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Sample records for vesico-ureteral reflux vur

  1. Genes in the Ureteric Budding Pathway : Association Study on Vesico-Ureteral Reflux Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, Albertien M.; Duran, Karen; van Riel, Els; de Kovel, Carolien G. F.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Renkema, Kirsten Y.; van der Horst, Henricus J. R.; Bokenkamp, Arend; van Hagen, Johanna M.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P.; van den Hoek, Joop; Feitz, Wouter F.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2012-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the urinary tract and causes 8.5% of end-stage renal disease in children. It is a complex genetic developmental disorder, in which ectopic embryonal ureteric budding is implicated in the pathogenesis. VUR is part of

  2. Genes in the ureteric budding pathway: Association study on vesico-ureteral reflux patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Eerde (Albertien ); K. Duran (Karen); E. van Riel (Els); C.G.F. de Kovel (Carolien); B.P.C. Koeleman (Bobby); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); K.Y. Renkema (Kirsten); H.J.R. van der Horst (Henricus); A. Bökenkamp (Arend); J.M. van Hagen (Johanna); L.H. van den Berg (Leonard); K.P. Wolffenbuttel (Katja); J. van den Hoek (Joop); W.F.J. Feitz (Wout); T.P.V.M. de Jong (Tom); J.C. Giltay (Jacques); C. Wijmenga (Cisca)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractVesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the urinary tract and causes 8.5% of end-stage renal disease in children. It is a complex genetic developmental disorder, in which ectopic embryonal ureteric budding is implicated in the pathogenesis. VUR

  3. Is joint hypermobility associated with vesico-ureteral reflux? An assessment of 50 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, Albertien M.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; van de Putte, Elise M.; Giltay, Jacques C.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess whether there is an increased prevalence of joint hypermobility in patients with vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR). MATERIALS AND METHODS We studied 50 patients with primary VUR and matched controls drawn from a reference population. Joint mobility was assessed using the Bulbena

  4. Genes in the ureteric budding pathway: association study on vesico-ureteral reflux patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, A.M. van; Duran, K.; Riel, E. van; Kovel, C.G.F. de; Koeleman, B.P.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Renkema, K.Y.; Horst, H.J. van der; Bokenkamp, A.; Hagen, J.M. van; Berg, L.H. van den; Wolffenbuttel, K.P.; Hoek, J. van den; Feitz, W.F.J.; Jong, T.P. de; Giltay, J.C.; Wijmenga, C.

    2012-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the urinary tract and causes 8.5% of end-stage renal disease in children. It is a complex genetic developmental disorder, in which ectopic embryonal ureteric budding is implicated in the pathogenesis. VUR is part of

  5. Genes in the Ureteric Budding Pathway: Association Study on Vesico-Ureteral Reflux Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, Albertien M.; Duran, Karen; van Riel, Els; de Kovel, Carolien G. F.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Renkema, Kirsten Y.; van der Horst, Henricus J. R.; Bökenkamp, Arend; van Hagen, Johanna M.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P.; van den Hoek, Joop; Feitz, Wouter F.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2012-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the urinary tract and causes 8.5% of end-stage renal disease in children. It is a complex genetic developmental disorder, in which ectopic embryonal ureteric budding is implicated in the pathogenesis. VUR is part of

  6. Vesico-ureteral reflux in children with prenatally detected hydronephrosis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, A. M.; Meutgeert, M. H.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.; Giltay, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the value of prenatally detected hydronephrosis (PNH) as a prognostic factor for vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR). The MEDLINE database was searched for articles on PNH and VUR published between 1980 and 2004. A total of 18 studies were identified and reviewed for various aspects. Results

  7. Linkage study of 14 candidate genes and loci in four large Dutch families with vesico-ureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, A.M. van; Koeleman, B.P.C.; Kamp, J.M. van de; Jong, T.P.V.M. de; Wijmenga, C.; Giltay, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is a major contributing factor to end-stage renal disease in paediatric patients. Primary VUR is a familial disorder, but little is known about its genetic causes. To investigate the involvement of 12 functional candidate genes and two reported loci in VUR, we

  8. Linkage study of 14 candidate genes and loci in four large Dutch families with vesico-ureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, Albertien M.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Giltay, Jacques C.

    2007-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is a major contributing factor to end-stage renal disease in paediatric patients. Primary VUR is a familial disorder, but little is known about its genetic causes. To investigate the involvement of 12 functional candidate genes and two reported loci in VUR, we performed

  9. Genetics of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract : towards elucidation of genetic factors in the etiology of vesico-ureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic renal failure and end stage renal disease (ESRD) can be life-threatening conditions. In a significant number of cases with ESRD the primary cause l is a congenital anomaly of the kidney and/or urinary tract (CAKUT). Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common of the CAKUT spectrum. The

  10. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF SURGICAL CORRECTION METHODS OF VESICO-URETERIC REFLUX IN CHILDREN

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    S. P. Yatsyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare different surgical correction methods of vesico-ureteric reflux in children using both open surgery and endoluminal (intraluminal treatment options of this pathology. Patients and methods: 166 patients aged from 4 months to 13 were examined and treated. All children underwent X-ray urological examination through cystography and ultrasound examination of kidneys and urocyst. Cohen's operation, STING procedure involving endoscopic injection of bulking agents was performed. Treatment results were assessed 6 months later through control cystography. Conclusion: Endoscopic correction of vesico-ureteric reflux is an effective and minimally invasive treatment method for this pathology. Maximum treatment effect after biodegradable bulking agents application should be expected in younger age group. Treatment rates of endoluminal correction of vesico-ureteric reflux with the use of sterile viscous gel as a fixing agent are higher than with the use of bovine collagen.

  11. Robot-assisted extravesical ureteral reimplantation (revur) for unilateral vesico-ureteral reflux in children: results of a multicentric international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ciro; Masieri, Lorenzo; Steyaert, Henri; Escolino, Maria; Cerchione, Raffaele; La Manna, Angela; Cini, Chiara; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2017-12-16

    This multicentric international retrospective study aimed to report the outcome of robot-assisted extravesical ureteral reimplantation (REVUR) in patients with unilateral vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR). The medical records of 55 patients (35 girls, 20 boys) underwent REVUR in four international centers of pediatric robotic surgery for primary unilateral VUR were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' average age was 4.9 years. The preoperative grade of reflux was III in 12.7%, IV in 47.3% and V in 40%. Twenty-six patients (47.3%) presented a loss of renal function preoperatively and 10 (18.1%) had a duplex system. Average robot docking time was 16.2 min (range 5-30). Average total operative time was 92.2 min (range 50-170). No conversions or intra-operative complications were recorded. All patients had a bladder Foley catheter for 24 h post-operatively. Average hospital stay was 2 days (range 1-3). Average follow-up length was 28 months (range 9-60). We recorded three (5.4%) postoperative complications: 1 small urinoma resolved spontaneously (II Clavien) and 2 persistent reflux, only one requiring redo-surgery using endoscopic injection (IIIb Clavien). REVUR is a safe and effective technique for treatment of primary unilateral VUR. The procedure is easy and fast to perform thanks to the 6° of freedom of robotic arms. The learning curve is short and it is useful to begin the robotics experience with a surgeon expert in robotic surgery as proctor on the 2nd robot console. The high cost and the diameter of instruments remain the main challenges of robotics applications in pediatric urology.

  12. Patients with a history of infection and voiding dysfunction are at risk for recurrence after successful endoscopic treatment of vesico ureteral reflux and deserve long-term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, R; Olivieri, C; Briganti, V; Perrotta, M L; Oriolo, L; Fabbri, F; Calisti, A

    2012-01-01

    Subureteral endoscopic injection of a bulking agent is an attractive alternative to open surgery or antibiotic prophylaxis for vesico ureteral reflux (VUR). Little information is available about long-term risk of recurrence after an initially successful treatment. Aim of this paper was to review short- and long-term success rate of endoscopic treatment in a single Center series after risk stratification of individual patients. The records of 126 patients who underwent Deflux injection for primary VUR were examined. Indications to treatment were an unvaried high grade VUR (IV-V) at 1 year from diagnosis and/or and recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) on antibiotic prophylaxis even in the presence of mild grade VUR (III grade). Gender, age and mode of diagnosis, infections (UTI), voiding dysfunctions, VUR grade and side, renal function, number of treatments were correlated to outcome. Long-term evaluation was planned at a minimum of 1 year from the last negative post-injection cystogram (MCUG). A new MCUG and DMSA scan were also offered to those complaining new UTI episodes. Late recurrences were correlated to history and grade of reflux. Data were analyzed with Graph Pad Instat software; the Chi-square test was used for univariate comparisons, the Fisher's exact test for categorical variables.and multiple regression tests for factors influencing outcome. M/F ratio was 62 to 64; median age at diagnosis was 28 months. VUR affected 198 renal units. Preinjection VUR grade was I in 1, II in 27, III in 107, IV in 59, and V in 4 units. Reduced DMSA uptake was evidenced in 51 units and scarring in 24. Median age at treatment was 34.5 months, for persistent high grade VUR (IV-V) in 55 patients and recurrent IVU in 92. Two hundred sixty seven injections were performed on 198 ureters. Complete resolution was documented by MCUG at 3-5 months in 68%, low grading IVU, together with high-grade reflux, seem to correlate to lower success rate of Deflux injection for primary VUR

  13. Circumcaval Ureter with Vesico Ureteral Reflux: The First Association in Literature

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    Ilhan Ciftci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A circumcaval ureter is a rare congenital anomaly in which the ureter passes behind, and is compressed by, the inferior vena cava. Its etiology is assumed to be abnormal embryologic development of the inferior vena cava as a result of atrophy failure of the right subcardinal vein in the lumbar portion. A circumcaval ureter is also termed a retrocaval ureter. The right supracardinal system fails to develop, whereas the right posterior cardinal vein persists. With one reported exception, the anomaly always occurs on the right side. Patients with this anomaly may develop partial right ureteral obstruction or recurrent urinary tract infections. Therapeutic options include surgical relocation of the ureter anterior to the cava. A 14-year-old female patient came with complaints of fever, intermittent colic and dysuria 4 years ago. A right ureteric fourth-grade VUR and circumcaval ureter were established. An anomaly in which both of these are together could not be found in literature. If after the VUR treatment he has progressive abdomen pain and advancing hydronephrosis, a circumcaval ureter as an additive anomaly must not be forgotten. For that reason, in a patient having a urinary system anomaly, a likely extra anomaly should be searched. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(3.000: 191-194

  14. Spontaneous Resolution of Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR in Iranian Children, a Single Center Experience in 533 Cases

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    B. Hatamian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesExperience with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR differs in different centers and there are lots of controversies surrounding this issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate Spontaneous resolution and prognosis of the disease among Iranian children.MethodsIn this case series study, 1278 children with urinary tract infection and visited at pediatric nephrology clinic in Tehran, Iran during 1999-2007 were studied. Primary VUR was found in 533 Patients. Following the diagnosis, the patients received prophylactic antibiotic and were annually followed with radionucleo cystography (RNC. Patients underwent surgery in case the medical treatment failed (breakthrough infection or new renal scar formation.Results533 patients with VUR were studied. Patients’ mean age with VUR was 3.7±2.4 years (range: 2 days to 18 years old. During an average follow-up duration of 3.3+2.2 years, spontaneous resolution was observed in 40% of 279 patients who had follow-up RNCs. The mean interval between VUR diagnosis and spontaneous resolution was 1.5+ 1 years (range: 2 months to 6 years. The resolution rate was decreased with increment of reflux grade so that for grades I to V, VUR was resolved in 63%, 57%, 27%, 22% and 10% of the cases, respectively. Anti reflux surgery was performed in 27(10% of patients during follow-up.ConclusionBased on the excellent results obtained from clinical therapy using low dose antibiotics, it is recommended that VUR grades 1 to 4 be managed medically with low-dose oral antibiotic prophylaxis and close follow-ups.Keywords: Urinary Tract Infection; Vesico-Ureteral Reflux; Spontaneous Resolution; Child.

  15. Patients with a history of infection and voiding dysfunction are at risk for recurrence after successful endoscopic treatment of vesico ureteral reflux and deserve long-term follow up

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    R Coletta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Preoperative recurrent IVU, together with high-grade reflux, seem to correlate to lower success rate of Deflux injection for primary VUR. Even after successful endoscopic treatment, long-term surveillance may be needed among these cases, mainly if voiding dysfunction is also recorded. Late recurring VUR must be actively excluded in case of new IVU episodes.

  16. [Pathogenetic bases for choosing treatment for vesicoureteral reflux in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Pugachev, A G; Kudriavtsev, Iu V

    2002-01-01

    600 children treated surgically or conservatively for vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) at the age 3 months to 15 years were followed up for maximum 28 years. The course of compensatory processes in the kidney with considering the cause of VUR development at different stages of life (childhood, adolescence, adult life) and the degree of renal function loss were specified. Morphologic studies of renal parenchyma help choosing treatment of VUR in children depending on the cause of its development: malformation of ostium ureteris and intramural ureter, inflammation in the urinary bladder.

  17. The sonographic visualization of the vesico-ureteral junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, G J; van Dijck, X M; Kint, E J; Peeters, S R; Baert, A L; Goddeeris, P

    1982-06-01

    The anatomical relationship between the terminal ureter, the trigone and the vesico-ureteral junction was studied in vivo by ultrasound. In healthy test persons successful visualization and differentiation of the submucosal, transmural and retrovesical segments of the terminal ureter could be obtained. Some potential clinical applications of the method are discussed.

  18. Spontaneous Resolution of Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR in Iranian Children, a Single Center Experience in 533 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sharifian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives

    Experience with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR differs in different centers and there are lots of controversies surrounding this issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate Spontaneous resolution and prognosis of the disease among Iranian children.

     

    Methods

    In this case series study, 1278 children with urinary tract infection and visited at pediatric nephrology clinic in Tehran, Iran during 1999-2007 were studied. Primary VUR was found in 533 Patients. Following the diagnosis, the patients received prophylactic antibiotic and were annually followed with radionucleo cystography (RNC. Patients underwent surgery in case the medical treatment failed (breakthrough infection or new renal scar formation.

     

    Results

    533 patients with VUR were studied. Patients’ mean age with VUR was 3.7±2.4 years (range: 2 days to 18 years old. During an average follow-up duration of 3.3+2.2 years, spontaneous resolution was observed in 40% of 279 patients who had follow-up RNCs. The mean interval between VUR diagnosis and spontaneous resolution was 1.5+ 1 years (range: 2 months to 6 years. The resolution rate was decreased with increment of reflux grade so that for grades I to V, VUR was resolved in 63%, 57%, 27%, 22% and 10% of the cases, respectively. Anti reflux surgery was performed in 27(10% of patients during follow-up.

     

    Conclusion

    Based on the excellent results obtained from clinical therapy using low dose antibiotics, it is recommended that VUR grades 1 to 4 be managed medically with low-dose oral antibiotic prophylaxis and close follow-ups.

  19. Growth indices in urinary tract infection children with or without vesicoureteral reflux

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    Majid Malaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the growth quality in children, less than 5 years of age, affected with urinary tract infection (UTI and to compare the indices between patients with and without vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR based on their reflux severity and/or laterality, we studied 106 children less than 5 years of age with UTI at Imam Reza Hospital of Kermanshah, Iran, and divided the study group into four subgroups based on their cystouretrography results as follows: Group 0: without reflux (as control group; Group 1: mild VUR; Group 2: moderate VUR; and Group 3: severe VUR. In all the subgroups, weight height index (WHI was lower than 100% and was 96%, 93%, 95%, and 98%, respectively. We found no correlation between reflux severity and WHI in all the subgroups. In addition, the difference in the mean height standard deviation score (HSDS (0.10, -0.12, -0.19, and -0.22, respectively in the different subgroups was statistically insignificant. The mean WHI in the group with unilateral and bilateral reflux was 94.5% ± 8.9% and 95.0% ± 8.16%, respectively, while the mean HSDS was -0.16 ± 0.35 and -0.18 ± 0.38, respectively, and the difference was statistically insignificant in both the cases. We conclude that in children with UTI and normal glomerular filtration rate, the existence of reflux with all grades of severity and laterality exerts no impact on the growth index.

  20. Routine delayed voiding cystourethography after initial successful endoscopic treatment with Dextranomer/Hialuronic Acid Copolimer (Dx/HA) of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Is it necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aparicio, L; Blázquez-Gómez, E; Vila Santandreu, A; Camacho Diaz, J A; Vila-Cots, J; Ramos Cebrian, M; de Haro, I; Martin, O; Tarrado, X

    2016-12-01

    Some guidelines recommend an early voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) after endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), but there's no consensus if it's necessary a long-term follow-up in these patients. The aim of our study is analyze if it's necessary a delayed VCUG after initial successful treatment with Dx/HA. We have reviewed all medical charts of patients that underwent Dx/HA treatment from 2006 to 2010. We have selected patients with initial successful treatment and more than 3 years of radiological and clinical follow-up. We have analyzed late clinical and radiological outcomes. One hundred and sixty children with 228 refluxing ureters underwent Dx/HA endoscopic treatment with a mean follow-up of 52.13 months. Early VCUG was performed in 215 ureters with an initial successful rate of 84.1%. The group of study was 94/215 ureters with more than 3 years of follow-up with a delayed VCUG. VUR was still resolved in 79,8% of the ureters. Clinical success rate was 91.7%. The incidence of febrile urinary tract infection in those patients with cured VUR and those with a relapsed VUR was 8 and 15%, respectively; but there were no significant differences. We have not found any variable related with relapsed VUR except those ureters that initially received 2 injections (P<.05). If our objective in the treatment of VUR is to reduce the incidence of febrile urinary tract infection it is not necessary to perform a delayed VCUG even though the long-term radiological outcomes is worse than clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. VESICO-URETERIC REFLUX IN CHILDREN WITH PRENATALLY DIAGNOSED HYDRONEPHROSIS: CHARACTERISTICS AND EVOLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, T.; Madalena, C.; Teixeira, P.; Matos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Objectivo: conhecer as características e evolução do Refluxo vésicoureteral ( RVU) de diagnóstico pré-natal, nas crianças vigiadas numa na Consulta de Nefrologia Pediátrica nos último 10 anos. Material e Métodos: entre Janeiro de 1992 e Dezembro de 2002 foram enviados à consulta 322 crianças com diagnóstico pré-natal de uropatia malformativa. Destas, 216 tinham critérios para realizar Cistouretrografia miccional seriada (CUMS) e 29 apresentaram RVU primá...

  2. Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) Chronic Kidney Diseases Your Urinary System Your Kidneys How the Body Works Main Page Urinary Tract Infections Glomerulonephritis Blood in the Urine (Hematuria) ...

  3. Prediction of high-grade vesicoureteral reflux after pediatric urinary tract infection: external validation study of procalcitonin-based decision rule.

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    Sandrine Leroy

    Full Text Available Predicting vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR ≥3 at the time of the first urinary tract infection (UTI would make it possible to restrict cystography to high-risk children. We previously derived the following clinical decision rule for that purpose: cystography should be performed in cases with ureteral dilation and a serum procalcitonin level ≥0.17 ng/mL, or without ureteral dilatation when the serum procalcitonin level ≥0.63 ng/mL. The rule yielded a 86% sensitivity with a 46% specificity. We aimed to test its reproducibility.A secondary analysis of prospective series of children with a first UTI. The rule was applied, and predictive ability was calculated.The study included 413 patients (157 boys, VUR ≥3 in 11% from eight centers in five countries. The rule offered a 46% specificity (95% CI, 41-52, not different from the one in the derivation study. However, the sensitivity significantly decreased to 64% (95%CI, 50-76, leading to a difference of 20% (95%CI, 17-36. In all, 16 (34% patients among the 47 with VUR ≥3 were misdiagnosed by the rule. This lack of reproducibility might result primarily from a difference between derivation and validation populations regarding inflammatory parameters (CRP, PCT; the validation set samples may have been collected earlier than for the derivation one.The rule built to predict VUR ≥3 had a stable specificity (ie. 46%, but a decreased sensitivity (ie. 64% because of the time variability of PCT measurement. Some refinement may be warranted.

  4. Is there need for both intravenous urography and voiding cystography in the evaluation of children with recurrent urinary tract infections?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Qvist, N; Jensen, K M

    1986-01-01

    unilateral and six children had bilateral vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR). Following normal IVU VUR was demonstrated in 22% of the ureters, but in all cases of low grade. In abnormal IVU, i.e. renal scarring or dilatation of the ureters, VC showed high grade VUR in 54% of the ureters. Based on these results...

  5. original Article double-nippled ureteroneocystostomy: A novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ureteroneocystostomy is frequently per- formed to manage distal ureteral obstruction or vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR). Several sur- gical procedures have been described. Those of Politano-Leadbetter1, Paquin2, Lich3 and. Gregoire4 are probably the most popular with a reported 90% to 99% success rate. In se-.

  6. Vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabrielle; Fletcher, Jeffery T; Alexander, Stephen I; Craig, Jonathan C

    2008-05-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), the retrograde flow of urine from the bladder toward the kidney, is common in young children. About 30% of children with urinary tract infections will be diagnosed with VUR after a voiding cystourethrogram. For most, VUR will resolve spontaneously; 20% to 30% will have further infections, but few will experience long-term renal sequelae. Developmentally, VUR arises from disruption of complex signaling pathways and cellular differentiation. These mechanisms are probably genetically programmed but may be influenced by environmental exposures. Phenotypic expression of VUR is variable, ranging from asymptomatic forms to severe renal parenchymal disease and end-stage disease. VUR is often familial but is genetically heterogeneous with variability in mode of inheritance and in which gene, or the number of genes, that are involved. Numerous genetic studies that explore associations with VUR are available. The relative utility of these for understanding the genetics of VUR is often limited because of small sample size, poor methodology, and a diverse spectrum of patients. Much, if not all, of the renal parenchymal damage associated with end-stage disease is likely to be congenital, which limits the opportunity for intervention to familial cases where risk prediction may be available. Management of children with VUR remains controversial because there is no strong supportive evidence that prophylactic antibiotics or surgical intervention improve outcomes. Furthermore, well-designed genetic epidemiological studies focusing on the severe end of the VUR phenotype may help define the causal pathway and identify modifiable or disease predictive factors.

  7. Technique of Intravesical Laparoscopy for Ureteric Reimplantation to Treat VUR

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    Atul A. Thakre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been estimated as 0.4 to 1.8% among the pediatric population. In children with urinary tract infection, the prevalence is typically from 30–50% with higher incidence occurring in infancy. When correction of VUR is determined to be necessary, traditionally open ureteral reimplantation by a variety of techniques has been the mainstay of treatment. This approach is justified because surgical correction affords a very high success rate of 99% in experienced hands and a low complication rate. In that context the purpose of presenting our surgical technique: laparoscopic intravesical ureteric reimplantation is to highlight the use of laparoscopy to perform ureteric reimplantation for the management of pediatric VUR.

  8. Vesicoureteral reflux and reflux nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H.S.

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is mainly a primary phenomenon due to incontinence of the ureterovesical junction, mostly affecting a pediatric population. During micturition cystourethrography (MCU) reflux into the kidney - intrarenal reflux (IRR) - is occasionally seen. In areas with IRR the kidney surface may subsequently be depressed and the papillae retracted (reflux nephropathy (RN)). VUR may lead to hypertension and/or end-stage renal failure. Most commonly, VUR is discovered during evaluation for urinary tract infection, but it may also be present in patients with hypertension, toxemia of pregnancy, chronic renal failure and proteinuria, and it may be found in siblings of patients with VUR. For the time being VUR is demonstrated at radiographic MCU, whereas RN is diagnosed by demonstration of focal scars and of abnormal parenchymal thickness at urography. In children with VUR and no abnormalities of calyces or parenchymal defects standardized measurement of the parenchymal thickness at three sites may identify kidneys which are likely to develop focal scars. Quantitation of focal scarring should be performed in connection with a measure of the overall kidney size. The occurrence of IRR is dependent of the papillary morphology, intrapelvic pressure and urine flow. There may be an important relationship between renal ischemia and IRR in producing a 'vicious circle of deleterious effects' which, combined with parenchymal extravasation, may lead to RN. Treatment of VUR includes medical and surgical management. Since renal scarring may occur in infancy, prevention should focus on infants and young children. Infants and young children with severe VUR may have normal urograms. Therefore a MCU should also be performed, preferably with the recommended standardized technique. (orig.).

  9. Vesicoureteric reflux in children

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    Jameela A Kari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to identify the differences between primary and secondary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and the effect of associated bladder abnormalities on kidney function. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with VUR who were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. The review included results of radiological investigations and kidney function tests. We used Chi-square test for statistical analysis and paired t-test to compare group means for initial and last creatinine levels. Results: Ninety-nine children were included in this study. Twenty (20.2% had primary VUR, 11 had high-grade VUR, while 9 had low-grade reflux. All children with low-grade VUR had normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. Renal scars were present in 72% of the children with high-grade VUR. The mean creatinine levels (initial and last for both groups were normal. Seventy-nine (79.8% children had secondary VUR, which was due to posterior urethral valves (PUV (46.8%, neurogenic bladder caused by meningomyelocele (25.3%, non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNB (21.5%, or neurogenic bladder associated with prune belly syndrome (6.3%. Children with NNB, meningomyelocele and PUV had high creatinine at presentation with no considerable worsening of their kidney functions during the last visit. Renal scars were present in 49.4% of the children with secondary VUR. Conclusion: Children with primary VUR and normal bladder had good-functioning kidneys, while those with secondary VUR associated with abnormal bladder caused by NNB, spina bifida or PUV had abnormal kidney functions. DMSA scans were useful in predicting higher grades of VUR in children with primary reflux.

  10. Vesicoureteral Reflux in Kidney Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Nina M.; Minnee, Robert C.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; Idu, Mirza M.

    2017-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is frequently found after transplantation, but its impact on graft function, urine tract infection, and graft loss remains uncertain. Therefore our objective was to evaluate the effects of VUR on the outcome of renal transplantation. We included 1008 adult renal

  11. Vesicoureteral Reflux and Duplex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is the most common anomaly associated with duplex systems. In addition to an uncomplicated duplex system, reflux can also be secondary in the presence of an ectopic ureterocele with duplex systems. Controversy exists in regard to the initial and most definitive management of these anomalies when they coexist. This paper will highlight what is currently known about duplex systems and VUR, and will attempt to provide evidence supporting the various surgical approaches to an ectopic ureterocele and duplex system and the implications of concomitant VUR.

  12. A Correlation between Renal Anomalies and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Il Young; Shin, Hyeong Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    To investigate the frequency of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children with renal anomalies a evaluate the correlation between renal anomalies and VUR. Eighty-one children (1 day-8 years) with renal anomalies underwent voiding cystourethrogram between 2006 and 2009 were reviewed. This study included ureteropelvic junction stenosis (n = 32), ureteropelvic duplication (n = 20), multicystic dysplastic kidney (n = 12), fusion anomaly (n = 11), renal agenesis (n = 3), unilateral renal hypoplasia (n = 2), and ectopic kidney (n = 1). The frequency, grade, and location of VUR were evaluated. The grade of VUR according to age and anomaly type was statistically analyzed, and the patients with VUR were followed. The VUR was present in 14 (17.3%); ipsilateral VUR was present in 8 (57.1%), bilateral VUR in 4 (28.6%), and contralateral VUR in 2 (14.2%). VUR was detected in 9 patients under the age of one. There was no statistical correlation between VUR grade and either age or anomaly type of the nine patients showed continuous VUR on up. The frequency of VUR in children with renal anomalies was 17.3%. VUR was most frequently detected in children under the age of one, and VUR grade was not related to age and anomaly type.

  13. Have we Overtreated Children with Vesicoureteric Reflux?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    ABSTRACT. Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common serious bacterial infections in young children. These UTIs have a high association with vesicoureteric reflux (VUR). The pathophysiology of. VUR's renal sequelae, its investigation and management is presently undergoing a reassessment. This review ...

  14. EAU Guidelines on Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tekgul, Serdar; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Hoebeke, Piet; Kocvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan Serkan

    Context: Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a common congenital urinary tract abnormality in children. There is considerable controversy regarding its management. Preservation of kidney function is the main goal of treatment, which necessitates identification of patients requiring early

  15. No pathogenic mutations in the uroplakin III gene of 25 patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, Jacques C.; van de Meerakker, Judith; van Amstel, Hans-Krisian Ploos; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.

    2004-01-01

    The uroplakin III (UPIII) knockout mouse provides a good model for human primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Since to our knowledge no causative genes in human VUR have been identified to date, we wondered whether the UPIII gene might be involved in human primary VUR. Therefore, the UPIII gene was

  16. Vesicoureteral reflux and continuous prophylactic antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR management must be tailored based on the risk for further infections and renal scarring, gender, likelihood of spontaneous resolution, and parental preferences. Because we now understand that sterile VUR is benign and most reflux spontaneously resolves over time, the initial approach in majority of children is non-surgical with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and correction of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Despite increasing utilization of CAP over the past four decades, the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis has been questioned due to conflicting results of studies plagued with design flaws and inadequate subject sample size. The Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR trial, which was designed to address many of the limitations from previous studies, provided much needed answers. In this review, we sought to describe the controversy surrounding VUR management, highlight the results of RIVUR trial, and discuss how the RIVUR findings impact our understanding of CAP in the management of VUR.

  17. Disruption of ROBO2 is associated with urinary tract anomalies and confers risk of vesicoureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Weining; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Fan, Xueping; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Ferguson, Heather; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Fan, Yanli; Xi, Qiongchao; Li, Qing-Gang; Sanlaville, Damien; Andrews, William; Sundaresan, Vasi; Bi, Weimin; Yan, Jiong; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Feather, Sally A.; Woolf, Adrian S.; Rao, Yi; Lupski, James R.; Eccles, Michael R.; Quade, Bradley J.; Gusella, James F.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Maas, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). VUR is a complex, genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by the retrograde flow of urine from the bladder into the ureter and is associated with reflux nephropathy, the cause of

  18. Vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Lee, Yong Seung; Im, Young Jae; Han, Sang Won

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction is inseparable and has long been emphasized. However, the primary concern of all physicians treating patients with vesicoureteral reflux is the prevention of renal scarring and eventual deterioration of renal function. Bladder dysfunction, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux are the three important factors which are closely related to each other and contribute to the formation of renal scar. Especially, there is ongoing discussion regarding the role of bladder dysfunction in the prognosis of both medically and surgically treated vesicoureteral reflux. The effect of bladder dysfunction on VUR is mostly via inadequate sphincter relaxation during infancy which is closer to immature bladder dyscoordination rather than true dysfunction. But after toilet training, functional obstruction caused by voluntary sphincter constriction during voiding is responsible through elevation in bladder pressure, thus distorting the architecture of bladder and ureterovesical junction. Reports suggest that voiding phase abnormalities in lower urinary tract dysfunction contributes to lower spontaneous resolution rate of VUR. However, filling phase abnormalities such as involuntary detrusor contraction can also cause VUR even in the absence of dysfunctional voiding. With regards to the effect of bladder dysfunction on treatment, meta-analysis reveals that the cure rate of VUR following endoscopic treatment is less in children with bladder bowel dysfunction but there is no difference for open surgery. The pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction associated with UTI can be explained by the 'milk-back' of contaminated urine back into the bladder and significant residual urine resulting from functional outlet obstruction. In addition, involuntary detrusor contraction can decrease perfusion of the bladder mucosa thus decreasing mucosal immunity and creating a condition prone to UTI. In terms of renal scarring

  19. Value of cystourethroscopy in the assessment of children with recurrent urinary tract infections and/or enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Qvist, N; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    Forty-one children ages 6-14 years consecutively referred for recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) and/or enuresis constituted the study group. Cystourethroscopy (CUS) was carried out in 40 children and pathologic findings were revealed in 70% of children with RUTI in the absence of vesico-ureteral...... abnormal ureteric orifices were demonstrated. We therefore find CUS to be valuable in the assessment of children with both RUTI and VUR, because this examination is helpful in selecting patients who might need operation for severe VUR. CUS was not of therapeutic benefit to children with enuresis. Five...... reflux (VUR). However, only in 4 patients did CUS influence treatment. Based on these data we conclude that routine CUS is not justified in the evaluation of this group of children unless anatomical infravesical lesions are suspected. VUR was proven in 44% of children with RUTI. In 86% of these ureters...

  20. Treatment of Vesicoureteral Reflux after Puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux is uncommonly diagnosed and treated after puberty. The natural history of uncorrected VUR after puberty is not documented. Postpubertal patients with recurrent pyelonephritis and VUR should be considered for treatment. Ureteral reimplantation, endoscopic injections, and laparoscopic or robotic ureteral reimplantation may be utilized. Endoscopic injection is an appealing option for these patients. The role of laparoscopic or robotic ureteral reimplantation in these patients is evolving.

  1. Treatment of vesicouretheral reflux in pediatric patients

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    Grebeldinger Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Vesicouretheral reflux (VUR is an inherited abnormality of the urinary tract caused by dysfunction of vesicouretheral junction frequently accompanied by recurrent urinary infection. The optimal treatment method of VUR is still controversial. The aim of the study was to analyze medical charts of children with VUR with special focus on the results of endoscopic treatment with Deflux. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed the medical charts of all children diagnosed with VUR at the Institute for Children and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, in five years period. The analyzed data were: age, gender, grade, bilateral or unilateral presence of reflux, distribution to the sides of the body, urinary tract infections, associated anomalies and complications of VUR, treatment methods and the success rate of endoscopic correction with Deflux. Data processing was performed using the standard statistical methods. Results. The study included 167 patients (101 females and 66 males with 231 refluxing ureters. The patients age at diagnosis was 1 month to 18 years (mean 4.6 years. Frequencies of different grades of VUR at initial investigation were: 17%, 27%, 22%, 21% and 13% for grades I to V, respectively. VUR was unilateral in 103 patients (left in 65 and right in 38, and bilateral in 64. Urinary tract infections were present in 78.4% of patients, reflux nephropathy in 38.3%, hypertension in 3.0%, chronic renal insufficiency in 4.8%, associated anomalies in 39.5% of patients. The treatment method was recorded in 154 cases. Medically were treated 80 patients, and surgically 74. Endoscopic injection of Deflux was carried out in 59 patients. From 79 ureters treated, five had grade I reflux, 11 grade II, 23 grade III, 27 grade IV, and 13 grade V. In 46 patients Deflux injection was carried out once. A second injection was required in eight, and third injection in five patients. Reflux was absent in 42 of the treated patients (71.2% and 15

  2. A genome search for primary vesicoureteral reflux shows further evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Conte; A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); B.M. de Graaf (Bianca); F. Punzo (Francesca); G. Lama (Guiliana); A. La Manna (Angela); C. Grassia (Carolina); P.F. Rambaldi; B.A. Oostra (Ben); S. Perrotta (Silverio)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractVesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children. In order to identify gene(s) involved in this complex disorder, we performed a genome-wide search in a selected sample of 31 patients with primary VUR from eight families originating from southern

  3. Decreased Identification of Vesicoureteral Reflux: A Cautionary Tale

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    Aslam Hyder Qureshi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AimTo find the trend in patient’s visits to our centers for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. We hypothesize that VUR diagnosis and hence possible nephropathy recognition may be diminishing because of changing practice patterns.MethodsData were extracted from electronic medical records for new and follow-up patients aged 0–18 years with ICD-9/10 codes to correspond with VUR, VUR unilateral, VUR bilateral, and VUR with reflux nephropathy, as well as new patients with diagnoses of urinary tract infections (UTI and pyelonephritis at two major pediatric centers from 2012 to 2015. Figures and statistics to reflect absolute clinic visits and annual trends were created with SPSS 2010. Linear regression was applied.ResultsAnnually, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and Nationwide Children’s Hospital experienced an average decrease of 13 and 17% in total VUR visits, and an average decrease of 22 and 27% in VUR nephropathy visits, respectively, for each institution. Patient visits for UTIs were reduced an average of 16% annually in both centers. Linear regression demonstrated that number of patients (patients/year ± SE decreased annually 69 ± 19 (P = 0.02, 7 ± 2 (P = 0.02, and 67 ± 25 (P = 0.04 for VUR, VUR nephropathy, and UTI, respectively.ConclusionWe conclude that the decreased number of VUR and VUR nephropathy cases identified in subspecialty clinics (Nephrology/Urology at two major children’s hospitals reflect a possible decreased identification of VUR. This trend may also be due to decreased referral of low grade cases of VUR. We cannot conclude that “undifferentiated UTI” referrals increased concomitantly to account for the decreased VUR as our data reflects a decreased trend in those visits as well. We suggest that clinicians following the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines ensure that all UTI are accounted for and surveillance is appropriately escalated for recurrent UTI or abnormal imaging results.

  4. Primary vesicoureteral reflux in Sudanese children

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    El-Tigani M. A. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a common congenital renal tract anomaly in children. Reports from Sudan are scanty. We report the characteristics, presentation and outcome of primary VUR in a tertiary care hospital. The records of 30 patients (16 males; 53% followed-up between January 2004 and December 2010 were reviewed. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 4 ± 3.9 years and 47% were <2 years of age. Renal ultrasound scan (USS failed to predict VUR in 17% of the patients. On voiding cysturethrogram (VCUG, VUR was bilateral in 57% and severe grade in 64%. Grades were not significantly associated with age, gender or site of VUR. Initial dimercaptosuccinic acid radionuclide scan showed renal damage in 61.5% of the patients. Renal damage was significantly associated with female gender and severe VUR, but not with age of onset or history of urinary tract infection (UTI. Thirteen patients (43.3% presented with acute UTI, eight (26.6% with non-specific urinary tract symptoms and nine (30% with persistently elevated serum creatinine. Urine cultures were positive in 73% of patients, and E. coli was the most common pathogen. Renal impairment at presentation was significantly associated with bilateral severe VUR and history of UTI but not age or gender. After a mean follow-up period of 1.78 years (6 months to 5 years, 70% of patients remained with normal renal function and 30% progressed to chronic kidney disease; two of them died. In conclusion, our data is different from many studies. Features of primary VUR in Sudanese children are late age of onset, equal gender affection and predominance of severe grade. Presentation is associated with a high rate of UTI, renal damage and advanced renal impairment. Measures to improve early detection and treatment of VUR may reduce the risk of kidney damage.

  5. Urodynamics in boys after prenatally diagnosed vesicoureteric reflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, several theories have been presented regarding the pathogenesis of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children without neurological disease or posterior urethral valves. Primary VUR is one of many fetal uropathies detectable by prenatal sonography. Thirteen boys with a prenatal...... diagnosis of hydronephrosis and postnatally demonstrated VUR had a urodynamic evaluation carried out at the age of 1 to 26 weeks. The renal function was evaluated by renography and estimation of glomerular filtration rate. Maximum detrusor pressure at voiding was significantly higher in the group...... of patients with VUR and impaired renal function compared to: (1) reflux patients with bilateral normal renal function; and (2) "normal" controls. Patients with normal bilateral renal and bladder function had a low risk of urinary tract infection during the period of follow-up (1 to 6 years). Early urodynamic...

  6. Surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jennifer; Skoog, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common uropathy affecting children. Compared to children without VUR, those with VUR have a higher rate of pyelonephritis and renal scarring following urinary tract infection (UTI). Options for treatment include observation with or without antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical repair. Surgical intervention may be necessary in patients with persistent reflux, renal scarring, and recurrent or breakthrough febrile UTI. Both open and endoscopic approaches to reflux correction are successful and reduce the occurrence of febrile UTI. Estimated success rates of open and endoscopic reflux correction are 98.1% (95% CI 95.1, 99.1) and 83.0% (95% CI 69.1, 91.4), respectively. Factors that affect the success of endoscopic injection include pre-operative reflux grade and presence of functional or anatomic bladder abnormalities including voiding dysfunction and duplicated collecting systems. Few studies have evaluated the long-term outcomes of endoscopic injection, and with variable results. In patients treated endoscopically, recurrent febrile UTI occurred in 0-21%, new renal damage in 9-12%, and recurrent reflux in 17-47.6% of treated ureters with at least 1 year follow-up. These studies highlight the need for standardized outcome reporting and longer follow-up after endoscopic treatment.

  7. Comparison of "Direct" and "Indirect" Nuclear Cystography in the Diagnosis of Vesicoureteric Reflux

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    Khriesat Imad

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to compare "direct" and "indirect" nuclear cystography for the detection of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Forty-five children (15 males and 30 females, ranging in age from 5 months to 10 years, were studied at the King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan between January 1998 and December 1999, using both direct (catheter and indirect techniques of nuclear cystography (NC. Of the 82 ureters that could be compared, 32 ureters were positive for VUR on the direct technique while only 20 ureters showed VUR on the indirect technique (sensitivity 62%. Nine ureters, which did not show VUR on the direct cystogram, were read as positive on the indirect cystogram (specificity 82%. The false positive results of indirect nuclear cystogram make it invalid for VUR screening program, while the ease of assessment and low radiation dose from the direct NC has made this the recommended test for screening and follow-up of VUR.

  8. Prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux in neonatal urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleper, Roxana; Krause, Irit; Eisenstein, Bella; Davidovits, Miriam

    2004-09-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) after a first episode of urinary tract infection (UTI) is apparently diagnosed much more frequently (25%-40%) in children than in neonates. The aims of the study were to determine the actual rate of VUR in neonates with UTI and to define the clinical clues to its diagnosis. The study sample included term infants with a diagnosis of UTI during their first month of life who were seen in this hospital between January 1997 and May 1999. All infants underwent complete diagnostic work-up (renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrography [VCUG]). The medical files were reviewed for patient sex, age at UTI diagnosis, laboratory findings (including causative pathogen), and ultrasonographic findings. These parameters were correlated with the finding of VUR on VCUG. Sixty-four neonates (55 males, 9 females) with UTI were included in this study. UTI was 6 times more common in males than females, although the incidence of VUR was equal between the sexes (about 20%). The presence of VUR was associated with a significantly younger age at presentation of UTI (11.4+/-4 vs 16.9+/-6.6 days, p<0.01). VUR was diagnosed at a fourfold higher rate in neonates with Klebsiella-induced UTI compared to those with E. Coli-UTI. In 80% of those with significantly abnormal ultrasonographic findings VUR was found on VCUG. Jaundice was noted at UTI diagnosis 3 times more often in infants with VUR, and elevated creatinine level, 2.5 times more often.

  9. Is There Hope for Renal Growth on Imaging Studies Following Ureteral Reimplant for Boys With Fetal Hydronephrosis and Urinary Reflux?

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    Ming-Hsien Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reflux nephropathy is thought to be the etiology for renal maldevelopment. We present two boys with fetal hydronephrosis and sterile vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. There was lack of renal growth of the refluxing renal units on surveillance renal ultrasound. Parents elected to undergo open ureteral reimplants. Post-surgical ultrasounds demonstrated improved renal growth.

  10. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  11. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging to predict vesicoureteral reflux in children with urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Yang Shin; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kee Hwan [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Bo-Kyung [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kiefer, Berthold [Oncology Application Development, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To compare the diffusion parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) between the ''reflux'' and the ''non-reflux'' kidneys, and to evaluate the feasibility of using IVIM DWI to predict vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children with a urinary tract infection (UTI). Eighty-three kidneys from 57 pediatric patients with a UTI were classified into ''reflux'' and ''non-reflux'' groups according to voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) results. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (PF) were measured and compared in the renal pelvis of both groups. Four indices (D*/ADC, PF/ADC, D*/D, and PF/D) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. VURs were detected on VCUG in 21 kidneys. PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' group than in the ''non-reflux'' group. The indices were all significantly higher. The PF/D index showed the best diagnostic performance in predicting VUR in children with UTI (A{sub z} = 0.864). PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' kidney than in the ''non-reflux'' kidney. Our new index (PF/D) could prove useful for predicting VUR. (orig.)

  12. Multi-institutional experience with PIC cystography--incidence of occult vesicoureteral reflux in children with febrile urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, John D; Maizels, Max; Alpert, Seth A; Kirsch, Andrew J; Hanna, Moneer K; Weiser, Adam C; Caione, Paolo; Kaplan, William E; Cheng, Earl Y; Houston, John T B

    2006-03-01

    It has been reported that all children with febrile urinary tract infections (FUTIs) and normal voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) findings show occult reflux (vesicoureteral reflux [VUR]) when examined by cystography performed with positioning of the instillation of contrast at the ureteral orifice (PIC cystography). In this study, we evaluated the reproducibility of this finding using a prospective multi-institutional collaborative examination to determine whether PIC-VUR is as common in such cases as previously shown. From March 2002 to October 2003, four institutions performed PIC cystography consecutively and prospectively in pediatric cases of FUTI (greater than 101 degrees F) who had not shown VUR by conventional VCUG. We correlated the ureteral orifice (UO) configuration and position with the status of PIC-VUR. PIC cystography was performed in 39 children (31 girls and 8 boys; 75 FUTIs). We identified PIC-VUR in 32 (82%) of 39 children, involving 58 (74%) of 78 ureters. The likelihood of demonstrating PIC-VUR was increased 37-fold if the UO showed a patulous configuration and was increased 9-fold if the UO showed a lateral configuration. PIC-VUR was noted uniformly in UOs showing hydrodistension. This multi-institutional registry showed that the incidence of PIC-VUR (82%) in children with FUTI and normal standard VCUG findings is similar to that previously reported. We consider that PIC-VUR likely accounts for the FUTIs.

  13. Risk factors for renal scarring in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Mir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the incidence of renal scarring among patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and the possible risk factor(s, we studied 90 children (60 girls and 30 boys with VUR followed in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit at the Ege University Hospital from 1998 to 2003. All the patients were assessed for VUR grade by voiding cystoureterography and for presence of renal scarring by (99 m technetium dimercapto-succinic acid scintigraphy. All infants with VUR were given low-dose prophylactic antibiotics and followed-up until resolution of the reflux. Grade of reflux and number of urinary tract infection (UTI episodes (≥3 were found to be statistically significant risk factors for renal scarring (P 0.05. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference of frequency of renal scarring among the different age groups (P >0.05. We conclude that recurrences of UTI and VUR severity are significant risk factors for renal scarring in children with VUR. Therefore, identification of VUR at an early age may offer the opportunity to prevent episodes of UTI and possible formation of renal scars that may result in end-stage renal failure.

  14. Endoscopic correction of vesicoureteric reflux: 10-year experience of a tertiary care center

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    Khalid Fouda Neel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment (ET of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR is becoming the new gold standard for surgical correction. ET for VUR using newly available bulking agents is a reliable and safe alternative procedure to open ureteral reimplantation for the treatment of VUR in children. We retrospectively reviewed our experience over 10 years of patients with primary VUR who underwent ET and had at least one year of follow-up at our center from 1998 to 2008. We looked at laterality, success rate, need for a second procedure and complication rate. We observed 321 patients with ET for VUR during this period; 115 (35.8% of them were males and the total intervened ureters were 480. Correction of VUR was defined as either the resolution of reflux or a downgrading to grade 1 revealed with a follow-up voiding cystourethrogram and no ipsilateral renal or ureteric dilatation detected on renal ultrasound. At two to three months of follow-up, VUR was corrected in 393/480 (81.8% refluxing ureters after a single endoscopic injection. With a second, repeated injection in the failed cases, VUR was corrected in a total of 418 (87.1% refluxing ureters. Only three patients had post-operative complications (<1%. We conclude that our study suggests that the majority of patients will be cured after undergoing, as out-patients, this endoscopic procedure. We believe that the widely reported safety of bulking agents and the short learning curve will make ET the standard treatment for VUR once surgical correction is warranted.

  15. Has the Data Efflux Regarding the Promising Outcome Following Injection of Deflux Changed the Management of Adult Vesicoureteral Reflux?

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    D. E. Zilberman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, traditionally considered a problem of childhood, can also be detected during adulthood. However, while the concept regarding the therapeutic management of VUR in children has undergone revolutionary changes, moving from surgical to conservative approach, the optimal therapeutic approach in adult reflux is poorly addressed and is still unknown. Herein, we review clinical and therapeutic approaches of VUR in pediatric population as published throughout the years. With the introduction of Deflux injection as a minimally invasive procedure, we identify a beginning of a new trend that further extends the indications for endoscopic injections, including its introduction to adult patients as well.

  16. The Value of PIC Cystography in Detecting De Novo and Residual Vesicoureteral Reflux after Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid Copolymer Injection

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    B. W. Palmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic injection of Dx/HA in the management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has become an accepted alternative to open surgery. In the current study we evaluated the value of cystography to detect de novo contralateral VUR in unilateral cases of VUR at the time of Dx/HA injection and correlated the findings of immediate post-Dx/HA injection cystography during the same anesthesia to 2-month postoperative VCUG to evaluate its ability to predict successful surgical outcomes. The current study aimed to evaluate whether an intraoperatively performed cystogram could replace postoperative studies. But a negative intraoperative cystogram correlates with the postoperative study in only 80%. Considering the 75–80% success rate of Dx/HA implantation, the addition of intraoperative cystograms cannot replace postoperative studies. In patients treated with unilateral VUR, PIC cystography can detect occult VUR and prevent postoperative contralateral new onset of VUR.

  17. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in pediatric patients

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    Jong Wook Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment is a minimally invasive treatment for managing patients with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Although several bulking agents have been used for endoscopic treatment, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid is the only bulking agent currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating VUR. Endoscopic treatment of VUR has gained great popularity owing to several obvious benefits, including short operative time, short hospital stay, minimal invasiveness, high efficacy, low complication rate, and reduced cost. Initially, the success rates of endoscopic treatment have been lower than that of open antireflux surgery. However, because injection techniques have been developed, a recent study showed higher success rates of endoscopic treatment than open surgery in the treatment of patients with intermediate- and high-grade VUR. Despite the controversy surrounding its effectiveness, endoscopic treatment is considered a valuable treatment option and viable alternative to long-term antibiotic prophylaxis.

  18. Serum interleukin -8 is not a reliable marker for prediction of vesicoureteral reflux in children with febrile urinary tract infection

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    Abolfazl Mahyar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In view of the side effects of voiding cystourethrography (VCUG, identification of noninvasive markers predicting the presence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is important. This study was conducted to determine the predictive value of serum interleukin-8 (IL-8 in diagnosis of VUR in children with first febrile urinary tract infection (UTI. Materials and Methods: Eighty children with first febrile UTI were divided into two groups, with and without VUR, based on the results of VCUG. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value positive and negative likelihood ratio, and accuracy of IL-8 for prediction of VUR were investigated. Results: Of the 80 children with febrile UTI, 30 (37.5% had VUR. There was no significant difference between the children with and without VUR and also between low and high-grade VUR groups in terms of serum concentration of IL-8 (P>0.05. Based on ROC curve, the sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio positive, and accuracy of serum IL-8 was lower than those of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed significant positive correlation only between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and VUR. Conclusions: This study showed no significant difference between the children with and without VUR in terms of the serum concentration of IL-8. Therefore, it seems that serum IL-8 is not a reliable marker for prediction of VUR.

  19. Meaning of ureter dilatation during ultrasonography in infants for evaluating vesicoureteral reflux

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    Park, Yae-won, E-mail: yaewonpark@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 120-752 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Joon, E-mail: mjkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 120-752 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Won, E-mail: swhan58@yuhs.ac [Department of Pediatric Urology, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 120-752 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook, E-mail: kimdw@yuhs.ac [Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 120-752 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Jung, E-mail: mjl1213@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 120-752 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the meaning of ureter dilatation during ultrasonography (US) in infants for evaluating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed abdominal US images of infants who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection (UTI group) or only hydronephrosis without UTI (control group). Hydronephrosis (graded 0–4) and ureter dilatation (present or absent) were evaluated on each side with US. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) within 3 months time interval with US was also reviewed and VUR was graded (0–5) on each side. Hydronephrosis, ureter dilatation, and VUR were then compared between the two groups. Results: Four hundred and three infants (142 in the UTI group and 261 in the control group) were included and VCUG was performed in 129 infants (68 in UTI and 61 in control groups). VUR grades were not different between the two groups (p = 0.252). Hydronephrosis grade was not related to VUR in either group (p > 0.05). However, ureter dilatation had a significant relationship with VUR in the UTI group (p = 0.015), even among patients with a high-grade VUR (p = 0.005). Whereas, ureter dilatation was not associated with VUR in the control group (p = 0.744). The relationship between ureter dilatation and VUR was different between the two groups for both all grades (p = 0.014) and high-grade (p = 0.004) VUR. Ureter dilatation had 66.7% sensitivity, 80.3% specificity, and 79.4% accuracy for evaluating high-grade VUR in the UTI group. Conclusion: Ureter dilatation on US can be a helpful finding for detecting VUR in infants with UTI, but not infants without UTI.

  20. Meaning of ureter dilatation during ultrasonography in infants for evaluating vesicoureteral reflux.

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    Park, Yae-won; Kim, Myung-Joon; Han, Sang Won; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the meaning of ureter dilatation during ultrasonography (US) in infants for evaluating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). We retrospectively reviewed abdominal US images of infants who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection (UTI group) or only hydronephrosis without UTI (control group). Hydronephrosis (graded 0-4) and ureter dilatation (present or absent) were evaluated on each side with US. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) within 3 months time interval with US was also reviewed and VUR was graded (0-5) on each side. Hydronephrosis, ureter dilatation, and VUR were then compared between the two groups. Four hundred and three infants (142 in the UTI group and 261 in the control group) were included and VCUG was performed in 129 infants (68 in UTI and 61 in control groups). VUR grades were not different between the two groups (p=0.252). Hydronephrosis grade was not related to VUR in either group (p>0.05). However, ureter dilatation had a significant relationship with VUR in the UTI group (p=0.015), even among patients with a high-grade VUR (p=0.005). Whereas, ureter dilatation was not associated with VUR in the control group (p=0.744). The relationship between ureter dilatation and VUR was different between the two groups for both all grades (p=0.014) and high-grade (p=0.004) VUR. Ureter dilatation had 66.7% sensitivity, 80.3% specificity, and 79.4% accuracy for evaluating high-grade VUR in the UTI group. Ureter dilatation on US can be a helpful finding for detecting VUR in infants with UTI, but not infants without UTI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux

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    T M Scholbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the "low grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the "high grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR.

  2. Practical approach to screen vesicoureteral reflux after a first urinary tract infection

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    Maria Alvarez Fuente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a common pediatric urologic disorder. After the first urinary tract infection (UTI, imaging studies are recommended, starting with a renal ultrasound (RUS. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA scan are the other main radiologic studies used to detect VUR. We evaluated the use of RUS as a screening method for VUR in children below 2 years of age, in order to avoid unnecessary VCUG. Materials and Methods: Medical records and imaging studies of infants (<2 years who had their first UTI in a 6 year period were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values of RUS and DMSA for diagnosing VUR. Results: Among 155 children (51% males with their first UTI, 148 RUS were performed, 128 VCUG and 29 DMSA. VUR was detected in 21% patients; 14.5% low grade and 6.5% high grade. One hundred and twenty-one patients underwent both RUS and VCUG, 101 RUS were normal and 20 abnormal. Of the normal RUS 98% had no or low grade VUR. Among those with an abnormality on RUS 30% had high grade VUR (P = 0.001. Conclusions: After the first UTI in infants (<2 years RUS is a good screening method for VUR. Among such shildren with a normal RUS, we do not recommend VCUG or DMSA. In our opinion, VCUG should be performed only in patients with abnormal findings in RUS or in recurrent UTI.

  3. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without reimplantation for patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux

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    Han-Chao Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR after augmentation cystoplasty alone in patients with a hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients with a hypocompliant bladder associated with VUR confirmed by videourodynamics (VUD preoperatively were recruited in this study. All patients had undergone bladder augmentation with a generous detubularized segment of bowel at our institution. No effort had been made to correct the existing reflux. Preoperative assessment included urinalysis, kidney function tests, ultrasonography, and videourodynamic evaluation. All patients had various degrees of VUR. The status of VUR and bladder function were studied by VUD. The mean follow-up period was 2.2 years (range 0.5–5.5 years. The VUD manifested a significant improvement of bladder capacity, diminution of intravesical pressure, and resolution of reflux after bladder augmentation. After the surgery, 24/29 (83% no longer had reflux, 3/29 (10% showed improvement in reflux, and 2/29 (7% demonstrated no change in reflux. In addition, 16/21 (76% patients had reflux Grades I-III; 100% patients with reflux Grades IV and V had complete cessation of reflux. Only one patient had symptomatic urinary infection after the surgery. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without ureteral reimplantation is thus effective and adequate for patients with high-pressure and hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Therefore, ureteral reimplantation is not necessary when augmentation enterocystoplasty is recommended for patients with high-pressure, low-compliant bladder and VUR.

  4. Interactions of Constipation, Dysfunctional Elimination Syndrome, and Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    Walid A. Farhat

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is simply described as incompetence of the unidirectional valve at the ureterovesical junction (UVJ, leading to backflow of urine to the kidney. Today, it is clear that VUR is not only related to the UVJ function but also to a combination of processes including immunity, bladder and pelvic floor function, dysfunctional voiding, and constipation. Although our surgical aims directed towards improving the valve coaptation at the UVJ, we understand today the importance of the diagnosis and treatment of constipation and dysfunctional voiding adjunctively.

  5. Factors influencing recurrent reflux acute pyelonephritis in patients with JJ ureteral stent after discharge

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    Pricop Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vesicoureteral reflux (VUR after the insertion of a JJ stent is a pathological entity characterized by the impossibility of the vesicoureteric junction (VUJ to exhibit its sphincterian functioning that allows the unidirectional flow of urine from the ureter to the bladder. This happens as long as the catheter is in place, and after its suppression due to traumatization of the ureterovesical junction, which loses its tonicity and ability to ensure urinary unidirectional flow. Reflux acute pyelonephritis is the acute inflammation of the renal tract and parenchyma resulting from stagnation of infected urine for long periods of time due to vesicoureteral reflux. We have noted multiple cases which, after the insertion of a JJ stent, presented reflux acute pyelonephritis due VUR, we considered the causes favoring these aspects. We focused on the frequency of reflux acute pyelonephritis and identified factors that could be used to advise patients with JJ stents.

  6. Diagnosis of intrarenal reflux and its role in pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy in children

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    Fujimatsu, Akiko [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    We compared newly developed radionuclide cystography with conventional contrast voiding cystography (VCG) with regard to their diagnostic usefulness of intrarenal reflux (IRR) in children. Based on the imaging findings, we assessed the role of IRR in the pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy (RN). Among the ureters which revealed IRR diagnosed by radionuclide cystography, 38.9% (7 out of 18 ureters) of the cases examined by VCG had IRR. In the case of VCG, the sensitivity and specificity of IRR detection were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. There was a statistical correlation between the presence/absence of IRR and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). RN was significantly correlated with advanced grade of VUR associated with IRR. Among 9 kidneys of the subjects who had suffered from urinary tract infection (UTI) only once, IRR was detected in 33.3% (3/9) and RN in 66.7% (2/3). From these findings, conventional contrast VCG is considered not effective for the diagnosis of IRR. Moreover, it is suggested that VUR complicated with IRR is deeply associated with the development of RN. In addition, it is suggested that UTI might be related to the onset of IRR. (author)

  7. The current evidence based medical management of vesicoureteral reflux: The Sickkids protocol

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    Sumit Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux is a common clinical entity and is one of the keystones of the establishment of pediatric urology as a urological subspeciality. There has been continued evolution in the management of vesicoureteral reflux as new insights are gained on its role in renal damage. The optimal treatment algorithm remains controversial. This review aims to highlight the current literature on VUR and its association with urinary tract infections and renal damage. The protocol of management of a child with VUR followed at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto is described.

  8. Efficacy of cyclic voiding cystourethrography in detection of vesicoureteral reflux in young children

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    Kim, Jee Eun; Choi, Soo Jin; Yang, Dal Mo [Ghil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of cyclic voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) for the detection of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in young children. Two cycles of cyclic VCUG were performed in 119 kidney-ureter units (KUUs) of 60 children (mean age; 9 months, range; 5 days-2 years). Spot radiographs and fluoroscopic-image captures were obtained. We analyzed the presence of VUR and the grade of VUR according to the standards of the international grading system. We recorded the amount of total contrast material on each cycle and the total fluoroscopic time. VUR was present in 21 (17.6%) KUUs of 13 (21.7%) children. On the first and second cycle, the reflux occurred in 9 (15.0%) children and 13 (12.6%) KUUs. In one hundred-four KUUs of 51 children whose VCUG results were negative on the first cycle, the reflux occurred in 4 (7.8%) children and 6 (5.8%) KUUs during the second cycle. The grading of the reflux was upgraded during a second cycle in one case. A new detection and upgrade of VUR by the second cycle was observed in 5 (9.8%) children and 7 (6.7%) KUUs. In 4 KUUs (53%) of these 7 KUUs, the VUR was higher than grade II. The mean amounts of contrast solution were 28 cc (range; 5-100 cc) on the first cycle and 39 cc (range; 10-100 cc) on the second cycle. The mean of the total fluoroscopic time was 147 seconds (range; 59--338 seconds). Cyclic VCUG can enhance the ability of the method to detect and grade VUR in children under 2 years of age.

  9. Treatment Outcomes of Subureteric Injection and Ureteroneocystostomy in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    Serkan Arslan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to evaluate patients treated with subureteric injection (STING and ureteroneo­cystostomy by the Lich-Gregoir technique (LGT due to vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in terms of radiologic, scintigraphic images, laboratory findings and bladder functions and determine the effectiveness of both treatment modalities. Methods: A total of 106 patients, who were treated with STING and ureteroneocystostomy between January 2002-2010 were investigated. Patients’ age, gender, complaints at presentation, bladder function impairment, laboratory outcome and radiologic and scintigraphic findings were retrospectively examined. The relationship among VUR grades and pel­vicalyceal ectasia, scars, treatment modalities and outcome were evaluated. Results: Left VUR was found in 68(64% and right VUR in 38(36% of the patients. The most common level of VUR was Grade III (42 patients, 40%. Additional urologic pathologies were found in 60 of the 106 of patients (57%. Pelvicalyceal ectasia was found in 44 (42% and scars were seen in dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA in 54 (51% of the patients. In total 86 (81% of 106 patients with VUR recovered completely and 20 (19% patients with VUR regressed. Conclusion: STING is a good alternative especially for patients with low grade VUR. However, it has some drawbacks, such as requiring a long follow-up period, having a lower rate of success compared to open surgery and being less ef­fective in patients with high grade VUR. Ureteroneocystostomy (LGT is a method with less morbidity and a high success rate, especially in the treatment of patients with higher grade VUR. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (2: 168-173

  10. Treatment of occult reflux lowers the incidence rate of pediatric febrile urinary tract infection.

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    Hagerty, Jennifer; Maizels, Max; Kirsch, Andrew; Liu, Dennis; Afshar, Kourosh; Bukowski, Timothy; Caione, Paolo; Homsy, Yves; Meyer, Theresa; Kaplan, William

    2008-07-01

    To examine whether vesicourethral reflux diagnosed by positioned instillation of contrast (PIC-VUR) shows clinical importance by comparing the incidence rates of febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) before and after treatment of PIC-VUR. Beginning in 2001 we used a multi-institutional registry to prospectively enroll consecutive pediatric patients with a history of FUTI without VUR according to voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and yet who show PIC-VUR. Treatment of PIC-VUR was with prophylactic antimicrobials or antireflux surgery. The post-treatment occurrence of FUTI was tracked. A total of 14 centers enrolled 118 patients (mean age, 7.2 years; range, 0.5 to 20 years). Parents self-selected the treatment of PIC-VUR as endoscopic injection (104), ureteral reimplantation (3), or antimicrobial prophylaxis (11). Study intervals surveying for FUTI before PIC (mean, 12 months; range, 1 to 17 years) and after PIC treatment (mean, 11 months; range, 0 to 3 years) were not significantly different. Overall the incidence rate for FUTI decreased significantly from 0.16 per patient per month before PIC-VUR treatment to 0.008 per patient per month after treatment (rate ratio 20; 95% confidence interval 11 to 36). The post-treatment rate of FUTI in patients treated with antibiotics versus surgery was not significantly different (rate ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 27). The diagnosis of PIC-VUR is clinically important because children treated for PIC-VUR with either antimicrobial prophylaxis or surgery show a significant reduction in the incidence rate of FUTI. This is the basis for a current prospective study randomizing patients with PIC-VUR to treatment or observation.

  11. Urosepsis in infants with vesicoureteral reflux masquerading as the salt-losing type of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

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    Vaid, Y.N.; Lebowitz, R.L.

    1989-08-01

    Three male infants with vomiting, dehydration, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis were found to have vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and urinary tract infection. Two were initially thought to have the salt-losing form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Although prompt diagnosis of this potentially fatal condition is critical, its mimicry by urosepsis in infants with VUR is actually more common. Infection probably causes unresponsiveness of the distal renal tubules to aldoterone. (orig.).

  12. Strengths and Pitfalls of Meta-Analysis Reports in Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    K. Afshar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many ongoing controversies surrounding vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. These include variable aspects of this common congenital anomaly. Lack of evidence-based recommendations has prolonged the debate. Systematic reviews (SRs and meta-analysis (MA are considered high-level evidence. The purpose of this review article is to summarize and critically appraise the available SR/MA pertaining to VUR. We also discuss the strength and pitfalls of SR/MA in general. A thorough literature search identified 9 SRs/MAs relevant to VUR. Both authors critically reviewed these articles for contents and methodological issues. There are many concerns about the quality of the studies included in these SRs. Clinical heterogeneity stemming from different patient selection criteria, interventions, and outcome definitions is a major issue. In spite of major advances in understanding different aspects of VUR in the last few decades, there is a paucity of randomized controlled trials in this field.

  13. Multicystic dysplastic kidney and contralateral vesicoureteral reflux. Renal growth.

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    Fanos, V; Sinaguglia, G; Vino, L; Pizzini, C; Portuese, A

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate if vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) contralateral to the multicystic dysplastic kidney can interfere with the compensatory renal hypertrophy. Twenty-seven patients (17 males, 10 females) with multicystic dysplastic kidney (MDK) (14 on the right, 13 on the left) have been treated at the Nephrology Unit of the Pediatric Department of the University of Verona from birth up to the second year of life. All these patients were diagnosed as having MDK by prenatal ultrasonography. Seven children (4 males and 3 females) had VUR (5 monolateral, 2 bilateral), diagnosed at the end of the first month of life. After diagnosis children underwent antibiotic prophylaxis with beta-lactam compounds at low doses. Four patients underwent a surgical correction of VUR associated with nephrectomy within the second year of life. The remaining 3 patients were treated with antibiotic prophylaxis; a progressive resolution or downgrading of reflux grade took place respectively in 1 and in 2 of them. Only 6 children with MDK underwent nephrectomy. Renal growth was studied by serial echographic measurements of the longitudinal renal lenght (performed at birth, at 6 months, and at 2 years of life). Renal length was 5.68+/-1.24 cm, 6.72+/-0.88 cm, 8.56+/-1.27 cm in children without VUR, respectively at birth, 6 months and 2 years of life. Renal length was 4.65+/-0.63 cm, 6.70+/-0.64 cm, 7.07+/-1.14 cm in children with VUR, respectively at birth, 6 months and 2 years of life. A statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups at birth (p<0.05) and at 2 years of life (p<0.01). The conclusion is that VUR contralateral to the MDK is associated with small kidneys and reduced renal growth both at birth and at 2 years of life.

  14. Role of the Teflon deposit in the recurrence of vesicoureteral reflux.

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    Oberritter, Zsolt; Somogyi, Reka; Juhasz, Zsolt; Pinter, Andrew B

    2008-05-01

    A relationship between the Teflon deposit, visible with ultrasound, and long-term success of subureteric Teflon injection (STING) treatment was investigated. The study included only those patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), in whom the reflux had disappeared and the Teflon deposits were visible 6 weeks following STING treatment. Cessation of VUR was proven by voiding cysto-urethrography (VCUG) in 99 patients (143 ureters). Average follow-up time was 9 (4-12) years. Patients were divided into two groups: group I, deposits visible with ultrasound [deposit (+)], and group II, no visible deposits at the end of the follow-up period [deposit (-)]. Reflux recurrence, the occurrence of urinary tract infection (UTI), and pyelonephritis were investigated, and technetium scintigraphy scans were examined. The deposit (+) group included 43 patients (65 ureters), and the deposit (-) group contained 56 patients (78 ureters). In the deposit (+) group there were no recurrences of VUR; however, 17 recurrences were found in the deposit (-) group (P Teflon deposit and the recurrence of VUR. Disappearance of the Teflon deposit and repeated bacteriuria is a warning sign of the recurrence of VUR; therefore, VCUG might be warranted for these patients.

  15. Spontaneous resolution rates of vesicoureteral reflux in Brazilian children: a 30-year experience

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    Miguel Zerati Filho

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We evaluated clinical characteristics of primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in infants in a 30-year period in Brazil with special reference to the relation of renal parenchymal damage to urinary tract infection and gender. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1975 through 2005, 417 girls (81.6% and 94 boys (18.4% with all grades of reflux were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were categorized by the worst grade of reflux, maintained on antibiotic prophylaxis and underwent yearly voiding cystourethrography until the reflux was resolved. VUR was considered resolved when a follow-up cystogram demonstrated no reflux. Surgical correction was recommended for those who fail medical therapy, severe renal scarring or persistent VUR. RESULTS: Grades I to V VUR resolved in 87.5%, 77.6%, 52.8%, 12.2% and 4.3%, respectively. Renal scars were present at presentation in 98 patients (19.2%. Neither gender nor bilaterality versus unilaterality was a helpful predictor of resolution. The significant difference was found among the curves using the log rank (p < 0.001 or Wilcoxon (p < 0.001 test. CONCLUSION: Despite the current use of screening prenatal ultrasound, many infants are still diagnosed as having vesicoureteral reflux only after the occurrence of urinary tract infection in our country. Scarring may be associated to any reflux grade and it may be initially diagnosed at any age but half of the scars are noted with higher grades of reflux (IV and V. The incidence of reflux related morbidity in children has significantly diminished over the last three decades.

  16. Effect of movement and developmental factors in growth and evolution in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

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    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Rafiei, Mohammad; Nouri-Kopaei, Simin; Shariatmadari, Fakhreddin; Pakniyat, Abdolghader; Naziri, Mahdyieh

    2015-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a backward flow of urine from bladder to ureter or kidney. Potential reflux is harmful because of kidney being faced with the hemodynamic high-pressure during urination. This project was carried out for high prevalence of VUR and delay in growth of children with chronic diseases. In case of growth disorder in children with this disease and its difference with healthy person, treatment can be tried by treating the growth disorder. The purpose of this study is survey of children with VUR about growth and developmental impairment. All patients who performed voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG)because of UTI, divided into 2 groups, healthy and sick. History and checklist filled, patients' height and weight measured in a standard way and ASQ questionnaires adjusted to age, used for the studying development effect. The height and weight of children measured by standard meter and scale and used the curves adjusted to age and sex. Control group entered the study with the same characteristics of case group without VUR, however, their height and weight were recorded. The way of evolution studied according to Nelsons evolution table and ASQ questionnaire. The both groups (total of 150 studied children) in the area of development of fine motor, gross motor and indicators of mean and percentile of height and weight and parents' literacy, had a significant difference (PChildren with VUR, in terms of height and weight growth and index of gross and fine movements and communicate were better than normal children.

  17. Aggressive diagnosis and treatment for posterior urethral valve as an etiology for vesicoureteral reflux or urge incontinence in children

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    Hideo Nakai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is one of the most common diseases in pediatric urology and classified into primary and secondary VUR. Although posterior urethral valve (PUV is well known as a cause of the secondary VUR, it is controversial that minor urethral deformity recognized in voiding cystourethrography represents mild end of PUV spectrum and contributes to the secondary VUR. We have been studying for these ten years congenital urethral obstructive lesions with special attention to its urethrographic and endoscopic morphology as well as therapeutic response with transurethral incision. Our conclusion to date is that congenital obstructive lesion in the postero-membranous urethra is exclusively PUV (types 1 and 3 and that severity of obstruction depends on broad spectrum of morphological features recognized in PUV. Endoscopic diagnostic criteria for PUV are being consolidated.

  18. Fluctuating fetal or neonatal renal pelvis: marker of high-grade vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nigel G; Allan, Richard B; Abbott, George D

    2004-07-01

    Fetal renal pelvic dilatation is a predictor of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), but has low specificity. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of fluctuating size of the renal pelvis on sonography, particularly in relationship to VUR. We prospectively recorded fetal renal pelvic diameter >/=4 mm in 1,092 fetuses (692 boys), from May 1989 to December 1995, with a minimum follow-up of 7 years. Fluctuation, defined as size of renal pelvis changing by more than 4 mm during the course of obstetric (23), postnatal (128), and both pre- and postnatal (7) renal sonograms, was recorded prospectively in 159 (117 boys). Of the 1,092, 849 (593 boys) had a voiding cystourethrogram at a mean age of 7 weeks (range 3-20 weeks). Of the 31 (16 girls) with high-grade VUR, fluctuation was observed in 20 (9 girls). Fluctuation was strongly associated with high-grade VUR (odds ratio 11.1, P=0.0000003) and with renal damage (sensitivity 61%, positive predictive value 31%). Primary high-grade VUR was persistent, seen equally in boys and girls, and required surgery in the majority. Fluctuation was associated with renal duplication anomalies ( P=0.00009) and megaureter ( P<0.00000001). Fluctuation of the renal pelvis on sonography is a marker for persistent high-grade VUR and renal damage in girls and boys.

  19. Endoscopic Treatment of Vesicoureteral Reflux with Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Children

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    Wolfgang H. Cerwinka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The goal of this review is to present current indications, injectable agents, techniques, success rates, complications, and potential future applications of endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children. Materials and Methods. The endoscopic method currently achieving one of the highest success rates is the double hydrodistention-implantation technique (HIT. This method employs dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer, which has been used in pediatric urology for over 10 years and may be at present the first choice injectable agent due to its safety and efficacy. Results. While most contemporary series report cure rates of greater than 85% for primary VUR, success rates of complicated cases of VUR may be, depending on the case, significantly lower. Endoscopic treatment offers major advantages to patients while avoiding potentially complicated open surgery. As the HIT method continues to be applied to complex cases of VUR and more outcome data become available, the indication for endoscopic treatment may exceed the scope of primary VUR. Conclusions. Endoscopic injection is emerging as the treatment of choice for VUR in children.

  20. Surgical Management of Pediatric Vesicoureteral Reflux: A Comparative Study Between Endoscopic, Laparoscopic, and Open Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ciro; Escolino, Maria; Lopez, Manuel; Farina, Alessandra; Cerulo, Mariapina; Savanelli, Antonio; La Manna, Angela; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Settimi, Alessandro; Varlet, Francois

    2016-07-01

    Our retrospective study compared the results of three surgical procedures for correction of pediatric vesicoureteral reflux (VUR): open Cohen, laparoscopic Lich-Gregoir reimplantation (LEVUR), and endoscopic subureteric injection (STING) procedure. We analyzed 90 patients (50 girls, 40 boys, average age 4.86 years) operated in two centers of pediatric surgery for VUR. Exclusion criteria were Grade 1 VUR, Grade 5 VUR with megaureters requiring ureteral tapering, secondary VUR, and patients already operated for VUR. Thirty patients underwent Cohen, 30 LEVUR, and 30 STING procedure. Follow-up included renal ultrasonography and voiding cystourethrography 6 months postoperatively. The statistical analysis was performed using χ(2) Pearson and Fisher tests. Operative time was shorter using STING either for unilateral or bilateral correction (P = .001). Hospitalization was statistically shorter using STING and LEVUR compared to Cohen (P = .001). The pain scores were worse after Cohen (P = .001). Analgesic requirements were higher after Cohen (P = .001). Reflux persistence was higher after STING (10 cases versus 5 Cohen and 4 LEVUR). Cohen presented more complications compared to LEVUR and STING (P = .001). Intraoperative costs were higher for STING procedure (P = .001), while hospitalization costs were significantly higher for Cohen procedure (P = .001). In children affected by VUR, open Cohen and LEVUR reported a higher success rate than STING procedure. However, Cohen procedure had a very long and painful hospital stay, more complications, more analgesic requirements compared to STING and LEVUR. Comparing the three techniques, it seems that LEVUR presents a high success rate similar to the Cohen procedure, but in addition, it presents the same advantages of STING procedure with no postoperative pain and a lower postoperative morbidity.

  1. Does routine ultrasound change management in the follow-up of patients with vesicoureteral reflux?

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    Rudzinski, Jan K; Weber, Bryce; Wildgoose, Petra; Lorenzo, Armando; Bagli, Darius; Farhat, Walid; Harvey, Elizabeth; Salle, Joao Luiz Pippi

    2013-01-01

    Children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) usually need a renal ultrasound (RUS). There is little data on the role of follow-up RUS in VUR. We evaluated the impact of follow-up RUS on the change in clinical management in patients with VUR. We prospectively analyzed children with a previous diagnosis of VUR seen in the outpatient clinic with a routine follow-up RUS within 4 months. Variables collected included: demographic data, VUR history, dysfunctional voiding symptoms and concurrent ultrasound findings. Change in management was defined as addition of new medication, nurse counselling, surgery or further investigations. The study included 114 consecutive patients. The mean patient age was 4.5 years old, mean age of VUR diagnosis was 1.7 years, with average follow-up of 2.8 years. A change in management with stable RUS occurred in 14 patients, in which the change included ordering a DMSA in 9, nurse counselling for dysfunctional voiding in 3, and booking surgery in 2 patients. Change on RUS was seen in 4 patients. Multivariable analysis showed that history of urinary tract infection (UTI) since the last follow-up visit was more significant than RUS findings. The RUS findings in most patients followed for VUR remain stable or with minimal changes. The variable showing a significant effect on change in management in our study was history of UTI since the last follow-up visit rather than RUS findings. The value of follow-up RUS for children with VUR may need to be revisited.

  2. Positional installation of contrast cystography: A new approach in the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux

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    Paunović Milan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Positional installation of contrast cystography (PIC cystography represents a new method to identify vesicoureteral reflux (VUR that is unrevealed by standard diagnostic procedures. It is performed by radiological examination of the vesicoureteral junction during cystoscopic installation of the contrast medium at the ureteral orifice. OBJECTIVE We studied the significance of PIC cystography to demonstrate VUR that failed to be revealed by standard voiding cystourethrography (MCUG, as well as the degree of the correlation of such a finding with endoscopic appearance and the position of the ureteral orifice (UO. METHOD The aim of the paper was to analyze a sample of 5 children (4 girls and 1 boy, aged 6-15 years (mean 9.8 years with recurrent febrile urotract infections, complicated with scarring changes of the renal parenchyma and normal findings on MCUG. The grade of VUR demonstrated by PIC cystography was classified using the standard hydrodistensional scale. RESULTS All 5 patients had VUR, disclosed by PIC cystography, of whom in 4 it was unilateral and in one bilateral. Of 5 patients, 4 had VUR grade I and one grade II. All the children with VUR detected by PIC cystography also had evident cystoscopic abnormalities in the position and/or configuration of the ureteral orifice at the same side, while at the side with normal finding on PIC cystography, the endoscopic finding was also within normal limits. CONCLUSION PIC cystography is the method of choice in the confirmation of VUR as the cause of recurrent urotract infection and its complications in children with a normal finding on standard MCUG. In all our patients with VUR verified by PIC cystography, at the same side we also revealed endoscopic changes in the position and/or configuration of UO.

  3. Does the presence of vesicoureteral reflux affect in vitro uropathogenic E. coli growth rate in urine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Alper; Karaman, Meral; Alaygut, Demet; Çamlar, Seçil Arslansoyu; Türkmen, Mehmet; Kavukçu, Salih

    2016-02-01

    Uroepithelial molecules like uroplakins are involved both in the development of urinary tract and in colonization, attachment and invasion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Uroplakin disorders are also associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). We hypothesized that urine contents, as well as urinary flow, may be altered in VUR, and aimed to determine whether in vitro UPEC growth is increased in urine from the refluxing systems. Children evaluated by voiding cystourethrography for UTI were enrolled. Groups 1 and 2 included children with and without VUR, respectively. Sterile urine samples were obtained from all patients, and 2 × 10(2) cfu/mL UPEC suspension was inoculated into these samples. After incubation for 24 h, colony counts were assessed. Both groups were compared for UPEC growth and colony counts. Forty-two urine samples were included (21 in each group). UPEC was cultured in 9 (43 %) and 3 (14 %) samples in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 0.040, OR 4.5). Colony counts were similar in both groups (log x; 2.36 ± 0.25 vs. 2.37 ± 0.12, p = 0.923). Inoculation of 2 × 10(2) cfu UPEC resulted in growth in almost half of the urine samples from refluxing systems, while UPEC growth was inhibited in most urine samples from non-refluxing systems suggesting that urine contents in refluxing units change in such a way that UPEC growth is facilitated.

  4. Urinary tract infection in the setting of vesicoureteral reflux [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Michael L. Garcia-Roig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is the most common underlying etiology responsible for febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs or pyelonephritis in children. Along with the morbidity of pyelonephritis, long-term sequelae of recurrent renal infections include renal scarring, proteinuria, and hypertension. Treatment is directed toward the prevention of recurrent infection through use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis during a period of observation for spontaneous resolution or by surgical correction. In children, bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD plays a significant role in the occurrence of UTI and the rate of VUR resolution. Effective treatment of BBD leads to higher rates of spontaneous resolution and decreased risk of UTI.

  5. [Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkin, A G; Iatsyk, S P; Sharkov, S M; Rusakov, A A; Tin, I F

    2014-01-01

    The one of the most common defects of the ureter-vesical segment in children is the condition, leading to a disorder of obturative function of this segment. Complications of vesicoureteral reflux include continuously recurrent pyelonephritis, reflux nephropathy. In this regard, the choice of the optimal treatment strategy based on minimal invasion is considered as one of the priorities of pediatric urology. The article presents the data obtained during the treatment of VUR in children of different ages in the Clinic of Reproductive Health FSBSI SCCH. A comparative evaluation of the results of endoscopic correction of vesicoureteral reflux depending on the kind of the bulking agent was performed. It was found that the use of endocorrection of reflux is highly effective surgical procedure, with the high number of positive results against the background of use of bulking agent "vantris". The study discriminates a group of patients with vesicoureteral reflux, intractable for endoscopic correction with cystoscopically normal structure of the orifices that allows to refer this method to the initial stage of treatment of the disease.

  6. Prophylactic antibiotics in vesicoureteric reflux: Evidence-based analysis

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    M S Ansari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this review was to systematically examine the available evidence for the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in cases of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR. Materials and Methods: We searched the relevant data on medical management of VUR and the date of last search was June 2008. The search included both randomized controlled trials as well as the nonrandomized trials and the data sources were; MEDLINE, online peer reviewed journals, Cochrane database and abstracts from conference proceedings. Results: Barring few most of the studies published on medical management were nonrandomized. Besides being small in number many of these studies were of poor-quality and poorly designed eventually failing in giving a reliable answer in this regard. Few of the studies suggest that the children with low grade VUR might do well even without antibiotic prophylaxis. Conclusions : In the absence of properly designed, randomized controlled trials and long-term follow-up the question of antibiotic prophylaxis in cases of VUR remains unanswered in large part of it. Whether to give prophylactic antibiotics or not would ultimately need a shared decision-making involving both the treating physician and the parents assessing both the risks and the benefits.

  7. Imaging studies and biomarkers to detect clinically meaningful vesicoureteral reflux

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    Michaella Maloney Prasad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work-up of a febrile urinary tract infection is generally performed to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and its possible complications. The imaging modalities most commonly used for this purpose are renal-bladder ultrasound, voiding cystourethrogram and dimercapto-succinic acid scan. These studies each contribute valuable information, but carry individual benefits and limitations that may impact their efficacy. Biochemical markers are not commonly used in pediatric urology to diagnose or differentiate high-risk disease, but this is the emerging frontier, which will hopefully change our approach to VUR in the future. As it becomes more apparent that there is tremendous clinical variation within grades of VUR, the need to distinguish clinically significant from insignificant disease grows. The unfortunate truth about VUR is that recommendations for treatment may be inconsistent. Nuances in clinical decision-making will always exist, but opinions for medical versus surgical intervention should be more standardized, based on risk of injury to the kidney.

  8. Laparoscopy in the management of pediatric vesicoureteral reflux

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    Atul A Thakre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been estimated as. 4 to 1.8% among the pediatric population. In children with urinary tract infection the prevalence is typically from 30-50% with higher incidence occurring in infancy. When correction of VUR is determined to be necessary, traditionally open ureteral reimplantation by a variety of techniques has been the mainstay of treatment. This approach is justified because surgical correction affords a very high success rate of 99% in experienced hands and a low complication rate. In that context the purpose of this review article is to highlight the use of laparoscopy and robot-assisted techniques to perform ureteric reimplantation for the management of pediatric VUR. A detailed review of recent literature on the subject is performed to find out various aspects of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of VUR, highlighting evolution of management approaches, operative steps, complications, results and the current status in clinical practice. We also share our experience on the subject.

  9. The Outcome of Surgery versus Medical Management in the Treatment of Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    Caleb P. Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the relative merits of medical versus surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been limited by the few prospective studies comparing these strategies. Among those trials that have been reported, the only consistent positive finding has been that incidence of febrile UTI is lower among children undergoing surgical treatment in comparison with medical treatment. Studies have not found significant differences in overall incidence of UTI, or in rates of new renal scarring or progression of existing scarring. It is likely that there is a subset of children with VUR who do benefit from aggressive treatment of their VUR, but we are not yet able to fully determine which children these are. It is hoped that future research will further clarify which treatments are useful in which children.

  10. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys in children with vesicoureteral reflux

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    Koçyiğit, Ali, E-mail: alkoc@yahoo.com [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Bayram, Recep [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Yüksel, Selçuk [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Denizli (Turkey); Yılmaz, İsmail; Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) which obtain from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), is a quantitative parameter representing the renal function and parenchymal damage in some renal disorders. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether renal tissue alterations associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) can be displayed by DWI. The secondary aim was to assess how ADC values change with age in kidneys with and without VUR. Materials and methods: This prospective study included 46 patients (8 boys, 38 girls; mean age 7.3 ± 4.2; range 1–15 years) with VUR and 54 control subjects (21 boys, 33 girls; mean age 7.7 ± 5.2; range 1–17 years). All subjects underwent DWI of the kidneys using b value of 600 s/mm{sup 2} in addition to MR urography. The ADC values of 71 kidneys with VUR were compared with those of 81 kidneys without VUR. Results: The mean ADC values were (1.93 ± 0.36) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.97 ± 0.24) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.83 ± 0.37) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.98 ± 0.20) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and (2.08 ± 0.42) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s in normal kidneys, and in those with grade 1, grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 VUR, respectively. There was no significant difference in ADC values between kidneys with and without VUR. There was a significant positive correlation between the age and ADC values both in kidneys with and without VUR (r = 0.79, p < 0.001 and r = 0.82; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: DWI does not reveal probable parenchymal alterations in reflux nephropathy. ADC values increase with age during childhood not only in normal kidneys but also in kidneys with VUR.

  11. Voiding cystourethrography revisited: descriptive statistics for the detection of vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Anh-Vu; Friedman, Seth D; Darling, Stephen; Sammer, Marla B K; Chapman, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    To determine which factors might influence the detection of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), we retrospectively reviewed factors including fluoroscopy time, number of true radiographic acquisitions, and patient characteristics from a large number of voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) examinations. Nine hundred eighty-seven VCUG examinations performed between March 2006 and March 2009 were randomly selected for review. Data recorded were presence of VUR, patient age and sex, examination indication, follow-up status, presence of a diagnostic radiology trainee, fluoroscopy time, and number of true radiographic acquisitions. For initial examinations, descriptive comparison and logistic analyses were performed. To evaluate which variables related to reflux identification, we analyzed variables by logistic regression after stratifying by patient age (≤ 1 or > 1 year) for both the full sample and cases grouped by VUR severity (grades I and II [mild] or grades III-V [moderate to severe]). Nine hundred eighty-seven VCUG examinations were evaluated for the study (65.5% female; mean age, 3 years 2 months; age range, 2 weeks-16 years), and 761 cases met the inclusion criteria. VUR was detected in 101 of 349 infants (40 mild, 61 moderate to severe) and in 107 of 412 children older than 1 year (52 mild, 55 moderate to severe). A wide range of fluoroscopy times was similar between both positive and negative cases (0.033-4.233 minutes). The number of true radiographic acquisitions differed significantly between the negative and positive cases. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses for a large number of VCUG examinations in a pediatric population are summarized. Our results showed that high fluoroscopy times were not associated with a higher likelihood of VUR. There may be a small benefit to the use of true radiographic acquisitions for detecting VUR.

  12. Voiding cystourethrogram in the diagnosis of vesicoureteric reflux in children with antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis

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    R B Nerli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available R B Nerli, S S Amarkhed, I R RavishDepartment of Urology, Kles Kidney Foundation, Nehru Nagar, Belgaum, IndiaAbstract: Prenatal ultrasonography has revolutionized the detection and management of many urological abnormalities. Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR which develops in 10% to 15% of cases of prenatal hydronephrosis, is difficult to predict prenatally. While all children with prenatal hydronephrosis should undergo ultrasonography within the first few weeks of life, there seems to be controversy regarding the role of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG in the assessment of these children.Materials and methods: Neonates with antenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis were prospectively assessed with sonography on day 3–7, and VCUG and isotope imaging at three months.Results: Seven (16.6% children of the 42 children with Society of Fetal Urology grade 0/I/II hydronephrosis on postnatal sonography had evidence of VUR on VCUG. 44.4% of the refluxing ureters identified involved high grade disease and two (28.5% children required reimplantation.Conclusions: Children with fetal reflux may be diagnosed prior to urinary tract infection and in whom further renal injury may be prevented. VCUG when performed properly is safe and presents with little risk of infectious and noninfectious complications. VCUG should be done in children in whom hydronephrosis is detected prenatally to restrict the use of VCUG to diagnose VUR. Two patients had infection.Keywords: antenatal hydronephrosis, voiding cystourethrogram, vesicoureteric reflux

  13. The impact of obesity on febrile urinary tract infection and renal scarring in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, H J; Ha, J Y; Jung, W; Kim, B H; Park, C H; Kim, C I

    2017-02-01

    It has become clear that obesity is associated with a variety of infectious diseases, including urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between obesity and the degree of febrile UTI (fUTI) and renal scarring in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), and to stratify the results into obesity subcategories. A total of 186 patients were diagnosed with VUR between January 2002 and December 2008. This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 72 children with primary VUR who had recurrent fUTI (more than twice). Overweight or obese status of the patients aged children, body mass index (BMI) percentile-for-age was used. They were divided into three groups as follows; standard (obese (≥95%). The following clinical variables were compared: age at diagnosis of primary VUR (months), sex, VUR grade, hydronephrosis grade, presence of renal scarring, surgical treatment, and degree of inflammation during fUTI. In the overweight and obese groups, VUR was diagnosed at a young age (P = 0.05), the degree of renal scarring was more severe (P = 0.006), and serum white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels were significantly higher (P children (35%). Cortical defects occurred more frequently in children with obesity, and they were associated with a higher grade of reflux and serum ESR levels (P = 0.007, P = 0.042, and P = 0.021, respectively). Among these risk factors, high-grade VUR (OR = 9.93, 95% CI = 1.13-86.71), and being overweight and obese (OR = 5.26, 95% CI = 1.75-15.82) were associated with increased renal scarring. However, ESR was not associated with renal scarring (OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.95-1.07). The relationships between obesity and UTI are controversial. Some studies have shown positive results; however, other studies have shown opposite results. The main limitations of this study were the retrospective data collection

  14. The increased incidence of the RET p.Gly691Ser variant in French-Canadian vesicoureteric reflux patients is not replicated by a larger study in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Darlow, John M

    2012-02-01

    The p.Gly691Ser variant of the RET protein, resulting from the \\'A\\' allele of the SNP rs1799939 in exon 11 of the RET gene, was recently found to be present in a high proportion of primary vesicoureteric reflux (pVUR) patients in Quebec. We have determined the genotype of this SNP in 221 unrelated index cases of pVUR from the Irish population, in 190 full siblings of 160 of the index cases, and in 592 healthy controls. We found no significant difference in genotype or allele frequencies in patients and controls, and no tendency of affected siblings to share the same genotype. We also found no difference in the presence of additional phenotypic features such as duplex kidneys, between patients with and without the \\'A\\' allele, and no difference in grade of reflux. We find no evidence of any influence of RET SNP rs1799939 on pVUR phenotype.

  15. Abdominoperineal pull-through with simultaneous extravesical detrussoraphy: An alternative surgical technique for congenital pouch colon with high-grade vesicoureteric reflux

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    Monika Bawa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital pouch colon (CPC is frequently associated with vesicoureteric reflux (VUR. These patients require long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and/or an additional surgical intervention for the management of the refluxing system. We propose a single-stage alternative approach in these patients. Two patients diagnosed to have CPC underwent pouch excision and an end colostomy at birth. Further evaluation revealed high-grade reflux in both the patients. At 6 months of age, definitive abdominoperineal pull-through (APPT surgery along with extravesical detrusorrhaphy was performed. In the follow-up at 1 year, they are thriving well with no urinary complaints. Micturating cystourethrogram revealed complete resolution of VUR. This approach takes the advantage of the anesthesia for APPT and offers a relatively simple and quick solution for the refluxing system, thus, enabling the stoppage of antibiotic prophylaxis and obviating the need for a future endoscopy/surgery.

  16. The efficacy of digital fluoroscopic image capture in the evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux in children

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    Fefferman, Nancy R.; Sabach, Amy S.; Rivera, Rafael; Milla, Sarah; Pinkney, Lynne P.; Strubel, Naomi A.; Babb, James [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In accordance with ALARA, minimizing radiation exposure associated with voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG) is of critical importance. Advances in fluoroscopic technology might help achieve this goal. To determine the efficacy of fluoroscopic image capture compared to conventional digital radiographic spot (DRS) images in voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG) for the evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children. The study was a retrospective review of 65 VCUG examinations (130 kidney/ureter units). Each examination consisted of fluoroscopically captured spot (FCS) images and the corresponding DRS images. Each set of images was evaluated by three pediatric radiologists for the diagnosis of VUR for a total of 390 kidney/ureter units reviewed. Using the DRS image set as the reference standard, the efficacy of the FCS images for diagnosing reflux was determined. The diagnostic accuracy of the FCS images in terms of the binary characterization of reflux as negative or positive was 97.2% (379/390). The sensitivity of the FCS images was 92.6% (88/95); the specificity of the FCS images was 98.6% (291/295). Fluoroscopically captured images are adequate in documenting absence of VUR on VCUG examinations, obviating the need for radiographic spot images and resulting in reduction in radiation exposure. (orig.)

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, L; McLeod, E

    2003-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is common in infants and generally resolves spontaneously within the first year of life as the lower esophageal sphincter mechanism matures. The reflux is only considered a "disease" (GERD) when it becomes symptomatic or causes pathological consequences. GERD is commonly associated with esophageal atresia and there is a high incidence in neurologically impaired children; in both groups conservative treatment is notoriously ineffective. The diagnosis of GER is made on upper gastrointestinal contrast studies, endoscopy and pH monitoring. Medical management comprises antacids, reduction of gastric acid production and prokinetic agents. The indications for antireflux surgery include an established esophageal stricture, associated anatomical defect and failure of medical therapy. Apnoeic episodes secondary to documented GER in the infant, constitute an absolute indication for early surgery.

  18. Laryngopharyngeal reflux

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    Maja Šereg-Bahar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 4–10 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER some atypical symptoms are found (cough, hoarseness, globus pharyngeus, dyspnea which are characteristic for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR. The signs of LPR can be detected in more than 50 % of dysphonic patients. In the diagnostics of LPR, a meticulous history and a videoendoscopy of the larynx and pharynx are the most important procedures. The diagnosis of LPR can be confirmed by the 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and the treatment test with proton pump inhibitors. The best diagnostic results can be obtained with a combination of several diagnostic procedures.Conclusions: An otorhinolaryngologist can start a treatment test with proton pump inhibitors in a patient in whom a laryngopharyngeal reflux is suspected on the basis of history and laryngopharyngeal endoscopy. A successful treatment requires at least 12 weeks regimen with high doses 20 mg twice a day. In the case of alarm signs and unsuccessful treatment a gastroenterologic intervention is necessary.

  19. EVALUATION OF TWO SURGICAL TREATMENTS OF PRIMARY VESICOURETERAL REFLUX AMONG CHILDREN: A 15 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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    Memeti Shaban

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of two different surgical treatments of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR on succesfull rate and patient outcome. Methods: Retrospective study on children with primary VUR and their surgical treatment from 1999 to 2014 in the University Clinic for Pediatric Surgery in Skopje. A total of 76 children (114 ureters with VUR ranging from second to fifth grade were treated surgically, 44 patients (67 ureters with an open surgical technique and 32 patients (47 ureters with endoscopic treatment ”STING” procedure. The following parameters were analyzed: duration of the intervention, duration of the hospitalization, the need for antibiotics and analgesic therapy and the need for blood and blood derivatives transfusion. The result of the surgical treatment was also validated. A good result was considered when reduction of VUR by 2 degrees with the endoscopic method or by 3 degrees in the open surgical technique was noticed. Results: Using open surgical technique, patients were hospitalized for an average of 9 days (range from 5 to 13 days. All children received double antibiotic therapy. The need for analgesics lasted for 3 to 4 days. 90% of treated children needed blood and/or blood derivatives transfusion. Success rate with this method was 93.8%. Endoscopic procedure was performed as a one-day surgical procedure. The average duration was 15 minutes. Single, prophylactic dose of antibiotic was ordinated. There was no need for blood and/or blood derivatives transfusion. The overall success of the treatment was about 70%. Conclusion: Open surgical procedure is used for more complicated cases, VUR grade IV-V or by previously failed. Endoscopic, “STING” procedure was commonly used for patients with VUR grade greater than 2, after previously failed conservative treatment, febrile urinary infection despite antibiotic prophylaxis and/or emergence of new scarring in the renal parenchyma. Patient assessment and

  20. Clinical Significance of Renal Pelvic Dilatation less than 10 mm in Neonates: Correlation with Urinary Tract Infection and Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Young Tong; Jo, Sung Sik; Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyung Cheol; Kim, Il Young [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    We wanted to evaluate the correlation of mild renal pelvic dilatation (RPD) that is observed to be less than 10 mm on ultrasound (US) with urinary tract infection (UTI) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in neonates. We reviewed 137 kidneys of 107 neonates who had RPD less than 10 mm on US. All the kidneys were divided into two groups: Group I (RPD <= 5.0 mm) and Group II (RPD > 5.0 mm), and we statistically analyzed the RPD change according to UTI and VUR. Seven neonates had VUR (5.1%), and there was no statistical significance between Group I (6 neonates, 5.6%) and Group II (1 neonate, 3.3%). Thirty seven cases (27%) had UTI and there was no statistical significance between Group I (30 cases, 28.0%) and Group II (7 cases, 23.3%). The RPD did not change in 81.8% of the cases, it increased in 4.4% of the cases and it decreased in 13.9% of the cases on follow up US. The incidence of VUR and UTI were not different according to the change of RPD. There were no statistical differences between the changes of RPD and the incidences of UTI and VUR in neonates with mild RPD less than 10 mm. Most of RPD did not change on the follow up US

  1. Is Ureter Visualization Possible on Tc-99m DMSA Scintigraphy with Vesicoureteral Reflux Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Atilgan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Ureter or pelvicalyceal system is not be vizualized with 99mTechnetium- dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA which is accumulated by renal cortex normally. In this study the cases whose ureters are visible were reviewed with 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy. Material and Method: 18 patients (5 females, 13 males with median age 3.5 years (min 2 months-max 18 years were included in this study. Twenty ureters and/or pelvis of 18 patients were visible in 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy. In two patients%u2019s both ureters were visible. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR grade, 99mTc-DMSA uptake, renal size, status of pelvicalyceal system, urea, creatinine levels were evaluated in all patients. Results: Three of the visible ureters were actually due to pelvicaliectasis. These pelvicaliectasic patients were excluded from the study. In the evaluation of the remaining 17 ureters of patients, congenital megaureter was present in three patients. Grade 3 VUR was detected in three patients, grade 4 was in three patients. VUR is seen as grade five in eight kidneys of seven patients because one of these patients has bilateral vizualized ureter. Discussion: In patients with congenital megaureter and VUR, ureters can be visible with 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy and further imaging modalities are recommended for these patients.

  2. Contrast-enhanced Voiding Urosonography for Vesicoureteral Reflux Diagnosis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Carmina; Beltrán, Viviana P; González, Amàlia; Gómez, Carles; Riego, Javier Del

    2017-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography (ceVUS) is a dynamic imaging technique that makes it possible to study the structure of the urinary tract after the administration of intravesical contrast material. Initially, ceVUS was indicated mainly to study vesicoureteral reflux (VUR); however, since the ability of ceVUS to depict the structure of the urethra was demonstrated in both sexes, ceVUS is now indicated for examination of the entire urinary tract. The main benefit of ceVUS is that it does not use ionizing radiation. In recent years, fundamental changes have occurred in the understanding of VUR. The lessening effect of VUR and the low rate of occurrence of urethral pathologic conditions have given rise to changes in the indications for tests for these conditions. In addition to being able to help confirm a diagnosis of VUR, the ceVUS technique can be used to depict obstructive and nonobstructive urethral pathologic conditions, as well as normal variants, on high-quality images. Furthermore, ceVUS enables real-time assessment of voiding function. For these reasons, ceVUS should be not only an alternative to voiding cystourethrography, but also the technique of choice for the study of the entire urinary tract in pediatric patients. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2017.

  3. Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Children with Primary Vesicoureteral Reflux: Where Do We Stand Today?

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    Guy Bogaert

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs, and thereby prevention of renal parenchymal damage possibly ensuing from these infections. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis is common practice in the management of children with VUR, as recommended in 1997 in the guidelines of the American Urological Association. We performed a systematic review to ascertain whether antibiotics can be safely discontinued in children with VUR and whether prophylaxis is effective in the prevention of recurrent UTIs and renal damage in these patients. Several uncontrolled studies indicate that antibiotic prophylaxis can be discontinued in a subset of patients, that is, school-aged children with low-grade VUR, normal voiding patterns, kidneys without hydronephrosis or scars, and normal anatomy of the urogenital system. Furthermore, a few recent randomized controlled trials suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis offers no advantage over intermittent antibiotic therapy of UTIs in terms of prevention of recurrent UTIs or new renal damage.

  4. URETERO-VESICAL ANASTOMOTIC COMPLICATIONS AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

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    S. V. Shkodkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents statistical analysis of vesico-ureteric reflux and uretero-vesical obstruction incidence after kidney transplantation depending on technique mode. In this item prevalence of chronic pyelonephritis and spe- cies of causative agent data are analyzed. The necessity of effective methods to accomplish the uretero-vesical anastomosis is suggested. 

  5. Short communication: Ureterocystoplasty using the lower pole ureter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe the case of a 9 year old boy with neurogenic bladder dysfunction who co-incidentally had a unilateral duplex kidney with Grade 5 vesico-ureteric reflux into a poorly functioning lower moiety allowing heminephrectomy and ureterocystoplasty with preservation of ipsilateral renal function.

  6. A Review of the Effect of Injected Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid Copolymer Volume on Reflux Correction Following Endoscopic Injection

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    Sumit Dave

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature suggests that multiple variables affect vesicoureteric reflux (VUR resolution rates following dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Dx/HA injection. This article reviews the evidence pertaining to the effect of injected Dx/HA volume on success rates following endoscopic correction. Lack of prospective studies which use injected volume as a continuous variable coupled with a nonstandardized injection technique and endpoint hinders the ability to reach a definite conclusion.

  7. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  8. Slight Hydronephrosis in Newborns and Breast-fed Infants: Can the Presence of Vesicoureteral Reflux Be Predicted?; Hidronefrosis leve en neonatos y lactantes: puede predecirse la presencia del reflujo vesicoureteral?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrocal, T.; Pablo, T. de; Gutierrez, J.; Prieto, C.; Hoyo, M. L. del [Hospital Universitario La Paz. Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of slight-to moderate echo graphically detected hydronephrosis in newborns and breast-fed infants that might serve as indicator for Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), and to evaluate the necessity of performing micturating cystourethrougraphy (MCUG) in these patients. There were reviewed MCUG of 237 patients (174 boys and 63 girls between the ages of 0 and 18 months) with slight echo graphically detected hydronephrosis in order to evaluate the presence of primary VUR. Patients with secondary reflux or those that presented anomalies which made impossible an exact reflux gradind were excluded. However, normal kidneys with reflux which were contralateral to hydronephrotic kidneys were included in the study. For a statistical analysis of the data, each kidney was considered separately, thereby forming a total of 474 kidneys. Slight hydronephrosis was diagnosed when the renal pelvis anteroposterior diameter was observed to measure between 0.5 and 1.5 cm. The International Grading System was used to grade reflux during MCUG. Of the 474 kidneys evaluated, 306 showed slight hydromephrosis in the echography. Only 98 of these presented reflux (32%) (14 grade 1.50 grade II, 32 grade III and 2 grade IV). The echography was normal (i. e. hydronephrosis not present) in 52 kidneys with reflux (31%) which were contralateral to hydronephrotic kidneys, although 38 of these had reflux of grade II or higher. The echography showed slight hydronephrosis in 208 kidneys that did not have reflux during MCUG (68%). There were no significant differences in the incidence of VUR among normal or hydronephrotic kidneys. There is a poor correlation between slight hydronephrosis and presence or grade of reflux in newborns and breast-fed infants. The latter should not, therefore, be considered an indication for MCUC. (Author) 33 refs.

  9. Extravesical (modified Gregoir Lich versus intravesical (Cohen′s ureteric reimplantation for vesicoureteral reflux in children: A single center experience

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    Krishnamoorthy Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are multiple techniques for surgical correction of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. We compared the outcomes of extravesical versus Cohen′s reimplantation for VUR in children. Methods: Records of all children (n = 118 who underwent reimplantation for VUR between 2003 and 2014 were analyzed (male: female = 43:75. Children with secondary VUR, duplication anomalies, and ectopic ureter were excluded from our study. Extravesical reimplantation (EVR was performed bilateral in 32 children (Group 1a and unilateral in 19 (Group 1b, while bilateral Cohen′s reimplantation was performed in 67 (Group 2. Parameters compared were length of the surgical procedure, average duration of stay in the hospital, postoperative bladder spasms, significant hematuria >72 h, and long-term complications. Results: The mean age at operation was 15 months in Group 1, and 36 months in Group 2. The mean duration of surgery was significantly less (P = 0.0001 in Group 1a (n = 32; mean 104 min; standard deviation [SD] 18 min compared to Group 2 (n = 67; mean 128 min; SD 15 min. The mean (SD postoperative stay was significantly lower (P = 0.0001 at 4.5 (1.5 days in Group 1a compared to 6.5 (0.5 days in Group 2. Postoperative bladder spasms were significantly lower (P = 0.03 at 10/32 in Group 1a compared to 37/67 in Group 2. All patients responded well with anticholinergics. Postoperative hematuria and bladder spasms were significantly lower (P = 0.03 in Group 1a compared to Group 2. There was no significant difference in persistent VUR between Group 1 and Group 2. At 1 year follow, none of them had any evidence of ureteral obstruction. Conclusions: EVR has lower operative time, less postoperative discomfort and shorter hospital stay compared to Cohen′s reimplantation. Both techniques are equally effective in treating reflux.

  10. Treatment of recurrent complicated urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Hua; Huang, Fang-Liang; Fu, Lin-Shien; Chou, Chia-Man; Chien, Ya-Li; Huang, Chung-Ming; Lin, Chin-Fu; Chen, Po-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) are often caused by uropathogens with a high rate of drug resistance and are associated with a high rate of recurrence with a single pathogen. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of recurrent UTI and the drug resistance pattern of Escherichia coli in children with VUR. We also evaluated whether combination therapy comprising fosomycin plus one other antimicrobial agent is effective for treatment of recurrent UTIs. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all children with VUR who developed at least one episode of UTI during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013 at a single medical center. The effectiveness of fosfomycin plus amikicin for Enterobacteriaceae or ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was prospectively studied in six children with recurrent relapsing UTIs. The study population comprised 129 children (age range, from 1month to 15 years; mean ± standard deviation, 2.37 ± 2.91 years) with VUR who developed at least one UTI during the 10-year study period; 68 (52.7%) had recurrent UTIs. The presence of an underlying urinary tract anomaly was predictive of recurrence (p = 0.028). The rates of susceptibility of E. coli to cefazolin (p < 0.001) and cefotaxime (p < 0.001) were significantly lower in patients with recurrent UTIs. Combination therapy with fosfomycin plus amikacin or ceftazidime was shown to be an effective therapeutic option for recurrent UTIs due to a single uropathogen. The rates of susceptibility of E. coli to commonly used antimicrobials were significantly lower in children who developed more than one episode of UTI. The empiric choice of cefazolin or cefotaxime was usually ineffective. Administration of fosfomycin plus amikacin or ceftazidime was an effective therapeutic and preventive strategy in children with VUR and recurrent relapsing UTI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Analysis of the IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α Gene Polymorphisms in Patients With Vesicoureteral Reflux Among the Southeast Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi Tamandani, Dor Mohammad; Naeimi, Nasim; Ghasemi, Ali; Baranzahi, Taybe; Sadeghi-Bojd, Simin

    2016-03-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a common childhood disorder that is characterized by the abnormal movement of urine from the bladder into the ureters or kidneys. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic polymorphisms of the IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α genes are involved in the development of VUR. The tetra amplification mutation refractory system-polymerase chain reaction (Tetra-ARMS PCR) was applied to analyze the four polymorphic sites of the IL-10AG-1082, IL-10CA597, IL-12CA1188, and TNF308GA genes in 124 VUR children and 110 healthy controls. A significant, highly increased risk of VUR disease was found for the CA, AA, and combined genotypes of IL-10CA597 (OR = 5.2, 95% CL: 1.80 - 18.25; P = 0.0006, OR = 9.1, 95% CL: 1.11 - 122.75; P = 0.02, OR = 5.3, 95% CL: 1.82 - 18.61; P = 0.00052, respectively); the AG, GG, and AG + GG genotypes of IL-10AG-1082 (OR = 12.8, 95% CL; 2.9 - 113.9; P = 0.00003, OR = 12.62, 95% CL: 2.93 - 114.53; P = 0.00003, respectively); and the AA genotype of IL-12 (AA, OR = 0.19, 95% CL: 0.5 - 0.55; P = 0.0006). The frequency of the C allele in both IL-10CA and IL-12CA was greater in patients with VUR than in the healthy controls. No association was found between TNF308GA and the risk of VUR. The results demonstrated significant associations between the IL-10 (AG-1089, IL-10CA) and IL-12 (AA) gene polymorphisms and a highly increased risk of VUR.

  12. Diagnostic Value of Technetium-99m-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Scintigraphy in Prediction of Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children with First-time Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

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    Fatemeh Ataei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imaging modalities such as voiding cystourethrography (VCUG, direct radionuclide cystography (DRNC, and renal cortical scintigraphy (RCS with technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99mDMSA, are helpful in detecting possible abnormalities of urinary tract such as vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. However, there are confounding data regarding the preference of these modalities. In the present study, we aimed to assess the role of Tc-99mDMSA scan in prediction of possible VUR and the subsequent need for VCUG or DRNC. Materials and Methods: Three hundred fifty seven children under 14 years old with first-time febrile urinary tract infection (UTI who were admitted between April 2004 and February 2017 were enrolled. Data regarding to VCUG or DRNC in order to evaluate the presence of possible VUR were recorded. Finally, accuracy of Tc-99mDMSA scans in prediction of VUR were assessed. Results: Analyses showed a sensitivity and specificity of 95.65% and 14.72%, respectively for Tc-99mDMSA scan in detection of VUR. Patients with mild renal involvement in Tc-99mDMSA scans had a 3.5-fold greater risk of having VUR than those with a normal scans (odds ratio=3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-8.58; p=0.007. In addition, the risk of VUR is up to 7.0-fold greater in children with moderate renal involvement (odds ratio=7.0; 95% CI: 2.6-13.2; p

  13. Reflux in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be GERD. What causes reflux and GERD in children? There is a muscle (the lower esophageal sphincter) ... don't flow back into the esophagus. In children who have reflux and GERD, this muscle becomes ...

  14. Is intraoperative surgeon's opinion an accurate tool to assess the outcome of endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Alberto; Tardáguila, Ana-Rosa; Romero, Rosa; Burgos, Laura; Rivas, Susana; Angulo, José-María

    2013-12-01

    Our experience in the endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) has significantly increased during the last decade. To help develop diagnostic tests to check the success of this procedure, we evaluated the accuracy of surgeons' intraoperative observations as a predictor of treatment results. We performed a prospective study of patients with VUR who were endoscopically treated during 1 year (106 renal units). Patients' age and gender, laterality, material used, grade of reflux, presence of ureteral duplication or associated pathology, and morphology of ureteral orifice were recorded as predictive factors related to the success rate. Surgeon and assistant indicated at the end of the endoscopic procedure whether the VUR was cured or not for each renal unit. These estimations were compared with postoperative voiding cystourethrogram results. Overall cure rate was 75.5%. Positive predictive value (PPV) for surgeon's opinion was 0.79 and negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.40. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the association between the surgeon's opinion and the cure rate was low with a Kappa value of 0.171 (p = 0.30). PPV of assistant's opinion was 0.80 and NPV was 0.40, with a Kappa value of 0.2 (p = 0.13). Concordance of surgeon and assistant's opinion resulted in PPV of 0.79 and NPV of 0.53 (Kappa = 0.261). Kappa value did not improve when surgeon's opinion was related to other factors such as the material employed, grade of reflux, presence of ureteral duplication or associated pathology and morphology of the ureteral orifice. In our experience, surgeon's opinion is not an accurate tool to predict the outcome of endoscopic treatment of VUR. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The method of urine sampling is not a valid predictor for vesicoureteral reflux in children after febrile urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, Bernhard; Roesch, Judith; Strasser, Christa; Oswald, Josef

    2017-10-01

    The likelihood of detecting vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) after febrile urinary tract infections (UTI) in children logically should correlate with the correct diagnosis of the UTI. Beneath the unspecific symptoms of fever urine analysis is the main diagnostic criterion for the exact diagnosis of febrile UTIs in children. Use of inadequate urine sampling techniques during diagnosis may lead to impaired accuracy in UTI diagnosis. This could lead to the assumption that children, having diagnosed their UTI by the use of possibly inadequate urine sampling techniques should not be evaluated as consequently compared to those, where the diagnosis relied on sterile urine sampling techniques. We hypothesized that children with possibly contaminated urine samples during the initial diagnosis may show a lower rate of VUR in subsequent VCUGs because of a wrong diagnosis initially compared to children, where accurate urine sampling techniques were used. Between 2009 and 2014, a total of 555 patients underwent a primary VCUG at our department indicated because of febrile UTIs. Patients with urine collection methods other than bag urine and catheter/suprapubic aspiration (SPA) were excluded from this study (mid-stream urine, potty urine, n = 149). We evaluated 402 patients (male/female 131/271, mean age 1.91 years), VUR rates and grades were compared between patients where urine was sampled by the use of a urine bag only at the time of diagnosis (n = 296, 73.6%) and those where sterile urine sampling (catheter, suprapubic puncture) was performed (n = 106, 26.3%). 4 patients were excluded due to equivocal data on urine sampling. VUR rate in children after sterile urine sampling using a catheter or SPA accounted to 31.1%. In those where urine samples acquired by the use of urine bags were used, 33.7% showed VUR on subsequent VCUG (p = 0.718). There were no significant differences as to VUR grades or gender, although VUR was much more commonly diagnosed in female patients (37

  16. Study of prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves

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    Divya Bhadoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Study on prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves. Materials and Methods: Antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis patients were included. Postnatally, they were divided into two groups, posterior urethral valve (PUV and non-PUV. The studied parameters were: Gestational age at detection, surgical intervention, ultrasound findings, cord blood and follow up plasma renin activity (PRA values, vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR, renal scars, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Results: A total of 25 patients were included, 10 PUV and 15 non-PUV. All infants with PUV underwent primary valve incision. GFR was less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 body surface area in 4 patients at last follow-up. Keyhole sign, oligoamnios, absent bladder cycling, and cortical cysts were not consistent findings on antenatal ultrasound in PUV. Cord blood PRA was significantly higher (P < 0.0001 in PUV compared to non-PUV patients. Gestational age at detection of hydronephrosis, cortical cysts, bladder wall thickness, and amniotic fluid index were not significantly correlated with GFR while PRA could differentiate between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV. Conclusions: Ultrasound was neither uniformly useful in diagnosing PUV antenatally, nor differentiating it from cases with non-PUV hydronephrosis. In congenital hydronephrosis, cord blood PRA was significantly higher in cases with PUV compared to non-PUV cases and fell significantly after valve ablation. Cord blood PRA could distinguish between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV.

  17. Endoscopic incision of protruding right ureterocele in a single collecting system: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinto Hariwibowo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protruding ureterocele is a very rare case found in the literature. We are reporting a 21 year-old female with an intermittent protruding mass from urethra, accompanied by dysuria, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. Inspection of the external genitalia revealed a protruding mass from the urethra which could be reduced manually. Excretory urography showed bilateral single collecting systems, grade II hydronephrosis of the right kidney, and a cobra head appearance of the lower right pelvis. The patient was diagnosed with a protruding right ureterocele in a single collecting system, and thus, endoscopic incision of a ureterocele was performed. Ultrasonography which was carried out three weeks after the procedure confirmed no residual hydronephrosis or ureterocele in the bladder. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG underwent at a three-month-follow up revealed a grade 5 vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR on the right side. Surgical reimplantation was then considered. In conclusion, endoscopic incision was safe and yielded good result for protruding ureteroceles, but the need for secondary surgery in several conditions should be considered.

  18. [Reflux nephropathy in absence of obvious vesicoureteral reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vino, L; Pedrolli, A; Portuese, A; Dal Cerè, M; Pizzini, C; Sinaguglia, G; Fanos, V

    2000-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with vesicoureteric reflux presents DMSA scan alterations, parenchimal renal scars are found also in children without vesicoureteric reflux. Two clinical cases of reflux nephropathy without evidence of reflux are presented. Several explanations could be advocated to justify this picture, including haematogenous source of infection, inadequate timing and/or procedure of cystouretrography, intermittency of reflux, ascending bacteria, previous presence of reflux, and appearance of controlateral reflux during the natural history of a monolateral documented reflux. Tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategy should discussed for each patient.

  19. Ureteroneocystostomy in primary vesicoureteral reflux: critical retrospective analysis of factors affecting the postoperative urinary tract infection rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Serkan Dogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To determine the parameters affecting the outcome of ureteroneocystostomy (UNC procedure for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Materials and Methods Data of 398 patients who underwent UNC procedure from 2001 to 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Different UNC techniques were used according to laterality of reflux and ureteral orifice configuration. Effects of several parameters on outcome were examined. Disappearance of reflux on control VCUG or absence of any kind of UTI/symptoms in patients without control VCUG was considered as clinical improvement. Results Mean age at operation was 59.2 ± 39.8 months and follow-up was 25.6 ± 23.3 months. Grade of VUR was 1-2, 3 and 4-5 in 17, 79, 302 patients, respectively. Male to female ratio was 163/235. UNC was performed bilaterally in 235 patients and intravesical approach was used in 373 patients. The frequency of voiding dysfunction, scar on preoperative DMSA, breakthrough infection and previous surgery was 28.4%, 70.7%, 49.3% and 22.4%, respectively. Twelve patients (8.9% with postoperative contralateral reflux were excluded from the analysis. Overall clinical improvement rate for UNC was 92%. Gender, age at diagnosis and operation, laterality and grade of reflux, mode of presentation, breakthrough infections (BTI under antibiotic prophylaxis, presence of voiding dysfunction and renal scar, and operation technique did not affect the surgical outcome. However, the clinical improvement rate was lower in patients with a history of previous endoscopic intervention (83.9% vs. 94%. Postoperative UTI rate was 27.2% and factors affecting the occurrence of postoperative UTI were previous failed endoscopic injection on univariate analysis and gender, preoperative BTI, postoperative VUR state, voiding dysfunction on multivariate analysis. Surgery related complication rate was 2% (8/398. These were all low grade complications (blood transfusion in 1, hematoma under incision in 3 and prolonged

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease References Falk GW, Katzka DA. Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ... gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol . 2013;108(3):308-328. ...

  1. Longterm outcome of Macroplatique injection for treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children

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    Elrahmany A. Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined our experience with one year follow-up of 20 cases of vesicoureteric reflux in children after treatment with Macroplastique ® injection. Patient and Methods: A total of 20 children (31 ureters with primary grades II to V vesicoureteral reflux were treated with subureteral Macroplastique ® injection from 2010 to 2011 and followed for an average of 12 months (range 3 to 24. Vesicoureteral reflux was grade II in 3, III in 7, IV in 9 and V in 12 ureters. Each child underwent pre-operative voiding cystourethrography, abdominopelvic ultrasound, urine analysis/culture, S. creatinine and CBC. Dimercapto-succinic acid scan (DMSA scan and magnetic resonance urography (MRU were done in some patients. Voiding cystourethrography at 3 months was done to rule out persistent reflux. Results: Overall, reflux was corrected in 11 (35.5% ureters and 9 (45% children after a single injection. With repeat injection, reflux was corrected in 16 (51.6% ureters and 11 (55% children, reflux improved/downgrade in 4 (12.9% ureters and 2 (10% children. Correction by grade was 100%, 100%, 9.7%, 9.7% for grades II to V, respectively. There were no surgical complications. None of the cured patients had recurrent reflux during follow-up. There were 9 (45% children who required open ureteral re-implantation for failed injection. Conclusion: Sub-ureteral Macroplastique ® injection therapy could be a primary treatment for low grade VUR (grade III or less in children because it is simple, safe, effective, less invasive, decreased.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with caffeine fatty and fried foods garlic and onions spicy foods tomato-based foods and sauces peppermint ... Heard of GERD? Your Digestive System Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  4. Evaluation of renal function in children with vesicoureteral reflux; Changes in renal uptake rate using [sup 99m]Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, Takuichi (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-09-01

    Renal uptake rate was calculated by [sup 99m]Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy in 100 kidneys from 58 patients with pediatric vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) to assess kidney function quantitatively for treatment selection and surgical timing. The conservatively treated group consisted of 42 patients (75 kidneys) who underwent DMSA renal scintigraphy twice at intervals of 2 years during their management. The surgically treated group consisted of 16 patients (25 kidneys) who underwent DMSA renal scintigraphy before and 2 years after surgery, Urine samples were collected at the time of initial DMSA renal scintigraphy for the simultaneous measurement of [beta][sub 2]-microglobulin ([beta][sub 2]-MG), [alpha][sub 1]-microglobulin and N-acetyl-[beta]-glucosaminidase. Renal uptake ratio of DMSA did not differ in VUR grades during a 2-year follow-up period in the conservative group. In the age group of patients aged 2 or less, renal uptake ratio decreased 2 years later, with significant difference with that in the other age groups. According to VUR grade, there was no significant difference in DMSA renal kidney ratios between the conservative group and the surgical group. According to age, significant difference in renal uptake ratio was observed between the two groups; i.e., patients aged 2 or less had a significantly decreased renal uptake ratio in the conservative group than the surgical group. However, the renal uptake ratio did not differ in the other age groups. For patients aged 2 or less, surgery was considerd necessary to prevent reflux when urinary [beta][sub 2]-MG indexes are increased. For those aged 3 years or more, on the other hand, conservative treatment was considered optimal regardless of VUR grades; surgery was considered recommended in the case of repeated urinary infection and decreased renal function. (N.K.).

  5. Reflux and aerodigestive tract diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Paccagnella, D.; Takes, R.P.; Rinaldo, A.; Silver, C.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Hinni, M.L.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease can present with a wide variety of extraesophageal symptoms. In particular, the type of disease characterized predominately by laryngopharyngeal reflux may be difficult to diagnose because of the absence of regurgitation or heartburn. The available battery of

  6. Deletion of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 from the peri-wolffian duct stroma leads to ureteric induction abnormalities and vesicoureteral reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A Walker

    Full Text Available Pax3cre-mediated deletion of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (Fgfr2 broadly in renal and urinary tract mesenchyme led to ureteric bud (UB induction defects and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, although the mechanisms were unclear. Here, we investigated whether Fgfr2 acts specifically in peri-Wolffian duct stroma (ST to regulate UB induction and development of VUR and the mechanisms of Fgfr2 activity.We conditionally deleted Fgfr2 in ST (Fgfr2(ST-/- using Tbx18cre mice. To look for ureteric bud induction defects in young embryos, we assessed length and apoptosis of common nephric ducts (CNDs. We performed 3D reconstructions and histological analyses of urinary tracts of embryos and postnatal mice and cystograms in postnatal mice to test for VUR. We performed in situ hybridization and real-time PCR in young embryos to determine mechanisms underlying UB induction defects.We confirmed that Fgfr2 is expressed in ST and that Fgfr2 was efficiently deleted in this tissue in Fgfr2(ST-/- mice at embryonic day (E 10.5. E11.5 Fgfr2(ST-/- mice had randomized UB induction sites with approximately 1/3 arising too high and 1/3 too low from the Wolffian duct; however, apoptosis was unaltered in E12.5 mutant CNDs. While ureters were histologically normal, E15.5 Fgfr2(ST-/- mice exhibit improper ureteral insertion sites into the bladder, consistent with the ureteric induction defects. While ureter and bladder histology appeared normal, postnatal day (P 1 mutants had high rates of VUR versus controls (75% versus 3%, p = 0.001 and occasionally other defects including renal hypoplasia and duplex systems. P1 mutant mice also had improper ureteral bladder insertion sites and shortened intravesicular tunnel lengths that correlated with VUR. E10.5 Fgfr2(ST-/- mice had decreases in Bmp4 mRNA in stromal tissues, suggesting a mechanism underlying the ureteric induction and VUR phenotypes.Mutations in FGFR2 could possibly cause VUR in humans.

  7. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India); Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); De Luca, Valeria [Department of Information Tech and Electrical Eng., ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Bardati, Fernando [Department of Computer Science, Systems and Production, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Snow, Brent W, E-mail: akavitha@iitm.ac.i [University of Utah and Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2010-09-21

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (f{sub c}), frequency band ({Delta}f) and aperture radius (r{sub a}) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna ({eta}). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over f{sub c} {+-} {Delta}f/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature ({delta}T{sub B}) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 {sup 0}C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum {eta} over 1.1-1.6 GHz for r{sub a} = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over f{sub c} {+-} {Delta}f/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate {delta}T{sub B} {>=} 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 {sup 0}C and 35 mm depth. Higher {eta} and {delta}T{sub B} were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements

  8. Modeling the Detectability of Vesicoureteral Reflux using Microwave Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as the warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. Radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf), and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from computed tomography (CT) images of children age 4–6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio between the power collected from the target at depth and the total power received by the antenna (η). Power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15–25 mL urine refluxes at 40–42°C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1–1.6 GHz for ra = 30–40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35–40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB ≥ 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40°C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. Numerical study suggests

  9. Gastro Oesophageal Reflux Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    refluxers, patients with large hiatal hernias, patients with paraoesophageal hernias, and at times those presenting with complications such as bleeding. Surgery does not seem to confer any additional benefit in patients with. Barrett's oesophagus. These patients would in any case need ongoing surveillance, whether treated ...

  10. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Do Routine Preoperative and Intraoperative Urine Cultures Benefit Pediatric Vesicoureteral Reflux Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Hettel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if routine preoperative and intraoperative urine cultures (UCx are necessary in pediatric vesicoureteral (VUR reflux surgery by identifying their association with each other, preoperative symptoms, and surgical outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective review of patients undergoing ureteral reimplant(s for primary VUR at a tertiary academic medical center between years 2000 and 2014 was done. Preoperative UCx were defined as those within 30 days before surgery. A positive culture was defined as >50,000 colony forming units of a single organism. Results. A total of 185 patients were identified and 87/185 (47.0% met inclusion criteria. Of those, 39/87 (45% completed a preoperative UCx. Only 3/39 (8% preoperative cultures returned positive, and all of those patients were preoperatively symptomatic. No preoperatively asymptomatic patients had positive preoperative cultures. Intraoperative cultures were obtained in 21/87 (24.1% patients; all were negative. No associations were found between preoperative culture results and intraoperative cultures or between culture result and postoperative complications. Conclusions. In asymptomatic patients, no associations were found between the completion of a preoperative or intraoperative UCx and surgical outcomes, suggesting that not all patients may require preoperative screening. Children presenting with symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI prior to ureteral reimplantation may benefit from preoperative UCx.

  12. Reflux oesophagitis : an experimental study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Kranendonk (Steef)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the surgical therapy of reflux oesophagitis is prevention of reflux, and the treatment of the irreversible complications of reflux such as strictures. Recent developments in the treatment of reflux are concentrated on an earlier diagnosis of reflux and oesophagitis and

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badriul Hegar

    2011-12-01

    Endoscopically-visible breaks in the distal esophageal mucosa are the most reliable evidence of reflux esophagitis. Esophageal pH monitoring quantitatively measures esophageal acid exposure. Combined multiple intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH measures acidic, weakly acidic, non-acidic and gas reflux episodes. MII-pH is superior to pH monitoring alone for evaluation of the temporal relationship between symptoms and GERER. Barium contrast radiography is not useful for the GERERD diagnosis, but may be used to detect anatomic abnormalities. Parental education, guidance, and support are always required and usually sufficient to manage healthy, thriving infants with symptoms likely due to physiologic GERER. Use of a thickened, commercially available anti-regurgitation formula by preference, may decrease visible regurgitation. Buffering agents, alginate and sucralfate, can be beneficial if used as needed for occasional heartburn. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs are superior to histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs.

  14. Application of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement to publications on endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, M K; Kirsch, A J

    2017-06-01

    Following an increasing number of submissions on endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), the Journal of Pediatric Urology sought to establish a quality guideline that would enable reviewers to select the best papers for publication in the journal. The "Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology" (STROBE) Statement, established in 2007, is a 22-item checklist designed to assist with clear reporting of observational studies. This checklist includes a description of methodological items and instructions on how to use them to transparently report observational studies. The aim of the present study was to apply the STROBE principle to observational studies about endoscopic management of VUR, and to establish a "check-list" to assist authors with good-quality submissions. The 22 STROBE criteria were listed and applied to publications on endoscopic treatment by utilizing examples from the current literature, with additional suggestions about how future studies could build upon the information already published on the subject. Based on this strategy, a checklist that is particular to endoscopic treatment studies was produced as a guideline for authors and reviewers. Application of the STROBE statement principles, in combination with key VUR data, will allow better quality submissions and a higher chance of positive reviews and acceptance rates. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. All rights reserved.

  15. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Joaquim Prado P. Moraes-Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a condition which develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment have frequently been analyzed but it is interesting to review some aspects of the GERD refractory patients to the proton pump inhibitors treatment. The treatment encompasses behavioral measures and pharmacological therapy. The majority of the patients respond well to proton pump inhibitors treatment but 20%-42% of them may not do so well. Patients who are unresponsible to 4-8 weeks' treatment with proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole-Mg might have so-called refractory GERD. RESULTS: In some cases the patients are not real refractory because either they do not have GERD or the disease was not correctly treated, but the term refractory is still employed. Although debatable, the Brazilian GERD Consensus based upon evidences recommends as first step in the diagnosis, the upper digestive endoscopy to exclude the diagnosis of peptic ulcer and cancer and in some cases identify the presence of esophageal mucosa erosions. CONCLUSIONS: The main causes of the so-called refractory GERD are: (1 functional heartburn; (2 low levels of adherence to proton pump inhibitors treatment; (3 inadequate proton pump inhibitors dosage; (4 wrong diagnosis; (5 co-morbidities and pill-induced esophagitis; (6 genotypic differences; (7 nonacid gastroesophageal reflux; (8 autoimmune skin diseases; (9 eosinophilic esophagitis.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X L; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2012-10-01

    Reflux of gastric contents is common in young infants but usually self-limiting and not pathological. Gastroesophageal reflux disease refers to persistent reflux due to pathological factors that results in significant symptoms. Patients may exhibit oesophagitis, bleeding, nutritional failure, or respiratory problems. A high index of suspicion must thus be maintained for all patients. The aim of this article was to provide a concise review of the understanding of this disease, and also to discuss current diagnosis and management strategies for children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  17. Acid Reflux (GER and GERD) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Adults View or Print ... up into your esophagus causing heartburn (also called acid reflux). Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a long- ...

  18. Severe laryngitis associated to gastroesophageal reflux

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botto, Hugo; Antonioli, Cintia; Nieto, Mary; Cocciaglia, Alejandro; Cuestas, Giselle; Roques Revol, Magdalena; López Marti, Jessica; Rodríguez, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngolaryngeal reflux as factors leading to respiratory disease, manifested as dysphonia, wheezing, coughing, recurrent laryngitis...

  19. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007401.htm Anti-reflux surgery - children To use the sharing features on this ... be done during a hiatal hernia repair. This article discusses anti-reflux surgery repair in children. Description The most common type ...

  20. Further investigation of confirmed urinary tract infection (UTI in children under five years: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Julie

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Further investigation of confirmed UTI in children aims to prevent renal scarring and future complications. Methods We conducted a systematic review to determine the most effective approach to the further investigation of confirmed urinary tract infection (UTI in children under five years of age. Results 73 studies were included. Many studies had methodological limitations or were poorly reported. Effectiveness of further investigations: One study found that routine imaging did not lead to a reduction in recurrent UTIs or renal scarring. Diagnostic accuracy: The studies do not support the use of less invasive tests such as ultrasound as an alternative to renal scintigraphy, either to rule out infection of the upper urinary tract (LR- = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.47, 0.68 and thus to exclude patients from further investigation or to detect renal scarring (LR+ = 3.5, 95% CI: 2.5, 4.8. None of the tests investigated can accurately predict the development of renal scarring. The available evidence supports the consideration of contrast-enhanced ultrasound techniques for detecting vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR, as an alternative to micturating cystourethrography (MCUG (LR+ = 14.1, 95% CI: 9.5, 20.8; LR- = 0.20, 95%CI: 0.13, 0.29; these techniques have the advantage of not requiring exposure to ionising radiation. Conclusion There is no evidence to support the clinical effectiveness of routine investigation of children with confirmed UTI. Primary research on the effectiveness, in terms of improved patient outcome, of testing at all stages in the investigation of confirmed urinary tract infection is urgently required.

  1. Retrocaval ureter with vesicoureteric reflux, a very rare entity | Arya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: A circumcaval ureter is a rare congenital anomaly in which the ureter passes behind inferior vena cava. VUR is rarely found in association with retrocaval ureter. Diagnosis and management are difficult. To our knowledge, we report a second case of retrocaval ureter with ipsilateral VUR. Observation: A ...

  2. Daño renal congénito asociado a reflujo vesicoureteral CONGENITAL RENAL DAMAGE ASSOCIATED WIHT VESICOURETERAL REFLUX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó uretrocistografía miccional a 71 niños (48 varones en los que el estudio ultrasonográfico materno-fetal había detectado una dilatación pélvica renal y esta alteración se confirmó en el ultrasonido renal posnatal. Se encontró reflujo vesicoureteral (RVU en 16 (22,5 % y unidades renales refluentes (URR en 23 (16 %. El estudio gammagráfico estático (Tc 99 m-DMSA demostró alteración de la función renal diferencial en 6 pacientes, 1 con RVU de grado II y 5 con RVU de grados IV y V. El grado de afectación funcional varió de ligero hasta esencialmente afuncional. En uno de estos pacientes había el antecedente de una infección urinaria en el período neonatal y en los 5 restantes no existía historia de infección urinaria. Estos datos apoyan el criterio de que en el RVU, sobre todo en los grados IV y V, el riñón puede afectarse antes del nacimiento.Miction uretrocystography was performed in 71 children (48 boys, among whom the maternofetal ultrasonographic study had detected a pelvic renal dilation that was confirmed in the postnatal renal ultrasound. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR was found in 16 (22.5 % and renal reflowing units (RRU in 23 (16 %. The static gammagraphic study (Tc 99m-DMSA showed alteration of the differential renal function in 6 patients, 1 with degree II VUR and 5 with degree IV and V VUR. The degree of functional affectation varied from mild to essentially nonfunctional. One of these patients had history of urinary infection in the neonatal period, whereas the other five did not. These data support the criterion that in VUR, mainly in IV and V degrees, the kidney may be affected before birth.

  3. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2013-10-25

    steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs and 8 (2%) were consuming alcohol. The duration of RS ranged from one. Abbreviations: GERD, gastro-esophageal reflux disease; NSAIDs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; RS, reflux ...

  4. Relationship between reflux and laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Takes, R.P.; Silver, C.E.; Paccagnella, D.; Rinaldo, A.; Hinni, M.L.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or its variation known as laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), has been recognized as a potential cause of several laryngeal disorders. Patients with laryngeal cancer have lifestyle risk factors, especially tobacco and alcohol consumption, that play an etiological

  5. Determinants of reflux-induced chronic cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, Thomas V. K.; Pauwels, Ans; Jafari, Jafar; Sifrim, Daniel; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Tack, Jan; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Gastro-oesophageal reflux is considered to be an important contributing factor in chronic unexplained cough. It remains unclear why some reflux episodes in the same patient causes cough while others do not. To understand more about the mechanism by which reflux induces cough, we aimed to

  6. Reflujo vesicoureteral: conceptos actuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Se hace una revisión de la literatura y se extraen las siguientes conclusiones: Las cicatrices renales pueden presentarse sin reflujo vesicoureteral (RVU y pueden no existir en presencia de reflujo severo. Aunque tienen más riesgos los lactantes, los niños mayores también son vulnerables. La respiración quirúrgica del RVU no disminuye la incidencia de infección urinaria recurrente, por lo que la cirugía no es el tratamiento de elección y probablemente sea una indicación excepcional. El RVU tiende a resolverse espontáneamente. No deben indicarse antibióticos en los niños con bacteriuria asintomática por ser potencialmente peligrosos. Se deberá descartar RVU mediante uretrocistografía miccional en todo paciente menor de 5 años que padezca infección urinaria aguda febril y especialmente si es menor de 3, independientemente del sexo y del resultado del estudio ultrasonográfico, y a cualquier edad si el ultrasonido detecta cicatriz, dilatación pélvica, mala delimitación corticomedular o signos de displasia; a toda hidronefrosis prenatal que se confirme después del nacimiento y a todo niño con agenesia renal o displasia renal multiquística unilaterales. Los hermanos e hijos de pacientes con RVU necesitan una valoración especial. No está demostrado que la profilaxis antibacteriana prevenga el daño renal en los pacientes con RVU. Se necesitan estudios controlados para poder precisar bien su utilidad o ineficiencia. Se recomienda no utilizarla después de los 3 años de edad.A literature review was made from which the following conclusions were drawn: Renal scars may occur without vesico-ureteral reflux and may not be present when there is severe reflux. Although infants are at more risk, older children are also vulnerable. Surgical repair of vesico-ureteral reflux does not reduce incidence of recurrent urinary infection, so surgery is not a treatment of choice but probably an exceptional measure. Vesico-ureteral reflux tends

  7. Vesicoureteral reflux: A historical perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K.N. DeCotiis

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... Vesicoureteral reflux: A historical perspective. K.N. DeCotiisa,∗. , F.J. Pennab, M.A. Koylec, A.A. Caldamonea a The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 2 Dudley Street, Suite 174, Providence, RI 02905, USA b Dartmouth | Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, ...

  8. Respiratory involvement in the gastroesophageal reflux disesease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureşan, Iulia; Picos, Alina; Grad, Simona; Dumitrascu, D L

    2011-01-01

    The pathological gastroesophageal reflux disease may lead to the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), manifested as a spectrum of conditions including erosive esophagitis, Barrett esophagus and has been linked to the development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. The gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated in the occurence of a number of pulmonary symptoms and diseases, otolaryngologic symptoms, and other extraesophageal manifestations. Clinicians must be aware of the possibility of some extraesophageal reflux-related manifestations, even in the absence of heartburn and acid reflux, classic esophageal symptoms of GERD. Although the correlation between gastroesophageal reflux disease and the extraesophageal manifestations has been established, a cause-and-effect relationship has not been proved yet. In this article, we present the respiratory manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease, referring to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar de; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors.

  10. Freqüência de desaparecimento do refluxo vésico-ureteral de graus I a III em pacientes pediátricos Vesicoureteral grade I to III reflux disappearance frequency in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia S. Macedo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar a freqüência do desaparecimento do refluxo vésico-ureteral (RVU primário de graus I a III em crianças e correlacionar com idade no diagnóstico, sexo, grau e lateralidade. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo de 34 crianças com RVU diagnosticado por uretrocistografia miccional (UCM. Cinco pacientes eram meninos (mediana: um ano e seis meses e 29 meninas (mediana: três anos O exame controle pela UCM ou cistografia foi realizado em intervalos de 12 a 24 meses. Na análise das variáveis utilizou-se a curva de sobrevida de Kaplan-Meier. RESULTADOS: o desaparecimento do RVU ocorreu em 52,9% dos pacientes. Comparando faixas etárias não houve diferença estatística. Nos meninos o desaparecimento do RVU ocorreu na mediana de 24 meses e nas meninas, de 60 meses. Houve diferença estatística entre os sexos (p = 0,02. Houve desaparecimento do RVU em 80% dos pacientes com RVU de grau I (mediana: 25,5 meses, 66,6% de grau II (mediana: 48 meses 40% de grau III (mediana: 60 meses; em 21% no bilateral (mediana: 48 meses e 75% no unilateral (mediana: 28,5 meses. Houve diferença estatística entre os graus de RVU (0,02 e lateralidade (p = 0,05. CONCLUSÕES: o desaparecimento do RVU ocorreu no sexo masculino, nos graus I ou II e unilateral.OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the frequency of disappearance of primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR grade I to III in children and correlate with patient's age at diagnosis, sex, grade and laterality. METHODS: a retrospective study of 34 children with VUR detected by voiding cystourethrography (VCU. Five patients were boys (median of age: one year and six months and 29 were girls (median of age: three years. Control exams by VCU or IC were made in performed 12 to 24 months. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for analysis. RESULTS: VUR cessation was observed in 52.9% of patients. Comparing age it was not observed statistic difference. VUR cessation occurred in a median of 24 months in boys and 60 months in

  11. Surgical Management of Reflux Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, J. Lynwood; Sawyers, John L.; Whitehead, William A.

    1974-01-01

    Reflux gastritis is now recognized with increasing frequency as a complication following operations on the stomach which either remove, alter, or bypass the pyloric phincter mechanism. The entity may occasionally occur as a result of sphincter dysfunction in the patient who has not undergone prior gastric surgery. The diagnosis is made on the basis of symptoms (postprandial pain, bilious vomiting and weight loss), gastroscopic examination with biopsy and persistent hypochlorhydria. Remedial operation for correction of reflux is indicated in the presence of persistent symptoms when conservative measures fail. Only operative procedures which divert duodenal contents from the stomach or gastric remnant are effective. Both the isoperistaltic jejunal segment (Henley loop) and the Roux-en-Y diversion have been effective as remedial operations for reflux gastritis and merit greater awareness by gastroenterologists and surgeons. Our choice is the Roux-en-Y because of its technical simplicity and lower morbidity rate. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 11.Fig. 12.Fig. 14.Fig. 15.Fig. 16. PMID:4415996

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux. Reflujo gastroesofágico.

    OpenAIRE

    Lauro A. Melo Aguilera; Rafael Trinchet Soler; Yanet Hidalgo Marrero

    2005-01-01

    Although many infants has smaller degrees of gastroesophageal reflux, it is recognized that 1:3,000 at 1:10,000 of they have a pathological or symptomatic reflux. Near 90% of children vomits during the first 6 weeks of life, due primarily to the physiologic immaturity of antireflux mechanism. However, in 60% of cases, reflux disappears before 18 months, even without treatment. 30% maintains the symptoms, becoming in pathological, and of them, 10% develops serious problems, around 5% esophagit...

  13. [Vesico-renal reflux and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Y P; Ratajczak, A; Coadou, Y; Guille, F; Lobel, B

    1985-01-01

    By modifying the anatomical location of the bladder and ureter, and by favoring urinary stasis and pyuria, pregnancy may reveal or aggravate an existing vesico-renal reflux. In reporting six cases of vesico-renal reflux in pregnant women, revealed by attacks of feverish lombalgia, or mictional disorders associated with pyuria, and confirmed postpartum by intravenous urography, retrograde cystography and cystoscopy, the authors recall the factors associated with pregnancy which favor the appearance of a reflux, mechanical, hormonal and metabolic action. Surgical correction of refluxes associated with pyuria and detected during pregnancy would seem indicated.

  14. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & ...

  15. Treatment of vesicoureteric reflux by endoscopic injection of Teflon.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, B; Puri, P

    1984-01-01

    Thirteen girls with grade III-V vesicoureteric reflux were treated by endoscopic injection of Teflon paste behind the intravesical ureter. Fourteen of the 18 treated ureters showed complete absence of reflux after one injection of Teflon. Three ureters required a second injection of Teflon for successful treatment of the reflux. One ureter with grade IV reflux was converted to grade II reflux. Properly carried out, this procedure corrects reflux. It takes less than 15 minutes, may be done as ...

  16. Sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Christopher; Gibbens, Kyle; Lomelin, Daniel; Krause, Crystal; Simorov, Anton; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is an epidemic in the USA that continues to grow, becoming a leading cause of premature avoidable death. Bariatric surgery has become an effective solution for obesity and its comorbidities, and one of the most commonly utilized procedures, the sleeve gastrectomy, can lead to an increase in gastroesophageal reflux following the operation. While these data are controversial, sometimes operative intervention can be necessary to provide durable relief for this problem. We performed an extensive literature review examining the different methods of anti-reflux procedures that are available both before and after a sleeve gastrectomy. We reviewed several different types of anti-reflux procedures, including those that supplement the lower esophageal sphincter anatomy, such as magnetic sphincter augmentation and radiofrequency ablation procedures. Re-operation was also discussed as a possible treatment of reflux in sleeve gastrectomy, especially if the original sleeve becomes dilated or if a conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion is deemed necessary. Sleeve gastrectomy with concomitant anti-reflux procedure was also reviewed, including the anti-reflux gastroplasty, hiatal hernia repair, and limited fundoplication. A number of techniques can be used to mitigate the severity of reflux, either by maintaining the normal anatomic structures that limit reflux or by supplementing these structures with a plication or gastroplasty. Individuals with existing severe reflux should not be considered for a sleeve gastrectomy. New techniques that incorporate plication at the time of the index sleeve gastrectomy show some improvement, but these are in small series that will need to be further evaluated. The only proven method of treating intractable reflux after sleeve gastrectomy is conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

  17. Renal imaging in paediatrics; Nuklearmedizinische Nierendiagnostik in der Paediatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porn, U.; Hahn, K.; Fischer, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    The most frequent renal diseases in paediatrics include urinary tract infections, hydronephrosis, kidney anomalies and reflux. The main reason for performing DMSA scintigraphy in paediatrics is the detection of cortical abnormalities related to urinary tract infection. Because the amount of tracer retained in the tubular cells is associated with the distribution of functioning renal parenchyma in the kidney, it is possible, to evaluate the split renal function. In comparison to ultrasound and intravenous urography the sensitivity in the detection of acute as well as chronic inflammatory changes is very high, however less specific. An indication for a renography in neonates and children is beside an estimation of the total renal function and the calculation of the split renal function, the assessment of renal drainage in patients with unclear dilatation of the collecting system in ultrasound. The analysis of the time activity curve provides, especially for follow-up studies, a reproducible method to assess the urinary outflow. The diuretic scintigraphy allows the detection of urinary obstruction. Subsequently it is possible to image the micturition phase to detect vesico-ureteric reflux (indirect MCU) after drainage of tracer from the renal pelvis. An reflux in the ureters or the pelvicalyceal system is visible on the scintigraphic images and can be confirmed by time activity curves. A more invasive technique is the direct isotope cystography with bladder catheterization. The present paper should give an overview about the role of nuclear medicine in paediatric urology. (orig.) [German] Die haeufigsten nephrourologischen Erkrankungen in der Paediatrie umfassen die entzuendlichen Veraenderungen des Nierenparenchyms, Harnstauungen, Nierenanomalien und Refluxerkrankungen. Die statische Nierenszintigraphie mit {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA hat in der Paediatrie vor allem zur Evaluierung von Narbenbildungen bei Pyelonephritis ihren Stellenwert. Da die tubulaere Speicherung von DMSA

  18. Discerning differences: gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Shawna M

    2004-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a frequently encountered problem in infancy; it commonly resolves spontaneously by 12 months of age. Caregivers are challenged to discriminate between physiologic GER and the much less common and more serious condition of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Pathologic GERD may require more extensive clinical evaluation and necessitate treatment. GERD may be primary or secondary; secondary GERD is associated with a number of genetic syndromes, chromosomal abnormalities, birth defects, or a host of neurologic conditions frequently seen in the newborn intensive care unit. This article reviews the unique anatomic, physiologic, developmental, and nutritional vulnerabilities of infants that make them susceptible to GER and GERD. The North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition have recently developed a comprehensive evidence-based clinical practice guideline that structures the diagnostic approach and treatment option in infants with suspected and confirmed GERD. These guidelines provide clear definitions of GER and GERD to aid the clinician in distinguishing between the 2 conditions. They emphasize the use of history and physical examination and discuss the indications for the use of other diagnostic procedures, such as upper gastrointestinal studies, nuclear medicine scintiscan, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy, and esophageal pH probe monitoring. Management of GERD begins with a nonpharmacologic approach; the emphasis is on positioning, a trial of a hypoallergenic formula, and thickening of feedings. When these measures fail to control symptoms, a trial of either histamine(2) antagonists or a proton pump inhibitor may be indicated. Finally, surgical treatment may be needed if all other management measures fail. New sleep recommendations for infants with GERD are now consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics' standard recommendations. Prone sleep positioning is only considered in

  19. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflux is a normal process that occurs in healthy infants, children and adults. Most episodes are short-lived and do not cause bothersome symptoms of complications. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when the reflux of stomach acid causes troublesome reflux-associated symptoms and/or complications.

  20. [Surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2007-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is major treatment for acid reflux. It reduces major symptom of GERD and effective. However, the cause of GERD is the insufficiency of anti-reflux mechanism of cardia. Only surgical treatment can care for hiatal hernia as the main cause of the disruption. Redundant reflux against conservative treatment or obvious hiatal hernia is indication for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Late diagnosis might request radical operation, so we need to know the indication for laparoscopic treatment. For the safer laparoscopic procedure, we perform curtain retraction technique and Floppy Nissen -short cuff method. The former contribute to prevent hemorrhage or pneumothorax, and the latter can reduce the post-operative disphagia.

  1. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Smout, Smout J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. Aim To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH 7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their correlation with symptoms. Methods Studies were identified by systematic PubMed and Embase searches. Data are presented as sample-size weighted ...

  2. Evaluación de la mutación a3243g en mtDNA, en familias de pacientes diagnosticados con el síndrome Melas Clinical characteristics of vesicoureteral Reflux in children at a University Hospital in Medellín, Colombia. 1960-2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ruiz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Las citopatías mitocondriales constituyen un variado grupo de desórdenes generados por déficits de la producción de energía en la mitocondria (1, proceso llevado a cabo a través de cinco complejos multienzimáticos ubicados en la membrana interna mitocondrial. Las subunidades que conforman estos complejos son codificadas por genoma nuclear y mitocondrial (mtDNA. Hasta el momento se ha identificado un gran cantidad de citopatías causadas por mutaciones en mtDNA; la más frecuente es MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic acidosis and Stroke-like episodes (2, de ésta, el 80% de los casos poseen la mutación A3243G en el gen del tRNALeu (3. En dicha mutación se ha encontrado hasta un 95% de heteroplasmia (4, lo cual hace que la variación en el fenotipo
    sea muy amplia.


    En este trabajo se evaluó la mutación A3243G en pacientes con diagnóstico de MELAS así como a sus familiares.

    A Total of 4.129 children with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI were attended at Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paúl in Medellín, Colombia, between 1960 and 2004. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, the commonest anomaly associated to UTI, was found in 1.309 children (31.7% who presented 1.914 cases of affected renal units (605 patients had bilateral reflux. This is a descriptive, retrospective work, carried out with information registered at the pediatric nephrology service by one of the authors (VPE on children younger than 17 years, with the diagnosis of VUR. The most important registered characteristics were reviewed, and the findings were as follows: 61.1% of children were women, 29.2% had the diagnosis of VUR made during the first year of life, and 41.4% had other associated anomalies; 72.4% of children had VUR of either III or IV grades, 53.8% had unilateral reflux, 23.8% had spontaneous resolution, and 36.1% required surgical correction. In 582 (44.5% out of 1.309 of these patients, studies for renal

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease with Thal fundoplication

    OpenAIRE

    Irwan Effendi; Yusri Dianne Jurnalis; Yorva Sayoeti; Yusirwan Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common phenomenon among heathy infants, with approximately 50% of infants aged 0 to 3 months and 67% of infants aged 4 months experiencing at least one episode of vomiting per day. GER defined as regurgitation of gastric contents into the esophagus or mouth. GER typically improves through the first postnatal year, with only 5% of healthy 12 month old infants experiencing vomiting.1,2 Complicated GER or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported...

  4. Management of gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    OpenAIRE

    Carré, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    Parental reassurance and thickened feeds are the only requirements in the management of infants with reflux when this is the sole detectable gastro-oesophageal abnormality. In view of the strong propensity for spontaneous clinical resolution and the excellent results achieved by conservative management, infants with reflux due to a partial thoracic stomach (hiatal hernia) uncomplicated by a stricture should be treated in the first instance by postural therapy, with or without thickened feeds ...

  5. Corpus gastritis is protective against reflux oesophagitis

    OpenAIRE

    El-Serag, H; Sonnenberg, A; Jamal, M; Inadomi, J; Crooks, L; Feddersen, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Gastric acid is important in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis. Acid production by the gastric corpus is reduced in corpus gastritis.
AIMS—To determine whether corpus gastritis protects against reflux oesophagitis.
METHODS—Patients presenting for elective oesophagogastroduodenoscopy were studied. Two biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, corpus, and cardia and stained with haematoxylin/eosin and Diff-Quick II stains. The presence and severity of gastritis were graded a...

  6. Sarcoglycan subcomplex expression in refluxing ureteral endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Salvatore; Favaloro, Angelo; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Consolo, Angela; Arena, Francesco; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Functional and structural lesions of ureteral endings seem to alter the active valve mechanism of the ureterovesical junction, causing vesicoureteral reflux. The interaction of the dystroglycan complex with components of the extracellular matrix may have an important role in force transmission and sarcolemma protection, and the sarcoglycan complex is an essential component of the muscle membrane located dystroglycan complex. We performed immunofluorescence and molecular analysis on the expression of sarcoglycan complex subunits. A total of 21 specimens of refluxing ureteral endings were obtained during ureteral reimplantation. Six ureteral ends obtained during organ explantation were used as controls. Immunohistochemical analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction evaluation were performed for alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon-sarcoglycan complex. The Spearman test revealed a significant positive correlation between alpha-sarcoglycan complex immunofluorescence intensity and grade of vesicoureteral reflux, while a negative correlation was recorded between epsilon-sarcoglycan complex immunofluorescence intensity and grade of vesicoureteral reflux. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated a significant grade related impairment of epsilon-sarcoglycan complex coupled with an increased expression of alpha-sarcoglycan complex. This observation suggests that the structural deficiency of the trigonal ureterovesical junction could cause a passive stretching of refluxing urine on the ureter, deranging the multimodular tensegrity architecture of the sarcoglycan subcomplex, or that the sarcoglycan complex could have a key role in the physiopathology of vesicoureteral reflux. In fact, the defect in any of the sarcoglycan complexes results in degeneration of membrane integrity and muscle fiber. An altered configuration of the sarcoglycan complex could explain the structural and functional changes in refluxing ureteral endings. Our observations underline the

  7. Small saphenous vein: where does reflux go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Gustavo Rossi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anatomy of small saphenous vein (SSV is very variable because of its complex embryological origin. SSV incompetence often causes reflux that goes to the perforating veins, sometimes not respecting the anatomical course. OBJECTIVE: To analyze differences in reflux direction and reentry in the SSV. METHODS: In this prospective, observational study, 60 lower limbs with SSV incompetence of 43 patients were assessed using a color Doppler ultrasound protocol. RESULTS: Reentry variations were grouped into four types and subtypes. Percentage results were: Type A, perforating veins on the medial side = 25/60 cases (41.66%; subtypes: Cockett, Sherman, paratibial and vertex; Type B, lateral malleolus and perforating veins on the lateral side (fibular 17-26 cm = 15/60 cases (25%; subtypes: fibular and malleolus; Type C, two branches = 19/60 cases (31.66%; subtypes: gastrocnemius and Cockett, gastrocnemius and malleolus, and/or fibular, Cockett and malleolus, Cockett-vertex and fibular; Type D, reflux in the superficial system = 1/60 cases (1.66%. CONCLUSION: On most of the lower limbs assessed, reflux did not follow the classical anatomic course. Our findings demonstrated a high degree of variation in reflux/reentry, but no SSV anatomical variations. Reflux seems to, either look for the most accessible anatomical connection for reentry or be originated in the distal area and then reach the SSV.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and vocal disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease in which gastroduodenal contents reflux into the esophagus. The clinical picture of gastroesophageal reflux disease is usually composed by heartburn and regurgitation (typical manifestations. Atypical manifestations (vocal disturbances and asthma may also be complaint. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pHmetric aspects of patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with vocal disturbances. METHODS: Fifty patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied, including 25 with vocal disturbances (group 1 - G1 and 25 without these symptoms (group 2 - G2. All patients were submitted to endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pHmetry (2 probes. The group 1 patients were submitted to videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Endoscopic findings: non-erosive reflux disease was observed in 95% of G1 patients and 88% of G2. Videolaryngoscopy: vocal fold congestion, asymmetry, nodules and polyps were observed in G1 patients. Manometric findings: pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 11.6 ± 5.2 in G1 and 14.0 ± 6.2 in G2 (P = 0.14; pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 58.4 ± 15.9 in G1 and 69.5 ± 30.7 in the controls. pHmetric findings: De Meester index: 34.0 ± 20.9 in G1 and 15.4 ± 9.4 in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in distal probe: 43.0 ± 20.4 in G1 and 26.4 ± 17.2 in G2 (P = 0.003; percentage of time with esophageal pH value lower than 4 units (distal sensor: 9.0% ± 6.4% in G1 and 3.4% ± 2.1% in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in proximal probe: 7.5 ± 10.9 in G1 and 5.3 ± 5.7 in G2 (P = 0.38; percentage of time with esophageal pH values lower than 4 units (Proximal probe: 1.2 ± 2.7 in G1 and 0.5 ± 0.7 in G2 (P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The clinical, endoscopic, and manometric findings observed in patients with vocal disturbance do not differ from those without these symptoms; 2 gastroesophageal

  9. Effect of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, PJ; Samsom, M; Smout, AJP

    1999-01-01

    Background Many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) report that coffee aggravates their symptoms and doctors tend to discourage its use in GORD. Objective To assess the effect of coffee ingestion on gastro-oesophageaI acid reflux. Design A randomized, controlled, crossover study.

  10. Reflux-cough syndrome: Assessment of temporal association between reflux episodes and cough bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; Pauwels, A.; Tack, J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundGastro-esophageal reflux can be the cause of chronic cough. In the assessment of the temporal association between reflux and cough, previous studies have used a two-minute time window, based on studies in patients with heartburn. However, it remains unclear whether the optimal time window

  11. [Recommended diet for reflux spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Viebig, Ricardo Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    The spectrophotometric probe, which uses bilirubin as a marker for the detection of duodenoesophagic reflux is subject to interference from strongly colored foods, which can cause erroneously high bilirubin absorbance readings. To overcome this problem it is necessary to ingest a diet that is free from such substances. To test the absorbance of 48 different food substances in an in vitro environment. Dry foods were blended with water or milk and non-dry solid foods were blended undiluted. It was utilized the proper calibration recipient to test them. The absorbance of weakly colored foods was usually lesser than the commonly accepted threshold of 0.14, and the absorbance of strongly colored foods was usually above this. Thirty-two from the 48 substances tested are suitable when the absorbance threshold is set at 0.14, but scrambled eggs, lacteous flour mush, green beans, beetroot, carrot, chayote, squash, "baroa" potato, boiled corn, orange, cashew, purple grape, avocado, mango, papaya and peach can alter the results and must be avoided. From the foods evaluated, enough are suitable at the 0.14 threshold to enable a suitable diet to be constructed for most patients during Bilitec studies.

  12. Anterior partial fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, W; Heintz, A; Trinh, T T; Junginger, T

    2003-07-01

    This study examined the effect of anterior partial fundoplication on reflux symptoms and dysphagia in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Perioperative results in 249 patients were evaluated retrospectively for 93 conventional and prospectively for 156 laparoscopic procedures. The patients were followed up by standardized questionnaire. Median clinical follow-up period was 9 months (range 6-44) after laparoscopic and 88 months (range 15-194) following partial open fundoplication. The median operating time was 58 and 115 min for laparoscopic and open partial fundoplication. Intraoperative complications were rare (1%) for both approaches. After introduction of the laparoscopic procedure the morbidity rate was reduced (mean 3.2% vs. 1.3%) at a shorter postoperative hospital stay (10 vs. 5 days). No reflux symptoms were found in 71.4% patients after conventional and in 69% after laparoscopic partial fundoplication, dysphagia did not develop in 86% and 85%, respectively, and 66% and 82% received no medications. Among the patients with reflux symptoms 6.5% and 0.9% underwent revision surgery. Satisfaction with the surgical outcome was expressed by 78% and 85% of patients, respectively. Anterior partial fundoplication achieves effective medium- and long-term control of reflux symptoms. Technically easy to perform and associated with few complications, the procedure is superior to fundoplication with respect to the development of postoperative dysphagia and therefore represents a viable alternative to fundoplication.

  13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: an overview of the pharmacotherapeutic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oesophageal reflux and secondary gastro-oesopahageal reflux. Management of GORD is aimed at decreasing the amount of stomach acid that enters the distal oesophagus usually by increasing the rate at which the stomach empties into the duodenum ...

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  15. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux diagnosed by occlusal splint tintion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián-Carretero, José Luis; López-Arcas-Calleja, José María

    2006-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is a very frequent digestive disorder, mainly characterised by the reflux of the gastric acidic content to the esophage in abnormal quantities. There are different situations that favour this situation but almost in all of them rely an incompetence of the esophagic sphincter. The clinical consequences are many, including oral manifestations. Among all of them the most frequent is the esophagitis followed by symptoms at the pharynx or larynx and finally, the oral cavity. At this level fundamentally we will find enamel and oral mucosa erosions. We report the case of a patient who was indirectly diagnosed of her esophague disease by the observation of the alterations in the occlusal splint induced by the gastric reflux. We review the literature concerning the above topic and its possible association with the miofascial syndrome.

  17. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF POSTOPERATIVE REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martynov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creation of anastomoses between hollow organs of the abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal space and the small intestine always raises the question of the prevention of reflux from the small intestine into the cavity drained the esophagus, stomach, gallbladder, liver outer duct cysts of the liver and pancreas. After surgery, any reflux becomes pathological. Reflux – is an obligate precancer. So, throw the bile and pancreatic juices in the stomach, the stump of the stomach, esophagus contributes to reflux esophagitis, reflux gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer, or a stump. After an internal drainage of cavity formation in the small intestine develops postoperative reflux disease, which is caused by the actions of the surgeon who tried sincerely to help the patient. It is possible to give the definition of such states “Iatrogenic Postoperative Reflux Disease”.The aim of this work was to develop and put into practice a “cap” on the afferent loop of the small intestine, do not migrate into the gut lumen, with an internal cavity drainage structures of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space and to evaluate clinical outcomes. As a result, the authors have developed a way to create a “cap” on a loop of the small intestine, which is used for the drainage of cavity formation, conducted research on its safety, proper functioning, accessibility, analyzed the clinical situation offers. For drainage of cavernous fistula formation impose between him and a loop of small intestine 40–50 cm from the Treitz ligament. Form a intestine anastomosis by Brown.Above this junction length leads to the formation of the drained portion of the small intestine is about 10 cm, in the middle of which impose a “stub”. Length of discharge from the drainage area of education of the small intestine to interintestinal Brownian anastomosis is about 30 cm. To form a “plug” free land use of the greater omentum, through which by puncture-poke perform

  18. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-31

    Jan 31, 2010 ... not cause bothersome symptoms of complications. Gastro- oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when the reflux of stomach acid causes troublesome reflux-associated symptoms and/or complications.6 ,7 The most common symptom of GORD is heartburn.1 Heartburn is experienced as a burning ...

  19. Review article: acidity and volume of the refluxate in the genesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sifrim, D.; Mittal, R.; Fass, R.; Smout, A.; Castell, D.; Tack, J.; Gregersen, H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A number of mechanisms, other than acid reflux, may be responsible for the symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. AIM: To assess the importance of non-acid reflux mechanisms. METHODS: This review is based on presentations and discussion at a workshop, where specialists in the

  20. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  1. The role of nuclear medicine in evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux and/or reflux nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early identification of different categories of the risk of scarring in children with first (or follow up) urinary tract infection and/or early detection and treatment of vesicoureteral reflux are important to prevent kidney impairment. The demonstration and grading of reflux is crucial in examination and follow up of any child with urinary tract infection. Nephro-urologic radionuclide studies are able to detect vesicoureteral reflux and reflux nephropathy, such as radionuclide cystography--RNC--(both direct radionuclide voiding cystography--DRVC--and indirect radionuclide cystography-IRC), renal DMSA scintigraphy, MAG3 renal diuresis scintigraphy and DTPA renal diuresis scintigraphy. They allow to assess renal parenchyma integrity, to detect pyelonephritic scars, to evaluate the different aspects of urinary tract function and to measure absolute and relative function after intravenous injection of radiopharmaceuticals. The procedure, image acquisition and processing and the diagnostic relevance of all aforesaid nephro-urologic radionuclide studies are illustrated.

  2. Identifying gastrooesophageal reflux disease in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Sara

    2012-11-01

    This article will look at the similarities between normal baby behaviours, and normal physiological gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and GORD, giving the practitioner evidence-based information to offer reassurance to parents. It will also look at conservative management of the common symptoms of GOR, and try to identify why this condition can cause confusion among health professionals and parents.

  3. Esophageal Sphincter Device for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganz, Robert A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A.; Dunst, Christy M.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Lipham, John C.; Luketich, James D.; Melvin, W. Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C.; Smith, C. Daniel; Smith, Christopher C.; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS We prospectively assessed 100 patients

  4. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most prevalent diseases seen in western countries. The prevalence of GERD is lower in the Asian population and the spectrum of the disease is mild. Data from Africa and the Middle East are sparse. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine the ...

  5. [Analysis of anti-reflux surgery failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Novillo, I; Benavent Gordo, M I; Portela Casalod, E; Delgado Muñoz, M D; Aguado Roncero, P; Vilariño Mosquera, A; Berchi García, F J

    2000-01-01

    Recurrent gastroesophageal reflux following fundoplication is a challenging problem, because it is usually refractory to medical treatment and a second, technically difficult, antireflux operation is required. Different factors that may contribute to surgery failure have been identified in children. We present 8 cases who underwent redofundoplication after failed procedures, from a total number of 96 patients operated on due to gastroesophageal reflux. Four patient's had their initial fundoplication performed at our institution. Six patients were neurologically impaired, six had chronic pulmonary disease, and two had esophageal atresia. The main presenting symptoms were recurrent vomiting (n = 8) and aspiration (n = 4). Gastroesophageal reflux was confirmed by barium swallow and endoscopy. Operative findings showed wrap breakdown in two cases, warp breakdown associated with hiatal hernia in five, wrap breakdown associated with paraesophageal hernia in two cases, and paraesophageal hernia with normal wrap in one. A second Nissen procedure were performed in five cases, whereas a Collis-Nissen gastroplasty was realized in three with a short esophagus. Six patients had a successful outcome remaining symptom free, one has severe disphagia, and one has recurrent vomiting. In our experience, patients with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux disease should undergo an antireflux procedure tailored to specific anatomic or functional abnormalities.

  6. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux: management guidance for the pediatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightdale, Jenifer R; Gremse, David A

    2013-05-01

    Recent comprehensive guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition define the common entities of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as the physiologic passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. The ability to distinguish between GER and GERD is increasingly important to implement best practices in the management of acid reflux in patients across all pediatric age groups, as children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment, whereas conservative recommendations are the only indicated therapy in those with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. This clinical report endorses the rigorously developed, well-referenced North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines and likewise emphasizes important concepts for the general pediatrician. A key issue is distinguishing between clinical manifestations of GER and GERD in term infants, children, and adolescents to identify patients who can be managed with conservative treatment by the pediatrician and to refer patients who require consultation with the gastroenterologist. Accordingly, the evidence basis presented by the guidelines for diagnostic approaches as well as treatments is discussed. Lifestyle changes are emphasized as first-line therapy in both GER and GERD, whereas medications are explicitly indicated only for patients with GERD. Surgical therapies are reserved for children with intractable symptoms or who are at risk for life-threatening complications of GERD. Recent black box warnings from the US Food and Drug Administration are discussed, and caution is underlined when using promoters of gastric emptying and motility. Finally, attention is paid to increasing evidence of inappropriate prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors in the pediatric population.

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of reflux condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Knut

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies the separation of gas mixtures in a reflux condenser. also called a dephlegmator. Reflux condensation is separation of a gas mixture, in reflux flow with condensing liquid, under continuous heat removal. A numerical model of a dephlegmator for binary mixtures was developed. The model may readily be extended to multi-component mixtures, as the solution method is based on a matrix solver. Separation of a binary mixture in a reflux condenser test rig is demonstrated. The test facility contains a single-tube test section that was designed and built as part of the project. Test mixtures of propane and n-butane were used, and a total of 15 experiments are reported. Limited degree of separation was achieved due to limited heat transfer area and narrow boiling point range of the test mixture. The numerical model reproduces the experimental data within reasonable accuracy. Deviation between calculated and measured properties is less than 6% of the measured temperature and less than 5% of the measured flow rate. The model is based on mechanistic models of physical processes and is not calibrated or tuned to fit the experimental data. The numerical model is applied to a number of separation processes. These case studies show that the required heat transfer area increases rapidly with increments in top product composition (light component). Flooding limits the amount of reflux liquid. The dephlegmator is suitable for separation of feed mixtures that are rich in light components. The gliding temperature in the dephlegmation process enables utilization of top product as refrigerant, with subsequent energy saving as a result. 61 refs., 50 figs., 34 tabs.

  9. Gastric Reflux on Routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary Scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Heon Young [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Reflux of bile and digestive enzymes from the small bowel and duodenum into stomach has been observed in patients with various gastroduodenal diseases. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives hepatobiliary scan has been used as a noninvasive method to detect duodenogastric reflux. Sometimes, gastric reflux can be observed incidentally on routine Tc-99m DISA hepatobiliary scintigraphy. To evaluate the clinical meaning of gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary scan, we analyzed 36 patients showed gastric reflux incidentally on the routine Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary scintigraphy from December 1991 to June 1995 in Chungnam National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1) The gastric reflux was observed in 2.3% of 1,553 cases of routine Tc-99m DISIDA Hepatobiliary scintigraphy for 43 months. 2) Nineteen percent of patients with gastric reflux had the past medical history of operations on stomach or biliary system. And that history was more prevalent in patients with reflux than those without reflux, significantly (p<0.01). 3) On fiberoptic gastroduodenpscopic examination, 87% of the patients with gastric reflux had the gastroduodenal diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, duodenal cancer and ampullary diverticulosis. We thought that the gastric reflux can be observed considerably in patients without any operation history on stomach or duodenum, although the operation history is more prevalent in patients with gastric reflux than those without reflux, significantly and most of patients with gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA scan has various gastroduodenal diseases.

  10. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD. This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2nd step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3% and 166 (16.6%, respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.13–2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.02. By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42–3.52, positive Campylo-like organism (CLO test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37–0.84, and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05–67.6 were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, A D

    2001-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common, self-limited process in infants that usually resolves by six to 12 months of age. Effective, conservative management involves thickened feedings, positional treatment, and parental reassurance. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a less common, more serious pathologic process that usually warrants medical management and diagnostic evaluation. Differential diagnosis includes upper gastrointestinal tract disorders; cow's milk allergy; and metabolic, infectious, renal, and central nervous system diseases. Pharmacologic management of GERD includes a prokinetic agent such as metoclopramide or cisapride and a histamine-receptor type 2 antagonist such as cimetidine or ranitidine when esophagitis is suspected. Although recent studies have supported the cautious use of cisapride in childhood GERD, the drug is currently not routinely available in the United States.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease with Thal fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Effendi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a common phenomenon among heathy infants, with approximately 50% of infants aged 0 to 3 months and 67% of infants aged 4 months experiencing at least one episode of vomiting per day. GER defined as regurgitation of gastric contents into the esophagus or mouth. GER typically improves through the first postnatal year, with only 5% of healthy 12 month old infants experiencing vomiting.1,2 Complicated GER or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been reported to affect up to 8% of infants and children with GER.l,3 Antireflux procedures (ARPs are increasingly offered to control GERD symptoms. We report a case of a baby with GERD and treated with ThaI fundoplication procedures. Fundoplication procedure is rarely performed in management of GERD, and this is the first fundoplication procedure in children with GERD at M. Djamil Hospital.

  13. Esophageal sphincter device for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Robert A; Peters, Jeffrey H; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A; Dunst, Christy M; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Lipham, John C; Luketich, James D; Melvin, W Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C; Smith, C Daniel; Smith, Christopher C; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A

    2013-02-21

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. We prospectively assessed 100 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease before and after sphincter augmentation. The study did not include a concurrent control group. The primary outcome measure was normalization of esophageal acid exposure or a 50% or greater reduction in exposure at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were 50% or greater improvement in quality of life related to gastroesophageal reflux disease and a 50% or greater reduction in the use of proton-pump inhibitors at 1 year. For each outcome, the prespecified definition of successful treatment was achievement of the outcome in at least 60% of the patients. The 3-year results of a 5-year study are reported. The primary outcome was achieved in 64% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 54 to 73). For the secondary outcomes, a reduction of 50% or more in the use of proton-pump inhibitors occurred in 93% of patients, and there was improvement of 50% or more in quality-of-life scores in 92%, as compared with scores for patients assessed at baseline while they were not taking proton-pump inhibitors. The most frequent adverse event was dysphagia (in 68% of patients postoperatively, in 11% at 1 year, and in 4% at 3 years). Serious adverse events occurred in six patients, and in six patients the device was removed. In this single-group evaluation of 100 patients before and after sphincter augmentation with a magnetic device, exposure to esophageal acid decreased, reflux symptoms improved, and use of proton-pump inhibitors decreased. Follow-up studies are needed to assess long-term safety. (Funded by Torax Medical; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00776997.).

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio

    2006-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in about two thirds of children with asthma. It may simply represent a concomitant unrelated finding or it may be responsible for provoking or worsening asthma. GERD could also be a byproduct of asthma itself. In any case, aggressive treatment of GERD seems to improve asthma outcomes. GERD should be suspected in asthma patients who do not have any known risk factors or those who are becoming difficult to treat.

  15. Modelling the carbon footprint of reflux control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Piers A C

    2011-01-01

    The NHS is responsible for approximately 30% of all public sector carbon emissions. The Climate Change Act 2008 introduced legally binding targets to cut emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) by at least 80% of the 1990 baseline by 2050. This paper seeks to examine two different strategies for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and their modelled costs and carbon emissions. This study uses data from the costs of care of patients in the REFLUX study and NHS England Carbon Emissions Carbon Footprinting Report to model the carbon emissions associated with medical and surgical treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The main outcome measures are modelled financial costs and carbon emissions for medical and surgical treatment pathways. There is a high initial cost (financially and carbon emissions) for surgery, however subsequent year-on-year financial spend and carbon emissions are lower in patients who have had surgical treatment such that the total modelled financial cost of surgery is lower in the 14th year and carbon emissions are lower in the 9th year. The model is sensitive to changes in the efficiency of pharmaceutical procurement and surgical failure rate. The model has demonstrated that in cases of equivalent clinical benefit one pathway may be preferred on the basis of other factors including carbon emissions. Copyright © 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Latest Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campagnolo, Andrea Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR is a highly prevalent disease and commonly encountered in the otolaryngologist's office. Objective To review the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of LPR. Data Synthesis LPR is associated with symptoms of laryngeal irritation such as throat clearing, coughing, and hoarseness. The main diagnostic methods currently used are laryngoscopy and pH monitoring. The most common laryngoscopic signs are redness and swelling of the throat. However, these findings are not specific of LPR and may be related to other causes or can even be found in healthy individuals. Furthermore, the role of pH monitoring in the diagnosis of LPR is controversial. A therapeutic trial with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs has been suggested to be cost-effective and useful for the diagnosis of LPR. However, the recommendations of PPI therapy for patients with a suspicion of LPR are based on the results of uncontrolled studies, and high placebo response rates suggest a much more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology of LPR than simple acid reflux. Molecular studies have tried to identify biomarkers of reflux such as interleukins, carbonic anhydrase, E-cadherin, and mucin. Conclusion Laryngoscopy and pH monitoring have failed as reliable tests for the diagnosis of LPR. Empirical therapy with PPIs is widely accepted as a diagnostic test and for the treatment of LPR. However, further research is needed to develop a definitive diagnostic test for LPR.

  17. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Niknam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a very common disease. GERD is defined as the reflux of stomach content which causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. The management of GERD is step by step. Dietary and lifestyle modifications are the first steps. Twice-daily H2RAs at standard doses for a minimum duration of two weeks can be considered in patients with GERD who fail zo respond to lifestyle and dietary modifications. If symptoms of GERD persist, once-daily Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs can be recommended. Patients with an unsatisfactory response to once-daily PPIs dosing can be considered to have refractory GERD. Twice-daily PPI therapy can be recommended in patients who fail to respond to once-daily PPI therapy. The add-on treatment with H2RAs, baclofen, or visceral pain modulators can be considered in selective subjects with GERD who fail to respond to twice-daily PPI. Anti-reflux surgery may be taken into account in selected patients. This review focuses on the initial and maintenance therapy of GERD and also reviews different management of recurrent and refractory GERD

  18. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Stamatiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  19. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Objective  The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Methods  Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. Results  The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). Conclusion  The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests. PMID:27413402

  20. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-07-01

    The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests.

  1. Esomeprazole reduces gastroesophageal reflux after beer consumption in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Andreas; Hepp, Caroline; Harder, Hermann; Beglinger, Christoph; Singer, Manfred V

    2008-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are advised to avoid alcoholic beverages since alcohol consumption induces gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers and increases it in patients with GERD. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently administered for reflux symptoms but their effect on gastroesophageal reflux after alcohol consumption has not yet been fully studied. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the effect of esomeprazole, an S-enantiomer of omeprazole, on gastroesophageal reflux after beer consumption. In this placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study, 16 healthy male volunteers received 20 mg esomeprazole daily for one week. On day 7, in an acute experiment, the subjects then consumed 500 ml beer within 5 min. Subsequently, gastroesophageal reflux was monitored by pH-metry over a period of 3 h. In addition, gastric emptying was measured by ultrasonography and blood concentrations of ethanol, cholecystokinin and gastrin were determined. Gastroesophageal reflux was significantly (p=0.001) reduced by 93% after treatment with esomeprazole (0.2%, median percentage of time pHbeer consumption. However, there was no difference in the increase in plasma gastrin after beer consumption between the esomeprazole treatment and placebo. Esomeprazole significantly reduces gastroesophageal reflux after beer consumption in healthy volunteers. Gastric emptying of beer is not prolonged after treatment with esomeprazole, although compared with placebo, this PPI induced significantly higher plasma gastrin concentrations. Moderate alcohol consumption does not worsen gastroesophageal reflux when a PPI is administered.

  2. Reflux esophagitis and its relationship to hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, J. S.; Park, H. J.; Cho, J. S.; Lee, S. I.; Park, I. S.

    1999-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the prevalence of reflux esophagitis and/or hiatal hernia in patients referred to a medical center and to examine the relationship between endoscopic reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia. The study was carried out in 1,010 patients referred to Yong Dong Severance Hospital for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of symptoms related to the gastrointestinal tract from September 1994 to March 1996. The presence of hiatal hernia was defined as a circular extension of the gastric mucosa of 2 cm or more above the diaphragmatic hiatus. Reflux esophagitis was found in 5.3% of patients, hiatal hernia in 4.1%, duodenal ulcer in 7.2% and gastric ulcer in 8.2%. The prevalence rates of reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia in males were significantly higher than those in females. Thirty-two percent of patients with reflux esophagitis had hiatal hernia. In patients without reflux esophagitis, hiatal hernia was found in only 2.5% (phiatal hernia and the degree of esophagitis on endoscopy. Duodenal ulcer was the second most common endoscopic abnormality found in patients with reflux esophagitis. The prevalence rate of reflux esophagitis and/or hiatal hernia at a medical center is relatively low compared to peptic ulcer disease and other reports from the Western countries. Our study confirms the close association between reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia. PMID:10402166

  3. Halitosis and tongue coating in patients with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease versus nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislig, Karin; Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Bornstein, Michael M; Lussi, Adrian; Seemann, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with diagnosed erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (ERD) have an increased probability of halitosis and tongue coating compared to patients with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). Sixty-six patients (33 males and 33 females) were recruited for the study and received an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence of ERD (n = 31) and NERD (n = 35) was classified based on the Los Angeles classification for erosive changes in the esophagus. Additionally, the patients filled in a questionnaire regarding their subjective assessment of halitosis, and an organoleptic assessment of halitosis, a measurement of oral volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) with the Halimeter, and a tongue coating index were performed. ERD and NERD subjects were compared with regard to Halitosis-related clinical and anamnestic findings. No statistically significant difference could be found between ERD and NERD patients regarding tongue coating index, organoleptic scores, and VSC values as well as self-perceived bad taste, tongue coating, and bad breath. These data suggest that halitosis is not typically associated with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and the presence of esophageal mucosal damage (ERD patients). The data of this investigation support the findings of interdisciplinary bad breath clinics that gastroesophageal reflux disease is not a leading cause for halitosis.

  4. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in the Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cendron

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis has been, since 1960s, one of the management options in treating vesicoureteral reflux. The purpose of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the rational for antiobiotic prophylaxis and to discuss the various agents used. Some of the current controversies regarding use of antibiotics for reflux will also be presented.

  5. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  6. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Current diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder difficult to diagnose and to treat. Due to the current definition of GERD, i.e. gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causing bothersome symptoms and/or complications, diagnosis is subject to broad interpretation. This thesis consists of studies

  7. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  8. the pharmacological management of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of gastric acid from the stomach through an incompetent cardiac sphincter into the lower ... acid secretion modifiers (H2RAs and PPIs) to anti-reflux surgery.8. Psychological therapeutic ... Keywords: gastro-oeosophageal reflux disease, gastric secretion, dyspepsia, proton-pump inhibitor, histamine-2-receptor antagonists.

  9. Endoscopical and histological features in bile reflux gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere, C C; Cazacu, S; Comănescu, Violeta; Mogoantă, L; Rogoveanu, I; Ciurea, T

    2005-01-01

    Bile reflux gastritis is due to an excessive reflux of duodenal contents into the stomach. The increased enterogastric reflux may provide the basis for increased mucosal injury. Bile reflux gastritis can appear in two circumstances: gastric resection with ablation of pylorus and primary biliary reflux due to the failure of pylorus. The aim of the study was to evaluate the endoscopical and histological changes caused by duodenal reflux on the gastric mucosa. The mucosal features were correlated with the risk factors involved in the development of bile reflux gastritis. Our study included 230 patients with alkaline reflux gastritis admitted in Medical Clinic no. 1, Emergency County Hospital Craiova. In all cases we performed an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Multiple biopsies were taken from gastric mucosa in 89 patients and the histological features were scored in accordance with the Sydney system. The average age of the patients with bile reflux gastritis was 58.387 years and the incidence of alkaline reflux gastritis was higher between 51 and 80 years. Reflux gastritis was noted to 138 males lpar;60%rpar; and 92 females (40%), ratio males/females was 1.5/1. The most frequent risk factors for bile reflux gastritis were gastric and biliary surgery. Alkaline reflux gastritis was observed in 167 cases (72.6%) after gastric surgery, consisting in gastric resection, pyloroplasty and gastroenteric-anastomosis. Gastroduodenal reflux after biliary surgery was noted in 17 cases (7.39%), 13 cases (5.69%) with cholecystectomy and four cases (1.73%) with biliary anastomosis. The average time interval from original operation to the discovery of the alkaline reflux gastritis was 14.91 years after gastric surgery and 15.29 years after biliary surgery. The commonest endoscopic alterations were: erythema of the gastric mucosa in 139 cases (64.43%), the presence of bile into the stomach in 133 cases (57.83%), the thicken of gastric folds in 22 cases (9.55%), erosions in 12 cases

  10. Clinical management of infants and children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L

    2004-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux refers to the passage of gastric contents including food, acid, and digestive enzymes up into the esophagus. Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as "spitting up," and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal weight gain or development. Adults and adolescents may also have reflux, which is usually either asymptomatic or recognized as dyspepsia or "heartburn." Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as symptoms or complications that result from reflux. Most evidence suggests the mechanism of reflux is due to transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter at inappropriate times. The diagnosis of suspected GERD in infants and children depends on the age and the presenting symptoms. A thorough history, physical examination, and growth charts are sufficient for the evaluation and diagnosis of GERD in most infants with recurrent vomiting or children with regurgitation and heartburn. Additional evaluation may include an upper gastrointestinal series, esophageal pH monitoring, or endoscopy. The goals of GERD management are eliminating symptoms, healing esophagitis, preventing complications, promoting normal weight gain and growth, and maintaining remission. Therapeutic options include lifestyle changes, pharmacologic therapy, and anti-reflux surgery. Currently available pharmacologic agents for the treatment of GERD include antacids, mucosal protectants, prokinetic agents, and acid suppressants.

  11. LINX(™) Reflux Management System: magnetic sphincter augmentation in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavina, Luigi; DeMeester, Tom R; Ganz, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly manifested by heartburn or regurgitation, is a chronic, progressive condition in which failed sphincter function allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways and the mouth. Chronic GERD affects 10% of Western society. The majority of patients receive adequate relief from proton pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms that cannot be addressed by increasing the dose of medications. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the surgical gold standard; however, the level of technical difficulty and its side effects have limited its use to less than 1% of the GERD population. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to persist with medical therapy, even when inadequate to control symptoms and complications of the disease. Consequently, a significant gap in the treatment continuum for GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(™) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the physiologic function of the sphincter barrier with a simple and reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and can be easily reversed if necessary.

  12. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  13. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Richdeep S.; Birch, Daniel W.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, when combined with lifestyle and medical interventions, is a common and successful treatment modality in the obese patient. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is one such procedure that has increased in popularity as a definitive bariatric operation. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been shown to be effective in producing weight loss and improving type 2 diabetes mellitus, its effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been inconsistent. This paper aims to summarize the available literature regarding GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 8 studies demonstrate increased GERD prevalence, and 5 demonstrate decreased GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The relationship between GERD and SG is complex and no clear relationship exists. The anatomic and physiologic changes caused by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are discussed in the context of these inconsistent results. PMID:23956846

  14. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:26420961

  15. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Laffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery, when combined with lifestyle and medical interventions, is a common and successful treatment modality in the obese patient. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is one such procedure that has increased in popularity as a definitive bariatric operation. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been shown to be effective in producing weight loss and improving type 2 diabetes mellitus, its effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been inconsistent. This paper aims to summarize the available literature regarding GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 8 studies demonstrate increased GERD prevalence, and 5 demonstrate decreased GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The relationship between GERD and SG is complex and no clear relationship exists. The anatomic and physiologic changes caused by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are discussed in the context of these inconsistent results.

  16. Clinical Management of Infants and Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux refers to the passage of gastric contents including food, acid, and digestive enzymes up into the esophagus. Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as “spitting up,” and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal weight gain or development. Adults and adolescents may also have reflux, which is usually either asymptomatic or recognized as dyspepsia or “heartburn.” Gastroesoph...

  17. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  18. The Role of Acid and Bile Reflux in Esophagitis and Barrett’s Metaplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Rhonda F.

    2010-01-01

    The precise mechanisms whereby gastroesophageal reflux disease causes reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus are not clear, even though these diseases have been known to be linked for many years. Recent studies indicate a role for the reflux-induced inflammatory response of esophageal squamous epithelial cells and the immune cells in the pathogenesis of reflux esophagitis. Although reflux esophagitis commonly heals with esophageal squamous cell regeneration, in some individuals the esopha...

  19. RADIONUCLIDE MEASURING OF THE TRANSIT OF URINE IN URETERS IN CHILDREN WITH OBSTRUCTIVE UROPATHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Burkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of radionuclide method for the rate measuring of the urine passing by the ureter, it became possible to assess the outcome of the surgical correction of the vesicoureteral segment obstructive uropathy, based on the nature of urodynamics in the operated organ and urinary tract. This method allows to determine the degree of the urodynamics in the urinary tract violations, the tactics of further treatment and objectively evaluate the outcome of the surgery performed, based on mathematical calculation of the activity of the radiopharmaceutical, eliminating the assessment subjectivity. Key words: radionuclide methods of investigation, obstructive uropathies, megaureter, vesico-ureteral reflux. (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 118–121.

  20. Urethral polyp in a 1-month-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beluffi, Giampiero [Department of Radiodiagnosis, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Section of Paediatric Radiology, Piazzale Golgi, 2, I-27100, Pavia PV (Italy); Berton, Francesca; Gola, Giada [University of Pavia, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Institute of Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Chiari, Giorgio; Romano, Piero; Cassani, Ferdinando [IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Division of Paediatric Surgery, Pavia (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    Urethral polyps are a rare finding in children, particularly in the very young. They are suspected by the presence of various clinical signs such as obstruction, voiding dysfunction and haematuria. There is an association with other urinary tract congenital anomalies. They are usually benign fibro-epithelial lesions with no tendency to recur and are treated by surgical ablation, fulguration or laser therapy. We report a 1-month-old boy with an antenatally diagnosed left ectopic pelvic kidney, postnatal urinary tract infection and no clinical signs of obstruction. Voiding cystourethrography to exclude vesico-ureteric reflux showed a trabeculated bladder and a mobile filling defect in the posterior urethra. Owing to its large size, cystotomy was necessary to remove the polyp successfully. (orig.)

  1. KIDNEY FUNCTION TESTS IN CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Chester C.

    1961-01-01

    Total renal function is best determined by urinalysis and serum creatinine determination. This may be supplemented, under controlled conditions, by fractional urinary phenosulfonphthalein clearance. The excretory urogram, while invaluable as a diagnostic test, lacks quantitative value as a function test. Until recently, individual renal function determinations depended upon the difficult and tedious cystoscopy and bilateral ureteral catheterization and skilled laboratory techniques. Frequently the necessity of anesthesia artificially depressed kidney function. Since 1956, the radioisotope kidney function test has offered an external, innocuous means of assessing individual renal blood flow, function and drainage plus evaluation of vesico-ureteral reflux. The method has distinct advantages for evaluation of pediatric urological problems. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:13785917

  2. Roentgen diagnosis of ureterocele - with special reference to the simple orthotopic ureterocele in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Moedder, U.; Beyer, D.

    1981-01-01

    The ureterocele is a cystic ballooning of the terminal ureter into the bladder resulting from a congenital weakness of the wall of the lower ureter and a facultative concomitant stenosis of the ureteral orifice. This condition is more frequent in females. The cobra head with its surrounding halo is the most common finding on the excretory urogram in the simple adult ureterocele. In ectopic ureterocele which is principally encountered in children, the ureter terminates either at the bladder neck or in the proximal urethra. The urogram shows a filling defect in the bladder which may extend into the female urethra. Ureteral duplication, dilatation of the upper urinary tract, vesico-ureteral reflux, chronic infection and ureteral stones are the most frequent additional findings and complications.

  3. Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccabona, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common query in pediatric radiology. Imaging for and after UTI is still a heavily debated topic with different approaches, as thorough evidence to decide upon a definite algorithm is scarce. This review article tries to address the clinical rational of the various approaches (general imaging, top-down or bottom-up, selected and individualized imaging concepts…), describes the available imaging modalities and the respective findings in imaging children with UTI, and proposes an imaging algorithm for the work-up of children during and after UTI discussing the "pros and cons" of the different attitudes. In summary, imaging by US is generally considered for all infants and children with a febrile or complicated (upper) UTI, particularly without previously known urinary tract anatomy. The further work-up (searching for renal scarring and assessment of vesico-ureteric reflux) is then decided according to these initial findings as well as the clinical presentation, course, and scenario.

  4. Clinical management of infants and children with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    .... Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as "spitting up," and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal...

  5. Serum Gastrin Levels in Patients with Reflux Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of investigation of basal gastrin serum level and its relationships at chronic reflux gastritis. It has been established that gastrin level was increased in 100 % of patients. It was directly dependent on the biliary acid concentration in gastric acid, H.pylori-infection, stomach alkalization. Thus, duodenogastrical reflux causes hypergastrinemia that can result in chronic gastritis development.

  6. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, John K; Thomson, Alan BR; Armstrong, David

    1998-01-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omep...

  7. Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation on Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-na Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate effects and possible mechanisms of transcutaneous electrical acustimulation (TEA performed by a wearable watch-size stimulator for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD. Methods. Twenty patients diagnosed as RGERD were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into four groups: esomeprazole group (Group A, esomeprazole combined with TEA group (Group B, esomeprazole combined with sham-TEA group (Group C, and esomeprazole combined with domperidone group (Group D. HRM and 24 h pH-impedance monitoring and GerdQ score were used to measure related indexes before and after treatment. Results. (1 TEA significantly increased LESP, compared with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA. After pairwise comparison, LESP of Group B was increased more than Group A (P=0.008 or Group C (P=0.021. (2 PPI plus TEA decreased not only the number of acid reflux episodes but also the number of weak acid reflux episodes (P=0.005. (3 Heartburn and reflux symptoms were improved more with PPI + TEA than with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA (GerdQ scores, P=0.001. Conclusion. TEA can improve symptoms in RGERD patients by increasing LESP and decreasing events of weak acid reflux and acid reflux; addition of TEA to esomeprazole significantly enhances the effect of TEA.

  8. A PROPOSITION FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM A WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NUSSLE, D; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; PEETERS, S; RAVELLI, A; POLANCO, [No Value; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux

  9. Acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) : A study using intraluminal impedance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, Jose M.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Selimah, Mohamed; Samsom, Melvin; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J.

    Background Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) are the most common phenotypic presentations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Aim To assess acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with EE and NERD using combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring. Methods A

  10. Which is best method for instillation of topical therapy to the upper urinary tract? An in vivo porcine study to evaluate three delivery methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbang Liu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare the staining intensity of the upper urinary tract (UUT urothelium among three UUT delivery methods in an in vivo porcine model. Materials and methods: A fluorescent dye solution (indigo carmine was delivered to the UUT via three different methods: antegrade perfusion, vesico-ureteral reflux via in-dwelling ureteric stent and retrograde perfusion via a 5F open-ended ureteral catheter. Twelve renal units were tested with 4 in each method. After a 2-hour delivery time, the renal-ureter units were harvested en bloc. Time from harvesting to analysis was also standardised to be 2 hours in each arm. Three urothelium samples of the same weight and size were taken from each of the 6 pre-defined points (upper pole, mid pole, lower pole, renal pelvis, mid ureter and distal ureter and the amount of fluorescence was measured with a spectrometer. Results: The mean fluorescence detected at all 6 predefined points of the UUT urothelium was the highest for the retrograde method. This was statistically significant with p-value less than <0.05 at all 6 points. Conclusions: Retrograde infusion of UUT by an open ended ureteral catheter resulted in highest mean fluorescence detected at all 6 pre-defined points of the UUT urothelium compared to antegrade infusion and vesico-ureteral reflux via indwelling ureteric stents indicating retrograde method ideal for topical therapy throughout the UUT urothelium. More clinical studies are needed to demonstrate if retrograde method could lead to better clinical outcomes compared to the other two methods.

  11. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux in infancy and childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwandhi, Eugene; Ton, Mimi N; Schwarz, Steven M

    2006-04-01

    GER is a common reason for pediatric office visits and referrals to a pediatric gastroenterologist. This condition frequently is benign, and it is self-limited in most infants. Although a thorough history and complete physical examination usually are adequate to diagnose GER, a high index of suspicion must be maintained for other diagnoses associated with recurrent emesis, including metabolic disorders, as well as for other gastrointestinal conditions, such as pyloric stenosis and abnormalities of intestinal rotation. Behavioral or lifestyle modification usually can be implemented empirically to diagnose and manage a suspected case of uncomplicated GER. When this fails, medical therapy can be initiated, employing either a step-up or step-down approach with a PPI or H2RA. With the proven efficacy of PPIs and their availability to children, medical treatment has become the mainstay of therapy in severely affected patients; nevertheless, anti-reflux surgery is still widely performed in children with GER. Pediatricians and other primary care providers often manage infants and children who have gastrointestinal complaints, prior to referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist. Hence, they have the responsibility to educate children and families about GER, its natural history, complications, and therapeutic options. A careful history and physical examination, informed use of diagnostic studies, and a consistent approach to medical treatment are important principles that are required to guarantee the success of GER management in infants and children.

  13. Pharmacologic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Amarnath; Katz, Philip O

    2002-06-01

    The burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from its widespread prevalence and the unfavorable impact of its symptoms on well-being and quality of life. Whereas abnormalities of the antireflux barrier (lower esophageal sphincter) are important in the pathophysiology of GERD, pharmacologic therapy for GERD is based on suppression of acid, which is responsible for the majority of the symptoms and for epithelial damage. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the agents of choice for achieving the goals of medical therapy in GERD, which include symptom relief, improvement in quality of life, and healing and prevention of mucosal injury. As a class, these drugs are extremely safe. The newest PPI, esomeprazole, brings a statistically significant increase in healing of mucosal injury and symptom relief in patients with erosive esophagitis, compared with omeprazole and lansoprazole. This article reviews the role of medical therapy in the short- and long-term management of symptomatic patients with or without erosive esophagitis, including extraesophageal presentations, GERD during pregnancy, and Barrett's esophagus. Management of refractory patients is addressed.

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  15. Gastric mucosal status in patients with reflux esophagitis

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    Riyadh Mohamad Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Reflux esophagitis and atrophic gastritis has increased in its frequency in patients with dyspepsia, heartburn and regurgitation. Aims To determine the association of reflux esophagitis, endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy and histolopathologic atrophy of the gastric mucosa in patients living in Iraq. Methods A group of 130 consecutive patients who were referred to Gastrointestinal Tract Center at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital (Baghdad-Iraq from January 2015 to January 2016. The presence or absence of reflux esophagitis, hiatal hernia and atrophic gastritis were determined by endoscopist. Collected gastric biopsy specimens from those patients were examined by for assessment gastric mucosal status and the presence of atrophic gastritis. Results A total of 130 patients were included: 91 men and 39 women, and with mean age of 42.5±6.7 years. According to patients profile, endoscope and histopathological examination of gastric biopsies; there was a significant increase (P=0.0001 in number of patients with diffuse antral gastritis (84(70 per cent compared to environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis (36(30 per cent. There was a significant increase (P=0.041 in the frequency of reflux esophagitis in patients with diffuse antral gastritis (76.19 per cent than environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis (55.55 per cent. There was no significant difference (P=0.479 in the assessment of gastric atrophy between endoscopy or histopathology in patients with reflux esophagitis. Conclusion The endoscopic investigation of atrophic gastritis was inversely associated with reflux esophagitis. Endoscopy investigates patients with symptoms of reflux esophagitis because it can confirm or exclude this disease with or without gastric atrophy with certainty.

  16. Características clínicas del reflujo vesicoureteral en niños atendidos en el Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paúl de Medellín,1960-2004 Clinical characteristics of vesicoureteral reflux in children at a university hospital in Medellín, Colombia. 1960-2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José William Cornejo Ochoa

    2006-01-01

    estudio más temprano y un mejor tratamiento de estos niños. A total of 4.129 children with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI were attended at Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paúl in Medellín, Colombia, between 1960 and 2004. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, the commonest anomaly associated to UTI, was found in 1.309 children (31.7% who presented 1.914 cases of affected renal units (605 patients had bilateral reflux. This is a descriptive, retrospective work, carried out with information registered at the pediatric nephrology service by one of the authors (VPE on children younger than 17 years, with the diagnosis of VUR. The most important registered characteristics were reviewed, and the findings were as follows: 61.1% of children were women, 29.2% had the diagnosis of VUR made during the first year of life, and 41.4% had other associated anomalies; 72.4% of children had VUR of either III or IV grades, 53.8% had unilateral reflux, 23.8% had spontaneous resolution, and 36.1% required surgical correction. In 582 (44.5% out of 1.309 of these patients, studies for renal scarring were carried out, and it was found in 371 (63.7%; 2.3% had high blood pressure, 7.4% developed chronic renal failure; 0.9% received kidney transplantation, and 2.4% died. Our findings, similar to those reported by other authors, allow us to insist on the need for adequate management of children with VUR, because of the risk of developing high blood pressure and chronic renal failure. Better diagnostic systems for VUR and renal scarring, the progress of information diffusion, and the medical interest on this subject are opportunities for making earlier diagnoses, and opportune and proper treatment of these children.

  17. LINX(®) Reflux Management System in chronic gastroesophageal reflux: a novel effective technology for restoring the natural barrier to reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavina, Luigi; Saino, Greta; Lipham, John C; Demeester, Tom R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from incompetency of the lower esophageal sphincter that allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways, and the mouth. The disease affects about 10% of the western population and has a profound negative impact on quality of life. The majority of patients are successfully treated with proton-pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms even after dose adjustment. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents the surgical gold standard, but is largely underused because of the level of technical difficulty and the prevalence of side effects. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to continue with medical therapy despite inadequate symptom control and complications of the disease. As a consequence, a significant 'therapy gap' in the treatment of GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(®) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the sphincter barrier with a standardized, reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and is easily reversible. Two single-group trials confirmed that a magnetic device designed to augment the lower esophageal sphincter can be safely and effectively implanted using a standard laparoscopic approach. The device decreased esophageal acid exposure, improved reflux symptoms and quality of life, and allowed cessation of proton-pump inhibitors in the majority of patients.

  18. A Study on the Relationship between Reflux Esophagitis and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Mishiro, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shino; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic syndrome and dental erosion have been demonstrated to correlate with gastroesophageal acid reflux disease (GERD), while periodontitis has been reported to have a positive relationship with metabolic syndrome. However, no correlation between periodontitis and GERD has yet been reported. We therefore investigated the relationship between periodontitis and GERD. Methods The subjects consisted of 280 individuals who visited the Health Center for a detailed medical checkup examination. Each underwent upper endoscopy and periodontitis examinations, with the latter performed by measuring the concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin in saliva. The subjects were divided into those with positive and negative periodontitis findings, and the prevalence rates of endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia were compared. Results The number of subjects positive for periodontitis was 93, while 187 had negative findings. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis was not different between the positive and negative groups (8.6% vs. 8.0%). In addition, a multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify a positive relationship between the presence of periodontitis and reflux esophagitis. On the other hand, dyslipidemia and hypertension were more frequently observed in the subjects that were positive for periodontitis. Conclusion We did not find an association between periodontitis and reflux esophagitis in the present study. On the other hand, the presence of periodontitis was found to correlate with hypertension and dyslipidemia.

  19. Clinical pathology of primary bile reflux gastritis

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    Ping YAO

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the clinical and pathological features of primary bile reflux gastritis(BRG.Methods Endoscopy,Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori detection,and histopathologic examination were performed in 218 patients with primary BRG(observed group and 236 patients with simple chronic gastritis(SCG,control group as identified by gastroscope in order to analyze the endoscopic abnormalities,the frequency of H.pylori infection,pathological features and scores of inflammation.Results The frequency of H.pylori infection was 39.0%(85/218 in the observed group,which was significantly lower than that in the control group [52.1%(123/236].The topographic abnormalities of the antral mucosa as detected by gastroscopy,i.e.,congestion,hemorrhagic spots,erosion were not significantly different between BRG and SCG patients(P > 0.05.The scores of chronic and active inflammation were higher in patients when H.pylori infection was present than in patients without H.pylori infection in both groups(P < 0.05.The scores of inflammation,the detection rates of the antral intestinal metaplasia,antral atrophy and atypical hyperplasia were all higher in observed group than in control group(P < 0.05.The incidence of lengthening of gastric pits,telangiectasis or interstitial edema in BRG patients was also significantly higher than those in SCG patients(P < 0.05.Conclusions Primary BRG shows features of chemical gastritis with a higher tendency toward mucosal atrophy,intestinal metaplasia and atypical hyperplasia.Gastropic examination and biopsy should be emphasized.

  20. An Antiregurgitation Milk Formula in the Management of Infants with Mild to Moderate Gastroesophageal Reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Xinias, Ioannis; Spiroglou, Kleomenis; Demertzidou, Vasiliki; Karatza, Eliza; Panteliadis, Christos

    2003-01-01

    Background: Thickened milk formulas are used to treat infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), but these substances often increase the duration of reflux episodes and worsen symptoms, and they have been associated with diarrhea, constipation, and cough.

  1. An alginate-antacid formulation localizes to the acid pocket to reduce acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roel J; Smout, Andre J P M; Thomas, Edward; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2013-12-01

    Alginate rafts (polysaccharide polymers that precipitate into a low-density viscous gel when they contact gastric acid) have been reported to form at the acid pocket, an unbuffered pool of acid that floats on top of ingested food and causes postprandial acid reflux. We studied the location of an alginate formulation in relation to the acid pocket and the corresponding effects on reflux parameters and acid pocket positioning in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic GERD and large hiatal hernias to groups who were given either (111)In-labeled alginate-antacid (n = 8, Gaviscon Double Action Liquid) or antacid (n = 8, Antagel) after a standard meal. The relative positions of labeled alginate and acid pocket were analyzed for 2 hours by using scintigraphy; reflux episodes were detected by using high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring. The alginate-antacid label localized to the acid pocket. The number of acid reflux episodes was significantly reduced in patients receiving alginate-antacid (3.5; range, 0-6.5; P = .03) compared with those receiving antacid (15; range, 5-20), whereas time to acid reflux was significantly increased in patients receiving alginate-antacid (63 minutes; range, 23-92) vs those receiving antacid (14 minutes; range, 9-23; P = .01). The acid pocket was located below the diaphragm in 71% of patients given alginate-antacid vs 21% of those given antacid (P = .08). There was an inverse correlation between a subdiaphragm position of the acid pocket and acid reflux (r = -0.76, P < .001). In a study of 16 patients with GERD, we observed that the alginate-antacid raft localizes to the postprandial acid pocket and displaces it below the diaphragm to reduce postprandial acid reflux. These findings indicate the importance of the acid pocket in GERD pathogenesis and establish alginate-antacid as an appropriate therapy for postprandial acid reflux. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute

  2. Características clínicas e laboratoriais à admissão de 483 crianças e adolescentes com refluxo vésico-ureteral primário: estudo retrospectivo Baseline clinical features of 483 children and adolescents with primary vesicoureteral reflux: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Penido Silva

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar retrospectivamente as características clínicas/radiológicas dos pacientes admitidos com refluxo vésico-ureteral primário (RVU entre 1969-1999. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com RVU primário foram submetidos a um protocolo de avaliação clínica, laboratorial e radiológica e acompanhados longitudinalmente. Na admissão, após controle da bacteriúria e do início da quimioprofilaxia, foram realizados avaliação laboratorial e estudo de imagens do trato urinário. Esta consistiu de uretrocistografia miccional, urografia excretora, cintilografia renal (DMSA e ultra-sonografia. Para o presente estudo foram utilizados os dados obtidos na admissão. RESULTADOS: Foram admitidos nesse período 483 pacientes. Houve predomínio do sexo feminino (70% e da cor branca (70%. A média de idade ao diagnóstico foi de 26 meses, sendo que 92,5% das crianças já haviam apresentado infecção urinária. Um grupo de 710 unidades renais foi analisado. A distribuição do grau de refluxo foi a seguinte: grau I (49; 7%; II (254; 36%; III (190; 26%; IV (161; 23% e V (56; 8%. Um total de 249 unidades renais apresentaram dano renal à admissão. A distribuição quanto à intensidade da lesão foi a seguinte: leve (36%, moderada (34% e grave (30%. Houve um risco significativo maior de lesão renal grave no sexo masculino (OR = 1,74, IC 95% = 1,2 - 2,5, p = 0,002. CONCLUSÃO: O RVU predominou no sexo feminino e em sua maioria apresentou-se em graus leves a moderados. Contudo, houve um alto percentual de dano renal à admissão e uma tendência de maior morbidade para o sexo masculino.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical/radiological features of patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR admitted to a single institution from 1969 to 1999. METHODS: At admission, after the institution of chemoprophylaxis, patients were investigated by CUM, DMSA, and US. The children were managed with periodical clinical and laboratory evaluations. Analyses were

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD

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    Selfie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD was a damage in mucosal layer caused by gastric acid reflux. GERD was found about 10-20% in Western Countries and less in Asia, about 2,6-6,7%. Among different type of GERD, refractory GERD was a problem found in daily clinical practice. This terminology was used in patients with regurgitation and heartburn symptoms which is not responsive to 8 weeks proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy. There were several mechanisms underlying the etiology and pathophysiology of refractory GERD. In general, refractory GERD diagnosis was based on clinical findings, objective endoscopic examination, ambulatory reflux monitoring, and response to antiacid-secretion therapy. Reevaluation of patients compliance should be the first step in refractory GERD management. A further treatment strategies could be started, consist of medical and surgical therapies. A basic clinical knowledge of refractory GERD would help clinician in deciding the best approach for diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h, indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  5. An updated review on gastro-esophageal reflux in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Hauser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and GER disease (GERD) were developed by the European and North American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. GERD is reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. The recognition of GER and GERD is relevant to implement best management practices. A conservative management is indicated in infants with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. Children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment. Since the publications of the European and North American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines in 2009, no important novelties in drug treatment have been reported. Innovations are mainly restricted to the management of regurgitation in infants. During the last 5 years, pros and cons of multichannel intraluminal impedance have been highlighted. However, overall 'not much has changed' in the diagnosis and management of GER and GERD in infants and children.

  6. Evaluation of reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis and renal dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan-Smith, J.D. [Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Little, Stephen B. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    MR urography has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis, vesicoureteric reflux and renal dysplasia. MR urography utilizes multiple parameters to assess both renal anatomy and function and provides a more complete characterization of acquired and congenital disease. Pyelonephritis and renal scarring can be distinguished by assessing the parenchymal contours and signal intensity. Characteristic imaging features of renal dysplasia include small size, subcortical cysts, disorganized architecture, decreased and patchy contrast enhancement as well as a dysmorphic pelvicalyceal system. Because of its ability to subdivide and categorize this heterogeneous group of disorders, it seems inevitable that MR urography will replace DMSA renal scintigraphy as the gold standard for assessment of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. MR urography will contribute to our understanding of renal dysplasia and its relationship to reflux nephropathy. (orig.)

  7. Omeprazole for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J K; Thompson, A B; Armstrong, D

    1998-04-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day) while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion) were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h), indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  8. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in mentally retarded persons: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, C J; Klinkenberg-Knol, E C; Niezen-de Boer, M C; Meuwissen, S G

    2000-06-10

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease among institutionalised intellectually disabled individuals with an IQ disabled individuals have an increased risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease in case of cerebral palsy, IQ disabled individuals in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease is clinically suspected. For the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in adults as well as children, proton pump inhibitors are highly effective, independent of the severity of oesophagitis. Marked improvement of symptoms and quality of life can be noticed after treatment.

  9. Chronic laryngitis as a result of gastro esophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajković Rada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflux of gastric contents to the level of the pharynx and larynx is called laryngopharyngeal reflux, which can exist as such or laryngeal and pharyngeal reflux as separate entities, and in such form may lead to other diseases such as rhinitis, sinusitis, otitis media, and precancerous cancerous condition. To determine the relationship and impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on the occurrence, frequency and duration of inflammatory processes and mucosal damage to the larynx. All patients were obtained anamnesticly, lab test done in all patients, indirect hipofaringo and laryngoscopy was performed in all patients. Based on the feedback reports gastroenterologists, we obtained data of gastroscopy. Results: 120 subjects were processed with dyspeptic symptoms. Based on history, all patients had some symptoms of upper respiratory tract disease.62 (51.66% male respondents and 58 (48.33% females. The average age of 54 years. In 82 (68.33% patients was increased salivation (one of the leading symptoms, of that number in 61 (74.39% participants laryngitis was present. In 68 (56.66% cases where the predominant symptom was cough, laryngitis was present in 26 (38.23%. In 70 (58.33% of patients with globus sensation, laryngitis was present in 38 (54.28% patients. Smoking has been represented with 65.83% (70 respondents, the percentage of patients with chronic laryngitis in this group was 69.62% (55 respondents. Been held after gastroscopy and otorinolaryngological examination in 62 (51.66% patients were diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, of which, in 43 (69.35% patients laryngitis was present. After a three-month follow-up of patients with therapy (H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors and antacids 28 (65.11% subjects (total treated, showed an improvement. The results of this study indicate a significant correlation between gastroesophageal reflux disease and chronic laryngitis, as well as the favorable impact and effect of antacid therapy

  10. Simulated Reflux Decreases Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The vocal fold epithelium provides a barrier to the entry of inhaled and systemic challenges. However, the location of the epithelium makes it vulnerable to damage. Past research suggests, but does not directly demonstrate, that exposure to gastric reflux adversely affects the function of the epithelial barrier. Understanding the nature of reflux-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction is necessary to better recognize the mechanisms for vocal fold susceptibility to this disease. Therefore, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant reflux challenges on vocal fold transepithelial resistance and gross epithelial and subepithelial appearance. Study Design Ex vivo, mixed design with between-group and repeated-measures analyses. Methods Healthy, native porcine vocal folds (N = 52) were exposed to physiologically relevant acidic pepsin, acid-only, or pepsin-only challenges and examined with electrophysiology and light microscopy. For all challenges, vocal folds exposed to a neutral pH served as control. Results Acidic pepsin and acid-only challenges, but not pepsin-only or control challenges significantly reduced transepithelial resistance within 30 minutes. Reductions in transepithelial resistance were irreversible. Challenge exposure produced minimal gross changes in vocal fold epithelial or subepithelial appearance as evidenced by light microscopy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that acidic environments characteristic of gastric reflux compromise epithelial barrier function without gross structural changes. In healthy, native vocal folds, reductions in transepithelial resistance could reflect reflux-related epithelial disruption. These results might guide the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic recommendations for patients with reflux, such as continued acid-suppression therapy and patient antireflux behavioral education. PMID:20564752

  11. [Temporal relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and cardiorespiratory events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, M J; Cabo, J A; Granero, R; Tuduri, I; Fernández, I; Cabello, R; López-Alonso, M

    2008-07-01

    The acid and non acidic gastroesophageal reflux can trigger apnoea, desaturation and bradicardia events, as well as chronic pulmonary pathology due to microaspirations, whereas the acute or chronic airway closing increase the intrathoracic pressure, triggering the reflux. Our aims were to measurement in preterms newborn the correlations between cardiorespiratory events and gastroesophageal reflux, find out the direction of this relation, identify the patients with association GER->CRE and decide the suitability of antireflux surgery. The study was made in the Motility Unit and in the Intensive Neonatal Care Unit, to preterms newborns without associated pathology except apnoea and/or bradicardia and/or desaturation. 3 hours manometry study in the Motility Unit. 24 hours impedance, pH and cardiorespiratory parameters monitoring (respiratory and cardiac frequent, O2 saturation and CO2) in Intensive Neonatal Care Unit. We characterised the gastroesophageal barrier, all the reflux events and the association between GER and CRE. We made 28 records to 28 patients with CRE. The average of the total number of reflux was 61 (22,25-103,00), 29,2% acid reflux and 70,8% weakly acidic. 12 patients had some GER associated with CRE but in only 2 cases was statistically significant (Sympton index: SI; Sympton Sensitivity Index: SSI) (SI > or = 50%; SSI > or = 10%). The surgical management was successfully in these two babies and nowadays they are asymptomatic. There is not any general association between GER and CRE, nevertheless, in a little percentage of patients, this relationship is fulfilled and it is possible to measurement with impedance, pH and cardiorespiratory parameters. In these cases, the surgical management is the right treatment.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  13. Dental erosion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picos, Alina; Chisnoiu, Andrea; Dumitrasc, Dan L

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition. In addition to esophageal alterations, there are several extra-esophageal symptoms, such as dental erosion. These areas of dental erosion have a characteristic localization and may sometimes be the first symptom of the GERD syndrome. Late recognition of these effects, or ignoring them, may cause irreversible dental lesions with a negative impact on esthetics, on masticator functions and hence on the digestive system. In this paper the effects of gastroesophageal reflux on hard dental tissues are reviewed.

  14. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-07-30

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the ther-apeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, main-tenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett's esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any fu-ture development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the afore-mentioned areas of unmet need.

  15. Pressure and X-ray recording of reflux into the thoracic stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelman, W. A.; Brummelkamp, W. H.; van der Hulst, V. P.; Reeders, J. W.; Roos, C. M.; Klopper, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage, pulmonary aspiration and reflux-esophagitis might be induced or aggravated by the increased duodenogastric reflux observed in the thoracic stomach. In this study, the effect of respiration on the reflux-promoting pressure gradient in the intrathoracally located stomach was

  16. Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians on gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Fontenele Soares

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS: Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16 and 62.1% (n=87 would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=6 in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122 in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132 and 92.9% (n=130 of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1% of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. CONCLUSIONS: Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly.

  17. Use of acid-suppressive therapy before anti-reflux surgery in 2922 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lødrup, A; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend that patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are adequately treated with acid-suppressive therapy before undergoing anti-reflux surgery. Little is known of the use of acid-suppressive drugs before anti-reflux surgery. AIM: To determine the use of proton pump...

  18. Patterns of food and acid reflux in patients with low-grade oesophagitis--the role of an anti-reflux agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, N; Steele, R J; Jackson, S J; Washington, C; Bush, D

    1998-01-01

    Food and acid have been shown to be refluxed independently of each other in healthy volunteers, and anti-reflux agents decrease the reflux of both parameters. Until now this phenomenon had not been studied in patients with low-grade oesophagitis, who are the group most likely to use anti-reflux medication. To assess patterns of gastro-oesophageal reflux of acid and food in 12 ambulant patients with endoscopically proven oesophagitis of between grades I and II, but who were otherwise healthy. Also to assess the effectiveness of a single dose of an alginate-containing anti-reflux agent in controlling food and acid reflux in this patient group. Oesophageal pH monitoring and external ambulatory gamma detection were used to study food and acid reflux. A pH electrode was positioned 5 cm above the cardia and the gamma detector was positioned externally over the pH electrode. The patients then received a technetium-99m labelled meal designed to provoke reflux. Thirty minutes later the patients were given a 20 ml dose of alginate (Liquid Gaviscon), or 20 ml of tap water. Incidence of reflux was monitored for approximately 4 h from the end of the meal. Allocation to treatment group was randomized, with patients receiving the alternative treatment on the second study day after approximately a 7-day washout period. The mean percentage time oesophageal pH remained below 4 was 16.3 min for the control group and 5.4 min for the treatment group (P = 0.03). Food reflux was detected 23.7% of the time in the control group compared to 12% of the time in the treatment group (P = 0.02). The anti-reflux agent was also successful in decreasing the number of events, but the duration of the reflux events was not significantly different. Patients with grades I and II oesophagitis reflux food and acid independently, and are predominantly either food refluxers or acid refluxers, but not both. Liquid alginate decreases the number of both food and acid reflux events, but does not change their

  19. Does the Compliance of the Bladder Affect the Grade of Vesicoureteral Reflux?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Kilinc

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We retrospectively reviewed videourodynamic outcomes in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. The aim of this study to evaluate the relationship between vesicoureteral reflux grade and bladder compliance. Material and Method: Videourodynamic traces of 53 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux investigated between January 2004 and January 2012 were reviewed. The detrusor pressures of the point when the reflux started were recorded. The detrusor pressures 10 cmH2O or less at that point was accepted as normal compliance (Group 1, the detrusor pressures more than10 cm H2O was accepted as hipocompliance (Group 2. The reflux grades were divided into two grades, low-grade reflux (grades 1 and 2, high-grade reflux (grades 3, 4 and 5. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test. Results: Patients’ ages ranged between 5 and 11 years (mean 7.09±1.81 years. Of the 53 patients, 29 (54.7% had normal compliance (Group 1, 24 (45.3% had hipocompliance (Group 2. Twenty-four (82.8% patients in-group 1 had a low-grade reflux, 5 (17.2% patients had a high-grade reflux. In group 2, 8 (33.3% patients had a low-grade reflux, 16 (66.7% patients had a high-grade reflux. The detected high-grade reflux in-group 2 was significantly higher than in-group 1 (p<0.001. Discussion: The physicians should be considering the bladder compliance at the point when the reflux started in primary vesicoureteral reflux cases. The bladder hipocompliance may play a secondary role in reflux grade.

  20. A proposition for the diagnosis and treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children: A report from a working group on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Ashkenazi, A.; Belli, D.; Boige, N.; Bouquet, Jan; Cadranel, S.; Cezard, J; Cucchiara, S.; Dupont, C.; Geboes, K; F. Gottrand; Heymans, Hugo; Jasinski, C.; Kneepkens, Frank; Koletzko, Sybille

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux can be safely treated before performing (expensive and often unnecessary) complementary investigations. However, the latter are mandatory if symptoms persist despite appropriate treatm...

  1. Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux: Definition, mechanism and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Han-Jing; Qiu, Zhong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux is a troublesome condition unresponsive to the standard medical anti-reflux therapy. Its underlying mechanisms may include incomplete acid suppression, non-acid reflux, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal hypersensitivity. The diagnosis of this disorder depends on both the findings of multi-channel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and the subsequent intensified anti-reflux therapy. The strategies of pharmacological treatment for refractory chronic cough due to reflux include the optimization of proton pump inhibitors and add-on therapies with histamine H2 receptor antagonists, baclofen and gabapentin. However, the further study is needed to satisfy its management. PMID:26413488

  2. Transpyloric feeding in gastroesophageal-reflux-associated apnea in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sudipta; Macwan, Kamlesh; Albert, Viola

    2007-10-01

    The aetiological role of gastroesophageal reflux in apnea of prematurity is controversial. We hypothesized that transpyloric feeds, which decreases reflux and aspiration, will not be associated with decrease in reflux-related apnea. The shows retrospective chart review of 41 premature babies on transpyloric feeds. Fifteen infants meeting the inclusion criteria of apnea of prematurity and clinical evidence of gastroesophageal reflux were included. Primary data points were number of apneas before and after transpyloric feeds. t-statistics was used for analysis. Twelve of the 15 babies showed significant improvement on transpyloric feeds (p management of suspected gastroesophageal-reflux-associated apnea in a selected group of infants.

  3. Refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a major management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... Refractory oesophagitis (non-healing of erosions) is rare since the advent of potent gastric acid inhibition with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). However, refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms, both typical and atypical (cough, chronic hoarseness, asthma and atypical chest pain), ...

  4. Review article: extra-oesophageal reflux disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shields, M. D.; Bateman, N.; McCallion, W. A.; van Wijk, M. P.; Wenzl, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    In children, respiratory and ENT disorders are associated with extra-oesophageal reflux. These include asthma, recurrent pneumonia, cough, apnoea, sinusitis, otitis media, laryngomalacia, recurrent croup and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. The traditional tests of barium swallow, 24 h pH

  5. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation...

  6. Nonpharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Corvaglia; Silvia Martini; Arianna Aceti; Santo Arcuri; Roberto Rossini; Giacomo Faldella

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of fe...

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: exaggerations, evidence and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Targa Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: there are many questions and little evidence regarding the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children. The association between GERD and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA, overuse of abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of GERD, and excessive pharmacological treatment, especially proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs are some aspects that need clarification. This review aimed to establish the current scientific evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children. DATA SOURCE: a search was conducted in the MEDLINE, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library electronic databases, using the following keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; gastroesophageal reflux disease; proton-pump inhibitors; and prokinetics; in different age groups of the pediatric age range; up to May of 2013. DATA SYNTHESIS: abdominal ultrasonography should not be recommended to investigate gastroesophageal reflux (GER. Simultaneous treatment of GERD and CMPA often results in unnecessary use of medication or elimination diet. There is insufficient evidence for the prescription of prokinetics to all patients with GER/GERD. There is little evidence to support acid suppression in the first year of life, to treat nonspecific symptoms suggestive of GERD. Conservative treatment has many benefits and with low cost and no side-effects. CONCLUSIONS: there have been few randomized controlled trials that assessed the management of GERD in children and no examination can be considered the gold standard for GERD diagnosis. For these reasons, there are exaggerations in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, which need to be corrected.

  8. Inducing and Aggravating Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhiyatam Mardhiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (subsequently abbreviated as GERD is a disease commonly found in the community. Several factors have been recognized as inducing and aggravating factors of GERD symptoms such as older age, female gender, obesity, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, certain diet and poor eating habit like eating fatty, spicy, and acid food.

  9. Retrocaval ureter with vesicoureteric reflux, a very rare entity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.C. Arya

    2016-12-26

    Dec 26, 2016 ... Therefore, we are following up with options of extravesical ureteric reimplanation or subureteric teflon injection in case he presents with recurrent urinary tract infection. In these types of situations we should treat the obstructive lesion first, followed by treatment of reflux if needed, without severing the ureter.

  10. Extraoesophageal symptoms and signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tepeš

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is very common in developed world, with the prevalence of disease is between 6 and 20%. Pathologic reflux can provoke not only typical symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation but also atypical symptoms and diseases of extraoesophageal organs (pulmonary, ENT, mouth. High prevalence of GERD in patients with unexplained chest pain, asthma, chronic cough, chronic laryngitis, hoarsness and dental erosions is not a proof of causality. GERD can cause these diseases with reflux of acid and pepsin into pharynx, larynx, lungs and mouth (reflux theory or through vasovagal mechanisms (reflex theory. Conclusions Good therapeutic success with medical or operative treatment in early methodologically not well conducted studies has not been completely proven in double-blind placebo controlled studies. GERD is an ethyological reason for these extraoesophageal symptoms and diseases in an approximately one third of patients. With diagnostic modalities that we have now, we cannot clearly define in which patient is GERD is an ethyologic factor or a contributer, before we start the treatment. In patients suspected of having GERD, there is therapeutic option of a trial with high dose of proton pump inhibitor for 3 to 6 months. In other patients with low clinical suspicion of GERD, 24-hour pH testing should be done first.

  11. [Current diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease: learning experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, F; Corsini, F; Marano, S; Palermmo, S; Piraino, A; Vasapollo, L; Scocchera, F; Paolini, A

    2001-02-01

    The authors report their study on gastro-esophageal reflux disease, a pathology that has become increasingly common over the past years reflecting both a real increase and the use of new and more sophisticated and reliable diagnostic methods and tests. It can be included in the group of pathologies absorbing the largest proportion of financial resources, even exceeding biliary lithiasic disease according to American studies. The authors start by analysing the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, drawing a distinction between typical (heartburn, epigastric pain and postprandial regurgitation) and atypical symptoms (laryngotracheal symptoms, bronchopulmonary symptoms and esophageal motor incoordination). They outline the diagnostic iter and tests most widely used today to achieve a correct diagnosis. Lastly, they report their experience of 160 patients attending their esophageal diagnostic unit since January 1999 who underwent a number of different instrumental tests, the results of which are compared. Three different aspects are compared: the presence of symptoms, 24-hour pH-metry and endoscopic tests. All these are necessary for a correct diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease and to evaluate the possibility and efficacy of surgery. They emphasise the diagnostic importance of 24-hour pH-measurement as the only test that can directly reveal gastroesophageal reflux. Positive pH results represent a discriminating element in deciding whether the patient should undergo surgery.

  12. Comparison of closed-pressurized and open-refluxed vessel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples of residual fuel oil reference material (SRM 1634c) were mineralized in closed digestion vessels from Milestone Laboratory Systems (MLS) or from PAAR (HPA) or in open-refluxed microwave digestion flasks from Prolabo. The three digestion systems were evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision, reagents ...

  13. The influence of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding on gastroesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, [No Value; van Ramshorst, B; Timmer, R; Gooszen, HG; Smout, AJPM

    Background: Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) influences gastroesophageal reflux. Methods: 26 patients undergoing gastric banding were assessed by a questionnaire for symptom analysis, 24-hour pH monitoring, endoscopy and barium swallows, preoperatively, at 6 weeks and at 6 months after

  14. How uncomplicated total thyroidectomy could aggravate the laryngopharyngeal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Alessia; Macaione, I; Fiorentino, E

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing, voice disorders, throat discomfort and subjective neck discomfort are usually reported by patients with a known thyroid nodule and are correlated to nodular thyroid disease itself. Moreover, in endemic goitrous areas, total thyroidectomy (TT) is the most frequently performed surgical procedure. We are used to relate swallowing, voice and throat discomfort to the mechanical effects of nodular goiter or to thyroidectomy itself, but in both these cases the relationship between symptoms and the thyroid mass or its removal is not always clear or easily demonstrated. How can we explain the persistence of local neck symptoms after TT? And how can TT worsen the dysphagic or dysphonic disorders attributed to the goiter's effect over the surrounding structures? During these years, many articles have analyzed the relationship between the thyroid disease and the laryngopharyngeal reflux, finding more and more evidences of their consensuality, leading to important new management considerations and notable medico-legal implications; if the reason of local neck symptoms is not the thyroid disease, we have to study and specially cure the reflux disease, with specific test and drugs. Therefore, the aim of our study, relying on the published literature, was to investigate how, in demonstrated presence of reflux laryngopharyngitis in patients with nodular goiter and local neck symptoms before and after uncomplicated TT, the surgery could influence our anti-reflux mechanism analyzing the anatomical connection as well as the functional coordination; can we play a part in the post-operative persistence of swallowing and voice alterations and throat discomfort?

  15. if, when and how to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neonates) are predisposed to reflux; there might be adverse consequences of not intervening surgically in the ... stimulant such as theophylline will be considered. Persistent symptoms, particularly if temporally ... beneficial effects on gastric emptying and respiratory function.s. However, such infants should be changed to the ...

  16. Nasogastric intubation causes gastroesophageal reflux in patients undergoing elective laparotomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The routine use of nasogastric tubes in patients undergoing elective abdominal operation is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative fever, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that nasogastric tubes have no significant effect on the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux or on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that nasogastric intubation in patients undergoing laparotomy reduces lower esophageal sphincter pressure and promotes gastroesophageal reflux in the perioperative period. METHODS: A prospective randomized case-control study was undertaken in which 15 consenting patients, admitted electively for bowel surgery, were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 underwent nasogastric intubation after induction of anesthesia, and Group 2 did not. All patients had manometry and pH probes placed with the aid of endoscopic vision at the lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophagus, respectively. Nasogastric tubes, where present, were left on free drainage, and sphincter pressures and pH were recorded continuously during a 24-hour period. Data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean number of reflux episodes (defined as pH < 4) in the nasogastric tube group was 137 compared with a median of 8 episodes in the group managed without nasogastric tubes (P =.006). The median duration of the longest episode of reflux was 132 minutes in Group 1 and 1 minute in Group 2 (P =.001). A mean of 13.3 episodes of reflux lasted longer than 5 minutes in Group 1, with pH less than 4 for 37.4% of the 24 hours. This was in contrast to Group 2 where a mean of 0.13 episodes lasted longer than 5 minutes (P =.001) and pH less than 4 for 0.2% of total time (P =.001). The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures were lower in Group 1. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate that patients undergoing elective laparotomy with routine nasogastric tube placement have significant gastroesophageal

  17. Hiatal hernia predisposes to nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanolis, Georgios; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Adamopoulos, Adam; Barbatzas, Charalampos; Vafiadis, Irini; Ladas, Spiros D

    2013-06-01

    Nocturnal reflux has been associated with severe complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and a poorer quality of life. Hiatal hernia predisposes to increased oesophageal acid exposure, but the effect on night reflux symptoms has never been investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate if hiatal hernia is associated with more frequent and severe night reflux symptoms. A total of 215 consecutive patients (110 male, mean age 52.6 ± 14.7 years) answered a detailed questionnaire on frequency and severity of specific day and night reflux symptoms. Subsequently, all patients underwent upper endoscopy and were categorized in two groups based on the endoscopic presence of hiatal hernia. Patients with hiatal hernia were more likely to have nocturnal symptoms compared to those without hiatal hernia (78.6 vs. 51.8%, p = 0.0001); 59.2% of patients with hiatal hernia reported heartburn and 60.2% regurgitation compared to 43.8 and 39.3% of those without hiatal hernia, respectively (p = 0.033 and p = 0.003). The proportions of patients with day heartburn or regurgitation were not significantly different between the two groups. Night heartburn and regurgitation were graded as significantly more severe by patients with hiatal hernia (4.9 ± 4.2 vs. 3.2 ± 3.7, p = 0.002, and 3.8 ± 4.2 vs. 2.2 ± 3.5, p = 0.001, respectively). Patients with hiatal hernia had more frequent weekly night heartburn and regurgitation compared to those without hiatal hernia (p = 0.004 and p = 0.008, respectively). More patients with hiatal hernia reported nocturnal reflux symptoms compared to those without hiatal hernia. Furthermore, nocturnal reflux symptoms were significantly more frequent and graded as significantly more severe in patients with presence of hiatal hernia rather than in those without hiatal hernia.

  18. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M Malaty, J Kennard Fraley

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoda M Malaty1, J Kennard Fraley1,2, Suhaib Abudayyeh1, Kenneth W Fairly1, Ussama S Javed1, et al1Department of Medicine, 2Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The association between body mass index (BMI and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been extensively studied among adults but few studies have examined such association in children. Aims: 1 to determine the relationship between BMI in children and GERD, and 2 to use the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS values for BMI as a valid source for comparison. Methods: We identified two cohorts of children aged between two and 17 years who were seen at Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH. The first cohort consisted of children diagnosed with GERD based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopic and histologic evaluation, which was recorded in the Pediatric Endoscopic Database System-Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI at TCH. A diagnosis of GERD was based on the presence of erosive esophagitis or esophageal ulcers. Endoscopic reports that were incomplete or did not include demographic features, indications for endoscopy, or endoscopic findings were excluded. The second cohort consisted of all children with symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER who received outpatient gastrointestinal (GI consultation at TCH for any 9th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 code suggestive of GER. There was no overlap between the two cohorts as each child was indexed only once. Children with any comorbid illnesses were excluded.Measurements: The records for each child namely, age, gender, height, and weight were obtained on the same date as that of the diagnosis. Using the growth curves published by the NCHS, the gender/age specific weight

  19. Extraesophageal reflux in patients with contact granuloma: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, Riitta; Ramel, Stig

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidences of extraesophageal reflux in patients with contact granuloma and healthy controls. A 24-hour ambulatory pH monitoring technique was used to measure reflux parameters in the pharynx and distal esophagus. Pharyngeal acid reflux events occurred in 17 of 26 granuloma patients (1 to 20 episodes per patient) and 5 of 19 controls (1 to 8 episodes per subject). The reflux episodes were typically short and occurred predominantly in an upright position. A comparison between the groups showed a significant difference in the number of pharyngeal reflux episodes (p = .009) and in the total time of pH below 4 (p = .006). On the other hand, we found no significant differences in any esophageal reflux parameters, except for the percentage of distal esophageal reflux episodes that reached the pharynx (p = .006). In this study, pharyngeal acid exposure was significantly more prevalent in patients with contact granuloma than in healthy controls.

  20. Gastroesophagopharyngeal reflux in patients with contact granuloma: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, Riitta; Ramel, Stig

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidences of gastroesophagopharyngeal reflux in patients with contact granuloma and healthy controls. A 24-hour ambulatory esophagopharyngeal pH monitoring technique was used to measure reflux parameters in the pharynx and distal esophagus. Pharyngeal acid reflux events occurred in 17 of 26 granuloma patients (1 to 20 episodes per patient) and 5 of 19 controls (1 to 8 episodes per patient). The reflux episodes were typically short and occurred predominantly in an upright position. A comparison between the groups showed a significant difference in the number of pharyngeal reflux episodes (p = .009) and in the total time of pH below 4 (p = .006). On the other hand, we found no significant differences in any esophageal reflux parameters, except for the percentage of distal esophageal reflux episodes that reached the pharynx (p = .006). In this study, pharyngeal acid exposure was significantly more prevalent in patients with contact granuloma than in healthy controls.

  1. Effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Nassar, Jihad; Dowli, Alexander; Al Zaghal, Zeid; Sabri, Alain

    2012-11-01

    To address the effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). A total of 22 male subjects have been recruited for this study. Subjects with vocal fold pathologies, recent history of upper respiratory tract infection or laryngeal manipulation were excluded. Demographic data included age and history of smoking. All subjects were evaluated while fasting for at least 12 h and non-fasting. By non-fasting we mean that they ate and drank during the day at their discretion with no reservation. The abstention from water and or food intake during the non-fasting period extended from few minutes to 3 h. All subjects were evaluated at the same time during the day. The evaluation consisted of a laryngeal examination and the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The Reflux Finding Score (RFS) was used to report on the reflux laryngeal findings. Subjects were considered to have LPRD if either the RSI or the RFS were positive (>9 RSI, >7 RFS). There was a non-significant increase in the total prevalence of LPRD while fasting compared to non-fasting (32 vs. 50 % while fasting, p value 0.361). In the RSI, the most common symptoms while non-fasting and fasting were throat clearing (64 vs. 68 %), postnasal drip (45 vs. 59 %) and globus sensation (36 vs. 50 %). The average score of all the three increased significantly while fasting. For the RFS the most common laryngeal findings in the non-fasting group versus the fasting group were erythema (77 vs. 68 %), thick endolaryngeal mucus (77 vs. 77 %) and posterior commissure hypertrophy (55 vs. 64 %). Fasting results in a nonsignificant increase in laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The increase can be hypothetically explained on the change in eating habits and the known alterations in gastric secretions during Ramadan. Fasting subjects must be alert to the effect of LPRD on their throat and voice in particular.

  2. Esophageal dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) and nonerosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Malenstein, Hannah; Farré, Ricard; Sifrim, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Esophageal mucosal dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) are frequently observed in patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and patients with esophagitis. The specificity of DIS is questionable, as it is present in up to 30% of asymptomatic healthy subjects and in patients with other esophageal disorders. DIS occurs in parallel with a drop in potential difference, diminished transepithelial resistance, and increased esophageal mucosal permeability. These alterations arise with exposure to acid and pepsin during gastroesophageal reflux, but the exact pathway of damage to the intercellular junctions remains unclear and seems to be multifactorial. Other noxious contents of the refluxate, such as bile acids, are harmful and DIS can also be induced by acute psychological stress. DIS can be assessed quantitatively with electron microscopy (EM), but it is also recognizable with light microscopy (LM). DIS can disappear after treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI); however, this is not the case in all NERD patients. A recent study showed that patients with NERD who are refractory to PPI might still have DIS; and animal experiments showed that persistence of DIS might be due to esophageal mucosal exposure to bile acids and/or psychological stress. In conclusion, DIS is a frequent but nonspecific histological feature of NERD. It can be caused by acid reflux, but bile acids in the refluxate and/or psychological stress can modulate the development or persistence of DIS. Although a causal relationship between DIS and heartburn has been proposed, it still needs to be proven and the underlying mechanisms investigated before considering DIS as a target for treatment of NERD.

  3. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux in Children with Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka-Tuteja, Anna; Jastrzębska, Izabela; Składzień, Jacek; Fyderek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the characteristic properties of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) using 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance combined with dual-probe (pharyngeal and esophageal) pH-metry. Methods Children aged 7–10 years of age with OME underwent 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance pH-metry. The upper pH sensor was situated 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter, and the lower pH sensor was placed 3–5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Parents were asked to complete the gastroesophageal reflux assessment of symptoms in a pediatrics questionnaire. Results Twenty-eight children were enrolled; LPR was detected in 19 (67.9%) children. The criteria of the LPR diagnosis was the presence of at least one supraesophageal episode with a pH 0.2. In total, 64 episodes were observed. Assessment of all LPR episodes showed the presence of 246 episodes in the entire study. A considerable predominance of weakly acidic episodes (87.8%) was noted; there were 6.5% acidic episodes, and weakly alkaline episodes reached 5.7%. Pathological GER was noted in 10 (35.7%) subjects. Acid GER was detected in 8 children, 2 of whom demonstrated non-acidic reflux. In the LPR-negative patients, no pathological GER was confirmed with the exception of a single case of non-acidic reflux. Conclusions LPR was frequently noted in the group of children with OME, and it might be an important risk factor in this common disease. PMID:27193974

  4. Endoscopic management is the preferred treatment modality for a Grade III vesicoureteric reflux with breakthrough infections in a young girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Joshi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic injection treatment for VUR appears to have less success rate than open surgical treatment, even in Gr 3 VUR. Economics of use of deflux injection and its success rate do not suit Indian milieu. To achieve high success rate of Atlanta group in endoscopic injection treatmnent , requires a longer learning curve and yet it has not achieved success rate of 96-98% achieved by open surgical techniques. Recent addition of modified extravesical reimplantation technique has reduced significantly the post operative pain and patient can be discharged within 2 days from the hospital.

  5. Diagnostic Utility of Impedance-pH Monitoring in Refractory Non-erosive Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Q; Alaraj, Ali; Alsohaibani, Fahad; Al-Kahtani, Khalid; Jbarah, Sahar; Al-Ashgar, Hamad

    2014-10-30

    Approximately one-third of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and face a therapeutic challenge. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between pathological and non-pathological reflux utilizing multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) to analyze symptom-reflux association and diagnose true NERD versus hyper-sensitive esophagus (HE) and functional heartburn (FH). Herein, we evaluated the diagnostic yield of MII-pH in refractory NERD and sub-classified it based on quantity and quality of acid/non-acid reflux and reflux-symptom association. Sixty symptomatic NERD patients on twice daily PPI for > 2 months were prospectively evaluated by MII-pH. Distal and prox-imal refluxes, bolus exposure time (BET), esophageal acid exposure time, symptom index (SI) and symptom association proba-bility (SAP) were measured. Thirty-two (53%) patients had BET > 1.4% (MII-pH positive-true NERD), while 28 (47%) had BET 80% of symptoms were associated with non-acid reflux. The number of distal refluxes in true NERD versus FH or HE were significantly different, but not between FH and HE. Approximately 60% of refractory PPI NERD patients had positive reflux-symptom association, primarily due to non-acid reflux. Nearly half of NERD patients on PPI had normal MII-pH monitoring, sub-divided further into FH and HE equally.(J Neurogastroenterol Motil 2014;20:497-505).

  6. REFLUX ESOPHAGITIS IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM THE WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE OF THE EUROPEAN-SOCIETY-OF-PEDIATRIC-GASTROENTEROLOGY-AND-NUTRITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BLECKER, U; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DEVREKER, T; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; NUSSLE, D; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; POLANCO, [No Value; RAVELLI, A; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this article, the Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition presents and discusses a definition of reflux esophagitis and recommends a diagnostic approach and therapeutic management for this condition. Histologic criteria for

  7. A proposition for the diagnosis and treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children: A report from a working group on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Vandenplas (Yvan); A. Ashkenazi (A.); D. Belli (D.); N. Boige (N.); J. Bouquet (Jan); S. Cadranel (S.); J.P. Cezard (J.); S. Cucchiara (S.); C. Dupont (C.); K. Geboes (K.); F. Gottrand; H.S.A. Heymans (Hugo); C. Jasinski (C.); C.M.F. Kneepkens (Frank); S. Koletzko (Sybille); P. Milla (Peter); J.F. Mougenot (J.); D. Nusslé (D.); J. Navarro (J.); S.J. Newell (S.); E. Olafsdottir (E.); S. Peeters (S.); A. Ravelli (A.); I. Polanco (I.); B. Sandhu; J.J. Tolboom (Jules)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated

  8. Partial symptom-response to proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive reflux disease or reflux oesophagitis - a post hoc analysis of 5796 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, P; van Zanten, S Veldhuyzen; Mattsson, H

    2012-01-01

    Although most patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) benefit from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, some experience only partial symptom relief.......Although most patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) benefit from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, some experience only partial symptom relief....

  9. The relationship between the numbers of reflux episodes with anatomic changes of the esophagus in children under one year with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HamidrezaTalari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the neonatal period, and the main reason for it is the lack of development in the first months of an infant's digestive system and it gets improved with the aging of baby and development of the digestive system. Some studies have shown that there is a relationship between characteristics of anatomic and esophageal reflux. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the characteristics and frequency of reflux in infants under one year old with gastroesophageal reflux disease. This study is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2015 in the hospital of martyr Beheshti. In this study, a group of 120 children with reflux in three age groups less than one month, 1-6 months and 6-12 months were choses and the relationship between reflux episodes with esophagus anatomic characteristics, including distal esophagus distention, Hiss angle, internal angle and length of esophagus were examined. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software and the relationship between the characteristics was compared with the number of reflux in three groups. According to the results, the frequency of reflux and extent of distention of the distal esophageal, Hiss angle, Internal Gastro esophageal angle and length of the esophagus, there was a statistically significant correlation (P <0.001. The correlation between reflux episodes and four parameters, are respectively, 0/95, 0/97, 0/71 and -0/79/. Also there was a direct relation between the frequency of reflux and extent of distention of the distal esophageal, Hiss angle, Internal Gastro esophageal angle and an inverse relation with length of the esophagus. The correlation between the frequency of reflux and esophageal characteristics in separation between all three age groups showed a statistically significant relationship exists between anatomical esophageal characteristics and reflux frequency. Based on the results of this study it

  10. Can yoga be used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh Kaswala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoga methods including Pranayama are the best ways to prevent many diseases and their progression. Even though, Yoga is widely practiced, its effects on certain medical conditions have not been studied or reported. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of them. GERD is extremely common condition requiring frequent consumption of over-the-counter or prescribed proton pump inhibitors (PPI. In severe symptoms of GERD and in the presence of multiple etiologies, PPIs are insufficient to relieve the symptoms of gastric reflux. Regular and proper use of the Yoga along with PPI can control the severe symptoms of GERD and can avoid or delay the necessity of invasive procedures. This evidence-based case report focuses on the effects of Yoga on GERD. Our case report showed that regular practice of Kapalbhati and Agnisar kriya along with PPI, patients with hiatal hernia had improvement in severe symptoms of GERD, which were initially refractory to PPI alone.

  11. Ureteral Triplication and Contralateral Duplication with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Söylemez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral triplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract. Since its first description, only about 100 cases have been reported in the literature. The association of ureteral triplication and contralateral duplication is even rarer. We reported a case of ureteral triplication and contralateral duplication with vesicoureteral reflux. The patient was a five-year-old girl with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections, dysuria and lower abdominal pain. Intravenous Pyelography (IVP showed duplication of the right ureter and triplication of the left ureter. In the cystourethrogram there was vesicoureteral reflux at the lower pole of the right kidney. The patient underwent right lower to upper ureteroureterostomy and excision of the distal ureter. This is the second report of ureteral triplication in Turkey. The literature concerning this rare anomaly was reviewed.

  12. [Application of Lugol solution in the gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Janusz

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopy examination followed by Lugol solution staining is used in the diagnostics of early squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The aim of the study was to describe usage of this method for the assessment of effectiveness in the gastroesophageal reflux disease. The method uses reaction between glycogen, present in epithelium, and iodine in Lugol solution. The study was conducted in 98 patients. Endoscopic assessment was made before application of Lugol solution, subsequently the gastroesophageal borderline and staining of mucosa membrane after application of Lugol solution was assessed. Biopsies were taken from the stained and unstained areas. The performed study showed that sensitivity of the method is 84%, specificity 79% and effectiveness 85%. The ratio of stained and unstained areas is statistically typical p=0.045. Endoscopic examination followed by Lugol solution staining are sensitive diagnostic methods in the gastroesophageal reflux disease. It is a simple and quick method which should be widely applied.

  13. Knowledge of pediatrician on gastroesophageal reflux/gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Surjono

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux (OER is involuntary movement of gastric content into esophagus due to transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This condition usually ignored by physician. Many GER cases have severe complication before properly managed. Ten years after incorporating GER into Indonesia pediatric training curriculum, the knowledge of GER among pediatrician need to be measured. Objectives To measure pediatrician's knowledge of GER/GERD in children. Methods This was a cross sectional study using questionnaire and interview. Result There were 387 respondents who filled the questionnaire and being interviewed. The majority of respondents were between 25-45 years old (33.6%. Respondents who graduated before the year 2000 were 48.3%, and after 2000 were 51.7%. Majority of respondents were general pediatrician (90.2% and 41.3% working in teaching hospitals Among pediatricians graduated after year 2000,6 6%,5 0.5% and 57.5% could gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about general knowledge, diagnosis and management of GERD as compared to 49.2%, 42.2% and 47% subjects graduated before year 2000. More pediatricians graduated before year 2000 answered the questions on general knowledge, diagnosis and management < 60% correctly compared to those graduated after year 2000 (42.2%, 25.2% and 28.3% vs. 14%,11.5% and 12%, respectively. Fifty five of 160 (34.4% respondents who working in teaching hospital gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about GERD. Compared to those working in non-teaching hospitals, only 17.6% were able to correctly answer more than 80% of questions. Conclusions Better knowledge about GER/GERD are found among pediatricians graduated after the topics has been introduced to the curriculum and among those practicing in teaching hospitals.

  14. Relationship between gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and dietary factors in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hyun; Chung, Su Jin; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Young-Ho; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Korea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between GERD symptoms and dietary factors in Korea. From January 2007 to April 2008, 162 subjects were enrolled (81 in GERD group and 81 in control group). They were asked to complete the questionnaires about GERD symptoms and dietary habits. The symptom severity score was recorded by visual analogue scale. Subjects with overweight or obesity had an increased risk for GERD (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.18-5.39). Irregular dietary intake was one of the risk factors for GERD (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.11-4.89). Acid regurgitation was the most suffering (2.85 ± 2.95 by visual analogue scale) and frequent reflux-related symptom (57.5%) in GERD. Noodles (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.12-1.34), spicy foods (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16), fatty meals (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09-1.33), sweets (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.00-2.02), alcohol (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03-1.31), breads (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34), carbonated drinks (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.04-2.74) and caffeinated drinks (OR,1.41; 95% CI, 1.15-1.73) were associated with symptom aggravation in GERD. Among the investigated noodles, ramen (instant noodle) caused reflux-related symptoms most frequently (52.4%). We found that noodles, spicy foods, fatty meals, sweets, alcohol, breads, carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks were associated with reflux-related symptoms.

  15. Dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): is there any correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2009-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and signs of upper gastrointestinal tract and the adjacent organs. It is estimated that 25% of the community have symptoms of dyspepsia syndrome. One-third of patients who visit general physician practices are patients with dyspepsia syndrome; and half of patients who visit gastroenterologists are also patients with dyspepsia syndrome. Dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very prevalent in the community throughout the world.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more and more commonly found in daily medical practice. Until now,the natural history of disease on GERD and dyspepsia is hardly understood, even though many scientists studied both conditions and there are frequently overlapping. In an individual, GERD and dyspepsia may occur simultaneously and therefore they are hardly to be discriminated.The management of GERD is performed in keeping with Indonesia and Asia Pacific consensus, life-style modification and administering the acid suppression agents (Proton pump inhibitor (drug of choice), H2-receptor antagonist, etc),prokinetic agents (Cisapride, domperidone, etc). Life-style modification shall be performed as follows, i.e. sleep with 30-45 degree elevated head or upper chest, do not avoid sour beverages, chocolate, coffee or alcohol, avoid fat and various fried foods, sour food, less stress, stop smoking, small but frequent feeding, etc. There is a correlation between dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD), particularly between the functional dyspepsia and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux (NERD). More appropriate definition is necessary to differentiate the dyspepsia syndrome and GERD. Further studies are needed to establish distinct definition and criteria between dyspepsia syndrome and GERD.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: exaggerations, evidence and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cristina Targa; Carvalho, Elisa de; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Morais, Mauro Batista de; Vieira, Mário César; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    there are many questions and little evidence regarding the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. The association between GERD and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA), overuse of abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of GERD, and excessive pharmacological treatment, especially proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are some aspects that need clarification. This review aimed to establish the current scientific evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children. a search was conducted in the MEDLINE, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library electronic databases, using the following keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; gastroesophageal reflux disease; proton-pump inhibitors; and prokinetics; in different age groups of the pediatric age range; up to May of 2013. abdominal ultrasonography should not be recommended to investigate gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Simultaneous treatment of GERD and CMPA often results in unnecessary use of medication or elimination diet. There is insufficient evidence for the prescription of prokinetics to all patients with GER/GERD. There is little evidence to support acid suppression in the first year of life, to treat nonspecific symptoms suggestive of GERD. Conservative treatment has many benefits and with low cost and no side-effects. there have been few randomized controlled trials that assessed the management of GERD in children and no examination can be considered the gold standard for GERD diagnosis. For these reasons, there are exaggerations in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, which need to be corrected. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Corvaglia; Caterina Monari; Silvia Martini; Arianna Aceti; Giacomo Faldella

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported...

  18. Early dumping syndrome and reflux esophagitis prevention with pouch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikic, Srdjan; Randjelovic, Tomislav; Dragojevic, Svetlana; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Granic, Miroslav; Gacic, Dragan; Zdravkovic, Darko; Stefanovic, Branislav; Djokovic, Aleksandra; Pazin, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    Total gastrectomy causes numerous disorders, such as reflux esophagitis, dumping syndrome, malabsorption, and malnutrition. To minimize the consequences, different variants of reconstruction are performed. The aim of our study is the comparison of two reconstructive methods: the standard Roux-en-Y and a new modality of pouch interposition, preduodenal-pouch interposition. This study aims to investigate the advantage of bile reflux prevention and to reduce symptoms of dumping syndrome after 3- and 6-mo follow-up. A total of 60 patients were divided in two groups: (A) 30 patients with Roux-en-Y reconstruction, and (B) 30 patients with the preduodenal-pouch (PDP) type of reconstruction. Endoscopic examination and endoluminal jejunal limb pressure measurements were performed. Scintigraphic measurements of half-emptying time were performed to evaluate meal elimination in the context of reflux esophagitis and early dumping syndrome. The Japan Society of Gastrointestinal Surgery has provided guidelines with which to classify the symptoms of early dumping syndrome. Patients were followed up for periods of 3 and 6 mo after the surgery. Our study groups did not differ with regard to the level of reflux esophagitis (P = 0.688). Average values of pressure at 10 and 15 cm below the esophago-jejunal junction were significantly lower in the PDP group (P dumping syndrome symptoms revealed a significant reduction among PDP patients after 3 and 6 mo. Our study showed significant superiority of the new pouch reconstruction over the standard Roux-en-Y approach in the treatment of early dumping syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extra-Esophageal Pepsin from Stomach Refluxate Promoted Tonsil Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Han-Sin; Kim, Kyung Mi; Lee, Ye Jin; Jung, Myeong Hee; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is associated with numerous pathologic conditions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Gastric pepsin within reflux contributes to immunologic reactions in the tonsil. In this study, we aimed to find the relationships between pepsin and tonsillar hypertrophy. We explored the notion whether tonsillar hypertrophy was due to pepsin-mediated gastric reflux in tonsil hypertrophy. Fifty-four children with tonsil hypertrophy and 30 adults with tonsillitis were recruited before surgical treatment. Blood and tonsil tissues from each patient were harvested for analysis of changes in lymphocyte and macrophage numbers coupled with histological and biochemical analysis. Pepsin was expressed at different levels in tonsil tissues from each tonsillar hypertrophy. Pepsin-positive cells were found in the crypt epithelium, surrounding the lymphoid follicle with developing fibrosis, and also surrounding the lymphoid follicle that faced the crypt. And also, pepsin staining was well correlated with damaged tonsillar squamous epithelium and TGF-β1 and iNOS expression in the tonsil section. In addition, pepsin and TGF-β1-positive cells were co-localized with CD68-positive cells in the crypt and surrounding germinal centers. In comparison of macrophage responsiveness to pepsin, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were noticeably larger in the presence of activated pepsin in the child group. Furthermore, CD11c and CD163-positive cells were significantly increased by activated pepsin. However, this was not seen for the culture of PBMNCs from the adult group. The lymphocytes and monocytes are in a highly proliferative state in the tonsillar hypertrophy and associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory factors as a result of exposure to stomach reflux pepsin.

  20. [Differentiation therapy for non-acidic gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishchuk, N B; Simanenkov, V I; Tikhonov, S V

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and pathogenetic features of the non-acidic types of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to evaluate the impact of combined therapy versus monotherapy on the course of this disease. The investigation enrolled 62 patients with non-acidic GERD. The follow-up period was 6 weeks. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) weakly acidic gastroesophageal refluxes (GER); 2) weakly alkaline GER. Then each group was distributed, thus making up 4 groups: 1) 19 patients with weakly acidic GER who received monotherapy with rabeprazole 20 mg/day; 2) 21 patients with weakly acidic GER had combined therapy with rabeprazole 20 mg and itopride; 3) 8 patients with weakly alkaline GER who received ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) monotherapy; and 4) 14 patients with weakly alkaline GER who had combined therapy with UDCA and itopride, The clinical symptoms of the disease, the endoscopic pattern of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosa, histological changes in the esophageal and gastric mucosa, and the results of 24-hour impedance pH monitoring were assessed over time. During differentiation therapy, the majority of patients reported positive clinical changes and an improved or unchanged endoscopic pattern. Assessment of impedance pH monitoring results revealed decreases in the overall number of GERs, the presence of a bolus in the esophagus, and the number of proximal refluxes. These changes were noted not only in patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but also in those treated with UDCA monotherapy or combined PPI and prokinetic therapy. A differentiated approach to non-acidic GER treatment contributes to its efficiency. Adding the prokinetic itomed (itopride hydrochloride) to PPI therapy in a patient with weakly acidic GER enhances the efficiency of treatment, by positively affecting upper GIT motility. The mainstay of therapy for GERD with a predominance of weakly alkaline refluxes is UDCA, the combination of the latter and the

  1. Cisapride treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux in children

    OpenAIRE

    MacLennan, S; Augood, C; Cash-Gibson, L; Logan, S; Gilbert, RE

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common and usually self-limiting in infants. Cisapride, a pro-kinetic agent, was commonly prescribed until reports of possible serious adverse events were associated with its use. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of cisapride versus placebo or non-surgical treatments for symptoms of GOR. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group Specialised Register and Central Register of Controlled Tri...

  2. Cisapride treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Augood, C; MacLennan, S; Gilbert, R.; Logan, S

    2003-01-01

    : Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is an extremely common and usually self-limiting condition in infants. When treatment is required, Cisapride, a pro-kinetic agent, has been commonly prescribed for the symptomatic management of GOR. There have been recent reports of possibly serious adverse events, e.g. an increased QTc interval, cardiac arrhythmias, and death, associated with the use of Cisapride. : To determine the effectiveness of Cisapride for symptoms of GOR compared with placebo or any ...

  3. Economic evaluations of gastroesophageal reflux disease medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Andrew J; French, Dustin D; Pandolfino, John E; Howden, Colin W

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) contributes to substantial medication use and costs worldwide. Economic evaluations provide insight into the value of healthcare, taking into account cost, quality, and benefits of particular treatments. Our objectives were to systematically review the existing literature to identify economic evaluations of GERD management strategies, to assess the scientific quality of these reports, and to summarize the economic outcomes of these evaluations. We identified economic evaluations and cost studies of GERD management strategies by searching PubMed and the UK NHS Economic Evaluation Database via the Cochrane Library. Searching was restricted to articles in English-language journals from July 2003 to July 2013. Cost-identification articles were excluded from the final analysis. Eighteen articles were included in the final analysis; 61 % of these met all criteria for quality reporting. Overall, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was preferred (most effective and least costly) as empiric therapy for patients with reflux symptoms, except in patient populations with high Helicobacter pylori prevalence (>40 %). Initial empiric PPI therapy (vs. initial endoscopy stratification or H. pylori testing) is likely the most cost-effective initial strategy for patients with typical GERD symptoms. Surgery may be cost effective in patients with chronic GERD symptoms at time horizons of 3-10 years. Endoscopic anti-reflux procedures were not cost effective based on available data. Further economic evaluations should adhere to standard reporting measures of cost estimates and outcomes, and should attempt to account for and compare the large heterogeneity of patient phenotypes and treatment effects seen with anti-reflux therapies.

  4. Evaluation of the Dental Effects of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    proximal migration of gastric contents. As such, patients will often wake with typical, as well as extraesophageal, symptoms (Ranjitkar S, 2012...acid reflux promotes the growth of Streptococcus mutans and results in an increase in dental caries , others suggest a lack of a relationship...single-probe test, this method utilizes two pH probes, one at the proximal end of the esophagus, and the other at the distal end (Postma, Belafsky

  5. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-28

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD.

  6. Evaluating the autonomic nervous system in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ju; Shu, Chih-Hung; Chou, Kun-Ta; Wang, Yi-Fen; Hsu, Yen-Bin; Ho, Ching-Yin; Lan, Ming-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) remains unclear. It is linked to but distinct from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which has been shown to be related to disturbed autonomic regulation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether autonomic dysfunction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of LPR. Case-control study. Tertiary care center. Seventeen patients with LPR and 19 healthy controls, aged between 19 and 50 years, were enrolled in the study. The patients were diagnosed with LPR if they had a reflux symptom index (RSI) ≥ 13 and a reflux finding score (RFS) ≥ 7. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was used to assess autonomic function. Anxiety and depression levels measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were also conducted. In HRV analysis, high frequency (HF) represents the parasympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system, whereas low frequency (LF) represents the total autonomic activity. There were no significant differences in the LF power and HF power between the 2 groups. However, significantly lower HF% (P = .003) and a higher LF/HF ratio (P = .012) were found in patients with LPR, who demonstrated poor autonomic modulation and higher sympathetic activity. Anxiety was also frequently observed in the patient group. The study suggests that autonomic dysfunction seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of LPR. The potential beneficial effect of autonomic nervous system modulation as a therapeutic modality for LPR merits further investigation.

  7. The suppression of gastro-oesophageal reflux by alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmar, P W; Hampson, F C; Taubel, J; Lorch, U; Johnstone, L M; Sykes, J; Berry, P J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare alginate products with the same amount of active ingredients but different dosage forms, in the suppression of reflux provoked by a standard meal in healthy human volunteers, using ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring. This was a single centre, randomised, open, three-period crossover, controlled study comparing Gaviscon Advance (10 ml) with a control (10 ml water) and with a new tablet product containing the same active ingredients as Gaviscon Advance. Volunteers who had oesophageal pH Gaviscon Advance and control in the mean angular transformed percentage of time for which oesophageal pH fell below four was statistically significant (p pH fell below four. There were also no significant differences between the two alginate dosage forms in the angular transformed percentage of time for which oesophageal pH fell below five and in the log-transformed number of occasions on which oesophageal pH fell below four and five. The study shows that alginate reflux suppressants containing a low amount of antacid are effective in suppressing acid reflux and that suspension and tablet forms are able to give equivalent acid suppression.

  8. Fabrication of hydroxyapatite from fish bones waste using reflux method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyanto, A.; Kosasih, E.; Aripin, D.; Hasratiningsih, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate the fabrication of hydroxyapatites, which were synthesized from fish bone wastes using reflux method. The fish bone wastes collected from the restaurant were brushed and boiled at 100°C for 10 minutes to remove debris and fat. After drying, the fish bones were crushed, and ball milled into a fine powder. The fish bone wastes were then processed by refluxing using KOH and H3PO4 solutions. The samples were calcined at 900°C and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The XRD pattern of samples after treatment revealed that the peak of hydroxyapatite was observed and the bands of OH- and PO4 3- were observed by FT-IR. The scanning electron microscope evaluation of sample showed the entangled crystal and porous structure of hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the hydroxyapatite was successfully synthesized from fish bone wastes using reflux method.

  9. Burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Yan, X; Ma, X-Q; Cao, Y; Wallander, M-A; Johansson, S; He, J

    2009-02-01

    Data on the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in Asian countries are scarce. This study evaluated the impact of GERD on HRQL in Shanghai, China. One thousand two hundred adult inhabitants of Shanghai, selected using randomized cluster sampling. Participants completed Mandarin versions of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ), GERD impact scale, quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire and short-form-36 (SF-36). GERD was defined as heartburn and/or regurgitation of any frequency during the 1-week recall period of the RDQ. A clinically meaningful impairment of HRQL was defined as a statistically significant decrease of >or=0.5 points in a QOLRAD dimension or >or=5 points in an SF-36 dimension. Overall, 1034 subjects completed the survey (86.2% response rate); 919 responses were suitable for analysis. The prevalence of GERD was 6.2%. GERD was associated with meaningfully impaired HRQL in the QOLRAD dimensions of vitality, eating/drinking and emotional well-being, but not sleep or physical/social functioning, and in all SF-36 dimensions except social functioning. Respondents with GERD experienced eating and drinking problems (47%), sleep impairment (32%) and reduced work productivity (32%). GERD has a clinically meaningful impact on HRQL in Shanghai, China.

  10. Bronchial hyperreactivity in non-atopic children with asthma and reflux: effect of anti-reflux treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Mohnot, Sopan; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio; Edell, Dean; Kobernick, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) or the effect of anti-reflux treatment on BHR in children with asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is not known. Thirty non-atopic children with persistent asthma were studied. Extended esophageal pH monitoring was used to diagnose GERD and methacholine challenge test (MCT) was used as a marker of BHR and performed before and 2 years after anti-GERD treatment. Of the 21 patients positive for GERD (group A), 15 had positive MCT suggesting BHR. Of the 9 patients negative for GERD (group B), 5 had positive MCT. On repeat testing 2 years later, 11/15 group A patients and 3/5 group B patients tested negative for BHR. Group A patients were receiving fewer asthma medications and experienced fewer exacerbations than Group B patients. BHR is prevalent in children with asthma and GERD and improves with anti-GERD treatment.

  11. Evaluation and Management of the Pediatric Patients with Suspected Gastroesophageal Reflux Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hegar, Badriul; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2011-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic process occurring in healthy infants. Symptoms due to gastro-esophageal reflux diseases (GERD) are troublesome when they have adverse effects on the well- being of the patient. A thorough history and physical examination is generally sufficient to establish a clinical diagnosis of uncomplicated infant with gastroesophageal reflux. Poor weight gain is a warning sign. Irritability and regurgitation are associated with a wide range of physiologic a...

  12. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants. Evaluation of treatment by pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Y; Sacré-Smits, L

    1987-09-01

    Forty bottle-fed babies, 4-12 weeks old, with clinical gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied. Continuous 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring in a prone position demonstrated a gastro-oesophageal reflux with all of the following parameters: reflux index, duration of the longest reflux episode, number of reflux episodes in 24 h, number of reflux episodes greater than 5 min in 24 h. Positional therapy (prone-antitrendelenburg position), applied to all infants, resulted in a normalization of these parameters in ten of them. The remaining 30 infants were treated with milk-thickening agents, as recommended by Carre. Nearly all (N = 25) showed an important clinical improvement. A third pH monitoring was performed after 10-14 days of treatment. In six infants the results were completely within normal ranges. In 24 infants a decrease in the number of reflux episodes was demonstrated, with a comparable reflux index and number of long lasting reflux episodes. The duration of the longest reflux episode however increased significantly (P less than 0.001). Drugs (domperidone, Gaviscon) added to the milk-thickening agents in these 24 children, led to normalization of pH tracings. Clinical symptoms were less severe or disappeared in all infants but one. We conclude that if positional therapy (prone-antitrendelenburg) does not correct gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants, pharmacological treatment should be applied. Milk-thickening agents alone can be effective in individual cases but should be prescribed with care as they can lead to more occult gastro-oesophageal reflux with episodes of longer duration, increasing the risk of oesophagitis or respiratory distress.

  13. Acid suppression increases rates of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal injury in the presence of duodenal reflux.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The contribution of gastric acid to the toxicity of alkaline duodenal refluxate on the esophageal mucosa is unclear. This study compared the effect of duodenal refluxate when acid was present, decreased by proton pump inhibitors (PPI), or absent. METHODS: We randomized 136 Sprague-Dawley rats into 4 groups: group 1 (n = 33) were controls; group 2 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy promoting "combined reflux"; group 3 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and PPI treatment to decrease acid reflux; and group 4, the \\'gastrectomy\\' group (n = 35) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and total gastrectomy to eliminate acid in the refluxate. Esophaguses were examined for inflammatory, Barrett\\'s, and other histologic changes, and expression of proliferative markers Ki-67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). RESULTS: In all reflux groups, the incidence of Barrett\\'s mucosa was greater when acid was suppressed (group C, 62%; group D, 71%) than when not suppressed (group B, 27%; P = 0.004 and P < .001). Erosions were more frequent in the PPI and gastrectomy groups than in the combined reflux group. Edema (wet weight) and ulceration was more frequent in the gastrectomy than in the combined reflux group. Acute inflammatory changes were infrequent in the PPI group (8%) compared with the combined reflux (94%) or gastrectomy (100%) groups, but chronic inflammation persisted in 100% of the PPI group. EGFR levels were greater in the PPI compared with the combined reflux group (P = .04). Ki-67, PCNA, and combined marker scores were greater in the gastrectomy compared with the combined reflux group (P = .006, P = .14, and P < .001). CONCLUSION: Gastric acid suppression in the presence of duodenal refluxate caused increased rates of inflammatory changes, intestinal metaplasia, and molecular proliferative activity. PPIs suppressed acute inflammatory changes only, whereas chronic inflammatory changes persisted.

  14. Hemodynamic patterns of reflux in primary sapheno-popliteal junction incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Cappelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Duplex ultrasound investigation (DUI has considerably improved the diagnosis of anatomical venous variations in the popliteal region: however, some pitfalls still remain concerning the hemodynamics of incompetent sapheno-popliteal junctions (SPJs. Aims of this study were to assess the prevalence rates of the hemodynamic patterns of reflux, either diastolic or systolic or both, in a large series of patients with SPJ incompetence, and to analyze the origin of the systolic components of the reflux. Four hundred and fiftythree patients, 83 males and 370 females, mean age 58.0 years±SD 13.8 with primary SPJ incompetence (512 limbs underwent preoperative DUI using the Paranà manoeuvre, a dynamic test able to develop systolic and diastolic pressure gradients through the reflex activation of muscle pumps. Of the 512 incompetent SPJs, 420 showed isolated diastolic reflux, 9 isolated systolic reflux and 83 systolic reflux followed by diastolic reflux. Altogether, 92 SPJs over 512 (18% showed a systolic component of the reflux, which originated from the popliteal vein in 78 cases (15% and from the gastrocnemius veins (GVs in 14 cases (3%. In these latter cases, the short saphenous vein and one or more GVs showed a common trunk. Our findings show that the detection of a systolic component of the reflux in incompetent SPJs is not an uncommon event and suggest that treatment strategy should be differentiated according to the origin of the systolic reflux, given their different hemodynamic behavior.

  15. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated with Increased Risk of Reflux Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Chang, Yoosoo; Park, Soo-Kyung; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Ryu, Seungho; Sohn, Chong Il

    2017-10-23

    Reflux esophagitis is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and reflux esophagitis is unclear. We examined the association between NAFLD and the development of reflux esophagitis. Our cohort consisted of 117,377 Korean adults without reflux esophagitis at baseline who underwent a health checkup program including upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 and were followed annually or biennially until December 2014. NAFLD was defined as hepatic steatosis on ultrasonography in the absence of excessive alcohol use or any other identifiable cause. Over 520,843.2 person-years of follow-up, 22,500 participants developed reflux esophagitis (incidence density, 43.2 per 1000 person-years). In models adjusted for age and sex, the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for incident reflux esophagitis in subjects with NAFLD compared to those without was 1.16 (1.13-1.20). After further adjustment for confounders of center, year of visit, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, education level, and body mass index, the association between NAFLD and incident reflux esophagitis was attenuated, but remained significant (aHR 1.06; 95% CI 1.02-1.10). In this large cohort of Korean men and women, participants with NAFLD exhibited increased incidence of reflux esophagitis independent of possible confounders, suggesting that NAFLD contributes to the development of reflux esophagitis.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Mark; Afzal, Nadeem A; Bevan, Amanda; Hayen, Andrew; Munro, Alasdair; Beattie, R Mark

    2014-11-24

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is a common disorder, characterised by regurgitation of gastric contents into the oesophagus. GOR is a very common presentation in infancy in both primary and secondary care settings. GOR can affect approximately 50% of infants younger than three months old (Nelson 1997). The natural history of GOR in infancy is generally that of a functional, self-limiting condition that improves with age; pH probe, but improvement in symptoms and reflux index was noted in a subgroup treated with domperidone and co-magaldrox(Maalox(®) ). In another RCT of 17 children, after eight weeks of therapy. 33% of participants treated with domperidone noted an improvement in symptoms (P value was not significant). In neonates, the evidence is even weaker; one RCT of 26 neonates treated with domperidone over 24 hours showed that although reflux frequency was significantly increased, reflux duration was significantly improved.Diversity of RCT evidence was found regarding efficacy of compound alginate preparations(Gaviscon Infant(®) ) in infants, although as a result of these studies, Gaviscon Infant(®) was changed to become aluminium-free and has been assessed in its current form in only two studies since 1999. Given the diversity of study designs and the heterogeneity of outcomes, as well as the evolution in formulation, it was not possible to perform a meta-analysis on the efficacy of Gaviscon Infant(®) . Moderate evidence indicates that Gaviscon Infant(®) improves symptoms in infants, including those with functional reflux; the largest study of the current formulation showed improvement in symptom control but was limited by length of follow-up.No serious side effects were reported.No RCTs on pharmacological treatments for children with neurodisability were identified. Moderate evidence was found to support the use of PPIs, along with some evidence to support the use of H₂ antagonists in older children with GORD, based on improvement in symptom scores

  17. Misdiagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease as epileptic seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ayşe Kaçar; Canpolat, Mehmet; Karacabey, Neslihan; Gumus, Hakan; Kumandas, Sefer; Doğanay, Selim; Arslan, Duran; Per, Hüseyin

    2016-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can mimic epileptic seizure, and may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy. On the other hand, GERD can be more commonly seen in children with neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy (CP); this co-incidence may complicate the management of patients by mimicking refractory seizures. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical features, definite diagnoses and treatment approaches of the patients with clinically suspected GERD who were referred to the division of pediatric neurology with a suspected diagnosis of epileptic seizure. We also aimed to investigate the occurrence of GERD in children with epilepsy and/or CP. Fifty-seven children who had a final diagnosis of GERD but were initially suspected of having epileptic seizures were assessed prospectively. All patients were assigned to 3 groups according to definite diagnoses as follows: patients with only GERD who were misdiagnosed as having epileptic seizure (group 1: n=16; 28.1%), those with comorbidity of epilepsy and GERD (group 2: n=21; 36.8%), and those with the coexistence of GERD with epilepsy and CP (group 3: n=20; 35.1%). Five patients (8.8%) did not respond to anti-reflux treatment and laparoscopic reflux surgery was performed. The positive effect of GERD therapy on paroxysmal nonepileptic events was observed in 51/57 (89.5%) patients. GERD is one of the important causes of paroxysmal nonepileptic events. In addition, GERD must be kept in mind at the initial diagnosis and also in the long-term management of patients with neurological disorders such as epilepsy and CP. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Schatzki ring as a symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M D; Mendel'son, G

    2015-01-01

    To determine the importance of a symptom of Schatzki ring. The results of examining 95 patients aged 62-92 years with the symptoms of dyspepsia in the Netanya State Geriatric Center (Israel) in 1994-2004 were analyzed. Standard X-ray study of the upper digestive tract was complemented by provocation tests. The length of an X-ray-negative area (XNA) between barium in the esophagus and stomach and the width in the lower esophagus were measured. Only 2 (2%) of the 95 patients were found to have normal function of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Two patients with a drastic esophageal narrowing due to reflux esophagitis were excluded. The remaining (91) patients were divided into 2 groups. The width of the esophagus was less than 2 cm and 2 cm or more in 64 (70%) and 27 (30%) patients, respectively. In weak GEJ, there was esophageal dilatation above the XNA. When in a horizontal position, this portion of the esophagus evacuates its contents into the stomach as a result of ampullary function. It is proximally closed by contracting the functional proximal sphincter (PS). When the ampulla contracts, its pressure increases up to the threshold. This causes the XNA to be closed and the ampulla to inject its contents into the stomach. The wider was the ampulla, the shorter the XNA was. Schatzki ring was detected in 20 (22%) of the 91 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was always at the level of the PS. The so-called sliding esophageal hernia is an esophageal ampulla measuring more than 2 cm in wide. The presence of the esophageal ampulla despite its size suggests that the GEJ is incompetent and GERD is present. Schatzki ring occurs at the level of the PS due to reflux esophagitis.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, V V; Ignat, A; Ciubotariu, G; Ciubară, A; Moscalu, M; Burlea, M

    2016-11-01

    Some studies suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection would be a protective factor for the gastroesophageal reflux. The aim of this study was to explore this fact. A group of 72 children, admitted in a pediatric gastroenterology regional center in Northeast Romania, diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux by 24-hour continuous esophageal pH monitoring (results were interpreted using the Boix-Ochoa score), underwent upper endoscopy with gastric biopsy to detect the presence of H. pylori by the rapid urease testing and for bacteriological and histologic examination. 19 children (26.39%) had H. pylori infection, while 53 (73.61%) did not. The grade of esophagitis was classified according to the Los Angeles classification system. Out of 47 children with esophagitis A, 16 (34.04%) had H. pylori infection, while out of the 25 children with esophagitis B, only 3 (12%) had H. pylori infection, with statistic significance (χ(2) = 54.69, P < 0.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Regarding the value of the Boix-Ochoa score, it appears that the presence of the H. pylori determines lower pH-metry scores (F = 8.13, P = 0.0015, 95% CI). The presence of the H. pylori was not an important factor in the gastroesophageal reflux. On the other hand its relationship with esophagitis appears to be inverse ratio. The fact that the H. pylori presence is statistically greater in the grade A esophagitis could confirm the hypothesis that the bacteria would slow down the development of the esophagitis. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  20. Prevalence of pancreaticobiliary reflux in symptomatic cholelithiasis and its significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Bohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Pancreaticobiliary reflux (PBR is reflux of pancreatic enzymes into the biliary tree which occurs as a result of an anamoly of pancreaticobiliary junction (PBJ or functionally impaired sphincter. PBR is associated with changes in biliary epithelium and is known to cause benign and malignant biliary pathology. Various authors have reported prevalence of PBR in patients with normal PBJ ranging from 20 % to 83.5 %. With aim to detect the prevalence of PBR in patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis in Nepalese population we conducted this study. Materials and methods: Thirty patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC for symptomatic cholelithiasis were included in the study. History, physical findings and relevant investigations including liver function test, serum amylase and abdominal ultrasound were recorded. Bile sample for amylase was taken from gall bladder during LC percuatneously before manipulation of calot’s triangle and common bile duct. Bile amylase level above serum amylase level was considered positive for PBR. Results: Mean age of the patient was 37.27 (± 14.41 years. Out of 30, 6 (20 % patients were male and 24 (80 % were female. Mean BMI was 21.58 (± 3.2. PBR reflux was present in 66.7 % of patients out of which 2 were male and 18 were female that was not statistically significant (p = 1.41 when compared with patients without PBR. Conclusion: PBR occurs in patient with cholelithiasis and has role in pathogenesis of gallstones disease and gall bladder carcinoma. Long term surveillance would be required to ascertain the significance of detection of PBR after LC. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 1-6 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9666

  1. The effect of N-acetyl cysteine on laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Dabirmoghaddam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR is a variant of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in which the stomach contents go up into the pharynx and then down into the larynx. LPR causes a wide spectrum of manifestations mainly related to the upper and the lower respiratory system such as laryngitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cough, hoarseness, postnasal drip disease, sinusitis, otitis media, recurrent pneumonia, laryngeal cancer and etc. The object of this study was to examine the effect of N-acetyl Cysteine (NAC with and without Omeprazole on laryngitis and LPR. Ninety patients with laryngitis or its symptoms were referred and randomly assigned into three groups. The first group was treated by Omeprazole and NAC. The second group was treated by Omeprazole and placebo and the last group was treated by NAC and placebo. Duration of treatment was 3 months and all patients were evaluated at the beginning of study, one month and three month after treatment of sign and symptoms, based on reflux symptom index (RSI and reflex finding score (RFS. Based on the results of this study, despite therapeutic efficacy of all treatment protocols, the RSI before and after 3 months treatment had significant difference in (NAS+ Omeprazole and (Omeprazole+ placebo group (P<0.001 in the first group, P<0.001 in the second group and P=0.35 in the third group. Whereas RFS before and after 3 month treatment had significant difference in all groups. (P<0.001 in each group in comparison with itself but this results had not significant difference after 1 month treatment. Our results showed that the combination therapy with Omeprazole and NAC treatment had the most effect on both subjective and objective questionnaire at least after 3 months treatment. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that the use objective tools are more accurate than subjective tools in evaluation of therapeutic effects in patients with GERD-related laryngitis.

  2. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and hiatus hernia—endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, W.

    1974-01-01

    The endoscopic diagnosis of hiatal hernia (sliding type) relies on direct and indirect criteria during the oesophagoscopic or gastroscopic approach. A wide separation between the anatomic and mucosal oesophago-gastric junction, the presence of a so-called Schatzki-ring, a wandering junction with sliding gastric mucosal folds during inspiration and two ring-like structures are important. Whereas radiology seems to be superior to endoscopy in the diagnosis of asymptomatic hiatus hernia, oesophagoscopy may reveal sequelae of reflux like oesophagitis, erosions, ulcers and strictures. Peptic oesophagitis is found in about 10% to cause upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4449767

  3. Treatment of reflux disease during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dağlı, Ülkü; Kalkan, İsmail Hakkı

    2017-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is frequently seen during pregnancy. In the medical treatment of pregnant women with GERD, alginic acid and sucralfate can be used. Calcium- and magnesium-based antacids can also be used, particularly for patients with preeclampsia. In particular, ranitidine -a histamine-2 receptor blocker- is preferred. In the case of non-responsiveness to the abovementioned treatments, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), except omeprazole, can be given considering the benefit-harm ratio for the mother and fetus after the first trimester. In cases with GERD during the lactation period, drugs having minimum systemic absorption, such as sucralfate and alginic acid, are preferable but there is no data.

  4. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux in severely mentally retarded people: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Bos, J.; Niezen-de Boer, M.C.; Böhmer, C.J.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acid frequently backs up (or refluxes) into the gullet (or esophagus), and it has serious consequences for the quality of life. Usually this is felt as heartburn. Because severely mentally retarded people usually do not utter

  5. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: An overview of the cost-effectiveness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients who suffer from gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. (GORD) suffer from acid heartburn (dyspepsia) due to the reflux of stomach acid into the distal part of the oesophagus. Drug management is aimed at decreasing the amount of stomach acid that enters the distal oesophagus, usually by increasing the rate at which ...

  6. Psychometric evaluation of a daily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptom measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Reimer, Christine; Smith, Gary

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ), a newly developed measure of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Specifically, the HRDQ was developed for patients, who still experience symptoms with proton ...

  7. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  8. Effect of azithromycin on acid reflux, hiatus hernia and proximal acid pocket in the postprandial period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Bennink, R. J.; de Ruigh, A. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk for acidic reflux is mainly determined by the position of the gastric acid pocket. It was hypothesised that compounds affecting proximal stomach tone might reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux by changing the acid pocket position. Objective To study the effect of azithromycin (Azi)

  9. Effect of elimination of acid reflux on epithelial cell proliferative activity of Barrett esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, F.T.M.; Ganesh, S.; Kuipers, E.J.; Sluiter, W.J.; Karrenbeld, A.; de Jager - Krikken, A.; Klinkenberg-Knol, E.C.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Barrett esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition resulting from chronic acid gastroesophageal reflux and is associated with increased epithelial cell proliferation. Elimination of acid reflux might decrease cancer risk by affecting cell proliferation in BE. The effect of elimination of

  10. A systematic review of the role of proton pump inhibitors for symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, P.; Georgalas, C.; Bhattacharyya, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    . Proton pump inhibitors are currently used widely for the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux. . This systematic review assessed the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in the treatment of symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux. . Outcome measures used to assess efficacy of proton pump inhibitors

  11. Effect of hyoscine butylbromide on gastroesophageal reflux in barium studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, R.F.; Mathieson, J.R.; Chipperfield, P.M.; Grymaloski, M.R.; Wong, A.D.

    1994-12-01

    The presence or absence and severity of gastroesophageal reflux before and after intravenous injection of 120 mg Buscopan were evaluated in 112 consecutive patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal examination. The study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan) could artificially induce gastroesophageal reflux during barium examination of the upper intestinal tract. Gastroesophageal reflux was seen in 49 (44%) of the patients. There was no significant difference in the overall occurrence or degree of gastroesophageal reflux before and after injection of Buscopan. The routine use of Buscopan was therefore unlikely to spuriously increase the frequency or degree of gastroesophageal reflux observed on upper gastrointestinal barium studies. The study also showed that Buscopan had a satisfactory antispasmodic effect and few side effects. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemenkov Yu.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis. Material and Methods. Features of acidity in esophagus and cardial part of stomach was studied in 175 children aged 4 to 17 years with chronic gastroduodenitis by pH-monitoring. pH-monitoring was carried by «Gastroscan-24». Age and sex characteristics have been identified on examination results. Results. Children of preschool age experience the most unfavorable reflux from the stomach to the esophagus. Boys experience the pathological reflux more severely. Conclusions: Effectiveness of esophageal clearance is lower in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux progresses are more favorably in a standing position, especially in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux occurs more often in the supine position and has a longer and more aggressive course in preschool age boys.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants: a primary care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguin, Amy Lynn; Swartz, Martha K

    2004-01-01

    This clinical paper discusses the role of the pediatric nurse in the evaluation and management of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in infants. During an infant's first year of life, GER is a common occurrence and concern of families. The infant with uncomplicated GER may be managed conservatively with feeding schedule modifications, thickened feeds, changes in positioning, or a trial of formula change. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a pathological process in infants manifested by poor weight gain, signs of esophagitis, persistent respiratory symptoms or complications, and changes in neurobehavior. Management of the infant with GERD, in addition to non-pharmacological interventions, involves further diagnostic evaluation and pharmacologic therapy, depending upon the child's history and clinical presentation. While most cases of GER are self-limiting, complications include esophagitis, bronchospasm, apnea, aspiration pneumonia and other otolaryngologic disorders. The pediatric health care provider should offer an ongoing, comprehensive clinical approach to the family based on considerations of growth and development, and the quality of interactions between the caregivers and child.

  14. Current status of surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Derek S; Wilson, Nicole A; Warner, Brad W

    2016-06-01

    Surgical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is controversial with considerable debate ranging from the indications for antireflux surgery to surgical technique. This article will attempt to clarify these issues with the most up-to-date information available on the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of GERD in children. Although laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has become the most popular operation performed for pathologic reflux, its superiority over both open surgery and other types of fundoplication is not well established. Large retrospective studies suggest LNF has a lower complication rate than open surgery. However, three prospective randomized controlled trials have been published recently which cast doubt on the superiority of LNF and suggest that LNF may have a higher failure rate compared to open fundoplication. Antireflux surgery has higher morbidity and failure rates in infants and in children with neurologic impairment. Based on the best available evidence, LNF may be less morbid, but have a higher rate of failure than open surgery. Pediatric surgeons should be mindful of the risks and benefits of both approaches to best counsel their patients. Larger prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the best treatments for pediatric GERD.

  15. Pharmacological therapy of gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects.

  16. Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Information on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgowan, Regina; Greer, Leah C; D'Auria, Jennifer P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the type and quality of health information about infant gastroesophageal reflux (GER) that a parent may find on the World Wide Web. The data collection tool included evaluation of Web site quality and infant GER-specific content on the 30 sites that met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly found content categories in order of frequency were management strategies, when to call a primary care provider, definition, and clinical features. The most frequently mentioned strategies included feeding changes, infant positioning, and medications. Thirteen of the 30 Web sites included information on both GER and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mention of the use of medication to lessen infant symptoms was found on 15 of the 30 sites. Only 10 of the 30 sites included information about parent support and coping strategies. Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) should utilize well-child visits to address the normalcy of physiologic infant GER and clarify any misperceptions parents may have about diagnosis and the role of medication from information they may have found on the Internet. It is critical for PNPs to assist in the development of Web sites with accurate content, advise parents on how to identify safe and reliable information, and provide examples of high-quality Web sites about child health topics such as infant GER. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endoscopic treatment of reflux: management pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Armando J; Khoury, Antoine E

    2006-07-01

    The goal of this review is to contrast the issues in favor of and against the use of endoscopic injection therapy in an attempt to highlight the current state of flux and draw attention to areas that merit further research. Current publications have mostly addressed the expanding use of endoscopic injection therapy for vesicoureteral reflux treatment, generally reporting short-term success rates and endpoints. This growing body of literature is presented in the context of perceived benefits vs. disadvantages in comparison with other available treatment modalities. The management of vesicoureteral reflux has changed dramatically in the past decade, mostly because of the increasing acceptance of endoscopic injection therapy as an adequate, minimally invasive, and effective form of therapy. Recent advances in the composition of injectable materials have allowed for easier placement with a perceived favorable safety profile. In particular, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid has become the injectable material of choice, with quick acceptance and widespread use soon after its introduction in different countries. As we critically evaluate the evolving treatment options, the presented literature helps draw attention to some of the challenges we face and the need for long-term and carefully planned prospective studies to support our interventions.

  18. Factors that influence therapeutic outcomes in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    The term "symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD) refers to those patients who present with the typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation, yet do not have endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. The primary goals of managing symptomatic GERD are to control symptoms and improve quality of life. A clinical assessment of the GERD patient can identify important clinical features, such as atypical and extraesophageal symptoms for which acid-suppressive agents tend to be less effective. Performing an endoscopy can further identify the patient as having nonerosive reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, or Barrett\\'s esophagus-diagnoses which can help determine treatment but may not prove predictive of therapeutic response. Determining acid exposure through pH testing can predict therapeutic response, with those revealing an abnormal acid exposure time being more responsive to acid-suppressive therapy. However, the performance of an endoscopy and pH testing on each patient is clearly not practical. Whereas the natural history of symptomatic GERD is still largely undefined, acid-suppressive therapy appears to be the best approach available for both the short-term and long-term management of this disease.

  19. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-05-07

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett's esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett's esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett's esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett's esophagus.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in pregnancy: a longitudinal study.

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    Ramya, R S; Jayanthi, N; Alexander, P C; Vijaya, S; Jayanthi, V

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms are common in pregnancy. It often manifests for the first time in pregnancy during the first three months and ceases after delivery. To study the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux in each of the three trimesters by follow-up of pregnant women. To examine the association between dietary factors and GER in pregnancy. This was a prospective hospital-based study. Sixty four pregnant women in their first trimester attending an antenatal clinic were interviewed for symptoms of GER and for dietary details and followed up until term and delivery. Fifty women (83.4%) experienced either heartburn or regurgitation during pregnancy. GER was commoner in primi-gravida (69.3%) and 50% remained symptomatic until term. Regurgitation was more common than heartburn and was often associated with nausea/vomiting. Women with an antenatal history of GERD had 3.79 times the odds of developing symptoms in the third trimester. There was no difference in weight gain in those with and without GER. Spicy food significantly increased the risk of heartburn and green vegetables were protective. The incidence of GERD decreased over three trimesters. Weight gain did not increase the prevalence of GERD. Spicy food aggravated while green vegetables protected against GERD.

  1. Feed thickener for newborn infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

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    Huang, R C; Forbes, D A; Davies, M W

    2002-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common in newborn infants. A common first line management is the use of feed thickeners. In newborn infants with GOR, to evaluate the use of feed thickeners in reducing signs and symptoms of GOR, acid episodes on pH monitoring and histological evidence of oesophagitis. We searched MEDLINE from 1966 to December 2001, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002. CINAHL from 1982 to December 2001, and conference and symposia proceedings published in Pediatric Research 1990 to 1994. We also searched conference proceedings for the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (ESPGAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (NASPGAN) from 1994 to December 2001. We did not restrict the searches to the English language. All randomised controlled trials that examine the effects of thickening formulas on treating gastro-oesophageal reflux in neonates. The eligible studies were to compare thickened feeds to no intervention (unthickened feeds). Two independent reviewers identified potential studies from the literature search. Quality was independently assessed by two independent reviewers. No studies fulfilled the requirements for inclusion in the systematic review. There is no evidence from randomised controlled trials to support or refute the efficacy of feed thickeners in newborn infants with GOR. Given the absence of evidence, we cannot recommend using thickening agents for management of GOR in newborn infants.

  2. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

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    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  3. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

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    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER’s improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects.

  4. Deep axial reflux, an important contributor to skin changes or ulcer in chronic venous disease.

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    Danielsson, Gudmundur; Eklof, Bo; Grandinetti, Andrew; Lurie, Fedor; Kistner, Robert L

    2003-12-01

    We undertook this cross-sectional study to investigate the distribution of venous reflux and effect of axial reflux in superficial and deep veins and to determine the clinical value of quantifying peak reverse flow velocity and reflux time in limbs with chronic venous disease. Four hundred one legs (127 with skin changes, 274 without skin changes) in 272 patients were examined with duplex ultrasound scanning, and peak reverse flow velocity and reflux time were measured. Both parameters were graded on a scale of 0 to 4. The sum of reverse flow scores was calculated from seven venous segments, three in superficial veins (great saphenous vein at saphenofemoral junction, great saphenous vein below knee, small saphenous vein) and four in deep veins (common femoral vein, femoral vein, deep femoral vein, popliteal vein). Axial reflux was defined as reflux in the great saphenous vein above and below the knee or in the femoral vein to the popliteal vein below the knee. Reflux parameters and presence or absence of axial reflux in superficial or deep veins were correlated with prevalence of skin changes or ulcer (CEAP class 4-6). The most common anatomic presentation was incompetence in all three systems (superficial, deep, perforator; 46%) or in superficial or perforator veins (28%). Isolated reflux in one system only was rare (15%; superficial, 28 legs; deep, 14 legs; perforator, 18 legs). Deep venous incompetence was present in 244 legs (61%). If common femoral vein reflux was excluded, prevalence of deep venous incompetence was 52%. The cause, according to findings at duplex ultrasound scanning, was primary in 302 legs (75%) and secondary in 99 legs (25%). Presence of axial deep venous reflux increased significantly with prevalence of skin changes or ulcer (C4-C6; odds ratio [OR], 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.56-4.67). Of 110 extremities with incompetent popliteal vein, 81 legs had even femoral vein reflux, with significantly more skin changes or ulcer, compared

  5. Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux in Childhood Corrosive Oesophageal Strictures

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    Serdar H. İskit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux may accompany the corrosive oesophageal damage caused by the ingestion of corrosive substances and affect its treatment. The factors that affect the development of reflux in these cases and their effects on treatment still remain unclear. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with corrosive oesophageal strictures, the risk factors affecting this prevalence and the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux on treatment. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We enrolled 52 patients with oesophageal stricture due to corrosive substance ingestion who were referred to our clinic between 2003 and 2010. Groups, which were determined according to the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER, were compared with each other in terms of clinical findings, results of examination methods, characteristics of the stricture and success of the treatment. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 52; 30 of them were male and 22 of them were female. The mean age of our study population was 4.2±2.88 years. Thirty-three patients had gastro-oesophageal reflux (63.5%. Patients who had strictures caused by the ingestion of alkali substances were 1.6-times more likely to have reflux. There were no differences between patients with or without reflux in terms of number and localisation of strictures. Mean distance of stricture was longer in patients with reflux (3.7±1.8 cm than in patients without (2.2±1.0 cm (p0.05. Conclusion: Corrosive oesophageal stricture was usually accompanied by gastro-oesophageal reflux and the length of stricture is an important risk factor. Negative effects of reflux over dilatation treatment have not yet been demonstrated in the short-term. Nevertheless, this frequent rate of reflux may eventually increase the risk of oesophagitis and Barrett’s oesophagus; therefore, we suggest that these effects should be prospectively evaluated in a

  6. The association between reflux esophagitis and airway hyper-reactivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux

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    Ashraf Karbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER with a wide variety of pulmonary disorders was recognized. We aimed to evaluate the effect of GER-induced esophagitis on airway hyper-reactivity (AHR in patients and the response to treatment. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, 30 patients attending the gastrointestinal clinic of a university hospital with acid reflux symptoms were included. All patients were evaluated endoscopically and divided into case group with esophagitis and control group without any evidence of esophagitis. Spirometry and methacholine test were done in all patients before and after treatment of GER with pantoprazole 40 mg daily for six months. Results: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive methacholine test between the cases (40% and the controls (6.7% prior to anti-acid therapy (P < 0.0001. After six months of treatment, the frequency of positive methacholine test diminished from 40 to 13.3% in the case group (P < 0.05 but did not change in the controls (P = 0.15. Conclusion: The presence of esophagitis due to GER would increase the AHR and treatment with pantoperazole would decrease AHR in patients with proved esophagitis and no previous history of asthma after six months.

  7. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

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    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the

  8. Liquid-containing Refluxes and Acid Refluxes May Be Less Frequent in the Japanese Population Than in Other Populations: Normal Values of 24- hour Esophageal Impedance and pH Monitoring.

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    Kawamura, Osamu; Kohata, Yukie; Kawami, Noriyuki; Iida, Hiroshi; Kawada, Akiyo; Hosaka, Hiroko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Inamori, Masahiko; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hongo, Micho

    2016-10-30

    Twenty-four-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring allows detection of all types of reflux episodes and is considered the best technique for identifying gastroesophageal refluxes. However, normative data for the Japanese population are lacking. This multicenter study aimed to establish the normal range of 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH data both in the distal and the proximal esophagus in Japanese subjects. Forty-two healthy volunteers (25 men and 17 women) with a mean ± standard deviation age of 33.3 ± 12.4 years (range: 22-72 years) underwent a combined 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. According to the physical and pH properties, distal or proximal esophageal reflux events were categorized. Median 45 reflux events occurred in 24 hours, and the 95th percentile was 85 events. Unlike previous reports, liquid-containing reflux events are median 25/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 62/24 hours. Acidic reflux events were median 11/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 39/24 hours. Non-acidic gas reflux events were median 15/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 39/24 hours. Proximal reflux events accounted for 80% of the total reflux events and were mainly non-acidic gas refluxes. About 19% of liquid and mixed refluxes reached the proximal esophagus. Unlike previous studies, liquid-containing and acidic reflux events may be less frequent in the Japanese population. Non-acidic gas reflux events may be frequent and a cause of frequent proximal reflux events. This study provides important normative data for 24-hour impedance and pH monitoring in both the distal and the proximal esophagus in the Japanese population.

  9. Clinical inquiries. What is the best treatment for gastroesophageal reflux and vomiting in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Vanessa; Wright, Sarah Towner; Bell, Alfreda D

    2005-04-01

    The literature on pediatric reflux can be divided into studies addressing clinically apparent reflux (vomiting or regurgitation) and reflux as measured by pH probe or other methods. Sodium alginate reduces vomiting and improves parents' assessment of symptoms (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, small randomized controlled trial [RCT]). Formula thickened with rice cereal decreases the number of postprandial emesis episodes in infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (SOR: B, small RCT). There are conflicting data on the effect of carob bean gum as a formula thickener and its effect on regurgitation frequency (SOR: B, small RCTs). Metoclopramide does not affect vomiting or regurgitation, but is associated with greater weight gain in infants over 3 months with reflux (SOR: B, low-quality RCTs). Carob bean gum used as a formula thickener decreases reflux as measured by intraluminal impedance but not as measured by pH probe (SOR: B, RCT). Omeprazole and metoclopramide each improve the reflux index as measured by esophageal pH probe (SOR: B, RCT). Evidence is conflicting for other commonly used conservative measures (such as positional changes) or other medications for symptomatic relief of infant GERD. There is very limited evidence or expert opinion regarding breastfed infants, particularly with regard to preservation of breastfeeding during therapy.

  10. Salivary transforming growth factor alpha in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and reflux laryngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvo, Marco Antonio dos Anjos; Eckley, Claudia Alessandra; Rizzo, Luis Vicente; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Rodriguez, Tomas Navarro; Bussoloti Filho, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Saliva plays a key role in the homeostasis of the digestive tract, through its inorganic components and its protein growth factors. Sjögren's syndrome patients have a higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and laryngopharyngeal reflux. Decreased salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels were observed in dyspeptic patients, but there have been no studies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux. To compare the salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels of patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux to those of healthy controls. This is a prospective controlled study. Twelve patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux and 11 controls were prospectively evaluated. Spontaneous and stimulated saliva samples were obtained to establish salivary transforming growth factor alpha concentrations. The salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels of patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. Five patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux also had erosive esophagitis; their salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels were comparable to controls. Salivary transforming growth factor alpha level was significantly higher in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux when compared to the control group. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation Between Bile Reflux Gastritis and Biliary Excreted Contrast Media in the Stomach.

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    Hyun, Jong Jin; Yeom, Suk Keu; Shim, Euddeum; Cha, Jaehyung; Choi, Inyoung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between biliary excreted contrast media in the stomach and the presence of bile reflux gastritis. Consecutive 111 patients who underwent both gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (gadoxetic MRC) and gastric endoscopy were included in this study. We performed a review of the gadoxetic-MRC image sets acquired 60 minutes after intravenous injection of contrast media and endoscopic images. We recorded amount of contrast media in the stomach. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of duodenogastric bile reflux diagnosis were evaluated for the gadoxetic MRC. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test and the linear-by-linear association test. Among the 111 patients, 39 had 60-minute delayed images showing the presence of contrast media in the stomach. Of these 39 patients, 13 had bile reflux gastritis and 5 showed bile in the stomach without evidence of erythematous gastritis. Of the 72 patients who did not show contrast media in the stomach, none had bile reflux gastritis and 2 patients showed bile staining in the stomach without evidence of erythematous gastritis. Bile reflux gastritis was significantly more frequent in patients with contrast media in the stomach on gadoxetic MRC than in those without. Patients with high-grade extension of contrast media in the stomach had significantly frequent bile reflux gastritis than did those with low-grade extension. Biliary excreted contrast media in the stomach on 60-minute delayed gadoxetic MRC has a correlation with the presence of bile reflux gastritis on endoscopic examination.

  12. Venous reflux has a limited effect on calf muscle pump dysfunction in post-thrombotic patients.

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    Haenen, J H; Janssen, M C; Brakkee, A J; Van Langen, H; Wollersheim, H; De Boo, T M; Skotnicki, S H; Thien, T

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between calf muscle pump dysfunction (CMD) and the presence and location of valvular incompetence. Deep vein obstruction might influence CMD, and so venous outflow resistance (VOR) was measured. VOR and calf muscle pump function were measured in 81 patients, 7-13 years after venographically confirmed lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. The supine venous pump function test (SVPT) measures CMD, and the VOR measures the presence of venous outflow obstructions, both with the use of strain-gauge plethysmography. Valvular incompetence was measured using duplex scanning in 16 vein segments of one leg. Venous reflux was measured in proximal veins using the Valsalva manoeuvre, and in the distal veins by distal manual compression with sudden release. Abnormal proximal venous reflux was defined as a reflux time of more than 1 s, and abnormal distal venous reflux as a reflux time of more than 0.5 s. No statistically significant relationship was found between the SVPT and either the location or the number of vein segments with reflux. Of the 81 patients, only nine still had an abnormally high VOR, and this VOR showed no relationship with the SVPT. In conclusion, venous reflux has a limited effect on CMD, as measured by the SVPT. The presence of a venous outflow obstruction did not significantly influence the SVPT. Duplex scanning and the SVPT are independent complementary tests for evaluating chronic venous insufficiency.

  13. Pattern of food intolerance in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

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    Caselli, Michele; Lo Cascio, Natalina; Rabitti, Stefano; Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zeni, Elena; Soavi, Cecilia; Cassol, Francesca; Zuliani, Giovanni; Zagari, Rocco M

    2017-12-01

    Many food items have been involved in gastro-esophageal reflux disease pathogenesis and dietary modification has been proposed as first-line treatment. Test-based exclusion diets have shown to significantly reduce reflux symptoms. We aimed to assess the patterns of food intolerance in a series of patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). We retrospectively evaluated all patients with typical reflux symptoms, attending the Centre Study Association on Food Intolerance and Nutrition of Ferrara from January 2010 to October 2015, who resulted positive to at least one food item at the Leucocytotoxic Test. The presence and severity of typical GERS (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) were assessed using the Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire. Only individuals with a GIS Score of at least 5 points were included. Almost all patients (91.1%) were intolerant to at least 5 food items. The most frequent food intolerance (more than 33% of patients) were found for milk (55.4%), lettuce (46.4%), coffee (43.7%), brewer's yeast (42.9%), pork (42.9%), tuna (37.5%), rice (35.7%), sole (34.8%), asparagus (34.8%) and eggs (33.9%). Nine different clusters of food intolerance were detected. Patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms seem to have intolerance to multiple food items, some of which (lettuce, brewer's yeast, tuna, rice, sole and asparagus) have not yet been associated to gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  14. Mucosal changes in laryngopharyngeal reflux--prevalence, sensitivity, specificity and assessment.

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    Powell, Jason; Cocks, Helen C

    2013-04-01

    A literature review regarding the use of laryngopharyngeal mucosal signs in diagnosing laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Literature review. A search of MEDLINE in February 2012 using the terms laryngopharyngeal reflux, laryngitis, mucosa, appearances, and signs (English language only). One or more laryngopharyngeal mucosal signs associated with LPR were identified in 64% to 93% of healthy volunteers (3% >5 signs) and in 17% to 85% of gastroesophageal reflux disease sufferers (Reflux Finding Score [RFS] >7 in 24%). Reinke's edema, pseudosulcus, ventricular obliteration, vocal cord nodules, and granulomas have in some, but not all studies, been shown to be more prevalent in those with pH-proven pharyngeal reflux. Pseudosulcus, interarytenoid thickening, and Reinke's edema were more prevalent in those symptomatic of LPR than those not. The use of multiple mucosal signs may improve detection of reflux sufferers from asymptomatic controls. The RFS has a sensitivity and specificity of 87.8% and 37.5%, respectively, for picking up pH-proven pharyngeal reflux individuals. Inter- and intrarater reliability for identifying signs is fair to good in most studies. The limited evidence for each mucosal finding should be considered in making the diagnosis of LPR. Further quality research in to mucosal findings in LPR is needed. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Acid reflux directly causes sleep disturbances in rat with chronic esophagitis.

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    Kenichi Nakahara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy improves subjective but not objective sleep parameters in patients with GERD. This study aimed to investigate the association between GERD and sleep, and the effect of PPI on sleep by using a rat model of chronic acid reflux esophagitis. METHODS: Acid reflux esophagitis was induced by ligating the transitional region between the forestomach and the glandular portion and then wrapping the duodenum near the pylorus. Rats underwent surgery for implantation of electrodes for electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings, and they were transferred to a soundproof recording chamber. Polygraphic recordings were scored by using 10-s epochs for wake, rapid eye movement sleep, and non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. To examine the role of acid reflux, rats were subcutaneously administered a PPI, omeprazole, at a dose of 20 mg/kg once daily. RESULTS: Rats with reflux esophagitis presented with several erosions, ulcers, and mucosal thickening with basal hyperplasia and marked inflammatory infiltration. The reflux esophagitis group showed a 34.0% increase in wake (232.2±11.4 min and 173.3±7.4 min in the reflux esophagitis and control groups, respectively; p<0.01 accompanied by a reduction in NREM sleep during light period, an increase in sleep fragmentation, and more frequent stage transitions. The use of omeprazole significantly improved sleep disturbances caused by reflux esophagitis, and this effect was not observed when the PPI was withdrawn. CONCLUSIONS: Acid reflux directly causes sleep disturbances in rats with chronic esophagitis.

  16. Severe Gastrooesophageal Reflux Disease Associated with Foetal Alcohol Syndrome

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    N. K. Sujay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure may have adverse effects on the developing foetus resulting in significant growth restriction, characteristic craniofacial features, and central nervous system dysfunction. The toxic effects of alcohol on the developing brain are well recognised. However, little is known about the effects of alcohol on the developing gastrointestinal tract or their mechanism. There are few case reports showing an association between foetal alcohol syndrome and gastrointestinal neuropathy. We report a rare association between foetal alcohol syndrome and severe gastrooesophageal reflux disease in an infant who ultimately required fundoplication to optimise her growth and nutrition. The child had failed to respond to maximal medical treatment (domperidone and omeprazole, high calorie feeds, PEG feeding, or total parenteral nutrition. The effect of alcohol on the developing foetus is not limited to the central nervous system but also can have varied and devastating effects on the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Update on Gastroesophageal Reflux and Respiratory Disease in Children

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    Susan R Orenstein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric respiratory diseases have been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, but evidence regarding the association and its potential mechanisms continues to accumulate, and important aspects remain to be determined. Evidence for the association in two common pediatric respiratory disorders - infantile apnea and asthma in older children - and difficult clinical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of these two disorders are reviewed. The provocative embryological and physiological connections between the upper gastrointestinal tract and the respiratory tract, and recent understanding of the compensatory anatomy and physiology that protect the normal individual from respiratory manifestations of GERD are also explored. Dysfunctions of these protections likely underlie the pathophysiology of these disorders.

  18. Nonpharmacological management of gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Arcuri, Santo; Rossini, Roberto; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of feeding modalities, should be considered the most advisable choice in preterm infants with GOR. This review focuses on the conservative management of GOR in the preterm population, aiming to provide a complete overview, based on currently available evidence, on potential benefits and adverse effects of nonpharmacological measures. Nonpharmacological management of GOR might represent a useful tool for neonatologists to reduce the use of antireflux medications, which should be limited to selected cases of symptomatic babies.

  19. Nonpharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

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    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of feeding modalities, should be considered the most advisable choice in preterm infants with GOR. This review focuses on the conservative management of GOR in the preterm population, aiming to provide a complete overview, based on currently available evidence, on potential benefits and adverse effects of nonpharmacological measures. Nonpharmacological management of GOR might represent a useful tool for neonatologists to reduce the use of antireflux medications, which should be limited to selected cases of symptomatic babies.

  20. [Diagnostic value of alginate test in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, D S; Masharova, A A; Droxzdov, V N; Firsova, L D; Kozhurina, T S

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of single dose of gaviscon (the alginates test) in detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with heartburn symptoms. 123 patients (male 46, female 77, age 43.6 +/- 15.5 years) with symptoms suggestive of GERD were investigated. Symptom response to the alginates test compared in GERD positive and GERD negative patients according traditional diagnostic criteria of GERD (upper endoscopy, 24-hr pH-monitoring, esophageal manometry, response to treatment with PPIs). Of 91 (78.9%) patients with positive alginates test, 87 were classified as GERD positive and 4 as GERD negative. Of 32 (26%) patients with negative alginates test, 29 were GERD negative and 3 GERD positive. The results providing a sensitivity of alginates test of 96.7% and a specificity of 87.7%. The alginates test is sensitive and specific for diagnosing GERD in patients with typical GERD symptoms.

  1. Cisapride treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augood, C; MacLennan, S; Gilbert, R; Logan, S

    2000-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is an extremely common and usually self limiting condition in infants. When treatment is required, Cisapride, a pro-kinetic agent, has been commonly prescribed for the symptomatic management of GOR. There have been recent reports of possibly serious adverse events e.g. an increased QTc interval, cardiac arrhythmias, and death, associated with the use of Cisapride. To determine the effectiveness of Cisapride for symptoms of GOR in children compared with placebo or any other non-surgical treatments. Searches were conducted of the Cochrane Central Trials Register and the specialised Trials register of the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group, MEDLINE and Embase. Reference lists of relevant review articles and identified trials were scrutinised and forward citation searches were performed in the Science Citation Index on all trials identified. Randomised controlled trials that compared oral Cisapride therapy with placebo or with other non-surgical treatments for children with a diagnosis of GOR were included. Only studies in which Cisapride was administered orally for a minimum of one week and which documented at least one of the primary outcomes were included. The primary outcomes were defined as a change in symptoms at the end of treatment, presence of adverse events, occurrence of clinical complications, and weight gain. The secondary outcomes included physiological measures of GOR or histological evidence of oesophagitis. We dichotomised symptoms into 'same or worse' vs 'improved' and calculated summary odds ratios. Continuous measures of GOR (e.g. reflux index) were summarised as a weighted mean difference. All outcomes were analysed using a random effects method. Sensitivity analyses were also performed. Searches identified eight trials which met the inclusion criteria. Seven trials (a total of 236 participants) compared Cisapride with placebo. The odds ratio for 'same or worse' vs 'improved symptoms' at

  2. [Pathophysiology of reflux esophagitis in the elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshiya; Uetake, Tomoyoshi; Fujino, Masayuki A

    2002-08-01

    Recent reports indicate an increased prevalence of reflux esophagitis(RE) in Japan. There are many factors causing RE, and many kinds of changes associating aging are important in the causes of RE in the elderly patients. Characteristic features of the causes of RE in elderly patients are summarized here. Within the elderly patients, there are cases with persistent gastric acid secretion. Aging affections lead to esophageal motor dysfunctions and to failure of LES function(presbyesophagus). The elderly are complicated by orthopedic degenerative diseases with posture change due to osteoporosis; some pharmaceutical agents such as Ca-channel blockers or NSAIDs. Hiatal hernia is also an aggravating factor. In the future, elderly people with persistent gastric acid secretion will be increased based on declining prevalence of Helicobacter pylori. Therefore further increase in the prevalence and development of RE is foreseen in our country. Pathophysiology of RE in the elderly patients is expected to show various changes in the future.

  3. Use of proton pump inhibitors after anti-reflux surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodrup, A.; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, J.

    2014-01-01

    healthcare registries. Design A nationwide retrospective follow-up study of all patients aged >= 18 and undergoing first-time ARS in Denmark during 1996-2010. Two outcome measures were used: redemption of first PPI prescription after ARS (index prescription) and a marker of long-term use, defined......, respectively. Five-, 10- and 15-year risks of redeeming index PPI prescription were 57.5%, 72.4% and 82.6%, respectively. Similarly, 5-, 10- and 15-year risks of taking up long-term PPI use were 29.4%, 41.1% and 56.6%. Female gender, high age, ARS performed in most recent years, previous use of PPI and use......Objective Antireflux surgery (ARS) has been suggested as an alternative to lifelong use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in reflux disease. Data from clinical trials on PPI use after ARS have been conflicting. We investigated PPI use after ARS in the general Danish population using nationwide...

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants. Myths and misconceptions, where is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhy, Ahmed A

    2012-06-01

    Infantile gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common self-limited, physiological phenomenon. Infantile gastroesophageal reflux becomes pathological (gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD]) when symptoms become more severe or are associated with complications such as failure to thrive or hematemesis. Though it is a very common condition, there are several misconceptions and myths on GER/GERD diagnosis and management. Inappropriate investigations are frequently requested and unnecessary medications are increasingly prescribed, particularly in infants with symptoms attributed to possible GER/GERD. Several therapeutic interventions are used widely in GERD management, although some evidence is either insufficient or controversial.

  5. [Role of laryngopharyngeal reflux on the pathogenesis of vocal cord leukoplakia and early glottic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangping; Huang, Zuofeng; Wu, Ting; Wang, Lu; Wu, Jianuan

    2014-05-01

    To explore the significance of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in patients with vocal cord leukoplakia and early glottic cancer. Patients with vocal cord leukoplakia and early glottic cancer encountered in Nanfang Hospital between December 2012 to January 2014 were included in this study. Ambulatory 24 hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH) was applied to obtain LPR and GER events, as well as the reflux properties of substances. Tobacco and alcohol history was also evaluated. Sixteen healthy volunteers were recruited as normal controls. There were 26.3% (5/19) LPR patients in glottic cancer group, 35.3% (6/17) LPR patients in vocal cord leukoplakia group and 12.5% (2/16) LPR volunteers in normal controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the positive rate of LPR between early glottic cancer patients and normal controls as well as between vocal cord leukoplakia patients and normal controls (P > 0.05). There was statistically significance in numbers of acid reflux events, time of acid exposure, and time of acid clearance between vocal cord leukoplakia patients and normal controls as well as between glottic cancer patients and normal controls (P leukoplakia group and 6.3% (1/16) volunteer in normal controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the positive rate of GER between early glottic cancer patients and normal controls as well as between vocal cord leukoplakia patients and normal controls (P > 0.05). However, there was statistically significance in DeMeester scores between glottic cancer patients and normal controls (P leukoplakia patients and normal controls (P > 0.05). Reflux events were dominated by acid and weakly acidic reflux in upright position. Weakly alkaline reflux events in upright position, acid reflux events in supine position, and weakly alkaline reflux events in supine position in vocal cord leukoplakia patients were significantly more than those in

  6. The lack of correlation between upper tract changes on excretory urography and significant vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A W; Nixon, G W

    1980-02-01

    In a retrospective review of all excretory urograms and voiding cystourethrograms performed in a 1-year period in 391 children evaluated with a history of urinary infection 56 (14 per cent) had vesicoureteral reflux as well as a normal excretory urogram. Of the 89 children in the study with vesicoureteral reflux 56 (63 per cent) had a normal excretory urogram. The grade of reflux was II or greater in 49 per cent of the cases, which also had a normal excretory urogram. We conclude that an excretory urogram without a voiding cystourethrogram is an inadequate study for a child with a history of urinary infection.

  7. A successful experience in managing a chylous reflux: importance of lymphoscintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hossein; Sadeghi, Ramin; Ebrahimi, Emad; Rad, Mohammad Ali Ghodsi

    2014-05-01

    Chylous reflux is described as the backflow of chyle through the varicose lymphatics with incompetent lymph valves and leakage of the lymph. The valves in the dilated, varicose, tortuous lymph vessels become incompetent, and as a result, the lymph blended with chyle, reflux into the lower limbs or the genitalia. Reflux causes delayed lymphatic transport in the affected lower extremity and chronic lymphedema can develop. Vesicles containing chyle could appear on the skin of the involved parts, and milky fluid discharge of the lymph and chyle interferes greatly with quality of life.

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas without Cortical Venous Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonetti, Daniel A; Gross, Bradley A; Jankowitz, Brian T; Atcheson, Kyle M; Kano, Hideyuki; Monaco, Edward A; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade

    2017-11-01

    The rationale for treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) without cortical venous reflux is symptomatic resolution. Most studies of dAVF treatment, including those for stereotactic radiosurgery, have focused on angiographic obliteration instead of clinical symptomatic outcome. The authors evaluated their institutional experience with stereotactic radiosurgery for cerebral dAVFs without cortical venous reflux from 1991 to 2016, evaluating angiographic and clinical outcomes, focusing on the course of pulsatile tinnitus and/or ocular symptoms after treatment. They subsequently pooled their results with those from a systematic literature review. Pooled outcomes data from 349 low-risk dAVF (120 patients with pulsatile tinnitus and 229 patients with ocular symptoms) were analyzed. Over a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, 77% of patients presenting with pulsatile tinnitus experienced resolution and an additional 21% had improvement, with an angiographic obliteration rate of 70.9%. Among 229 patients with ocular symptoms from carotid-cavernous dAVFs, improvement or resolution of symptoms occurred in 95% of those with chemosis, 90% of those with ophthalmoparesis, and 96% of those with proptosis. The angiographic obliteration rate was 76.2%. There were six permanent complications in 349 total treated low-risk dAVF (1.7%). Rates of clinically significant symptomatic improvement/resolution of symptoms referable to "low-risk" dAVFs are even greater than their angiographic obliteration rate, an important factor in patient counseling and when considering the optimal treatment approach for these dAVFs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fundoplication in neonates and infants with primary gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung Geon; Yang, Hea Kyoung; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Byun, Shin Yun; Kim, Hae Young; Park, Jae Hong

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux in infant is a physiological process. However, surgery is performed in high risk infants with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when medical management fails. This study focuses on efficacy and safety of Nissen fundoplication for GERD in infants under age 12 months. This study was a retrospective case analysis of 11 neonates and infants under 12 months of age who underwent Nissen fundoplication following a failure of medical treatment between June 2010 and June 2013 at Pusan National University Children's Hospital. The records were reviewed to determine the effect of fundoplication on symptoms and post-operative complications. A total of 11 infants consist of four males and seven females. Mean birth weight was 2,305.5±558.6 g (1,390-3,130 g). They had some underlying disease, which are not related with GERD such as congenital heart disease (54.5%), prematurity (45.5%), neurologic disease (18.2%), respiratory disease (18.2%), and other gastrointestinal disease. Mean body weight at surgery was 3,803.6±1,864.9 g (1,938.7-5,668.5 g). Mean age at operation was 99.9±107.6 days (17-276 days). Duration from operation to full enteral feeding was 10.9 days. Symptoms related GERD disappeared in all patients including one who got reoperation. One infant died of congenital heart disease unrelated to surgery. There were no complications related to fundoplication. Fundoplication is effective and safe treatment in the neonates and infants with severe GERD.

  10. Referring physicians' decision making for pediatric anti-reflux procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papic, Jonathan C; Finnell, S Maria E; Leys, Charles M; Bennett, William E; Downs, Stephen M

    2014-05-01

    Rates of anti-reflux procedures (ARP) vary greatly among pediatric hospitals. How pediatric subspecialists make referral decisions for ARPs has not been described. The aim of this study was to characterize pediatric subspecialists' decision making for referring children for ARPs. Pediatric subspecialists at a single children's hospital were interviewed about their decision making when referring for ARPs. Qualitative analysis was performed on clinicians' perceptions of the risks and benefits of the treatment options. Clinical algorithms were derived from each interview and were compared using the Clinical Algorithm Nosology. Clinical Algorithm Structural Analysis (CASA) scores were calculated to assess algorithm complexity. Clinical Algorithm Patient Abstraction (CAPA) scores on a scale from 0 (different) to 10 (identical) were generated based on algorithm agreement. The interviews yielded 15 algorithms. There was substantial variation in the providers' perceived risks and benefits of the treatment options. CASA scores ranged from 8 to 28 and CAPA scores ranged from 0 to 5.7 (median, 0), indicating great variation in both complexity and patient management. Management variation included testing (33% of algorithms incorporated pH probe test, 67% upper gastrointestinal, and 47% small bowel follow-through), procedure contraindications (33% considered history of gagging a contraindication to ARP), and use of gastrojejunostomy tubes (20% using gastrojejunostomy tube before ARP). No standards exist for the decision to refer children with gastroesophageal reflux disease for ARP. There is great variation among pediatric subspecialists in their decision making. Differences in providers' perception of the risks and benefits of these procedures contribute to this variation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Oikonomidou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary care physicians face challenges in diagnosing and managing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ meets the standards of validity, reliability, and practicability. This paper reports on the validation of the Greek translation of the RDQ. RDQ is a condition specific instrument. For the validation of the questionnaire, the internal consistency of its items was established using the alpha coefficient of Chronbach. The reproducibility (test-retest reliability was measured by kappa correlation coefficient and the criterion of validity was calculated against the diagnosis of another questionnaire already translated and validated into Greek (IDGP using kappa correlation coefficient. A factor analysis was also performed. Greek RDQ showed a high overall internal consistency (alpha value: 0.91 for individual comparison. All 8 items regarding heartburn and regurgitation, GERD, had good reproducibility (Cohen’s κ 0.60-0.79, while the remaining 4 items about dyspepsia had a moderate reproducibility (Cohen’s κ=’ 0.40-0.59 The kappa coefficient for criterion validity for GERD was rather poor (0.20, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.36 and the overall agreement between the results of the RDQ questionnaire and those based on the IDGP questionnaire was 70.5%. Factor analysis indicated 3 factors with Eigenvalue over 1.0, and responsible for 76.91% of variance. Regurgitation items correlated more strongly with the third component but pain behind sternum and upper stomach pain correlated with the second component. The Greek version of RDQ seems to be a reliable and valid instrument following the pattern of the original questionnaire, and could be used in primary care research in Greece.

  12. Acid gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic infants is primarily a function of classic 2-phase and pH-only acid reflux event types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Frederick W; Hayes, John; Mousa, Hayat

    2009-05-01

    Combined esophageal pH monitoring (EPM) and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) reveal 4 unique acid gastroesophageal reflux (AGER) types in infants: classic 2-phase, single-phase, pH-only events (POEs), and re-reflux episodes. The extent to which different AGER event types contribute to AGER frequency, acid reflux exposure time (ARET), and the number of episodes lasting 5 minutes or longer, has never been reported. In this study, EPM/MII was used to assess AGER in symptomatic infants on the basis of these 4 AGER types. EPM/MII tracings from 12 symptomatic infants (POEs, and re-reflux episodes, respectively. In 20.2 hours of combined ARET, 52.3%, 2.3%, 42.4%, and 3.0% occurred during classic 2-phase, single-phase, POEs, and re-reflux episodes, respectively. Classic 2-phase and POE events were both more frequent than single-phase (P = 0.002 and P POEs (P = 0.0001). Of the 35 total AGER episodes that lasted 5 minutes or longer, 94% were classic 2-phase episodes or POEs (57% and 37%, respectively). In symptomatic infants, total AGER episodes, total ARET, and AGER episodes lasting 5 minutes or longer are largely a function of classic 2-phase and pH-only AGER types.

  13. Usefulness of assessment of voice capabilities in female patients with reflux-related dysphonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Adamonis, Kestutis; Toohill, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    ... and to assess voice changes following treatment. Six parameters of voice range profile (VRP) and five parameters of speech range profile were taken and analyzed from 60 dysphonic outpatient females with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR...

  14. Smaller volume, thickened formulas in the management of gastroesophageal reflux in thriving infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, V; Ross, G; Brown, S; Edell, D

    2000-11-01

    The effect of smaller volume, thickened formulas on gastroesophageal reflux is not clear. The frequency of gastroesophageal reflux and duration of acid pH in the esophagus were determined in six thriving infants using extended esophageal pH monitoring. There was a significant reduction in frequency of emesis and gastroesophageal reflux but not the duration of acid pH in the esophagus with the use of infant formula thickened with rice cereal to provide a nutritionally appropriate intake in a smaller volume. Thickening of formula with rice cereal in a nutritionally balanced form and smaller volume may be an appropriate strategy for reducing frequency of emesis and gastroesophageal reflux in thriving infants.

  15. Managing gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the very low-birth-weight infant postdischarge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrow, Tammy; Dressler-Mund, Donna; Kowal, Kelly; Dai, Susan; Wilson, Melissa D; Lasby, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms are common challenges for very low-birth-weight infants (Management of symptoms across healthcare disciplines may not be based on current evidence, and inconsistency can result in confusion for families and delayed interventions. The feeding relationship between infant and caregivers may be impaired when symptoms are persistent and poorly managed. An algorithm for managing gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms in very low-birth-weight infants (from hospital discharge to 12 months corrected age) was developed through the formation of a multidisciplinary community of practice and critical appraisal of the literature. A case study demonstrates how the algorithm results in a consistent approach for identifying symptoms, applying appropriate management strategies, and facilitating appropriate timing of medical consultation. Application to managing gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the neonatal intensive care unit will be briefly addressed.

  16. Effect of dietary sodium chloride on gastro-oesophageal reflux: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanen, Marissa C; Bredenoord, Albert J; Smout, André J P M

    2006-10-01

    It has been suggested that a high consumption of sodium chloride (NaCl) is associated with reflux symptoms. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of increased dietary NaCl intake on gastro-oesophageal reflux and reflux mechanisms. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study 10 healthy male subjects received 5 g NaCl or placebo in capsules per day for one week, after which concurrent manometric, pH and impedance monitoring was carried out for 4.5 h. Oesophageal acid exposure time (pH salt intake lowered LOS pressure overall and in the first postprandial hour (p<0.01). High dietary sodium intake does not increase gastro-oesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers, despite a decrease in LOS pressure.

  17. [Treatment with sodium alginate of gastroesophageal reflux disease in childhood: efficacy and tolerance assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestri, L

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of efficacy of sodium alginate (Gaviscon) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children 3-12 months old, assessed by 24 hours esophageal continuous pH monitoring. 28 children studied by 24 hours pH esophageal continuous monitoring before starting the treatment with Gaviscon 0.5 ml/Kg/dose four times a day, 20 minutes after meal. After 2 months of treatment, a second pH esophageal monitoring was performed, during therapy. Total number of refluxes, number of refluxes longer than 5 minutes and reflux index before and during treatment were evaluated, by multiple regression method. All pHmetric parameters showed a statistically significative improvement after 60 days of treatment.

  18. Overlap of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Jensen, Trine Holm; Henriksen, Susanne Lund

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common functional gastrointestinal conditions with significant impact on the daily lives of individuals. The objective was to investigate the prevalence and overlap...

  19. Esophageal mucosal integrity improves after laparoscopic antireflux surgery in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, F.A.; Rinsma, N.F.; Heurn, E.L. van; Sloots, C.E.; Siersema, P.D.; Houwen, R.H.; Zee, D.C. van der; Masclee, A.A.M.; Conchillo, J.M.; Herwaarden-Lindeboom, M.Y. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance reflects the conductivity of the esophageal mucosa and may be an instrument for in vivo evaluation of mucosal integrity in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) is a well-established

  20. Operative Treatments for Reflux After Bariatric Surgery: Current and Emerging Management Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treitl, Daniela; Nieber, Derek; Ben-David, Kfir

    2017-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that has a well-established connection with obesity. To ameliorate the morbidity associated with obesity, bariatric procedures have become an established pathway to accomplish sustained weight loss. In some procedures, such as with the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, weight loss is also accompanied by the resolution of GERD symptoms. However, other popular bariatric surgeries, such as the sleeve gastrectomy, have a controversial impact on their effect on reflux. Consequently, increased attention has been given to the development of strategies for the management of de novo or recurrent reflux after bariatric surgery. This article aims to discuss medical and surgical strategies for reflux after bariatric surgery, and their outcomes.

  1. Synthesis of nano sized ZnO by chemical method via refluxing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najidha, S.; Malik, M. M.; Shastri, Lokesh; Koutu, V.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, nanomaterials have attracted attention of researchers as advanced technological materials because of their unique structural, optical and electrical characteristics. In this work, ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction method in an aqueous solution via refluxing using Zinc acetate dehydrate and sodium hydroxide as precursors. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The XRD pattern indicates hexagonal wurtzite structure with average grain size of 0.628nm and 0.491nm at refluxing temperatures 90°C and 100°C respectively. The FESEM images reveal that the as-prepared powder shows cubical structures with hexagonal base with an average size of ˜47 nm for 90°C reflux sample and ˜44nm for 100°C reflux sample.

  2. Long-term treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), characterized by heartburn and acid regurgitation, is one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases general practitioners encounter. GORD is effectively treated with acid suppressive medication (ASM), of which proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are most

  3. Is the use of esomeprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease a cost-effective option in Poland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryszyn, Pawel; Staniak, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej

    2016-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esomeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in Poland. Studies comparing esomeprazole with other PPIs in the treatment of erosive esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease maintenance therapy were systematically reviewed. 9 randomized clinical trials were selected, meta-analyses were conducted. Cost data derived from Polish Ministry of Health and Pharmacies in Wroclaw. In the treatment of erosive esophagitis esomeprazole was significantly more effective than other PPIs. Both for 4- and 8-week therapy respective incremental cost-effectiveness ratio values were acceptably low. Differences in effectiveness of non-erosive reflux disease therapy were not significant. The replacement of pantoprazole 20 mg with more effective esomeprazole 20 mg in the 6-month maintenance therapy was associated with a substantially high incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

  4. Colonic fermentation influences lower esophageal sphincter function in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piche, Thierry; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Sacher-Huvelin, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colonic fermentation of carbohydrates is known to influence gastric and esophageal motility in healthy subjects. This study investigated the effects of colonic fermentation induced by oral administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux d...

  5. A randomized trial comparing reflux symptoms in sleeve gastrectomy patients with or without hiatal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Brad; Wilson, Erik; Wilson, Todd; Mehta, Sheilendra; Bajwa, Kulvinder; Klein, Conniw

    2016-11-01

    The effect of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on reflux symptoms is unclear. Many surgeons offer SG only to patients with minor or no reflux symptoms, fearing that patients with severe reflux symptoms will experience worsening of their condition after SG. Many also advocate crural repair at the time of SG to prevent de novo or worsening reflux symptoms. These decisions are made without suitable data to form such conclusions. To determine the effect of SG with or without hiatal hernia repair on reflux symptoms. University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was administered to 100 consecutive, preoperative SG patients who were then randomly assigned into a crural repair group or nonrepair group in a parallel design. The patients were subsequently followed-up every 3 months for 1 year. We compared reflux symptoms of the 2 groups on the basis of demographic characteristics, body mass index, weight loss, presence and size of hiatal hernia, and GSRS for 12 months. At 1 year, with 78% follow-up, the data demonstrated a significant decrease in the GSRS for both groups (Phiatal hernia size did not correlate with change in the GSRS score. The only variable that affected outcome was the preoperative GSRS. At 12 months, 38% of patients with a preoperative GSRS score less than the median score of the study population experienced worsening of their symptoms compared with only 2% of patients who had a preoperative GSRS score greater than the median. Overall, 19% experienced worsening reflux (5% de novo), 14% had no change, and 66% reported an improvement in symptoms. These data suggest that a crural repair at the time of SG does not significantly reduce reflux symptoms compared with SG alone. Preoperative patients with significant reflux symptoms experienced a more significant improvement in symptoms after surgery compared with those who did not report significant reflux symptoms before surgery. The high incidence of

  6. Use of the Montreal global definition as an assessment of quality of life in reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, R A; Macgill, A; Parkman, H P; Friedenberg, F K

    2012-08-01

    According to the Montreal Consensus Group's classification, gastroesophageal reflux disease develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications such as esophagitis. The characteristic gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms included in this statement are retrosternal burning and regurgitation. Troublesome is meant to imply that these symptoms impact on the well-being of affected individuals; in essence, quality of life (QOL). Whether heartburn and regurgitation symptoms would be characterized as more troublesome in those with confirmed pathologic acid reflux was determined. A second purpose was to assess how well troublesome scores correlated with the results of a validated, disease-specific QOL instrument. Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with 48-hour wireless esophageal pH testing off proton pump inhibitor therapy were interviewed. Esophagitis on EGD or pH Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) 25-item questionnaire. Sixty-seven patients (21 males, 46 females) with mean age 47.8 ± 15.6 years were identified. Forty (59.7%) had an EGD or pH study positive for acid reflux. Overall 35/40 (87.5%) complained of either heartburn or regurgitation. There was no difference (P= 0.80) in heartburn VAS troublesome ratings for those with (54.0 ± 43.9) and without (56.7 ± 37.6) confirmed acid reflux. The same was true for regurgitation VAS troublesome ratings (P= 0.62). Likewise, mean QOLRAD scores did not differ between those with and without confirmed acid reflux by pH or EGD (4.5 ± 1.7 vs. 4.3 ± 1.7; P= 0.61). There was a moderately strong inverse correlation between patient self-rated VAS troublesome scores for both heartburn and regurgitation with each dimension (emotional distress, sleep disturbance, eating problems, physical/social functioning, and vitality) of the QOLRAD (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In regression analysis, both heartburn and regurgitation troublesome ratings were

  7. Clinical studies of contact granuloma and posterior laryngitis with special regard to esophagopharyngeal reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Ylitalo, Riitta

    2000-01-01

    This investigation had two main goals. The first goal was to evaluate the clinical symptoms and signs of contact granuloma patients and to study the short-and long-term treatment outcomes. The second goal was to determine the occurrence of esophagopharyngeal reflux (EPR) in patients with contact granuloma and patients with posterior laryngitis, as well as in healthy controls, and to study the association of symptoms, laryngeal findings, and esophagopharyngeal reflux. In ...

  8. The effect of a sports drink on gastroesophageal reflux during a run-bike-run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H P; Wiersma, J W; Koerselman, J; Akkermans, L M; Bol, E; Mosterd, W L; de Vries, W R

    2000-01-01

    The effects of different modes of prolonged exercise and different drinks on gastroesophageal reflux and reflux-related symptoms were examined. In a cross-over design seven male triathletes performed two tests at one week intervals (50 min periods of alternately running, cycling and running at 70-75% VO2max), with supplementation of either a conventional sports drink (7% carbohydrates) or tap water. Gastroesophageal reflux (percentage time and number of periods esophageal pH < 4) was measured with an ambulant pH system before, during and after exercise. Percentage reflux time (+/- SEM) during running, cycling, running and recovery was 24.0 +/- 4.6, 8.2 +/- 4.8, 17.6 +/- 8.4 and 11.8 +/- 4.0 with carbohydrates and 7.4 +/- 2.9, 0 +/- 0, 2.4 +/- 1.4 and 0.2 +/- 0.2 with water, respectively. Reflux lasted longer during exercise as compared to the rest situation (5.6 + 1.4%), especially with carbohydrates, and lasted longer with carbohydrates than with water (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon signed rank test). In general, reflux lasted longer during running than during cycling (P < 0.05). Data on the number of reflux periods are concordant to these results. Chest pain was reported by one subject during running with carbohydrates. Heartburn during running was reported by two subjects with water and by one with carbohydrates. In conclusion, physical exercise increases gastroesophageal reflux, dependent on the mode of exercise and beverage used.

  9. Effect of alginate and alginate-cimetidine combination therapy on stimulated postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, N; Denton, G

    1995-11-01

    This randomized, single-blind cross-over study compared the effectiveness of a conventional alginate reflux barrier formulation (20 mL single dose of Liquid Gaviscon; sodium alginate, sodium bicarbonate, calcium carbonate) with a 20 mL single dose of an alginate-cimetidine combination formulation (Algitec Suspension; sodium alginate, cimetidine) in the suppression of food and acid reflux into the oesophagus after a test meal in 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects were fasted overnight before the study. A pH electrode and gamma detector were accurately positioned 5 cm above the cardia. The volunteers received a 99mTc-labelled meal designed to provoke reflux and then either remained untreated, or 30 min later were given either Algitec Suspension or Liquid Gaviscon. Reflux of both food and acid into the oesophagus was measured for 3 h. There was a seven day wash-out period between each treatment. Food reflux in the control group was 22,878 +/- 14,385 counts x 10(3) and this was significantly suppressed by both Liquid Gaviscon (174 +/- 128 (s.e.) counts x 10(3); P = 0.003); however, although the reduction of food reflux to 3812 +/- 2322 counts x 10(3) observed after Algitec treatment was considerable, this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05) due to the large intersubject variation. Liquid Gaviscon was significantly better at reducing food reflux than Algitec (P = 0.001). Gaviscon also significantly reduced acid reflux when compared with the control group (1.08 +/- 0.73 vs 5.87 +/- 3.27% recording time oesophageal pH pH Gaviscon treatment was also not significant.

  10. The effects of gaviscon and metoclopramide in gastroesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, D; Hodgson, M; Hill, R

    1986-01-01

    Oral metoclopramide (0.5 mg/kg/24 h) and a liquid alginic acid-antacid compound were administered to infants and children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. The effect of medication was measured with 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring. Neither metoclopramide nor the alginic acid-antacid compound decreased the frequency or duration of gastroesophageal reflux.

  11. Heating of solid target in electron refluxing dominated regime with ultra-intense laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kodama, R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Chen, S. N.; Clark, D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Fuchs, J.; Green, J. S.; Gregory, C. D.; Guillou, P.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hey, D. S.; Highbarger, K.; Jaanimagi, P.; Key, M. H.; Koenig, M.; Krushelnick, K.; Lancaster, K. L.; Loupias, B.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Mackinonn, A. J.; Mima, K.; Morace, A.; Nakamura, H.; Norryes, P. A.; Piazza, D.; Rousseaux, C.; Stephans, R. B.; Storm, M.; Tampo, M.; Theobald, W.; Woerkom, L. V.; Weber, R. L.; Wei, M. S.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-05-01

    Propagation of electron beams generated in laser-plasma interactions is strongly influenced by self-induced electrostatic fields at target-vacuum interfaces, resulting the refluxing of electrons. We confirmed the refluxing and propagation of electrons with three different kinds of target configurations; thin-wide foil, thin-narrow foil, and long-wire geometry. Enhancement of target heating, effective guiding and collimation of high density MeV electrons were observed.

  12. Gastro-esophageal reflux in children:Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Hauser,Bruno; Devreker,Thierry; Mahler, Tania; Degreef, Elisabeth; Veereman-Wauters, Gigi

    2011-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and is a normal physiologic process occurring several times per day in healthy individuals. In infants and toddlers, no symptoms allow to diagnose GERD or to predict response to therapy. In older children and adolescents, history and physical examination may be sufficient to diagnose GERD.Endoscopically visible breaks in the distal esophageal mucosa are the most reliable evidence of reflux esophagitis. Esophag...

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    OpenAIRE

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniqu...

  14. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: new understanding in a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregods, T V K; Bredenoord, A J; Smout, A J P M

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in the last decades and it is now one of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout time our insight in the pathophysiology of GERD has been characterized by remarkable back and forth swings, often prompted by new investigational techniques. Even today, the pathophysiology of GERD is not fully understood but it is now recognized to be a multifactorial disease. Among the factors that have been shown to be involved in the provocation or increase of reflux, are sliding hiatus hernia, low lower esophageal sphincter pressure, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, the acid pocket, obesity, increased distensibility of the esophagogastric junction, prolonged esophageal clearance, and delayed gastric emptying. Moreover, multiple mechanisms influence the perception of GERD symptoms, such as the acidity of the refluxate, its proximal extent, the presence of gas in the refluxate, duodenogastroesophageal reflux, longitudinal muscle contraction, mucosal integrity, and peripheral and central sensitization. Understanding the pathophysiology of GERD is important for future targets for therapy as proton pump inhibitor-refractory GERD symptoms remain a common problem. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms leading to reflux and the factors influencing perception, in the light of historical developments. It is clear that further research remains necessary despite the recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reflux Incidence among Exclusively Breast Milk Fed Infants: Differences of Feeding at Breast versus Pumped Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourkavitch, Jennifer; Zadrozny, Sabrina; Flax, Valerie L

    2016-10-14

    The practice of feeding infants expressed breast milk is increasing in the United States, but the impacts on infant and maternal health are still understudied. This study examines the monthly incidence of regurgitation (gastro-esophageal reflux) in exclusively breast milk fed infants from ages two to six months. Among infants whose mothers participated in the Infant Feeding Practices II Study (IFPS II; 2005-2007), data on reflux and feeding mode were collected by monthly questionnaires. A longitudinal, repeated measures analysis was used, with feeding mode lagged by one month in order to compare reflux incidence among infants fed directly at the breast to infants receiving pumped breast milk. Mothers in both feeding groups had similar characteristics, although a greater proportion feeding at least some pumped milk were primiparous. The number of exclusively breastfed infants decreased steadily between months 2 and 6, although the proportion fed at the breast remained similar over time. An association between feeding mode and reflux incidence was not found; however, the analyses were limited by a small number of reported reflux cases. More studies are needed to further explain the relationship between different feeding modes and infant reflux.

  16. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease: comparison between patients with and without esophagitis, concerning age, gender and symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasi, A; de Moraes-Filho, J P; Zilberstein, B; Cecconello, I; Gama-Rodrigues, J

    2001-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may or may not have endoscopic esophagitis; there are few studies comparing these groups among themselves. This study was designed in order to evaluate differences between patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with and without esophagitis. A hundred and twenty-two patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease characterized by esophageal endoscopy and pHmetry were included, 90 with and 32 without esophagitis. Assessment involved an anamnesis, including the following data: age, sex, heartburn, dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain and respiratory symptoms. Heartburn was analyzed in more detail, its duration, intensity and periodicity being determined. No statistical significant difference was observed between the groups, regarding age, sex or presence of symptoms. However, in the group with esophagitis, heartburn classified as severe or very severe was more frequent. 1. The groups of patients with or without esophagitis analyzed were very similar concerning age, gender and presence of symptoms. However, regarding the heartburn's intensity, it was more intense in the group with esophagitis. 2. Among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, there is a large number of cases without esophagitis (26.2%) and that prolonged pH-monitoring is fundamental in its identification; 3. A better definition of reflux disease, esophagitis and pathological reflux is needed, in order to allow better diagnostic accuracy and comparisons in different studies on this subject.

  17. Evaluation of bile reflux in HIDA images based on fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Rong-Chin; Huang, Wen-Lin; Fan, Yu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new method to help physicians assess, using a hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid scan image, whether or not there is bile reflux into the stomach. The degree of bile reflux is an important index for clinical diagnosis of stomach diseases. The proposed method applies image-processing technology combined with a hydrodynamic model to determine the extent of bile reflux or whether the duodenum is also folded above the stomach. This condition in 2D dynamic images suggests that bile refluxes into the stomach, when endoscopy shows no bile reflux. In this study, we used optical flow to analyze images from Tc99m-diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (Tc99m-DISIDA) to ascertain the direction and velocity of bile passing through the pylorus. In clinical diagnoses, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the main clinical tool for evaluating functional images of hepatobiliary metabolism. Computed tomography (CT) shows anatomical images of the external contours of the stomach, liver, and biliary extent. By exploiting the functional fusion of the two kinds of medical image, physicians can obtain a more accurate diagnosis. We accordingly reconstructed 3D images from SPECT and CT to help physicians choose which cross sections to fuse with software and to help them more accurately diagnose the extent and quantity of bile reflux. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Time esophageal pH < 4 overestimates the prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Sheldon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Stanford University study reported that in asymptomatic GERD patients who were being treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, 50% had pathologic esophageal acid exposure. Aim We considered the possibility that the high prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux might simply have resulted from calculating acidity as time pH Methods We calculated integrated acidity and time pH Results The prevalence of pathologic 24-hour esophageal reflux in both studies was significantly higher when measured as time pH Conclusion In GERD subjects treated with a PPI, measuring time esophageal pH

  19. Pediatric febrile urinary tract infections: the current state of play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewitt Ian K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies undertaken in recent years have improved our understanding regarding the consequences and management of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs, which are amongst the most common serious bacterial infections in childhood, with renal scarring a frequent outcome. In the past pyelonephritic scarring of the kidney, often associated with vesico-ureteral reflux (reflux nephropathy was considered a frequent cause of chronic renal insufficiency in children. Increasing recognition as a consequence of improved antenatal ultrasound, that the majority of these children had congenital renal hypo-dysplasia, has resulted in a number of studies examining treatment strategies and outcomes following UTI. In recent years there is a developing consensus regarding the need for a less aggressive therapeutic approach with oral as opposed to intravenous antibiotics, and less invasive investigations, cystourethrography in particular, following an uncomplicated first febrile UTI. There does remain a concern that with this newer approach we may be missing a small subgroup of children more prone to develop severe kidney damage as a consequence of pyelonephritis, and in whom some form of intervention may prove beneficial. These concerns have meant that development of a universally accepted diagnostic protocol remains elusive.

  20. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in children for benign conditions: indications and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prema Menon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the indications and outcome of laparoscopic nephrectomy for benign non-functioning kidneys in children. Materials and Methods: The data of all patients operated over a 10 year period was retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were 56 children, aged 4 months to 12 years with a male: female ratio of 2.3:1. The most common presentation in boys and girls was urinary tract infection (UTI (61.5% and 47.05% respectively. Incontinence due to ectopic ureter was a close second in girls (41.17%. The most common underlying conditions were vesico-ureteric reflux (42.85% and multicystic dysplastic kidney (23.2%. There were 6 nephrectomies, 4 heminephroureterectomies and the remaining nephroureterectomies. All children tolerated the surgery well. One patient underwent a concomitant cholecystectomy. The post-operative problems encountered were UTI (1, urine retention (1, pyonephrosis in the opposite kidney and development of contra-lateral reflux (1. All others had resolution of pre-operative symptoms with good cosmesis. Conclusions: As per available literature, this appears to be the largest Indian series of pediatric laparoscopic nephrectomies for benign non-functioning kidneys. Laparoscopic approach gives excellent results provided pre-operative investigations rule out other causes for the symptoms with which the patient presents. Often it is not the kidney but the dilated dysplastic ureter which is the seat of stasis and infection or pain and therefore should be completely removed.

  1. EMPIRIC THERAPY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGIC MANIFESTATIONS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature shows that a strong relationship exists between the symptoms of otolaryngologic diseases and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. It is commonly observed that an extended physical examination is needed to determine the occurrence of GERD. This non-randomized,prospective quasi-experimental study was performed to clinically verify the relationship between otolaryngologic symptoms and GERD and to show that a search for GERD is necessary under conditions that patients do not respond to initial routine treatment for otolaryngologic symptoms. Extended physical examination of patients who had been referred to an Ear, Nose and throat (ENThospital revealed that GERD-related laryngeal signs were present in 55 patients. Otolaryngologic symptoms detected in decreasing order of occurrence were posterior nasal drip, chronic pharyngitis, chronic cough, hoarseness, ear pain, chronic throat clearing and pruritus in the ear. Furthermore, 66% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms that included heartburn, dysphagia, odynophagia, aspiration, globus hystericus, dyspepsia and foreign body sensation. Signs observed during the physical examination were posterior pharyngitis, granular pharyngitis, inflamed arytenoids, contact granuloma, and pachyderma laryngitis. We administered proton pump inhibitor to all patients and recommended to change their life style. The follow up program was a 6-month period. Only 53 patients showed up for the follow up. The overall response rate to the therapeutic regimen was 83%. In treating otolaryngologic patients, especially those who are resistant to routine treatments, a careful extended physical examination including an indirect laryngoscopy for diagnosis of GERD is recommended.

  2. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: The role of endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldani, Helena As; Nunes, Daltro La; Ferreira, Cristina T

    2012-08-16

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a growing problem in the pediatric population and recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutics have improved their management, particularly the use of esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Most of the current knowledge is derived from studies in adults; however there are distinct features between infant onset and adult onset GERD. Children are not just little adults and attention must be given to the stages of growth and development and how these stages impact the disease management. Although there is a lack of a gold standard test to diagnose GERD in children, EGD with biopsy is essential to assess the type and severity of tissue damage. To date, the role of endoscopy in adults and children has been to assess the extent of esophagitis and detect metaplastic changes complicating GERD; however the current knowledge points another role for the EGD with biopsy that is to rule out other potential causes of esophagitis in patients with GERD symptoms such as eosinophilic esophagitis. This review highlights special considerations about the role of EGD in the management of children with GERD.

  3. Complications of bariatric surgery: dumping syndrome, reflux and vitamin deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jan; Deloose, Eveline

    2014-08-01

    Bariatric surgical procedure are increasingly and successfully applied in the treatment of morbid obesity. Nevertheless, these procedures are not devoid of potential long-term complications. Dumping syndrome may occur after procedures involving at least partial gastric resection or bypass, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy. Diagnosis is based on clinical alertness and glucose tolerance testing. Treatment may involve dietary measures, acarbose and somatostatin analogues, or surgical reintervention for refractory cases. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be aggravated by vertical banded gastroplasty and sleeve gastrectomy procedures, but pre-existing GERD may improve after RYGB and with adjustable gastric banding. Nutrient deficiencies constitute the most important long-term complications of bariatric interventions, as they may lead to haematological, metabolic and especially neurological disorders which are not always reversible. Malabsorptive procedures, poor postoperative nutrient intake, recurrent vomiting and poor compliance with vitamin supplement intake and regular follow-up are important risk factors. Preoperative nutritional assessment and rigourous postoperative follow-up plan with administration of multi-vitamin supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended in all patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux associated with paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Liaudet, Lucas; Wiesel, Paul; Bettschart, Vincent; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be associated with episodes of bronchoaspiration, sometimes leading to life-threatening respiratory complications. GERD is frequently observed in the setting of type 1 (sliding type) hiatal hernia, but only infrequently complicates the course of type 2 (paraesophageal) hernia. We performed a retrospective analysis of 50 patients operated for type 2 hiatal hernia in our hospital, to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints related to GERD in this setting. We found 7 cases (14%) of type 2 hiatal hernia complicated by pulmonary manifestations as the only symptoms of GERD. These ranged from dyspnea to severe bronchoconstriction and acute respiratory failure. The series is illustrated by the report of 1 patient who experienced acute bronchospasm and cardiopulmonary arrest as a complication of GERD. In all patients, surgical repair of the hiatal hernia, together with an antireflux procedure, resulted in complete resolution of the respiratory complaints for follow-up periods up to 160 months. Our data emphasize the particular prevalence of respiratory involvement in the case of GERD complicating type 2 hiatal hernia, and also the excellent symptomatic results obtained by surgical therapy for this condition.

  5. Effect of sodium polyacrylate on chronic reflux esophagitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Y; Fujii, Y; Yamashita, T

    1981-01-01

    Sodium polyacrylate (PANa) is a high-molecular compound which makes a very viscous aqueous solution. It was reported that PANa has a preventive effect on spontaneous gastroesophageal ulceration in swine. In this study, the effect of PANa on the chronic reflux esophagitis in rats induced by total gastrectomy followed by esophagojejunostomy was investigated. Ulceration and hyperplasia began to develop in the esophageal region about 10 days after the operation. PANa was dissolved in drinking water and the rats were allowed free access to the solution. The development of ulceration and hyperplasia was significantly inhibited by the treatment with PANa in a dose-dependent manner (0.02-0.5%). Histological findings at 30 days after the operation indicated that PANa caused a significant inhibition of the ulceration and a significant acceleration of the regeneration of the mucosa. On the other hand, other viscous compounds such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate and a specific trypsin inhibitor such as leupeptin showed no significant inhibition against the esophagitis. The decrease in the red blood cell count and in hematocrit value caused by the esophagitis was significantly prevented by the treatment with PANa.

  6. Work productivity and activity impairment in gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korean full-time employees: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Gyu; Kim, Jae J; Yim, Da-Hae; Park, Sue K; Park, Soo-Heon

    2012-04-01

    The costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease have not been assessed in Asia, even though the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is gradually increasing. We evaluated work presenteeism and absenteeism as indirect costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korea. This was a cross-sectional and multicentre study using patient-reported outcome instruments. A total of 1009 full-time employees who visited the gastrointestinal department for any reason (281 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and 728 controls) were included. Main outcomes were presenteeism and absenteeism measured as work productivity loss and monetary cost per week. Absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (1.49% vs. 0.46%, P=0.0010; 34.13% vs. 9.23%, Pproductivity was significantly greater in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (33.09% vs. 9.02%; Pproductivity difference between the two groups represented an additional productivity loss of 11.7h/week in the gastroesophageal reflux disease group compared with the control group. Assuming average hourly wages of $14.12, the weekly burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease reached $165.07 per person. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was associated with substantial work productivity loss, mainly due to presenteeism rather than absenteeism, in Korean full-time employees. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum lipid levels are positively associated with non-erosive reflux disease, but not with functional heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, J; Suzuki, H; Iwasaki, E; Yokoyama, H; Sugino, Y; Hibi, T

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome and obesity are known risk factors for gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), especially for erosive esophagitis. Although non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is probably associated with obesity or other metabolic syndrome, there is little direct evidence to support this assertion. Workers in Keio University who underwent a general health examination between September 2006 and August 2007 were enrolled. Reflux symptom questionnaires were administered and metabolic parameters were obtained. The severity of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) was scored using a validated scale of videoesophagography. Two hundred and eighty-three subjects (243 men and 40 women; mean age 49.8 +/- 6.9 years) with no radiographic evidence of erosive esophagitis were enrolled. The severity of GER was worse among men than among women, whereas the severity of reflux symptoms was worse among women. The severity of GER was associated with age and serum triglyceride levels in men, and with the serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in women. The severity of reflux symptoms, however, was not associated with metabolic parameters. There were more women than men with reflux symptoms but without GER ('presumed' functional heartburn group), compared with subjects with neither GER nor reflux symptoms. In men, the presence of both reflux symptoms and GER ('presumed' NERD group) was associated with the serum triglyceride levels. While NERD is associated with serum lipid levels, functional heartburn is not. The prevalence of GER was greater among men; conversely, the prevalence of functional heartburn was greater among women.

  8. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer and dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akif Turk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer and polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer in endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux disease in adult patients with and without chronic renal failure. Materials and Methods Thirty two patients (12 female, 20 male with a total of 50 renal units were treated for vesicoureteral reflux. There were 26 (81% chronic renal failure patients. The success of treatment was evaluated by voiding cystouretrography at 3rd and 12th months after subureteric injection. The persistence of reflux was considered as failure. Patients were divided into two groups according to injected material. Age, sex, grade of reflux and treatment results were recorded and evaluated. Results Reflux was scored as grade 1 in seven (14%, grade 2 in 16 (32%, grade 3 in 21 (42% and grade 4 in six (12% renal units. There was not patient with grade 5 reflux. Fourteen renal units (28% were treated with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (group 1 and 36 renal units (72% were treated with polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer (group 2. The overall treatment success was achieved at 40 renal units (80%. The treatment was successful at 11 renal units (79% in group 1 and 29 renal units (81% in group 2 (p = 0.71. There was not statistically significant difference between two groups with patients with chronic renal failure in terms of treatment success (p = 1.00. Conclusions The effectiveness of two bulking agents was similar in treatment of vesicoureteral reflux disease in adult patients and patients with chronic renal failure.

  9. Laryngeal T regulatory cells in the setting of smoking and reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetté, Marie E; Seroogy, Christine M; Thibeault, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    The larynx is a mucosal organ rich in lymphatic tissue that is regularly exposed to a multitude of inhaled, ingested, and refluxed microorganisms and irritants. The first line of mucosal immune defense is the barrier, including resident immune cells. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a specialized subset of CD4+ T cells that suppress or dampen immune responses to prevent damaging immunopathology. As Treg cells have been shown to preferentially accumulate at sites of infection, and Treg responses may contribute to persistence of infection by impairing antibacterial immunity, we sought to quantify these cells in laryngeal tissue exposed to smoking and reflux. Cross-sectional study. Using an epigenetic assay, we quantified Treg and T cells and calculated the ratio of Treg to T cells (i.e., cellular ratio of immune tolerance [ImmunoCRIT]) in disease-free laryngeal biopsies representing four inflammatory states: 1) tobacco-exposed tissue, 2) refluxate and tobacco-exposed tissue, 3) refluxate-exposed tissue, and 4) unexposed tissue. There was epigenetic evidence of Treg cells in all tissues, and we found no differences in Treg cell frequency relative to smoking and reflux in laryngeal tissue collected from 42 non-treatment-seeking participants. There was a decrease in total T cell frequency and an increase in ImmunoCRIT values in smokers regardless of reflux status. In this study, laryngeal tissue from smokers show decreased overall T cells and increased ImmunoCRIT values. Our findings indicate that laryngeal inflammation is not directly mediated by loss of Treg cells in response to smoking and reflux in local tissue and increased ImmunoCRIT values in smokers implicate a role for this environmental exposure in modulating laryngeal immune homeostasis. More studies are indicated to explore Treg cell dysfunction in the pathophysiology of laryngeal disease. NA Laryngoscope, 127:882-887, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Recurrent urinary tract infections in young children: role of DMSA scintigraphy in detecting vesicoureteric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awais, Muhammad; Rehman, Abdul; Nadeem, Naila [Aga Khan University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan); Zaman, Maseeh Uz [Aga Khan University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2014-07-04

    Performing micturiting cystourethrography (MCUG) in young children with recurrent urinary tract infections is controversial with discrepancy among the major guidelines. Previous studies have shown that a normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy may avoid the need of performing MCUG for detecting vesicoureteric reflux in children with first febrile urinary tract infection. However, the role of DMSA for ruling out vesicoureteric reflux in children with recurrent urinary tract infections has not been studied. Approval from institutional ethical review committee was sought and the requirement of informed consent was waived. A total of 50 children under the age of 10 years with recurrent urinary tract infections underwent MCUG scan within 3 months of DMSA scan from January 2011 to September 2012 at our institution. Diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infections and grading of vesicoureteric reflux was according to previously established standards. Abnormalities on DMSA scan - scarring, hydronephrosis and reduced differential renal function - were compared with presence of vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG. High-grade vesicoureteric reflux was noted on MCUG in 22 (44%) cases. The findings on DMSA included hydronephrosis and scarring in 25 (50%) and 25 (50%) cases, respectively. Abnormalities on DMSA scan for detecting the presence of high-grade vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG examination had sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 95.45%, 35.71%, 53.85% and 90.91%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.48 and 0.13 respectively. DMSA scan had high overall sensitivity and negative predictive value with a low negative likelihood ratio for ruling out high-grade vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG, which may obviate the need of invasive MCUG along with its associated drawbacks. (orig.)

  11. Non-erosive and uncomplicated erosive reflux diseases: Difference in physiopathological and symptom pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Adani, Gian Luigi; Londero, Francesco; Leo, Cosimo Alex; Cherchi, Vittorio; Lorenzin, Dario; Rossetto, Anna; Vit, Gianmatteo; Baccarani, Umberto; Terrosu, Giovanni; Anna, Dino De

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate differences in the physiopathological findings (manometry and pH monitoring) and symptoms between cases of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive reflux disease (ERD) found positive at 24 h pH monitoring. METHODS: For a total of 670 patients who underwent 24 h pH monitoring, esophageal manometry and upper endoscopy were retrospectively evaluated, assessing the reflux symptoms, manometric characteristics of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and esophageal body and the presence or absence of esophagitis and hiatal hernia. Typical and atypical symptoms were also evaluated. For inclusion in the study, patients had to have NERD or ERD and be found positive on pH monitoring (NERD+). Patients with Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) complicated by stenosis, ulcers or Barrett's esophagus were ruled out. RESULTS: 214 patients were involved in the study, i.e. 107 cases of NERD+ and 107 of ERD. There were no significant gender- or age-related differences between the two groups. The ERD group had more cases of hiatal hernia (P = 0.02) and more acid reflux, both in terms of number of reflux episodes (P = 0.01) and as a percentage of the total time with a pH 0.05). The NERD+ patients presented more often with atypical symptoms (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The NERD+ patients’ fewer reflux episodes and the fact that they occurred mainly while in the upright position (unlike the cases of ERD) may be two factors that do not favor the onset of esophagitis. The frequently atypical symptoms seen in patients with NERD+ need to be accurately evaluated for therapeutic purposes because patients with GERD and atypical symptoms generally respond only partially to medical and surgical treatments. PMID:21860835

  12. Endoscopic grading of the gastroesophageal flap valve is correlated with reflux activity and can predict the size of the esophageal hiatus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Oliver Owen; Spaun, Georg; Antoniou, Stavros A; Rabl, Charlotte; Köhler, Gernot; Emmanuel, Klaus; Öfner, Dietmar; Pointner, Rudolph

    2013-12-01

    Endoscopic grading of the gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) is simple, reproducible, and suggested to be a good predictor of reflux activity. This study aimed to investigate the potential correlation between grading of the GEFV and quality of life (QoL), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, esophageal manometry, multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) data, and size of the hiatal defect. The study included 43 patients with documented chronic GERD who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and ambulatory MII monitoring before laparoscopic fundoplication. The GEFV was graded 1-4 using Hill's classification. QoL was evaluated using the Gastrointestinal Quality-of-Life Index (GIQLI), and gastrointestinal symptoms were documented using a standardized questionnaire. The size of the esophageal hiatus was measured during surgery by calculating the hiatal surface area (HSA). Analysis of the correlation between QoL, GERD symptoms, esophageal manometry, MII data, HSA size, and GEFV grading was performed. Statistical significance was set at a p value of 0.05. A significant positive correlation was found between increased GEFV grade and DeMeester score, total number of acid reflux events, number of reflux events in the supine position, and number of reflux events in the upright position. Additionally, a significant positive correlation was found between HSA size and GEFV grading. No significant influence from intensity of GERD symptoms, QoL, and the GEFV grading was found. The mean LES pressures were reduced with increased GEFV grade, but not significantly. The GEFV plays a major role in the pathophysiology of GERD. The results underscore the importance of reconstructing a valve in patients with GERD and an altered geometry of the gastroesophageal junction when they receive a laparoscopic or endoscopic intervention.

  13. The PIC cystogram: a novel approach to identify "occult" vesicoureteral reflux in children with febrile urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Jonathan N; Maizels, Max; Kim, Samuel C; Houston, John T

    2003-06-01

    When the standard cystogram does not show vesicoureteral reflux in children who have experienced febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs), clinical management is controversial. We postulated that vesicoureteral reflux accounts for such UTIs but is "occult." We tested this hypothesis by using a novel method, PIC cystography (Positioning the Instillation of Contrast at the ureteral orifice) at the time of cystoscopy. We performed PIC cystography with instillation of contrast medium at the ureteral orifice consecutively and prospectively in 57 children who underwent cystoscopy between November 1999 and February 2002 to evaluate febrile UTIs in 40 patients, dysfunctional voiding in 14 and hydronephrosis in 3. The control group (27 patients, 54 renal units) was used to assess the accuracy of PIC by comparing the results against those with the standard cystogram in children who did not have febrile infection and did not demonstrate vesicoureteral reflux (15 patients, 30 renal units), and in those who had febrile infection and vesicoureteral reflux (12 patients, 24 renal units). The study group (30 patients, 60 renal units) served to assess the incidence of "occult" vesicoureteral reflux in children who experienced febrile UTIs yet did not have vesicoureteral reflux on standard cystography. In children without febrile UTIs all 30 ureteral orifices had a normal endoscopic appearance and no vesicoureteral reflux by PIC cystography. In children with febrile UTIs 15 ureteral orifices with known vesicoureteral reflux were lateral and/or patulous and demonstrated vesicoureteral reflux by PIC, 4 appeared normal and did not exhibit vesicoureteral reflux on standard cystography or by PIC, and 5 were lateral and/or patulous in appearance and did not display vesicoureteral reflux on standard cystography, but did show vesicoureteral reflux by PIC. These findings reveal that PIC cystography is 100% sensitive at demonstrating reflux already known by standard cystogram, is 87% specific

  14. SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY AND FUNDOPLICATION AS A SINGLE PROCEDURE IN PATIENTS WITH OBESITY AND GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    LASNIBAT, Juan Pablo; BRAGHETTO, Italo; GUTIERREZ, Luis; SANCHEZ, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Bariatric surgery in Chile has seen an exponential increase in recent years, especially in sleeve gastrectomy. Its use is currently discussed in patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Different options have been considered for the management of these patients but up to now laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the best option. Sleeve gastrectomy plus concomitant fundoplication or hiatal hernia repair also has been suggested in patients having reflux or small hiatal hernia. Aim: To present a cohort of obese patients with gatroesophageal reflux undergoing this procedure, which seeks to provide the benefits of both laparoscopic gastric sleeve (LSG) and antireflux surgery focused on the evaluation of presence of reflux and BMI after surgery, and to compare the result observed in this cohort with a previous group of obese patients without reflux submitted to sleeve gastrectomy alone. Methods: Retrospective case series in 15 patients who underwent this surgery between the years 2003 and 2012. Clinical records were analyzed and values ​​of 24 hr pH monitoring, esophageal manometry and clinical outcome were recorded. Results were compared to a previous series of patients who underwent LSG. No statistical analyses were made. Results: Group A consisted of 15 patients submitted to LSG plus fundoplication. 93% (n=14) were female. Mean age was 46.2 years. Mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 33.9. All patients had altered pH monitoring and manometry preoperatively. There was one minor complication corresponding to a seroma. There was no perioperative mortality. Group B consisted of 23 obese patients who underwent LSG. These patients developed de novo reflux, hypotensive LES and esophagitis after the surgery. Group A patients showed improvement in esophageal pH monitoring and manometry at three months. During long-term follow-up, six underwent revision surgery, four for weight regain, one regained weight associated

  15. Design of Batch Distillation Columns Using Short-Cut Method at Constant Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asteria Narvaez-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A short-cut method for batch distillation columns working at constant reflux was applied to solve a problem of four components that needed to be separated and purified to a mole fraction of 0.97 or better. Distillation columns with 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 theoretical stages were used; reflux ratio was varied between 2 and 20. Three quality indexes were used and compared: Luyben’s capacity factor, total annual cost, and annual profit. The best combinations of theoretical stages and reflux ratio were obtained for each method. It was found that the best combinations always required reflux ratios close to the minimum. Overall, annual profit was the best quality index, while the best combination was a distillation column with 30 stages, and reflux ratio’s of 2.0 for separation of benzene (i, 5.0 for the separation of toluene (ii, and 20 for the separation of ethylbenzene (iii and purification of o-xylene (iv.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux in asymptomatic obese subjects: An esophageal impedance-pH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Filiz; Uyanıkoglu, Ahmet; Ermis, Fatih; Arıcı, Serpil; Akyüz, Ümit; Baran, Bülent; Pinarbasi, Binnur; Gul, Nurdan

    2015-03-14

    To investigate the relationship between reflux and body mass index (BMI) in the asymptomatic obese population using the impedance-pH technique. Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in the obese population. However, the relationship between acid reflux and BMI in asymptomatic obese people is unclear. Forty-six obese (BMI > 25 kg/m(2)) people were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the demographic findings and 24-h impedance pH values of the whole group. Gas, acid (pH 30 kg/m(2)). Demographic and endoscopic findings, and impedance results were similar in these two groups. However, there was a positive correlation between BMI and total and supine pH < 4 episodes (P = 0.002, r = 0.414; P = 0.000, r = 0.542), pH < 4 reflux time (P = 0.015, r = 0.319; P = 0.003, r = 0.403), and DeMeester score (P = 0.012, r = 0.333). Acid reflux is correlated with BMI in asymptomatic obese individuals.

  17. In-vivo anti-reflux and raft properties of alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J R; Korman, M G; Nicholson, L; Chan, J G

    1990-12-01

    The comparative efficacy of two alginate-containing anti-reflux preparations (Gaviscon, Algicon) was assessed in a single blind crossover study of 20 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The clinical efficacy study was preceded by two studies in healthy volunteers to assess the intragastric effects of Algicon and Gaviscon by pH measurement, endoscopic visualization and gamma scintigraphy. Algicon and Gaviscon were shown to form a raft in the fasting and fed human stomach, with Algicon alone having a potent antacid effect below and within the raft. Both Algicon and Gaviscon liquids significantly reduced the frequency and severity of reflux symptoms from baseline when given at their recommended doses (10 ml and 20 ml four times daily, respectively). There were no significant differences between Algicon and Gaviscon, although 12 patients preferred Algicon (vs 5 for Gaviscon) for control of reflux symptoms. It was concluded that both Algicon and Gaviscon were effective for the symptomatic control of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  18. Effect of low-proof alcoholic beverages on duodenogastro-esophageal reflux in health and GERD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, H; Gundling, F; Schepp, W; Schmidt, T; Pehl, C

    2011-02-01

    Alcoholic beverages are known to increase acidic gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and the risk of esophagitis. Moreover, duodenogastro-esophageal reflux (DGER), containing bile acids, was shown to harmfully alter the esophageal mucosa, alone and synergistically with HCl and pepsin. However, studies directly addressing potential effects of different low proof alcoholic beverages on DGER in health and disease are missing. Bilitec readings for beer and white, rose, and red wine were obtained in vitro from pure and from mixtures with bile. One-hour DGER monitoring and pH-metry were performed in 12 healthy subjects and nine reflux patients with DGER after ingestion of a standardized liquid meal together with 300 mL of water, white wine, and in the volunteers, beer and rose wine. Bilitec measurement was found to be feasible in the presence of beer, white wine, and using a threshold of 0.25, rose wine. However, the presence of red wine resulted in extinction values above this threshold. The consumption of all investigated alcoholic beverages, especially of white wine, triggered increased acidic GER, both in healthy participants and patients with reflux disease. In contrast, no relevant DGER was found after intake of alcoholic beverages. Fiber-optic bilirubin monitoring can be used for DGER monitoring in combination with alcoholic beverages, except with red wine. Low-proof alcoholic beverages are a strong trigger of GER, but not of DGER, both in healthy subjects and patients with reflux disease. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Local neck symptoms before and after thyroidectomy: a possible correlation with reflux laryngopharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Eugenio; Cipolla, Calogero; Graceffa, Giuseppa; Cusimano, Alessia; Cupido, Francesco; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Matranga, Domenica; Latteri, Mario Adelfio

    2011-05-01

    Local symptoms in the neck such as swallowing and voice disorders, and throat discomfort might be related to a goiter if present, but are also reported by patients suffering from reflux laryngopharyngitis. The aim of our study was to investigate the presence of reflux laryngopharyngitis in patients with nodular goiter before and after uncomplicated total thyroidectomy (TT) using a prospective study in University Hospital setting. We considered 25 patients, affected by non-toxic nodular goiter and candidates for TT, who complained of local symptoms in the neck. All the patients were carefully interviewed, with emphasis on swallowing and voice disorders, throat discomfort and reflux-related symptoms and underwent a videolaryngoscopy (VLS) and a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) before and 3 months after TT. Before thyroidectomy, reflux laryngopharyngitis-related alterations were present in 68 and 50% at VLS and VFSS, respectively. After thyroidectomy, the swallowing and voice disorders persisted in 79 and 75%, respectively, while throat discomfort persisted in 91%. The results show that patients with a non-toxic nodular goiter who complain of local neck symptoms, before surgery it is appropriate to see if a reflux laryngopharyngitis is present; VLS and VFSS could be indicated for this and if necessary an antireflux treatment should be administered. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  20. [Pathological physiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Hypothesis (Literature review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M D; Korshun, Z; Mendelson, G

    2013-01-01

    Currently prolonged pH-monitoring is considered as Gold standard for diagnosis of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Criteria and norms based on prolonged pH-monitoring were the basic concepts of pathophysiology of GERD. For example, it is accepted that esophageal hernia (EG) can be present without GERD, as well as GERD without EG. X-ray diagnosis compared to the pH- monitoring has a low sensitivity (70%) and specificity (74%). Meanwhile, in recent decades, it has been found that the pH-metry is not effective in a non-erosive reflux disease. We figured that the criteria and norms of pH-monitoring are not accurate. The purpose of this study is to determine the radiological norms of gastroesophageal junction (EGJ) and, to clarify the pathological physiology of GERD according to the new criteria and analysis of the literature. The analysis of the survey of 452 patients was done. Among them were 263 children aged from 1 day to 15 years who have applied to the Belarusian Center of Pediatric Surgery (BCPS) in 1983-1987 and 189 patients aged 15-92 years surveyed in the BCPC, as well as in the Government Geriatric Center (Israel) in 1994-2004. The standard radiography of the upper digestive tract was supplemented by provocative tests. In 21 children and 36 adults survey was carried out to locate space-occupying lesions of the chest or abdomen. Other patients had symptoms of GERD. The 21 children and 17 of 34 adult patients without of GERD symptoms had the same radiographic picture, indicating of the normal LES function: the width of the esophagus was the same all over and no more than 1.5 cm; in a horizontal position a peristaltic wave opens the LES and pushes its contents into the stomach without delay, despite the provocative tests. In 15 out of 34 adults with no symptoms of GERD radiographic findings show signs of LES weakness. In these patients, with a mild GERD, abdominal compression caused contraction of the GEJ with length of (3.60 +/- 0.8 cm) in adults which

  1. Reflux venous flow in dural sinus and internal jugular vein on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Bum-soo; Kim, Bom-yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Byun, Jae Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Reflux venous signal on the brain and neck time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) is thought to be related to a compressed left brachiocephalic vein. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of venous reflux flow in internal jugular vein (IJV), sigmoid sinus/transverse sinus (SS/TS), and inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) on the brain and neck TOF MRA and its pattern. From the radiology database, 3,475 patients (1,526 men, 1,949 women, age range 19-94, median age 62 years) with brain and neck standard 3D TOF MRA at 3 T and 1.5 T were identified. Rotational maximal intensity projection images of 3D TOF MRA were assessed for the presence of reflux flow in IJV, IPS, and SS/TS. Fifty-five patients (1.6 %) had reflux flow, all in the left side. It was more prevalent in females (n = 43/1,949, 2.2 %) than in males (n = 12/1,526, 0.8 %) (p = 0.001). The mean age of patients with reflux flow (66 years old) was older than those (60 years old) without reflux flow (p = 0.001). Three patients had arteriovenous shunt in the left arm for hemodialysis. Of the remaining 52 patients, reflux was seen on IJV in 35 patients (67.3 %). There were more patients with reflux flow seen on SS/TS (n = 34) than on IPS (n = 25). Venous reflux flow on TOF MRA is infrequently observed, and reflux pattern is variable. Because it is exclusively located in the left side, the reflux signal on TOF MRA could be an alarm for an undesirable candidate for a contrast injection on the left side for contrast-enhanced imaging study. (orig.)

  2. Dietary habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, You Jin; Ha, Eun Kyo; Jeong, Su Jin

    2016-07-01

    To identify the relationship between dietary habits and childhood gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in preschool children. We performed a questionnaire study to analyze the relationship between dietary habits and GERD in 85 preschool children with GERD and 117 healthy children of the same age. Irregular and picky eating were more p-revalent in the GERD group than in the control group (odds ratio [OR], 4.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-12.54 and OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.88-13.14, respectively). The snack preferences and the late night eating habits were significantly more prevalent in the GERD group than in the control group (OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 1.23-11.87 and OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.55-35.49, respectively). A preference for liquid foods was significantly more prevalent in the GERD group (OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.548-35.485). The dinner-to-bedtime interval was significantly shorter in the GERD group than in the control group (157.06±48.47 vs. 174.62±55.10, P=0.020). In addition, the time between dinner and bedtime was shorter than 3 hours in 47 children (55.3%) of the GERD group and 44 (37.6%) of the control group. This difference was statistical significance (P=0.015). Dietary habits such as picky and irregular eating, snack preference, a preference of liquid foods, late night eating, and a shorter dinner-to-bedtime interval had a significant correlation with GERD. Further large-scale studies are necessary to confirm our results.

  3. [The Mexican consensus on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Iga, F; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Noble-Lugo, A; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Torres-Villalobos, G; Ramos-de la Medina, A; Pantoja-Millán, J P

    2013-01-01

    To update the themes of endoscopic and surgical treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) from the Mexican Consensus published in 2002. Part I of the 2011 Consensus dealt with the general concepts, diagnosis, and medical treatment of this disease. Part II covers the topics of the endoscopic and surgical treatment of GERD. In this second part, an expert in endoscopy and an expert in GERD surgery, along with the three general coordinators of the consensus, carried out an extensive bibliographic review using the Embase, Cochrane, and Medline databases. Statements referring to the main aspects of endoscopic and surgical treatment of this disease were elaborated and submitted to specialists for their consideration and vote, utilizing the modified Delphi method. The statements were accepted into the consensus if the level of agreement was 67% or higher. Twenty-five statements corresponding to the endoscopic and surgical treatment of GERD resulted from the voting process, and they are presented herein as Part II of the consensus. The majority of the statements had an average level of agreement approaching 90%. Currently, endoscopic treatment of GERD should not be regarded as an option, given that the clinical results at 3 and 5 years have not demonstrated durability or sustained symptom remission. The surgical indications for GERD are well established; only those patients meeting the full criteria should be candidates and their surgery should be performed by experts. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of retinoblastoma RNA reflux after intravitreal injection of melphalan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Ursula; Nicolas, Michael; Sgroi, Mariana; Sampor, Claudia; Torbidoni, Ana; Fandiño, Adriana; Chantada, Guillermo L; Munier, Francis L; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2017-10-31

    Intravitreal injection of chemotherapy in retinoblastoma eyes with vitreous seeds may lead to a risk of extraocular tumour dissemination that has not been assessed so far. To develop a sensitive and clinically feasible technique to assess for potential retinoblastoma cell reflux after intravitreal injection of melphalan. Filter papers were cut in 6 mm diameter circles and sterilised before use. Eyes with retinoblastoma vitreous seeds (group D, International Classification) received weekly intravitreal melphalan injections (20 µg or 30 µg/dose) followed by cryotherapy as part of local treatment. Immediately after finishing the injection and cryotherapy, filter papers were placed on the injection site and on the cryoprobe tip to assess for the expression of the cone-rod homeobox gene (CRX) by real-time qPCR as a surrogate of retinoblastoma RNA. The assay was developed and validated to determine sensitivity, linearity, recovery, repeatability and reproducibility. The assay for quantitation of CRX expression was linear in the range of 1 to 1000 cells. The lowest limit of detection was one retinoblastoma cell and allowed to recover 100% of the cell load in external supplementation. A total of 14 eyes received 22 cycles of intravitreal melphalan and were evaluated for potential extraocular tumour cell dissemination using the developed technique. None of the cycles were positive for CRX in samples from the scar or from the cryoprobe tip. A sensitive and simple method of tumour cell assessment has been developed that can be used in the clinics to assess for potential extraocular dissemination after intravitreal injections to assure its performance. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  6. Association between sleep bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Dalberto, Charlene da Silveira; Scheeren, Betina; Barros, Sérgio Gabriel Silva de

    2013-11-01

    Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity, including sleep bruxism (SB), can be induced in healthy individuals by experimental esophageal acidification, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, no robust evidence supports the association between SB and GERD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between SB and GERD. Forty-five individuals were eligible to participate in this observational transversal study at the Gastroenterology Service of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The participants were classified into 2 groups, those with and without GERD, according to the Montreal Criteria and pH-metry/endoscopy findings. The diagnosis of SB was not assessed in a sleep laboratory but was based on self-report plus clinical inspection, according to the minimal diagnostic criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory was used to evaluate self-perceived stress. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed with SB as dependent variable and GERD, sex, age, body mass index, and stress as predictors (α=.05; 90% power). The study population included individuals with SB without GERD (13.3%) and individuals with SB with GERD (31.1%). In participants with GERD, the prevalence of SB was 73.7%. Only the variable GERD was significantly associated with SB (P=.017; odds ratio 6.58; 95% confidence interval 1.40-30.98), although adjusted for stress and age. Sleep bruxism is prevalent in GERD patients, and GERD is highly associated with SB. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–3 Roger S Goldstein1,2,4 1West Park Healthcare Centre, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the

  8. [Laparoscopic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Experience with 100 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Gómez, R; Olivares-Ontiveros, O; García-Vázquez, A; Silva-Sánchez, V; Noyola-Cedillo, S; Quezada-Salcedo, J E; Morales-Trejo, R M

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the results of laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti funduplication and to compare them with the results obtained in open surgery. Prospective, observational, longitudinal, pre and post-procedure. Beneficencia Española, Hospital Angeles, and Hospital Francisco Galindo Chávez, ISSSTE, in Torreón, Coahuila, Mexico. From December 1992 to February 1999, 100 patients with surgical indications due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) prospectively underwent a laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti procedure. A clinical and endoscopic follow up from 3 months to 9 years was performed in 87 cases. Symptomatic control was achieved in 98% (85/87) of the cases and remission of overall endoscopic esophagitis in 79% (69/87); excluding Barrett cases, esophagitis remission was observed in 93% (67/72) of the subjects. The following recurrences took place: two with G-II and two with G-III esophagitis, one requiring pyloroplasty due gastric stasis, and other patient with G-IV esophagitis, who has needed to continue with postoperative dilations. Of 16 cases with Barrett's esophagus, two-showed remission and one did not return control. Perioperative complications included gastric perforations (3), acute pulmonary edema during the immediate postoperative period (1), deep vein thrombosis (1), and late esophageal perforation (1). All were resolved satisfactorily. Surgical mortality was 0 in the 100 cases undergoing the procedure. Eighty-six percent of cases had a 24-h hospital stay. Early morbidity: dysphagia in 60 patients, early satiety in 91 cases, abdominal distention in 25 cases, all this symptomatology disappears during the subsequent 3 months. Persistent morbidity: flatulence in 60% of patients, difficulty for vomiting in 10% of cases. The laparoscopic procedure is as effective as the open method with the advantage of being minimally invasive.

  9. Foods Inducing Typical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung Wan; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2017-07-30

    Several specific foods are known to precipitate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and GERD patients are usually advised to avoid such foods. However, foods consumed daily are quite variable according to regions, cultures, etc. This study was done to elucidate the food items which induce typical GERD symptoms in Korean patients. One hundred and twenty-six Korean patients with weekly typical GERD symptoms were asked to mark all food items that induced typical GERD symptoms from a list containing 152 typical foods consumed daily in Korea. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy followed by 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. The definition of "GERD" was if either of the 2 studies revealed evidence of GERD, and "possible GERD" if both studies were negative. One hundred and twenty-six cases (51 GERD and 75 possible GERD) were enrolled. In 19 (37.3%) of 51 GERD cases and in 17 (22.7%) of 75 possible GERD cases, foods inducing typical GERD symptoms were identified. In the GERD group (n = 19), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki. In the possible GERD group (n = 17), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, fried foods, doughnuts, breads, ramen noodles, coffee, pizza, topokki, rice cakes, champon noodles, and hotdogs. In one-third of GERD patients, foods inducing typical symptoms were identified. Hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki were the foods frequently inducing typical symptoms in Korea. The list of foods frequently inducing typical GERD symptoms needs to be modified based on their own local experiences.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and its correlation to extraesophageal and esophageal reflux in contact granuloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, Riitta

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its correlation to extraesophageal and esophageal reflux, 18 consecutive contact granuloma patients were examined by laryngoscopy, 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and [13C]-urea breath test. Sixteen of the 18 patients (89%) were H. pylori-negative, while 2 patients (11%) showed positive test results. Extraesophageal reflux was detected in 14 patients; one of them was H. pylori-positive. In the ten patients with abnormal distal esophageal reflux, one was H. pylori-positive. The present results do not confirm increased prevalence for H. pylori infection in contact granuloma patients and the occurrence of H. pylori infection was not correlated to the amount of pharyngeal or esophageal acid exposure.

  11. Gastrooesophageal reflux disease in preterm infants: current management and diagnostic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, J L; Newell, S J

    2009-09-01

    Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD) provides a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to many neonatologists. Reflux of gastric contents is common in preterm infants but usually not pathological. GORD is frequently diagnosed despite the lack of a fully identified clinical syndrome and of a truly valid diagnostic test. Treatment modalities, for which there is little convincing evidence regarding efficacy, are commonly instigated for troublesome symptoms attributed to GORD. Diagnosis is so problematic in preterm infants that GORD is starting to be described as the clinical syndrome that responds to anti-reflux treatment. We discuss the dilemmas facing us when dealing with this condition, summarise the best available evidence regarding diagnosis and management, and use it to inform a suggested treatment pathway. We introduce the concept of a clinical scoring system to aid the diagnosis and monitoring of GORD in preterm infants and highlight areas where further research would be beneficial.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux - correlation between diagnostic methods; Refluxo gastroesofagico - correlacao entre metodos diagnosticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Maria das Gracas de Almeida; Penas, Maria Exposito; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia-Medicina Nuclear; Lemme, Eponina Maria O. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinia Medica-Gastroenterologia; Martinho, Maria Jose Ribeiro [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    1999-02-01

    A group of 97 individuals with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was submitted to gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) and compared to the results obtained from endoscopy, histopathology and 24 hours pHmetry. Twenty-four healthy individuals were used as a control group and they have done only the GERS. The results obtained showed that: (a) the difference in the reflux index (RI) for the control group and the sick individuals was statistically significant (p < 0.0001); (b) the correlation between GERS and the other methods showed the following results: sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 95%; positive predictive value, 98%; negative predictive value, 67%; accuracy, 87%. We have concluded that the scintigraphic method should be used to confirm the diagnosis of GERD and also recommended as initial investiative procedure. (author)

  13. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in premature infants using a radionuclide method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Michiomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Ohkubo (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    The cases of 36 very low birthweight infants (premature group) and 52 mature infants with birth weights as low as 1500 g (mature group) with gastro-esephageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed. These infants received 24 hour pH monitoring, reflux scintigraphy, gastric emptying, and antrum motility measurement. The results of 24-hour pH monitoring of the premature group are not different from these of the mature group. Time required for reflux scintigraphy of the premature group is higher than that of the mature group. Emptying time of premature group is slower than that of the mature group. Dietary management in premature infants with GERD is important. Using a nasoduodenal feeding tube is quite effective. Radionuclide method, in addition to 24-hour pH monitoring, should be used to evaluate total gastroesophageal function. (author)

  14. Effects of omeprazole and cisapride treatment in Japanese asthmatics with reflux esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Fujimori

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States and Europe, gastroesophageal reflux (GER is receiving attention as a potential cause of bronchial asthma. Few Japanese case reports have described this relationship. Therefore, we investigated the effect of omeprazole and cisapride on pulmonary function tests, blood gases and home peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR in six Japanese outpatients with asthma and proven GER. After 8 weeks of treatment, reflux esophagitis had improved in all patients. However, the parameters of pulmonary function showed no change other than a significant post- treatment increase in home PEFR (4.4-27.7% in three patients. These results suggest that anti-reflux (omeprazole and cisapride treatment will produce small improvements in the PEFR in some Japanese asthmatics with GER.

  15. [Esophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus, achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Important new advances were presented in esophageal disease in Digestive Disease Week 2013. A highlight was confirmation of the high efficacy of weight loss to treat symptoms of reflux and an interesting pilot study suggesting that a simple ligature with supra- and infracardial bands could be an effective technique in esophageal reflux. If the excellent results and safety and efficacy of this technique are confirmed in the long term, it could revolutionize the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Also of note this year was the presentation of multiple studies validating a new technique, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for the endoscopic treatment of achalasia. This technique seems to have excellent efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    (31 vs 21%, P = 0.004), more breathlessness (39 vs 22%, P history of respiratory infections (6.8 vs 1.4%, P disease. Among individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, those who did......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD...... and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We...

  17. Floral aroma improvement of Muscat spirits by packed column distillation with variable internal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias-Guiu, Pau; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Orriols, Ignacio; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López, Francisco

    2016-12-15

    The organoleptic quality of wine distillates depends on raw materials and the distillation process. Previous work has shown that rectification columns in batch distillation with fixed reflux rate are useful to obtain distillates or distillate fractions with enhanced organoleptic characteristics. This study explores variable reflux rate operating strategies to increase the levels of terpenic compounds in specific distillate fractions to emphasize its floral aroma. Based on chemical and sensory analyses, two distillate heart sub-fractions obtained with the best operating strategy found, were compared with a distillate obtained in a traditional alembic. Results have shown that a drastic reduction of the reflux rate at an early stage of the heart cut produced a distillate heart sub-fraction with a higher concentration of terpenic compounds and lower levels of negative aroma compounds. Therefore, this sub-fraction presented a much more noticeable floral aroma than the distillate obtained with a traditional alembic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vesicoureteral Reflux: Where Have We Been, Where Are We Now, and Where Are We Going?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon A. McLorie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a retrospective review of the scientific and clinical advances, extending over four decades, which have linked vesicoureteral reflux, with renal injury, and urinary tract infection. We have traced the original studies, coupled with advances in technology which led to the awareness, and ability to detect and diagnose the problems early in childhood. These advances progressed through clinical studies which defined the epidemiology of both reflux and urinary tract infection. Along with these diagnostic advances, there were numerous surgical developments, which allowed progressive improvements in the outcomes and effectiveness of a variety of treatment modalities. All of this literature leads us to the current era, when several clinical trials are currently underway in an effort to more fully define the most efficacious and safe methods to treat vesicoureteral reflux and associated urinary tract infection.

  19. Cardiac tamponade: contrast reflux as an indicator of cardiac chamber equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Foeke Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic hemopericardium remains a rare entity; it does however commonly cause cardiac tamponade which remains a major cause of death in traumatic blunt cardiac injury. Objectives We present a case of blunt chest trauma complicated by cardiac tamponade causing cardiac chamber equalization revealed by reflux of contrast. Case report A 29-year-old unidentified male suffered blunt chest trauma in a motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a periaortic hematoma and hemopericardium. Significant contrast reflux was seen in the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins suggesting a change in cardiac chamber pressures. After intensive treatment including cardiac massage this patient expired of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Reflux of contrast on CT imaging can be an indicator of traumatic cardiac tamponade.

  20. The Diagnosis of Yo-Yo Reflux with Dynamic Renal Scintigraphy in a Patient with Incomplete Ureteral Duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özhan Özdoğan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of yo-yo reflux in patients with incomplete upper collecting system duplications is difficult. We report a case with recurrent urinary tract infections and ultrasonographically detected duplication in the left collecting system in which the presence of yo-yo reflux is demonstrated with dynamic renal scintigraphy. (MIRT 2012;21:114-116

  1. Does the Presence of a Hiatal Hernia Affect the Efficacy of the Reflux Inhibitor Baclofen During Add-On Therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, Hanneke; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Reflux inhibitors, like the gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptor agonist, baclofen, block transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) and are proposed as an add-on therapy in patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-resistant gastroesophageal reflux. However,

  2. Ambulatory pH-impedance-pressure monitoring as a diagnostic tool for the reflux-cough syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; Pauwels, A.; Jafari, J.; Sifrim, D.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Tack, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is considered to be a significant contributing factor to chronic unexplained cough. Patients are often presumed to have reflux-induced cough and are exposed to high-dose and long-term empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) despite the limited treatment efficacy

  3. Ambulatory pH-impedance-pressure monitoring as a diagnostic tool for the reflux-cough syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; Pauwels, A.; Jafari, J.; Sifrim, D.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Tack, J.

    2018-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is considered to be a significant contributing factor to chronic unexplained cough. Patients are often presumed to have reflux-induced cough and are exposed to high-dose and long-term empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) despite the limited treatment efficacy

  4. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in obese subjects: Influence of overweight, weight loss and chronic gastric balloon distension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Tygat, G. N. J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux is an obesity-related health risk assumed to improve after weight loss. Prolonged intragastric balloon distension might oppose this. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in untreated obese subjects and to study

  5. Magnification endoscopy for diagnosis of nonerosive reflux disease: a proposal of diagnostic criteria and critical analysis of observer variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edebo, A.; Tam, W.; Bruno, M.; van Berkel, A.-M.; Jönson, C.; Schoeman, M.; Tytgat, G.; Dent, J.; Lundell, L.

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the diagnostic value of high-resolution endoscopy for the recognition of subtle diagnostic esophageal mucosal changes in nonerosive reflux disease. Ten control subjects and eleven patients with nonerosive reflux disease confirmed by a validated questionnaire, standard endoscopy,

  6. Epithelial Thickness is a Marker of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, Michael; Mastracci, Luca; Vakil, Nimish; Dent, John; Wernersson, Börje; Baldycheva, Irina; Wissmar, Jenny; Ruth, Magnus; Fiocca, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Histologic criteria have been refined for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate these criteria for the assessment of GERD and to measure interassessor agreement. We performed a post hoc analysis of data from the Diamond study (NCT 00291746), conducted in Europe and Canada on adults with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms who had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months. GERD was diagnosed based on the presence of 1 or more of the following: reflux esophagitis, pathologic esophageal acid exposure, and/or positive symptom-acid association probability. Nonerosive reflux disease was defined as the presence of pathologic esophageal acid exposure and/or a positive symptom-acid association probability, but no reflux esophagitis. Biopsies collected from 336 patients from 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line were evaluable; they were analyzed independently at pathology centers in Germany and Italy (biopsies from 258 and 195 patients, respectively). The primary outcomes were the accuracy of histologic criteria for the diagnosis of GERD, defined by endoscopy and pH monitoring, and interassessor agreement on histologic criteria. At the assessment site for basal cell layer thickness, total epithelial thickness was the best-performing criterion for diagnosis of investigation-defined GERD; it also identified nonerosive reflux disease, reflux esophagitis, and pathologic esophageal acid exposure at 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line. Basal cell layer thickness and presence of dilated intercellular spaces did not identify patients with GERD. Among the criteria tested, the best agreement between assessments carried out at the 2 pathology centers was for total epithelial thickness at 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line. Based on an analysis of 336 patients with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms, total epithelial thickness is a robust histologic marker for GERD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  7. Comparative study of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and esomeprazole for symptom relief in patients with reflux esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ri-Nan

    2009-02-28

    To clarify whether there is any difference in the symptom relief in patients with reflux esophagitis following the administration of four Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Two hundred and seventy-four patients with erosive reflux esophagitis were randomized to receive 8 wk of 20 mg omeprazole (n = 68), 30 mg of lansoprazole (n = 69), 40 mg of pantoprazole (n = 69), 40 mg of esomeprazole (n = 68) once a day in the morning. Daily changes in heartburn and acid reflux symptoms in the first 7 d of administration were assessed using a six-point scale (0: none; 1: mild; 2: mild-moderate; 3: moderate; 4: moderate-severe; 5: severe). The mean heartburn score in patients treated with esomeprazole more rapidly decreased than those receiving other PPI. Complete resolution of heartburn was also more rapid in patients treated with esomeprazole for 5 d compared with omeprazole (P = 0.0018, P = 0.0098, P = 0.0027, P = 0.0137, P = 0.0069, respectively), lansoprazole (P = 0.0020, P = 0.0046, P = 0.0037, P = 0.0016, P = 0.0076, respectively), and pantoprazole (P = 0.0006, P = 0.0005, P = 0.0009, P = 0.0031, P = 0.0119, respectively). There were no significant differences between the four groups in the rate of endoscopic healing of reflux esophagitis at week 8. Esomeprazole may be more effective than omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole for the rapid relief of heartburn symptoms and acid reflux symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis.

  8. Sleep-related breathing disorders in small children with nocturnal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, J; Kaczmarski, M

    2004-01-01

    Coincidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome has been discussed in recent years. Treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) reduces gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Moreover, treatment of gastroesophageal reflux with omeprazole can reduce the severity of obstructive sleep in selected individuals. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that gastroesophageal reflux does not influence sleep quality and breathing pattern during sleep in children. 24 children (14 boys, 10 girls, aged 2 months-3 years) with sleep disturbances indicating GER were studied. Standard polysomnography with parallel recording of 24-h oesophageal monitoring was performed. Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) in active/REM sleep and quiet/NREM sleep was compared between nocturnal acid GER children (13 children; 7 boys, 6 girls; aged 1.28 +/- 0.95y; FRT-18.63 +/- 11.83%) and nocturnal acid GER-free controls (11 children; 7 boys, 4 girls; aged 1.64 +/- 0.97y; FRT-2.93 +/- 2.08%). Exclusion criteria were: 1. laboratory signs of infection (increasing OB, increasing CRP, increasing alpha2-globulin); 2. clinical symptoms of infection in the respiratory tract, the alimentary tract or in the urinary tract. In children with nocturnal GER higher incidence of obstructive apnea/hypopnea during REM sleep was found: AHI = 23.35/h +/- 19.1; (CI 95%11.81-34.89) vs AHI = 4.99/h +/- 3.12 in children without nocturnal GER. We found no differences between the groups in saturation < 90% time during sleep. The study confirms coincidence of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux and sleep-related breathing disorders in children. Higher number of apnea/hypopnea during REM sleep was found in children with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux.

  9. A prospective study of the effect of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment on children with otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, Edward D; Goldstein, Nira A; Koliskor, Bernard; Weedon, Jeremy; Jackson, Alison; Goldsmith, Ari J

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate improvements in validated quality-of-life measures for otitis media and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and an objective score for pediatric reflux obtained by fiberoptic laryngoscopy after treatment with antireflux precautions and therapy in children diagnosed as having either recurrent acute otitis media or otitis media with effusion and GERD. Prospective, before-and-after intervention study. Hospital-based pediatric otolaryngology practice. Population-based sample of 47 patients (mean age, 19.5 months). Standard antireflux therapy for 2 consecutive 12-week periods. Otitis Media 6-Item quality-of-life survey, Infant GERD Questionnaire-Revised, GERD Symptom Questionnaire for Young Children, Pediatric Reflux Finding Score, and speech awareness threshold. Follow-up data were available for 37 patients. Mean (SD) change scores for Otitis Media 6-Item quality-of-life survey were 1.6 (1.1) at visit 2 and 1.5 (1.1) at visit 3 (P Infant GERD Questionnaire-Revised and GERD Symptom Questionnaire for Young Children at visit 2 and for Infant GERD Questionnaire-Revised at visit 3. Mean (SD) change scores for the Pediatric Reflux Finding Score were 6.4 (4.9) at visit 2 and 8.0 (7.2) at visit 3 (P reflux on fiberoptic laryngoscopy. Otitis media was considered by the examining physician to be clinically improved in 28 of 37 children (76%; 95% confidence interval, 60%-87%) at visit 2 and in 6 of 10 children (60%; 95% confidence interval, 31%-83%) at visit 3. Nine children (19.1%) required myringotomy tube placement. Children with otitis media with effusion or recurrent acute otitis media and GERD have improved quality of life following treatment with antireflux therapy. Control of gastroesophageal reflux may play a role in the management of otitis media and avoidance of tympanostomy.

  10. Effect of H. pylori infection on gastrin, ghrelin, motilin, and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Makbule; Çolak, Ömer; Işıksoy, Serap; Yavuz, Aslı

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux and possible mechanisms in Helicobacter pylori infection. Symptoms of H. pylori-infected children, their total gastroesophageal reflux episodes, acid exposure percentage, gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels were evaluated before and after H. pylori eradication. Forty-two H. pylori-infected children were eligible for this study. Acid exposure % and total reflux episodes before and after H. pylori eradication were 10.2%±14.8% vs. 7.71%±5.0% and 94.7%±102.1% vs. 64.6%±55.0%, respectively (p=0.28, p=0.082). There was an insignificant change in the serum gastrin (93.4±153.8 pmol/L vs. 1.28±149.4 pmol/L, p=0.67), ghrelin (7.69±197.5 pg/mL vs. 8.36±299.5 pg/mL, p=0.274), and motilin (75.1±81.2 pg/mL vs. 97.2±80.5 pg/mL, p=0.206) levels after eradication. Gastrin and ghrelin levels were negatively correlated after H. pylori eradication (r=-0.38, p=0.031). There was no association between gastroesophageal reflux episodes and gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels (r=0.25 and p=0.11; r= 0.24 and p=0.13; r=-0.23 and p=0.14, respectively). H. pylori infection is neither protective nor harmful in the gastroesophageal reflux. Neither ghrelin nor motilin levels was associated with gastroesophageal reflux. None of gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels was affected by H. pylori infection. There is an inverse association between gastrin and ghrelin levels after H. pylori eradication.

  11. The efficacy of i-SCAN for detecting reflux esophagitis: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H S; Hong, S N; Kim, Y S; Park, H S; Kim, B K; Lee, J H; Kim, S I; Lee, T Y; Kim, J H; Lee, S Y; Sung, I K; Shim, C S

    2013-01-01

    New imaging technologies have been applied in endoscopy to improve the detection and differentiation of subtle mucosal changes using a digital contrast method. Among them, i-SCAN technology is the most recently developed image-enhancing technology. We investigated whether i-SCAN could improve the detection rate of reflux esophagitis. Interobserver agreement between endoscopists was compared with conventional white light (WL) endoscopic examination. We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial. A consecutive series of 514 subjects that underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy for health inspection were enrolled and randomized into the i-SCAN group (n = 246) and WL group (n = 268). An esophagogastroduodenoscopy with video recording was used for detecting reflux esophagitis, and reflux esophagitis were categorized by the modified Los Angeles (LA) classification. The total number of reflux esophagitis identified by WL and i-SCAN was 58 (21.7%) and 74 (30.1%), respectively. The diagnostic yield of reflux esophagitis was significantly higher (P = 0.034) in the i-SCAN group (30.1%) as compared to the WL group (21.6%). Using the modified LA classification, the detection rate of minimal changes was significantly higher (P = 0.017) in the i-SCAN group (11.8%) as compared to the WL group (5.6%), but the detection rates of LA-A and LA-B were not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.897 and P = 0.311, respectively). After comparison of the interobserver agreement using randomly selected video clips, the i-SCAN group showed better agreement than the WL group (Kappa value, 0.793 vs. 0.473). Compared to WL endoscopy, applying i-SCAN in daily practice can improve the diagnostic yield of reflux esophagitis by detecting more minimal changes in the squamo-columnar junction of the esophagus and can improve the interobserver agreement of the modified Los Angeles classification.

  12. Comparative study of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and esomeprazole for symptom relief in patients with reflux esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ri-Nan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether there is any difference in the symptom relief in patients with reflux esophagitis following the administration of four Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). METHODS: Two hundred and seventy-four patients with erosive reflux esophagitis were randomized to receive 8 wk of 20 mg omeprazole (n = 68), 30 mg of lansoprazole (n = 69), 40 mg of pantoprazole (n = 69), 40 mg of esomeprazole (n = 68) once a day in the morning. Daily changes in heartburn and acid reflux symptoms in the first 7 d of administration were assessed using a six-point scale (0: none; 1: mild; 2: mild-moderate; 3: moderate; 4: moderate-severe; 5: severe). RESULTS: The mean heartburn score in patients treated with esomeprazole more rapidly decreased than those receiving other PPI. Complete resolution of heartburn was also more rapid in patients treated with esomeprazole for 5 d compared with omeprazole (P = 0.0018, P = 0.0098, P = 0.0027, P = 0.0137, P = 0.0069, respectively), lansoprazole (P = 0.0020, P = 0.0046, P = 0.0037, P = 0.0016, P = 0.0076, respectively), and pantoprazole (P = 0.0006, P = 0.0005, P = 0.0009, P = 0.0031, P = 0.0119, respectively). There were no significant differences between the four groups in the rate of endoscopic healing of reflux esophagitis at week 8. CONCLUSION: Esomeprazole may be more effective than omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole for the rapid relief of heartburn symptoms and acid reflux symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis. PMID:19248200

  13. The Cohen cross-trigonal technic for vesicoureteral reflux with contracted bladder in children

    OpenAIRE

    進藤, 和彦; 野俣, 浩一郎; 城代, 明仁; 実藤, 健; 金武, 洋; 斉藤, 泰; 計屋, 紘信; 由良, 守司; 松崎, 幸康

    1984-01-01

    A 8-year-old girl was referred with both vesicoureteral reflux and repeated urinary infection since she was 30 months old. At 5 years old, she had had cystoscopy. Her excretory urogram (IVP) was almost normal; her voiding cystogram showed both vesicoureteral reflux of grade III and a maximum bladder capacity of 75 ml. At cystoscopy the ureteral orifices were in normal position of the trigone and the orifices were dilated like a golf-hole. Both ureters were reimplanted without ureter stents by...

  14. The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, A; Evans, C J; Allan, P; Lee, A J; Ruckley, C V; Fowkes, F G

    2000-11-01

    Previous work from this group has demonstrated the relationships between lower limb symptoms and the presence and severity of trunk varicose veins as seen on clinical examination to be generally weak, symptom specific, and gender dependent. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationships in the general population between lower limb symptoms and the presence of superficial or deep venous reflux. A cross-sectional study was made of an age-stratified random sample of 1566 subjects (699 men and 867 women) aged 18 to 64 selected from 12 general practices in Edinburgh, Scotland. Subjects completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding symptoms (heaviness/tension, a feeling of swelling, aching, restless legs, cramps, itching, tingling) and underwent duplex ultrasound examination of the superficial and deep venous systems of both legs. Reflux of 0.5 seconds or greater was considered pathologic. Deep venous reflux was defined as reflux in at least the popliteal vein. There was a significant positive relationship between isolated superficial reflux and the presence of heaviness/tension (P superficial reflux in men was not significantly positively associated with any symptom. Isolated deep venous reflux was not significantly related to any symptom in either leg in either sex. Combined reflux was related to a feeling of swelling (P =.018, right leg; P =.0022, left leg), cramps (P =.0049, left leg) and itching (P =.0043, left leg) in men, and aching (P =.03, right leg) and cramps (P =.026, left leg) in women. In the general population, only certain lower limb symptoms were related to the presence of reflux on duplex ultrasound scanning. The strongest relationships were observed in the left legs of men with combined superficial and deep reflux.

  15. Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntaro Matsuzaki

    Full Text Available Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett's esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models.A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46 and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40. Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett's esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41 and the presence of Barrett's esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56.Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett's esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

  16. Experience with the NICE Guidelines for Imaging Studies in Children with First Pyelonephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lytzen, R; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Cortes, D

    2011-01-01

    mercaptoacetyltriglycine scinti- and renography ( (99m)Tc MAG3). If vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was suspected, then prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was prescribed and the patients were referred to a surgeon for further evaluation including voiding cystoureterography (VCU). Patients with known urological anomalies...... was prescribed for 19 (20%), and VUR was diagnosed by VCU in 9 patients. Surgery was carried out in 7 (7%) patients, primarily for VUR. If the NICE guidelines had been initially followed, 5 of our 9 patients with VUR would not have been identified. VUR surgery was performed in 4 of these cases. Moreover, 9 cases...... a minimum of 3.5 years, the initial diagnosis of VUR would have been missed in 4 out of the 5 patients who underwent VUR surgery....

  17. [Virulence factors and pathophysiology of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, P; Bonarcorsi, S; Bingen, E

    2012-11-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causing urinary tract infections, bacteraemia or meningitis are characterized by a particular genetic background (phylogenetic group B2 and D) and the presence, within genetic pathogenicity islands (PAI) or plasmids, of genes encoding virulence factors involved in adhesion to epithelia, crossing of the body barriers (digestive, kidney, bloodbrain), iron uptake and resistance to the immune system. Among the many virulence factors described, two are particularly linked with a pathophysiological process: type P pili PapGII adhesin is linked with acute pyelonephritis, in the absence of abnormal flow of urine, and the K1 capsule is linked with neonatal meningitis. However, if the adhesin PapGII appears as the key factor of pyelonephritis, such that its absence in strain causing the infection is predictive of malformation or a vesico-ureteral reflux, the meningeal virulence of E. coli can not be reduced to a single virulence factor, but results from a combination of factors unique to each clone, and an imbalance between the immune defenses of the host and bacterial virulence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Urological complications after kidney transplantation from extended criteria donors: Ureteroneocystostomy versus pyelo-ureterostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promeyrat, X; Alechinsky, L; Duarte, R-C; Martin, X; Paparel, P; Timsit, M-O; Badet, L

    2016-05-01

    The use of transplants from extended criteria donors increases the number of urological complications after renal transplantation. Two different anastomosis techniques used to restore urinary continuity are compared in this study. Retrospective study, bi-center over a period of 5 years. One hundred and seventy six patients operated at Hospices Civils de Lyon benefited from ureteroneocystostomy according to De Campos-Freire (group 1) and 167 patients operated at the Necker Hospital in Paris had a pyelo-ureterostomy (group 2). The various urological complications (fistulas, strictures, seromas, haematomas and vesico-ureteric reflux) and their care were compared. Risk factors were sought. The waiting time before transplantation was longer in group 2 than in group 1 (51 and 33.84 months) as the percentage of anuric patients (52.9 % against 32.9 %) (Panuria, sex of recipients and donor age as independent risk factors in the onset of complications and the double J stent as a protective factor. This study does not demonstrate the superiority of a urinary anastomosis technique. The establishment of a double J stent reduces the risk of complications. Analysis of risk factors allows to propose a decision tree to guide the surgical strategy, particularly in the population of anuric recipients. 5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Involvement of the renal parenchyma in acute urinary tract infection: the contribution of 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, K; Vandevivere, J; Hoskens, C; Vervaet, A; Sand, A; Van Acker, K J

    1992-07-01

    We performed 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan and ultrasonography in 146 children during the acute phase of a proven urinary tract infection (UTI). In 99 a micturating cysto-urethrography and in 83 an intravenous urography was also done. The occurrence of fever and increased WBC count, CRP and ESR were also studied. It appeared from this retrospective study that 47% of the kidneys had a cortical or patchy pattern of decreased uptake of 99mTc DMSA, as compared to 23% with abnormal findings on US. Vesico-ureteral reflux was present in 38% of the kidneys with parenchymal involvement on 99mTc DMSA scan. Although fever, leucocytosis and elevated CRP and ESR were significantly correlated with abnormal 99mTc DMSA scan, they were also observed in children without renal parenchymal involvement. Our results suggest that 99mTc DMSA scan is a sensitive method for the detection of parenchymal involvement during acute UTI. The exact nature of these lesions and their relation with scars need, however, to be defined.

  20. [Pyelonephritis with massive renal tissue necrosis in child with urinary tract malformation--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Bratkowska, Monika; Finke, Daria; Olejniczak, Dariusz; Midel, Anna; Tkaczyk, Marcin

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the case report is presentation of unusual and heavy clinical course of pyelonephritis with renal tissue necrosis in a child with urinary tract malformation. Nine month old girl was admitted to hospital in heavy clinical status due to pyelonephritis--urosepsis. It was complicated by acute renal insufficiency. Patient was treated by broad-spectrum antibiotics and parenteral nutrition. She was feverish for 14 days. Computed tomography done in order to exclude abdominal abscess showed massive renal tissue necrosis of on both sides. Antibiotic treatment was successful after 6 weeks. Urological evaluation revealed bilateral vesico-ureteral refluxes grade IV. Scintigraphy showed multiple scars. Patient was treated Deflux injections (twice). We noted 5 urinary tract recurrences despite antibiotic profilaxis. GFR of 75 ml/min/1.73 m2 was estimated at age of 16 m. Immunodeficiency or malignancy as background of clinical course were excluded. The case we describe presents severe clinical course of pyelonephritis due to complex urinary tract malformation that is to be considered despite based on modern publications "sparing" strategies of diagnosis and profilaxis in urinary tract malformations.

  1. Dilated uropathies in children; Dilatation des reins et voies urinaires chez l`enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouissou, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Purpan, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1995-12-31

    These uropathies are frequent in children and are often diagnosed by ante-natal ultrasound examination. The dilatation, hydronephrosis or uretero-hydro-nephrosis may be due to a large pattern of malformations, either anatomical dysplasia, vesico-ureteric reflux or obstruction of the pelvi-ureteric junction, of the vesical-ureteric junction or due to a chronic urethral obstruction. The investigations must determine the exact urinary tract abnormalities, the renal function and the uro-dynamic change. They are guided by the ultrasound findings and cystography. In obstructive malformation, the MAG3 renogram with furosemide test is the best way to precise the uro-dynamic status, but it requires a careful technique in children and its interpretation is sometimes equivocal. DMSA scan is very useful to give precise separate kidney function and to follow the maturational change with age. All the results must be carefully analysed ; the final therapeutic decision and specially surgery is dependent of the type of uropathy and its natural history. In many cases, surgical treatment is only indicated after a longer follow-up and repeated evaluations. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: a retrospective study of 34 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahed, Jamila; Jouini, Riadh; Krichene, Imed; Maazoun, Kaies; Brahim, Mohamed Ben; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2011-01-01

    Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females) with a mean age of 4.8 years (range, 2 months to 14 years). All patients had urinary lithiasis with a urinary tract malformation. Abdominal pain was the most frequent clinical symptom (38%). Urinary infection was found in 7 patients (21%) and macroscopic haematuria was present in 10 patients (29%). The most frequent urinary tract malformations were megaureter (8 cases), uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (7 cases) and vesico-ureteric reflux (8 cases), but its malformative origin could not be confirmed. Treatment consisted of lithiasis extraction in 32 cases associated with specific treatment of the uropathy in 27 cases. Postoperative outcome was uneventful in all cases. In fact, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is not rare. Indeed, 9-34% of urinary lithiasis are noted to be associated with urinary tract malformation. Positive diagnosis relies specifically on kidney ultrasound, intravenous urography, and urethrocystography. Treatment depends on the type of urinary tract malformation, localisation and size of the urinary lithiasis. In conclusion, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is a frequent eventuality. Surgical intervention is the usual mode of treatment.

  3. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: A retrospective study of 34 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Chahed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females with a mean age of 4.8 years (range, 2 months to 14 years. All patients had urinary lithiasis with a urinary tract malformation. Abdominal pain was the most frequent clinical symptom (38%. Urinary infection was found in 7 patients (21% and macroscopic haematuria was present in 10 patients (29%. The most frequent urinary tract malformations were megaureter (8 cases, uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (7 cases and vesico-ureteric reflux (8 cases, but its malformative origin could not be confirmed. Treatment consisted of lithiasis extraction in 32 cases associated with specific treatment of the uropathy in 27 cases. Postoperative outcome was uneventful in all cases. In fact, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is not rare. Indeed, 9-34% of urinary lithiasis are noted to be associated with urinary tract malformation. Positive diagnosis relies specifically on kidney ultrasound, intravenous urography, and urethrocystography. Treatment depends on the type of urinary tract malformation, localisation and size of the urinary lithiasis. Conclusion: In conclusion, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is a frequent eventuality. Surgical intervention is the usual mode of treatment.

  4. [Outpatient pediatric urology in France: A still under developed practice. Results of a survey of the French Section of pediatric Urology (SFUP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, J; Marret, J-B; Ravasse, P

    2015-05-01

    Outpatient surgery is a very well adapted practice to the pediatric population. Our goal was to evaluate its actual development in the field of the pediatric urology. A questionnaire was addressed to all the French pediatric surgery centers in which at least one surgeon was member of the French Section of Pediatric Urology. The questionnaire concerned the organization and the outpatient urology procedures performed during the years 2011 and 2012. Thirty of the 34 approached centers returned the questionnaire. The total number of patients concerned in this study was of 33,166. The practices were very variable among centers: the inferior limit of age for anesthesia ranged from 2 to 12 months and type of surgery was also heterogeneous. Foreskin surgery, orchiopexy for undescended testis, inguinal hernia, and endoscopic treatment of vesico-ureteral reflux were the only procedures performed for more than 60% of cases as outpatient surgery. Outpatient surgery is not well developed in hypospadias repair. Only five centers raised 60% of ambulatory procedures for distal cases. No serious complication related to the outpatient approach was reported. This survey demonstrated very heterogeneous practices among French pediatric urologic centers. According to the French guidelines about outpatient pediatric surgery, this type of care could be more developed if anesthesiologists and surgeons accepted to evolve in their practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after kidney transplantation in pediatric recipients: Two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Antenore; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Belingheri, Mirco; Dilena, Robertino; Raiteri, Mauro; Pasciucco, Antonio; Colico, Caterina; Beretta, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    PRES is a neuro-clinical and radiological syndrome that can result as a consequence of several different conditions including hypertension, fluid overload, and immunosuppressive treatment. Herein, we report two children who received kidney and combined liver-kidney transplantation as treatment for renal hypodysplasia associated with bilateral vesico-ureteral reflux and methylmalonic acidemia, respectively. Early after surgery (seven and 10 days), both patients presented with hypertension and seizures. The patients' immunosuppressive regimen included steroid and calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and cyclosporine, respectively) and basiliximab and one with anti-IL2 receptor. In both cases, the imaging strongly supported the diagnosis of PRES. In details, the CT scan showed hypodensities in the posterior areas of the brain, and brain MRI demonstrated parieto-occipital alterations indicative of vasogenic edema. Treatment with calcineurin inhibitors was temporally discontinued and restarted at lower dosage; arterial hypertension was treated with Ca-channel blockers. Both children fully recovered without any neurological sequels. In conclusion, in children undergoing solid organ transplantation, who develop neurological symptoms PRES, should be carefully considered in the differential diagnosis and once the diagnosis is ruled in, we recommend strict arterial blood pressure control and adjustment or withholding of calcineurin inhibitor therapy should be considered based upon blood levels. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Klebsiella spp urinary tract infections during first year after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołębiewska, J; Tarasewicz, A; Dębska-Ślizień, A; Rutkowski, B

    2014-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common infections in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Klebsiella spp is a well-recognized source of nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is also the most common pathogen capable of producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). We performed a retrospective cohort study reviewing medical records of patients followed-up at Gdańsk Transplantation Centre. We analyzed urine cultures performed within the first 12 months after renal transplantation (RT) with reference to clinical data. We recorded all Klebsiella spp UTIs. We studied urine cultures and clinical data from 335 RTRs. We observed 59 Klebsiella spp episodes in 24 RT patients, including 10 cases of acute graft pyelonephritis and 8 of urosepsis. More than half were caused by ESBL+, whereas there were no carbapenemase-producing strains. Almost 80% of episodes were diagnosed beginning from the second month post-transplantation. More than 60% of upper Klebsiella spp UTIs were due to ESBL+ strains, although we did not identify any host risk factors including vesico-ureteral reflux, strictures at the uretero-vesical junction, history of recurrent UTIs before RT, comorbidity measured by Charlson Comorbidity Index, history of acute rejection, use of induction, and type of immunosuppression used. Upper Klebsiella spp UTIs were slightly more prevalent in males with urinary flow impairment due to various reasons. Klebsiella spp virulence factors, not the host factors, seem to be mostly responsible for developing upper UTIs in RT patients.

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics and evaluation scheme following febrile urinary tract infection in children: a nationwide Israeli survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Naama; Ashkenazi, Shai; Davidovits, Miriam

    2009-11-01

    Although febrile urinary tract infections are very common in young children, the need for antimicrobial prophylaxis and evaluation following a first event is controversial. To assess the approach of leading pediatric specialists throughout israel to antimicrobial prophylaxis. A questionnaire regarding the approach to antibiotic prophylaxis and diagnostic evaluation following a first event of febrile UTI, according to age and underlying renal abnormality, was sent to all 58 directors of departments of pediatrics, units of pediatric infectious diseases and pediatric nephrology in Israel. Fifty-six directors (96%) responded. Most prescribed prophylactic antibiotics after UTI. Heads of infectious disease departments prescribed less prophylaxis following UTI at the age of 18 months than heads of pediatrics or heads of pediatric nephrology units (34% vs. 72-75%, P = 0.018), but more often in cases of severe vesico-ureteral reflux without UTI. Cephalosporins were used prophylactically more often by directors of pediatrics compared to heads of pediatric nephrology units (71% vs. 38%, P = 0.048); the latter used non-beta-lactam prophylaxis (61% vs. 23%, P = 0.013) more often. Most pediatricians used renal sonography for evaluation; renal scan was used more commonly by pediatric nephrologists. The administration of prophylactic antibiotics after UTI is still common practice among pediatric opinion leaders, although the specific approach differs by subspecialty. According to the latest evidence-based data, educational efforts are needed to formulate and implement judicious guidelines.

  8. Design and construction of a reflux column distillation unit for bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bio-ethanol distilling tank was designed and constructed to distil ethanol from sugarcane substrate. The machine has a capacity to process 200 litres of substrate at full load of the boiler. The distiller has an Internal Reflux Still Condenser (IRSC) that controls the intemal re-distillation process and the separation of the final ...

  9. Clinical utility of esomeprazole for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric and adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardile S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Cardile, Claudio RomanoDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Messina, ItalyAbstract: Gastroesophageal reflux is a common condition in the pediatric population, with an increasing incidence in the last few years. It can be defined as an effortless retrograde movement of gastric contents into the esophagus related to complex multifactorial pathogenesis, involving anatomical, hormonal, environmental, and genetic factors. In some cases, it may be associated with esophageal or extraesophageal symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation, and is defined as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The therapeutic approach to gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children is often conservative, including changes in lifestyle (eg, posture and thickening of meals. If these children remain symptomatic after lifestyle changes (nutrition, feeding, and positional modification, or present with clinical red flags (poor weight gain, recurrent respiratory symptoms, or hematemesis and complications of GERD (esophagitis, bleeding, stricture, Barrett's esophagus, or adenocarcinoma it may be necessary to set up a proper diagnostic protocol. Proton pump inhibitors have been recommended as the most effective acid suppression therapy for adults and pediatric patients. Esomeprazole, the S-isomer of omeprazole, is the only single-isomer proton pump inhibitor available. The paper assesses the safety and tolerability of esomeprazole in pediatric and adolescent patients.Keywords: esomeprazole, gastroesophageal reflux disease, pump proton inhibitors

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease in an impoverished minority population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Frank K; Rai, Jitha; Vanar, Vishwas; Bongiorno, Charles; Nelson, Deborah B; Parepally, Mayur; Poonia, Arashdeep; Sharma, Amol; Gohel, Shaun; Richter, Joel E

    2010-10-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: An epidemiological link between an increased body mass index and complaints of typical heartburn symptoms has been identified. It appears that increasing waist circumference, rather than overall weight is most important. Studies to date have not included minority, impoverished communities. Our aim was to determine the impact of obesity on the prevalence of reflux disease in an impoverished community while controlling for known confounders. METHODS: DESIGN Cross-sectional survey delivered by in-home interviews, convenience sampling, and targeted mailing. Data queried include demographics, medical history, lifestyle habits, and symptoms of reflux disease. Height, weight, hip and waist circumference measured in participating subjects. PARTICIPANTS: 503 subjects living in the zip code immediately surrounding Temple University Hospital. Included only adults living in the hospital's zip code for at least 3 years. RESULTS: The highest quartile of waist circumference (≥42 in.) demonstrated a strong association with GERD (AOR = 2.15; 95% CI 1.18-3.90). Smoking increased the odds by 1.72 (95% CI 1.13-2.62). There was no relationship between body mass index, waist-hip ratio, or diet and reflux classification. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing waist circumference, but not overall body mass index or waist-hip ratio, and smoking are risk factors for prevalent GERD. No association between reflux disease and lifestyle choices such as coffee drinking and fast food dining were found. LIMITATIONS: Potential for recall bias and disease misclassification. Possible methodological errors in self-measurement of waist and hip circumference.

  11. [Usefulness of assessment of voice capabilities in female patients with reflux-related dysphonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Adamonis, Kestutis; Toohill, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    To analyze vocal capabilities in patients diagnosed with reflux related dysphonia versus controls with healthy voice with selection of the most informative discriminating quantitative parameters and to assess voice changes following treatment. Six parameters of voice range profile (VRP) and five parameters of speech range profile were taken and analyzed from 60 dysphonic outpatient females with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) diagnosed by reflux-related atypical and typical symptoms, videolaryngoscopic findings, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and positive response to empiric 3-month omeprazole treatment. Seventy-six females with healthy voice served as controls. All six parameters of voice range profile and three of 5 parameters of speech range profile showed significant differences comparing LPR patients with controls before omeprazole treatment (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed VRP maximum-minimum intensity range to be the most informative parameter for discrimination between reflux-related dysphonic and healthy voices (overall prediction accuracy, 86.8%). A threshold value of significant parameter was stated using the receiver operating characteristic curve. Treatment with omeprazole significantly improved voice quality showing the greatest changes in the mean scores of majority of voice range profile parameters. Vocal capabilities, especially evaluated by voice range profile, are restricted in LPR female patients in comparison to subjects with healthy voice. Quantitative voice assessment with voice range profile may add more objective aspect for screening dysphonia and could be used as a criterion of evaluation of treatment efficacy in such patients.

  12. Corpus gastritis in patients with endoscopic diagnosis of reflux oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, R.J.F.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Boer, W.A. de; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A high level of gastric acid secretion is considered to be a risk factor for reflux oesophagitis or Barrett's oesophagus. Corpus gastritis may have a protective effect on the oesophagus, because of decreased gastric acid output. AIM: To determine if corpus gastritis is associated with

  13. Beneficial effect of omeprazole in a patient with severe bronchial asthma and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Roos, C. M.; Tytgat, G. N.; Jansen, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    A 25-yr-old man suffered from severe nocturnal asthma, which was shown to be provoked by pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux. A dramatic, immediate improvement of his pulmonary condition was achieved by treatment with omeprazole after failure of other therapeutic measures, including high doses of

  14. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux disease : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oor, Jelmer E; Roks, David J; Ünlü, Çagdas; Hazebroek, Eric J

    BACKGROUND: The effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains unclear. We aimed to outline the currently available literature. DATA SOURCES: All relevant databases were searched for publications examining the effect of laparoscopic SG on GERD.

  15. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Timmer, R.; Akkermans, L. M. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  16. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, AJ; Weusten, BLAM; Timmer, R; Akkermans, LMA; Smout, AJPM

    Background: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  17. Prognostic factors for relapse and maintenance treatment with cisapride in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Blum, A. L.; Verlinden, M.

    1995-01-01

    AIM: To perform a further Cox proportional hazards logistic regression analysis of data from two large-scale placebo-controlled trials with cisapride as maintenance treatment in reflux disease. RESULTS: Analysis of each of the two databases, allowing the model to operate freely, led to the

  18. Kosten en effecten van esomeprazol in de behandeling van reflux ziekte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Buijt; M.J. Al (Maiwenn); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractDoel. Het bepalen van de kosten-effectiviteit van esomeprazol (Nexium(r)) ten opzichte van alle andere in Nederland geregistreerde protonpomp remmers in de behandeling van reflux ziekte. Voor de effectiviteit vormt het hebben van voldoende controle over de symptomen het

  19. The effect of itopride combined with lansoprazole in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Byung-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of adding a prokinetic agent to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) for the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease. A prospective, randomized open trial comparing lansoprazole plus itopride to lansoprazole single therapy was performed for 12 weeks. Sixty-four patients with a reflux finding score (RFS) >7 and a reflux symptom index (RSI) >13 were enrolled and received either lansoprazole 30 mg once daily with itopride 50 mg three times daily or lansoprazole 30 mg once daily for 12 weeks. RSI and RFS were completed at baseline, after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. During the treatment period, RSI and RFS were significantly improved compared with the pretreatment scores in both study groups. Reductions of total RSI and globus symptom were significantly higher in the lansoprazole plus itopride group compared to the lansoprazole group. In the RFS, however, there were no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, itopride in addition to PPI did not show any superior RFS improvement compared to PPI single therapy, but was helpful in speeding up relief of reflux symptoms in LPR patients. Thus, itopride may be considered as the secondary additive agent in the PPI treatment of LPR patients.

  20. Health care utilisation of women who experience pregnancy-related reflux, nausea and/or vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Jane; Hall, Helen; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David

    2017-08-01

    Nausea, vomiting and reflux are common conditions experienced by women during pregnancy. The objective of this project was to examine women's use of health services for these conditions. The study sample was obtained via the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. A total of 2445 women who were pregnant or who had recently given birth in 2009 were invited to complete a sub-survey in 2010 about pregnancy and health service utilisation. A response rate of 79.2% was obtained. During their pregnancy, 604 (32.9%) respondents experienced nausea, with 255 (42.2%) of these women seeking help from a health care practitioner. A total of 201 women (11%) reported repeated vomiting, and 637 women (34.7%) reported reflux, of which 78.6% and 59.2% sought help, respectively. There were no significant differences in the mental and physical health measures between women with nausea, vomiting and/or reflux who sought help and women who did not. Having private health insurance with obstetric cover was associated with seeking help for reflux; this was the only demographic measure significantly associated with seeking help for any condition. Research is required to understand why many women do not seek professional help for common gastrointestinal conditions during pregnancy.

  1. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, C. M. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20

  2. [Post-cholecystectomy condition: duodeno-gastric reflux and bile acid concentration in the gastric juice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, K A; Kühne, C; Zemlin, C

    1979-07-01

    In cholecystectomized patients highly significantly more frequently a duodenogastric reflux was found than in a group of patients with a healthy abdomen and a group of patients with cholelithiasis. The average concentration of bile acid in the gastric juice was after the removal of the gall-bladder manifoldly higher than in the control groups. The number of patients with concentrated reflux was also highly significantly larger than in patients with cholelithiasis not operated on and in patients with a healthy abdomen. Despite the high reflux rate and the high concentration of the bile acids influencing on the mucous membrane of the stomach the number of patients with ulcera ventriculi was not significantly larger than in a group of not cholecystectomized persons. These observations plead for the fact that the bile acids in the duodenogastric reflux alone are not to be regarded as an ulcerogenic agent, but that perhaps other components of the duodenal juice have to be considered as causes of lesions of the gastric mucous membrane.

  3. Glottic cancer in a non-smoking patient with laryngopharyngeal reflux

    OpenAIRE

    N. Zainuddin; Mohd Kornain, NK

    2016-01-01

    The onset of carcinoma of the larynx, especially of the glottis, is heralded mainly by a change of voice. It has a male preponderance and is almost exclusively common to smokers and patients with heavy alcohol consumption. We report a case of glottic carcinoma in a non-smoker female patient. The only possible risk factor for her is a history of laryngopharyngeal reflux.

  4. Surgical Reimplantation for the Correction of Vesicoureteral Reflux following Failed Endoscopic Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Chertin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In recent years, endoscopic injection became the procedure of choice for the correction of vesicoureteral reflux in the majority of the centers. Unfortunately, endoscopic treatment is not always successful and sometimes requires more than one trial to achieve similar results to that of an open reimplantation surgery. Our aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and success rate of open ureteral reimplantation following failed endoscopic procedure. Patients and Methods. During 2004–2010, we evaluated 16 patients with persistent vesicoureteral reflux (grades II–IV following failed endoscopic treatment. All patients underwent open ureteral reimplantation. All patients were followed with an ultrasound 6 weeks following surgery and every 6 months thereafter for an average of 22 months. Voiding cystography was performed at 3 months after surgery. Results. During unilateral open ureteral reimplantation, the implanted deposit from previous procedures was either excised, drained, or incorporated into the neotunnel with the ureter. Vesicoureteral reflux was resolved in all patients with 100% success rate. No new hydronephrosis or signs of obstruction developed in any of the patients. qDMSA renal scan was available in 8 patients showing improvement of function in 5 and stable function in 3, and no new scars were identified. Conclusions. Open ureteral reimplantation is an excellent choice for the correction of failed endoscopic treatment in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

  5. Endoscopic pH Monitoring for Patients with Suspected or Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G Turner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless pH studies can offer prolonged pH monitoring, which may potentially facilitate the diagnosis and management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of abnormal esophageal acid exposure using prolonged pH monitoring in patients with suspected or refractory GERD symptoms.

  6. Non-refluxing ileal ureter replacement using intussuscepted nipple valve--an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, T

    1996-04-01

    Although the vast accumulation of data from the continent urinary reservoir clearly proves that intussusception of the ileum is a reliable procedure for preventing urine reflux, few reports have appeared on the application of this technique to ileal replacement of the ureter. In an effort to determine if the nipple valve created by the intussuscepted ileum can prevent urine reflux in the ileal ureter, an experimental study was done using five dogs. I performed ureteral replacement using a newly developed procedure to secure the nipple valve in place. All dogs were followed for 6 months and evaluated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), serum electrolyte, urine culture, intravenous urogram (IVU), cystogram, and urodynamic studies. No significant differences were notable between the preoperative and 6-month postoperative values of BUN, Cr, and serum electrolytes in all dogs. Only one of the dogs, which showed extussusception of the nipple valve, demonstrated the reflux. IVUs and Whitaker flow studies did not confirm any urinary outflow obstruction. Furthermore, during the pressure studies, the nipple valve prevented transmission of the increased intravesical pressure to the upper urinary tract. I believe that the intussuscepted ileum can be secured by our procedure and can prevent reflux even though it is incorporated into the urinary system itself.

  7. Reflux heat-pipe solar receiver for a Stirling dish-electric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziph, B.; Godett, T. M.; Diver, R. B.

    This paper describes the preliminary design of a reflux heat-pipe solar receiver to match the STM4-120 variable swashplate Stirling engine to a test bed concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories Distributed Receiver Test Facility. Performance analysis and other design considerations are presented and discussed.

  8. Reflux heat-pipe solar receiver for a Stirling dish-electric system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziph, B.; Godett, T.M.; Diver, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of competitive, modular bulk electric power from the sun is enhanced by the use of a reflux heat-pipe receiver to combine a Stirling engine with a paraboloidal dish concentrator. This combination represents a potential improvement over previous successful demonstrations of Stirling dish-electric technology in terms of enhanced performance, lower cost, and longer life. In the reflux (i.e. gravity assisted) heat-pipe receiver, concentrated solar radiation causes liquid sodium to evaporate, the vapor flows to the Stirling engine heaters where it condenses on the heater tubes. The condensate is returned to and distributed over the receiver by gravity (refluxing) and by capillary forces in a wick lining the receiver. It is essentially an adaptation of sodium heat pipe technology to the peculiar requirements of concentrated solar flux and provides many potential advantages over conventional tube receiver technology. This paper describes the preliminary design of a reflux heat-pipe solar receiver to match the STM4-120 variable swashplate Stirling engine to a Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories Distributed Receiver Test Facility. Performance analysis and other design considerations are presented and discussed.

  9. Association of heartburn and laryngopharyngeal symptoms with endoscopic reflux esophagitis, smoking, and drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chang-Chun; Wang, Ya-Yu; Wang, Kai-Li; Lien, Han-Chung; Liang, Ming-Tai; Yen, Ting-Ting; Wang, Jing-Ping; Liu, Shi-An; Wang, Chen-Chi

    2009-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the association of laryngopharyngeal symptoms and heartburn with endoscopic esophagitis, smoking, and drinking. The clinical importance of the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) in predicting endoscopic esophagitis was also evaluated. Case series with planned data collection. From November 2006 to February 2007, 156 adults received a whole-body physical check-up. They filled out the RSI questionnaire and were dichotomized into either a "no problem group" or a "possible patients group" according to their scores on the RSI. All subjects received an esophagoscopy. The relationship between RSI score and endoscopic esophagitis, smoking, and drinking was analyzed. Voice change, but not heartburn, was significantly associated with endoscopic reflux esophagitis. Based on the RSI scores, some items in addition to voice change were significantly associated with smoking or drinking but not with endoscopic esophagitis. While screening patients for reflux esophagitis by using the RSI questionnaire, there is little value in using heartburn to predict endoscopic esophagitis in Taiwanese people. On the other hand, a husky voice might be a good clinical indicator of patients at risk of having reflux esophagitis.

  10. Reflux of a staple after kock pouch urinary diversion: a nidus for renal stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Eckart; Pannek, Juergen

    2004-06-01

    A patient with cystectomy and urinary diversion after spinal cord injury had multiple pouch concretements and a kidney stone formed around a staple that apparently had refluxed from the nipple of the pouch. In such cases, the stone and staple should be removed at the same time, either percutaneously or by ureterorenoscopy.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of baclofen in pediatric patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, H. E.; van Boxtel, C. J.; Butter, J. J.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Omari, T.; Benninga, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (TLESR) is the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults and children. Baclofen [4-amino-3-(p-chlorophenyl)-butanoic acid], a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist used for the management of spasticity, has

  12. Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis and Prevention in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Using Rat Duodenoesophageal Reflux Models

    OpenAIRE

    Koichi Miwa; Tetsuo Ohta; Takanori Hattori; Koji Nishijima; Tomoharu Miyashita; Shozo Sasaki; Katsunobu Oyama; Takashi Fujimura

    2011-01-01

    Development from chronic inflammation to Barrett's adenocarcinoma is known as one of the inflammation-related carcinogenesis routes. Gastroesophageal reflux disease induces regurgitant esophagitis, and esophageal mucosa is usually regenerated by squamous epithelium, but sometimes and somewhere replaced with metaplastic columnar epithelium. Specialized columnar epithelium, so-called Barrett's epithelium (BE), is a risk factor for dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in esophagus. Several experiments u...

  13. Two years of experience with robot-assisted anti-reflux surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanberg Jensen, Jonas; Kold Antonsen, Henning; Durup, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    significantly dependent on type of fundic wrap with reoperation of Nissen fundoplication being dysphagia and reoperation of Toupet being recurrent reflux (p = 0.008). There was no clearly determined learning curve. Conclusions RAAS was safe, feasible and with equal efficacy to CLAS. There were however...

  14. Combination therapy versus monotherapy for gastroesophageal reflux in children with difficult-to-treat bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Salah Bediwy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Combination of domperidone and esomeprazole was more effective in improving the endoscopic reflux score, childhood-asthma control test (C-ACT and FEV1 (% of predicted and significantly reduced the sputum SP than the use of esomeprazole only in children with difficult-to-treat asthma.

  15. Circumferential and axial distribution of esophageal mucosal damage in reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edebo, A.; Vieth, M.; Tam, W.; Bruno, M.; van Berkel, A.-M.; Stolte, M.; Schoeman, M.; Tytgat, G.; Dent, J.; Lundell, L.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the axial and radial distribution of histological markers including hyperplasia of the basal cell layer, elongation of the papillae and dilatation of the intercellular spaces of the squamous epithelium in patients with nonerosive reflux disease compared to

  16. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI te...

  17. Induced viscosity fibre system for the treatment or prevention of gastro-oesophageal reflux (gor)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Harthoorn, L.F.; Venema, P.; Choi, W.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The invention pertains to the use of pectin and alginate in the manufacture of a liquid nutritional composition in the treatment or prevention of gastro-oesophageal reflux in a patient, said composition comprising pectin and alginate, said composition exhibiting a maximum gel strength at a pH in the

  18. Radionuclide scintigraphy in the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic and asymptomatic pre-term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigeri, C.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Narang, A. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Chandigarh (India); Bhattacharya, A.; Mittal, B.R. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chandigarh (India)

    2008-09-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in pre-term infants. The diagnosis based on symptoms is always questionable. The incidence of GER in symptomatic babies varies from 22% to 85%, but literature regarding the incidence of reflux in asymptomatic pre-term infants is lacking. We used radionuclide scintigraphy to evaluate the incidence of GER in symptomatic as well as asymptomatic pre-term neonates and to assess whether symptoms have any relation with positive scintigraphy. We studied 106 pre-term infants (52 symptomatic, 54 asymptomatic) of less than 34 weeks of gestation, who fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Babies were considered symptomatic in the presence of vomiting, regurgitation, apnea, de-saturations, unexplained bradycardia and recurrent lung collapses. Radionuclide scintigraphy was conducted at post-conceptional age of 32-34 weeks when they were clinically stable for 72 h. Feeding was avoided for 2 h preceding the study. {sup 99m}Tc sulphur colloid was administered in a dose of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) in 1 ml, followed by milk (full feed) through an orogastric tube, prior to imaging under a gamma camera. Reflux was graded as low or high, and reflux episodes during the study were counted. The incidence of GER in the symptomatic group was 71.2% and in asymptomatic babies 61.1% (p=0.275). High-grade reflux was more common (71.4%) than low-grade (28.6%) in both groups (p=0.449). Mean number of reflux episodes in 20 min was 4.4{+-}2.4 in symptomatic babies and 4.9 {+-}2.2 in asymptomatic babies (p=0.321). Babies with positive scintigraphy were similar in birth weight, gestation, time to achieve full feeds, weight and age at discharge to those with negative scintigraphy. GER is common in pre-term infants of less than 34 weeks gestation. The incidence of positive scintigraphy and grade of reflux is not significantly different in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic babies. Though radionuclide scintigraphy is a simple, quick and non-invasive investigation in

  19. Effect of Gaviscon Infant on gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants assessed by combined intraluminal impedance/pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Buono, R; Wenzl, T G; Ball, G; Keady, S; Thomson, M

    2005-05-01

    Gaviscon Infant (GI) has been recommended for gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants. Its efficacy has not been examined with a physiologically appropriate denominator to define the degree of GOR. To investigate the influence of Gaviscon Infant on GOR in infants using combined pH and intraluminal impedance measurement. Twenty infants (mean age 163.5 days, range 34-319 days) exclusively bottle fed, with symptoms clinically suggestive of GOR, underwent 24 hour studies of intra-oesophageal 6 channel impedance and dual channel pH monitoring, during which six random administrations (3+3) of Gaviscon Infant (625 mg in 225 ml milk) or placebo (mannitol and Solvito N, 625 mg in 225 ml milk) were given in a double blind fashion. Impedance/pH reflux data were recorded and analysed blind by one observer. The median number of reflux events/hour (1.58 v 1.68), acid reflux events/hour (0.26 v 0.43), minimum distal or proximal pH, total acid clearance time per hour (time with pH below pH 4), and total reflux duration per hour were not significantly different after GI than after placebo. Reflux height was marginally lower after GI (median 66.6% v 77.3% oesophageal length) compared with placebo. Results showed a marginal but significant difference between Gaviscon Infant and placebo in average reflux height, and raises questions regarding any perceived clinical benefit of its use.

  20. Cardiaplication: a novel surgical technique for refractory gastroesophageal reflux in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah J; Pandya, Samir; Clifton, Matthew S; Bhatia, Amina; Wulkan, Mark L

    2011-11-01

    We encountered 3 patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease and tubular stomachs precluding fundoplication. Here, we report the use of an innovative technique, cardiaplication, as an alternative approach for antireflux surgery. Three infants with medically refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were referred for fundoplication. In each case, the patient's anatomy prevented a traditional fundoplication from being performed. A cardiaplication was performed by invaginating the cardia of the stomach at the angle of His and securing the invaginated tissue with interrupted silk suture. The plication tubularized the cardia of the stomach, essentially increasing the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus and altering the angle of His. The imbrication also creates a flapper valve over the distal esophagus, further limiting potential reflux. The charts for the infants who received cardiaplication were reviewed. Radiographic studies and clinical notes for the presence of persistent reflux were evaluated. Cardiaplication was completed in 3 patients with GERD. All cases were initiated laparoscopically and one was converted to an open procedure secondary to dense adhesive disease. Each child was initiated on feeds between postoperative day 2 and 3. Two of the 3 patients were tolerating goal feeds with-in 2 days. The third patient reached goal feeds on day 16. Postoperative imaging (upper gastrointestinal series [UGI]) was obtained in 2 of the 3 patients. At follow-up (13, 7, and 4 months), all 3 patients are clinically free of symptoms of GERD. Delayed radiographic imaging has confirmed that the patients are no longer refluxing. Based on preliminary findings, cardiaplication appears to be a safe and effective surgical technique for the management of severe GERD in infants. We performed cardiaplication out of necessity; however, after further testing this may prove to be an optimal approach, as it can be performed without disruption of the hiatus.