya-phosphatidylcholine (SPC), in order to enhance absorption. Prepared andrographolide-soy phosphatidylcholine (AN-SPC) complex prepared was subjected for characterisation of complex and formation of vesicular system known as ANH using rotary evaporation techniques. This complex was subjected to in vitro study using everted small intestine sac technique which showed significantly increased absorption of AN from the ANH as compared to the plain AN. The hepatoprotective potential of ANH and plain AN was evaluated using carbon tetrachloride inducing hepatotoxicity rat model and compared, in which ANH equivalent to 50 mg/kg of plain AN significantly restore serum glutamate oxalacetate transaminase (112.4 ± 9.67 for AN whereas 90.2 ± 4.23 for ANH) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (109.3 ± 7.89 for AN whereas 90.6 ± 4.34 for ANH) level as compared to control group. The ANH showed significantly better absorption than plain AN and this effect of ANH was also comparable to the standard drug (Silymarin). The findings of present study reveal that ANH has better bioavailability as shown by in vitro absorption study and hence improved hepatoprotection as compared to plain AN at equivalent dose.

  11. RuBi-Glutamate: Two-photon and visible-light photoactivation of neurons and dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Fino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe neurobiological applications of RuBi-Glutamate, a novel caged-glutamate compound based on ruthenium photochemistry. RuBi-Glutamate can be excited with visible wavelengths and releases glutamate after one- or two-photon excitation. It has high quantum efficiency and can be used at low concentrations, partly avoiding the blockade of GABAergic transmission present with other caged compounds. Two-photon uncaging of RuBi-glutamate has a high spatial resolution and generates excitatory responses in individual dendritic spines with physiological kinetics. With laser beam multiplexing, RuBi-Glutamate uncaging can also be used to depolarize and fire pyramidal neurons with single-cell resolution. RuBi-Glutamate therefore enables the photo-activation of neuronal dendrites and circuits with visible or two-photon light sources, achieving single spine, or single cell, precision.

  12. Polysaccharide nano-vesicular multidrug carriers for synergistic killing of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, P. S.; Shah, Ruchira; Chaphekar, Sonali; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2014-09-01

    Multi-drug delivery based on polymer nano-scaffolds is an essential protocol to be developed for better administration of anticancer drugs to enhance their therapeutic efficacies against cancer cells. Here, we report dual delivery polysaccharide nano-vesicles that are capable of loading and delivering both water soluble and water insoluble drugs together in a single polymer scaffold. The selective rupture of the nano-vesicular assembly under intracellular enzyme conditions allowed the simultaneous delivery of a hydrophobic drug camptothecin (CPT) and hydrophilic drug doxorubicin (DOX) supporting their synergistic killing of breast and colon cancer cells. The polysaccharide nano-vesicles have allowed us to address a few important questions regarding the need for multiple drug administration in cancer cells including (a) the role of simultaneous drug release, (b) antagonistic versus synergistic effects of drug combinations and (c) how these are affected by the ratio of drugs. Further, evaluation of the role of caveolae in endocytosis of these polymer scaffolds was also made. The vesicular scaffolds were found to preserve and deliver DOX resulting in 50-60% better killing of cancer cells than the free drug. Additionally, dual loaded nano-vesicles when compared to drug cocktails with individual drugs in separate nano-vesicles (at comparable molar ratios) suggest the relative drug concentration following release and mode of delivery to be both important in cancer cell killing. Results from these experiments have revealed newly developed polysaccharide nano-vesicles loaded with DOX and CPT drugs as potential candidates for improved breast cancer cell killing. Thus, these custom-designed polysaccharide nano-vesicles provide a new perspective on multi-anticancer drug delivery systems and their efficacy.Multi-drug delivery based on polymer nano-scaffolds is an essential protocol to be developed for better administration of anticancer drugs to enhance their therapeutic

  13. Astrocytic energy metabolism and glutamate formation--relevance for 13C-NMR spectroscopy and importance of cytosolic/mitochondrial trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Leif

    2011-12-01

    Glutamate plays a double role in (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic determination of glucose metabolism in the brain. Bidirectional exchange between initially unlabeled glutamate and labeled α-ketoglutarate, formed from pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), indicates the rate of energy metabolism in the tricarboxylic acid (V(TCA)) cycle in neurons (V(PDH, n)) and, with additional computation, also in astrocytes (V(PDH, g)), as confirmed using the astrocyte-specific substrate [(13)C]acetate. Formation of new molecules of glutamate during increased glutamatergic activity occurs only in astrocytes by combined pyruvate carboxylase (V(PC)) and astrocytic PDH activity. V(PDH, g) accounts for ~15% of total pyruvate metabolism in the brain cortex, and V(PC) accounts for another ~10%. Since both PDH-generated and PC-generated pyruvates are needed for glutamate synthesis, ~20/25 (80%) of astrocytic pyruvate metabolism proceed via glutamate formation. Net transmitter glutamate [γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)] formation requires transfer of newly synthesized α-ketoglutarate to the astrocytic cytosol, α-ketoglutarate transamination to glutamate, amidation to glutamine, glutamine transfer to neurons, its hydrolysis to glutamate and glutamate release (or GABA formation). Glutamate-glutamine cycling, measured as glutamine synthesis rate (V(cycle)), also transfers previously released glutamate/GABA to neurons after an initial astrocytic accumulation and measures predominantly glutamate signaling. An empirically established ~1/1 ratio between glucose metabolism and V(cycle) may reflect glucose utilization associated with oxidation/reduction processes during glutamate production, which together with associated transamination processes are balanced by subsequent glutamate oxidation after cessation of increased signaling activity. Astrocytic glutamate formation and subsequent oxidative metabolism provide large amounts of adenosine triphosphate used for

  14. Vesicular signalling and immune modulation as hedonic fingerprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christina F; Bak, Steffen; Christensen, Trine

    2012-01-01

    ) differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The majority of the proteins we identified were enzymes involved in different metabolic activities. Additional proteins were functionally classified as vesicular proteins and immune system proteins. Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor...

  15. Formulation and evaluation of a transfersomal vesicular carrier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AF1 was investigated. NIPRD-AF1 is a phytomedicine derived from the leaves of an indigenous plant, for use in the treatment of fungal infections. A transfersomal vesicular carrier system of NIPRD-AF1 was formulated and evaluated for topical ...

  16. Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The symbiotic association between certain plants and microorganisms plays an important role in soil fertilization, and improves their growth and mineral nutrition. The symbiotic association between vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and roots provides a significant contribution to plant nutrition and growth.

  17. The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis | Quilambo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are associated with the majority ot the terrestrial plants. Their function ranges from stress alleviation to bioremediation in soils polluted with heavy metals. However, our knowledge about this symbiosis is still limited. For the semi-arid tropics, where some african countries are located, ...

  18. Influence of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and phosphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was carried out to find out the effect of biofertilizers, vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM), and phosphate solubilising bacteria (PSB) individually and in combination on growth and physiological attributing properties of Marsdenia volubilis plant under nursery conditions. The plant seedlings were ...

  19. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  20. Local activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibits the handling-induced increased release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but not that of dopamine or noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex: comparison with inhibition of ionotropic receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, M. G.; Botterblom, M. H.; van Uum, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    On-line in vivo microdialysis was used to determine the effects of a 16-min handling period on release of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens and of DA and noradrenaline (NA) in the medial prefrontal cortex of awake, freely moving rats. DA and NA were determined in one HPLC run. Handling resulted

  1. [The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A; Malchow, B; Falkai, P; Schmitt, A

    2014-08-01

    For many years, the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia has been the leading theory explaining the aetiology of schizophrenia. However, since the first observation showed that NMDA-receptor antagonists (e. g., PCP) can induce all kinds of schizophrenia symptoms in humans, the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia has been established as an additional explanation model. Apart from the PCP-induced psychoses, many other findings from all areas of modern neuroscience have confirmed and extended the glutamate hypothesis. This review discusses the available evidence for the glutamate hypothesis and puts the different findings into relation. Consecutively, the possibilities for a pharmacological modulation of the glutamate system and recent clinical trials are discussed. To sum up, one could note that the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia is now well-established. The development of glutamatergic antipsychotics is still in the early stages, but there is hope for a new generation of antipsychotics based on the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, recent findings from registration trials could not provide positive findings for the recently developed glutamatergic drugs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Genotoxicity of monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataseven, Nazmiye; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Keskin, Ayten Çelebi; Ünal, Fatma

    2016-05-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the most widely used flavor enhancers throughout the world. The aim of this study is to investigate the genotoxic potential of MSG by using chromosome aberrations (CAs), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN), and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polimerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) in cultured human lymphocytes and alkaline comet assays in isolated human lymphocytes, which were incubated with six concentrations (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 8000 μg/mL) of MSG. The result of this study indicated that MSG significantly and dose dependently increased the frequencies of CAs, SCE and MN in all treatments and times, compared with control. However, the replication (RI) and nuclear division indices (NDI) were not affected. In this paper, in vitro genotoxic effects of the MSG was also investigated on human peripheral lymphocytes by analysing the RAPD-PCR with arbitrary 10-mer primers. The changes occurring in RAPD profiles after MSG treatment include increase or decrease in band intensity and gain or loss of bands. In the comet assay, this additive caused DNA damage at all concentrations in isolated human lymphocytes after 1-h in vitro exposure. Our results demonstrate that MSG is genotoxic to the human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The Dynamic Control of Kiss-And-Run and Vesicular Reuse Probed with Single Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Yulong; Tsien, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Vesicular secretion of neurotransmitter is essential for neuronal communication. Kiss-and-run is a mode of membrane fusion and retrieval without the full collapse of the vesicle into the plasma membrane and de novo regeneration. The significance of kiss-and-run during efficient neurotransmission has remained in doubt. We developed an approach for loading individual synaptic vesicles with single quantum dots. Their size and pH-dependent photoluminescence change allowed us to distinguish kiss-and-run from full-collapse fusion and to track single vesicles through multiple rounds of kiss-and-run and reuse, without perturbing vesicle cycling. Kiss-and-run dominated at the beginning of stimulus trains, reflecting the preference of vesicles with high release probability. Its incidence was increased by rapid firing, a response appropriate to meet the dynamic demands of neurotransmission. PMID:19213879

  4. Exocytosis regulates trafficking of GABA and glycine heterotransporters in spinal cord glutamatergic synapses: a mechanism for the excessive heterotransporter-induced release of glutamate in experimental amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Marco; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Fedele, Ernesto; Rebosio, Claudia; Cattaneo, Luca; Benfenati, Fabio; Usai, Cesare; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2015-02-01

    The impact of synaptic vesicle endo-exocytosis on the trafficking of nerve terminal heterotransporters was studied by monitoring membrane expression and function of the GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) and of type-1/2 glycine (Gly) transporters (GlyT-1/2) at spinal cord glutamatergic synaptic boutons. Experiments were performed by inducing exocytosis in wild-type (WT) mice, in amphiphysin-I knockout (Amph-I KO) mice, which show impaired endocytosis, or in mice expressing high copy number of mutant human SOD1 with a Gly93Ala substitution (SOD1(G93A)), a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing constitutively excessive Glu exocytosis. Exposure of spinal cord synaptosomes from WT mice to a 35mM KCl pulse increased the expression of GAT-1 at glutamatergic synaptosomal membranes and enhanced the GAT-1 heterotransporter-induced [(3)H]d-aspartate ([(3)H]d-Asp) release. Similar results were obtained in the case of GlyT-1/2 heterotransporters. Preventing depolarization-induced exocytosis normalized the excessive GAT-1 and GlyT-1/2 heterotransporter-induced [(3)H]d-Asp release in WT mice. Impaired endocytosis in Amph-I KO mice increased GAT-1 membrane expression and [(3)H]GABA uptake in spinal cord synaptosomes. Also the GAT-1 heterotransporter-evoked release of [(3)H]d-Asp was augmented in Amph-I KO mice. The constitutively excessive Glu exocytosis in SOD1(G93A) mice resulted in augmented GAT-1 expression at glutamatergic synaptosomal membranes and GAT-1 or GlyT-1/2 heterotransporter-mediated [(3)H]d-Asp release. Thus, endo-exocytosis regulates the trafficking of GAT-1 and GlyT-1/2 heterotransporters sited at spinal cord glutamatergic nerve terminals. As a consequence, it can be hypothesized that the excessive GAT-1 and GlyT-1/2 heterotransporter-mediated Glu release, in the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) mice, is due to the heterotransporter over-expression at the nerve terminal membrane, promoted by the excessive Glu exocytosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Induction of VMAT-1 and TPH-1 expression induces vesicular accumulation of serotonin and protects cells and tissue from cooling/rewarming injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Talaei

    Full Text Available DDT₁ MF-2 hamster ductus deferens cells are resistant to hypothermia due to serotonin secretion from secretory vesicles and subsequent cystathionine beta synthase (CBS mediated formation of H₂S. We investigated whether the mechanism promoting resistance to hypothermia may be translationally induced in cells vulnerable to cold storage. Thus, VMAT-1 (vesicular monoamino transferase and TPH-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase were co-transfected in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMAC and kidney tissue to create a serotonin-vesicular phenotype (named VTSMAC and VTkidney, respectively. Effects on hypothermic damage were assessed. VTSMAC showed a vesicular phenotype and an 8-fold increase in serotonin content and 5-fold increase in its release upon cooling. Cooled VTSMAC produced up to 10 fold higher concentrations of H₂S, and were protected from hypothermia, as shown by a 50% reduction of caspase 3/7 activity and 4 times higher survival compared to SMAC. Hypothermic resistance was abolished by the inhibition of CBS activity or blockade of serotonin re-uptake. In VTkidney slices, expression of CBS was 3 fold increased in cold preserved kidney tissue, with two-fold increase in H₂S concentration. While cooling induced substantial damage to empty vector transfected kidney as shown by caspase 3/7 activity and loss of FABP1, VTkidney was fully protected and comparable to non-cooled control. Thus, transfection of VMAT-1 and TPH-1 induced vesicular storage of serotonin which is triggered release upon cooling and has protective effects against hypothermia. The vesicular serotonergic phenotype protects against hypothermic damage through re-uptake of serotonin inducing CBS mediated H₂S production both in cells and kidney slices.

  6. Induction of VMAT-1 and TPH-1 expression induces vesicular accumulation of serotonin and protects cells and tissue from cooling/rewarming injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei, Fatemeh; Schmidt, Martina; Henning, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    DDT₁ MF-2 hamster ductus deferens cells are resistant to hypothermia due to serotonin secretion from secretory vesicles and subsequent cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) mediated formation of H₂S. We investigated whether the mechanism promoting resistance to hypothermia may be translationally induced in cells vulnerable to cold storage. Thus, VMAT-1 (vesicular monoamino transferase) and TPH-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) were co-transfected in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMAC) and kidney tissue to create a serotonin-vesicular phenotype (named VTSMAC and VTkidney, respectively). Effects on hypothermic damage were assessed. VTSMAC showed a vesicular phenotype and an 8-fold increase in serotonin content and 5-fold increase in its release upon cooling. Cooled VTSMAC produced up to 10 fold higher concentrations of H₂S, and were protected from hypothermia, as shown by a 50% reduction of caspase 3/7 activity and 4 times higher survival compared to SMAC. Hypothermic resistance was abolished by the inhibition of CBS activity or blockade of serotonin re-uptake. In VTkidney slices, expression of CBS was 3 fold increased in cold preserved kidney tissue, with two-fold increase in H₂S concentration. While cooling induced substantial damage to empty vector transfected kidney as shown by caspase 3/7 activity and loss of FABP1, VTkidney was fully protected and comparable to non-cooled control. Thus, transfection of VMAT-1 and TPH-1 induced vesicular storage of serotonin which is triggered release upon cooling and has protective effects against hypothermia. The vesicular serotonergic phenotype protects against hypothermic damage through re-uptake of serotonin inducing CBS mediated H₂S production both in cells and kidney slices.

  7. Trojan horse lymphocytes: a vesicular stomatitis virus-specific T-cell clone lyses target cells by carrying virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hom, R C; Soman, G; Finberg, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific CD4+ CD8- murine T-cell clone. This clone proliferates only in response to VSV and lyses infected tumor cells bearing class II major histocompatibility antigens in short-term chromium release assays. In addition, the cell has VSV antigens on its surface and is capable of killing uninfected tumor cells without major histocompatibility antigen restriction in a 2-day assay. This latter cytolytic activity is eliminated by anti-VSV antib...

  8. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Julie Ladeby; Blaabjerg, Morten; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    differentiated an immortalized, forebrain-derived stem cell line in the presence or absence of glutamate and with addition of either the group I mGluR agonist DHPG or the selective antagonists; MPEP (mGluR5) and LY367385 (mGluR1). Characterization of differentiated cells revealed that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 were...... present on the cells. Addition of glutamate to the growth medium significantly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell death, resulting in increased cell numbers. In the presence of glutamate, selective activation of group I mGluRs reduced gliogenesis, whereas selective inhibition of group I m...... is, however, needed to realise their therapeutic potential. Glutamate and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) affect proliferation and survival of rodent NSCs both during embryonic and postnatal development. To investigate the role of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) on human NSCs, we...

  9. Inhibitory mechanism of l-glutamic acid on spawning of the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    l-Glutamic acid was previously identified as an inhibitor of spawning in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera; this study examined how l-glutamic acid works. Oocyte release from ovaries of P. pectinifera occurred after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and follicular envelope breakdown (FEBD) when gonads were incubated ex vivo with either relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) or 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde). l-Glutamic acid blocked this spawning phenotype, causing the mature oocytes to remain within the ovaries. Neither RGP-induced 1-MeAde production in ovarian follicle cells nor 1-MeAde-induced GVBD and FEBD was affected by l-glutamic acid. l-Glutamic acid may act through metabotropic receptors in the ovaries to inhibit spawning, as l-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, an agonist for metabotropic glutamate receptors, also inhibited spawning induced by 1-MeAde. Application of acetylcholine (ACH) to ovaries under inhibitory conditions with l-glutamic acid, however, brought about spawning, possibly by inducing contraction of the ovarian wall to discharge mature oocytes from the ovaries concurrently with GVBD and FEBD. Thus, l-glutamic acid may inhibit ACH secretion from gonadal nerve cells in the ovary. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 246-256, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effects of Cymbopogon citratus and Ferula assa-foetida extracts on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeboon, Ghazaleh S; Tavakoli, Fatemeh; Hassani, Shokoufeh; Khanavi, Mahnaz; Sabzevari, Omid; Ostad, S Nasser

    2013-10-01

    Many of CNS diseases can lead to a great quantity of release of glutamate and the extreme glutamate induces neuronal cell damage and death. Here, we wanted to investigate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and Ferula assa-foetida extracts treatment on glutamate-induced cell damage in a primary culture of rat cerebellar granule neurons. Cerebellums were collected from 7-d rat brains and cerebellar granule neurons were obtained after 8-d culture. CGN cells were treated with C. citratus essential oil and F. assa-foetida extracts at concentration of 100 μg/ml before, after, and during exposure to 30 μM glutamate. The cellular viability was evaluated by 3-(4, 5-dimethytthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) staining. The flow cytometry assay was used to examine cell cycle and apoptosis. MTT assay showed a glutamate-induced reduction in cellular viability while treatment with C. citratus essential oil and F. assa-foetida extracts before, during, and after exposure to glutamate was increased. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that F. assa-foetida extracts treatment significantly (p citratus essential oil treatment compared to glutamate group, significantly (p citratus essential oil and F. assa-foetida extracts display neuroprotective effects in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. These extracts exert antiapoptotic activity in cerebellar granule neurons due to cell cycle arrest in G0G1 phase, which explain the beneficial effects of C. citratus essential oil and F. assa-foetida extracts as therapies for neurologic disorders.

  11. [Vesicular and pronuclear glycoproteins in the pathogenesis of cholesterol lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, M; Smíd, F; Marecek, Z

    1998-01-26

    Several biliary proteins have been known to accelerate fusion of cholesterol rich phospholipid vesicles. Some of them are present in vesicular membrane, localisation of other proteins is unknown. Biliary glycoprotein has not been studied in consequence with pathogenesis of cholesterol lithiasis. Low molecular extravesicular proteins were separated from vesicles by gel filtration on a 1200mm column of Sephacryl S-300 HR. Immunoglobulins IgM, IgA, haptoglobin, biliary glycoprotein I (BGP I) and nonspecific crossreactive antigen were eluted along with vesicles. Albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein were eluted later and must be extravesicular. Fact that BGP I (85 kDa membrane glycoprotein) eluted along with vesicles and not in albumin fraction suggests that it might be bound in vesicular membrane. As a known adhesion molecule it could thus play an important role in pathogenesis of cholesterol cholelithiasis.

  12. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Valery Z Grdzelishvili

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a sa...

  13. Influenza infection modulates vesicular trafficking and induces Golgi complex disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vibha; Panganiban, Antonito T; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Voss, Thomas G

    2016-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IFV) replicates its genome in the nucleus of infected cells and uses the cellular protein transport system for genome trafficking from the nucleus to the plasma membrane. However, many details of the mechanism of this process, and its relationship to subsequent cytoplasmic virus trafficking, have not been elucidated. We examined the effect of nuclear transport inhibitors Leptomycin B (LB), 5,6 dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB), the vesicular transport inhibitor Brefeldin A (BFA), the caspase inhibitor ZWEHD, and microtubule inhibitor Nocodazole (NOC) on virus replication and intracellular trafficking of viral nucleoprotein (NP) from the nucleus to the ER and Golgi. Also, we carried out complementary studies to determine the effect of IFV on intracellular membranes. Inhibition of the CRM1 and TAP-P15 nuclear transport pathways by DRB and LB blocked completely the export of virus. Inhibition of vesicular trafficking by BFA, NOC, and ZWEHD also affected influenza infection. Interestingly, IFV infection induced fragmentation of the Golgi complex resulting in diffuse distribution of large and small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. Live-cell microscopy revealed expansion of Golgi localization signals indicating progressive dispersion of Golgi positive structures, resulting in the disassembly of the Golgi ribbon structure. Other vesicular components (Rab1b, ARF1 and GBF1) were also found to be required for IFV infection. Furthermore, the exact step at which IFV infection disrupts vesicle trafficking was identified as the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. These findings suggest that IFV NP is trafficked from the nucleus via the CRM1 and TAP pathways. IFV modulates vesicular trafficking inducing disruption of the Golgi complex. These studies provide insight on the ways in which IFV affects intracellular trafficking of different host proteins and will facilitate identification of useful pharmaceutical targets to abrogate virus

  14. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Modeling of glutamate-induced dynamical patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurby-Bentzen, Christian Krefeld; Zhabotinsky, A.M.; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2009-01-01

    Based on established physiological mechanisms, the paper presents a detailed computer model, which supports the hypothesis that temporal lobe epilepsy may be caused by failure of glutamate reuptake from the extracellular space. The elevated glutamate concentration causes an increased activation...

  16. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdallah, Chadi G; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H; Rothman, Douglas L; Mason, Graeme F; Sanacora, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Research on novel treatments for major depressive disorder focuses quite deeply on glutamate function, and this research would benefit from a brain-imaging technique that precisely quantified glutamate function...

  17. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plesa, C.; Van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate

  18. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents...

  19. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  20. Readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles measured at single synaptic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Sakaba, Takeshi; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2012-10-30

    To distinguish between different models of vesicular release in brain synapses, it is necessary to know the number of vesicles of transmitter that can be released immediately at individual synapses by a high-calcium stimulus, the readily releasable pool (RRP). We used direct stimulation by calcium uncaging at identified, single-site inhibitory synapses to investigate the statistics of vesicular release and the size of the RRP. Vesicular release, detected as quantal responses in the postsynaptic neuron, showed an unexpected stochastic variation in the number of quanta from stimulus to stimulus at high intracellular calcium, with a mean of 1.9 per stimulus and a maximum of three or four. The results provide direct measurement of the RRP at single synaptic sites. They are consistent with models in which release proceeds from a small number of vesicle docking sites with an average occupancy around 0.7.

  1. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations, restrictions, or...

  2. Evidence of activation of the renal glutamate dehydrogenase pathway in intact acidotic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, J V; Risquez, A; McCarthy, M; Preuss, H G

    1981-04-01

    To determine if activity of the renal glutamate dehydrogenase (GD) pathway changes during chronic acidosis in intact dogs, we assessed the deamination of glutamate formed within renal cells during glutamine and alanine infusions. Infusing glutamine into chronically acidotic, normal and acutely alkalotic dogs enhanced renal ammonia production; more was formed as glutamine loading increased. In 4 acidotic dogs, the ratio of ammonia produced to glutamine extracted by the kidneys during exogenous glutamine loading was 1.93 compared with 0.99 for 5 alkalotic dogs and 1.23 for 2 control dogs. Little glutamate and alanine were released into the renal vein in acidotic dogs, whereas over 50% of the exogenous glutamine extracted in acutely alkalotic dogs could be accounted for as glutamate and alanine released into the renal vein. Renal glutamate concentrations were not elevated in acidosis compared with alkalosis despite greater deamidation. When glutamine infusions increased renal ammoniagenesis in acutely alkalotic and control dogs to levels seen in chronically acidotic dogs receiving no exogenous glutamine, approximately 4 to 6 times more glutamate was released from the kidneys. Infusing alanine into 7 chronically acidotic dogs enhanced ammoniagenesis significantly (p less than 0.01), but lesser augmentation was seen in 3 control dogs and no augmentation was seen in 6 acutely alkalotic dogs. The increases were secondary to enhanced glutamate deamination, not secondary to any changes in glutamine extraction and/or transaminase activity. We conclude that the glutamate dehydrogenase pathway is more active in intact acidotic dogs than it is in control and alkalotic dogs.

  3. Motor dysfunction in cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific vesicular GABA transporter knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko eKayakabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system and plays modulatory roles in neural development. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT is an essential molecule for GABAergic neurotransmission due to its role in vesicular GABA release. Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs are GABAergic projection neurons that are indispensable for cerebellar function. To elucidate the significance of VGAT in cerebellar PCs, we generated and characterized PC-specific VGAT knockout (L7-VGAT mice. VGAT mRNAs and proteins were specifically absent in the 40-week-old L7-VGAT PCs. The morphological charactereistics, such as lamination and foliation of the cerebellar cortex, of the L7-VGAT mice were similar to those of the control littermate mice. Moreover, the protein expression levels and patterns of pre- (calbindin and parvalbumin and postsynaptic (GABA-A receptor α1 subunit (GABAARα1 and gephyrin molecules between the L7-VGAT and control mice were similar in the deep cerebellar nuclei that receive PC projections. However, the L7-VGAT mice performed poorly in the accelerating rotarod test and displayed ataxic gait in the footprint test. The L7-VGAT mice also exhibited severer ataxia as VGAT deficits progressed. These results suggest that VGAT in cerebellar Purkinje cells is not essential for the rough maintenance of cerebellar structure, but does play an important role in motor coordination. The L7-VGAT mice are a novel model of ataxia without PC degeneration, and would also be useful for studying the role of Purkinje cells in cognition and emotion.

  4. [Glutamate signaling and neural plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    Proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the precise formation of neural circuits during development. At birth, neurons have redundant synaptic connections not only to their proper targets but also to other neighboring cells. Then, functional neural circuits are formed during early postnatal development by the selective strengthening of necessary synapses and weakening of surplus connections. Synaptic connections are also modified so that projection fields of active afferents expand at the expense of lesser ones. We have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying these activity-dependent prunings and the plasticity of synaptic circuitry using gene-engineered mice defective in the glutamatergic signaling system. NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critically involved in the establishment of the somatosensory pathway ascending from the brainstem trigeminal nucleus to the somatosensory cortex. Without NMDA receptors, whisker-related patterning fails to develop, whereas lesion-induced plasticity occurs normally during the critical period. In contrast, mice lacking the glutamate transporters GLAST or GLT1 are selectively impaired in the lesion-induced critical plasticity of cortical barrels, although whisker-related patterning itself develops normally. In the developing cerebellum, multiple climbing fibers initially innervating given Purkinje cells are eliminated one by one until mono-innervation is achieved. In this pruning process, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels expressed on Purkinje cells are critically involved by the selective strengthening of single main climbing fibers against other lesser afferents. Therefore, the activation of glutamate receptors that leads to an activity-dependent increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays a key role in the pruning of immature synaptic circuits into functional circuits. On the other hand, glutamate transporters appear to control activity-dependent plasticity among afferent fields, presumably through adjusting

  5. Vesicular exanthema of swine virus: isolation and serotyping of field samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, J F; Yedloutschnig, R J; Dardiri, A H; Callis, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Virus isolation was attempted from 262 field samples of vesicular material collected during the outbreaks of vesicular exanthema of swine in the U.S.A. from 1952-54. Using primary swine kidney culture, viral cytopathogenic agents were isolated from 76.3% of the samples. However, an overall recovery rate of 82.1% was obtained after samples negative in tissue culture were inoculated intradermally in susceptible swine. All vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolates were identified as serotype B...

  6. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB, a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment.

  7. Glutamate modulators as novel interventions for mood disorders Moduladores de glutamato como novas intervenções em transtornos do humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay J Mathew

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that critical molecules in neurotrophic signaling cascades are long-term targets for currently available monoaminergic antidepressants. As chronic and severe mood disorders are characterized by impairments in neuronal resilience, pharmacological strategies that subserve a neuroprotective function might alter disorder pathophysiology and modify disease progression. Several promising approaches involve modulation of the glutamate neurotransmitter system, via post-synaptic receptor blockade or potentiation and presynaptic vesicular release inhibition. A focused review of the extant scientific literature was conducted, with a discussion of 3 compounds or classes of drugs currently undergoing clinical investigation: ketamine, riluzole, and AMPA receptor potentiators. Recent investigations in mood disordered patients suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine might demonstrate rapid antidepressant properties. Riluzole has been shown to reverse glutamate-mediated impairments in neuronal plasticity and to stimulate the synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor. Open-label trials in treatment-resistant depression have yielded promising results. Likewise, AMPA receptor potentiators favorably impact neurotrophic factors as well as enhance cognition. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacological approaches that modulate components of the glutamate system offer novel targets for severe, recurrent mood disorders. Controlled studies are necessary.Recentes evidências sugerem que as moléculas críticas nas cascatas de sinalização neurotrófica são alvos de longo prazo dos antidepressivos monoaminérgicos disponíveis atualmente. Na medida em que transtornos graves e crônicos são caracterizados por deficiências na resiliência neuronal, estratégias farmacológicas que sejam úteis para uma função neuroprotetora talvez possam alterar a fisiopatologia e modificar a progressão da doença. Vários enfoques promissores envolvem a

  8. Silicon Wafer-Based Platinum Microelectrode Array Biosensor for Near Real-Time Measurement of Glutamate in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel T. Maidment

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS technologies, we have developed silicon wafer-based platinum microelectrode arrays (MEAs modified with glutamate oxidase (GluOx for electroenzymatic detection of glutamate in vivo. These MEAs were designed to have optimal spatial resolution for in vivo recordings. Selective detection of glutamate in the presence of the electroactive interferents, dopamine and ascorbic acid, was attained by deposition of polypyrrole and Nafion. The sensors responded to glutamate with a limit of detection under 1μM and a sub-1-second response time in solution. In addition to extensive in vitro characterization, the utility of these MEA glutamate biosensors was also established in vivo. In the anesthetized rat, these MEA glutamate biosensors were used for detection of cortically-evoked glutamate release in the ventral striatum. The MEA biosensors also were applied to the detection of stress-induced glutamate release in the dorsal striatum of the freely-moving rat.

  9. Endobronchial tuberculosis presented as multiple endobronchial vesicular lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Idrees

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB is a tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbiological and histopathological evidence, with or without parenchymal involvement. EBTB commonly presents as acute or insidious onset cough, wheeze, low grade fever, and constitutional symptoms. In elderly patients, other differentials like malignancy and pneumonia may lead to misdiagnosis. Hence, bronchoscopy is essential for confirmation of EBTB. Here we report a rare presentation of EBTB in a 65 year old patient who presented with 3 months history of fever and cough and have multiple endobronchial vesicular lesions on bronchoscopy.

  10. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...... in fumigated plots, although both it and P uptake were increased by adding P fertilizer. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. A supplementary survey on infection development at five other field sites showed that peas are extensively colonized by VAM fungi, even in soils where a standard...

  11. Thinking outside the cleft to understand synaptic activity: contribution of the cystine-glutamate antiporter (System xc-) to normal and pathological glutamatergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Richard; Lutgen, Victoria; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2012-07-01

    System x(c)(-) represents an intriguing target in attempts to understand the pathological states of the central nervous system. Also called a cystine-glutamate antiporter, system x(c)(-) typically functions by exchanging one molecule of extracellular cystine for one molecule of intracellular glutamate. Nonvesicular glutamate released during cystine-glutamate exchange activates extrasynaptic glutamate receptors in a manner that shapes synaptic activity and plasticity. These findings contribute to the intriguing possibility that extracellular glutamate is regulated by a complex network of release and reuptake mechanisms, many of which are unique to glutamate and rarely depicted in models of excitatory signaling. Because system x(c)(-) is often expressed on non-neuronal cells, the study of cystine-glutamate exchange may advance the emerging viewpoint that glia are active contributors to information processing in the brain. It is noteworthy that system x(c)(-) is at the interface between excitatory signaling and oxidative stress, because the uptake of cystine that results from cystine-glutamate exchange is critical in maintaining the levels of glutathione, a critical antioxidant. As a result of these dual functions, system x(c)(-) has been implicated in a wide array of central nervous system diseases ranging from addiction to neurodegenerative disorders to schizophrenia. In the current review, we briefly discuss the major cellular components that regulate glutamate homeostasis, including glutamate release by system x(c)(-). This is followed by an in-depth discussion of system x(c)(-) as it relates to glutamate release, cystine transport, and glutathione synthesis. Finally, the role of system x(c)(-) is surveyed across a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Fast inhibition of glutamate-activated currents by caffeine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Vyleta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses.

  13. G-protein coupled receptor-evoked glutamate exocytosis from astrocytes: role of prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cali, Corrado; Lopatar, Jan; Petrelli, Francesco; Pucci, Luca; Bezzi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are highly secretory cells, participating in rapid brain communication by releasing glutamate. Recent evidences have suggested that this process is largely mediated by Ca(2+)-dependent regulated exocytosis of VGLUT-positive vesicles. Here by taking advantage of VGLUT1-pHluorin and TIRF illumination, we characterized mechanisms of glutamate exocytosis evoked by endogenous transmitters (glutamate and ATP), which are known to stimulate Ca(2+) elevations in astrocytes. At first we characterized the VGLUT1-pHluorin expressing vesicles and found that VGLUT1-positive vesicles were a specific population of small synaptic-like microvesicles containing glutamate but which do not express VGLUT2. Endogenous mediators evoked a burst of exocytosis through activation of G-protein coupled receptors. Subsequent glutamate exocytosis was reduced by about 80% upon pharmacological blockade of the prostaglandin-forming enzyme, cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, receptor stimulation was accompanied by extracellular release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Interestingly, administration of exogenous PGE2 produced per se rapid, store-dependent burst exocytosis of glutamatergic vesicles in astrocytes. Finally, when PGE2-neutralizing antibody was added to cell medium, transmitter-evoked exocytosis was again significantly reduced (by about 50%). Overall these data indicate that cyclooxygenase products are responsible for a major component of glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes and that large part of such component is sustained by autocrine/paracrine action of PGE2.

  14. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  15. G-Protein Coupled Receptor-Evoked Glutamate Exocytosis from Astrocytes: Role of Prostaglandins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Cali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are highly secretory cells, participating in rapid brain communication by releasing glutamate. Recent evidences have suggested that this process is largely mediated by Ca2+-dependent regulated exocytosis of VGLUT-positive vesicles. Here by taking advantage of VGLUT1-pHluorin and TIRF illumination, we characterized mechanisms of glutamate exocytosis evoked by endogenous transmitters (glutamate and ATP, which are known to stimulate Ca2+ elevations in astrocytes. At first we characterized the VGLUT1-pHluorin expressing vesicles and found that VGLUT1-positive vesicles were a specific population of small synaptic-like microvesicles containing glutamate but which do not express VGLUT2. Endogenous mediators evoked a burst of exocytosis through activation of G-protein coupled receptors. Subsequent glutamate exocytosis was reduced by about 80% upon pharmacological blockade of the prostaglandin-forming enzyme, cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, receptor stimulation was accompanied by extracellular release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Interestingly, administration of exogenous PGE2 produced per se rapid, store-dependent burst exocytosis of glutamatergic vesicles in astrocytes. Finally, when PGE2-neutralizing antibody was added to cell medium, transmitter-evoked exocytosis was again significantly reduced (by about 50%. Overall these data indicate that cyclooxygenase products are responsible for a major component of glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes and that large part of such component is sustained by autocrine/paracrine action of PGE2.

  16. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  17. Reconstruction of aperture functions during full fusion in vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatore, Christian; Oleinick, Alexander I; Svir, Irina

    2010-01-18

    Individual vesicular exocytosis of adrenaline by dense core vesicles in chromaffin cells is considered here as a paradigm of many situations encountered in biology, nanosciences and drug delivery in which a spherical container releases in the external environment through gradual uncovering of its surface. A procedure for extracting the aperture (opening) function of a biological vesicle fusing with a cell membrane from the released molecular flux of neurotransmitter as monitored by amperometry has been devised based on semi-analytical expressions derived in a former work [C. Amatore, A. I. Oleinick, I. Svir, ChemPhysChem 2009, 10, DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900646]. This precise analysis shows that in the absence of direct information about the radius of the vesicle or about the concentration of the adrenaline cation stored by the vesicle matrix, current spikes do not contain enough information to determine the maximum aperture angle. Yet, a statistical analysis establishes that this maximum aperture angle is most probably less than a few tens of degrees, which suggests that full fusion is a very improbable event.

  18. Sexual attraction enhances glutamate transmission in mammalian anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional human brain imaging studies have indicated the essential role of cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in romantic love and sex. However, the neurobiological basis of how the ACC neurons are activated and engaged in sexual attraction remains unknown. Using transgenic mice in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP is controlled by the promoter of the activity-dependent gene c-fos, we found that ACC pyramidal neurons are activated by sexual attraction. The presynaptic glutamate release to the activated neurons is increased and pharmacological inhibition of neuronal activities in the ACC reduced the interest of male mice to female mice. Our results present direct evidence of the critical role of the ACC in sexual attraction, and long-term increases in glutamate mediated excitatory transmission may contribute to sexual attraction between male and female mice.

  19. Acute treatment with doxorubicin affects glutamate neurotransmission in the mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Theresa Currier; Beitchman, Joshua A; Pomerleau, Francois; Noel, Teresa; Jungsuwadee, Paiboon; Allan Butterfield, D; Clair, Daret K St; Vore, Mary; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2017-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapeutic agent known to cause acute and long-term cognitive impairments in cancer patients. Cognitive function is presumed to be primarily mediated by neuronal circuitry in the frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus, where glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. Mice treated with DOX (25mg/kg i.p.) were subjected to in vivo recordings under urethane anesthesia at 24h post-DOX injection or 5 consecutive days of cognitive testing (Morris Water Maze; MWM). Using novel glutamate-selective microelectrode arrays, amperometric recordings measured parameters of extracellular glutamate clearance and potassium-evoked release of glutamate within the medial FC and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. By 24h post-DOX injection, glutamate uptake was 45% slower in the FC in comparison to saline-treated mice. In the DG, glutamate took 48% longer to clear than saline-treated mice. Glutamate overflow in the FC was similar between treatment groups, however, it was significantly increased in the DG of DOX treated mice. MWM data indicated that a single dose of DOX impaired swim speed without impacting total length traveled. These data indicate that systemic DOX treatment changes glutamate neurotransmission in key nuclei associated with cognitive function within 24h, without a lasting impact on spatial learning and memory. Understanding the functional effects of DOX on glutamate neurotransmission may help us understand and prevent some of the debilitating side effects of chemotherapeutic treatment in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Delineation of glutamate pathways and secretory responses in pancreatic islets with β-cell-specific abrogation of the glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetterli, Laurène; Carobbio, Stefania; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin

    2012-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) modulates insulin secretion, although its function regarding specific secretagogues is unclear. This study investigated the role of GDH using a β-cell-specific GDH knockout mouse model, called βGlud1(-/-). The absence of GDH in islets isolated...... from βGlud1(-/-) mice resulted in abrogation of insulin release evoked by glutamine combined with 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid or l-leucine. Reintroduction of GDH in βGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored the secretory response. Regarding glucose stimulation, insulin secretion in islets...... isolated from βGlud1(-/-) mice exhibited half of the response measured in control islets. The amplifying pathway, tested at stimulatory glucose concentrations in the presence of KCl and diazoxide, was markedly inhibited in βGlud1(-/-) islets. On glucose stimulation, net synthesis of glutamate from α...

  1. Vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs experimentally infected with Senecavirus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Senecavirus A (SVA), a picornavirus, has been infrequently associated with cases of idiopathic vesicular disease (IVD) in pigs in the US and Canada since 1988. In 2014 and 2015 there was surge of IVD cases in Brazil and US, respectively. SVA was identified in serum, vesicular fluid, an...

  2. H-aggregation of azobenzene-substituted amphiphiles in vesicular membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, JM; Engberts, JBFN

    2004-01-01

    Photochemical switching has been studied of double-tailed phosphate amphiphiles containing azobenzene units in both tails in aqueous vesicular dispersions and in mixed vesicular systems with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Since the ease of switching depends on the strength of the

  3. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. III. Macrophage resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.R.; Cain, C.A.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of hamsters to microwave (MW) energy (2.45 GHz, 25 mW/cm2, 1 h) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages (PM) to a viricidal state restricting the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The PM from MW-exposed hamsters were viricidal as early as 1 day after exposure and remained active for 5 days. Immunization of hamsters with vaccinia virus induced viricidal PM by 3 to 4 days and they remained active for 7 days. To test the hypothesis that thermogenic MW exposure results in the release of endotoxin across the intestinal epithelium which subsequently activates PM, hamsters were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their viricidal activity was studied. Lipopolysaccharide in vitro (0.2 microgram) and in vivo (0.5 microgram) activated macrophages to a viricidal state. When administered in vivo, LPS (0.5 microgram) activated macrophages as early as 1 day and the activity remained for 3 days. While MW exposure of PM in vitro failed to induce viricidal activity, exposure of PM to LPS in vitro induced strong viricidal activity. This suggests that the in vivo response of PM to MW is an indirect one, which is consistent with the hypothesis that MW-induced PM viricidal activity may be mediated via LPS. In preliminary experiments, MW exposure resulted in extended survival time for hamsters challenged with a lethal dose of vesicular stomatitis virus, supporting the concept that MW-activated PM may be a useful therapeutic modality.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glutamate formiminotransferase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the FTCD gene cause glutamate formiminotransferase deficiency . The FTCD gene provides instructions for ...

  5. AMPK Activation Affects Glutamate Metabolism in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Caroline Marie; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    acid (TCA) cycle was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis supplemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology. It was found that AMPK activation had profound effects on the pathways involved in glutamate metabolism since the entrance of the glutamate carbon...... affected by a reduction of the flux of glutamate derived carbon through the malic enzyme and pyruvate carboxylase catalyzed reactions. Finally, it was found that in the presence of glutamate as an additional substrate, glucose metabolism monitored by the use of tritiated deoxyglucose was unaffected by AMPK...

  6. Glutamate signalling in healthy and diseased bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Cowan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone relies on multiple extracellular signalling systems to maintain homeostasis of its normal structure and functions. The amino acid glutamate is a fundamental extracellular messenger molecule in many tissues, and is used in bone for both neural and non-neural signalling. This review focuses on the non-neural interactions, and examines the evolutionarily ancient glutamate signalling system in the context of its application to normal bone functioning and discusses recent findings on the role of glutamate signalling as they pertain to maintaining healthy bone structure. The underlying mechanisms of glutamate signalling and the many roles glutamate plays in modulating bone physiology are featured, including those involved in osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and mature cell functions. Moreover, the relevance of glutamate signalling systems in diseases that affect bone, such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, is discussed, and will highlight how the glutamate system may be exploited as a viable therapeutic target. We will identify novel areas of research where knowledge of glutamate communication mechanisms may aid in our understanding of the complex nature of bone homeostasis. By uncovering the contributions of glutamate in maintaining healthy bone, the reader will discover how this complex molecular signalling system may advance our capacity to treat bone pathologies.

  7. Pressor effects of L-glutamate injected into the diagonal band of Broca of unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Rodrigo Fiacadori; de Aguiar Corrêa, Fernando Morgan

    2003-01-10

    The diagonal band of Broca (dbB) is involved in central cardiovascular control. In the present study we compared the effects of microinjections of L-glutamate into the dbB of unanesthetized rats with those observed after the injection of L-glutamate into the same area in urethane-anesthetized rats. The microinjection of L-glutamate (10, 30, 100 or 200 nmol/200 nl) into the dbB of urethane-anesthetized rats caused dose-related short-lasting depressor responses The depressor responses to L-glutamate were accompanied by dose-related heart rate reduction. The cardiovascular response to the injection of L-glutamate (10, 30 or 100 nmol/200 nl) into the dbB of unanesthetized rats was characterized as a long-lasting pressor response without consistent heart rate changes. The pressor response was dose-related and presented an ED(50) of approximately 30 nmol/200 nl. The fact that the chemical stimulation of the dbB with L-glutamate caused only dose-related pressor responses in unanesthetized rats suggests that under normal conditions the dbB is predominantly a pressor area. After the characterization of the pressor response to L-glutamate microinjected into the dbB of unanesthetized rats we studied the mechanisms involved in the mediation of these responses. The pressor response to L-glutamate (30 nmol/200 nl) into the dbB was blocked by intravenous pretreatment with the vasopressin antagonist dTyr(CH(2))(5)(Me)AVP (50 microg/kg), suggesting the involvement of circulating vasopressin in this response. Further evidence of the involvement of the endocrine vasopressin system in the pressor response to L-glutamate injected into the dbB was provided by hypophysectomy since L-glutamate (30 nmol/200 nl) microinjection into the dbB of hypophysectomized rats caused only depressor responses. We presently report that chemical stimulation of the dbB with L-glutamate caused only pressor responses in unanesthetized rats that were mediated by vasopressin release into the systemic

  8. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the

  9. A new role for human dyskerin in vesicular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Nunzia; Vicidomini, Rosario; Angrisani, Alberto; Belli, Valentina; Furia, Maria; Turano, Mimmo

    2017-10-01

    Dyskerin is an essential, conserved, multifunctional protein found in the nucleolus, whose loss of function causes the rare genetic diseases X-linked dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. To further investigate the wide range of dyskerin's biological roles, we set up stable cell lines able to trigger inducible protein knockdown and allow a detailed analysis of the cascade of events occurring within a short time frame. We report that dyskerin depletion quickly induces cytoskeleton remodeling and significant alterations in endocytic Ras-related protein Rab-5A/Rab11 trafficking. These effects arise in different cell lines well before the onset of telomere shortening, which is widely considered the main cause of dyskerin-related diseases. Given that vesicular trafficking affects many homeostatic and differentiative processes, these findings add novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlining the pleiotropic manifestation of the dyskerin loss-of-function phenotype.

  10. Glutamate gated spiking Neuron Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Krisha M; Roy, Soumik

    2014-01-01

    Biological neuron models mainly analyze the behavior of neural networks. Neurons are described in terms of firing rates viz an analog signal. The Izhikevich neuron model is an efficient, powerful model of spiking neuron. This model is a reduction of Hodgkin-Huxley model to a two variable system and is capable of producing rich firing patterns for many biological neurons. In this paper, the Regular Spiking (RS) neuron firing pattern is used to simulate the spiking of Glutamate gated postsynaptic membrane. Simulation is done in MATLAB environment for excitatory action of synapses. Analogous simulation of spiking of excitatory postsynaptic membrane potential is obtained.

  11. Auditory hindbrain atrophy and anomalous calcium binding protein expression after neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Lindsey; Blackburn, Kaitlyn; Kulesza, Randy J

    2017-03-06

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is stored and released by both neurons and astrocytes. Despite the important role of glutamate as a neurotransmitter, elevated extracellular glutamate can result in excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a naturally occurring sodium salt of glutamic acid that is used as a flavor enhancer in many processed foods. Previous studies have shown that MSG administration during the early postnatal period results in neurodegenerative changes in several forebrain regions, characterized by neuronal loss and neuroendocrine abnormalities. Systemic delivery of MSG during the neonatal period and induction of glutamate neurotoxicity in the cochlea have both been shown to result in fewer neurons in the spiral ganglion. We hypothesized that an MSG-induced loss of neurons in the spiral ganglion would have a significant impact on the number of neurons in the cochlear nuclei and superior olivary complex (SOC). Indeed, we found that exposure to MSG from postnatal days 4 through 10 resulted in significantly fewer neurons in the cochlear nuclei and SOC and significant dysmorphology in surviving neurons. Moreover, we found that neonatal MSG exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of both calretinin and calbindin. These results suggest that neonatal exposure to MSG interferes with early development of the auditory brainstem and impacts expression of calcium binding proteins, both of which may lead to diminished auditory function. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A neuroprotective role for microRNA miR-1000 mediated by limiting glutamate excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Pushpa; Augustine, George J; Ammar, Mohamed-Raafet

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has begun to emerge for microRNAs as regulators of synaptic signaling, specifically acting to control postsynaptic responsiveness during synaptic transmission. In this report, we provide evidence that Drosophila melanogaster miR-1000 acts presynaptically to regulate glutamate release at ...

  13. Some Properties of Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daisy Ouya

    1) glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH) and (2) glutamine synthetase (GS)/ glutamate synthase (GOGAT). In the GS/ GOGAT route, ammonia is first incorporated into glutamine by the action of GS and subsequently into glutamic acid by GOGAT.

  14. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  15. Ethosomes as novel vesicular carrier: An overview of the principle, preparation and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sanjoy Kumar; Chakraborty, Soumalya; Roy, Chhandita; Rajabalaya, Rajan; Mohaimin, Amal Widaad; Khanam, Jasmina; Nanda, Arunabha; David, Sheba R

    2018-01-15

    In the study of lipid vesicular carriers in permeation enhancement of drug molecules across skin after the success story of liposomes, ethosomes are a recent addition. There are a number of published reviews but still, there is a lack of reviews representing various aspects in a systematic way with a detailed description of current research works. This review serves to fill this deficiency along with a special emphasize on its preparation methods and application. Information was collected from previously published literatures which were represented after analysis in terms of various aspects such as principles, composition, preparation, mechanism of penetration, modified forms, characterization, marketed preparation and its application. This review is represented in an informative and easily understandable way. Basic principles and background of exploring were covered in the introduction section. Composition section contains the basic components of formulations along with the impact of various parameters on the characterization of the ethosome. A detailed discussion of all the methods along with their own utility is elaborately discussed. Various aspects of characterization of ethosomes are also discussed. Therapeutic and cosmetic applications of ethosomes are also outlined here. In spite of having a potent permeation enhancing and targeted drug release profile ethosome suffers from limited commercialization. Various challenges regarding its commercialization and product development are also discussed in this review with an objective of acting as a directional route for the researchers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Endoplasmosis and exoplasmosis: the evolutionary principles underlying endocytosis, exocytosis, and vesicular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Johannes A

    2016-05-01

    Eukaryotic cells are characterized by a multicompartmental structure with a variety of organelles. Vesicular transport between these compartments requires membrane fusion events. Based on a membrane topology view, we conclude that there are two basic mechanisms of membrane fusion, namely where the membranes first come in contact with the cis-side (the plasmatic phase of the lipid bilayer) or with the trans-side (the extra-plasmatic face). We propose to designate trans-membrane fusion processes as "endoplasmosis" as they lead to uptake of a compartment into the plasmatic phase. Vice versa we suggest the term "exoplasmosis" (as already suggested in a 1964 publication) for cis-membrane fusion events, where the interior of a vesicle is released to an extraplasmatic environment (the extracellular space or the lumen of a compartment). This concept is supported by the fact that all cis- and all trans-membrane fusions, respectively, exhibit noticeable similarities implying that they evolved from two functionally different mechanisms.

  17. Vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase's strong affinity to its template suggests exotic transcription models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototype for negative sense non segmented (NNS RNA viruses which include potent human and animal pathogens such as Rabies, Ebola and measles. The polymerases of NNS RNA viruses only initiate transcription at or near the 3' end of their genome template. We measured the dissociation constant of VSV polymerases from their whole genome template to be 20 pM. Given this low dissociation constant, initiation and sustainability of transcription becomes nontrivial. To explore possible mechanisms, we simulated the first hour of transcription using Monte Carlo methods and show that a one-time initial dissociation of all polymerases during entry is not sufficient to sustain transcription. We further show that efficient transcription requires a sliding mechanism for non-transcribing polymerases and can be realized with different polymerase-polymerase interactions and distinct template topologies. In conclusion, we highlight a model in which collisions between transcribing and sliding non-transcribing polymerases result in release of the non-transcribing polymerases allowing for redistribution of polymerases between separate templates during transcription and suggest specific experiments to further test these mechanisms.

  18. Genetic Inactivation of COPI Coatomer Separately Inhibits Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Entry and Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdeinick-Kerr, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Viruses coopt cellular membrane transport to invade cells, establish intracellular sites of replication, and release progeny virions. Recent genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens revealed that genetically divergent viruses require biosynthetic membrane transport by the COPI coatomer complex for efficient replication. Here we found that disrupting COPI function by RNAi inhibited an early stage of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. To dissect which replication stage(s) was affected by coatomer inactivation, we used visual and biochemical assays to independently measure the efficiency of viral entry and gene expression in hamster (ldlF) cells depleted of the temperature-sensitive ε-COP subunit. We show that ε-COP depletion for 12 h caused a primary block to virus internalization and a secondary defect in viral gene expression. Using brefeldin A (BFA), a chemical inhibitor of COPI function, we demonstrate that short-term (1-h) BFA treatments inhibit VSV gene expression, while only long-term (12-h) treatments block virus entry. We conclude that prolonged coatomer inactivation perturbs cellular endocytic transport and thereby indirectly impairs VSV entry. Our results offer an explanation of why COPI coatomer is frequently identified in screens for cellular factors that support cell invasion by microbial pathogens. PMID:22072764

  19. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebenol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-09-01

    α-Iso-cubebenol is a natural compound isolated from Schisandra chinensis, and is reported to have beneficial bioactivity including anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. Glutamate-induced oxidative neuronal damage has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we investigated the mechanisms of α-iso-cubebenol protection of mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells (HT22 cells) from apoptotic cell death induced by the major excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate. Pretreatment with α-iso-cubebenol markedly attenuated glutamate-induced loss of cell viability and release of lactate dehydrogenase), in a dose-dependent manner. α-Iso-cubebenol significantly reduced glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium accumulation. Strikingly, α-iso-cubebenol inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization, which releases apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria. α-Iso-cubebenol also suppressed glutamate-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases. Furthermore, α-iso-cubebenol induced CREB phosphorylation and Nrf-2 nuclear accumulation and increased the promoter activity of ARE and CREB in HT22 cells. α-Iso-cubebenol also upregulated the expression of phase-II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes such as HO-1 and NQO1. Subsequent studies revealed that the inhibitory effects of α-iso-cubebenol on glutamate-induced apoptosis were abolished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CREB and Nrf-2. These findings suggest that α-iso-cubebenol prevents excitotoxin-induced oxidative damage to neurons by inhibiting apoptotic cell death, and might be a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glutamate synthase: An archaeal horizontal gene transfer?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (GOGAT) which is a key enzyme in ammonia assimilation in bacteria, algae and plants. It catalyzes the reductive transamidation of amido nitrogen from glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form two molecules of glutamate (Temple et al 1998). Glutamate synthases differ according to their molecular weights, subunit compositions, ...

  1. Activities of alkaline phosphatase, glutamate oxaloacetate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alkaline phosphatase, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase activities were assessed in rats highly infected with federe strain of Trypanosoma brucei and treated with honey. Therapeutic effect of honey on parasitaemia was also assessed. Results show an extension in the life span of ...

  2. Synaptic release and extracellular actions of Zn2+ limit propagation of spreading depression and related events in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Isamu; Carlson, Andrew P.; Sheline, Christian T.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a consequence of a slowly propagating wave of neuronal and glial depolarization (spreading depolarization; SD). Massive release of glutamate contributes to SD propagation, and it was recently shown that Zn2+ is also released from synaptic vesicles during SD. The present study examined consequences of extracellular Zn2+ accumulation on the propagation of SD. SD mechanisms were studied first in murine brain slices, using focal KCl applications as stimuli and making electrical and optical recordings in hippocampal area CA1. Elevating extracellular Zn2+ concentrations with exogenous ZnCl2 reduced SD propagation rates. Selective chelation of endogenous Zn2+ (using TPEN or CaEDTA) increased SD propagation rates, and these effects appeared due to chelation of Zn2+ derived from synaptic vesicles. Thus, in tissues where synaptic Zn2+ release was absent [knockout (KO) of vesicular Zn2+ transporter ZnT-3], SD propagation rates were increased, and no additional increase was observed following chelation of endogenous Zn2+ in these tissues. The role of synaptic Zn2+ was then examined on CSD in vivo. ZnT-3 KO animals had higher susceptibility to CSD than wild-type controls as evidenced by significantly higher propagation rates and frequencies. Studies of candidate mechanisms excluded changes in neuronal excitability, presynaptic release, and GABA receptors but left open a possible contribution of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibition. These results suggest the extracellular accumulation of synaptically released Zn2+ can serve as an intrinsic inhibitor to limit SD events. The inhibitory action of extracellular Zn2+ on SD may counteract to some extent the neurotoxic effects of intracellular Zn2+ accumulation in acute brain injury models. PMID:22131381

  3. A glial variant of the vesicular monoamine transporter is required to store histamine in the Drosophila visual system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Romero-Calderón

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other monoamine neurotransmitters, the mechanism by which the brain's histamine content is regulated remains unclear. In mammals, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs are expressed exclusively in neurons and mediate the storage of histamine and other monoamines. We have studied the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster in which histamine is the primary neurotransmitter released from photoreceptor cells. We report here that a novel mRNA splice variant of Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT-B is expressed not in neurons but rather in a small subset of glia in the lamina of the fly's optic lobe. Histamine contents are reduced by mutation of dVMAT, but can be partially restored by specifically expressing DVMAT-B in glia. Our results suggest a novel role for a monoamine transporter in glia that may be relevant to histamine homeostasis in other systems.

  4. Trojan horse lymphocytes: a vesicular stomatitis virus-specific T-cell clone lyses target cells by carrying virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, R C; Soman, G; Finberg, R

    1989-10-01

    We have isolated a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific CD4+ CD8- murine T-cell clone. This clone proliferates only in response to VSV and lyses infected tumor cells bearing class II major histocompatibility antigens in short-term chromium release assays. In addition, the cell has VSV antigens on its surface and is capable of killing uninfected tumor cells without major histocompatibility antigen restriction in a 2-day assay. This latter cytolytic activity is eliminated by anti-VSV antibody, indicating that its lytic activity is provided by the virus. [35S]methionine labeling and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that viral protein translation is initiated after incubation of the clone with a tumor target cell, defining this as the mechanism of its cytolytic activity.

  5. The blood-brain barrier and glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Richard A

    2009-09-01

    Glutamate concentrations in plasma are 50-100 micromol/L; in whole brain, they are 10,000-12,000 micromol/L but only 0.5-2 micromol/L in extracellular fluids (ECFs). The low ECF concentrations, which are essential for optimal brain function, are maintained by neurons, astrocytes, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Cerebral capillary endothelial cells form the BBB that surrounds the entire central nervous system. Tight junctions connect endothelial cells and separate the BBB into luminal and abluminal domains. Molecules entering or leaving the brain thus must pass 2 membranes, and each membrane has distinct properties. Facilitative carriers exist only in luminal membranes, and Na(+)-dependent glutamate cotransporters (excitatory amino acid transporters; EAATs) exist exclusively in abluminal membranes. The EAATs are secondary transporters that couple the Na(+) gradient between the ECF and the endothelial cell to move glutamate against the existing electrochemical gradient. Thus, the EAATs in the abluminal membrane shift glutamate from the ECF to the endothelial cell where glutamate is free to diffuse into blood on facilitative carriers. This organization does not allow net glutamate entry to the brain; rather, it promotes the removal of glutamate and the maintenance of low glutamate concentrations in the ECF. This explains studies that show that the BBB is impermeable to glutamate, even at high concentrations, except in a few small areas that have fenestrated capillaries (circumventricular organs). Recently, the question of whether the BBB becomes permeable in diabetes has arisen. This issue was tested in rats with diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance or with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Neither condition produced any detectable effect on BBB glutamate transport.

  6. Functional and structural remodeling of glutamate synapses in prefrontal and frontal cortex induced by behavioral stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMusazzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has shown that the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, is associated with abnormal function and regulation of the glutamatergic system. Consistently, preclinical studies on stress-based animal models of pathology showed that glucocorticoids and stress exert crucial effects on neuronal excitability and function, especially in cortical and limbic areas. In prefrontal and frontal cortex, acute stress was shown to induce enhancement of glutamate release/transmission dependent on activation of corticosterone receptors. Although the mechanisms whereby stress affects glutamate transmission have not yet been fully understood, it was shown that synaptic, non-genomic action of corticosterone is required to increase the readily releasable pool of glutamate vesicles but is not sufficient to enhance transmission in prefrontal and frontal cortex. Slower, partly genomic mechanisms are probably necessary for the enhancement of glutamate transmission induced by stress.Combined evidence has suggested that the changes in glutamate release and transmission are responsible for the dendritic remodeling and morphological changes induced by stress and it has been argued that sustained alterations of glutamate transmission may play a key role in the long-term structural/functional changes associated with mood disorders in patients. Intriguingly, modifications of the glutamatergic system induced by stress in the prefrontal cortex seem to be biphasic. Indeed, while the fast response to stress suggests an enhancement in the number of excitatory synapses, synaptic transmission and working memory, long-term adaptive changes -including those consequent to chronic stress- induce opposite effects. Better knowledge of the cellular effectors involved in this biphasic effect of stress may be useful to understand the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders, and open new paths for the development of therapeutic approaches.

  7. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klin, Yael [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram [The Division of Anesthesiology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Teichberg, Vivian I., E-mail: Vivian.teichberg@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    , mainly in non-metabolized form. The liver plays a central role in glutamate metabolism and serves as an origin for glutamate metabolites that redistribute into skeletal muscle and gut. The findings of this study suggest now that pharmacological manipulations that reduce the liver glutamate release rate or cause a boosting of the skeletal muscle glutamate pumping rate are likely to cause brain neuroprotection.

  8. Lassa-vesicular stomatitis chimeric virus safely destroys brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N; Cepko, Connie; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2015-07-01

    High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We tested a series of

  9. Intercellular signal communication among odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion neurons via glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, A; Sato, M; Kimura, M; Katakura, A; Tazaki, M; Shibukawa, Y

    2016-11-01

    Various stimuli to the exposed surface of dentin induce changes in the hydrodynamic force inside the dentinal tubules resulting in dentinal pain. Recent evidences indicate that mechano-sensor channels, such as the transient receptor potential channels, in odontoblasts receive these hydrodynamic forces and trigger the release of ATP to the pulpal neurons, to generate dentinal pain. A recent study, however, has shown that odontoblasts also express glutamate receptors (GluRs). This implies that cells in the dental pulp tissue have the ability to release glutamate, which acts as a functional intercellular mediator to establish inter-odontoblast and odontoblast-trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron signal communication. To investigate the intercellular signal communication, we applied mechanical stimulation to odontoblasts and measured the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). During mechanical stimulation in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+), we observed a transient [Ca(2+)]i increase not only in single stimulated odontoblasts, but also in adjacent odontoblasts. We could not observe these responses in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). [Ca(2+)]i increases in the neighboring odontoblasts during mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts were inhibited by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) as well as glutamate-permeable anion channels. In the odontoblast-TG neuron coculture, we observed an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in the stimulated odontoblasts and TG neurons, in response to direct mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts. These [Ca(2+)]i increases in the neighboring TG neurons were inhibited by antagonists for mGluRs. The [Ca(2+)]i increases in the stimulated odontoblasts were also inhibited by mGluRs antagonists. We further confirmed that the odontoblasts express group I, II, and III mGluRs. However, we could not record any currents evoked from odontoblasts near the mechanically stimulated odontoblast, with or without

  10. Control of Amygdala Circuits by 5-HT Neurons via 5-HT and Glutamate Cotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ayesha; Bocchio, Marco; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) system and the amygdala are key regulators of emotional behavior. Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT transmission in the amygdala is implicated in the susceptibility and drug treatment of mood disorders. Therefore, elucidating the physiological mechanisms through which midbrain 5-HT neurons modulate amygdala circuits could be pivotal in understanding emotional regulation in health and disease. To shed light on these mechanisms, we performed patch-clamp recordings from basal amygdala (BA) neurons in brain slices from mice with channelrhodopsin genetically targeted to 5-HT neurons. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at low frequencies (≤1 Hz) evoked a short-latency excitation of BA interneurons (INs) that was depressed at higher frequencies. Pharmacological analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by glutamate and not 5-HT because it was abolished by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at higher frequencies (10-20 Hz) evoked both slow excitation and slow inhibition of INs. These effects were mediated by 5-HT because they were blocked by antagonists of 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 1A receptors, respectively. These fast glutamate- and slow 5-HT-mediated responses often coexisted in the same neuron. Interestingly, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking INs displayed differential modulation by glutamate and 5-HT. Furthermore, optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals did not evoke glutamate release onto BA principal neurons, but inhibited these cells directly via activation of 5-HT 1A receptors and indirectly via enhanced GABA release. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-HT neurons exert a frequency-dependent, cell-type-specific control over BA circuitry via 5-HT and glutamate co-release to inhibit the BA output. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The modulation of the amygdala by serotonin (5-HT) is important for emotional regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders

  11. Glutamate and Brain Glutaminases in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Javier; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Blanco, Eduardo; Alonso, Francisco J; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and its actions are related to the behavioral effects of psychostimulant drugs. In the last two decades, basic neuroscience research and preclinical studies with animal models are suggesting a critical role for glutamate transmission in drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse. Although most of the interest has been centered in post-synaptic glutamate receptors, the presynaptic synthesis of glutamate through brain glutaminases may also contribute to imbalances in glutamate homeostasis, a key feature of the glutamatergic hypothesis of addiction. Glutaminases are the main glutamate-producing enzymes in brain and dysregulation of their function have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders; however, the possible implication of these enzymes in drug addiction remains largely unknown. This mini-review focuses on brain glutaminase isozymes and their alterations by in vivo exposure to drugs of abuse, which are discussed in the context of the glutamate homeostasis theory of addiction. Recent findings from mouse models have shown that drugs induce changes in the expression profiles of key glutamatergic transmission genes, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate drug-induced neuronal sensitization and behavioral plasticity are not clear.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  14. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Jeffery; Tang, Xiaolin; Landesman, Michael B. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Ruedas, John B. [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Ghimire, Anil [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Gudheti, Manasa V. [Vutara, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Perrault, Jacques [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Jorgensen, Erik M. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Gerton, Jordan M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Bioengineering, University of Utah (United States); Saffarian, Saveez, E-mail: saffarian@physics.utah.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter.

  15. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV's broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV's neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  17. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  18. Molecular architecture of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeh, Amal A; Schenk, Andreas D; Danek, Eric I; Kranzusch, Philip J; Liang, Bo; Walz, Thomas; Whelan, Sean P J

    2010-11-16

    Nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses initiate infection by delivering into the host cell a highly specialized RNA synthesis machine comprising the genomic RNA completely encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein and associated with the viral polymerase. The catalytic core of this protein-RNA complex is a 250-kDa multifunctional large (L) polymerase protein that contains enzymatic activities for nucleotide polymerization as well as for each step of mRNA cap formation. Working with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of NNS RNA viruses, we used negative stain electron microscopy (EM) to obtain a molecular view of L, alone and in complex with the viral phosphoprotein (P) cofactor. EM analysis, combined with proteolytic digestion and deletion mapping, revealed the organization of L into a ring domain containing the RNA polymerase and an appendage of three globular domains containing the cap-forming activities. The capping enzyme maps to a globular domain, which is juxtaposed to the ring, and the cap methyltransferase maps to a more distal and flexibly connected globule. Upon P binding, L undergoes a significant rearrangement that may reflect an optimal positioning of its functional domains for transcription. The structural map of L provides new insights into the interrelationship of its various domains, and their rearrangement on P binding that is likely important for RNA synthesis. Because the arrangement of conserved regions involved in catalysis is homologous, the structural insights obtained for VSV L likely extend to all NNS RNA viruses.

  19. [Safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in complicated vesicular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Alfonso; Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Díaz-Blanco, Fernando; Martínez-Fernández, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the experience and safety of cholecystectomy through laparoscopic approach in patients with complicated biliary gallbladder disease who were attended at the Hospital Español, Veracruz, Mexico, during a 10-year period. A prospective, longitudinal, comparative study with a control group was designed. We studied a group of patients with complicated cholelithiasis disease (Group I) and compared them with patients without complicated diseases. We analyzed the following variables: age, gender, risk factors, associated trans-operative pathology and accidents, surgical time, rate of conversion to open procedure, length of hospital stay, complications and evolution. During the 10-year period, 733 cholecystectomies were performed, 245 (33.42%) to treat complicated cholelithiasis and 488 (66.58%) uncomplicated. There were no differences regarding gender, age, risk factors, hospital stay, complications, morbidity and mortality, and iatrogenic lesions of the biliary tree, postoperative morbidity and mortality. In all patients of Group I (245), we found complications of cholelithiasis (acute cholecystitis, choledochal gallstones, vesicular adherences, and cholecystocolonic fistula). Surgical time was longer in Group I and surgical accidents made the surgical procedure more difficult. The overall results established that laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our institution is a safe procedure in patients with complicated gallbladder disease and can be performed by experienced surgeons.

  20. Cocaine-induced neuroadaptations in glutamate transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heath D.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that repeated exposure to cocaine leads to profound changes in glutamate transmission in limbic nuclei, particularly the nucleus accumbens. This review focuses on preclinical studies of cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity, including behavioral sensitization, self-administration, and the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Behavioral, pharmacological, neurochemical, electrophysiological, biochemical, and molecular biological changes associated with cocaine-induced plasticity in glutamate systems are reviewed. The ultimate goal of these lines of research is to identify novel targets for the development of therapies for cocaine craving and addiction. Therefore, we also outline the progress and prospects of glutamate modulators for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:20201846

  1. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  2. NMDA-Type Glutamate Receptor Activation Promotes Vascular Remodeling and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Sébastien J; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Courboulin, Audrey; Quatredeniers, Marceau; Rücker-Martin, Catherine; Antigny, Fabrice; Nakhleh, Morad K; Ranchoux, Benoit; Gouadon, Elodie; Vinhas, Maria-Candida; Vocelle, Matthieu; Raymond, Nicolas; Dorfmüller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2018-02-14

    Background -Excessive proliferation and apoptosis resistance in pulmonary vascular cells underlie vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Specific treatments for PAH exist, mostly targeting endothelial dysfunction, but high pulmonary arterial pressure still causes heart failure and death. Pulmonary vascular remodeling may be driven by metabolic reprogramming of vascular cells to increase glutaminolysis and glutamate production. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major neuronal glutamate receptor, is also expressed on vascular cells, but its role in PAH is unknown. Methods -We assessed the status of the glutamate-NMDAR axis in the pulmonary arteries of PAH patients and controls, through mass spectrometry imaging, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We measured the glutamate release from cultured pulmonary vascular cells using enzymatic assays, and analyzed NMDAR regulation/phosphorylation through western blot experiments. The effect of NMDAR blockade on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (hPASMC) proliferation was determined using a BrdU incorporation assay. We assessed the role of NMDARs in vascular remodeling associated to pulmonary hypertension (PH), both in smooth muscle-specific NMDAR knockout mice exposed to chronic hypoxia and in the monocrotaline rat model of PH using NMDAR blockers. Results -We report glutamate accumulation, upregulation of the NMDAR, and NMDAR engagement reflected by increases in GluN1-subunit phosphorylation, in the pulmonary arteries of human PAH patients. K v channel inhibition and ETAR activation amplified calcium-dependent glutamate release from hPASMCs, and ETAR and PDGFR activation led to NMDAR engagement, highlighting crosstalk between the glutamate-NMDAR axis and major PAH-associated pathways. The PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of hPASMCs involved NMDAR activation and phosphorylated GluN1 subunit localization to cell-cell contacts, consistent with glutamatergic communication between

  3. Metabolic fate and function of dietary glutamate in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as an additive in the form of monosodium glutamate. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is extensively metabol...

  4. Emerging aspects of dietary glutamate metabolism in the developing gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as a flavour additive in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is exten...

  5. Neural Mechanisms of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Possible Role for Peripheral Glutamate Receptor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Lam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present review is to correlate recent knowledge of the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the temporomandibular joint and muscle pain from animal and human experimental pain models with findings in patients. Chronic pain is common, and many people suffer from chronic pain conditions involving deep craniofacial tissues such as temporomandibular disorders or fibromyalgia. Animal and human studies have indicated that the activation of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in deep craniofacial tissues may contribute to muscle and temporomandibular joint pain and that sex differences in the activation of glutamate receptors may be involved in the female predominance in temporomandibular disorders and fibromyalgia. A peripheral mechanism involving autocrine and/or paracrine regulation of nociceptive neuronal excitability via injury or inflammation-induced release of glutamate into peripheral tissues that may contribute to the development of craniofacial pain is proposed.

  6. Genetic inactivation of glutamate neurons in the rat sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus recapitulates REM sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Lazarus, Michael; Grassi, Daniela; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    SEE SCHENCK AND MAHOWALD DOI101093/AWW329 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by the enactment of violent dreams during paradoxical (REM) sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. Accumulating clinical and experimental data suggest that REM sleep behaviour disorder might be due to the neurodegeneration of glutamate neurons involved in paradoxical sleep and located within the pontine sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. The purpose of the present work was thus to functionally determine first, the role of glutamate sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons in paradoxical sleep and second, whether their genetic inactivation is sufficient for recapitulating REM sleep behaviour disorder in rats. For this goal, we first injected two retrograde tracers in the intralaminar thalamus and ventral medulla to disentangle neuronal circuits in which sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus is involved; second we infused bilaterally in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus adeno-associated viruses carrying short hairpin RNAs targeting Slc17a6 mRNA [which encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2)] to chronically impair glutamate synaptic transmission in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons. At the neuroanatomical level, sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep hypersomnia send descending efferents to glycine/GABA neurons within the ventral medulla, but not ascending projections to the intralaminar thalamus. These data suggest a crucial role of sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons rather in muscle atonia than in paradoxical sleep generation. In line with this hypothesis, 30 days after adeno-associated virus injections into sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus rats display a decrease of 30% of paradoxical sleep daily quantities, and a significant increase of muscle tone during paradoxical sleep concomitant to a tremendous increase of abnormal motor dream

  7. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  8. Biobased synthesis of acrylonitrile from glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notre, le J.E.L.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamic acid was transformed into acrylonitrile in a two step procedure involving an oxidative decarboxylation in water to 3-cyanopropanoic acid followed by a decarbonylation-elimination reaction using a palladium catalyst

  9. Monosodium glutamate: Potentials at inducing prostate pathologies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... either MSG or DW. Key words: Monosodium glutamate, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate cancer, prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, infertility. INTRODUCTION. Elevated total acid phosphatase (TAP) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) activities are among the main.

  10. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase enables anaplerotic refilling of TCA cycle intermediates in stroke-affected brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron; Gnyawali, Surya; Stewart, Richard; Teplitsky, Seth; Harris, Hallie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Khanna, Savita

    2017-04-01

    Ischemic stroke results in excessive release of glutamate, which contributes to neuronal cell death. Here, we test the hypothesis that otherwise neurotoxic glutamate can be productively metabolized by glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) to maintain cellular energetics and protect the brain from ischemic stroke injury. The GOT-dependent metabolism of glutamate was studied in primary neural cells and in stroke-affected C57-BL6 mice using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and GC-MS. Extracellular Glu sustained cell viability under hypoglycemic conditions and increased GOT-mediated metabolism in vitro Correction of stroke-induced hypoxia using supplemental oxygen in vivo lowered Glu levels as measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. GOT knockdown abrogated this effect and caused ATP loss in the stroke-affected brain. GOT overexpression increased anaplerotic refilling of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in mouse brain during ischemic stroke. Furthermore, GOT overexpression not only reduced ischemic stroke lesion volume but also attenuated neurodegeneration and improved poststroke sensorimotor function. Taken together, our results support a new paradigm that GOT enables metabolism of otherwise neurotoxic extracellular Glu through a truncated tricarboxylic acid cycle under hypoglycemic conditions.-Rink, C., Gnyawali, S., Stewart, R., Teplitsky, S., Harris, H., Roy, S., Sen, C. K., Khanna, S. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase enables anaplerotic refilling of TCA cycle intermediates in stroke-affected brain. © FASEB.

  11. MADP, a salidroside analog, protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Meihong; Huang, Jun; Wu, Bingxin; Sun, Cheng; Yang, Yumin

    2014-05-08

    To investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of MADP, an analog of salidroside, against glutamate induced apoptosis in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method and lactate dehydrogenase release to the medium. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33342 staining, TUNEL assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was applied for detecting protein levels of cellular signaling molecules. Our results showed that glutamate exposure significantly induces cell apoptosis, whereas the pretreatment of salidroside or MADP remarkably improves cell viability. Most importantly, the anti-apoptotic effect of MADP against glutamate insult is superior to salidroside. To explore the involved mechanisms, we measured some pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic protein levels, and several cell survival signaling pathways were analyzed as well. No visible alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax protein levels were observed by MADP or salidroside. Akt and JNK phosphorylation was robustly stimulated by MADP in the glutamate-treated neurons. Salidroside treatment results in a slight activation in Akt, while no significant alteration in JNK activity was observed. MADP exhibits higher capacity to attenuate glutamate induced cell apoptosis in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that MADP might be a better candidate than salidroside for developing novel drugs treating neuron loss associated disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intracellular synthesis of glutamic acid in Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001, a glutamate-independent poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingyun; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001 is a glutamate-independent strain that produces poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a polymer of D- and L-glutamic acids that possesses applications in food, the environment, agriculture, etc. This study was undertaken to explore the synthetic pathway of intracellular L- and D-glutamic acid in SK19.001 by investigating the effects of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and different amino acids as metabolic precursors on the production of γ-PGA and analyzing the activities of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of L- and D-glutamate. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids could participate in the synthesis of γ-PGA via independent pathways in SK19.001. L-Aspartate aminotransferase, L-glutaminase and L-glutamate synthase were the enzymatic sources of L-glutamate. Glutamate racemase was responsible for the formation of D-glutamate for the synthesis of γ-PGA, and the synthetase had stereoselectivity for glutamate substrate. The enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were investigated for the first time in the glutamate-independent γ-PGA-producing strain, and multiple enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were verified in SK19.001, which will benefit efforts to improve production of γ-PGA with metabolic engineering strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Vesicular Contact Reaction May Progress into Erythema Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Jenerowicz, Dorota; Szulczyńska-Gabor, Joanna; Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Szyfter-Harris, Joanna; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Dear Editor, Erythema multiforme is considered an acute skin condition, characterized by a self-limiting and sometimes recurrent course. It is regarded as a type IV hypersensitivity reaction associated with certain infections, medications, and other various triggers. Allergic contact dermatitis is in turn a delayed type of induced allergy as a result of cutaneous contact with a specific allergen to which the patient develops specific sensitivity. This type of cutaneous reaction is associated with inflammation manifesting with erythema, edema, and vesicles. A 27-year old female patient presented with a 3-day history of erythematous and vesicular lesions which developed 24 hours after cesarean section. Initially the lesions were localized in the area of surgery (mainly the abdomen and upper thighs) and on the next day progressed to the buttocks and lumbar area. The patient was referred to the Outpatient Clinic and was treated with antihistamines, but her dermatological state deteriorated rapidly. At the day of admission to the Department of Dermatology, numerous erythematous and vesicular lesions were present on the skin of the abdomen, thighs, and back (Figure 1, a), but the skin of the neck, chest, and extremities was also covered with erythematous and edematous patches. On the second day of hospitalization, we observed the evolution of lesions localized within the chest and extremities into an erythema multiforme-like targetoid eruption (Figure 1, b). Initially the patient was treated with intravenous injections of dexamethasone and ceftriaxone and orally with second-generation antihistamines (in four-fold doses), followed by intravenous metyloprednisolone pulse-therapy (total dose of 3 g). As the new vesicobullous lesions started to appear on the face and arms, we introduced cyclosporine A orally 400 mg daily. We could then observe gradual remission, but on the seventh day of hospitalization the patient developed a massive labial herpes simplex infection and had

  14. A novel reagentless glutamate microband biosensor for real-time cell toxicity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, G.; Pemberton, R.M. [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Fielden, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Hart, J.P., E-mail: john.hart@uwe.ac.uk [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-24

    A reagentless glutamate biosensor was applied to the determination of glutamate released from liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) in response to toxic challenge from various concentrations of paracetamol. A screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) containing the electrocatalyst Meldola's Blue (MB-SPCE) served as the electron mediator for the oxidation of NADH. A mixture of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) and the biopolymer chitosan (CHIT) were drop-coated onto the surface of the transducer (MB-SPCE) in a simple one step fabrication process. The reagentless biosensor was used with amperometry in stirred solution at an applied potential of +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). All experiments were carried out at the following conditions: pH 7, temperature 37 °C, atmosphere 5% CO{sub 2}. The linear range of the device was found to be 25–125 μM in phosphate buffer (75 mM, containing 0.05 M NaCl) and 25–150 μM in cell culture medium. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to be 1.2 μM and 4.2 μM based on three times signal to noise, using PBS and culture medium respectively. The sensitivity was calculated to be 106 nA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and 210 nA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in PBS and cell medium respectively. The response time was ∼60 s in an agitated solution. HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of paracetamol (1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM) in order to investigate the drug-induced release of glutamate into the culture medium in real time. Two toxicity studies were investigated using different methods of exposure and analysis. The first method consisted of a single measurement of the glutamate concentration, using the method of standard addition, after 24 h incubation. The concentrations of glutamate were found to be 52 μM, 93 μM and 177 μM, released on exposure to 1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM paracetamol respectively. The second method involved the

  15. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  16. Mutation of His465 Alters the pH-dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Escherichia coli Glutamate Decarboxylase and Broadens the Range of Its Activity toward More Alkaline pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennacchietti, E.; Lammens, T.M.; Capitani, G.; Franssen, M.C.R.; John, R.A.; Bossa, F.; Biase, De D.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GadB) from Escherichia coli is a hexameric, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme catalyzing CO2 release from the a-carboxyl group of l-glutamate to yield ¿-aminobutyrate. GadB exhibits an acidic pH optimum and undergoes a spectroscopically detectable and strongly

  17. Bid-mediated mitochondrial damage is a key mechanism in glutamate-induced oxidative stress and AIF-dependent cell death in immortalized HT-22 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaben, S; Grohm, J; Seiler, A; Conrad, M; Plesnila, N; Culmsee, C

    2011-02-01

    Glutamate toxicity involves increases in intracellular calcium levels and enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing neuronal dysfunction and death in acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. The molecular mechanisms mediating glutamate-induced ROS formation are, however, still poorly defined. Using a model system that lacks glutamate-operated calcium channels, we demonstrate that glutamate-induced acceleration of ROS levels occurs in two steps and is initiated by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and then significantly accelerated through Bid-dependent mitochondrial damage. The Bid-mediated secondary boost of ROS formation downstream of LOX activity further involves mitochondrial fragmentation and release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus. These data imply that the activation of Bid is an essential step in amplifying glutamate-induced formation of lipid peroxides to irreversible mitochondrial damage associated with further enhanced free radical formation and AIF-dependent execution of cell death.

  18. The application of glutamic acid alpha-decarboxylase for the valorization of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Biase, De Daniela; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of nitrogen containing bulk chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. On the pathway from glutamic acid to a range of molecules, the

  19. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  20. Mapping the distribution of vesicular textures on silicic lavas using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrusek, Jaime; Christensen, Philip R.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effect of vesicularity on TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) imagery independent of chemical variations, we studied a large rhyolitic flow of uniform composition but textural heterogeneity. The imagery was recalibrated so that the digital number values for a lake in the scene matched a calculated ideal spectrum for water. TIMS spectra for the lava show useful differences in coarsely and finely vesicular pumice data, particularly in TIMS bands 3 and 4. Images generated by ratioing these bands accurately map out those areas known from field studies to be coarsely vesicular pumice. These texture-related emissivity variations are probably due to the larger vesicles being relatively deeper and separated by smaller septa leaving less smooth glass available to give the characteristic emission of the lava. In studies of inaccessible lava flows (as on Mars) areas of coarsely vesicular pumice must be identified and avoided before chemical variations can be interpreted. Remotely determined distributions of vesicular and glassy textures can also be related to the volatile contents and potential hazards associated with the emplacement of silicic lava flows on Earth.

  1. Vesicular exanthema of swine virus: isolation and serotyping of field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J F; Yedloutschnig, R J; Dardiri, A H; Callis, J J

    1987-01-01

    Virus isolation was attempted from 262 field samples of vesicular material collected during the outbreaks of vesicular exanthema of swine in the U.S.A. from 1952-54. Using primary swine kidney culture, viral cytopathogenic agents were isolated from 76.3% of the samples. However, an overall recovery rate of 82.1% was obtained after samples negative in tissue culture were inoculated intradermally in susceptible swine. All vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolates were identified as serotype B51 using complement fixation and serum neutralization tests. Two isolates did not react with antisera to known vesicular agents of swine and failed to produce vesicles or clinical signs of disease upon inoculation in swine. One vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolate from tissue of equine origin was pathogenic for swine but produced limited vesiculation at the site of intradermalingual inoculation in the tongue of a pony infected experimentally. Type B51 virus was reisolated from lesions produced in the pony and the pony became seropositive for virus type B51. PMID:3651889

  2. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Astroglial Potassium and Glutamate Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Cheung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has shown that astrocytes play essential roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Nevertheless, how neuronal activity alters astroglial functional properties and whether such properties also display specific forms of plasticity still remain elusive. Here, we review research findings supporting this aspect of astrocytes, focusing on their roles in the clearance of extracellular potassium and glutamate, two neuroactive substances promptly released during excitatory synaptic transmission. Their subsequent removal, which is primarily carried out by glial potassium channels and glutamate transporters, is essential for proper functioning of the brain. Similar to neurons, different forms of short- and long-term plasticity in astroglial uptake have been reported. In addition, we also present novel findings showing robust potentiation of astrocytic inward currents in response to repetitive stimulations at mild frequencies, as low as 0.75 Hz, in acute hippocampal slices. Interestingly, neurotransmission was hardly affected at this frequency range, suggesting that astrocytes may be more sensitive to low frequency stimulation and may exhibit stronger plasticity than neurons to prevent hyperexcitability. Taken together, these important findings strongly indicate that astrocytes display both short- and long-term plasticity in their clearance of excess neuroactive substances from the extracellular space, thereby regulating neuronal activity and brain homeostasis.

  3. Glutamic acid modification of vincristine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D V; Rosenbaum, D L; Carlisle, L J; Long, T R; Wells, H B; Spurr, C L

    1984-09-01

    The principal limiting feature of the antitumor agent, vincristine, in the clinic has been neurotoxicity; there are no known agents which can routinely prevent or decrease this side effect. Glutamic acid in laboratory and clinical investigations in the early 1960s was found to antagonize vinblastine, another clinically useful vinca alkaloid. Glutamic acid 250 mg/kg/d i.p. was given to normal mice treated with repetitive doses of vincristine 1.5 mg/kg every other day. When glutamic acid was given both before and during vincristine administration, it produced a 49-79% increase in survival compared to control mice receiving vincristine only (p less than 0.01). Other schedules of glutamic acid administration were ineffective. Also, there appeared to be a delay in development of neurotoxic manifestations (toe-walking gait) but the results were not as consistent as the improvement in survival. Glutamic acid given to tumor-bearing mice (P-388 and P-1534 murine leukemia) did not inhibit the antitumor effect of vincristine-induced host toxicity in a schedule-dependent fashion without inhibition of the antitumor effect of vincristine.

  4. Soluble ectodomain of neuroligin 1 decreases synaptic activity by activating metabotropic glutamate receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørlund, Michelle D.; Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier; Kønig, Andreas Bay

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic cell adhesion molecules represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Postsynaptic neuroligins (NLs) form trans-synaptic complexes with presynaptic neurexins (NXs). Both NXs and NLs are cleaved from the cell surface by metalloproteases in an activity......-dependent manner, releasing a soluble extracellular fragment and membrane-tethered C-terminal fragment. The cleavage of NL1 depresses synaptic transmission, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) are located primarily at the periphery of presynaptic terminals......, where they inhibit the formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and consequently suppress the release of glutamate and decrease synaptic transmission. In the present study, we found that the soluble ectodomain of NL1 binds to and activates mGluR2 in both neurons and heterologous cells...

  5. Lysergic acid diethylamide and [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine increase extracellular glutamate in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschamp, John W; Regina, Meredith J; Hull, Elaine M; Winter, Jerrold C; Rabin, Richard A

    2004-10-08

    The ability of hallucinogens to increase extracellular glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. The hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a time-dependent increase in PFC glutamate that was blocked by the 5-HT(2A) antagonist M100907 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the 5-HT(2A/C) agonist [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM; 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.), which is a phenethylamine hallucinogen, increased glutamate to 206% above saline-treated controls. When LSD (10 microM) was directly applied to the PFC by reverse dialysis, a rapid increase in PFC glutamate levels was observed. Glutamate levels in the PFC remained elevated after the drug infusion was discontinued. These data provide direct evidence in vivo for the hypothesis that an enhanced release of glutamate is a common mechanism in the action of hallucinogens.

  6. Effect of cannabis on glutamate signalling in the brain: A systematic review of human and animal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizzi, Marco; McGuire, Philip; Pertwee, Roger G; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    Use of cannabis or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), its main psychoactive ingredient, is associated with psychotic symptoms or disorder. However, the neurochemical mechanism that may underlie this psychotomimetic effect is poorly understood. Although dopaminergic dysfunction is generally recognized as the final common pathway in psychosis, evidence of the effects of Δ9-THC or cannabis use on dopaminergic measures in the brain is equivocal. In fact, it is thought that cannabis or Δ9-THC may not act on dopamine firing directly but indirectly by altering glutamate neurotransmission. Here we systematically review all studies examining acute and chronic effects of cannabis or Δ9-THC on glutamate signalling in both animals and man. Limited research carried out in humans tends to support the evidence that chronic cannabis use reduces levels of glutamate-derived metabolites in both cortical and subcortical brain areas. Research in animals tends to consistently suggest that Δ9-THC depresses glutamate synaptic transmission via CB1 receptor activation, affecting glutamate release, inhibiting receptors and transporters function, reducing enzyme activity, and disrupting glutamate synaptic plasticity after prolonged exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  8. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate results in dysmorphology of orofacial lower motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Lindsey; Kupelian, Chloe; Laroia, Swati; Esper, Jeffrey; Kulesza, Randy Joseph

    2017-06-14

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is stored and released by both neurons and astrocytes. Despite the important role of glutamate as a neurotransmitter, high levels of extracellular glutamate can result in excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a naturally occurring sodium salt of glutamic acid that is used as a flavor enhancer in many processed foods. Neonatal exposure to MSG has been shown to result in neurodegeneration in several forebrain regions, characterized by neuronal loss and neuroendocrine abnormalities. However, the brainstem effects of neonatal monosodium glutamate exposure have not been investigated. It is therefore hypothesized that MSG exposure during the early postnatal period would impact brainstem lower motor neurons involved in feeding behavior. The effect of neonatal MSG exposure on brainstem lower motor neurons was investigated by exposing rat pups to either 4mg/g MSG or saline from postnatal day (P) 4 through 10. On P28, brains were preserved by vascular perfusion with fixative, frozen sectioned and stained for Nïssl substance. The number, size and shape of brainstem motor neurons were compared between MSG and saline-exposed animals. MSG exposure had no impact on the total number of neurons in the nuclei examined. However, MSG exposure was associated with a significant increase in the number of round somata in both the trigeminal and facial nuclei. Furthermore, MSG exposure resulted in significantly smaller neurons in all motor nuclei examined. These results suggest that neonatal exposure to MSG impacts the development of brainstem lower motor neurons which may impact feeding and swallowing behaviors in young animals.

  9. Towards a glutamate hypothesis of depression: an emerging frontier of neuropsychopharmacology for mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacora, Gerard; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Half a century after the first formulation of the monoamine hypothesis, compelling evidence implies that long-term changes in an array of brain areas and circuits mediating complex cognitive-emotional behaviors represent the biological underpinnings of mood/anxiety disorders. A large number of clinical studies suggest that pathophysiology is associated with dysfunction of the predominant glutamatergic system, malfunction in the mechanisms regulating clearance and metabolism of glutamate, and cytoarchitectural/morphological maladaptive changes in a number of brain areas mediating cognitive-emotional behaviors. Concurrently, a wealth of data from animal models have shown that different types of environmental stress enhance glutamate release/transmission in limbic/cortical areas and exert powerful structural effects, inducing dendritic remodeling, reduction of synapses and possibly volumetric reductions resembling those observed in depressed patients. Because a vast majority of neurons and synapses in these areas and circuits use glutamate as neurotransmitter, it would be limiting to maintain that glutamate is in some way 'involved' in mood/anxiety disorders; rather it should be recognized that the glutamatergic system is a primary mediator of psychiatric pathology and, potentially, also a final common pathway for the therapeutic action of antidepressant agents. A paradigm shift from a monoamine hypothesis of depression to a neuroplasticity hypothesis focused on glutamate may represent a substantial advancement in the working hypothesis that drives research for new drugs and therapies. Importantly, despite the availability of multiple classes of drugs with monoamine-based mechanisms of action, there remains a large percentage of patients who fail to achieve a sustained remission of depressive symptoms. The unmet need for improved pharmacotherapies for treatment-resistant depression means there is a large space for the development of new compounds with novel mechanisms

  10. Anorexigenic Lipopeptides Ameliorate Central Insulin Signaling and Attenuate Tau Phosphorylation in Hippocampi of Mice with Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špolcová, Andrea; Mikulášková, Barbora; Holubová, Martina; Nagelová, Veronika; Pirník, Zdenko; Zemenová, Jana; Haluzík, M.; Železná, Blanka; Galas, M. C.; Maletínská, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2015), s. 823-835 ISSN 1387-2877 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/0576 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * insulin signaling * liraglutide * monosodium glutamate-obese mice * obesity * pre-diabetes * prolactin-releasing peptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.920, year: 2015

  11. Disturbed mitochondrial function restricts glutamate uptake in the human Müller glia cell line, MIO-M1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Henriksen, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Using the human Müller cell line, MIO-M1, the aim was to study the impact of mitochondrial inhibition in Müller glia through antimycin A treatment. MIO-M1 cell survival, levels of released lactate, mitochondrial function, and glutamate uptake were studied in response to mitochondrial inhibition a...

  12. Historia natural del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en zonas enzoóticas de Antioquia

    OpenAIRE

    John Arboleda; Andrés Londoño; Víctor Quiroz; Carlos Trujillo

    2003-01-01

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) es una enfermedad producida
    por el virus de la Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipos New Jersey (VSV-NJ) e Indiana (VSV-IN), afecta bovinos y equinos, porcinos y causa infección natural en humanos, principalmente granjeros, ordeñadores y personal de laboratorio.
    Se caracteriza por producir vesículas en las membranas mucosas
    de la boca (epitelio de la lengua y el paladar), bandas coronarias,
    pezones y tejidos blandos...

  13. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 and Glutamate Involvement in Major Depressive Disorder: A Multimodal Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Chadi G; Hannestad, Jonas; Mason, Graeme F; Holmes, Sophie E; DellaGioia, Nicole; Sanacora, Gerard; Jiang, Lihong; Matuskey, David; Satodiya, Ritvij; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Lin, Xin; Javitch, Jonathan; Planeta, Beata; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Carson, Richard E; Esterlis, Irina

    2017-07-01

    Preclinical and postmortem studies have implicated the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of the present study was to determine the role of mGluR5 in a large group of individuals with MDD compared to healthy controls (HC) in vivo with [(18)F]FPEB and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, we sought to determine the role glutamate plays on mGluR5 availability in MDD. Sixty-five participants (30 MDD and 35 HC) completed [(18)F]FPEB PET to estimate the primary outcome measure - mGluR5 volume of distribution (VT), and the secondary outcome measure - mGluR5 distribution volume ratio (DVR). A subgroup of 39 participants (16 MDD and 23 HC) completed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to estimate anterior cingulate (ACC) glutamate, glutamine, and Glx (glutamate + glutamine) levels relative to creatine (Cr). No significant between-group differences were observed in mGluR5 VT or DVR. Compared to HC, individuals with MDD had higher ACC glutamate, glutamine, and Glx levels. Importantly, the ACC mGluR5 DVR negatively correlated with glutamate/Cr and Glx/Cr levels. In this novel in vivo examination, we show an inverse relationship between mGluR5 availability and glutamate levels. These data highlight the need to further investigate the role of glutamatergic system in depression.

  14. Spinal control of erection by glutamate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampin, Olivier; Monnerie, Régine; Jérôme, Nathalie; McKenna, Kevin; Maurin, Yves

    2004-04-01

    The lumbosacral spinal network controlling penile erection is activated by information from peripheral and supraspinal origins. We tested the hypothesis that glutamate, released by sensory afferents from the genitals, activates this proerectile network. In anesthetized intact and T8 spinalized (i.e., freed from supraspinal inhibition) male rats, the parameters of electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) that elicited intracavernous pressure (ICP) rises were determined. In T8 spinalized rats, DPN stimulations were applied in the presence of d(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5), a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, or of 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulphonamide (NBQX), an AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist, injected intrathecally at the lumbosacral level. Both antagonists, alone or in combination, dose dependently decreased the ICP rise and increased its latency. In conscious rats, reflexive erections were depressed by d-AP5 and NBQX, as revealed by an increased latency of the first erection and by decreases of the number of rats displaying erections, of the number of erection clusters and of the number of erections per cluster. In anesthetized ats, the combined administration of the glutamatergic agonists NMDA and AMPA elicited ICP rises in the absence of DPN stimulation. In contrast, both agonists moderately decreased the ICP rise elicited by DPN stimulation but did not affect its latency. These results support our hypothesis that glutamate, released on stimulation of the genitals and acting at AMPA and NMDA receptors, is a potent reactivator of the spinal proerectile network.

  15. Cytopathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our ...

  16. Targeting exocytosis: ins and outs of the modulation of quantal dopamine release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission is mediated by the vesicular release of dopamine (DA), i.e. DA exocytosis. DA exocytosis and its modulation are generally believed to affect neuronal communication, development, maintenance and survival, and contribute to extracellular DA levels in the brain. As a

  17. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  18. Folic Acid Protects Against Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity in Hippocampal Slices Through a Mechanism that Implicates Inhibition of GSK-3β and iNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budni, Josiane; Molz, Simone; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martín-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Egea, Javier; Lopéz, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla Ines; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia Severo

    2017-02-10

    Folic acid (folate) is a vitamin of the B-complex group crucial for neurological function. Considering that excitotoxicity and cell death induced by glutamate are involved in many disorders, the potential protective effect of folic acid on glutamate-induced cell damage in rat hippocampal slices and the possible intracellular signaling pathway involved in such effect were investigated. The treatment of hippocampal slices with folic acid (100 μM) significantly abrogated glutamate (1 mM)-induced reduction of cell viability measured by MTT reduction assay and inhibited glutamate-induced D-[(3)H]-aspartate release. To investigate the putative intracellular signaling pathways implicated in the protective effect of folic acid, we used a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, which abolished the protective effects of folic acid against glutamate-induced cell damage and D-[(3)H] aspartate release. Moreover, hippocampal slices incubated with folic acid alone for 30 min presented increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, indicating an inhibition of the activity of this enzyme. Furthermore, folic acid in the presence of glutamate insult in hippocampal slices maintained for an additional period of 6 h in fresh culture medium without glutamate and/or folic acid induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β and β-catenin expression. In addition, glutamate-treated hippocampal slices showed increased iNOS expression that was reversed by folic acid. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the protective effect of folic acid against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity may involve the modulation of PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway and iNOS inhibition.

  19. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading... imports of monosodium glutamate from China and Indonesia that are subsidized by the Governments of China...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of hexa-tailed cryptand based amphiphiles: spontaneous formation of giant vesicular microcapsule with efficient and long-term dye encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Prasun; Bhunia, Prasenjit

    2007-07-01

    A cryptand with six secondary amino groups has been derivatized by reacting with acid chlorides of different chain lengths (C(7), C(10) and C(18)) to get three cryptand based hexa-tailed neutral amphiphiles (L(1)-L(3)). The cavity of the cryptand head group accommodates two Cu(II) ion giving another set of three amphiphiles. These amphiphiles and its copper complexes can aggregate spontaneously as giant vesicular microcapsules in 10% ethanolic water medium. In all cases vesicles formed are mostly unilamellar in nature. Vesicular microcapsules prepared from L(1)-L(3) can encapsulate hydrophilic dye 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF). Stability of microcapsules, CF encapsulation efficiencies and release rates were dependent on the hydrophobic chain length of the amphiphiles. Results show the permeability of the L(2) and L(3) bilayer is lower than that of phosphatidylcholine vesicles and the loading capacity is approximately 3 times greater. Microcapsules have been characterized by optical microscopy, freeze fracture scanning electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  3. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Properties of Poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate Bioelastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifu Dong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to further improve the biocompatibility of xylitol based poly(xylitol sebacate (PXS bioelastomer, a novel kind of amino acid based poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate (PXGS has been successfully prepared in this work by melt polycondensation of xylitol, N-Boc glutamic acid and sebacic acid. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results indicated the glass-transition temperatures could be decreased by feeding N-Boc glutamic acid. In comparison to PXS, PXGS exhibited comparable tensile strength and much higher elongation at break at the same ratio of acid/xylitol. The introduction of glutamic acid increased the hydrophilicity and in vitro degradation rate of the bioelastomer. It was found that PXGS exhibited excellent properties, such as tensile properties, biodegradability and hydrophilicity, which could be easily tuned by altering the feeding monomer ratios. The amino groups in the PXGS polyester side chains are readily functionalized, thus the biomelastomers can be considered as potential biomaterials for biomedical application.

  4. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System-based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Kimble, Christopher J; Sieck, Gary C; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-10-01

    In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal model, the pig. The

  5. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  6. Monosodium glutamate: Potentials at inducing prostate pathologies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The health implication of the alteration could be compounded by the opposing response elicited by increasing the concentration of either MSG or DW. Key words: Monosodium glutamate, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate cancer, prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, infertility. African Journal of ...

  7. Increase in vesicular hand eczema after house dust mite inhalation provocation : a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, Marielouise; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; Huizinga, Janneke; De Monchy, Jan G; Vermeulen, Karin M

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether the respiratory tract is involved in eliciting or aggravating eczematous lesions in patients with vesicular hand eczema. Objectives. To investigate the effect of inhalation of house dust mite (HDM) on vesicular hand eczema. METHODS: Eighteen patients with vesicular

  8. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  10. TNF-mediated survival of CD169(+) cells promotes immune activation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain ...

  11. Influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elizondo, Elisa; Larsen, Jannik; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    A confocal fluorescence microscopy-based assay was used for studying the influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system. In this work, vesicles composed of cholesterol and CTAB (1/1 mol %) or cholesterol and DOPC (2/8 mol %) and incorporating...

  12. [Seminal vesicular cysts associated with renal agenesis, ipsilateral ureter and hemitrigone. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis Mínguez, B; Ferrutxe Frau, J; Moreno Pardo, B; Baixauli Martínez, J M; Moreno Barrachina, E; Rodríguez Hernández, J H

    1979-01-01

    A case is presented of seminal vesicular cyst associated with kidney agenesia, ipsilateral ureter and hemitrigon; this is the 17th case presented in the world literature reviewed. A study is made of all the cases published and the authors recommend deferento-vesiculography as the best means of diagnosis and total excision of the cyst as the most effective treatment.

  13. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... exists. (a) Swine vesicular disease is considered to exist in all regions of the world except Australia..., Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Poland, Portugal..., the pork or pork products must be moved under Department seals or seals of the U.S. Customs Service...

  14. The development and significance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas as influenced by agricultural practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruissen, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and significance of vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM) in wheat and potatoes have been studied in relation to various farming systems and agricultural practices. The effects of farming systems on VAM have been observed on three neighbouring experimental farms in the vicinity of

  15. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Glud1) in the central nervous system affects glutamate handling without altering synaptic transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, Francesca; Karaca, Melis; De Roo, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), encoded by GLUD1, participates in the breakdown and synthesis of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter. In the CNS, besides its primary signaling function, glutamate is also at the crossroad of metabolic and neurotransmitter pathways. Importance of brain G...... transporters and of glutamine synthetase. Present data show that the lack of GDH in the CNS modifies the metabolic handling of glutamate without altering synaptic transmission....

  16. Analysis of virion associated host proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus using a proteomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Sun-Il

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototypic rhabdovirus and the best studied member of the order Mononegavirales. There is now compelling evidence that enveloped virions released from infected cells carry numerous host (cellular proteins some of which may play an important role in viral replication. Although several cellular proteins have been previously shown to be incorporated into VSV virions, no systematic study has been done to reveal the host protein composition for virions of VSV or any other member of Mononegavirales. Results Here we used a proteomics approach to identify cellular proteins within purified VSV virions, thereby creating a "snapshot" of one stage of virus/host interaction that can guide future experiments aimed at understanding molecular mechanisms of virus-cell interactions. Highly purified preparations of VSV virions from three different cell lines of human, mouse and hamster origin were analyzed for the presence of cellular proteins using mass spectrometry. We have successfully confirmed the presence of several previously-identified cellular proteins within VSV virions and identified a number of additional proteins likely to also be present within the virions. In total, sixty-four cellular proteins were identified, of which nine were found in multiple preparations. A combination of immunoblotting and proteinase K protection assay was used to verify the presence of several of these proteins (integrin β1, heat shock protein 90 kDa, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, annexin 2, elongation factor 1a within the virions. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of the host protein composition for virions of VSV or any other member of the order Mononegavirales. Future experiments are needed to determine which of the identified proteins have an interaction with VSV and whether these interactions are beneficial, neutral or antiviral with respect to VSV replication. Identification

  17. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  18. Systemic administration of monosodium glutamate elevates intramuscular glutamate levels and sensitizes rat masseter muscle afferent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Brian E; Dong, Xudong; Mann, Mandeep K; Svensson, Peter; Sessle, Barry J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; McErlane, Keith M

    2007-11-01

    There is evidence that elevated tissue concentrations of glutamate may contribute to pain and sensitivity in certain musculoskeletal pain conditions. In the present study, the food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG) was injected intravenously into rats to determine whether it could significantly elevate interstitial concentrations of glutamate in the masseter muscle and whether MSG administration could excite and/or sensitize slowly conducting masseter afferent fibers through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. The interstitial concentration of glutamate after systemic injection of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline (control) or MSG (10 and 50mg/kg) was measured with a glutamate-selective biosensor. The pre-injection baseline interstitial concentration of glutamate in the rat masseter muscle was 24+/-11 microM. Peak interstitial concentration after injection of 50mg/kg MSG was 63+/-18 microM and remained elevated above baseline for approximately 18 min. In vivo single unit recording experiments were undertaken to assess the effect of MSG (50mg/kg) on masseter afferent fibers. Injection of MSG evoked a brief discharge in one afferent fiber, and significantly decreased ( approximately 25%) the average afferent mechanical threshold (n=10) during the first 5 min after injection of MSG. Intravenous injection of ketamine (1mg/kg), 5 min prior to MSG, prevented the MSG-induced decreases in the mechanical threshold of masseter afferent fibers. The present results indicate that a 2- to 3-fold elevation in interstitial glutamate levels in the masseter muscle is sufficient to excite and induce afferent mechanical sensitization through NMDA receptor activation. These findings suggest that modest elevations of interstitial glutamate concentration could alter musculoskeletal pain sensitivity in humans.

  19. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2017-01-01

    concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...... cells. The mechanisms underlying transendothelial L-glutamate transport are however still not well understood. The present chapter summarizes the current knowledge on blood-brain barrier L-glutamate transporters and the suggested pathways for the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux....

  1. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate...... synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle...

  2. Microbial production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Cao, Mingfeng; Kongklom, Nuttawut; Chuensangjun, Chaniga; Shi, Zhongping; Chisti, Yusuf

    2017-09-05

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a natural, biodegradable and water-soluble biopolymer of glutamic acid. This review is focused on nonrecombinant microbial production of γ-PGA via fermentation processes. In view of its commercial importance, the emphasis is on L-glutamic acid independent producers (i.e. microorganisms that do not require feeding with the relatively expensive amino acid L-glutamic acid to produce γ-PGA), but glutamic acid dependent production is discussed for comparison. Strategies for improving production, reducing costs and using renewable feedstocks are discussed.

  3. Cortico-accumbens fiber stimulation does not induce dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Marand, Marianne; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2008-09-01

    Interactions between dopamine (DA) and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NA) are important for a variety of cognitive and limbic functions. Although, there is strong evidence that DA controls glutamate responses, the converse (glutamate affecting DA release) is controversial. To determine whether endogenous glutamate released from corticostriatal terminals can evoke DA release by local interactions in the NA, we measured DA release with amperometry simultaneously with whole cell recordings from NA medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in a slice preparation preserving DA terminals (but not cell bodies) and cortico-accumbens fibers. MSNs responded to cortical stimulation with a postsynaptic potential that was blocked by the AMPA antagonist CNQX, but no DA overflow was detected with the carbon fiber electrode. This absence of DA release cannot be accounted for by a deterioration of the DA terminals in this slice preparation since DA release was evoked with a caudal stimulation in the same slices. The DA signal was modulated as expected by bath application of a DA transporter blocker. The data show that cortico-striatal activation does not induce DA release by local interactions, suggesting that observations of glutamate-evoked DA release previously reported in vivo may be taking place via an extra-NA circuit.

  4. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 mRNA levels are reduced in platelets from patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Gessica; Brighina, Laura; Saracchi, Enrico; Fermi, Silvia; Riva, Chiara; Carrozza, Veronica; Pirovano, Marta; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2010-09-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging, the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) remains clinical. The identification of biological markers for an early diagnosis is of great interest to start a neuroprotective therapy aimed at slowing, blocking or reversing the disease progression. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) sequesters cytoplasmic dopamine into synaptic vesicles for storage and release. Thus, VMAT2 impairment can regulate intra- and extracellular dopamine levels, influencing oxidative stress and neuronal death. Because in vivo imaging studies have demonstrated a VMAT2 reduction in PD patients greater than would be explained by neuronal loss alone, as an exploratory study we assessed VMAT2 mRNA and protein levels in platelets from 39 PD patients, 39 healthy subjects and 10 patients with vascular parkinsonism (VP) to identify a possible peripheral biomarker for PD. A significant reduction (p platelets. Although further studies in a greater number of cases are needed to confirm our data, the reduction in VMAT2 mRNA in platelets from PD patients suggests the existence of a systemic impairment of this transporter possibly contributing to PD pathology.

  5. Inhibitors of glutamate dehydrogenase block sodium-dependent glutamate uptake in rat brain membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan S Whitelaw

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently found evidence for anatomic and physical linkages between the astroglial Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (GLT-1/EAAT2 and GLAST/EAAT1 and mitochondria. In these same studies, we found that the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH inhibitor, epigallocatechin-monogallate (EGCG, inhibits both glutamate oxidation and Na+-dependent glutamate uptake in astrocytes. In the present study, we extend this finding by exploring the effects of EGCG on Na+-dependent L-[3H]-glutamate (Glu uptake in crude membranes (P2 prepared from rat brain cortex. In this preparation, uptake is almost exclusively mediated by GLT-1. EGCG inhibited L-[3H]-Glu uptake in cortical membranes with an IC50 value of 230 µM. We also studied the effects of two additional inhibitors of GDH, hexachlorophene (HCP and bithionol (BTH. Both of these compounds also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of glutamate uptake in cortical membranes. Pre-incubating with HCP for up to 15 min had no greater effect than that observed with no pre-incubation, showing that the effects occur rapidly. HCP decreased the Vmax for glutamate uptake without changing the Km, consistent with a non-competitive mechanism of action. EGCG, HCP, and BTH also inhibited Na+-dependent transport of D-[3H]-aspartate (Asp, a non-metabolizable substrate, and [3H]-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. In contrast to the forebrain, glutamate uptake in crude cerebellar membranes (P2 is likely mediated by GLAST (EAAT1. Therefore, the effects of these compounds were examined in cerebellar membranes. In this region, none of these compounds had any effect on uptake of either L-[3H]-Glu or D-[3H]-Asp, but they all inhibited [3H]-GABA uptake. Together these studies suggest that GDH is preferentially required for glutamate uptake in forebrain as compared to cerebellum, and GDH may be required for GABA uptake as well. They also provide further evidence for a functional linkage between glutamate transport and mitochondria.

  6. Microsensors for in vivo Measurement of Glutamate in Brain Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda van der Zeyden

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Several immobilized enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors for glutamate detection have been developed over the last decade. In this review, we compare first and second generation sensors. Structures, working mechanisms, interference prevention, in vitro detection characteristics and in vivo performance are summarized here for those sensors that have successfully detected brain glutamate in vivo. In brief, first generation sensors have a simpler structure and are faster in glutamate detection. They also show a better sensitivity to glutamate during calibration in vitro. For second generation sensors, besides their less precise detection, their fabrication is difficult to reproduce, even with a semi-automatic dip-coater. Both generations of sensors can detect glutamate levels in vivo, but the reported basal levels are different. In general, second generation sensors detect higher basal levels of glutamate compared with the results obtained from first generation sensors. However, whether the detected glutamate is indeed from synaptic sources is an issue that needs further attention.

  7. Localisation of novel forms of glutamate transporters and the cystine-glutamate antiporter in the choroid plexus: Implications for CSF glutamate homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aven; Anderson, Ashley R.; Rayfield, Andrew J.; Stevens, Melissa G.; Poronnik, Philip; Meabon, James S.; Cook, David G.; Pow, David V.

    2012-01-01

    The choroid plexus is a structure within each ventricle of the brain that is composed of fenestrated vessels surrounded by secretory epithelial cells. The epithelial cells are linked by tight junctions to create a permeability barrier. The epithelial cells are derived from neuroectoderm, and are thus defined by some authors as a subtype of macroglia. Glutamate is a tightly regulated substance in the CSF, as it is in the rest of the brain. In the brain macroglia express multiple sodium dependent and independent glutamate transporters and are the main regulators of extracellular glutamate. However, the identities of the transporters in the choroid plexus and their localisations have remained poorly defined. In this study we examined the expression and distribution of multiple splice variants of classical sodium-dependent glutamate transporters, as well as the cystine-glutamate antiporter, and the PDZ protein NHERF1, (which acts as a molecular anchor for proteins such as the glutamate transporter GLAST). We identified three forms of sodium-dependent transporters (GLAST1a, GLAST1c and GLT1b) that are expressed at the apical surface of the epithelial cells, a location that matches the distribution of NHERF1 and the cystine-glutamate antiporter. We propose that this coincident localisation of GLAST1a/GLAST1c/GLT1b and the cystine-glutamate antiporter would permit the cyclical trafficking of glutamate and thus optimise the accumulation of cystine for the formation of glutathione in the choroid plexus. PMID:21982839

  8. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  9. Modafinil attenuates reinstatement of cocaine seeking: role for cystine-glutamate exchange and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Stephen V; Hensley-Simon, Megan; Tahsili-Fahadan, Pouya; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Thomas, Charles; Fallon, Rebecca V; Kalivas, Peter W; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil may be useful for treating stimulant abuse, but the mechanisms by which it acts to do so are unknown. Indeed, a primary effect of modafinil is to inhibit dopamine transport, which typically promotes rather than inhibits motivated behavior. Therefore, we examined the role of nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) in modafinil effects. One group of rats was trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days and extinguished, then given priming injections of cocaine to elicit reinstatement. Modafinil (300 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) inhibited reinstated cocaine seeking (but did not alter extinction responding by itself), and this effect was prevented by pre-treatment with bilateral microinjections of the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY-341495 (LY) into nucleus accumbens core. No reversal of modafinil effects was seen after unilateral accumbens core LY, or bilateral LY in the rostral pole of accumbens. Next, we sought to explore effects of modafinil on extracellular glutamate levels in accumbens after chronic cocaine. Separate rats were administered non-contingent cocaine, and after 3 weeks of withdrawal underwent accumbens microdialysis. Modafinil increased extracellular accumbens glutamate in chronic cocaine, but not chronic saline-pre-treated animals. This increase was prevented by reverse dialysis of cystine-glutamate exchange or voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists. Voltage-dependent sodium channel blockade partly attenuated the increase in glutamate, but mGluR1 blockade did not. We conclude that modafinil increases extracellular glutamate in nucleus accumbens from glial and neuronal sources in cocaine-exposed rats, which may be important for its mGluR2/3-mediated antirelapse properties. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  11. Activation of β-adrenoceptor facilitates active avoidance learning through enhancement of glutamate levels in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jing; Feng, Hao; Chen, Ling; Wang, Wei-Yao; Yue, Xue-Ling; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2017-10-18

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely accepted as the best studied model for neurophysiological mechanisms that could underlie learning and memory formation. Despite a number of studies indicating that β-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is involved in the modulation of learning and memory as well as LTP, few studies have used glutamate release as a visual indicator in awake animals to explore the role of β-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of propranolol (an antagonist of β-adrenoceptor) and isoproterenol (an agonist of β-adrenoceptor) on extracellular concentrations of glutamate and amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during active avoidance learning in freely moving conscious rats. In the control group, the glutamate level in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active avoidance behavior and returned to basal level following extinction training. In propranolol group, antagonism of β-adrenoceptors in the DG significantly reduced the change in glutamate level, and the acquisition of the active avoidance behavior was significantly inhibited. In contrast, the change in glutamate level was significantly enhanced by isoproterenol, and the acquisition of the active avoidance behavior was significantly accelerated. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in glutamate level were accompanied by corresponding changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude and active avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that activation of β-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG facilitates active avoidance learning by modulations of glutamate level and synaptic efficiency in rats.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene against glutamate-induced damage in the HT22 hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Jung, Won Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-02-01

    Since oxidative stress is critically involved in excitotoxic damage, we sought to determine whether the activation of the transcription factors, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2, also known as NFE2L2), by α-iso-cubebene is involved in its protective effects against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Pre-treatment with α-iso-cubebene significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells. α-iso-cubebene also reduced the glutamate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and calcium influx, thus preventing apoptotic cell death. α-iso-cubebene inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and, consequently, inhibited the release of the apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria. Immunoblot anlaysis revealed that the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by glutamate was reduced in the presence of α-iso-cubebene. α-iso-cubebene activated protein kinase A (PKA), CREB and Nrf2, which mediate the expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1), involved in neuroprotection. In addition, α-iso-cubebene induced the expression of antioxidant responsive element and CRE transcriptional activity, thus conferring neuroprotection against glutamate-induced oxidative injury. α-iso-cubebene also induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding HO-1 and NQO1. Furthermore, the knockdown of CREB and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA attenuated the neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene. Taken together, our results indicate that α-iso-cubebene protects HT22 cells from glutamate-induced oxidative damage through the activation of Nrf2/HO-1/NQO-1, as well as through the PKA and CREB signaling pathways.

  13. Changes in hippocampal synaptic functions and protein expression in monosodium glutamate-treated obese mice during development of glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Hojo, Yuki; Koyama, Hajime; Otsuka, Hayuma; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    Glucose is the sole neural fuel for the brain and is essential for cognitive function. Abnormalities in glucose tolerance may be associated with impairments in cognitive function. Experimental obese model mice can be generated by an intraperitoneal injection of monosodium glutamate (MSG; 2 mg/g) once a day for 5 days from 1 day after birth. MSG-treated mice have been shown to develop glucose intolerance and exhibit chronic neuroendocrine dysfunction associated with marked cognitive malfunctions at 28-29  weeks old. Although hippocampal synaptic plasticity is impaired in MSG-treated mice, changes in synaptic transmission remain unknown. Here, we investigated whether glucose intolerance influenced cognitive function, synaptic properties and protein expression in the hippocampus. We demonstrated that MSG-treated mice developed glucose intolerance due to an impairment in the effectiveness of insulin actions, and showed cognitive impairments in the Y-maze test. Moreover, long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal synapses in hippocampal slices was impaired, and the relationship between the slope of extracellular field excitatory postsynaptic potential and stimulus intensity of synaptic transmission was weaker in MSG-treated mice. The protein levels of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and GluA1 glutamate receptor subunits decreased in the CA1 region of MSG-treated mice. These results suggest that deficits in glutamatergic presynapses as well as postsynapses lead to impaired synaptic plasticity in MSG-treated mice during the development of glucose intolerance, though it remains unknown whether impaired LTP is due to altered inhibitory transmission. It may be important to examine changes in glucose tolerance in order to prevent cognitive malfunctions associated with diabetes. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Glutamate monitoring in vitro and in vivo: recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieben, Nathalie Ines; Rose, Nadia Cherouati; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2009-01-01

    , and different techniques have been developed to this end. This review presents and discusses these techniques, especially the recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors, as well as the great potential of nanotechnology in glutamate sensing. Microdialysis coupled to analytical detection techniques...... is currently the most common method for in vivo glutamate sampling. However, the recent development and improvement of enzyme-based amperometric glutamate biosensors makes them a promising alternative to microdialysis for in vivo applications, as well as valuable devices for in vitro applications in basic...... neurobiological research. Another interesting group of biosensors for glutamate are fluorescence-based glutamate biosensors, which have unsurpassed spatio-temporal resolution and are therefore important tools for investigating glutamate dynamics during signaling. Adding to this list are biosensors based on nano...

  15. Monosodium glutamate 'allergy': menace or myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A N; Woessner, K M

    2009-05-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a salt form of a non-essential amino acid commonly used as a food additive for its unique flavour enhancing qualities. Since the first description of the 'Monosodium glutamate symptom complex', originally described in 1968 as the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome', a number of anecdotal reports and small clinical studies of variable quality have attributed a variety of symptoms to the dietary ingestion of MSG. Descriptions of MSG-induced asthma, urticaria, angio-oedema, and rhinitis have prompted some to suggest that MSG should be an aetiologic consideration in patients presenting with these conditions. This review prevents a critical review of the available literature related to the possible role of MSG in the so-called 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' and in eliciting asthmatic bronchospasm, urticaria, angio-oedema, and rhinitis. Despite concerns raised by early reports, decades of research have failed to demonstrate a clear and consistent relationship between MSG ingestion and the development of these conditions.

  16. The Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein...... synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase...... information about glutamine transfer. The present review will give information about glutamine trafficking and the tools used to map it as exemplified by discussions of published work employing brain cell cultures as well as intact animals. It will be documented that considerably more glutamine is transferred...

  17. Acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides act as antagonists against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death via Bcl-2/Bax signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Cui; Gao, Lixia; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Wei; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Chunxia

    2015-03-12

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs), depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4) D-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs) and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs) were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death.

  18. Acetylated Chitosan Oligosaccharides Act as Antagonists against Glutamate-Induced PC12 Cell Death via Bcl-2/Bax Signal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Hao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs, depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4 d-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death.

  19. Oligomers of Amyloid β Prevent Physiological Activation of the Cellular Prion Protein-Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Complex by Glutamate in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Laura T; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-08-12

    The dysfunction and loss of synapses in Alzheimer disease are central to dementia symptoms. We have recently demonstrated that pathological Amyloid β oligomer (Aβo) regulates the association between intracellular protein mediators and the synaptic receptor complex composed of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Here we sought to determine whether Aβo alters the physiological signaling of the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex upon glutamate activation. We provide evidence that acute exposure to Aβo as well as chronic expression of familial Alzheimer disease mutant transgenes in model mice prevents protein-protein interaction changes of the complex induced by the glutamate analog 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. We further show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine triggers the phosphorylation and activation of protein-tyrosine kinase 2-β (PTK2B, also referred to as Pyk2) and of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in wild-type brain slices but not in Alzheimer disease transgenic brain slices or wild-type slices incubated with Aβo. This study further distinguishes two separate Aβo-dependent signaling cascades, one dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and Fyn kinase activation and the other dependent on the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Thus, Aβo triggers multiple distinct PrP(C)-mGluR5-dependent events implicated in neurodegeneration and dementia. We propose that targeting the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex will reverse aberrant Aβo-triggered states of the complex to allow physiological fluctuations of glutamate signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glutamate oxidase biosensor based on mixed ceria and titania nanoparticles for the detection of glutamate in hypoxic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Ispas, Cristina; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Leiter, J C; Andreescu, Silvana

    2014-02-15

    We report on the design and development of a glutamate oxidase (GmOx) microelectrode for measuring l-glutamic acid (GluA) in oxygen-depleted conditions, which is based on the oxygen storage and release capacity of cerium oxides. To fabricate the biosensor, a nanocomposite of oxygen-rich ceria and titania nanoparticles dispersed within a semi-permeable chitosan membrane was co-immobilized with the enzyme GmOx on the surface of a Pt microelectrode. The oxygen delivery capacity of the ceria nanoparticles embedded in a biocompatible chitosan matrix facilitated enzyme stabilization and operation in oxygen free conditions. GluA was measured by amperometry at a working potential of 0.6 V vs Ag/AgCl. Detection limits of 0.594 µM and 0.493 µM and a sensitivity of 793 pA/µM (RSD 3.49%, n=5) and 395 pA/µM (RSD 2.48%, n=5) were recorded in oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions, with response times of 2s and 5s, respectively. The biosensor had good operational stability and selectivity against common interfering substances. Operation of the biosensor was tested in cerebrospinal fluid. Preliminary in vivo recording in Sprague-Dawley rats to monitor GluA in the cortex during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion demonstrate a potential application of the biosensor in hypoxic conditions. This method provides a solution to ensure functionality of oxidoreductase enzymes in oxygen-free environments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  3. Cell Type-Specific Expression of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Binding Protein in GABAergic Interneurons in the Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D. Ketchesin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone-binding protein (CRH-BP is a secreted glycoprotein that binds CRH with very high affinity to modulate CRH receptor activity. CRH-BP is widely expressed throughout the brain, with particularly high expression in regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral tegmental area and prefrontal cortex (PFC. Recent studies suggest a role for CRH-BP in stress-related psychiatric disorders and addiction, with the PFC being a potential site of interest. However, the molecular phenotype of CRH-BP-expressing cells in this region has not been well-characterized. In the current study, we sought to determine the cell type-specific expression of CRH-BP in the PFC to begin to define the neural circuits in which this key regulator is acting. To characterize the expression of CRH-BP in excitatory and/or inhibitory neurons, we utilized dual in situ hybridization to examine the cellular colocalization of CRH-BP mRNA with vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD mRNA in different subregions of the PFC. We show that CRH-BP is expressed predominantly in GABAergic interneurons of the PFC, as revealed by the high degree of colocalization (>85% between CRH-BP and GAD. To further characterize the expression of CRH-BP in this heterogenous group of inhibitory neurons, we examined the colocalization of CRH-BP with various molecular markers of GABAergic interneurons, including parvalbumin (PV, somatostatin (SST, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and cholecystokinin (CCK. We demonstrate that CRH-BP is colocalized predominantly with SST in the PFC, with lower levels of colocalization in PV- and CCK-expressing neurons. Our results provide a more comprehensive characterization of the cell type-specific expression of CRH-BP and begin to define its potential role within circuits of the PFC. These results will serve as the basis for future in vivo studies to manipulate CRH-BP in a cell type-specific manner to better

  4. Dopamine neurons release transmitter via a flickering fusion pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Roland G W; Mosharov, Eugene V; Sulzer, David

    2004-04-01

    A key question in understanding mechanisms of neurotransmitter release is whether the fusion pore of a synaptic vesicle regulates the amount of transmitter released during exocytosis. We measured dopamine release from small synaptic vesicles of rat cultured ventral midbrain neurons using carbon fiber amperometry. Our data indicate that small synaptic vesicle fusion pores flicker either once or multiple times in rapid succession, with each flicker releasing approximately 25-30% of vesicular dopamine. The incidence of events with multiple flickers was reciprocally regulated by phorbol esters and staurosporine. Thus, dopamine neurons regulate the amount of neurotransmitter released by small synaptic vesicles by controlling the number of fusion pore flickers per exocytotic event. This mode of exocytosis is a potential mechanism whereby neurons can rapidly reuse vesicles without undergoing the comparatively slow process of recycling.

  5. Depletion of vesicular zinc in dorsal horn of spinal cord causes increased neuropathic pain in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Seung; Danscher, Gorm; Schrøder, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    pain. The animals were then sacrificed 5 days later. The ZnT3 immunoreactivity was found to have decreased significantly in dorsal horn of fourth, fifth, and sixth lumbar segments. In parallel with the depressed ZnT3 immunoreactivity the amount of vesicular zinc decreased perceptibly in superficial...... to neuropathic pain we applied Chung's rodent pain model on BALB/c mice, and traced zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) proteins and zinc ions with immunohistochemistry and autometallography (AMG), respectively. Under anesthesia the left fifth lumbar spinal nerve was ligated in male mice in order to produced neuropathic...... gray matters of especially layer I-IV of the same segments. The transection-induced reduction of vesicular zinc in ZEN terminals of the dorsal horn was synchronic to reduced pain threshold, as measured by von Frey method. In a separate study, we observed intensive zinc selenite precipitation in somata...

  6. Vesicular noradrenaline stores in peripheral nerves of the rat and their modification by tranylcypromine.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillenz, M; Stanford, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    1 Vesicular noradrenaline stores were compared in the heart, salivary gland and vas deferens of the rat. 2 Noradrenaline storage vesicles in nerve terminals of different organs differed with respect to the amount of noradrenaline they contain in the endogenous store (content), the amount of exogenous noradrenaline they can take up from the circulation (uptake) and the amount of noradrenaline they contain when they are saturated (total storage capacity). 3 The data suggest that the vesicles in...

  7. Endoplasmosis and exoplasmosis: the evolutionary principles underlying endocytosis, exocytosis, and vesicular transport

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells are characterized by a multicompartmental structure with a?variety of organelles. Vesicular transport between these compartments requires membrane fusion events. Based on a?membrane topology view, we conclude that there are two basic mechanisms of membrane fusion, namely where the membranes first come in contact with the cis-side (the plasmatic phase of the lipid bilayer) or with the trans-side (the extra-plasmatic face). We propose to designate trans-membrane fusion ...

  8. Neurovirulence properties of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors in non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Erik; Nasar, Farooq; Coleman, John W.; Price, Roger E; Javadian, Ali; Draper, Kenneth; Lee, Margaret; Reilly, Patricia A.; Clarke, David K.; Hendry, R. Michael; Udem, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Although vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) neurovirulence and pathogenicity in rodents have been well studied, little is known about VSV pathogenicity in non-human primates. To address this question, we measured VSV viremia, shedding, and neurovirulence in macaques. Following intranasal inoculation, macaques shed minimal recombinant VSV (rVSV) in nasal washes for one day post-inoculation; viremia was not detected. Following intranasal inoculation of macaques, wild type (wt) VSV, rVSV, and two ...

  9. Protective efficacy of a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Minmin; Ge, Jinying; Li, Xiaofang; Chen, Weiye; Wang, Xijun; Wen, Zhiyuan; Bu, Zhigao

    2016-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes severe losses to the animal husbandry industry. In this study, a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the glycoprotein (G) of VSV (rL-VSV-G) was constructed and its pathogenicity and immune protective efficacy in mouse were evaluated. Results In pathogenicity evaluation test, the analysis of the viral distribution in mouse organs and body weight change showed that rL-VSV-G was safe in mice. In immune protection assay, the reco...

  10. Pseudotype formation of murine leukemia virus with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Emi, N; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K

    1991-01-01

    Mixed infection of a cell by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and retroviruses results in the production of progeny virions bearing the genome of one virus encapsidated by the envelope proteins of the other. The mechanism for the phenomenon of pseudotype formation is not clear, although specific recognition of a viral envelope protein by the nucleocapsid of an unrelated virus is presumably involved. In this study, we used Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vectors encoding...

  11. Production of vesicular stomatitis virus by antigen- or mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and continuous lymphoblastoid lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, M.; Feldman, J.D.; Kano, S.; Bloom, B.R.

    1973-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore at the ultrastructural level the nature of the cells engaged in the production of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in different lymphoid cell populations, particularly after stimulation with several different agents. Specifically, we have examined (a) lymph node cells from guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity activated by specific antigen, (b) murine spleen cells activated by selective B cell and T cell mitogens, and (c) cells of human and murine continuous lymphoblastoid or lymphoma lines.

  12. Efficacy study of vesicular gel containing methotrexate and menthol combination on parakeratotic rat skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Amrita; Goyal, Amit K; Kesarla, Rajesh; Murthy, Rayasa R

    2011-06-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is indicated in the symptomatic control of severe, recalcitrant, and disabling psoriasis. The oral or parenteral route of administration causes systemic toxicity. The topical route of delivery, though, reduces systemic toxicity and has limited applicability due to restricted permeability. Liposomal and niosomal MTX topical formulations have also been investigated with limited success to achieve drug localization in the skin. Menthol has been suggested in conditions of psoriasis, in addition to its skin-penetration-enhancing effect on drugs. The present work aimed at investigating the potential benefits of combining menthol with MTX in a vesicular gel base for not only improving the penetration and dermal availability of MTX, but also to render such a formulation more effective with greater patient acceptability. MTX liposomes were prepared by thin-film hydration, and the vesicles were characterized for drug-entrapment efficiency, size, and morphology. These liposomal vesicles were incorporated in a gel base, and this vesicular gel was evaluated for transdermal drug permeation and extent of drug accumulation in the skin, using a rat skin ex vivo model. Skin histology studies were carried out to investigate any structural changes caused by the permeation enhancers. Antipsoriatic efficacy of the formulations was tested in vivo, using the rat tail model. The results indicated that the vesicular gel containing menthol could cause maximum drug retention in the skin. The skin treated with menthol had a disrupted epidermis and microcavities. The in vivo studies also ascertained the effectiveness of the formulation in inducing a normal pattern of differentiation in the rat tail skin that initially showed parakeratosis, which is also characteristic of psoriatic epidermis. These results show the potential of vesicular gel containing MTX and menthol to improve penetration into the skin and cause drug retention in skin appendages.

  13. Formation and Stability of Prebiotically Relevant Vesicular Systems in Terrestrial Geothermal Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Manesh Prakash Joshi; Anupam Samanta; Gyana Ranjan Tripathy; Sudha Rajamani

    2017-01-01

    Terrestrial geothermal fields and oceanic hydrothermal vents are considered as candidate environments for the emergence of life on Earth. Nevertheless, the ionic strength and salinity of oceans present serious limitations for the self-assembly of amphiphiles, a process that is fundamental for the formation of first protocells. Consequently, we systematically characterized the efficiency of amphiphile assembly, and vesicular stability, in terrestrial geothermal environments, both, under simula...

  14. Inhibition of skin inflammation in mice by diclofenac in vesicular carriers: liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddeo, Carla; Sales, Octavio Diez; Valenti, Donatella; Saurí, Amparo Ruiz; Fadda, Anna Maria; Manconi, Maria

    2013-02-25

    Diclofenac-loaded phospholipid vesicles, namely conventional liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs (penetration enhancer-containing vesicles) were developed and their efficacy in TPA (phorbol ester) induced skin inflammation was examined. Vesicles were made from a cheap and unpurified mixture of phospholipids and diclofenac sodium; Transcutol P and propylene glycol were added to obtain PEVs, and ethanol to produce ethosomes. The structure and lamellar organization of the vesicle bilayer were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and small and wide angle X-ray scattering, as well as the main physico-chemical features. The formulations, along with a diclofenac solution and commercial Voltaren Emulgel, were tested in a comparative trial for anti-inflammatory efficacy on TPA-treated mice dorsal skin. Vesicles were around 100 nm, negatively charged, able to encapsulate diclofenac in good yields, and disclosed different lamellarity, as a function of the formulation composition. Vesicular formulations promoted drug accumulation and reduced the permeation. Administration of vesicular diclofenac on TPA-inflamed skin resulted in marked attenuation of oedema and leucocyte infiltration, especially using PEVs. Histology confirmed the effectiveness of vesicles, since they provided an amelioration of the tissual damage induced by TPA. The proposed approach based on vesicular nanocarriers may hold promising therapeutic value for treating a variety of inflammatory skin disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro percutaneous permeation and skin accumulation of finasteride using vesicular ethosomal carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found to be oppositely charged. Ethosomes were found to be more efficient delivery carriers with high encapsulation capacities. In vitro percutaneous permeation experiments demonstrated that the permeation of finasteride through human cadaver skin was significantly increased when ethosomes were used. The finasteride transdermal fluxes from ethosomes containing formulation (1.34 +/- 0.11 microg/cm(2)/h) were 7.4, 3.2 and 2.6 times higher than that of finasteride from aqueous solution, conventional liposomes and hydroethanolic solution respectively (P ethosomes produced a significant (P ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for enhancing percutaneous absorption of finasteride.

  16. Spiroindolines identify the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as a novel target for insecticide action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Sluder

    Full Text Available The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family.

  17. Influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Elisa; Larsen, Jannik; Hatzakis, Nikos S; Cabrera, Ingrid; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Veciana, Jaume; Stamou, Dimitrios; Ventosa, Nora

    2012-02-01

    A confocal fluorescence microscopy-based assay was used for studying the influence of the preparation route on the supramolecular organization of lipids in a vesicular system. In this work, vesicles composed of cholesterol and CTAB (1/1 mol %) or cholesterol and DOPC (2/8 mol %) and incorporating two membrane dyes were prepared by either a compressed fluid (CF)-based method (DELOS-susp) or a conventional film hydration procedure. They were subsequently immobilized and imaged individually using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Two integrated fluorescence intensities, I(dye1) and I(dye2), were assigned to each tracked vesicle, and their ratio, I(dye1)/I(dye2), was used for quantifying the degree of membrane inhomogeneity between individual vesicles within each sample. A distribution of I(dye1)/I(dye2) values was obtained for all the studied vesicular systems, indicating intrasample heterogeneity. The degree of inhomogeneity (DI) was similar for Chol/DOPC vesicles prepared by both procedures. In contrast, DI was more than double for the hydration method compared to the CF-based method in the case of Chol/CTAB vesicles, which can suffer from lipid demixing during film formation. These findings reveal a more homogeneous vesicle formation path by CFs, which warranted good homogeneity of the vesicular system, independently of the lipid mixture used. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  19. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  20. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling of glutamic acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum MNZ

    OpenAIRE

    Zareian,Mohsen; Ebrahimpour,Afshin; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Saari, Nazamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: L-glutamic acid, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism acts as a precursor of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). In the present study, culture condition for enhanced glutamic acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum MNZ was optimized and the influence of such conditions on GABA production was evaluated. Results: Results indicated that glutamic acid increased up to 3-fold (3.35) under the following condition: pH 4.5, tem...

  2. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  3. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    glutamate and sPLA2 from bee venom. sPLA2, at concentrations eliciting low neurotoxicity (acid into triacylglycerols. Free [3H]arachidonic acid accumulated at higher enzyme concentrations......, from Taipan snake venom. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 blocked glutamate effects and partially inhibited sPLA2 OS2 but not sPLA2 from bee venom-induced arachidonic acid release. Thus, the synergy with glutamate and very low concentrations of exogenously added sPLA2 suggests a potential role......Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding...

  4. Glutamate transporter: an unexpected target for some antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianren

    2005-02-09

    Glutamate transporter (GT) plays a major role in the mechanisms of glutamate homeostasis. Can this transporter system be a therapeutic target for glutamate-mediated neurological disorders? In January's edition of Nature, Rothstein et al (2005) reports that the most commonly used class of antibiotics (beta-lactam antibiotics) such as ceftriaxone promoted the expression of GLT1 and demonstrated a functional role in both in vitro and in vivo models of glutamate neurotoxicity. These findings indicate that positive promoters of GT expression may have a unique role in neuroprotection through regulating GT expression. This is also encouraging in search for new pharmacological tools for pain management.

  5. Glutamate. Its applications in food and contribution to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinap, S; Hajeb, P

    2010-08-01

    This article reviews application of glutamate in food and its benefits and role as one of the common food ingredients used. Monosodium glutamate is one of the most abundant naturally occurring amino acids which frequently added as a flavor enhancer. It produced a unique taste that cannot be provided by other basic taste (saltiness, sourness, sweetness and bitterness), referred to as a fifth taste (umami). Glutamate serves some functions in the body as well, serving as an energy source for certain tissues and as a substrate for glutathione synthesis. Glutamate has the potential to enhance food intake in older individuals and dietary free glutamate evoked a visceral sensation from the stomach, intestine and portal vein. Small quantities of glutamate used in combination with a reduced amount of table salt during food preparation allow for far less salt to be used during and after cooking. Because glutamate is one of the most intensely studied food ingredients in the food supply and has been found safe, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization placed it in the safest category for food additives. Despite a widespread belief that glutamate can elicit asthma, migraine headache and Chinese Restaurant Syndrome (CRS), there are no consistent clinical data to support this claim. In addition, findings from the literature indicate that there is no consistent evidence to suggest that individuals may be uniquely sensitive to glutamate. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence. PMID:26151922

  7. Needle-Free Injection of Vesicular Phospholipid Gels-A Novel Approach to Overcome an Administration Hurdle for Semisolid Depot Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsamer, Michaela; Winter, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Vesicular phospholipid gels (VPGs) are depot formulations for the sustained release of drugs which are characterized by a high amount of phospholipids in the formulation. They consist of physiological excipients only and therefore display high biocompatibility. Their manufacture is simple, cheap, solvent free, and ideal for the processing of proteins and peptides because of the low stress on the molecule, for example, by elevated temperatures. One major hurdle of VPGs is their high viscosity which makes them hard to almost impossible to inject with conventional, thin needles used for subcutaneous administration. However, so far no data are published to overcome this administration challenge. In the present study, needle-free injection was investigated and successfully applied as a technology for the easy and elegant administration of VPGs. VPGs with different phospholipid content were injected with a Biojector 2000 into gelatin blocks and full thickness pig skin postmortem as in vitro models and the injection depth was determined after injection. The release behavior was tested after shearing the VPG with the device to evaluate the effect of shearing on the drug release from the formulation. No differences were observed when compared to an ejection with needle and syringe. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Strontium D-Glutamate Hexahydrate and Strontium Di(hydrogen L-glutamate) Pentahydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, Stephan; Odderhede, Jette; Stahl, Kenny

    2005-01-01

    Sr(C5H7NO4)] center dot 6H(2)O, ( I), and [Sr(C5H8NO4)(2)] center dot 5H(2)O, (II), both crystallize with similar strontium - glutamate - water layers. In ( I), the neutral layers are connected through hydrogen bonds by water molecules, while in ( II), the positively charged layers are connected...

  9. Glutamate concentration in whole saliva and taste responses to monosodium glutamate in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scinska-Bienkowska, A; Wrobel, E; Turzynska, D; Bidzinski, A; Jezewska, E; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H; Golembiowska, K; Kostowski, W; Kukwa, A; Plaznik, A; Bienkowski, P

    2006-01-01

    It is universally accepted that saliva plays an important role in taste sensations. However, interactions between constituents of whole saliva and the five basic taste modalities are still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible relationship between endogenous glutamate (Glu) levels in whole saliva and taste responses to a prototypic umami substance, monosodium glutamate (MSG; 0.03-10.0%). Rated intensity and pleasantness of MSG taste was studied in healthy volunteers divided into a high glutamate (HG) in saliva (HG; n = 19) and low glutamate in saliva (LG; n = 18) group based on the median split level of salivary Glu. The HG and LG group did not differ in terms of electrogustometric thresholds, rated intensity of the MSG samples and pleasantness of distilled water and the lower MSG concentrations (0.03-1.0%). Perceived intensity of water taste was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the LG subjects. The LG group rated the higher MSG concentrations (3.0-10.0%) as more unpleasant (P < 0.01). The difference remained significant after controlling for a between-group difference in age. The present results suggest that individual differences in salivary Glu levels may alter hedonic responses to suprathreshold MSG concentrations.

  10. Distribution of glutamate receptors in the posterodorsal medial amygdala of adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpian, Francine; Brusco, Janaina; Calcagnotto, Maria Elisa; Moreira, Jorge E; Rasia-Filho, Alberto A

    2015-11-01

    The rat posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) has a remarkable neuronal plasticity and responds to olfactory/pheromonal stimuli to modulate emotional and reproductive behaviors. Glutamate is locally released by incoming sensorial pathways to establish and enforce synaptic inputs. Here, we combined DiI dye and immunolabeling procedure under confocal microscopy to describe the presence and distribution of glutamate receptors on neurons of the MePD of adult male rats. Western blot analysis interrogated binding specificity. Both AMPA (GluA1-4 subunits) and NMDA (GluN1 subunit) receptors were immunolabeled on cell bodies and along proximal and distal dendritic shafts. AMPA receptors were mainly observed on mushroom and stubby/wide spines, whereas NMDA receptors were found on thin spines. Colocalization of AMPA and NMDA receptors occurred in some spines. Filopodium did not show immunolabeled puncta on it. Our results are different from the distribution of glutamate receptors in the amygdaloid lateral nucleus, an upstream area involved with emotional processing, and suggest a region-specific excitatory transmission at proximal and distal dendritic branches. Altogether, these data provide new information for synaptic processing in the MePD likely related to the modulation of social behavior in rats.

  11. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  12. Inducible nitric oxide inhibitors block NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behaviors and medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadley C Bergstrom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS for studying the neurobehavioral effects of noncompetitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP. This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS aminoguanidine (AG and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in green tea and chocolate may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia.

  13. Effects of nicotine infusion on striatal glutamate and cortical non-protein-bound iron in hypoxic newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Jannicke Hanne; Saugstad, Ola Didrik

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia triggers a large cascade of mechanisms leading to brain damage. Release of glutamate and increased oxidative stress play substantial roles. Non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), which contributes to the production of free radical species through the Fenton reaction, increases in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Results from in vitro and adult animal studies show that nicotine can decrease extracellular levels of NPBI and glutamate. Nicotine's effects have further been shown to be dose-dependent, with lower doses showing neuroprotective, and higher doses showing neurotoxic effects. We wished to assess nicotine's effect on levels of NPBI and glutamate in an animal model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. 47 anesthetized newborn piglets were randomized to one of four infusions after hypoxia (nicotine 130 microg/kg/h, 260 microg/kg/h, adrenaline 0.05 microg/kg/min, saline 2.6 ml/kg/h). Glutamate in striatum and NPBI in cortex were analyzed in microdialysate. Striatal glutamate presented a significant rise for all the animals from baseline to the end of hypoxia (p nicotine 130 microg/kg/h versus saline (p = 0.002) 2 h after hypoxia. Cortical NPBI presented a significant rise from baseline to the end of hypoxia for all the animals (p nicotine 130 microg/kg/h versus saline 2 h after hypoxia (p = 0.013). Our findings support the hypothesis that nicotine can decrease extracellular levels of glutamate and NPBI in a neonatal model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. This suggests possible neuroprotective effects of a low dose of nicotine in neonates, as it has already been shown in adult models. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. pH modulation of glial glutamate transporters regulates synaptic transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrimmon, Donald R.; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the major site for termination of visceral sensory afferents contributing to homeostatic regulation of, for example, arterial pressure, gastric motility, and breathing. Whereas much is known about how different neuronal populations influence these functions, information about the role of glia remains scant. In this article, we propose that glia may contribute to NTS functions by modulating excitatory neurotransmission. We found that acidification (pH 7.0) depolarizes NTS glia by inhibiting K+-selective membrane currents. NTS glia also showed functional expression of voltage-sensitive glutamate transporters, suggesting that extracellular acidification regulates synaptic transmission by compromising glial glutamate uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evoked glutamatergic slow excitatory potentials (SEPs) in NTS neurons with repetitive stimulation (20 pulses at 10 Hz) of the solitary tract. This SEP depends on accumulation of glutamate following repetitive stimulation, since it was potentiated by blocking glutamate uptake with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or a glia-specific glutamate transport blocker, dihydrokainate (DHK). Importantly, extracellular acidification (pH 7.0) also potentiated the SEP. This effect appeared to be mediated through a depolarization-induced inhibition of glial transporter activity, because it was occluded by TBOA and DHK. In agreement, pH 7.0 did not directly alter d-aspartate-induced responses in NTS glia or properties of presynaptic glutamate release. Thus acidification-dependent regulation of glial function affects synaptic transmission within the NTS. These results suggest that glia play a modulatory role in the NTS by integrating local tissue signals (such as pH) with synaptic inputs from peripheral afferents. PMID:23615553

  15. Neuroprotection by donepezil against glutamate excitotoxicity involves stimulation of α7 nicotinic receptors and internalization of NMDA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H; Kihara, T; Hongo, H; Wu, X; Kem, WR; Shimohama, S; Akaike, A; Niidome, T; Sugimoto, H

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Glutamate excitotoxicity may be involved in ischaemic injury to the CNS and some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, exerts neuroprotective effects. Here we demonstrated a novel mechanism underlying the neuroprotection induced by donepezil. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell damage in primary rat neuron cultures was quantified by lactate dehydrogenase release. Morphological changes associated with neuroprotective effects of nicotine and AChE inhibitors were assessed by immunostaining. Cell surface levels of the glutamate receptor sub-units, NR1 and NR2A, were analyzed using biotinylation. Immunoblot was used to measure protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, total NR1, total NR2A and phosphorylated NR1. Immunoprecipitation was used to measure association of NR1 with the post-synaptic protein, PSD-95. Intracellular Ca2+ concentrations were measured with fura 2-acetoxymethylester. Caspase 3-like activity was measured using enzyme substrate, 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC)-DEVD. KEY RESULTS Levels of NR1, a core subunit of the NMDA receptor, on the cell surface were significantly reduced by donepexzil. In addition, glutamate-mediated Ca2+ entry was significantly attenuated by donepezil. Methyllycaconitine, an inhibitor of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), inhibited the donepezil-induced attenuation of glutamate-mediated Ca2+ entry. LY294002, a phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, had no effect on attenuation of glutamate-mediated Ca2+ entry induced by donepezil. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Decreased glutamate toxicity through down-regulation of NMDA receptors, following stimulation of α7 nAChRs, could be another mechanism underlying neuroprotection by donepezil, in addition to up-regulating the PI3K-Akt cascade or defensive system. PMID:20718745

  16. GABA and glutamate pathways are spatially and developmentally affected in the brain of Mecp2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita El-Khoury

    Full Text Available Proper brain functioning requires a fine-tuning between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, a balance maintained through the regulation and release of glutamate and GABA. Rett syndrome (RTT is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2 gene affecting the postnatal brain development. Dysfunctions in the GABAergic and glutamatergic systems have been implicated in the neuropathology of RTT and a disruption of the balance between excitation and inhibition, together with a perturbation of the electrophysiological properties of GABA and glutamate neurons, were reported in the brain of the Mecp2-deficient mouse. However, to date, the extent and the nature of the GABA/glutamate deficit affecting the Mecp2-deficient mouse brain are unclear. In order to better characterize these deficits, we simultaneously analyzed the GABA and glutamate levels in Mecp2-deficient mice at 2 different ages (P35 and P55 and in several brain areas. We used a multilevel approach including the quantification of GABA and glutamate levels, as well as the quantification of the mRNA and protein expression levels of key genes involved in the GABAergic and glutamatergic pathways. Our results show that Mecp2-deficient mice displayed regional- and age-dependent variations in the GABA pathway and, to a lesser extent, in the glutamate pathway. The implication of the GABA pathway in the RTT neuropathology was further confirmed using an in vivo treatment with a GABA reuptake inhibitor that significantly improved the lifespan of Mecp2-deficient mice. Our results confirm that RTT mouse present a deficit in the GABAergic pathway and suggest that GABAergic modulators could be interesting therapeutic agents for this severe neurological disorder.

  17. Identification and characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamic peptidases, from the MEROPS family G1, are a distinct group of peptidases characterized by a catalytic dyad consisting of a glutamate and a glutamine residue, optimal activity at acidic pH and insensitivity towards the microbial derived protease inhibitor, pepstatin. Previously, only glutamic peptidases derived from filamentous fungi have been characterized. Results We report the first characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase (pepG1, derived from the thermoacidophilic bacteria Alicyclobacillus sp. DSM 15716. The amino acid sequence identity between pepG1 and known fungal glutamic peptidases is only 24-30% but homology modeling, the presence of the glutamate/glutamine catalytic dyad and a number of highly conserved motifs strongly support the inclusion of pepG1 as a glutamic peptidase. Phylogenetic analysis places pepG1 and other putative bacterial and archaeal glutamic peptidases in a cluster separate from the fungal glutamic peptidases, indicating a divergent and independent evolution of bacterial and fungal glutamic peptidases. Purification of pepG1, heterologously expressed in Bacillus subtilis, was performed using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The purified peptidase was characterized with respect to its physical properties. Temperature and pH optimums were found to be 60°C and pH 3-4, in agreement with the values observed for the fungal members of family G1. In addition, pepG1 was found to be pepstatin-insensitive, a characteristic signature of glutamic peptidases. Conclusions Based on the obtained results, we suggest that pepG1 can be added to the MEROPS family G1 as the first characterized bacterial member.

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptors as a strategic target for the treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Georgia M; Godwin, Dwayne W

    2006-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that has many known types, including generalized epilepsies that involve cortical and subcortical structures. A proportion of patients have seizures that are resistant to traditional anti-epilepsy drugs, which mainly target ion channels or postsynaptic receptors. This resistance to conventional therapies makes it important to identify novel targets for the treatment of epilepsy. Given the involvement of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the etiology of epilepsy, targets that control glutamatergic neurotransmission are of special interest. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are of a family of eight G-protein-coupled receptors that serve unique regulatory functions at synapses that use the neurotransmitter glutamate. Their distribution within the central nervous system provides a platform for both presynaptic control of glutamate release, as well as postsynaptic control of neuronal responses to glutamate. In recent years, substantial efforts have been made towards developing selective agonists and antagonists which may be useful for targeting specific receptor subtypes in an attempt to harness the therapeutic potential of these receptors. We examine the possibility of intervening at these receptors by considering the specific example of absence seizures, a form of generalized, non-convulsive seizure that involves the thalamus. Views of the etiology of absence seizures have evolved over time from the "centrencephalic" concept of a diffuse subcortical pacemaker toward the "cortical focus" theory in which cortical hyperexcitability leads the thalamus into the 3-4 Hz rhythms that are characteristic of absence seizures. Since the cortex communicates with the thalamus via a massive glutamatergic projection, ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) blockade has held promise, but the global nature of iGluR intervention has precluded the clinical effectiveness of drugs that block iGluRs. In contrast, mGluRs, because they

  19. Nicotine self-administration differentially modulates glutamate and GABA transmission in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to enhance the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoliang; Chen, Hao; Wu, Xingjun; Matta, Shannon G; Sharp, Burt M

    2010-05-01

    The mechanisms by which chronic nicotine self-administration augments hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses to stress are only partially understood. Nicotine self-administration alters neuropeptide expression in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons within paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and increases PVN responsiveness to norepinephrine during mild footshock stress. Glutamate and GABA also modulate CRF neurons, but their roles in enhanced HPA responsiveness to footshock during chronic self-administration are unknown. We show that nicotine self-administration augmented footshock-induced PVN glutamate release, but further decreased GABA release. In these rats, intra-PVN kynurenic acid, a glutamate receptor antagonist, blocked enhanced adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone responses to footshock. In contrast, peri-PVN kynurenic acid, which decreases activity of GABA afferents to PVN, enhanced footshock-induced corticosterone secretion only in control rats self-administering saline. Additionally, in rats self-administering nicotine, footshock-induced elevation of corticosterone was significantly less than in controls after intra-PVN saclofen (GABA-B receptor antagonist). Therefore, the exaggerated reduction in GABA release by footshock during nicotine self-administration disinhibits CRF neurons. This disinhibition combined with enhanced glutamate input provides a new mechanism for HPA sensitization to stress by chronic nicotine self-administration. This mechanism, which does not preserve homeostatic plasticity, supports the concept that smoking functions as a chronic stressor that sensitizes the HPA to stress.

  20. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 in Learning and Memory Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonyi, Agnes; Schachtman, Todd; Christoffersen, Gert Rene Juul

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), a subtype in the group I mGluRs, couples to phospholipase C through Gq protein. Stimulation of mGluR5 leads to the release of calcium from intracellular stores and protein kinase C activation. In addition, links to different ion channels and other signa...... will provide new pharmacological tools to enhance our knowledge of these receptors in physiological and pathophysiological processes and will further facilitate new investigations on mGluR5 as a therapeutic target for a range of neurological and psychological disorders....

  1. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K Supports Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Replication by Regulating Cell Survival and Cellular Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Phat X.; Das, Anshuman; Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the family of hnRNPs and was recently shown in a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to support vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) growth. To decipher the role of hnRNP K in VSV infection, we conducted studies which suggest that the protein is required for VSV spreading. Virus binding to cells, entry, and nucleocapsid uncoating steps were not adversely affected in the absence of hnRNP K, whereas viral genome transcription and replication were reduced slightly. These results indicate that hnRNP K is likely involved in virus assembly and/or release from infected cells. Further studies showed that hnRNP K suppresses apoptosis of virus-infected cells, resulting in increased cell survival during VSV infection. The increased survival of the infected cells was found to be due to the suppression of proapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-XS and Bik in a cell-type-dependent manner. Additionally, depletion of hnRNP K resulted in not only significantly increased levels of T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) but also switching of the expression of the two isoforms of the protein (TIA1a and TIA1b), both of which inhibited VSV replication. hnRNP K was also found to support expression of several cellular proteins known to be required for VSV infection. Overall, our studies demonstrate hnRNP K to be a multifunctional protein that supports VSV infection via its role(s) in suppressing apoptosis of infected cells, inhibiting the expression of antiviral proteins, and maintaining the expression of proteins required for the virus. PMID:23843646

  2. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedore, Jake; Martyn, Amanda C; Li, Anson K C; Dolinar, Eric A; McDonald, Ian S; Coupland, Stuart G; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A; Hill, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina. A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5) deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox) and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP) amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses. This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina.

  3. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Bedore

    Full Text Available Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina.A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5 deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses.This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina.

  4. Cellular ATP release in the lung and airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Ito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is a universal energy source synthesized by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic glycolysis and transported by the vesicular nucleotide transporter for storage in secretory vesicles. Extracellular ATP regulates physiological functions and homeostasis of the respiratory system and is associated with pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Thus, modulation of ATP and purinergic signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach to pulmonary disease. ATP is released from alveolar epithelial cells, airway epithelial cells, airway smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in response to various chemical and mechanical stimuli. In addition to conductive pathways such as connexins and pannexins, vesicular exocytosis is involved in the mechanisms of ATP release from the cells. Imaging approaches enable us to visualize ATP release from not only cultured cells but also lung tissue ex vivo. Extracellular vesicles, exosomes and membrane-derived microvesicles, containing cytoplasmic proteins, mRNA and microRNA, represent important mediators of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular microenvironment. However, it is not known whether extracellular vesicles contain ATP as an intercellular messenger. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of cellular ATP release and purinergic signaling in the respiratory system.

  5. Release of luminal exosomes contributes to TLR4-mediated epithelial antimicrobial defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoku Hu

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles released by most cell types from multi-vesicular endosomes. They are speculated to transfer molecules to neighboring or distant cells and modulate many physiological and pathological procedures. Exosomes released from the gastrointestinal epithelium to the basolateral side have been implicated in antigen presentation. Here, we report that luminal release of exosomes from the biliary and intestinal epithelium is increased following infection by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. Release of exosomes involves activation of TLR4/IKK2 signaling through promoting the SNAP23-associated vesicular exocytotic process. Downregulation of let-7 family miRNAs by activation of TLR4 signaling increases SNAP23 expression, coordinating exosome release in response to C. parvum infection. Intriguingly, exosomes carry antimicrobial peptides of epithelial cell origin, including cathelicidin-37 and beta-defensin 2. Activation of TLR4 signaling enhances exosomal shuttle of epithelial antimicrobial peptides. Exposure of C. parvum sporozoites to released exosomes decreases their viability and infectivity both in vitro and ex vivo. Direct binding to the C. parvum sporozoite surface is required for the anti-C. parvum activity of released exosomes. Biliary epithelial cells also increase exosomal release and display exosome-associated anti-C. parvum activity following LPS stimulation. Our data indicate that TLR4 signaling regulates luminal exosome release and shuttling of antimicrobial peptides from the gastrointestinal epithelium, revealing a new arm of mucosal immunity relevant to antimicrobial defense.

  6. Linking tricyclic antidepressants to ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Laura; Gentile, Lisa

    2005-07-29

    Although tricyclic antidepressants have been in existence since the 1940s when they were discovered upon screening iminodibenzyl derivatives for other potential therapeutic uses, their mechanism of action has remained unclear [A. Goodman Gilman, T.W. Rall, A.S. Nies, P. Taylor, Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, eighth ed., Pergamon Press, New York, 1990]. In addition to their ability to hinder the reuptake of biogenic amines, there is mounting evidence that the tricyclic antidepressants inhibit glutamate transmission. Here, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy is used to document the binding of desipramine, a member of the tricyclic antidepressant family, to a well-defined extracellular glutamate binding domain (S1S2) of the GluR2 subunit of the amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor. The binding is distinct from those of other known effectors of the receptor, including the endogenous sulfated neurosteroids pregnenolone sulfate and 3alpha-hydroxy-5beta-pregnan-20-one sulfate, and is consistent with a conformational change upon binding that is allosterically transmitted to the channel region of the receptor.

  7. Inhibition of glutamate regulated calcium entry into leukemic megakaryoblasts reduces cell proliferation and supports differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Tania; Green, Taryn N; Morel-Kopp, Marie-Christine; Ward, Christopher M; McGregor, Ailsa L; McGlashan, Susan R; Bohlander, Stefan K; Browett, Peter J; Teague, Lochie; During, Matthew J; Skerry, Timothy M; Josefsson, Emma C; Kalev-Zylinska, Maggie L

    2015-09-01

    Human megakaryocytes release glutamate and express glutamate-gated Ca(2+)-permeable N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) that support megakaryocytic maturation. While deregulated glutamate pathways impact oncogenicity in some cancers, the role of glutamate and NMDARs in megakaryocytic malignancies remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDARs participate in Ca(2+) responses in leukemic megakaryoblasts and if so, whether modulating NMDAR activity could influence cell growth. Three human cell lines, Meg-01, Set-2 and K-562 were used as models of leukemic megakaryoblasts. NMDAR components were examined in leukemic cells and human bone marrow, including in megakaryocytic disease. Well-established NMDAR modulators (agonists and antagonists) were employed to determine NMDAR effects on Ca(2+) flux, cell viability, proliferation and differentiation. Leukemic megakaryoblasts contained combinations of NMDAR subunits that differed from normal bone marrow and the brain. NMDAR agonists facilitated Ca(2+) entry into Meg-01 cells, amplified Ca(2+) responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and promoted growth of Meg-01, Set-2 and K-562 cells. Low concentrations of NMDAR inhibitors (riluzole, memantine, MK-801 and AP5; 5-100μM) were weakly cytotoxic but mainly reduced cell numbers by suppressing proliferation. The use-dependent NMDAR inhibitor, memantine (100μM), reduced numbers and proliferation of Meg-01 cells to less than 20% of controls (IC50 20μM and 36μM, respectively). In the presence of NMDAR inhibitors cells acquired morphologic and immunophenotypic features of megakaryocytic differentiation. In conclusion, NMDARs provide a novel pathway for Ca(2+) entry into leukemic megakaryoblasts that supports cell proliferation but not differentiation. NMDAR inhibitors counteract these effects, suggesting a novel opportunity to modulate growth of leukemic megakaryoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  9. Electrochemical Synthesis of Polypyrrole Layers Doped with Glutamic Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meteleva-Fischer, Yulia V.; Von Hauff, Elizabeth; Parisi, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films doped with glutamic ions were investigated as interesting materials for potential use as molecularly selective surfaces. Pyrrole and glutamate interact in aqueous solution, resulting in the formation of a prominent band at 240 nm in the absorption

  10. Surface grafting of poly(L-glutamates). 3. Block copolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, RH; Siesling, EA; Werkman, PJ; Vorenkamp, EJ; Schouten, AJ

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the synthesis of surface-grafted AB-block copolypeptides, consisting of poly(gamma -benzyl L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the A-block and poly(gamma -methyl L-glutamate) (PMLG) as the B-block. Immobilized primary amine groups of (,gamma -aminopropyl)triethoxysilane

  11. changes in activities of enzymes of glutamate metabolism in rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regions of brain under sub-acute dosing. Glutamine Synthetase. Glutamine synthetase converts glutamate into glutamine, and glutamine levels in neural tissues help in the m~intenance of glutamate concentration for its general .. function as an amino acid as well as for the neurotransmitter poo! (Shank and. Aprison, 1981 ).

  12. Glutamate Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg-Helms, Hans Christian; Uhd-Nielsen, Carsten; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    L-Glutamate is considered the most important excitatory amino acid in the mammalian brain. Strict control of its concentration in the brain interstitial fluid is important to maintain neurotransmission and avoid excitotoxicity. The role of astrocytes in handling L-glutamate transport and metaboli...

  13. Some Properties of Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: ammonia assimilation, glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH, Gracilaria sordida, red alga, enzyme activity. Glutamate ... NAD-/NADP- and NADH-/ NADPH-dependent activities were the order of 11:1 and 1:1.8, respectively. The pH optima for ... This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  14. Study on soluble expression of glutamate dehydrogenase from tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-20

    Mar 20, 2012 ... Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC1.4.1.2) catalyses the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate for the synthesis of glutamate using ... CsGDH2 was predominantly found in insoluble bodies and no soluble protein was detected by either .... phosphatase (TAP) to remove the 50 cap structure from intact full-.

  15. Dietary glutamate will not affect pain in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Janssens, E.L.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Injection of glutamate into the masseter muscle has been suggested-to evoke an increase in intensity of and sensitivity to pain. A case study showed that a diet low in monosodium glutamate (MSG) might accomplish pain relief in fibromyalgia (FM). To clarify the possible pain-modulating effect of

  16. Histochemical Studies of the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a commonly used food additive and there is growing concern that excitotoxins such as MSG play a critical role in the development of several hepatic disorders. Objectives: The histochemical effect of monosodium glutamate was investigated on the liver of adult Wistar rats.

  17. Microscopic picture of the aqueous solvation of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, E.J.M.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Meijer, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of glutamic acid and glutamate solvated in water, using both density functional theory (DFT) and the Gromos96 force field. We focus on the microscopic aspects of the solvation−particularly on the hydrogen bond structures and dynamics−and investigate the

  18. Histological Studies of the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a commonly used food additive and there is growing concern that this may play a critical role in the aethiopathogenesis of anovulatory infertility. Objectives: The effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) used as food additive on the ovaries of adult Wistar rat was investigated.

  19. Coxiella burnetii effector protein subverts clathrin-mediated vesicular trafficking for pathogen vacuole biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Howe, Dale; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Successful macrophage colonization by Coxiella burnetii, the cause of human Q fever, requires pathogen-directed biogenesis of a large, growth-permissive parasitophorous vacuole (PV) with phagolysosomal characteristics. The vesicular trafficking pathways co-opted by C. burnetii for PV development are poorly defined; however, it is predicted that effector proteins delivered to the cytosol by a defective in organelle trafficking/intracellular multiplication (Dot/Icm) type 4B secretion system are required for membrane recruitment. Here, we describe involvement of clathrin-mediated vesicular trafficking in PV generation and the engagement of this pathway by the C. burnetii type 4B secretion system substrate Coxiella vacuolar protein A (CvpA). CvpA contains multiple dileucine [DERQ]XXXL[LI] and tyrosine (YXXΦ)-based endocytic sorting motifs like those recognized by the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes AP1, AP2, and AP3. A C. burnetii ΔcvpA mutant exhibited significant defects in replication and PV development, confirming the importance of CvpA in infection. Ectopically expressed mCherry-CvpA localized to tubular and vesicular domains of pericentrosomal recycling endosomes positive for Rab11 and transferrin receptor, and CvpA membrane interactions were lost upon mutation of endocytic sorting motifs. Consistent with CvpA engagement of the endocytic recycling system, ectopic expression reduced uptake of transferrin. In pull-down assays, peptides containing CvpA-sorting motifs and full-length CvpA interacted with AP2 subunits and clathrin heavy chain. Furthermore, depletion of AP2 or clathrin by siRNA treatment significantly inhibited C. burnetii replication. Thus, our results reveal the importance of clathrin-coated vesicle trafficking in C. burnetii infection and define a role for CvpA in subverting these transport mechanisms. PMID:24248335

  20. Production of poly-γ-glutamic acid by a thermotolerant glutamate-independent strain and comparative analysis of the glutamate dependent difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Chen, Guiguang; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Bin; Dong, Mengna; Wu, Yange; Wang, Jun; Che, Zhiqun; Liang, Zhiqun

    2017-11-25

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a promising microbial polymer with wide applications in industry, agriculture and medicine. In this study, a novel glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing strain with thermotolerant characteristics was isolated and identified as Bacillus subtilis GXG-5, then its product was also characterized. The fermentation process was optimized by single-factor tests, and results showed that high temperature (50 °C) was especially suitable for the γ-PGA production by GXG-5. The γ-PGA yield reached 19.50 ± 0.75 g/L with substrate conversion efficiency of 78% at 50 °C in 10 L fermentor. Comparison of GXG-5 and GXA-28 (glutamate-dependent strain) under respective optimal fermentation conditions, the γ-PGA yield of GXG-5 was 19.0% higher than that of GXA-28, and GXG-5 was also superior to GXA-28 in the availability of carbon sources and substrates. Furthermore, the glutamate dependent difference between GXA-28 and GXG-5 was analyzed by genomic sequencing, results indicated that genes related to the glutamate dependent difference mainly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism and amino acid metabolism, and 13 genes related to γ-PGA synthesis were mutated in GXG-5. This study provided a potential glutamate-independent strain to replace glutamate-dependent strain for γ-PGA production, and shared novel information for understanding the glutamate dependent difference at the genomic level.

  1. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation inactivation analysis of fusion and hemolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation inactivation analysis was used to determine the size of the functional unit responsible for fusion of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with cardiolipin or phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine (1:1) liposomes, and for VSV-induced hemolysis. When radiation-insensitive background values were subtracted, the calculated functional units for all three activities were similar, ranging from 866 to 957 kDa, equivalent to about 15 G protein molecules. This is in striking contrast to results of similar studies with influenza and Sendai viruses, in which the functional unit corresponded in size to a single fusion protein monomer, and suggests that VSV fusion may occur by a different mechanism.

  3. Initiation and Direction of RNA Transcription by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Virion Transcriptase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Polly; Bishop, D. H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of RNA transcription by the virion-bound RNA transcriptase of vesicular stomatitis virus has been examined. Multiple initiation sequences have been observed, two of which have been characterized (pppApCpGp... and pppGpCp...) suggestive of a transcription process which can start at different sites along the template RNA. By the use of sequential labeling techniques and exonucleases, it has been determined that there is a 5′ to 3′ direction of product RNA synthesis. PMID:4349490

  4. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection Promotes Immune Evasion by Preventing NKG2D-Ligand Surface Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has recently gained attention for its oncolytic ability in cancer treatment. Initially, we hypothesized that VSV infection could increase immune recognition of cancer cells through induction of the immune stimulatory NKG2D-ligands. Here we show that VSV infection......D-ligand expression at an early post-transcriptional level. Our results show that VSV possess an escape mechanism, which could affect the immune recognition of VSV infected cancer cells. This may also have implications for immune recognition of cancer cells after combined treatment with VSV...

  5. ANTICUERPOS CONTRA EL VIRUS DE ESTOMATITIS VESICULAR EN HUANGANAS (Tayassu pecari) EN MADRE DE DIOS, PERÚ

    OpenAIRE

    Carruitero H., Susan; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Rivera G., Hermelinda; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.; Ramírez V., Mercy; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; More B., Juan; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima.; Zúñiga H., Alfonso; Proyecto ÁREAS–Amazonía de la World Wildlife Fund (WWF-Peru); Romero S., Mónica; Proyecto ÁREAS–Amazonía de la World Wildlife Fund (WWF-Peru)

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar la presencia de anticuerpos neutralizantes contra los serotipos New Jersey (NJ) e Indiana subtipo 1 (IND-1) del virus Estomatitis Vesicular (VEV) en huanganas (Tayassu pecari) de vida libre de las localidades de Boca de Manu (n=30), Concesión para la Conservación Los Amigos (n=10) y La Reserva Nacional Tambopata/Parque Nacional Bahuaja Sonene (n=48) en el departamento de Madre de Dios. La presencia de anticuerpos contra el VEV fue determinado me...

  6. MEJORAMIENTO DE LA PRODUCCIÓN DE UNA VACUNA OLEOSA CONTRA ESTOMATITIS VESICULAR BIVALENTE

    OpenAIRE

    Arbeláez, Gustavo; Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Cra. 7 Nº 43 - 82, Bogotá; Mondragón, Nestor; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá; Turriago, Clara; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá; Mora, Nelson; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá; Méndez, María; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá

    2008-01-01

    El presente estudio calculó diferentes MI (Multiplicidad de Infección) para la producción de cultivos industriales de virus de Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) y evaluó el efecto de la cantidad de glicoproteína G en la inducción de respuesta de anticuerpos neutralizantes contra el virus de EV en cobayos inmunizados con una vacuna oleosa bivalente (Indiana (I) y New Jersey (NJ)). Al establecer el MI más eficiente se logró mejorar la cinética de infección de los cultivos industriales disminuyendo los...

  7. The Effects of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizae on the Plant Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Cucumber

    OpenAIRE

    ÇIĞŞAR, Sibel; Sari, Nebahat

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizae on plant growth of cucumber. Yayla F 1 seeds were sown in sterile and non-sterile growing medium (organic manure:soil:mix of sand; v:v:v 1:1:1). The mix inoculum of Glomus mosseaand Glomus fasciculatumspores (10 g/plant) was placed 5 cm below the cucumber seed before sowing. In order to investigate the effects of VA mycorrhizae on plant growth, plant height, diameter, number of nodes were measured ...

  8. The role of glutamate and its receptors in autism and the use of glutamate receptor antagonists in treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and may be a key neurotransmitter involved in autism. Literature pertaining to glutamate and autism or related disorders (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) is reviewed in this article. Interest in glutamatergic dysfunction in autism is high due to increasing convergent evidence implicating the system in the disorder from peripheral biomarkers, neuroimaging, protein expression, genetics and animal models. Currently, there are no pharmaceutical interventions approved for autism that address glutamate deficits in the disorder. New treatments related to glutamatergic neurotransmission, however, are emerging. In addition, older glutamate-modulating medications with approved indications for use in other disorders are being investigated for re-tasking as treatments for autism. This review presents evidence in support of glutamate abnormalities in autism and the potential for translation into new treatments for the disorder. PMID:24752754

  9. Improved working memory but no effect on striatal vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 after omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Narendran

    Full Text Available Studies in rodents indicate that diets deficient in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA lower dopamine neurotransmission as measured by striatal vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2 density and amphetamine-induced dopamine release. This suggests that dietary supplementation with fish oil might increase VMAT2 availability, enhance dopamine storage and release, and improve dopamine-dependent cognitive functions such as working memory. To investigate this mechanism in humans, positron emission tomography (PET was used to measure VMAT2 availability pre- and post-supplementation of n-3 PUFA in healthy individuals. Healthy young adult subjects were scanned with PET using [(11C]-(+-α-dihydrotetrabenzine (DTBZ before and after six months of n-3 PUFA supplementation (Lovaza, 2 g/day containing docosahexaenonic acid, DHA 750 mg/d and eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA 930 mg/d. In addition, subjects underwent a working memory task (n-back and red blood cell membrane (RBC fatty acid composition analysis pre- and post-supplementation. RBC analysis showed a significant increase in both DHA and EPA post-supplementation. In contrast, no significant change in [(11C]DTBZ binding potential (BP(ND in striatum and its subdivisions were observed after supplementation with n-3 PUFA. No correlation was evident between n-3 PUFA induced change in RBC DHA or EPA levels and change in [(11C]DTBZ BP(ND in striatal subdivisions. However, pre-supplementation RBC DHA levels was predictive of baseline performance (i.e., adjusted hit rate, AHR on 3-back on the n-back task (y = 0.19+0.07, r(2 = 0.55, p = 0.009. In addition, subjects AHR performance improved on 3-back post-supplementation (pre 0.65±0.27, post 0.80±0.15, p = 0.04. The correlation between n-back performance, and DHA levels are consistent with reports in which higher DHA levels is related to improved cognitive performance. However, the lack of change in [(11C]DBTZ BP(ND indicates that

  10. Poly(γ-glutamic acid), coagulation? Anticoagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Peng, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Chi, Bo; Xu, Hong; Mao, Chun; Feng, Shuaihui

    2016-11-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) powder was usually used as hemostatic agent because of its excellent physical properties of water-absorption and water-locking. However, if γ-PGA absorbs enough water, how about its blood compatibility? Here, the other side of the coin was investigated. The anticoagulant properties of γ-PGA were characterized by in vitro coagulation tests, hemolytic assay, platelet adhesion, and platelet activation. Moreover, cytotoxicity experiments of γ-PGA were also carried out by MTT assay. Results indicated that the sufficient water-absorbed γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property and non-cytotoxicity. It means γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property, non-cytotoxicity. If γ-PGA has absorbed enough water, it can be used as an anticoagulation biomaterial. With double effects (coagulation and anticoagulation), the γ-PGA with desirable bioproperties can be readily tailored to cater to various biomedical applications.

  11. Calcium regulates glutamate dehydrogenase and poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yonghong; Dong, Guiru; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yuling; Chen, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of Ca(2+) on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and its role in poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthesis in Bacillus natto HSF 1410. When the concentration of Ca(2+) varied from 0 to 0.1 g/l in the growth medium of B. natto HSF 1410, γ-PGA production increased from 6.8 to 9.7 g/l, while GDH specific activity and NH4Cl consumption improved from 183 to 295 U/mg and from 0.65 to 0.77 g/l, respectively. GDH with α-ketoglutarate as substrate primarily used NADPH as coenzyme with a K m of 0.08 mM. GDH was responsible for the synthesis of endogenous glutamate. The specific activity of GDH remained essentially unchanged in the presence of CaCl2 (0.05-0.2 g/l) in vitro. However, the specific activity of GDH and its expression was significantly increased by CaCl2 in vivo. Therefore, the regulation of GDH and PGA synthesis by Ca(2+) is an intracellular process. Calcium regulation may be an effective approach for producing γ-PGA on an industrial scale.

  12. Genomic analyses of gas (nitric oxide and carbon monoxide) and small molecule transmitter (acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA) signaling systems in Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoole, Matthew D; D'Andrea, Brandon T; Baer, Kevin N; Christie, Andrew E

    2012-06-01

    Diffusible gasses and small molecule transmitters are classes of compounds used by neurons and other cell types for local and hormonal signaling. In crustaceans, there is evidence for the neuronal production of the gasses nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), as well as the small molecule transmitters acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA. While much is known about the physiological roles played by these molecules in crustaceans, little is known about them at the molecular level. Here, we have mined the genome of Daphnia pulex for genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes, receptors and transporters necessary for establishing each of these transmitter systems. The biosynthetic enzyme genes identified included nitric oxide synthase, heme oxygenase, choline acetyltransferase, glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase. Genes encoding several transporters (e.g. vesicular acetylcholine transporter) were also characterized, as were ones involved in transmitter degradation/recycling (e.g. acetylcholine esterase); genes encoding receptors for NO and CO (i.e. soluble guanylyl cyclase), and for each small molecule transmitter (both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors for each compound) were identified. These data provide the first molecular descriptions of gas and small molecule transmitter signaling systems in D. pulex, and provide frameworks for future molecular, anatomical and physiological investigations of them in Daphnia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of aminotransferases in glutamate metabolism of human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger, James J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lewis, Ian A. [Princeton University, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics (United States); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Human erythrocytes require a continual supply of glutamate to support glutathione synthesis, but are unable to transport this amino acid across their cell membrane. Consequently, erythrocytes rely on de novo glutamate biosynthesis from {alpha}-ketoglutarate and glutamine to maintain intracellular levels of glutamate. Erythrocytic glutamate biosynthesis is catalyzed by three enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutamine aminohydrolase (GA). Although the presence of these enzymes in RBCs has been well documented, the relative contributions of each pathway have not been established. Understanding the relative contributions of each biosynthetic pathway is critical for designing effective therapies for sickle cell disease, hemolytic anemia, pulmonary hypertension, and other glutathione-related disorders. In this study, we use multidimensional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple reaction mode mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) to measure the kinetics of de novo glutamate biosynthesis via AST, ALT, and GA in intact cells and RBC lysates. We show that up to 89% of the erythrocyte glutamate pool can be derived from ALT and that ALT-derived glutamate is subsequently used for glutathione synthesis.

  14. Posttranslational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min eMao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues on their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiquitination and sumoylation at lysine residues also occur to certain glutamate receptors. These modifications are dynamic and reversible in nature and are regulatable by changing synaptic inputs. The regulated modifications significantly impact the receptor in many ways, including interrelated changes in biochemistry (synthesis, subunit assembling and protein-protein interactions, subcellular redistribution (trafficking, endocytosis, synaptic delivery and clustering, and physiology, usually associated with changes in synaptic plasticity. Glutamate receptors are enriched in the striatum and cooperate closely with dopamine to regulate striatal signaling. Emerging evidence shows that modification processes of striatal glutamate receptors are sensitive to addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamines. Altered modifications are believed to be directly linked to enduring receptor/synaptic plasticity and drug-seeking. This review summarizes several major types of modifications of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of these modifications in striatal signaling and in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction.

  15. Regulation of acetylcholine receptor clustering by ADF/cofilin-directed vesicular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Wai; Han, Jianzhong; Bamburg, James R; Han, Liang; Lynn, Rachel; Zheng, James Q

    2009-07-01

    Postsynaptic receptor localization is crucial for synapse development and function, but the underlying cytoskeletal mechanisms remain elusive. Using Xenopus neuromuscular junctions as a model, we found that actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin regulated actin-dependent vesicular trafficking of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) to the postsynaptic membrane. Active ADF/cofilin was concentrated in small puncta adjacent to AChR clusters and was spatiotemporally correlated with the formation and maintenance of surface AChR clusters. Notably, increased actin dynamics, vesicular markers and intracellular AChRs were all enriched at the sites of ADF/cofilin localization. Furthermore, a substantial amount of new AChRs was detected at these ADF/cofilin-enriched sites. Manipulation of either ADF/cofilin activity through its serine-3 phosphorylation or ADF/cofilin localization via 14-3-3 proteins markedly attenuated AChR insertion and clustering. These results suggest that spatiotemporally restricted ADF/cofilin-mediated actin dynamics regulate AChR trafficking during the development of neuromuscular synapses.

  16. Ethosomes: versatile vesicular carriers for efficient transdermal delivery of therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikas; Golhani, Dilip; Shukla, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Delivery across skin is attractive due to its easy accessibility. However, drug delivery across skin is still a challenge in biomedical sciences. Over the past few decades, various successful novel devices and techniques have emerged to optimize drug delivery across skin whose obstructing behavior constricts entry of most of the therapeutic agents. Inability of various conventional vesicular formulations, e.g. liposomes to pass through the tapered (>30 nm) intercellular channels of stratum corneum, rendered invention of some lipid based vesicular carrier systems such as ethosomes which consist of phospholipid, ethanol and water. Ethosomes are non-invasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. In spite of their sophistication in conceptuality, they are exemplified by easiness in their preparation, safety and efficacy - a combination that can highly inflate their application. This review attempts to describe all aspects of ethosomes including roles and upshots of different excipients, various methods of preparation and characterizations, research reports on various drug deliveries, patent reports and future prospects.

  17. Hitchhiking vesicular transport routes to the vacuole: Amyloid recruitment to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Neuser, Nicole; Tyedmers, Jens

    2017-03-04

    Sequestration of aggregates into specialized deposition sites occurs in many species across all kingdoms of life ranging from bacteria to mammals and is commonly believed to have a cytoprotective function. Yeast cells possess at least 3 different spatially separated deposition sites, one of which is termed "Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD)" and harbors amyloid aggregates. We have recently discovered that recruitment of amyloid aggregates to the IPOD uses an actin cable based recruitment machinery that also involves vesicular transport. 1 Here we discuss how different proteins known to be involved in vesicular transport processes to the vacuole might act to guide amyloid aggregates to the IPOD. These factors include the Myosin V motor protein Myo2 involved in transporting vacuolar vesicles along actin cables, the transmembrane protein Atg9 involved in the recruitment of large precursor hydrolase complexes to the vacuole, the phosphatidylinositol/ phosphatidylcholine (PI/PC) transfer protein Sec 14 and the SNARE chaperone Sec 18. Furthermore, we present new data suggesting that the yeast dynamin homolog Vps1 is also crucial for faithful delivery of the amyloid model protein PrD-GFP to the IPOD. This is in agreement with a previously identified role for Vps1 in recruitment of heat-denatured aggregates to a perivacuolar deposition site. 2.

  18. Vesicular calcium regulates coat retention, fusogenicity, and size of pre-Golgi intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Marvin; Nycz, Deborah C; Joglekar, Ashwini; Fertschai, Ismene; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F; Hay, Jesse C

    2010-03-15

    The significance and extent of Ca(2+) regulation of the biosynthetic secretory pathway have been difficult to establish, and our knowledge of regulatory relationships integrating Ca(2+) with vesicle coats and function is rudimentary. Here, we investigated potential roles and mechanisms of luminal Ca(2+) in the early secretory pathway. Specific depletion of luminal Ca(2+) in living normal rat kidney cells using cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) resulted in the extreme expansion of vesicular tubular cluster (VTC) elements. Consistent with this, a suppressive role for vesicle-associated Ca(2+) in COPII vesicle homotypic fusion was demonstrated in vitro using Ca(2+) chelators. The EF-hand-containing protein apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2), previously implicated in the stabilization of sec31 at endoplasmic reticulum exit sites, inhibited COPII vesicle fusion in a Ca(2+)-requiring manner, suggesting that ALG-2 may be a sensor for the effects of vesicular Ca(2+) on homotypic fusion. Immunoisolation established that Ca(2+) chelation inhibits and ALG-2 specifically favors residual retention of the COPII outer shell protein sec31 on pre-Golgi fusion intermediates. We conclude that vesicle-associated Ca(2+), acting through ALG-2, favors the retention of residual coat molecules that seem to suppress membrane fusion. We propose that in cells, these Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms temporally regulate COPII vesicle interactions, VTC biogenesis, cargo sorting, and VTC maturation.

  19. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lauria

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP, we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes.

  20. Vibrio tapetis isolated from vesicular skin lesions in Dover sole Solea solea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, A M; Chiers, K; Soetaert, M; Lasa, A; Romalde, J L; Polet, H; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2015-06-29

    Vibrio tapetis is primarily known as the causative agent for brown ring disease in bivalves, although it has been isolated from cultivated fish during mortalities on farms. Here we describe the first isolation of V. tapetis from wild-caught and subsequently captive-held Dover sole Solea solea. Pathological features consisted of multifocal circular greyish-white skin discolourations evolving into vesicular lesions and subsequent ulcerations on the pigmented side. On the non-pigmented side, multiple circular lesions-white at the center and red at the edges-were evident. Histological examination of the vesicular lesions revealed dermal fluid-filled spaces, collagen tissue necrosis and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate, with large numbers of small rod-shaped bacteria. In the deep skin lesions, loss of scales and dermal connective tissue, with degeneration and fragmentation of the myofibres bordering the ulceration, were noted. Serotyping, DNA-DNA hybridization and REP- and ERIC-PCR techniques showed that the retrieved isolates displayed a profile similar to the representative strain of genotype/serotype O2 which originally was isolated from carpet-shell clam Venerupis decussata and to which isolates obtained from wedge sole Dicologoglossa cuneata were also closely related.

  1. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  2. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fístula colecistoduodenal, complicación infrecuente de litiasis vesicular: nuestra experiencia en su manejo quirúrgico

    OpenAIRE

    F. Aguilar-Espinosa; R. Maza-Sánchez; F. Vargas-Solís; G.A. Guerrero-Martínez; J.L. Medina-Reyes; P.I. Flores-Quiroz

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: Las fístulas bilioentéricas son la comunicación anormal entre el sistema biliar y el tracto gastrointestinal, que ocurre de manera espontánea y en la mayoría de los casos es una complicación rara de la litiasis vesicular no tratada. Pueden provocar consecuencias clínicas diversas que, en algunas situaciones, ponen en peligro la vida del paciente. Objetivo: Identificar la incidencia de fístula bilioentérica en pacientes con litiasis vesicular, su presentación clínica, diagnóst...

  4. Didelphis marsupialis como un reservorio potencial u hospedero amplificador del virus de la estomatitis vesicular, serotipo new jersey en Antioquia

    OpenAIRE

    John Arboleda; Carlos Trujillo

    2004-01-01

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) es una enfermedad viral, aguda
    y autolimitante que afecta principalmente bovinos, equinos y
    porcinos. Es producida por el virus de estomatitis vesicular (VEV), serotipos New Jersey (VEV-NJ) e Indiana (VEV-IN), que son los as importantes epidemiológicamente (1). Los estudios serológicos demuestran que VEV-NJ y VEV-IN infectan en forma natural una gran variedad de animales silvestres, que están posiblemente implicados en la  coepizoot...

  5. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located...

  6. Targeting glutamate signalling in depression: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrough, James W; Abdallah, Chadi G; Mathew, Sanjay J

    2017-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is severely disabling, and current treatments have limited efficacy. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine was recently repurposed as a rapidly acting antidepressant, catalysing the vigorous investigation of glutamate-signalling modulators as novel therapeutic agents for depressive disorders. In this Review, we discuss the progress made in the development of such modulators for the treatment of depression, and examine recent preclinical and translational studies that have investigated the mechanisms of action of glutamate-targeting antidepressants. Fundamental questions remain regarding the future prospects of this line of drug development, including questions concerning safety and tolerability, efficacy, dose-response relationships and therapeutic mechanisms.

  7. Clearance of glutamate inside the synapse and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergles, D E; Diamond, J S; Jahr, C E

    1999-06-01

    The heated debate over the level of postsynaptic receptor occupancy by transmitter has not been extinguished - indeed, new evidence is fanning the flames. Recent experiments using two-photon microscopy suggest that the concentration of glutamate in the synaptic cleft does not attain levels previously suggested. In contrast, recordings from glial cells and studies of extrasynaptic receptor activation indicate that significant quantities of glutamate escape from the cleft following exocytosis. Determining the amount of glutamate efflux from the synaptic cleft and the distance it diffuses is critical to issues of synaptic specificity and the induction of synaptic plasticity.

  8. Melatonin protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation by decreasing extracellular glutamate and Nox-derived ROS in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Paloma; Parada, Esther; Farré-Alins, Victor; Molz, Simone; Cacabelos, Ramón; Marco-Contelles, José; López, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla I; Ramos, Eva; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic interventions on pathological processes involved in the ischemic cascade, such as oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and/or apoptosis, are of urgent need for stroke treatment. Melatonin regulates a large number of physiological actions and its beneficial properties have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate whether melatonin mediates neuroprotection in rat hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) and glutamate excitotoxicity. Thus, we describe here that melatonin significantly reduced the amount of lactate dehydrogenase released in the OGD-treated slices, reverted neuronal injury caused by OGD-reoxygenation in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, restored the reduction of GSH content of the hippocampal slices induced by OGD, and diminished the oxidative stress produced in the reoxygenation period. Furthermore, melatonin afforded maximum protection against glutamate-induced toxicity and reversed the glutamate released almost basal levels, at 10 and 30μM concentration, respectively. Consequently, we propose that melatonin might strongly and positively influence the outcome of brain ischemia/reperfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training Induces Tolerance to Brain Ischemia: Involvement of Glutamate and ERK1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Shan Hu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise has been shown to be beneficial in stroke patients and animal stroke models. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are not yet very clear. The present study investigated whether pre-ischemic treadmill training could induce brain ischemic tolerance (BIT by inhibiting the excessive glutamate release and event-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 activation observed in rats exposed to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into three groups (n = 12/group: sham surgery without prior exercise, MCAO without prior exercise and MCAO following three weeks of exercise. Pre-MCAO exercise significantly reduced brain infarct size (103.1 ± 6.7 mm3 relative to MCAO without prior exercise (175.9 ± 13.5 mm3. Similarly, pre-MCAO exercise significantly reduced neurological defects (1.83 ± 0.75 relative to MCAO without exercise (3.00 ± 0.63. As expected, MCAO increased levels of phospho-ERK1/2 (69 ± 5% relative to sham surgery (40 ± 5%, and phospho-ERK1/2 levels were normalized in rats exposed to pre-ischemic treadmill training (52 ± 6% relative to MCAO without exercise (69% ± 5%. Parallel effects were observed on striatal glutamate overflow. This study suggests that pre-ischemic treadmill training might induce neuroprotection by inhibiting the phospho-ERK1/2 over-activation and reducing excessive glutamate release.

  10. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Glutamate Carrier SLC25A22 in Astrocytes Leads to Intracellular Glutamate Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Goubert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The solute carrier family 25 (SLC25 drives the import of a large diversity of metabolites into mitochondria, a key cellular structure involved in many metabolic functions. Mutations of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier SLC25A22 (also named GC1 have been identified in early epileptic encephalopathy (EEE and migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI but the pathophysiological mechanism of GC1 deficiency is still unknown, hampered by the absence of an in vivo model. This carrier is mainly expressed in astrocytes and is the principal gate for glutamate entry into mitochondria. A sufficient supply of energy is essential for the proper function of the brain and mitochondria have a pivotal role in maintaining energy homeostasis. In this work, we wanted to study the consequences of GC1 absence in an in vitro model in order to understand if glutamate catabolism and/or mitochondrial function could be affected. First, short hairpin RNA (shRNA designed to specifically silence GC1 were validated in rat C6 glioma cells. Silencing GC1 in C6 resulted in a reduction of the GC1 mRNA combined with a decrease of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier activity. Then, primary astrocyte cultures were prepared and transfected with shRNA-GC1 or mismatch-RNA (mmRNA constructs using the Neon® Transfection System in order to target a high number of primary astrocytes, more than 64%. Silencing GC1 in primary astrocytes resulted in a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (Phosphate (NAD(PH formation upon glutamate stimulation. We also observed that the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC was functional after glucose stimulation but not activated by glutamate, resulting in a lower level of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP in silenced astrocytes compared to control cells. Moreover, GC1 inactivation resulted in an intracellular glutamate accumulation. Our results show that mitochondrial glutamate transport via GC1 is important in sustaining glutamate homeostasis in

  11. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer in dual phenotype GABA/glutamate-coexpressing striatal medium spiny neurons: regulation of BDNF, GAD67 and VGLUT1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Perreault

    Full Text Available In basal ganglia a significant subset of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs coexpress D1 and D2 receptors (D1R and D2R along with the neuropeptides dynorphin (DYN and enkephalin (ENK. These coexpressing neurons have been recently shown to have a region-specific distribution throughout the mesolimbic and basal ganglia circuits. While the functional relevance of these MSNs remains relatively unexplored, they have been shown to exhibit the unique property of expressing the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer, a novel receptor complex with distinct pharmacology and cell signaling properties. Here we showed that MSNs coexpressing the D1R and D2R also exhibited a dual GABA/glutamate phenotype. Activation of the D1R-D2R heteromer in these neurons resulted in the simultaneous, but differential regulation of proteins involved in GABA and glutamate production or vesicular uptake in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, ventral tegmental area (VTA, caudate putamen and substantia nigra (SN. Additionally, activation of the D1R-D2R heteromer in NAc shell, but not NAc core, differentially altered protein expression in VTA and SN, regions rich in dopamine cell bodies. The identification of a MSN with dual inhibitory and excitatory intrinsic functions provides new insights into the neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia and demonstrates a novel source of glutamate in this circuit. Furthermore, the demonstration of a dopamine receptor complex with the potential to differentially regulate the expression of proteins directly involved in GABAergic inhibitory or glutamatergic excitatory activation in VTA and SN may potentially provide new insights into the regulation of dopamine neuron activity. This could have broad implications in understanding how dysregulation of neurotransmission within basal ganglia contributes to dopamine neuronal dysfunction.

  12. Long-term activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors increases functional TRPV1-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi eMasuoka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C, protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia.

  13. Glutamate neurotransmission is affected in prenatally stressed offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrover, Ezequiela; Pallarés, Maria Eugenia; Baier, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    with synaptic loss. Since metabolism of glutamate is dependent on interactions between neurons and surrounding astroglia, our results suggest that glutamate neurotransmitter pathways might be impaired in the brain of prenatally stressed rats. To study the effect of prenatal stress on the metabolism...... uptake capacity for glutamate in the FCx of PS male offspring while no such changes were observed in the HPC. The results show that changes mediated by PS on the adult glutamatergic system are brain region specific. Overall, PS produces long-term changes in the glutamatergic system modulating......Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that male adult offspring of stressed mothers exhibited higher levels of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors than control rats. These offspring also showed long-lasting astroglial hypertrophy and a reduced dendritic arborization...

  14. Modeling of glutamic acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum MNZ

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Saari, Nazamid

    2014-01-01

    ...-amino butyric acid (GABA). In the present study, culture condition for enhanced glutamic acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum MNZ was optimized and the influence of such conditions on GABA production was evaluated. Results...

  15. Receptors of glutamate and neurotrophin in vestibular neuronal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y S; Chen, L W; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Yung, K K L; Zhang, F X

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed advances in understanding the roles of receptors of neurotrophin and glutamate in the vestibular system. In the first section of this review, the biological actions of neurotrophins and their receptors in the peripheral and central vestibular systems are summarized. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of neurotrophins in developmental plasticity and in the maintenance of vestibular function in the adult animal. This is reviewed in relation to the developmental expression pattern of neurotrophins and their receptors within the vestibular nuclei. The second part is focused on the functional role of different glutamate receptors on central vestibular neurons. The developmental expression pattern of glutamate receptor subunits within the vestibular nuclei is reviewed in relation to the potential role of glutamate receptors in regulating the development of vestibular function. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Neuroprotective effects of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydoxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside from Polygonum multiflorum against glutamate-induced oxidative toxicity in HT22 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Young; Ahn, Sung Min; Wang, Ziyu; Choi, Young Whan; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2017-01-04

    Since ancient times, Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. has been used to treat premature grey hair, dizziness, and blurred vision in East Asia. A major bioactive constituent of this medicinal herb, 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydoxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (THSG), has antioxidant activity and exerts beneficial effects on cognition and memory. The purpose of the current study was to determine if THSG affects hippocampal neuronal cell death and mitochondrial function following exposure to oxidative stress. HT22 hippocampal cells with or without THSG pretreatment were exposed to glutamate, and the effects on cell viability and expression of molecules related to apoptotic cell death were examined using biochemical techniques, flow cytometry, western immunoblotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pretreatment with THSG significantly attenuated glutamate-induced loss of cell viability and release of lactate dehydrogenase as well as apoptotic cell death. THSG inhibited generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression of heme oxygenase-1, and activation of caspase-3 and calpain-1 proteases, all of which were increased by glutamate. THSG inhibited glutamate-induced disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and voltage-dependent anion channel-1. It also regulated the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2. These results indicate that THSG has a marked neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced hippocampal damage by decreasing ROS production and stabilizing MMP. These findings suggest the potential of THSG as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Update on food safety of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Unaeze, Helen Nonye

    2017-12-01

    This evidence-based safety review of the flavor enhancer monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) was triggered by its global use and recent studies expressing some safety concerns. This article obtained information through search of evidence-based scientific databases, especially the US National Library of Medicine NIH. (A) MSG is a water-soluble salt of glutamate, a non-essential amino acid, normally synthesized in the body and prevalent in protein foods. (B) MSG is utilized world-wide for its "umami" taste and flavor enhancement qualities, (C) the human body does not discriminate between glutamate present in food and that added as seasoning, (D) glutamate metabolism is compartmentalized in the human body without reported ethnic differences, (E) glutamate does not passively cross biological membranes, (F) food glutamate is completely metabolized by gut cells as energy source and serves as key substrate for other important metabolites in the liver, (G) normal food use of MSG is dose-dependent and self-limiting without elevation in plasma glutamate, (H) the recent EFSA acceptable daily intake (30mg/kg body weight/day) is not attainable when MSG is consumed at normal dietary level, (I) scientists have not been able to consistently elicit reactions in double-blind studies with 'sensitive' individuals using MSG or placebo in food. Based on the above observations (A-I), high quality MSG is safe for all life-cycle stages without respect to ethnic origin or culinary background. MSG researchers are advised to employ appropriate scientific methodologies, consider glutamate metabolism and its normal food use before extrapolating pharmacological rodent studies to humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  19. Monosodium glutamate is not likely to be genotoxic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    The International Glutamate Technical Committee (IGTC) wishes to comment on a recent publication in the Journal entitled "Genotoxicity of monosodium glutamate" (authored by Ataseven N, Yüzbaşıoğlu D, Keskin AÇ and Ünal F) (Ataseven et al. 2016). In particular, we wish to highlight that, in our considered view, the results of this study were inappropriately discussed and that references were selectively used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Glio-Protective Role of mir-263a by Tuning Sensitivity to Glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aw, Sherry Shiying; Lim, Isaac Kok Hwee; Tang, Melissa Xue Mei

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate is a ubiquitous neurotransmitter, mediating information flow between neurons. Defects in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission can result in glutamate toxicity, which is associated with neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate receptors are expressed in glia, but little is kno...... of glutamate receptor levels protects glia from excitotoxicity, ensuring CNS health. Chronic low-level glutamate receptor overexpression due to mutations affecting microRNA (miRNA) regulation might contribute to glial dysfunction and CNS impairment....

  1. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  2. In vitro evidence for the brain glutamate efflux hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian; Madelung, Rasmus; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L-glutamate ho......The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L......-glutamate homeostasis. Transendothelial transport- and accumulation studies of (3) H-L-glutamate, (3) H-L-aspartate, and (3) H-D-aspartate in an electrically tight bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte blood-brain barrier coculture model were performed. After 6 days in culture, the endothelium displayed transendothelial...... was shown with immunofluorescence. Overall, the findings suggest that the blood-brain barrier itself may participate in regulating brain L-glutamate concentrations. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  3. Oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is nonpathogenic and non-transmissible in pigs, a natural host of VSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a negative stranded RNA virus that naturally causes disease in agricultural livestock including horses, cattle and pigs. The two main identified VSV strains are the New Jersey (VSNJV) and Indiana (VSIV) strains. VSV is a rapidly replicating, potently immunogenic v...

  4. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of dexamphetamine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, S.; Aono, Y.; Fusa, K.; Takada, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Systemic administration of high doses of dexamphetamine induces a dopamine efflux that has its intracellular origin in both the vesicular, reserpine-sensitive dopamine pool and the cytosolic, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive, newly synthesized dopamine pool. It remains unknown whether locally

  5. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of SKF38393.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Like dexamphetamine, SKF38393 induces an increase in striatal dopamine efflux which is insensitive for tetrodotoxin, Ca(2+) independent and prevented by a dopamine transporter inhibitor. The dexamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine efflux originates from both the reserpine-sensitive vesicular

  6. Reduction of bacterial growth by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in the rhizosphere of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Jakobsen, I.

    1993-01-01

    Cucumber was grown in a partially sterilized sand-soil mixture with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum or left uninoculated. Fresh soil extract was places in polyvinyl chloride tubes without propagules of mycorrhizal fungi. Root tips and root segments...

  7. APPARENT LACK OF VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA (VAM) IN SEAGRASSES ZOSTERA MARINA L. AND THALASSIA TESTUDIUM BANKS EX KONIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined two populations of Zostera marina L. and one of Thalassia testudinum Banks ex Konig for presence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM). None of these plants showed any VAM colonization. In addition, we were unable to find any literature references on the presence o...

  8. Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene polymorphism and white matter integrity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eunsoo; Han, Kyu-Man; Kang, June; Kim, Aram; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Chang, Hun Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Min-Soo; Greenberg, Tsafrir; Tae, Woo-Suk; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2017-07-03

    The genetic variant of the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene (VMAT1) has been suggested to be associated with monoaminergic signaling and neural circuit activity related to emotion processing. We aimed to investigate microstructural changes in white matter tracts of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and examined the interaction effect between VMAT1 Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism and MDD on white matter integrity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and VMAT1 Thr136Ile (rs1390938) genotyping were performed on 103 patients diagnosed with MDD and 83 healthy control participants. DTI was used to investigate microstructural changes in white matter tracts in patients compared to healthy controls. The possible interaction effect between rs1390938 and MDD on white matter integrity was also assessed. Patients with MDD exhibited lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the forceps major (pdepression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. LDL receptor and its family members serve as the cellular receptors for vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelshtein, Danit; Werman, Ariel; Novick, Daniela; Barak, Sara; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) exhibits a remarkably robust and pantropic infectivity, mediated by its coat protein, VSV-G. Using this property, recombinant forms of VSV and VSV-G-pseudotyped viral vectors are being developed for gene therapy, vaccination, and viral oncolysis and are extensively used for gene transduction in vivo and in vitro. The broad tropism of VSV suggests that it enters cells through a highly ubiquitous receptor, whose identity has so far remained elusive. Here we show that the LDL receptor (LDLR) serves as the major entry port of VSV and of VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in human and mouse cells, whereas other LDLR family members serve as alternative receptors. The widespread expression of LDLR family members accounts for the pantropism of VSV and for the broad applicability of VSV-G-pseudotyped viral vectors for gene transduction. PMID:23589850

  10. Impact of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus M Proteins on Different Cellular Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Redondo

    Full Text Available Three different matrix (M proteins termed M1, M2 and M3 have been described in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. Individual expression of VSV M proteins induces an evident cytopathic effect including cell rounding and detachment, in addition to a partial inhibition of cellular protein synthesis, likely mediated by an indirect mechanism. Analogous to viroporins, M1 promotes the budding of new virus particles; however, this process does not produce an increase in plasma membrane permeability. In contrast to M1, M2 and M3 neither interact with the cellular membrane nor promote the budding of double membrane vesicles at the cell surface. Nonetheless, all three species of M protein interfere with the transport of cellular mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and also modulate the redistribution of the splicing factor. The present findings indicate that all three VSV M proteins share some activities that interfere with host cell functions.

  11. Spectrum of Text Information Content in the RNA Sequence of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyukov, Alexander A.

    A new strategy to recognize patterns in the DNA sequences with functional significance is proposed. The strategy is based on the general definition of any individual organism as a Gibbsian ensemble of identical personal DNA molecules. This approach provides application of the methods of statistical thermodynamics of irreversible steady processes to genome informatics. The random processes theory and its Markov chains approximation lead in this approach directly to the definition of the generalized concept of evolution entropy and to the genuine measure of text information content in the sequences. Computer-assisted proofs of the existence of the nonequilibrium steady state conditions in genome molecule were obtained by investigation of the special type balance relations in the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) RNA sequence. The main maxima of the text information content were decoded and denominated. The established coding principles are connected with deviations from equilibrium conditions and from equipartition.

  12. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Unusual armadillo fold in the human general vesicular transport factor p115.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Striegl

    Full Text Available The golgin family gives identity and structure to the Golgi apparatus and is part of a complex protein network at the Golgi membrane. The golgin p115 is targeted by the GTPase Rab1a, contains a large globular head region and a long region of coiled-coil which forms an extended rod-like structure. p115 serves as vesicle tethering factor and plays an important role at different steps of vesicular transport. Here we present the 2.2 A-resolution X-ray structure of the globular head region of p115. The structure exhibits an armadillo fold that is decorated by elongated loops and carries a C-terminal non-canonical repeat. This terminal repeat folds into the armadillo superhelical groove and allows homodimeric association with important implications for p115 mediated multiple protein interactions and tethering.

  14. Cutting Edge: Innate Immune Augmenting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Zika Virus Proteins Confers Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; de Queiroz, Nina M G P; Xia, Tianli; Ahn, Jeonghyun; Barber, Glen N

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has become a serious public health concern because of its link to brain damage in developing human fetuses. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) was shown to be a highly effective and safe vector for the delivery of foreign immunogens for vaccine purposes. In this study, we generated rVSVs (wild-type and attenuated VSV with mutated matrix protein [VSVm] versions) that express either the full length ZIKV envelope protein (ZENV) alone or include the ZENV precursor to the membrane protein upstream of the envelope protein, and our rVSV-ZIKV constructs showed efficient immunogenicity in murine models. We also demonstrated maternal protective immunity in challenged newborn mice born to female mice vaccinated with VSVm-ZENV containing the transmembrane domain. Our data indicate that rVSVm may be a suitable strategy for the design of effective vaccines against ZIKV. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Pesquisaje de litiasis vesicular en un sector de población supuestamente sana

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro Yera Abreus; Mercedes Cárdenas Drake; Angel Gutiérrez Rojas

    1997-01-01

    Se hace un estudio de frecuencia de litiasis vesicular en un sector de población supuestamente sana, en el que se encontró una frecuencia de la afección de un 6,2 %, el predominio de las personas de la raza blanca sobre las de la raza negra fue de sólo 1,8:1; la afección es mucho más frecuente en el sexo femenino que en el masculino (proporción de 9:1) y en personas mayores de 40 años (60 %) con sobrepeso u obesas (85 %), y puede cursar de forma totalmente asintomática en el 50 % de los casos...

  16. Enhancing poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by introducing the glutamate synthesis features from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Liu, Fenghong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Shen, Haosheng; Dang, Yulei; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yi; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2017-05-22

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a valuable polymer with glutamate as its sole precursor. Enhancement of the intracellular glutamate synthesis is a very important strategy for the improvement of γ-PGA production, especially for those glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing strains. Corynebacterium glutamicum has long been used for industrial glutamate production and it exhibits some unique features for glutamate synthesis; therefore introduction of these metabolic characters into the γ-PGA producing strain might lead to increased intracellular glutamate availability, and thus ultimate γ-PGA production. In this study, the unique glutamate synthesis features from C. glutamicum was introduced into the glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NK-1 strain. After introducing the energy-saving NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) pathway, the NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain showed slightly increase (by 9.1%) in γ-PGA production. Moreover, an optimized metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ɑ-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was introduced into the NK-1 strain, because it was previously shown that the ODHC in C. glutamicum was completely inhibited when glutamate was actively produced. The obtained NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain showed 66.2% higher γ-PGA production than the NK-1 strain. However, the further combination of these two strategies (introducing both NADPH-GDH pathway and the metabolic toggle switch) did not lead to further increase of γ-PGA production but rather the resultant γ-PGA production was even lower than that in the NK-1 strain. We proposed new metabolic engineering strategies to improve the γ-PGA production in B. amyloliquefaciens. The NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain with the introduction of NADPH-GDH pathway showed 9.1% improvement in γ-PGA production. The NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain with the introduction of a metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ODHC showed 66.2% higher

  17. Antibodies against vesicular stomatitis virus in horses from southern, midwestern and northeastern Brazilian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Leobet Lunkes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the agent of a vesicular disease that affects many animal species and may be clinically confounded with foot-and-mouth disease in ruminant and swine. Horses are especially susceptible to VSV and may serve as sentinels for virus circulation. The present study investigated the presence of neutralizing antibodies against VSV Indiana III (VSIV-3 in serum samples of 3,626 horses from six states in three Brazilian regions: Southern (RS, n = 1,011, Midwest (GO/DF, n = 1,767 and Northeast (PB, PE, RN and CE, n = 848 collected between 2013 and 2014. Neutralizing antibodies against VSIV-3 (titers ≥40 were detected in 641 samples (positivity of 17.7%; CI95%:16.5-19.0%, being 317 samples from CE (87.3%; CI95%: 83.4-90.5 %; 109 from RN (65.7%; CI95%: 57.8 -72.7%; 124 from PB (45.4%; CI95%: 39.4-51.5%; 78 from GO/DF (4.4%; CI95%: 3.5-5.5% and nine samples of RS (0.9%; CI95%: 0.4-1.7%. Several samples from the Northeast and Midwest harbored high neutralizing titers, indicating a recent exposure to the virus. In contrast, samples from RS had low titers, possibly due to a past remote exposure. Several positive samples presented neutralizing activity against other VSV serotypes (Indiana I and New Jersey, yet in lower titers, indicating the specificity of the response to VSIV-3. These results demonstrated a relatively recent circulation of VSIV-3 in northeastern Brazilian States, confirming clinical findings and demonstrating the sanitary importance of this infection.

  18. BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NATIVE USHER PROTEIN COMPLEXES FROM A VESICULAR SUBFRACTION OF TRACHEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Sisson, Joseph H.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the major cause of deaf/blindness in the world. It is a genetic heterogeneous disorder, with nine genes already identified as causative for the disease. We noted expression of all known Usher proteins in bovine tracheal epithelial cells, and exploited this system for large-scale biochemical analysis of Usher protein complexes. The dissected epithelia were homogenized in non-detergent buffer, and sedimented on sucrose gradients. At least two complexes were evident after the first gradient: one formed by specific isoforms of CDH23, PCDH15 and VLGR-1, and a different one at the top of the gradient that included all the Usher proteins and rab5, a transport vesicle marker. TEM analysis of these top fractions found them enriched in 100–200 nm vesicles, confirming a vesicular association of the Usher complex(es). Immunoisolation of these vesicles confirmed some of the associations already predicted and identified novel interactions. When the vesicles are lysed in the presence of phenylbutyrate, most of the Usher proteins co-sediment into the gradient at a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 50S, correlating with a predicted molecular mass of 2 × 106 Daltons. Although it is still unclear whether there is only one complex or several independent complexes that are trafficked within distinct vesicular pools, this work shows for the first time that native Usher proteins complexes occur in vivo. This complex(es) is present primarily in transport vesicles at the apical pole of tracheal epithelial cells, predicting that Usher proteins may be directionally transported as complexes in hair cells and photoreceptors. PMID:20058854

  19. Topical vesicular formulations of Curcuma longa extract on recuperating the ultraviolet radiation-damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Chanchal Deep; Saraf, Swarnlata

    2011-12-01

      Ultraviolet radiations generate reactive oxygen species, leading to adverse effects on skin properties. Botanical extracts are multifunctional in nature having various properties like photoprotection, anti-aging, moisturizing, antioxidant, astringent, anti-irritant, and antimicrobial activity.   The aim of this study was to formulate creams having Curcuma longa extract loaded novel vesicular systems (liposomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes) and study their photoprotective effect by assessment of skin hydration (Cutometer) and sebum content (Sebumeter).   The alcoholic C. longa extract loaded liposomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes having 0.5-2.0% w/w extract were prepared, evaluated for size, entrapment efficiency, and incorporated into the cream. Their long-term interaction with skin (6 weeks) was compared in terms of their effects on skin hydration and sebum content.   Vesicular size obtained was in the range 167.3 ± 3.0 to 262.4 ± 2.4 nm with low polydispersity index (0.2-0.3) and high entrapment efficiency. The efficacy was in the order C. longa extract loaded transfersomal creams > C. longa extract loaded ethosomal creams > C. longa extract loaded liposomal creams > C. longa extract loaded creams > Empty transfersome loaded cream > Empty ethosome loaded cream > Empty liposome loaded cream > Base cream.   The photoprotective properties of the constituents of C. longa extract and hydrant, moisturizing lipid components of nano vesicles with better skin penetration resulted in improvement in skin properties like skin hydration and sebum content. The herbal extract loaded nano vesicles incorporated in cream could be used as photoprotective formulations. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Potential fossil endoliths in vesicular pillow basalt, Coral Patch Seamount, eastern North Atlantic Ocean.

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    Cavalazzi, Barbara; Westall, Frances; Cady, Sherry L; Barbieri, Roberto; Foucher, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    The chilled rinds of pillow basalt from the Ampère-Coral Patch Seamounts in the eastern North Atlantic were studied as a potential habitat of microbial life. A variety of putative biogenic structures, which include filamentous and spherical microfossil-like structures, were detected in K-phillipsite-filled amygdules within the chilled rinds. The filamentous structures (∼2.5 μm in diameter) occur as K-phillipsite tubules surrounded by an Fe-oxyhydroxide (lepidocrocite) rich membranous structure, whereas the spherical structures (from 4 to 2 μm in diameter) are associated with Ti oxide (anatase) and carbonaceous matter. Several lines of evidence indicate that the microfossil-like structures in the pillow basalt are the fossilized remains of microorganisms. Possible biosignatures include the carbonaceous nature of the spherical structures, their size distributions and morphology, the presence and distribution of native fluorescence, mineralogical and chemical composition, and environmental context. When taken together, the suite of possible biosignatures supports the hypothesis that the fossil-like structures are of biological origin. The vesicular microhabitat of the rock matrix is likely to have hosted a cryptoendolithic microbial community. This study documents a variety of evidence for past microbial life in a hitherto poorly investigated and underestimated microenvironment, as represented by the amygdules in the chilled pillow basalt rinds. This kind of endolithic volcanic habitat would have been common on the early rocky planets in our Solar System, such as Earth and Mars. This study provides a framework for evaluating traces of past life in vesicular pillow basalts, regardless of whether they occur on early Earth or Mars.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar) and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf), act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 protein strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf proteins contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro eYorimitsu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf, act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 GTPase strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf GTPases contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants.

  3. Developing ultra deformable vesicular transportation of a bioactive alkaloid in pursuit of vitiligo therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod KR

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop transfersomal formulation integrated with piperine intended for vitiligo. Methods: Film hydration technique was employed in the preparation of transfersomes. Modified diffusion cell, consistency tester were fabricated for ex vivo diffusion studies and spreadability studies respectively while tape stripping method was integrated with tissue extraction in the determination of tissue drug concentration. Results: When film hydration technique was used for, ultradeformable vesicles (transfersomes of piperine in soabean phosphatidylcholine was formed with (67.11依0.22 to (70.55依3.62 and (60.12依1.04 to (80.43依0.14 mean size (毺 m and entrapment efficiency (% respectively. Transfersomes are capable of crossing the pores in permeability barriers extremely efficient even if the transfersome radius (tr is much greater than the pore size (rpore ie., tr/rpore曒0.25 the driven flux rate depends on the transdermal osmotic gradient. The vesicles describes elasto-mechanical character of vesicles while penetrating through the pores. The proviso is that the vesicular membrane elasticity is dynamically to the local stress by the external. Diffusion and Spreadability studies showed maximum diffusion when the lipid was kept minimum. Tape stripping and tissue extraction method for the tissue drug retention showed that (75.25依1.72% drug was retained in the dermis. Conclusions: Span 80 was preferred over tween 80 in terms of dermal retention. Size and encapsulation was slightly altered by phosphatidylcholine concentration. The kinetics, efficiency and the transfersome mediated transport can be tailored for trans-epidermal, deep tissues and systemic depending on the vesicular composition, dose and form. Thus we have offered a successful drug delivery of piperine targeting the deep epidermis.

  4. Pathogenesis of experimental vesicular stomatitis virus (New Jersey serotype) infection in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, T E; Stallknecht, D E; Brown, C C; Seal, B S; Howerth, E W

    2001-07-01

    The pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection has not been investigated previously in native New World rodents that may have a role in the epidemiology of the disease. In the present study, 45 juvenile and 80 adult deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were inoculated intranasally with VSV New Jersey serotype (VSV-NJ) and examined sequentially over a 7-day period. Virus was detected by means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in all tissues containing histologic lesions. Viral antigen and mRNA were observed initially in olfactory epithelium neurons, followed by olfactory bulbs and more caudal olfactory pathways in the brain. Virus also was detected throughout the ventricular system in the brain and central canal of the spinal cord. These results support both viral retrograde transneuronal transport and viral spread within the ventricular system. Other tissues containing viral antigen included airway epithelium and macrophages in the lungs, cardiac myocytes, and macrophages in cervical lymph nodes. In a second experiment, 15 adult, 20 juvenile, and 16 nestling deer mice were inoculated intradermally with VSV-NJ. Adults were refractory to infection by this route; however, nestlings and juveniles developed disseminated central nervous system infections. Viral antigen also was detected in cardiac myocytes and lymph node macrophages in these animals. Viremia was detected by virus isolation in 35/72 (49%) intranasally inoculated juvenile and adult mice and in 17/36 (47%) intradermally inoculated nestlings and juveniles from day 1 to day 3 postinoculation. The documentation of viremia in these animals suggests that they may have a role in the epidemiology of vector-borne vesicular stomatitis.

  5. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 facilitates vesicular stomatitis virus infection by binding vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hongjun; Tan, Binghe; Wei, Yinglei; Xiong, Qingqing; Yan, Yan; Hou, Lili; Wu, Nannan; Siwko, Stefan; Cimarelli, Andrea; Xu, Jianrong; Han, Honghui; Qian, Min; Liu, Mingyao; Du, Bing

    2017-10-06

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies and Chandipura viruses belong to the Rhabdovirus family. VSV is a common laboratory virus to study viral evolution and host immune responses to viral infection, and recombinant VSV-based vectors have been widely used for viral oncolysis, vaccination, and gene therapy. Although the tropism of VSV is broad, and its envelope glycoprotein G is often used for pseudotyping other viruses, the host cellular components involved in VSV infection remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the host protein leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) is essential for VSV and VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus (VSVG-LV) to infect susceptible cells. Accordingly, Lgr4-deficient mice had dramatically decreased VSV levels in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, Lgr4 knockdown in RAW 264.7 cells also significantly suppressed VSV infection, and Lgr4 overexpression in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced VSV infection. Interestingly, only VSV infection relied on Lgr4, whereas infections with Newcastle disease virus, influenza A virus (A/WSN/33), and herpes simplex virus were unaffected by Lgr4 status. Of note, assays of virus entry, cell ELISA, immunoprecipitation, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that VSV bound susceptible cells via the Lgr4 extracellular domain. Pretreating cells with an Lgr4 antibody, soluble LGR4 extracellular domain, or R-spondin 1 blocked VSV infection by competitively inhibiting VSV binding to Lgr4. Taken together, the identification of Lgr4 as a VSV-specific host factor provides important insights into understanding VSV entry and its pathogenesis and lays the foundation for VSV-based gene therapy and viral oncolytic therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Upregulation of transmitter release probability improves a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into neuronal digital spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Action potentials at the neurons and graded signals at the synapses are primary codes in the brain. In terms of their functional interaction, the studies were focused on the influence of presynaptic spike patterns on synaptic activities. How the synapse dynamics quantitatively regulates the encoding of postsynaptic digital spikes remains unclear. We investigated this question at unitary glutamatergic synapses on cortical GABAergic neurons, especially the quantitative influences of release probability on synapse dynamics and neuronal encoding. Glutamate release probability and synaptic strength are proportionally upregulated by presynaptic sequential spikes. The upregulation of release probability and the efficiency of probability-driven synaptic facilitation are strengthened by elevating presynaptic spike frequency and Ca2+. The upregulation of release probability improves spike capacity and timing precision at postsynaptic neuron. These results suggest that the upregulation of presynaptic glutamate release facilitates a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into digital spikes in postsynaptic neurons, i.e., a functional compatibility between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. PMID:22852823

  7. Cholesterol Alters the Dynamics of Release in Protein Independent Cell Models for Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafinobar, Neda; Mellander, Lisa J.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Dunevall, Johan; Angerer, Tina B.; Fletcher, John S.; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-09-01

    Neurons communicate via an essential process called exocytosis. Cholesterol, an abundant lipid in both secretory vesicles and cell plasma membrane can affect this process. In this study, amperometric recordings of vesicular dopam