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Sample records for vesicle structures insights

  1. Capsids, Matrices and Vesicles : Structural Insights into the Assembly of Paramyxoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Liljeroos, Lassi

    2013-01-01

    Paramyxoviridae constitute a family of pleomorphic, enveloped viruses including several human pathogens. Understanding of the structure and assembly of paramyxoviruses has been hindered by the lack of whole-virion three-dimensional structures. In this work, measles and human respiratory syncytial viruses were studied with three-dimensional electron microscopy and biochemical analysis of recombinant proteins. The analysis revealed significant differences in the structure and assembly of the tw...

  2. Vesicles and vesicle gels - structure and dynamics of formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gradzielski, M

    2003-01-01

    Vesicles constitute an interesting morphology formed by self-aggregating amphiphilic molecules. They exhibit a rich structural variety and are of interest both from a fundamental point of view (for studying closed bilayer systems) and from a practical point of view (whenever one is interested in the encapsulation of active molecules). In many circumstances vesicular structures have to be formed by external forces, but of great interest are amphiphilic systems, where they form spontaneously. Here the question arises of whether this means that they are also thermodynamically stable structures, which at least in some systems appears to be the case. If such vesicles are well defined in size, it is possible to pack them densely and thereby form vesicle gels that possess highly elastic properties even for relatively low volume fractions of amphiphile. Conditions for the formation and the microstructure of such vesicle gels have been studied in some detail for the case of unilamellar vesicles. Another important and ...

  3. Structure of Amphiphilic Terpolymer Raspberry Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Guo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Terpolymer raspberry vesicles contain domains of different chemical affinities. They are potential candidates as multi-compartment cargo carriers. Their efficacy depends on their stability and load capacity. Using a model star terpolymer system in an aqueous solution, a dissipative particle dynamic (DPD simulation is employed to investigate how equilibrium aggregate structures are affected by polymer concentration and pairwise interaction energy in a solution. It is shown that a critical mass of polymer is necessary for vesicle formation. The free energy of the equilibrium aggregates are calculated and the results show that the transition from micelles to vesicles is governed by the interactions between the longest solvophobic block and the solvent. In addition, the ability of vesicles to encapsulate solvent is assessed. It is found that reducing the interaction energy favours solvent encapsulation, although solvent molecules can permeate through the vesicle’s shell when repulsive interactions among monomers are low. Thus, one can optimize the loading capacity and the release rate of the vesicles by turning pairwise interaction energies of the polymer and the solvent. The ability to predict and control these aspects of the vesicles is an essential step towards designing vesicles for specific purposes.

  4. Insights into the self-reproduction of oleate vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P [' Enrico Fermi' Centre, Compendio Viminale, 00184 Rome (Italy); Wehrli, E [Electron Microscopy Centre (EMEZ), Applied Physics Institute, ETH Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Luisi, P L [Biology Department, University of RomaTre, Viale Marconi 446, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    In view of the importance of vesicles as models for early cells, several groups have started work looking for conditions under which vesicles can undergo growth and division. Evidence for growth and division has been obtained with the help of ferritin-labelled vesicles; furthermore, it has been shown that in such processes the vesicle size distribution is largely conserved. In both cases, the data suggest that the process under study is mainly characterized by vesicle growth and eventually division into daughter vesicles. However, direct evidence for vesicle division has not been obtained. In this paper, mostly based on freeze-fracture electron microscopy, we describe conditions under which for the first time division intermediates can be trapped in the form of twin vesicles. This finding, together with supporting dynamic light scattering and fluorescence investigations, permits us to establish some additional points in the mechanism of vesicle self-reproduction.

  5. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  6. Formation and structural properties of multi-block copolymer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Ma, Shiying

    2014-03-01

    Due to the unique structure, vesicles have attracted considerable attention for their potential applications, such as gene and drug delivery, microcapsules, nanoreactors, cell membrane mimetic, synthetic organelles, etc. By using dissipative particle dynamics, we studied the self-assembly of amphiphilic multi-block copolymer. The phase diagram was constructed by varying the interaction parameters and the composition of the block copolymers. The results show that the vesicles are stable in a large region which is different from the diblock copolymer or triblock copolymer. The structural properties of vesicles can be controlled by varying the interaction parameters and the length of the hydrophobic block. The relationship between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic block length vs the aqueous cavity size and vesicle size are revealed. The copolymers with shorter hydrophobic blocks length or the higher hydrophilicity are more likely to form vesicles with larger aqueous cavity size and vesicle size as well as thinner wall thickness. However, the increase in hydrophobic-block length results to form vesicles with smaller aqueous cavity size and larger vesicle size. Acknowledgments. This work has been supported by NNSFC (No. 21074053) and NBRPC (No. 2010CB923303).

  7. Endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles have a characteristic striped bipolar surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K R; Carley, W W; Palade, G E

    1985-12-01

    Capillary endothelial cells have a large population of small (65-80 nm diameter in transmission electron microscopy) vesicles of which a large fraction is associated with the plasmalemma of the luminal and abluminal side. We studied the fine structure and distribution of these plasmalemmal vesicles by high resolution scanning electron microscopy in cultured endothelial cells obtained from bovine adrenal cortical capillaries. Cell monolayers were covered with polylysine-coated silicon chips, split in high potassium buffer, fixed in aldehyde mixtures, and then treated with OsO4 and thiocarbohydrazide. After critical point drying, the specimens were coated with a thin (less than 2 nm) continuous film of chromium. On the cytoplasmic aspect of the dorsal plasmalemmal fragments seen in such specimens, plasmalemmal vesicles appear as uniform vesicular protrusions approximately 70-90 nm in diameter, preferentially concentrated in distinct large fields in which they occur primarily as single units. Individual plasmalemmal vesicles exhibit a striped surface fine structure which consists of ridges approximately 10 nm in diameter, separated by furrows and oriented as meridians, often ending at two poles on opposite sides of the vesicles in a plane parallel to the plasmalemma. This striped surface structure is clearly distinct from the cage structure of coated pits found, at low surface density, on the same specimens. The cytoplasmic aspect of the plasmalemma proper is covered by a fibrillar infrastructure which does not extend over plasmalemmal vesicles but on which the latter appear to be anchored by fine filaments.

  8. Nanoparticle analysis sheds budding insights into genetic drivers of extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N. Hurwitz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication in healthy and pathological environments. Because EVs are present in a variety of biological fluids and contain molecular signatures of their cell or tissue of origin, they have great diagnostic and prognostic value. The ability of EVs to deliver biologically active proteins, RNAs and lipids to cells has generated interest in developing novel therapeutics. Despite their potential medical use, many of the mechanisms underlying EV biogenesis and secretion remain unknown. Methods: Here, we characterized vesicle secretion across the NCI-60 panel of human cancer cells by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Using CellMiner, the quantity of EVs secreted by each cell line was compared to reference transcriptomics data to identify gene products associated with vesicle secretion. Results: Gene products positively associated with the quantity of exosomal-sized vesicles included vesicular trafficking classes of proteins with Rab GTPase function and sphingolipid metabolism. Positive correlates of larger microvesicle-sized vesicle secretion included gene products involved in cytoskeletal dynamics and exocytosis, as well as Rab GTPase activation. One of the identified targets, CD63, was further evaluated for its role in vesicle secretion. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of the CD63 gene in HEK293 cells resulted in a decrease in small vesicle secretion, suggesting the importance of CD63 in exosome biogenesis. Conclusion: These observations reveal new insights into genes involved in exosome and microvesicle formation, and may provide a means to distinguish EV sub-populations. This study offers a foundation for further exploration of targets involved in EV biogenesis and secretion.

  9. Removal of Vesicle Structures from Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion...

  10. Vesicles from Amphiphilic Dumbbells and Janus Dendrimers: Bioinspired Self-Assembled Structures for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Taabache

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The current review focuses on vesicles obtained from the self-assembly of two types of dendritic macromolecules, namely amphiphilic Janus dendrimers (forming dendrimersomes and amphiphilic dumbbells. In the first part, we will present some synthetic strategies and the various building blocks that can be used to obtain dendritic-based macromolecules, thereby showing their structural versatility. We put our focus on amphiphilic Janus dendrimers and amphiphilic dumbbells that form vesicles in water but we also encompass vesicles formed thereof in organic solvents. The second part of this review deals with the production methods of these vesicles at the nanoscale but also at the microscale. Furthermore, the influence of various parameters (intrinsic to the amphiphilic JD and extrinsic—from the environment on the type of vesicle formed will be discussed. In the third part, we will review the numerous biomedical applications of these vesicles of nano- or micron-size.

  11. Cell Secretion: Current Structural and Biochemical Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  12. Functional insights from structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouhar, Farhad; Kuzin, Alexandre; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Lee, Insun; Zhou, Weihong; Abashidze, Mariam; Chen, Yang; Yong, Wei; Janjua, Haleema; Fang, Yingyi; Wang, Dongyan; Cunningham, Kellie; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Pichersky, Eran; Klessig, Daniel F; Porter, Carl W; Montelione, Gaetano T; Tong, Liang

    2007-09-01

    Structural genomics efforts have produced structural information, either directly or by modeling, for thousands of proteins over the past few years. While many of these proteins have known functions, a large percentage of them have not been characterized at the functional level. The structural information has provided valuable functional insights on some of these proteins, through careful structural analyses, serendipity, and structure-guided functional screening. Some of the success stories based on structures solved at the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) are reported here. These include a novel methyl salicylate esterase with important role in plant innate immunity, a novel RNA methyltransferase (H. influenzae yggJ (HI0303)), a novel spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferase (B. subtilis PaiA), a novel methyltransferase or AdoMet binding protein (A. fulgidus AF_0241), an ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (B. subtilis YvqK), a novel carboxysome pore (E. coli EutN), a proline racemase homolog with a disrupted active site (B. melitensis BME11586), an FMN-dependent enzyme (S. pneumoniae SP_1951), and a 12-stranded beta-barrel with a novel fold (V. parahaemolyticus VPA1032).

  13. Biochemical and structural features of extracellular vesicle-binding RNA aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazuyoshi; Zhao, Jing; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Miyagishi, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are particles in mammalian body fluids that have attracted considerable attention as biomarkers for various diseases. In the present study, the authors isolated RNA aptamers with an affinity for extracellular vesicles from two library pools that encoded randomized sequences of different lengths. After the several rounds of selection, two conserved motifs are identified in the sequences that are obtained by next-generation sequencing. Most of the sequences were predicted to adopt a secondary structure that consisted of a non-conserved stem structure and a conserved loop sequence. Two minimal similar sequences are synthesized and confirmed the ability of these sequences to bind to extracellular vesicles. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and melting temperature analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were able to form a G-quadruplex structure in their loop regions and these structures were stabilized by potassium ions. Consistent with these structural data, the affinity of each aptamer for extracellular vesicles was dependent on potassium ions. The aptamers that were identified may be useful molecular tools for the development of diagnostic methods that utilize body fluids, such as blood, saliva and urine. PMID:28584632

  14. Structure-directing star-shaped block copolymers: supramolecular vesicles for the delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Liu, Shao Qiong; Venkataraman, Shrinivas; Gao, Shu Jun; Ke, Xiyu; Chia, Xin Tian; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan

    2015-06-28

    Amphiphilic polycarbonate/PEG copolymer with a star-like architecture was designed to facilitate a unique supramolecular transformation of micelles to vesicles in aqueous solution for the efficient delivery of anticancer drugs. The star-shaped amphipilic block copolymer was synthesized by initiating the ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) from methyl cholate through a combination of metal-free organo-catalytic living ring-opening polymerization and post-polymerization chain-end derivatization strategies. Subsequently, the self-assembly of the star-like polymer in aqueous solution into nanosized vesicles for anti-cancer drug delivery was studied. DOX was physically encapsulated into vesicles by dialysis and drug loading level was significant (22.5% in weight) for DOX. Importantly, DOX-loaded nanoparticles self-assembled from the star-like copolymer exhibited greater kinetic stability and higher DOX loading capacity than micelles prepared from cholesterol-initiated diblock analogue. The advantageous disparity is believed to be due to the transformation of micelles (diblock copolymer) to vesicles (star-like block copolymer) that possess greater core space for drug loading as well as the ability of such supramolecular structures to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded vesicles effectively inhibited the proliferation of 4T1, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells, with IC50 values of 10, 1.5 and 1.0mg/L, respectively. DOX-loaded vesicles injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice exhibited enhanced accumulation in tumor tissue due to the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Importantly, DOX-loaded vesicles demonstrated greater tumor growth inhibition than free DOX without causing significant body weight loss or cardiotoxicity. The unique ability of the star-like copolymer emanating from the methyl cholate core provided the requisite modification in the block copolymer interfacial curvature to generate vesicles of high loading capacity for DOX with significant

  15. LL-37 Triggers Formation of Streptococcus pyogenes Extracellular Vesicle-Like Structures with Immune Stimulatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Julia; Rohde, Manfred; Siemens, Nikolai; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Reports have shown that the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is abundantly expressed but has limited bactericidal effect in Streptococcus pyogenes infections. At sub-inhibitory concentrations, LL-37 has been reported to alter virulence gene expression. Here, we explored the interaction of S. pyogenes strains with LL-37, focusing on bacterial growth, cell surface alterations and pro-inflammatory responses. Bioscreen turbidity measurements of strain 5448 cultured in the presence or absence of LL-37 confirmed the poor antimicrobial effect, and revealed a significant increase in turbidity of bacterial cultures exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of LL-37. However, this was not linked to increased bacterial counts. Electron microscopy of LL-37-exposed bacteria revealed the presence of vesicle-like structures on the bacterial surface. The vesicles stained positive for LL-37 and were released from the bacterial surface. Concentrated supernatants enriched in these structures had a broader protein content, including several virulence factors, compared to supernatants from untreated bacteria. The supernatants from LL-37-exposed bacteria were pro-inflammatory and elicited resistin and myeloperoxidase release from neutrophils. This is the first report on S. pyogenes extracellular vesicle-like structures formed at the bacterial surface in response to LL-37. The associated increased pro-inflammatory activity further implicates LL-37 as a potential factor involved in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. New insights in the composition of extracellular vesicles from pancreatic cancer cells: implications for biomarkers and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Scory, Susanne; Tehrani, Mahnaz Moradian; Eilert-Micus, Christina; Adamczyk, Kamila A; Wojtalewicz, Nathalie; Schnölzer, Martina; Hahn, Stephan A; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer development is associated with characteristic alterations like desmoplastic reaction and immune escape which are mediated by the cell-cell communication mechanism and by the microenvironment of the cells. The whole of released components are important determinants in these processes. Especially the extracellular vesicles released by pancreatic cancer cells play a role in cell communication and modulate cell growth and immune responses. Here, we present the proteomic description of affinity purified extracellular vesicles from pancreatic tumour cells, compared to the secretome, defined as the whole of the proteins released by pancreatic cancer cells. The proteomic data provide comprehensive catalogues of hundreds of proteins, and the comparison reveals a special proteomic composition of pancreatic cancer cell derived extracellular vesicles. The functional analysis of the protein composition displayed that membrane proteins, glycoproteins, small GTP binding proteins and a further, heterogeneous group of proteins are enriched in vesicles, whereas proteins derived from proteasomes and ribosomes, as well as metabolic enzymes, are not components of the vesicles. Furthermore proteins playing a role in carcinogenesis and modulators of the extracellular matrix (ECM) or cell-cell interactions are components of affinity purified extracellular vesicles. The data deepen the knowledge of extracellular vesicle composition by hundreds of proteins that have not been previously described as vesicle components released by pancreatic cancer cells. Extracellular vesicles derived from pancreatic cancer cells show common proteins shared with other vesicles as well as cell type specific proteins indicating biomarker candidates and suggesting functional roles in cancer cell stroma interactions.

  17. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 The Authors. WIREs RNA published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mesoscopic Structure in the Chain-Melting Regime of Anionic Phospholipid Vesicles: DMPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riske, K. A.; Amaral, L. Q.; Döbereiner, H.-G.; Lamy, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    In a range of low ionic strength, aqueous dispersions of the anionic phospholipid DMPG (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) have a transparent intermediate phase (IP, between \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}T_{{\\mathrm{m}}}^{{\\mathrm{on}}}{\\cong}20{^\\circ}{\\mathrm{C}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}T_{{\\mathrm{m}}}^{{\\mathrm{off}}}{\\cong}30{^\\circ}{\\mathrm{C}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) between the turbid gel and fluid membrane phases, evidenced in turbidity data. Small angle x-ray scattering results on DMPG dispersions show that, besides the bilayer peak present in all phases, a peak corresponding to a mesoscopic structure at ∼400 Å is detected only in IP. The dependence of this peak position on DMPG concentration suggests a correlation in the bilayer plane, consistent with the stability of vesicles in IP. Moreover, observation of giant DMPG vesicles with phase contrast light microscopy show that vesicles “disappear” upon cooling below \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}T_{{\\mathrm{m}}}^{{\\mathrm{off}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and “reappear” after reheating. This further proves that although vesicles cannot be visualized in IP, their overall structure is maintained. We propose that the IP in the melting regime corresponds to unilamellar vesicles with perforations, a model which is consistent with all

  19. Thermodynamics and Structural Evolution during a Reversible Vesicle-Micelle Transition of a Vitamin-Derived Bolaamphiphile Induced by Sodium Cholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Nan; Ge, Bing-Qiang; Shen, Yun-Feng; He, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Zhong-Xiu

    2016-03-09

    Interaction of endogenous sodium cholate (SC) with dietary amphiphiles would induce structural evolution of the self-assembled aggregates, which inevitably affects the hydrolysis of fat in the gut. Current work mainly focused on the interaction of bile salts with classical double-layered phospholipid vesicles. In this paper, the thermodynamics and structural evolution during the interaction of SC with novel unilamellar vesicles formed from vitamin-derived zwitterionic bolaamphiphile (DDO) were characterized. It was revealed that an increased temperature and the presence of NaCl resulted in narrowed micelle-vesicle coexistence and enlarged the vesicle region. The coexistence of micelles and vesicles mainly came from the interaction of monomeric SC with DDO vesicles, whereas micellar SC contributed to the total solubilization of DDO vesicles. This research may enrich the thermodynamic mechanism behind the structure transition of the microaggregates formed by amphiphiles in the gut. It will also contribute to the design of food formulation and drug delivery system.

  20. Insight into the template effect of vesicles on the laccase-catalyzed oligomerization of N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine from Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ležaić, Aleksandra Janoševic; Luginbühl, Sandra; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Pašti, Igor; Kissner, Reinhard; Rakvin, Boris; Walde, Peter; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2016-08-01

    We report about the first Raman spectroscopy study of a vesicle-assisted enzyme-catalyzed oligomerization reaction. The aniline dimer N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (= p-aminodiphenylamine, PADPA) was oxidized and oligomerized with Trametes versicolor laccase and dissolved O2 in the presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) vesicles (80-100 nm diameter) as templates. The conversion of PADPA into oligomeric products, poly(PADPA), was monitored during the reaction by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained are compared with UV/vis/NIR and EPR measurements. All three complementary methods indicate that at least some of the poly(PADPA) products, formed in the presence of AOT vesicles, resemble the conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI-ES). The Raman measurements also show that structural units different from those of “ordinary” PANI-ES are present too. Without vesicles PANI-ES-like products are not obtained. For the first time, the as-prepared stable poly(PADPA)-AOT vesicle suspension was used directly to coat electrodes (without product isolation) for investigating redox activities of poly(PADPA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV showed that poly(PADPA) produced with vesicles is redox active not only at pH 1.1-as expected for PANI-ES-but also at pH 6.0, unlike PANI-ES and poly(PADPA) synthesized without vesicles. This extended pH range of the redox activity of poly(PADPA) is important for applications.

  1. Monodisperse structured multi-vesicle microencapsulation using flow-focusing and controlled disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Rodrigo; Luis Sampedro, José; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso; Marquez, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    A method to produce monodisperse structured microcapsules in the diameter range from 10-100 microm is here presented. Flow-focusing is a well known technique whereby a steady capillary micro-jet is generated by the action of a highly accelerated co-flowing stream forced through a small orifice. The micro-jet breaks up owing to capillary instability, giving rise to droplets with a narrow size distribution. In the present study, flow-focusing gives rise not to simple but to compound capillary jets. At break-up, under suitable control parameters, such jets give rise to microcapsules where an outer liquid (shell liquid) surrounds a core liquid integrated by one or more vesicles. Furthermore, under adequate stimulation combining a sinusoidal signal with intermittent pulses, the jet break-up can be controlled. Highly monodisperse microcapsules are produced; fundamental geometric parameters (main diameter, shell thickness or number of cores) are reliably controlled. Rather than using a gas flow to focus the concentric stream of two immiscible liquids, this study has investigated in some detail the evolution of a concentric stream of three immiscible liquids forced through a small orifice. The selection of the surface tension coefficients between the three phases ensures the robust production of a microcapsule structure involving a plurality of vesicles homogeneously distributed in the capsule bulk, the number of cores being a freely chosen parameter. Such composite microcapsules find a broad field of technological applications in the pharmaceutical, food or biotechnology industries.

  2. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Talsma, Aaron D.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Heroux, Annie; Levitan, Edwin S.; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2016-03-31

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface.

  3. Structure of clathrin-coated vesicles from small-angle scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    used for interpreting the data has spherical symmetry and explicitly takes into account polydispersity, which is described by a Gaussian distribution. A constant thickness of the clathrin coats is assumed. The fitting of the model shows that the coated vesicles consist of a low-density outer protein...... shell (clathrin) and a central protein shell (accessory polypeptides and receptors) of approximately six times higher density. For the X-ray scattering and neutron contrast variation data. the polydispersity of the samples is of the order of 90 angstrom (full-width-at-half-maximum value) and the average...... is situated in the central high-density shell, which gives a large amount of protein in the lipid membrane. The densities of the central shell and the lipid membrane show that the hydration is small in the central region. A comparison of the total mass, the mass distribution, and the structure of the average...

  4. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  5. Structure formation in binary mixtures of surfactants: vesicle opening-up to bicelles and octopus-like micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    Micelle formation in binary mixtures of surfactants is studied using a coarse-grained molecular simulation. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle, the bicelle, is typically formed. It is found that cup-shaped vesicles and bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and critical micelle concentration. The obtained octopus shape of micelles agree with those observed in the cryo-TEM images reported in [S. Jain and F. S. Bates, Macromol. 37, 1511 (2004).]. Two types of connection structures between the worm-like micelles and the bicelles are revealed.

  6. Structure parameters of synaptic vesicles quantified by small-angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorph, Simon; Riedel, Dietmar; Arleth, Lise; Sztucki, Michael; Jahn, Reinhard; Holt, Matthew; Salditt, Tim

    2010-04-07

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are small, membrane-bound organelles that are found in the synaptic terminal of neurons, and which are crucial in neurotransmission. After a rise in internal [Ca(2+)] during neuronal stimulation, SVs fuse with the plasma membrane releasing their neurotransmitter content, which then signals neighboring neurons. SVs are subsequently recycled and refilled with neurotransmitter for further rounds of release. Recently, tremendous progress has been made in elucidating the molecular composition of SVs, as well as putative protein-protein interactions. However, what is lacking is an empirical description of SV structure at the supramolecular level-which is necessary to enable us to fully understand the processes of membrane fusion, retrieval, and recycling. Using small-angle x-ray scattering, we have directly investigated the size and structure of purified SVs. From this information, we deduced detailed size and density parameters for the protein layers responsible for SV function, as well as information about the lipid bilayer. To achieve a convincing model fit, a laterally anisotropic structure for the protein shell is needed, as a rotationally symmetric density profile does not explain the data. Not only does our model confirm many of the preexisting ideas concerning SV structure, but also for the first time, to our knowledge, it indicates structural refinements, such as the presence of protein microdomains. Copyright (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure Parameters of Synaptic Vesicles Quantified by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorph, Simon; Riedel, Dietmar; Arleth, Lise; Sztucki, Michael; Jahn, Reinhard; Holt, Matthew; Salditt, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are small, membrane-bound organelles that are found in the synaptic terminal of neurons, and which are crucial in neurotransmission. After a rise in internal [Ca2+] during neuronal stimulation, SVs fuse with the plasma membrane releasing their neurotransmitter content, which then signals neighboring neurons. SVs are subsequently recycled and refilled with neurotransmitter for further rounds of release. Recently, tremendous progress has been made in elucidating the molecular composition of SVs, as well as putative protein-protein interactions. However, what is lacking is an empirical description of SV structure at the supramolecular level—which is necessary to enable us to fully understand the processes of membrane fusion, retrieval, and recycling. Using small-angle x-ray scattering, we have directly investigated the size and structure of purified SVs. From this information, we deduced detailed size and density parameters for the protein layers responsible for SV function, as well as information about the lipid bilayer. To achieve a convincing model fit, a laterally anisotropic structure for the protein shell is needed, as a rotationally symmetric density profile does not explain the data. Not only does our model confirm many of the preexisting ideas concerning SV structure, but also for the first time, to our knowledge, it indicates structural refinements, such as the presence of protein microdomains. PMID:20371319

  8. Botulinum neurotoxins: genetic, structural and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Ornella; Pirazzini, Marco; Montecucco, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by anaerobic bacteria of the genus Clostridium and cause a persistent paralysis of peripheral nerve terminals, which is known as botulism. Neurotoxigenic clostridia belong to six phylogenetically distinct groups and produce more than 40 different BoNT types, which inactivate neurotransmitter release owing to their metalloprotease activity. In this Review, we discuss recent studies that have improved our understanding of the genetics and structure of BoNT complexes. We also describe recent insights into the mechanisms of BoNT entry into the general circulation, neuronal binding, membrane translocation and neuroparalysis.

  9. Vesicle Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, S.; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-07-01

    Amphiphiles, under appropriate conditions, can self-assemble into nanoscale thin membrane vessels (vesicles) that encapsulate and hence protect and transport molecular payloads. Vesicles assemble naturally within cells but can also be artificially synthesized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and applications of light-field interactions with vesicles. By being associated with light-emitting entities (e.g., dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as imaging agents in addition to cargo carriers. Vesicles can also be optically probed on the basis of their nonlinear response, typically from the vesicle membrane. Light fields can be employed to transport vesicles by using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or can directly perturb the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy). We conclude with emerging vesicle applications in biology and photochemical microreactors.

  10. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  11. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  12. Extracellular vesicles: structure, function, and potential clinical uses in renal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T. Borges

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the role of extracellular vesicles in various diseases including cancer has been increasing. Extracellular vesicles include microvesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, and argosomes, and are classified by size, content, synthesis, and function. Currently, the best characterized are exosomes and microvesicles. Exosomes are small vesicles (40-100 nm involved in intercellular communication regardless of the distance between them. They are found in various biological fluids such as plasma, serum, and breast milk, and are formed from multivesicular bodies through the inward budding of the endosome membrane. Microvesicles are 100-1000 nm vesicles released from the cell by the outward budding of the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles is very broad, with applications including a route of drug delivery and as biomarkers for diagnosis. Extracellular vesicles extracted from stem cells may be used for treatment of many diseases including kidney diseases. This review highlights mechanisms of synthesis and function, and the potential uses of well-characterized extracellular vesicles, mainly exosomes, with a special focus on renal functions and diseases.

  13. Structure and function of ABCG2-rich extracellular vesicles mediating multidrug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Goler-Baron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major impediment to curative cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-Binding Cassette transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC2 form a unique defense network against multiple structurally and functionally distinct chemotherapeutics, thereby resulting in MDR. Thus, deciphering novel mechanisms of MDR and their overcoming is a major goal of cancer research. Recently we have shown that overexpression of ABCG2 in the membrane of novel extracellular vesicles (EVs in breast cancer cells results in mitoxantrone resistance due to its dramatic sequestration in EVs. However, nothing is known about EVs structure, biogenesis and their ability to concentrate multiple antitumor agents. To this end, we here found that EVs are structural and functional homologues of bile canaliculi, are apically localized, sealed structures reinforced by an actin-based cytoskeleton and secluded from the extracellular milieu by the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. Apart from ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC2 were also selectively targeted to the membrane of EVs. Moreover, Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein complex selectively localized to the border of the EVs membrane, suggesting a key role for the tethering of MDR pumps to the actin cytoskeleton. The ability of EVs to concentrate and sequester different antitumor drugs was also explored. Taking advantage of the endogenous fluorescence of anticancer drugs, we found that EVs-forming breast cancer cells display high level resistance to topotecan, imidazoacridinones and methotrexate via efficient intravesicular drug concentration hence sequestering them away from their cellular targets. Thus, we identified a new modality of anticancer drug compartmentalization and resistance in which multiple chemotherapeutics are actively pumped from the cytoplasm and highly concentrated within the lumen of EVs via a network of MDR transporters differentially targeted to the EVs membrane. We propose a composite model for the structure and

  14. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  15. Insights into the mechanisms of electromediated gene delivery and application to the loading of giant vesicles with negatively charged macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Portet, Thomas; Teissié, Justin; Dean, David S; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We present experimental results regarding the electrotransfer of plasmid DNA into phosphatidylcholine giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Our observations indicate that a direct entry is the predominant mechanism of electrotransfer. A quantitative analysis of the DNA concentration increments inside the GUVs is also performed, and we find that our experimental data are very well described by a simple theoretical model in which DNA entry is mostly driven by electrophoresis. Our theoretical framework allows for the prediction of the amount of transfered DNA as a function of the electric field parameters, and thus paves the way towards a novel method for encapsulating with high efficiency not only DNA, but any negatively charged macromolecule into GUVs.

  16. Extracellular vesicles: a platform for the structure determination of membrane proteins by Cryo-EM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C Alistair; Whittle, Cathy; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-11-04

    Membrane protein-enriched extracellular vesicles (MPEEVs) provide a platform for studying intact membrane proteins natively anchored with the correct topology in genuine biological membranes. This approach circumvents the need to conduct tedious detergent screens for solubilization, purification, and reconstitution required in classical membrane protein studies. We have applied this method to three integral type I membrane proteins, namely the Caenorhabditis elegans cell-cell fusion proteins AFF-1 and EFF-1 and the glycoprotein B (gB) from Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1). Electron cryotomography followed by subvolume averaging allowed the 3D reconstruction of EFF-1 and HSV1 gB in the membrane as well as an analysis of the spatial distribution and interprotein interactions on the membrane. MPEEVs have many applications beyond structural/functional investigations, such as facilitating the raising of antibodies, for protein-protein interaction assays or for diagnostics use, as biomarkers, and possibly therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enantioselectivity of vesicle-forming chiral surfactants in capillary electrophoresis. Role of the surfactant headgroup structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Ashok; Dey, Joykrishna

    2006-09-22

    Two vesicle-forming single-tailed amino acid derivatized surfactants sodium N-[4-n-dodecyloxybenzoyl]-L-leucinate (SDLL) and sodium N-[4-n-dodecyloxybenzoyl]-L-isoleucinate (SDLIL) have been synthesized and used as pseudo-stationary phase in micellar electrokinetic chromatography to evaluate the role of steric factor of amino acid headgroup and hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions for enantiomeric separations. The aggregation behavior of the surfactants has been studied in aqueous buffered solution using surface tension and fluorescence probe techniques. Results of these studies have suggested formation of vesicles in aqueous solutions. Microenvironment of the vesicle, which determines the depth of penetration of the analytes into vesicle was determined by fluorescence probe technique using pyrene, N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN), and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as probe molecules. Atropisomeric compounds (+/-)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BOH), (+/-)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamine (BDA), (+/-)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diylhydrogen phosphate (BNP) and Tröger's base (TB) and chiral compound benzoin (BZN) has been enantioseparated. The separations were optimized with respect to surfactant concentration, pH, and borate buffer concentration. SDLL was found to provide better resolution for BOH, BNP, and BZN. On the other hand, SDLIL offers better resolution for BDA. The chromatographic results have been discussed in the light of the aggregation behavior of the surfactants and the interaction of the solutes with the vesicles.

  18. A method for analysis of lipid vesicle domain structure from confocal image data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter Rasmussen; Fidorra, Matthias; Hartel, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    confocal imaging stacks. The technique involves projection of volumetric image data onto a triangulated surface mesh representation of the membrane, correction of photoselection effects and global motion of the vesicle during image acquisition and segmentation of the surface into domains using histograms....... The analysis allows for investigation of the morphology and size distribution of domains on the surface....

  19. Statistical thermodynamics of association colloids : the equilibrium structure of micelles, vesicles, and bilayer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to unravel the general equilibrium physical properties of lipid bilayer membranes. We consider four major questions:
    1. What determines the morphology of the association colloids (micelles, membranes, vesicles) in general?
    2. Do the

  20. Characterization ofTrichuris murissecreted proteins and extracellular vesicles provides new insights into host-parasite communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Ramon M; Talukder, Md Hasanuzzaman; Field, Matthew A; Wangchuk, Phurpa; Giacomin, Paul; Loukas, Alex; Sotillo, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Whipworms are parasitic nematodes that live in the gut of more than 500 million people worldwide. Owing to the difficulty in obtaining parasite material, the mouse whipworm Trichuris muris has been extensively used as a model to study human whipworm infections. These nematodes secrete a multitude of compounds that interact with host tissues where they orchestrate a parasitic existence. Herein we provide the first comprehensive characterization of the excretory/secretory products of T. muris . We identify 148 proteins secreted by T. muris and show for the first time that the mouse whipworm secretes exosome-like extracellular vesicles (EVs) that can interact with host cells. We use an Optiprep® gradient to purify the EVs, highlighting the suitability of this method for purifying EVs secreted by a parasitic nematode. We also characterize the proteomic and genomic content of the EVs, identifying >350 proteins, 56 miRNAs (22 novel) and 475 full-length mRNA transcripts mapping to T. muris gene models. Many of the miRNAs putatively mapped to mouse genes are involved in regulation of inflammation, implying a role in parasite-driven immunomodulation. In addition, for the first time to our knowledge, colonic organoids have been used to demonstrate the internalization of parasite EVs by host cells. Understanding how parasites interact with their host is crucial to develop new control measures. This first characterization of the proteins and EVs secreted by T. muris provides important information on whipworm-host communication and forms the basis for future studies.

  1. Basalt: structural insight as a construction material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... needed research. An insight on inconsistency reported in the literature with respect to the behaviour of basalt-fibre-reinforced composites is also expressed in this paper. The overall idea is to gain information and identify and prioritize research areas of the possible applications of basalt towards sustainable construction.

  2. Structure of Coatomer Cage Proteins and the Relationship among COPI, COPII, and Clathrin Vesicle Coats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Changwook; Goldberg, Jonathan (MSKCC)

    2010-09-13

    COPI-coated vesicles form at the Golgi apparatus from two cytosolic components, ARF G protein and coatomer, a heptameric complex that can polymerize into a cage to deform the membrane into a bud. Although coatomer shares a common evolutionary origin with COPII and clathrin vesicle coat proteins, the architectural relationship among the three cages is unclear. Strikingly, the {alpha}{beta}-COP core of coatomer crystallizes as a triskelion in which three copies of a {beta}-COP {beta}-propeller domain converge through their axial ends. We infer that the trimer constitutes the vertex of the COPI cage. Our model proposes that the COPI cage is intermediate in design between COPII and clathrin: COPI shares with clathrin an arrangement of three curved {alpha}-solenoid legs radiating from a common center, and COPI shares with COPII highly similar vertex interactions involving the axial ends of {beta}-propeller domains.

  3. Structural insights into the translational infidelity mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2015-06-01

    The decoding of mRNA on the ribosome is the least accurate process during genetic information transfer. Here we propose a unified decoding mechanism based on 11 high-resolution X-ray structures of the 70S ribosome that explains the occurrence of missense errors during translation. We determined ribosome structures in rare states where incorrect tRNAs were incorporated into the peptidyl-tRNA-binding site. These structures show that in the codon-anticodon duplex, a G.U mismatch adopts the Watson-Crick geometry, indicating a shift in the tautomeric equilibrium or ionization of the nucleobase. Additional structures with mismatches in the 70S decoding centre show that the binding of any tRNA induces identical rearrangements in the centre, which favours either isosteric or close to the Watson-Crick geometry codon-anticodon pairs. Overall, the results suggest that a mismatch escapes discrimination by preserving the shape of a Watson-Crick pair and indicate that geometric selection via tautomerism or ionization dominates the translational infidelity mechanism.

  4. Structural insights into the exon junction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Hervé; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2008-02-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the exon junction complex is loaded onto spliced mRNAs at a precise position upstream of exon junctions, where it remains during nuclear export and cytoplasmic localisation until it is removed during the first translation round. The exon junction core complex consists of four proteins that form a dynamic binding platform for a variety of peripheral factors involved in mRNA metabolism. In the complex, mRNA binding is mediated by the DEAD-box protein eIF4AIII, and inhibition of its ATPase activity forms the mechanistic basis for the long-term stability of the complex. Recent crystal structures of the exon junction complex and eIF4AIII have provided the structural framework for investigating the function of the eIF4AIII ATPase and for localisation of surface patches involved in binding peripheral factors. Additionally, by comparison with the structure of a second DEAD-box protein also bound to RNA and ATP, general principles for the ATPase and unwinding/mRNP remodelling activities for this important group of enzymes can be proposed on the basis of atomic structures.

  5. Methods for the physical characterization and quantification of extracellular vesicles in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Déborah L M; Claudio, Virginia; Lässer, Cecilia; Bally, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Our body fluids contain a multitude of cell-derived vesicles, secreted by most cell types, commonly referred to as extracellular vesicles. They have attracted considerable attention for their function as intercellular communication vehicles in a broad range of physiological processes and pathological conditions. Extracellular vesicles and especially the smallest type, exosomes, have also generated a lot of excitement in view of their potential as disease biomarkers or as carriers for drug delivery. In this context, state-of-the-art techniques capable of comprehensively characterizing vesicles in biological fluids are urgently needed. This review presents the arsenal of techniques available for quantification and characterization of physical properties of extracellular vesicles, summarizes their working principles, discusses their advantages and limitations and further illustrates their implementation in extracellular vesicle research. The small size and physicochemical heterogeneity of extracellular vesicles make their physical characterization and quantification an extremely challenging task. Currently, structure, size, buoyant density, optical properties and zeta potential have most commonly been studied. The concentration of vesicles in suspension can be expressed in terms of biomolecular or particle content depending on the method at hand. In addition, common quantification methods may either provide a direct quantitative measurement of vesicle concentration or solely allow for relative comparison between samples. The combination of complementary methods capable of detecting, characterizing and quantifying extracellular vesicles at a single particle level promises to provide new exciting insights into their modes of action and to reveal the existence of vesicle subpopulations fulfilling key biological tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  7. FIJI Macro 3D ART VeSElecT: 3D Automated Reconstruction Tool for Vesicle Structures of Electron Tomograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Verena Kaltdorf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic image reconstruction is critical to cope with steadily increasing data from advanced microscopy. We describe here the Fiji macro 3D ART VeSElecT which we developed to study synaptic vesicles in electron tomograms. We apply this tool to quantify vesicle properties (i in embryonic Danio rerio 4 and 8 days past fertilization (dpf and (ii to compare Caenorhabditis elegans N2 neuromuscular junctions (NMJ wild-type and its septin mutant (unc-59(e261. We demonstrate development-specific and mutant-specific changes in synaptic vesicle pools in both models. We confirm the functionality of our macro by applying our 3D ART VeSElecT on zebrafish NMJ showing smaller vesicles in 8 dpf embryos then 4 dpf, which was validated by manual reconstruction of the vesicle pool. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of C. elegans septin mutant unc-59(e261 on vesicle pool formation and vesicle size. Automated vesicle registration and characterization was implemented in Fiji as two macros (registration and measurement. This flexible arrangement allows in particular reducing false positives by an optional manual revision step. Preprocessing and contrast enhancement work on image-stacks of 1nm/pixel in x and y direction. Semi-automated cell selection was integrated. 3D ART VeSElecT removes interfering components, detects vesicles by 3D segmentation and calculates vesicle volume and diameter (spherical approximation, inner/outer diameter. Results are collected in color using the RoiManager plugin including the possibility of manual removal of non-matching confounder vesicles. Detailed evaluation considered performance (detected vesicles and specificity (true vesicles as well as precision and recall. We furthermore show gain in segmentation and morphological filtering compared to learning based methods and a large time gain compared to manual segmentation. 3D ART VeSElecT shows small error rates and its speed gain can be up to 68 times faster in comparison to manual

  8. Ca2+ Dependence of Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jeremy; Kavalali, Ege T

    2016-10-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent synaptic vesicle recycling is essential for structural homeostasis of synapses and maintenance of neurotransmission. Although, the executive role of intrasynaptic Ca(2+) transients in synaptic vesicle exocytosis is well established, identifying the exact role of Ca(2+) in endocytosis has been difficult. In some studies, Ca(2+) has been suggested as an essential trigger required to initiate synaptic vesicle retrieval, whereas others manipulating synaptic Ca(2+) concentrations reported a modulatory role for Ca(2+) leading to inhibition or acceleration of endocytosis. Molecular studies of synaptic vesicle endocytosis, on the other hand, have consistently focused on the roles of Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent phosphatase calcineurin and synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin as potential Ca(2+) sensors for endocytosis. Most studies probing the role of Ca(2+) in endocytosis have relied on measurements of synaptic vesicle retrieval after strong stimulation. Strong stimulation paradigms elicit fusion and retrieval of multiple synaptic vesicles and therefore can be affected by several factors besides the kinetics and duration of Ca(2+) signals that include the number of exocytosed vesicles and accumulation of released neurotransmitters thus altering fusion and retrieval processes indirectly via retrograde signaling. Studies monitoring single synaptic vesicle endocytosis may help resolve this conundrum as in these settings the impact of Ca(2+) on synaptic fusion probability can be uncoupled from its putative role on synaptic vesicle retrieval. Future experiments using these single vesicle approaches will help dissect the specific role(s) of Ca(2+) and its sensors in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Retention of structure and function of the cat germinal vesicle after air-drying and storage at suprazero temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves-Herring, Jennifer E; Wildt, David E; Comizzoli, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The study explored a novel approach for preserving the maternal genome without the entire oocyte by air-drying the cat germinal vesicle (GV) in the presence of the disaccharide trehalose. Specifically, we examined GV structure and function after desiccation, storage at 4 °C (up to 32 wk), and rehydration including the ability to resume meiosis after injection into a fresh, conspecific cytoplast. In experiment 1, DNA integrity was similar to fresh controls after 1 and 4 wk storage in the presence of trehalose, but was more fragmented at later time points (especially after 32 wk). Nuclear envelope integrity was sustained in >90% of oocytes stored for 0, 4, or 16 wk regardless of protective treatment. In experiment 2, compacted, air-dried GVs were stored for 2 or 4 wk, rehydrated, and injected into fresh cytoplasts. After culture for 24 h in vitro, up to 73% of oocytes reconstructed with desiccated GVs preserved in trehalose resumed meiosis compared to 30% of those dried in the absence of the disaccharide. At each storage time point, trehalose presence during air-drying was advantageous for resumption of meiosis, with >20% of oocytes completing nuclear maturation to metaphase II. This demonstrates a potential for preserving the female genome using the GV alone and for multiple weeks after desiccation. Trehalose enhanced the process by retaining the ability of a dried and rehydrated GV to resume communication with the surrounding cytoplasm of the recipient oocyte to permit reaching metaphase II and likely sustain subsequent embryo development.

  10. Self-assembly, aggregates morphology and ionic liquid crystal of polyoxometalate-based hybrid molecule: From vesicles to layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunxia

    2017-11-01

    Polyoxometalate anions [SiW12O40]4- were encapsulated by four 1, 3-dioctadecylimidazolium cations (labeled as L+) driven by electrostatic interaction to obtain hybrid molecule L4[SiW12O40]. The composition and ingredients of L4[SiW12O40] were confirmed by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and elemental analysis. In mixedsolvent (chloroform/methanol volume of 4:1), the self-assembled aggregates of L4[SiW12O40] appear at multilamllar vesicles under optical microscopy and the micron-size bulky flower-like aggregates in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) of L4[SiW12O40] demonstrate that spherical aggregations in mixed-solvent are densely packed by flakes, which can self-assembly into ordered one dimension layered structure. In addition, L4[SiW12O40] shows typical thermotropic liquid crystal behavior similar to imidazole cations. The ordered self-assembly hybrid molecule materials based on organic-polyoxometalate ionic liquids would be exciting branch of nanostructure functional materials.

  11. Small Changes in the Primary Structure of Transportan 10 Alter the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of its Interaction with Phospholipid Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of binding of transportan 10 (tp10) and four of its variants to phospholipid vesicles, and the kinetics of peptide-induced dye efflux, were compared. Tp10 is a 21-residue, amphipathic, cationic, cell-penetrating peptide similar to helical antimicrobial peptides. The tp10 variants examined include amidated and free peptides, and replacements of tyrosine by tryptophan. Carboxy-terminal amidation or substitution of tryptophan for tyrosine enhance binding and activity. The Gibbs energies of peptide binding to membranes determined experimentally and calculated from the interfacial hydrophobicity scale are in good agreement. The Gibbs energy for insertion into the bilayer core was calculated using hydrophobicity scales of residue transfer from water to octanol and to the membrane/water interface. Peptide-induced efflux becomes faster as the Gibbs energies for binding and insertion of the tp10 variants decrease. If anionic lipids are included, binding and efflux rate increase, as expected because all tp10 variants are cationic and an electrostatic component is added. Whether the most important effect of peptide amidation is the change in charge or an enhancement of helical structure, however, still needs to be established. Nevertheless, it is clear that the changes in efflux rate reflect the differences in the thermodynamics of binding and insertion of the free and amidated peptide groups. PMID:18260641

  12. The Structure of the Mouse Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor in Lipid Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Deluz, Cédric; Hassaine, Gherici; Grasso, Luigino; Graf-Meyer, Alexandra; Vogel, Horst; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-05

    The function of membrane proteins is best understood if their structure in the lipid membrane is known. Here, we determined the structure of the mouse serotonin 5-HT3 receptor inserted in lipid bilayers to a resolution of 12 Å without stabilizing antibodies by cryo electron tomography and subtomogram averaging. The reconstruction reveals protein secondary structure elements in the transmembrane region, the extracellular pore, and the transmembrane channel pathway, showing an overall similarity to the available X-ray model of the truncated 5-HT3 receptor determined in the presence of a stabilizing nanobody. Structural analysis of the 5-HT3 receptor embedded in a lipid bilayer allowed the position of the membrane to be determined. Interactions between the densely packed receptors in lipids were visualized, revealing that the interactions were maintained by the short horizontal helices. In combination with methodological improvements, our approach enables the structural analysis of membrane proteins in response to voltage and ligand gating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent structural insights into the function of copper nitrite reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Kekilli, Demet; Strange, Richard W; Hough, Michael A

    2017-11-15

    Copper nitrite reductases (CuNiR) carry out the first committed step of the denitrification pathway of the global nitrogen cycle, the reduction of nitrite (NO 2 - ) to nitric oxide (NO). As such, they are of major agronomic and environmental importance. CuNiRs occur primarily in denitrifying soil bacteria which carry out the overall reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. In this article, we review the insights gained into copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR) function from three dimensional structures. We particularly focus on developments over the last decade, including insights from serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and from the recently discovered 3-domain CuNiRs.

  14. Post-fusion structural changes and their roles in exocytosis and endocytosis of dense-core vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Shin, Wonchul; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Hamid, Edaeni; Sheng, Jiansong; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wen, Peter J.; Jin, Albert; Momboisse, Fanny; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2014-02-01

    Vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane generates an Ω-shaped membrane profile. Its pore is thought to dilate until flattening (full-collapse), followed by classical endocytosis to retrieve vesicles. Alternatively, the pore may close (kiss-and-run), but the triggering mechanisms and its endocytic roles remain poorly understood. Here, using confocal and stimulated emission depletion microscopy imaging of dense-core vesicles, we find that fusion-generated Ω-profiles may enlarge or shrink while maintaining vesicular membrane proteins. Closure of fusion-generated Ω-profiles, which produces various sizes of vesicles, is the dominant mechanism mediating rapid and slow endocytosis within ~1-30 s. Strong calcium influx triggers dynamin-mediated closure. Weak calcium influx does not promote closure, but facilitates the merging of Ω-profiles with the plasma membrane via shrinking rather than full-collapse. These results establish a model, termed Ω-exo-endocytosis, in which the fusion-generated Ω-profile may shrink to merge with the plasma membrane, change in size or change in size then close in response to calcium, which is the main mechanism to retrieve dense-core vesicles.

  15. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Aikawa, Elena

    2018-02-19

    Extracellular vesicles have emerged as one of the most important means through which cells interact with each other and the extracellular environment, but extracellular vesicle research remains challenging due to their small size, limited amount of material required for traditional molecular biology assays and inconsistency in the methods of their isolation. The advent of new technologies and standards in the field, however, have led to increased mechanistic insight into extracellular vesicle function. Herein, the latest studies on the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular physiology and disease are discussed. Extracellular vesicles help control cardiovascular homeostasis and remodelling by mediating communication between cells and directing alterations in the extracellular matrix to respond to changes in the environment. The message carried from the parent cell to extracellular space can be intended for both local (within the same tissue) and distal (downstream of blood flow) targets. Pathological cargo loaded within extracellular vesicles could further result in various diseases. On the contrary, new studies indicate that injection of extracellular vesicles obtained from cultured cells into diseased tissues can promote restoration of normal tissue function. Extracellular vesicles are an integral part of cell and tissue function, and harnessing the properties inherent to extracellular vesicles may provide a therapeutic strategy to promote tissue regeneration.

  16. Insights into the structure of class B GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Kaspar; de Graaf, Chris; Bortolato, Andrea; Wang, Ming-Wei; Marshall, Fiona H; Stevens, Raymond C

    2014-01-01

    The secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are interesting drug targets for the treatment of several metabolic disorders (such as type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and obesity) and nervous system diseases (such as migraine, anxiety, and depression). The recently solved crystal structures of the transmembrane domains of the human glucagon receptor and human corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 have opened up new opportunities to study the structure and function of class B GPCRs. The current review shows how these structures offer more detailed explanations to previous biochemical and pharmacological studies of class B GPCRs, and provides new insights into their interactions with ligands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural modification of unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles in the presence of vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, A.; Raouf, Y. A.; Rashid, S.; Law, R. L.; Stojanoff, V.; Isakovic, A. F.; Gater, D. L.

    Chronic vitamin D deficiency is increasingly associated with a range of health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and certain cancers. Our report contributes to a mechanistic understanding of these associations. Vitamin D is a lipophilic compound that is synthesized in the skin by the action of UV light on 7-dehydrocholesterol and obtained from dietary sources. We look at how vitamin D could be extracted from either skin membranes or therapeutic liposomes and transported through the body by its associated proteins. A variety of physical techniques (FTIR, DLS, UV-Vis spectroscopy, NMR, XRD) are brought to investigate: (a) the behavior of vitamin D in model membranes, and (b) the effect of vitamin D-associated proteins on membrane structure. Our results include: (1) vitamin D can be incorporated into DOPC membranes up to 40mol% with only minor changes in the dynamics of the lipid acyl chains; (2) liposomes containing larger quantities of vitamin D may have reduced stability over time; (3) the vitamin D binding protein and the vitamin D receptor do associate with and alter the behavior of model membranes, including systems that do not contain vitamin D. We acknowledge the support from KU-KAIST collaborative Grant program, and support from BNL staff.

  18. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  19. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengchen; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively. PMID:25229189

  20. Insights into the Diagnostic Potential of Extracellular Vesicles and Their miRNA Signature from Liquid Biopsy as Early Biomarkers of Diabetic Micro/Macrovascular Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Valeria; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2017-09-14

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a heterogeneous population of small vesicles, consisting of a phospholipidic bilayer surrounding a soluble interior cargo. Almost all cell types release EVs, thus they are naturally present in all body fluids. Among the several potential applications, EVs could be used as drug delivery vehicles in disease treatment, in immune therapy because of their immunomodulatory properties and in regenerative medicine. In addition to general markers, EVs are characterized by the presence of specific biomarkers (proteins and miRNAs) that allow the identification of their cell or tissue origin. For these features, they represent a potential powerful diagnostic tool to monitor state and progression of specific diseases. A large body of studies supports the idea that endothelial derived (EMPs) together with platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) are deeply involved in the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by micro- and macrovascular damages, including diabetes. Existing literature suggests that the detection of circulating EMPs and PMPs and their specific miRNA profile may represent a very useful non-invasive signature to achieve information on the onset of peculiar disease manifestations. In this review, we discuss the possible utility of EVs in the early diagnosis of diabetes-associated microvascular complications, specifically related to kidney.

  1. Structural insights into Reelin function: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanomezana Moutse Ranaivoson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reelin is a neuronal glycoprotein secreted by the Cajal-Retzius cells in marginal regions of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus where it plays important roles in the control of neuronal migration and the formation of cellular layers during brain development. This 3461 residue-long protein is composed of a signal peptide, an F-spondin-like domain, eight Reelin repeats (RR1-8, and a positively charged sequence at the C-terminus. Biochemical data indicate that the central region of Reelin binds to the low-density lipoprotein receptors ApoER2 and VLDLR, leading to the phosphorylation of the intracellular adaptor protein Dab1. After secretion, Reelin is rapidly degraded in three major fragments, but the functional significance of this degradation is poorly understood. Probably due to its large mass and the complexity of its architecture, the high-resolution, three-dimensional structure of Reelin has never been determined. However, the crystal structures of some of the reelin repeats have been solved, providing important insights into their fold and the interaction with the ApoER2 receptor. This review discusses the current findings on the structure of Reelin and its binding to the ApoER2 and VLDLR receptors, and we discuss some areas where proteomics and structural biology can help understanding Reelin function in brain development and human health.

  2. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G. [Department of Neuroscience, Room 215, Stemmler Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zorec, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Zorec@mf.uni-lj.si [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  3. Supramolecular Langmuir monolayers and multilayered vesicles of self-assembling DNA–lipid surface structures and their further implications in polyelectrolyte-based cell transfections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirsoy, Fatma Funda Kaya [Ankara University, The Central Laboratory of The Institute of Biotechnology (Turkey); Eruygur, Nuraniye [Gazi University, Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy (Turkey); Süleymanoğlu, Erhan, E-mail: erhans@mail.ru [Gazi University, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    The basic interfacial characteristics of DNA–lipid recognitions have been studied. The complex structures of individual unbound DNA molecules and their binary and ternary complexes with zwitterionic lipids and divalent cations were followed by employing lipid monolayers at the air–liquid interfaces, as well as by performing various microscopic, spectroscopic, and thermodynamic measurements with multilayered vesicles. The pressure-area isotherms depicted that Mg{sup 2+}-ions increase the surface pressure of lipid films and thus give rise to electrostatic and hydrophobic lipid–DNA interactions in terms of DNA adsorption, adhesion, and compaction. These features were further approached by using multilamellar vesicles with a mean diameter of 850 nm, where a metal ion-directed nucleic acid compaction and condensation effects were shown. The data obtained show the effectiveness of Langmuir monolayers and lipid multilayers in studying nucleic acid–lipid recognitions. The data provide with further details and support previous reports on mainly structural features of these recognitions. Biomolecular surface recognition events were presented in direct link with spectral and thermodynamic features of lipid vesicle–polynucleotide complex formations. The results serve to build a theoretical model considering the use of neutral lipids in lipoplex designs as a polyelectrolyte alternatives to the currently employed cytotoxic cationic liposomes. The supramolecular structures formed and their possible roles in interfacial electrostatic and hydrophobic mechanisms of endosomal escape in relevant cell transfection assays are particularly emphasized.

  4. Structural and dynamical insights into the membrane-bound α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Jain

    Full Text Available Membrane-induced disorder-to-helix transition of α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, has been implicated in a number of important neuronal functions as well as in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. In order to obtain structural insights of membrane-bound α-synuclein at the residue-specific resolution, we took advantage of the fact that the protein is devoid of tryptophan and incorporated single tryptophan at various residue positions along the sequence. These tryptophans were used as site-specific markers to characterize the structural and dynamical aspects of α-synuclein on the negatively charged small unilamellar lipid vesicles. An array of site-specific fluorescence readouts, such as the spectral-shift, quenching efficiency and anisotropy, allowed us to discern various features of the conformational rearrangements occurring at different locations of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane. In order to define the spatial localization of various regions of the protein near the membrane surface, we utilized a unique and sensitive indicator, namely, red-edge excitation shift (REES, which originates when a fluorophore is located in a highly ordered micro-environment. The extent of REES observed at different residue positions allowed us to directly identify the residues that are localized at the membrane-water interface comprising a thin (∼ 15 Å layer of motionally restrained water molecules and enabled us to construct a dynamic hydration map of the protein. The combination of site-specific fluorescence readouts allowed us to unravel the intriguing molecular details of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane in a direct model-free fashion. Additionally, the combination of methodologies described here are capable of distinguishing subtle but important structural alterations of α-synuclein bound to different negatively charged lipids with varied head-group chemistry. We believe that the structural modulations of α-synuclein on the membrane could

  5. Structural insights into the Slit-Robo complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlot, Cecile; Thielens, Nicole M; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Hemrika, Wieger; Romijn, Roland A; Gros, Piet; Cusack, Stephen; McCarthy, Andrew A

    2007-09-18

    Slits are large multidomain leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins that provide crucial guidance cues in neuronal and vascular development. More recently, Slits have been implicated in heart morphogenesis, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis. Slits are ligands for the Robo (Roundabout) receptors, which belong to the Ig superfamily of transmembrane signaling molecules. The Slit-Robo interaction is mediated by the second LRR domain of Slit and the two N-terminal Ig domains of Robo, but the molecular details of this interaction and how it induces signaling remain unclear. Here we describe the crystal structures of the second LRR domain of human Slit2 (Slit2 D2), the first two Ig domains of its receptor Robo1 (Ig1-2), and the minimal complex between these proteins (Slit2 D2-Robo1 Ig1). Slit2 D2 binds with its concave surface to the side of Ig1 with electrostatic and hydrophobic contact regions mediated by residues that are conserved in other family members. Surface plasmon resonance experiments and a mutational analysis of the interface confirm that Ig1 is the primary domain for binding Slit2. These structures provide molecular insight into Slit-Robo complex formation and will be important for the development of novel cancer therapeutics.

  6. Insight into the Disciplinary Structure of Nanoscience & Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjuan Luan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims to gain an insight into the disciplinary structure of nanoscience & nanotechnology (N&N: What is the disciplinary network of N&N like? Which disciplines are being integrated into N&N over time? For a specific discipline, how many other disciplines have direct or indirect connections with it? What are the distinct subgroups of N&N at different evolutionary stages? Such critical issues are to be addressed in this paper. Design/methodology/approach: We map the disciplinary network structure of N&N by employing the social network analysis tool, Netdraw, identifying which Web of Science Categories (WCs mediate nbetweenness centrality in different stages of nano development. Cliques analysis embedded in the Ucinet program is applied to do the disciplinary cluster analysis in the study according to the path of “Network-Subgroup-Cliques,” and a tree diagram is selected as the visualizing type. Findings: The disciplinary network structure reveals the relationships among different disciplines in the N&N developing process clearly, and it is easy for us to identify which disciplines are connected with the core “N&N” directly or indirectly. The tree diagram showing N&N related disciplines provides an interesting perspective on nano research and development (R&D structure. Research limitations: The matrices used to draw the N&N disciplinary network are the original ones, and normalized matrix could be tried in future similar studies. Practical implications: Results in this paper can help us better understand the disciplinary structure of N&N, and the dynamic evolution of N&N related disciplines over time. The findings could benefit R&D decision making. It can support policy makers from government agencies engaging in science and technology (S&T management or S&T strategy planners to formulate efficient decisions according to a perspective of converging sciences and technologies. Originality/value: The novelty of this study

  7. Structural insights into regioselectivity in the enzymatic chlorination of tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H

    2009-08-07

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important insights into the chemical mechanism of halogenation by this enzyme family. These proteins comprise two modules: a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding module and a tryptophan-binding module. Although the 7-halogenase studies advance a hypothesis for regioselectivity, this has never been experimentally demonstrated. PyrH is a tryptophan 5-halogenase that catalyzes halogenation on tryptophan C5 position. We report the crystal structure of a tryptophan 5-halogenase (PyrH) bound to tryptophan and FAD. The FAD-binding module is essentially unchanged relative to PrnA (and RebH), and PyrH would appear to generate the same reactive species from Cl(-), O(2), and 1,5-dihydroflavin adenine dinucleotide. We report additional mutagenesis data that extend our mechanistic understanding of this process, in particular highlighting a strap region that regulates FAD binding, and may allow communication between the two modules. PyrH has a significantly different tryptophan-binding module. The data show that PyrH binds tryptophan and presents the C5 atom to the reactive chlorinating species, shielding other potential reactive sites. We have mutated residues identified by structural analysis as recognizing the tryptophan in order to confirm their role. This work establishes the method by which flavin-dependent tryptophan halogenases regioselectively control chlorine addition to tryptophan. This method would seem to be general across the superfamily.

  8. Structural Insights into Regioselectivity in the Enzymatic Chlorination of Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important insights into the chemical mechanism of halogenation by this enzyme family. These proteins comprise two modules: a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding module and a tryptophan-binding module. Although the 7-halogenase studies advance a hypothesis for regioselectivity, this has never been experimentally demonstrated. PyrH is a tryptophan 5-halogenase that catalyzes halogenation on tryptophan C5 position. We report the crystal structure of a tryptophan 5-halogenase (PyrH) bound to tryptophan and FAD. The FAD-binding module is essentially unchanged relative to PrnA (and RebH), and PyrH would appear to generate the same reactive species from Cl-, O2, and 1,5-dihydroflavin adenine dinucleotide. We report additional mutagenesis data that extend our mechanistic understanding of this process, in particular highlighting a strap region that regulates FAD binding, and may allow communication between the two modules. PyrH has a significantly different tryptophan-binding module. The data show that PyrH binds tryptophan and presents the C5 atom to the reactive chlorinating species, shielding other potential reactive sites. We have mutated residues identified by structural analysis as recognizing the tryptophan in order to confirm their role. This work establishes the method by which flavin-dependent tryptophan halogenases regioselectively control chlorine addition to tryptophan. This method would seem to be general across the superfamily. PMID:19501593

  9. Structural Insights into Arl1-Mediated Targeting of the Arf-GEF BIG1 to the trans-Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Galindo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The GTPase Arf1 is the major regulator of vesicle traffic at both the cis- and trans-Golgi. Arf1 is activated at the cis-Golgi by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF GBF1 and at the trans-Golgi by the related GEF BIG1 or its paralog, BIG2. The trans-Golgi-specific targeting of BIG1 and BIG2 depends on the Arf-like GTPase Arl1. We find that Arl1 binds to the dimerization and cyclophilin binding (DCB domain in BIG1 and report a crystal structure of human Arl1 bound to this domain. Residues in the DCB domain that bind Arl1 are required for BIG1 to locate to the Golgi in vivo. DCB domain-binding residues in Arl1 have a distinct conformation from those in known Arl1-effector complexes, and this plasticity allows Arl1 to interact with different effectors of unrelated structure. The findings provide structural insight into how Arf1 GEFs, and hence active Arf1, achieve their correct subcellular distribution.

  10. Endocytic proteins drive vesicle growth via instability in high membrane tension environment

    CERN Document Server

    Walani, Nikhil; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key pathway for transporting cargo into cells via membrane vesicles. It plays an integral role in nutrient import, signal transduction, neurotransmission and cellular entry of pathogens and drug-carrying nanoparticles. As CME entails substantial local remodeling of the plasma membrane, the presence of membrane tension offers resistance to bending and hence, vesicle formation. Experiments show that in such high tension conditions, actin dynamics is required to carry out CME successfully. In this study, we build upon these pioneering experimental studies to provide fundamental mechanistic insights into the roles of two key endocytic proteins, namely, actin and BAR proteins in driving vesicle formation in high membrane tension environment. Our study reveals a new actin force induced `snap-through instability' that triggers a rapid shape transition from a shallow invagination to a highly invaginated tubular structure. We show that the association of BAR proteins stabilizes...

  11. Loading of Vesicles into Soft Amphiphilic Nanotubes using Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erne, Petra M; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Štacko, Peter; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Stuart, Marc C A; Boekema, Egbert J; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-12-07

    The facile assembly of higher-order nanoarchitectures from simple building blocks is demonstrated by the loading of vesicles into soft amphiphilic nanotubes using osmosis. The nanotubes are constructed from rigid interdigitated bilayers which are capped with vesicles comprising phospholipid-based flexible bilayers. When a hyperosmotic gradient is applied to these vesicle-capped nanotubes, the closed system loses water and the more flexible vesicle bilayer is pulled inwards. This leads to inclusion of vesicles inside the nanotubes without affecting the tube structure, showing controlled reorganization of the self-assembled multicomponent system upon a simple osmotic stimulus. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Structural and Dynamic Insight into Hirudin Epitopes-HLADRB1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Altogether, the results show the potentials of predictive methods and molecular modeling in molecular mimicry of peptide-MHC interaction and provide insights into the binding characteristics of antigen presentation mechanism. Keywords: Modified peptide ligand, Epitopes, MHC peptide binding, Hirudin, ...

  14. Hemoglobin-vesicle, a cellular artificial oxygen carrier that fulfils the physiological roles of the red blood cell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiromi; Sou, Keitaro; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Koichi; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2010-01-01

    Hb-vesicles (HbV) are artificial O(2) carriers encapsulating concentrated Hb solution (35 g/dL) with a phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome). The concentration of the HbV suspension is extremely high ([Hb] = 10 g/dL) and it has an O(2) carrying capacity that is comparable to that of blood. HbV is much smaller than RBC (250 vs. 8000 nm), but it recreates the functions of RBCs; (i) the slower rate of O(2) unloading than Hb solution; (ii) colloid osmotic pressure is zero; (iii) the viscosity of a HbV suspension is adjustable to that of blood; (iv) HbV is finally captured by and degraded in RES; (v) co-encapsulation of an allosteric effector to regulate O(2) affinity; (vi) the lipid bilayer membrane prevents direct contact of Hb and vasculature; (vii) NO-binding is retarded to some extent by an intracellular diffusion barrier, and HbV does not induce vasoconstriction. (viii) Both RBC and HbV can be a carrier of not only O(2) but also exogenous CO. However, HbV has limitations such as a shorter functional half-life when compared with RBCs. On the other hand, the advantages of HbV are that it is pathogen-free and blood-type-antigen-free; moreover, it can withstand long-term storage of a few years, none of which can be achieved by the RBC transfusion systems.

  15. Soft vesicles in the synthesis of hard materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renhao; Liu, Weimin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2012-04-17

    Vesicles of surfactants in aqueous solution have received considerable attention because of their use as simple model systems for biological membranes and their applications in various fields including colloids, pharmaceuticals, and materials. Because of their architecture, vesicles could prove useful as "soft" templates for the synthesis of "hard materials". The vesicle phase, however, has been challenging and difficult to work with in the construction of hard materials. In the solution-phase synthesis of various inorganic or macromolecular materials, templating methods provide a powerful strategy to control the size, morphology, and composition of the resulting micro- and nanostructures. In comparison with hard templates, soft templates are generally constructed using amphiphilic molecules, especially surfactants and amphiphilic polymers. These types of compounds offer advantages including the wide variety of available templates, simple fabrication processes under mild conditions, and easy removal of the templates with less damage to the final structures. Researchers have used many ordered molecular aggregates such as vesicles, micelles, liquid crystals, emulsion droplets, and lipid nanotubes as templates or structure-directing agents to control the synthesis or assembly hard micro- and nanomaterials composed from inorganic compounds or polymers. In addition to their range of sizes and morphologies, vesicles present unique structures that can simultaneously supply different microenvironments for the growth and assembly of hard materials: the inner chamber of vesicles, the outer surface of the vesicles, and the space between bilayers. Two main approaches for applying vesicles in the field of hard materials have been explored: (i) in situ synthesis of micro- or nanomaterials within a specific microenvironment by vesicle templating and (ii) the assembly or incorporation of guest materials during the formation of vesicles. This Account provides an in-depth look at

  16. Osmotin from Calotropis procera latex: new insights into structure and antifungal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Cleverson Diniz Teixeira; Lopes, José Luiz de Souza; Beltramini, Leila Maria; de Oliveira, Raquel Sombra Basílio; Oliveira, José Tadeu Abreu; Ramos, Márcio Viana

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the structural properties and mechanisms of the antifungal action of CpOsm, a purified osmotin from Calotropis procera latex. Fluorescence and CD assays revealed that the CpOsm structure is highly stable, regardless of pH levels. Accordingly, CpOsm inhibited the spore germination of Fusarium solani in all pH ranges tested. The content of the secondary structure of CpOsm was estimated as follows: α-helix (20%), β-sheet (33%), turned (19%) and unordered (28%), RMSD 1%. CpOsm was stable at up to 75°C, and thermal denaturation (T(m)) was calculated to be 77.8°C. This osmotin interacted with the negatively charged large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-1-glycerol (POPG), inducing vesicle permeabilization by the leakage of calcein. CpOsm induced the membrane permeabilization of spores and hyphae from Fusarium solani, allowing for propidium iodide uptake. These results show that CpOsm is a stable protein, and its antifungal activity involves membrane permeabilization, as property reported earlier for other osmotins and thaumatin-like proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  18. Interaction of insulin with SDS/CTAB catanionic Vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tah, Bidisha; Pal, Prabir; Talapatra, G.B., E-mail: spgbt@iacs.res.in

    2014-01-15

    In the present study, a novel method was used for entrapping the protein, insulin into the catanionic SDS/CTAB vesicle membrane. The anionic SDS and cationic CTAB formed catanionic vesicles at particular concentration (35:65 by volume). In this study, vesicle membrane can be considered as model membrane. The vesicle formation and entrapment efficiency depend on the pH of the aqueous solution. The insulin molecules have attached with the vesicular membrane at pH 7.0. However, at acidic pH, the vesicles were ruptured and the insulin did not entrap into the vesicle membrane, whereas at alkaline pH insulin became fibriller. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Zeta potential studies established the self-assembled structure formation of insulin and catanionic vesicles. To know the protein confirmations, Circular dichroism (CD) was also employed. The temperature dependent steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy show that at room temperature (25 °C), apart from the 305 nm tyrosine fluorescence, a new emission peak at 450 nm was observed only in case of insulin-vesicle system, and was assigned as the tyrosine phosphorescence. This phosphorescence peak is the signature of the entrapment of insulin into the vesicle membrane. Highlights: • SDS-CTAB based catanionic vesicle has been fabricated. • Insulin has been successfully immobilized on these vesicles. • Immobilized insulin shows room temperature phosphorescence.

  19. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins : A comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374650519; Wienk, Hans L J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203884884; Frissen, Augustinus E.; Peinder, Peter De|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325810818; Boelens, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Van Es, Daan S.; Grisel, Ruud J H; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Gosselink, Richard J A; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to devise efficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering three main industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and

  20. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins: a comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra; Wienk, Hans L.J.; Frissen, A.E.; Peinder, de Peter; Boelens, Rolf; Es, van D.S.; Grisel, Ruud J.H.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to devise efficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering three main industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and

  1. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  2. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures ar...... a barrier to fusion changing from 15 k(B)T at T = 26 degrees C to 10k(H) T at T = 35 degrees C. These results are compatible with the theoretical predictions using the stalk model of vesicle fusion....

  3. Dynamic properties of the alkaline vesicle population at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Röther

    Full Text Available In compensatory endocytosis, scission of vesicles from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm is a prerequisite for intravesicular reacidification and accumulation of neurotransmitter molecules. Here, we provide time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of the alkaline vesicle population which appears upon endocytic retrieval. Using fast perfusion pH-cycling in live-cell microscopy, synapto-pHluorin expressing rat hippocampal neurons were electrically stimulated. We found that the relative size of the alkaline vesicle population depended significantly on the electrical stimulus size: With increasing number of action potentials the relative size of the alkaline vesicle population expanded. In contrast to that, increasing the stimulus frequency reduced the relative size of the population of alkaline vesicles. Measurement of the time constant for reacification and calculation of the time constant for endocytosis revealed that both time constants were variable with regard to the stimulus condition. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of the alkaline vesicle population can be predicted by a simple mathematical model. In conclusion, here a novel methodical approach to analyze dynamic properties of alkaline vesicles is presented and validated as a convenient method for the detection of intracellular events. Using this method we show that the population of alkaline vesicles is highly dynamic and depends both on stimulus strength and frequency. Our results implicate that determination of the alkaline vesicle population size may provide new insights into the kinetics of endocytic retrieval.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Glycosphingolipids in Lipid Bilayers: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Y. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolipids are important constituents of biological membranes, and understanding their structure and dynamics in lipid bilayers provides insights into their physiological and pathological roles. Experimental techniques have provided details into their behavior at model and biological membranes; however, computer simulations are needed to gain atomic level insights. This paper summarizes the insights obtained from MD simulations into the conformational and orientational dynamics of glycosphingolipids and their exposure, hydration, and hydrogen-bonding interactions in membrane environment. The organization of glycosphingolipids in raft-like membranes and their modulation of lipid membrane structure are also reviewed.

  5. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  6. Structural insights into excitation-contraction coupling by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serysheva, I I

    2004-11-01

    In muscle, excitation-contraction coupling is defined as the process linking depolarization of the surface membrane with Ca2+ release from cytoplasmic stores, which activates contraction of striated muscle. This process is primarily controlled by interplay between two Ca2+ channels--the voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channel (dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR) localized in the t-tubule membrane and the Ca2+-release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. The structures of both channels have been extensively studied by several groups using electron cryomicroscopy and single particle reconstruction techniques. The structures of RyR, determined at resolutions of 22-30 A, reveal a characteristic mushroom shape with a bulky cytoplasmic region and the membrane-spanning stem. While the cytoplasmic region exhibits a complex structure comprising a multitude of distinctive domains with numerous intervening cavities, at this resolution no definitive statement can be made about the location of the actual pore within the transmembrane region. Conformational changes associated with functional transitions of the Ca2+ release channel from closed to open states have been characterized. Further experiments determined localization of binding sites for various channel ligands. The structural studies of the DHPR are less developed. Although four 3D maps of the DHPR were reported recently at 24-30 A resolution from studies of frozen-hydrated and negatively stained receptors, there are some discrepancies between reported structures with respect to the overall appearance and dimensions of the channel structure. Future structural studies at higher resolution are needed to refine the structures of both channels and to substantiate a proposed molecular model for their interaction.

  7. Structural insight into the PTS sugar transporter EIIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G; Levin, Elena J; Zhou, Ming

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme IIC (EIIC) component of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) is responsible for selectively transporting sugar molecules across the inner bacterial membrane. This is accomplished in parallel with phosphorylation of the sugar, which prevents efflux of the sugar back across the membrane. This process is a key part of an extensive signaling network that allows bacteria to efficiently utilize preferred carbohydrate sources. The goal of this review is to examine the current understanding of the structural features of the EIIC and how it mediates concentrative, selective sugar transport. The crystal structure of an N,N'-diacetylchitobiose transporter is used as a structural template for the glucose superfamily of PTS transporters. Comparison of protein sequences in context with the known EIIC structure suggests that members of the glucose superfamily of PTS transporters may exhibit variations in topology. Despite these differences, a conserved histidine and glutamate appear to have roles shared across the superfamily in sugar binding and phosphorylation. In the proposed transport model, a rigid body motion between two structural domains and movement of an intracellular loop provide the substrate binding site with alternating access, and reveal a surface required for interaction with the phosphotransfer protein responsible for catalysis. The structural and functional data discussed here give a preliminary understanding of how transport in EIIC is achieved. However, given the great sequence diversity between varying glucose-superfamily PTS transporters and lack of data on conformational changes needed for transport, additional structures of other members and conformations are still required. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural biochemistry and biophysics of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural insight into catalytic mechanism of PET hydrolase

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xu; Liu, Weidong; Huang, Jian-Wen; Ma, Jiantao; Zheng, Yingying; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Xu, Limin; Cheng, Ya-Shan; Chen, Chun-Chi; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2017-01-01

    PET hydrolase (PETase), which hydrolyzes polyethylene terephthalate (PET) into soluble building blocks, provides an attractive avenue for the bioconversion of plastics. Here we present the structures of a novel PETase from the PET-consuming microbe Ideonella sakaiensis in complex with substrate and product analogs. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and activity measurements, a substrate-binding mode is proposed, and several features critical for catalysis are elucidated.

  9. Structural insight into catalytic mechanism of PET hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Weidong; Huang, Jian-Wen; Ma, Jiantao; Zheng, Yingying; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Xu, Limin; Cheng, Ya-Shan; Chen, Chun-Chi; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2017-12-13

    PET hydrolase (PETase), which hydrolyzes polyethylene terephthalate (PET) into soluble building blocks, provides an attractive avenue for the bioconversion of plastics. Here we present the structures of a novel PETase from the PET-consuming microbe Ideonella sakaiensis in complex with substrate and product analogs. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and activity measurements, a substrate-binding mode is proposed, and several features critical for catalysis are elucidated.

  10. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  11. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular disease: are they Jedi or Sith?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Németh, Andrea; Sódar, Barbara W; Vukman, Krisztina V; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-06-01

    In the recent past, extracellular vesicles have become recognized as important players in cell biology and biomedicine. Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed structures found to be secreted by most if not all cells. Extracellular vesicle secretion represents a universal and highly conserved active cellular function. Importantly, increasing evidence supports that extracellular vesicles may serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets or tools in human diseases. Cardiovascular disease undoubtedly represents one of the most intensely studied and rapidly growing areas of the extracellular vesicle field. However, in different studies related to cardiovascular disease, extracellular vesicles have been shown to exert diverse and sometimes discordant biological effects. Therefore, it might seem a puzzle whether these vesicles are in fact beneficial or detrimental to cardiovascular health. In this review we provide a general introduction to extracellular vesicles and an overview of their biological roles in cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, we aim to untangle the various reasons for the observed discrepancy in biological effects of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we provide several examples that demonstrate that the observed functional diversity is in fact due to inherent differences among various types of extracellular vesicles. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  12. A new structural insight into XPA–DNA interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Benjamin; Shkriabai, Nick; Musich, Phillip R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Shell, Steven; Zou, Yue

    2014-01-01

    XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein is an essential factor for NER (nucleotide excision repair) which is believed to be involved in DNA damage recognition/verification, NER factor recruiting and stabilization of repair intermediates. Past studies on the structure of XPA have focused primarily on XPA interaction with damaged DNA. However, how XPA interacts with other DNA structures remains unknown though recent evidence suggest that these structures could be important for its roles in both NER and non-NER activities. Previously, we reported that XPA recognizes undamaged DNA ds/ssDNA (double-strand/single-strandDNA) junctions with a binding affinity much higher than its ability to bind bulky DNA damage. To understand how this interaction occurs biochemically we implemented a structural determination of the interaction using a MS-based protein footprinting method and limited proteolysis. By monitoring surface accessibility of XPA lysines to NHS-biotin modification in the free protein and the DNA junction-bound complex we show that XPA physically interacts with the DNA junctions via two lysines, K168 and K179, located in the previously known XPA(98–219) DBD (DNA-binding domain). Importantly, we also uncovered new lysine residues, outside of the known DBD, involved in the binding. We found that residues K221, K222, K224 and K236 in the C-terminal domain are involved in DNA binding. Limited proteolysis analysis of XPA–DNA interactions further confirmed this observation. Structural modelling with these data suggests a clamp-like DBD for the XPA binding to ds/ssDNA junctions. Our results provide a novel structure-function view of XPA–DNA junction interactions. PMID:25385088

  13. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    is mainly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the contact surface area is similar to that of the myosinactin complex. A significant interspecies difference in the myosin binding epitope is observed. Our results reveal the structural basis of MYH7 exons 15–16 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy......The UNC-45 chaperone protein interacts with and affects the folding, stability, and the ATPase activity of myosins. It plays a critical role in the cardiomyopathy development and in the breast cancer tumor growth. Here we propose the first structural model of the UNC-45–myosin complex using various...

  14. Structural insights shed light onto septin assemblies and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Yves; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    While the original septin mutants were identified more than 30 years ago for their role in cytokinesis [Hartwell, LH: Genetic control of the cell division cycle in yeast. IV. Genes controlling bud emergence and cytokinesis. Exp Cell Res 1971, 69: 265-276], the architecture of septin complexes and higher order structures has remained a mystery up until very recently. Over the last few months a number of converging approaches have suddenly provided a wealth of structural information about the different levels of septin organization. Here, we review these advancements and highlight their functional consequences.

  15. Determination of Cell Doubling Times from the Return-on-Investment Time of Photosynthetic Vesicles Based on Atomic Detail Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Andrew; Hunter, C Neil; Sener, Melih

    2017-04-20

    Cell doubling times of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides during photosynthetic growth are determined experimentally and computationally as a function of illumination. For this purpose, energy conversion processes in an intracytoplasmic membrane vesicle, the chromatophore, are described based on an atomic detail structural model. The cell doubling time and its illumination dependence are computed in terms of the return-on-investment (ROI) time of the chromatophore, determined computationally from the ATP production rate, and the mass ratio of chromatophores in the cell, determined experimentally from whole cell absorbance spectra. The ROI time is defined as the time it takes to produce enough ATP to pay for the construction of another chromatophore. The ROI time of the low light-growth chromatophore is 4.5-2.6 h for a typical illumination range of 10-100 μmol photons m -2 s -1 , respectively, with corresponding cell doubling times of 8.2-3.9 h. When energy expenditure is considered as a currency, the benefit-to-cost ratio computed for the chromatophore as an energy harvesting device is 2-8 times greater than for photovoltaic and fossil fuel-based energy solutions and the corresponding ROI times are approximately 3-4 orders of magnitude shorter for the chromatophore than for synthetic systems.

  16. An insight into the sequential, structural and phylogenetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    MA-ACS1) and the enzymatic activity of ACC ... for ligand binding, are mostly conserved across the MA-ACS1 structure and the competitive inhibitor AVG binds at a location ... short half-life, its intracellular concentration is low and the active form ...

  17. Building insightful simulation models using Petri Nets - A structured approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, D.J.

    Petri Nets have essential strengths in capturing a system's static structure and dynamics, its mathematical underpinning, and providing a graphical representation. However, visual simulation models of realistic systems based on Petri Nets are often perceived as too large and too complex to be easily

  18. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Huyet

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  19. Soluble monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles: the three dimensions of structural complexity to use HLA-G as a clinical biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, F da Silva; König, L; Wagner, B; Giebel, B; Santos Manvailer, L F; Rebmann, V

    2016-09-01

    The HLA-G molecule belongs to the family of nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. At variance to classical HLA class I, HLA-G displays (i) a low number of nucleotide variations within the coding region, (ii) a high structural diversity, (iii) a restricted peptide repertoire, (iv) a limited tissue distribution and (v) strong immune-suppressive properties. The physiological HLA-G surface expression is restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune-privileged adult tissues. Soluble forms of HLA-G (sHLA-G) are detectable in various body fluids. Cellular activation and pathological processes are associated with an aberrant or a neo-expression of HLA-G/sHLA-G. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to be key players in the induction of short- and long-term tolerance. Thus, its unique expression profile and tolerance-inducing functions render HLA-G/sHLA-G an attractive biomarker to monitor the systemic health/disease status and disease activity/progression for clinical approaches in disease management and treatments. Here, we place emphasis on (i) the current status of the tolerance-inducing functions by HLA-G/sHLA-G, (ii) the current complexity to implement this molecule as a meaningful clinical biomarker regarding the three dimensions of structural diversity (monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles) with its functional implications, and (iii) novel and future approaches to detect and quantify sHLA-G structures and functions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cryo-electron tomography of mouse hepatitis virus : Insights into the structure of the coronavirion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barcena, Montserrat; Oostergetel, Gert T.; Bartelink, Willem; Faas, Frank G. A.; Verkleij, Arie; Rottier, Peter J. M.; Koster, Abraham J.; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2009-01-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped viruses containing the largest reported RNA genomes. As a result of their pleomorphic nature, our structural insight into the coronavirion is still rudimentary, and it is based mainly on 2D electron microscopy. Here we report the 3D virion structure of coronaviruses

  1. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (Michigan); (NIH); (Michigan-Med)

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  2. Structural insights into substrate traffic and inhibition in acetylcholinesterase

    OpenAIRE

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe,; Fournier, Didier; Greenblatt, Harry M.; Stojan, Jure; Sussman, Joel L.; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Silman, Israel; Weik, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) terminates nerve-impulse transmission at cholinergic synapses by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. Substrate traffic in AChE involves at least two binding sites, the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites, which have been suggested to be allosterically related and involved in substrate inhibition. Here, we present the crystal structures of Torpedo californica AChE complexed with the substrate acetylthiocholine, the product thiocholine and a n...

  3. Structural Insights Into the Evolutionary Paths of Oxylipin Biosynthetic Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.-S.; Nioche, P.; Hamberg, M.; Raman, C.S.

    2009-05-20

    The oxylipin pathway generates not only prostaglandin-like jasmonates but also green leaf volatiles (GLVs), which confer characteristic aromas to fruits and vegetables. Although allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase are atypical cytochrome P450 family members involved in the synthesis of jasmonates and GLVs, respectively, it is unknown how these enzymes rearrange their hydroperoxide substrates into different products. Here we present the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AOS, free and in complex with substrate or intermediate analogues. The structures reveal an unusual active site poised to control the reactivity of an epoxyallylic radical and its cation by means of interactions with an aromatic {pi}-system. Replacing the amino acid involved in these steps by a non-polar residue markedly reduces AOS activity and, unexpectedly, is both necessary and sufficient for converting AOS into a GLV biosynthetic enzyme. Furthermore, by combining our structural data with bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, we have discovered previously unknown hydroperoxide lyase in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, AOS in coral, and epoxyalcohol synthase in amphioxus. These results indicate that oxylipin biosynthetic genes were present in the last common ancestor of plants and animals, but were subsequently lost in all metazoan lineages except Placozoa, Cnidaria and Cephalochordata.

  4. Insights into molecular structure and digestion rate of oat starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinchuan; Kuang, Qirong; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Sumei; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Xingxun; Wang, Shujun

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro digestibility of oat starch and its relationship with starch molecular structure was investigated. The in vitro digestion results showed that the first-order kinetic constant (k) of oat starches (OS-1 and OS-2) was lower than that of rice starch. The size of amylose chains, amylose content and degree of branching (DB) of amylopectin in oat starch were significantly higher than the corresponding parameters in rice starch. The larger molecular size of oat starch may account for its lower digestion rate. The fine structure of amylopectin showed that oat starch had less chains of DP 6-12 and DP>36, which may explain the small difference in digestion rate between oat and rice starch. The biosynthesis model from oat amylopectin fine structure data suggested a lower starch branching enzyme (SBE) activity and/or a higher starch synthase (SS) activity, which may decrease the DB of oat starch and increase its digestion rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  6. Floating Escherichia coli by expressing cyanobacterial gas vesicle genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhe; Kang, Li; Li, Jiaheng; Wu, Wenjie; Zhang, Peiran; Gong, Minghao; Lai, Weihong; Zhang, Chunyan; Chang, Lei; Peng, Yong; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Lian; Bao, Yingying; Xu, Haowen; Zhang, Xiaohua; Sui, Zhenghong; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Xianghong

    2015-02-01

    Gas vesicles are hollow, air-filled polyprotein structures that provide the buoyancy to cells. They are found in a variety of prokaryotes. In this study, we isolated a partial gas vesicle protein gene cluster containing gvpA and gvpC20Ψ from Planktothrix rubescens, and inserted it into an expression vector and expressed it in E. coli. The gas vesicle was developed in bacterial cells, which made bacterial cells to float on medium surface. We also amplified gvpA and gvpC20Ψ separately and synthesized an artificial operon by fusing these two genes with the standardized gene expression controlling elements of E. coli. The artificial operon was expressed in E. coli, forming gas vesicles and floating bacteria cells. Our findings verified that the whole set of genes and the overall structure of gas vesicle gene cluster are not necessary for developing gas vesicles in bacteria cells. Two genes, gvpA and gvpC20Ψ, of the gas vesicle gene cluster are sufficient for synthesizing an artificial operon that can develop gas vesicles in bacteria cells. Our findings provided a wide range of applications including easing the harvest of cultured microalgae and bacteria, as well as enriching and remediating aquatic pollutants by constructing gas vesicles in their cells.

  7. Structural Insights into DNA Replication Without Hydrogen-Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Karin; Malyshev, Denis A.; Lavergne, Thomas; Welte, Wolfram; Diederichs, Kay; Romesberg, Floyd E.; Marx, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The genetic alphabet is comprised of two base pairs, and the development of a third, unnatural base pair would increase the genetic and chemical potential of DNA. d5SICS-dNaM is one of the most efficiently replicated unnatural base pairs identified to date, but its pairing is mediated by only hydrophobic and packing forces, and in free duplex DNA it forms a cross-strand intercalated structure that makes its efficient replication difficult to understand. Recent studies of the KlenTaq polymerase revealed that the insertion of d5SICSTP opposite dNaM proceeds via a mutually induced-fit mechanism, where the presence of the triphosphate induces the polymerase to form the catalytically competent closed structure, which in turn induces the pairing nucleotides of the developing unnatural base pair to adopt a planar Watson-Crick-like structure. To understand the remaining steps of replication, we now report the characterization of the pre-chemistry complexes corresponding to the insertion of dNaMTP opposite d5SICS, as well as multiple post-chemistry complexes in which the already formed unnatural base pair is positioned at the post-insertion site. Unlike with the insertion of d5SICSTP opposite dNaM, addition of dNaMTP does not fully induce the formation of the catalytically competent closed state. The data also reveal that once synthesized and translocated to the post-insertion position, the unnatural nucleobases again intercalate. Two modes of intercalation are observed, depending on the nature of the flanking nucleotides, and are each stabilized by different interactions with the polymerase, and each appear to reduce the affinity with which the next correct triphosphate binds. Thus, continued primer extension is limited by de-intercalation and rearrangements with the polymerase active site that are required to populate the catalytically active, triphosphate bound conformation. PMID:24283923

  8. Structural insight into the Clostridium difficile ethanolamine utilisation microcompartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C Pitts

    Full Text Available Bacterial microcompartments form a protective proteinaceous barrier around metabolic enzymes that process unstable or toxic chemical intermediates. The genome of the virulent, multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile 630 strain contains an operon, eut, encoding a bacterial microcompartment with genes for the breakdown of ethanolamine and its utilisation as a source of reduced nitrogen and carbon. The C. difficile eut operon displays regulatory genetic elements and protein encoding regions in common with homologous loci found in the genomes of other bacteria, including the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecalis. The crystal structures of two microcompartment shell proteins, CD1908 and CD1918, and an uncharacterised protein with potential enzymatic activity, CD1925, were determined by X-ray crystallography. CD1908 and CD1918 display the same protein fold, though the order of secondary structure elements is permuted in CD1908 and this protein displays an N-terminal β-strand extension. These proteins form hexamers with molecules related by crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetry. The structure of CD1925 has a cupin β-barrel fold and a putative active site that is distinct from the metal-ion dependent catalytic cupins. Thin-section transmission electron microscopy of Escherichia coli over-expressing eut proteins indicates that CD1918 is capable of self-association into arrays, suggesting an organisational role for CD1918 in the formation of this microcompartment. The work presented provides the basis for further study of the architecture and function of the C. difficile eut microcompartment, its role in metabolism and the wider consequences of intestinal colonisation and virulence in this pathogen.

  9. Structural Insight into the Clostridium difficile Ethanolamine Utilisation Microcompartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Lewis, Richard J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments form a protective proteinaceous barrier around metabolic enzymes that process unstable or toxic chemical intermediates. The genome of the virulent, multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile 630 strain contains an operon, eut, encoding a bacterial microcompartment with genes for the breakdown of ethanolamine and its utilisation as a source of reduced nitrogen and carbon. The C. difficile eut operon displays regulatory genetic elements and protein encoding regions in common with homologous loci found in the genomes of other bacteria, including the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecalis. The crystal structures of two microcompartment shell proteins, CD1908 and CD1918, and an uncharacterised protein with potential enzymatic activity, CD1925, were determined by X-ray crystallography. CD1908 and CD1918 display the same protein fold, though the order of secondary structure elements is permuted in CD1908 and this protein displays an N-terminal β-strand extension. These proteins form hexamers with molecules related by crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetry. The structure of CD1925 has a cupin β-barrel fold and a putative active site that is distinct from the metal-ion dependent catalytic cupins. Thin-section transmission electron microscopy of Escherichia coli over-expressing eut proteins indicates that CD1918 is capable of self-association into arrays, suggesting an organisational role for CD1918 in the formation of this microcompartment. The work presented provides the basis for further study of the architecture and function of the C. difficile eut microcompartment, its role in metabolism and the wider consequences of intestinal colonisation and virulence in this pathogen. PMID:23144756

  10. Thermodynamic and structural insights into CSL-DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, David R.; Kovall, Rhett A. (UCIN-MED)

    2010-10-28

    The Notch pathway is an intercellular signaling mechanism that plays important roles in cell fates decisions throughout the developing and adult organism. Extracellular complexation of Notch receptors with ligands ultimately results in changes in gene expression, which is regulated by the nuclear effector of the pathway, CSL (C-promoter binding factor 1 (CBF-1), suppressor of hairless (Su(H)), lin-12 and glp-1 (Lag-1)). CSL is a DNA binding protein that is involved in both repression and activation of transcription from genes that are responsive to Notch signaling. One well-characterized Notch target gene is hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES-1), which is regulated by a promoter element consisting of two CSL binding sites oriented in a head-to-head arrangement. Although previous studies have identified in vivo and consensus binding sites for CSL, and crystal structures of these complexes have been determined, to date, a quantitative description of the energetics that underlie CSL-DNA binding is unknown. Here, we provide a thermodynamic and structural analysis of the interaction between CSL and the two individual sites that comprise the HES-1 promoter element. Our comprehensive studies that analyze binding as a function of temperature, salt, and pH reveal moderate, but distinct, differences in the affinities of CSL for the two HES-1 binding sites. Similarly, our structural results indicate that overall CSL binds both DNA sites in a similar manner; however, minor changes are observed in both the conformation of CSL and DNA. Taken together, our results provide a quantitative and biophysical basis for understanding how CSL interacts with DNA sites in vivo.

  11. Structural and Biochemical Insights into MLL1 Core Complex Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Groulx, Adam; Tremblay, Véronique; Brunzelle, Joseph; Couture, Jean-François (Ottawa); (NWU)

    2012-05-02

    Histone H3 Lys-4 methylation is predominantly catalyzed by a family of methyltransferases whose enzymatic activity depends on their interaction with a three-subunit complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. Here, we report that a segment of 50 residues of RbBP5 bridges the Ash2L C-terminal domain to WDR5. The crystal structure of WDR5 in ternary complex with RbBP5 and MLL1 reveals that both proteins binds peptide-binding clefts located on opposite sides of WDR5s {beta}-propeller domain. RbBP5 engages in several hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts within a V-shaped cleft formed by the junction of two blades on WDR5. Mutational analyses of both the WDR5 V-shaped cleft and RbBP5 residues reveal that the interactions between RbBP5 and WDR5 are important for the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Overall, this study provides the structural basis underlying the formation of the WDR5-RbBP5 subcomplex and further highlight the crucial role of WDR5 in scaffolding the MLL1 core complex.

  12. Structural and Functional Insights into Foamy Viral Integrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha-Gyun Shin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful integration of retroviral DNA into the host chromosome is an essential step for viral replication. The process is mediated by virally encoded integrase (IN and orchestrated by 3'-end processing and the strand transfer reaction. In vitro reaction conditions, such as substrate specificity, cofactor usage, and cellular binding partners for such reactions by the three distinct domains of prototype foamy viral integrase (PFV-IN have been described well in several reports. Recent studies on the three‑dimensional structure of the interacting complexes between PFV-IN and DNA, cofactors, binding partners, or inhibitors have explored the mechanistic details of such interactions and shown its utilization as an important target to develop anti-retroviral drugs. The presence of a potent, non-transferable nuclear localization signal in the PFV C-terminal domain extends its use as a model for investigating cellular trafficking of large molecular complexes through the nuclear pore complex and also to identify novel cellular targets for such trafficking. This review focuses on recent advancements in the structural analysis and in vitro functional aspects of PFV-IN.

  13. Au-Based Catalysts: Electrochemical Characterization for Structural Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pifferi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Au-based catalysts are widely used in important processes because of their peculiar characteristics. The catalyst performance depends strongly on the nature and structure of the metal nanoparticles, especially in the case of bimetallic catalysts where synergistic effects between the two metals can be occasionally seen. In this paper, it is shown that electrochemical characterisation (cyclovoltammetry CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS of AuPd systems can be used to determine the presence of an electronic interaction between the two metals, thus providing a strong support in the determination of the nature of the synergy between Au and Pd in the liquid phase oxidation of alcohols. However, it seems likely that the strong difference in the catalytic behavior between the single metals and the bimetallic system is connected not only to the redox behaviour, but also to the energetic balance between the different elementary steps of the reaction.

  14. Ribonuclease revisited: structural insights into ribonuclease III family enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Ian J; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-02-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes occur ubiquitously in biology and are responsible for processing RNA precursors into functional RNAs that participate in protein synthesis, RNA interference and a range of other cellular activities. Members of the RNase III enzyme family, including Escherichia coli RNase III, Rnt1, Dicer and Drosha, share the ability to recognize and cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), typically at specific positions or sequences. Recent biochemical and structural data have shed new light on how RNase III enzymes catalyze dsRNA hydrolysis and how substrate specificity is achieved. A major theme emerging from these studies is that accessory domains present in different RNase III enzymes are the key determinants of substrate selectivity, which in turn dictates the specialized biological function of each type of RNase III protein.

  15. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  16. Extracellular vesicles of calcifying turkey leg tendon characterized by immunocytochemistry and high voltage electron microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; McKee, M. D.; Nanci, A.; Song, M. J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Arena, J.; McEwen, B.

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the structure and possible function of extracellular vesicles in certain calcifying vertebrate tissues, normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, have been studied in two separate investigations, one concerning the electron microscopic immunolocalization of the 66 kDa phosphoprotein, osteopontin, and the other detailing the organization and distribution of mineral crystals associated with the vesicles as determined by high voltage microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction. Immunolabeling shows that osteopontin is related to extracellular vesicles of the tendon in the sense that its initial presence appears coincident with the development of mineral associated with the vesicle loci. By high voltage electron microscopy and 3-D imaging techniques, mineral crystals are found to consist of small irregularly shaped particles somewhat randomly oriented throughout individual vesicles sites. Their appearance is different from that found for the mineral observed within calcifying tendon collagen, and their 3-D disposition is not regularly ordered. Possible spatial and temporal relationships of vesicles, osteopontin, mineral, and collagen are being examined further by these approaches.

  17. Lubrication synergy: Mixture of hyaluronan and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raj, Akanksha; Wang, Min; Zander, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    with the outer shell of dipalmitoylphophatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles in bulk solution. Further, we follow adsorption to silica from mixed hyaluronan/DPPC vesicle solution by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation measurements. Atomic Force Microscope imaging visualises the adsorbed layer structure...... and partly removed from between the surfaces under high loads. These layers offer very low friction coefficient (

  18. The freezing process of small lipid vesicles at molecular resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    At present very little is known about the kinetic barriers which a small vesicle will face during the transformation from the liquid-crystalline to the gel phase, and what the structure of frozen vesicles looks like at the molecular level. The formation of gel domains in the strongly curved bilayer

  19. Structural Studies of Perfluoroaryldiselenadiazolyl Radicals: Insights into Dithiadiazolyl Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melen, Rebecca L; Less, Robert J; Pask, Christopher M; Rawson, Jeremy M

    2016-11-21

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a series of perfluoroaryldiselenadiazolyls [DSeDA; p-XC6F4CNSeSeN (X = F, Cl, Br, CF3, NO2, and CN for 2a-2f, respectively)] are described. Concentration-dependent solution UV/vis measurements on 2a follow the Beer-Lambert law and the transitions assigned through time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) studies, indicating little propensity for dimerization in solution (10-3-10-4 M). Solution electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra reveal that these radicals exhibit a broad featureless singlet around g = 2.04 but form well-resolved anisotropic EPR spectra in frozen solution, from which spin densities were determined and found to reflect an increase in the spin density at the chalcogen in relation to the corresponding dithiadiazolyl (DTDA) radicals, p-XC6F4CNSSN. The solid-state structures of 2a and 2d-2f all adopt spin-paired cis-cofacial dimers in which the dimers are held together via multicenter π*-π* "pancake bonding" interactions. Conversely, 2b and 2c exhibit an orthogonal mode of association, which is unique to DSeDA chemistry but which also affords a singlet ground state evidenced by SQUID magnetometry. The more sterically demanding diselenadiazolyl radical 2f was also prepared and exhibits a trans-antarafacial dimerization mode. DFT studies [UPBE0-D3 ccPVTZ-PP(-F)++] on the model radical HCNSeSeN confirm that each dimer is a stable energy minimum on the potential energy surface, reproducing well the experimental geometric parameters with relative stability in the order cis-cofacial > orthogonal > trans-antarafacial. Computational studies reflect stronger dimerization for DSeDA radicals in relation to their sulfur analogues, consistent with the experimental observation: While 2a and 2d are isomorphous with their corresponding DTDA radicals, 2b, 2c, and 2e-2g are all dimeric, in contrast to their DTDA analogues, which are monomeric in the solid-state. A study on 2f reveals that significant

  20. Insight into SUCNR1 (GPR91) structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilissen, Julie; Jouret, François; Pirotte, Bernard; Hanson, Julien

    2016-03-01

    SUCNR1 (or GPR91) belongs to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), which represents the largest group of membrane proteins in human genome. The majority of marketed drugs targets GPCRs, directly or indirectly. SUCNR1 has been classified as an orphan receptor until a landmark study paired it with succinate, a citric acid cycle intermediate. According to the current paradigm, succinate triggers SUCNR1 signaling pathways to indicate local stress that may affect cellular metabolism. SUCNR1 implication has been well documented in renin-induced hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, inflammation and immune response, platelet aggregation and retinal angiogenesis. In addition, the SUCNR1-induced increase of blood pressure may contribute to diabetic nephropathy or cardiac hypertrophy. The understanding of SUCNR1 activation, signaling pathways and functions remains largely elusive, which calls for deeper investigations. SUCNR1 shows a high potential as an innovative drug target and is probably an important regulator of basic physiology. In order to achieve the full characterization of this receptor, more specific pharmacological tools such as small-molecules modulators will represent an important asset. In this review, we describe the structural features of SUCNR1, its current ligands and putative binding pocket. We give an exhaustive overview of the known and hypothetical signaling partners of the receptor in different in vitro and in vivo systems. The link between SUCNR1 intracellular pathways and its pathophysiological roles are also extensively discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Insight into the Geothermal Structure in Chingshui, Ilan, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Tao Tong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chingshui geothermal field is the largest known productive geothermal area in Taiwan. The purpose of this paper is to delineate this geothermal structure by integrating geophysical data and borehole information. The existence of a magma chamber in the shallow crust and shallow intrusive igneous rock results in a high heat flow and geothermal gradient; furthermore, the NE deep fault system within the meta-sandstones provides meteoric recharge from a higher elevation to artesianally drive the geothermal system. There is evidence that geothermal fluid deeply circulated within the fracture zone and was heated by a deeply located body of hot rock. The geothermal reservoir of the Chingshui geothermal field might be related to the fracture zone of the Chingshuihsi fault. It is bounded by the C-fault in the north and Xiaonanao fault in the south. Based on information obtained from geophysical interpretations and well logs, a 3-D geothermal conceptual model is constructed in this study. Further, the geothermal reservoir is confined to an area that is 260 m in width, N21°W, 1.5 km in length, and has an 80° dip toward the NE. Ahigh-temperature zone is found in the SE region of the reservoir, which is about 500 m in length; this zone is located near the intersection of the Chingshuihsi and Xiaonanao faults. An area on the NE side of the high-temperature zone has been recommended for the drilling of production wells for future geothermal development.

  2. Insight, self-stigma and psychosocial outcomes in Schizophrenia: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Y-J; Chang, H-A; Kao, Y-C; Tzeng, N-S; Lu, C-W; Loh, C-H

    2016-12-15

    Poor insight is prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and has been associated with acute illness severity, medication non-adherence and poor treatment outcomes. Paradoxically, high insight has been associated with various undesirable outcomes, including low self-esteem, depression and low subjective quality of life (QoL) in patients with schizophrenia. Despite the growing body of studies conducted in Western countries supporting the pernicious effects of improved insight in psychosis, which bases on the level of self-stigma, the effects are unclear in non-Western societies. The current study examined the role of self-stigma in the relationship between insight and psychosocial outcomes in a Chinese population. A total of 170 outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were recruited from two general university hospitals. Sociodemographic data and clinical variables were recorded and self-report scales were employed to measure self-stigma, depression, insight, self-esteem and subjective QoL. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the cross-sectional data. High levels of self-stigma were reported by 39% of the participants (n = 67). The influences of insight, self-stigma, self-esteem and depression on subjective QoL were confirmed by the SEM results. Our model with the closest fit to the data (χ 2 = 33.28; df = 20; p = 0.03; χ 2/df = 1.66; CFI = 0.98; TLI = 0.97; RMSEA = 0.06) demonstrated that self-stigma might fully mediate the association of insight with low self-esteem, depression and poor subjective QoL. High insight into illness contributed to self-stigma, which caused low self-esteem and depression and, consequently, low QoL. Notably, insight did not directly affect self-esteem, depression or QoL. Furthermore, the association of insight with poor psychosocial outcomes was not moderated by self-stigma. Our findings support the mediating model of insight relevant to the poor psychosocial outcomes of individuals diagnosed with

  3. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald eHancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete territories for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a crumpled globule with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates. This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter

  4. Studies of matrix vesicle-induced mineralization in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Boyan, B. D.; Doty, S. B.; Feliciano, A.; Greer, K.; Weiland, D.; Swain, L. D.; Schwartz, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix vesicles isolated from fourth-passage cultures of chondrocytes were tested for their ability to induce hydroxyapatite formation in a gelatin gel in order to gain insight into the function of matrix vesicles in in situ mineralization. These matrix vesicles did not appear to be hydroxyapatite nucleators per se since the extent of mineral accumulation in the gel diffusion system was not altered by the presence of matrix vesicles alone, and in the vesicle containing gels, mineral crystals were formed whether associated with vesicles or not. In gels with these matrix vesicles and beta-glycerophosphate, despite the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, there was no increase in mineral deposition. This suggested that in the gel system these culture-derived vesicles did not increase local phosphate concentrations. However, when known inhibitors of mineral crystal formation and growth (proteoglycan aggregates [4 mg/ml], or ATP [1 mM], or both proteoglycan and ATP) were included in the gel, more mineral was deposited in gels with the vesicles than in comparable gels without vesicles, indicating that enzymes within these vesicles were functioning to remove the inhibition. These data support the suggestion that one function of the extracellular matrix vesicles is to transport enzymes for matrix modification.

  5. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins.

  6. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  7. Planned Products of the Mars Structure Service for the InSight Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, Mark P.; Lognonné, Philippe; Bruce Banerdt, W.; Garcia, Raphaël; Golombek, Matthew; Kedar, Sharon; Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte; Mocquet, Antoine; Teanby, Nick A.; Tromp, Jeroen; Weber, Renee; Beucler, Eric; Blanchette-Guertin, Jean-Francois; Bozdağ, Ebru; Drilleau, Mélanie; Gudkova, Tamara; Hempel, Stefanie; Khan, Amir; Lekić, Vedran; Murdoch, Naomi; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Rivoldini, Atillio; Schmerr, Nicholas; Ruan, Youyi; Verhoeven, Olivier; Gao, Chao; Christensen, Ulrich; Clinton, John; Dehant, Veronique; Giardini, Domenico; Mimoun, David; Thomas Pike, W.; Smrekar, Sue; Wieczorek, Mark; Knapmeyer, Martin; Wookey, James

    2017-10-01

    The InSight lander will deliver geophysical instruments to Mars in 2018, including seismometers installed directly on the surface (Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure, SEIS). Routine operations will be split into two services, the Mars Structure Service (MSS) and Marsquake Service (MQS), which will be responsible, respectively, for defining the structure models and seismicity catalogs from the mission. The MSS will deliver a series of products before the landing, during the operations, and finally to the Planetary Data System (PDS) archive. Prior to the mission, we assembled a suite of a priori models of Mars, based on estimates of bulk composition and thermal profiles. Initial models during the mission will rely on modeling surface waves and impact-generated body waves independent of prior knowledge of structure. Later modeling will include simultaneous inversion of seismic observations for source and structural parameters. We use Bayesian inversion techniques to obtain robust probability distribution functions of interior structure parameters. Shallow structure will be characterized using the hammering of the heatflow probe mole, as well as measurements of surface wave ellipticity. Crustal scale structure will be constrained by measurements of receiver function and broadband Rayleigh wave ellipticity measurements. Core interacting body wave phases should be observable above modeled martian noise levels, allowing us to constrain deep structure. Normal modes of Mars should also be observable and can be used to estimate the globally averaged 1D structure, while combination with results from the InSight radio science mission and orbital observations will allow for constraint of deeper structure.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  9. How pure are your vesicles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  10. Structural insights into the recognition of phosphopeptide by the FHA domain of kanadaptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qingping; Deller, Marc C; Nielsen, Tine K

    2014-01-01

    Kanadaptin is a nuclear protein of unknown function that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. The crystal structure of the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain of human kanadaptin was determined to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals an asymmetric dimer in which one monomer is complexed...... with a phosphopeptide mimic derived from a peptide segment from the N-terminus of a symmetry-related molecule as well as a sulfate bound to the structurally conserved phosphothreonine recognition cleft. This structure provides insights into the molecular recognition features utilized by this family of proteins...

  11. Visualization of peptide secretory vesicles in living nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joshua J; Loh, Y Peng

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of real-time movements of peptidergic vesicles in live neurons provides insight into molecular mechanism(s) supporting the activity-dependent secretion of neurotrophins and neuropeptides. We examined the effect of overexpression of exogenous peptides comprising of the cytoplasmic tail sequence of vesicular carboxypeptidase E (CPE), proposed to be involved in the mechanism of trafficking of peptidergic secretory vesicles, in live hippocampal neurons. E16 rat hippocampal neurons were transfected with the peptidergic vesicle markers, CPE C-terminally tagged with red or green fluorescent protein, or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tagged with green fluorescent protein, and grown on dishes specialized for real-time live cell visualization. Movements of peptidergic vesicles were imaged in a temperature-controlled chamber on a confocal inverted microscope and analyzed with respect to their velocity, displacement distance, and processivity.

  12. Engineering Globular Protein Vesicles through Tunable Self-Assembly of Recombinant Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeongseon; Choi, Won Tae; Heller, William T; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Champion, Julie A

    2017-09-01

    Vesicles assembled from folded, globular proteins have potential for functions different from traditional lipid or polymeric vesicles. However, they also present challenges in understanding the assembly process and controlling vesicle properties. From detailed investigation of the assembly behavior of recombinant fusion proteins, this work reports a simple strategy to engineer protein vesicles containing functional, globular domains. This is achieved through tunable self-assembly of recombinant globular fusion proteins containing leucine zippers and elastin-like polypeptides. The fusion proteins form complexes in solution via high affinity binding of the zippers, and transition through dynamic coacervates to stable hollow vesicles upon warming. The thermal driving force, which can be tuned by protein concentration or temperature, controls both vesicle size and whether vesicles are single or bi-layered. These results provide critical information to engineer globular protein vesicles via self-assembly with desired size and membrane structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Network of Three Types of Filaments Organizes Synaptic Vesicles for Storage, Mobilization, and Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Andy A; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S

    2016-03-16

    Synaptic transmission between neurons requires precise management of synaptic vesicles. While individual molecular components of the presynaptic terminal are well known, exactly how the molecules are organized into a molecular machine serving the storage and mobilization of synaptic vesicles to the active zone remains unclear. Here we report three filament types associated with synaptic vesicles in glutamatergic synapses revealed by electron microscope tomography in unstimulated, dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. One filament type, likely corresponding to the SNAREpin complex, extends from the active zone membrane and surrounds docked vesicles. A second filament type contacts all vesicles throughout the active zone and pairs vesicles together. On the third filament type, vesicles attach to side branches extending from the long filament core and form vesicle clusters that are distributed throughout the vesicle cloud and along the active zone membrane. Detailed analysis of presynaptic structure reveals how each of the three filament types interacts with synaptic vesicles, providing a means to traffic reserved and recycled vesicles from the cloud of vesicles into the docking position at the active zone. The formation and release of synaptic vesicles has been extensively investigated. Explanations of the release of synaptic vesicles generally begin with the movement of vesicles from the cloud into the synaptic active zone. However, the presynaptic terminal is filled with filamentous material that would appear to limit vesicular diffusion. Here, we provide a systematic description of three filament types connecting synaptic vesicles. A picture emerges illustrating how the cooperative attachment and release of these three filament types facilitate the movement of vesicles to the active zone to become docked in preparation for release. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363222-09$15.00/0.

  14. Extracellular vesicles as new pharmacological targets to treat atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Loyer, Xavier; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular vesicles released by most cell types, include apoptotic bodies (ABs), microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. They play a crucial role in physiology and pathology, contributing to "cell-to-cell" communication by modifying the phenotype and the function of target cells. Thus, extracellular vesicles participate in the key processes of atherosclerosis from endothelial dysfunction, vascular wall inflammation to vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on extracellular vesicle formation, structure, release and clearance. We focus on the deleterious and beneficial effects of extracellular vesicles in the development of atherosclerosis. The potential role of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and pharmacological targets, their innate therapeutic capacity, or their use for novel drug delivery devices in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Placental Extracellular Vesicles and Feto-Maternal Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M.; Chamley, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. PMID:25635060

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the structural basis of neuromuscular transmission: insights from Torpedo postsynaptic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2013-11-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor, at the neuromuscular junction, is a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel that has been fine-tuned through evolution to transduce a chemical signal into an electrical signal with maximum efficiency and speed. It is composed from three similar and two identical polypeptide chains, arranged in a ring around a narrow membrane pore. Central to the design of this assembly is a hydrophobic gate in the pore, more than 50 Å away from sites in the extracellular domain where ACh binds. Although the molecular properties of the receptor have been explored intensively over the last few decades, only recently have structures emerged revealing its complex architecture and illuminating how ACh entering the binding sites opens the distant gate. Postsynaptic membranes isolated from the (muscle-derived) electric organ of the Torpedo ray have underpinned most of the structural studies: the membranes form tubular vesicles having receptors arranged on a regular surface lattice, which can be imaged directly in frozen physiological solutions. Advances in electron crystallographic techniques have also been important, enabling analysis of the closed- and open-channel forms of the receptor in unreacted tubes or tubes reacted briefly with ACh. The structural differences between these two forms show that all five subunits participate in a concerted conformational change communicating the effect of ACh binding to the gate, but that three of them (αγ, β and δ) play a dominant role. Flexing of oppositely facing pore-lining α-helices is the principal motion determining the closed/open state of the gate. These results together with the findings of biochemical, biophysical and other structural studies allow an integrated description of the receptor and of its mode of action at the synapse.

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  18. Structural classification of proteins and structural genomics: new insights into protein folding and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Antonina; Murzin, Alexey G

    2010-10-01

    During the past decade, the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) centres have become major contributors of new families, superfamilies and folds to the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database. The PSI results have increased the diversity of protein structural space and accelerated our understanding of it. This review article surveys a selection of protein structures determined by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG). It presents previously undescribed β-sheet architectures such as the double barrel and spiral β-roll and discusses new examples of unusual topologies and peculiar structural features observed in proteins characterized by the JCSG and other Structural Genomics centres.

  19. The toolbox of vesicle sidedness determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, Peter; Hoekstra, Dick; Kok, Jan Willem

    2012-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from cellular plasma membranes are widely used in science for different purposes. The outer membrane leaflet differs from the inner membrane leaflet of the vesicle, and during vesicle preparation procedures two types of vesicles will be generated: right-side-out vesicles, of which

  20. The crystal structure of a sodium galactose transporter reveals mechanistic insights into Na+/sugar symport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faham, Salem; Watanabe, Akira; Besserer, Gabriel Mercado; Cascio, Duilio; Specht, Alexandre; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M; Abramson, Jeff

    2008-08-08

    Membrane transporters that use energy stored in sodium gradients to drive nutrients into cells constitute a major class of proteins. We report the crystal structure of a member of the solute sodium symporters (SSS), the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT). The approximately 3.0 angstrom structure contains 14 transmembrane (TM) helices in an inward-facing conformation with a core structure of inverted repeats of 5 TM helices (TM2 to TM6 and TM7 to TM11). Galactose is bound in the center of the core, occluded from the outside solutions by hydrophobic residues. Surprisingly, the architecture of the core is similar to that of the leucine transporter (LeuT) from a different gene family. Modeling the outward-facing conformation based on the LeuT structure, in conjunction with biophysical data, provides insight into structural rearrangements for active transport.

  1. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Receptor-Independent Transmission of Novel Tick-Borne Bunyavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvas, Jesus A.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is a newly recognized member of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The virus was isolated from patients presenting with hemorrhagic manifestations and an initial case fatality rate of 12 to 30% was reported. Due to the recent emergence of this pathogen, there is limited knowledge on the molecular virology of SFTS virus. Recently, we reported that the SFTS virus NSs protein inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter. Furthermore, we also found that SFTS virus NSs relocalizes key components of the IFN response into NSs-induced cytoplasmic structures. Due to the important role these structures play during SFTS virus replication, we conducted live cell imaging studies to gain further insight into the role and trafficking of these cytoplasmic structures during virus infection. We found that some of the SFTS virus NSs-positive cytoplasmic structures were secreted to the extracellular space and endocytosed by neighboring cells. We also found that these secreted structures isolated from NSs-expressing cells and SFTS virus-infected cells were positive for the viral protein NSs and the host protein CD63, a protein associated with extracellular vesicles. Electron microscopy studies also revealed that the isolated CD63-immunoprecipitated extracellular vesicles produced during SFTS virus infection contained virions. The virions harbored within these structures were efficiently delivered to uninfected cells and were able to sustain SFTS virus replication. Altogether, these results suggest that SFTS virus exploits extracellular vesicles to mediate virus receptor-independent transmission to host cells and open the avenue for novel therapeutic strategies against SFTS virus and related pathogens. IMPORTANCE SFTS virus is novel bunyavirus associated with hemorrhagic fever illness. Currently, limited information is available about SFTS virus. In the present study, we demonstrated

  2. Structural insight to mutation effects uncover a common allosteric site in class C GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Boesgaard, Michael W; Munk, Christian

    2017-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate important physiological functions and allosteric modulators binding to the transmembrane domain constitute an attractive and, due to a lack of structural insight, a virtually unexplored potential for therapeutics and the food industry....... Combining pharmacological site-directed mutagenesis data with the recent class C GPCR experimental structures will provide a foundation for rational design of new therapeutics. RESULTS: We uncover one common site for both positive and negative modulators with different amino acid layouts that can...

  3. Cryo-electron microscopy snapshots of the spliceosome: structural insights into a dynamic ribonucleoprotein machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fica, Sebastian M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-05

    The spliceosome excises introns from pre-messenger RNAs using an RNA-based active site that is cradled by a dynamic protein scaffold. A recent revolution in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has led to near-atomic-resolution structures of key spliceosome complexes that provide insight into the mechanism of activation, splice site positioning, catalysis, protein rearrangements and ATPase-mediated dynamics of the active site. The cryo-EM structures rationalize decades of observations from genetic and biochemical studies and provide a molecular framework for future functional studies.

  4. Asymmetric osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Zhao, Yunzhen; Fang, Chang; Shi, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the water permeation through a cell membrane is of primary importance for biological activities and a key step to capture its shape transformation in salt solution. In this work, we reveal the dynamical behaviors of osmotically driven transport of water molecules across a vesicle membrane by molecular dynamics simulations. Of particular interest is that the water transport in and out of vesicles is highly distinguishable given the osmotic force are the same, suggesting an asymmetric osmotic transportation. This asymmetric phenomenon exists in a broad range of parameter space such as the salt concentration, temperature, and vesicle size and can be ascribed to the similar asymmetric potential energy of lipid-ion, lipid-water, lipid-solution, lipid-lipid, and the lipid-lipid energy fluctuation. Specifically, the water flux has a linear increase with the salt concentration, similar to the prediction by Nernst-Planck equation or Fick's first law. Furthermore, due to the Arrhenius relation between the membrane permeability and temperature, the water flux also exhibits excellent Arrhenius dependence on the temperature. Meanwhile, the water flux shows a linear increase with the vesicle surface area since the flux amount across a unit membrane area should be a constant. Finally, we also present the anonymous diffusion behaviors for the vesicle itself, where transitions from normal diffusion at short times to subdiffusion at long times are identified. Our results provide significant new physical insights for the osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane and are helpful for future experimental studies.

  5. Biogenesis and function of ESCRT-dependent extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Thomas; Fürthauer, Maximilian

    2018-02-01

    From bacteria to humans, cells secrete a large variety of membrane-bound extracellular vesicles. Only relatively recently has it however started to become clear that the exovesicular transport of proteins and RNAs is important for normal physiology and numerous pathological conditions. Extracellular vesicles can be formed through the release of the intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes as so-called exosomes, or through direct, ectosomal, budding from the cell surface. Through their ability to promote the bending of membranes away from the cytoplasm, the components of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) have been implicated in both exo- and ectosomal biogenesis. Studies of the ESCRT machinery may therefore provide important insights into the formation and function of extracellular vesicles. In the present review, we first describe the cell biological mechanisms through which ESCRT components contribute to the biogenesis of different types of extracellular vesicles. We then discuss how recent functional studies have started to uncover important roles of ESCRT-dependent extracellular vesicles in a wide variety of processes, including the transport of developmental signaling molecules and embryonic morphogenesis, the regulation of social behavior and host-pathogen interactions, as well as the etiology and progression of neurodegenerative pathologies and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. RIM1α SUMOylation Is Required for Fast Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Girach

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid, activity-dependent quantal presynaptic release of neurotransmitter is vital for brain function. The complex process of vesicle priming, fusion, and retrieval is very precisely controlled and requires the spatiotemporal coordination of multiple protein-protein interactions. Here, we show that posttranslational modification of the active zone protein Rab3-interacting molecule 1α (RIM1α by the small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1 functions as a molecular switch to direct these interactions and is essential for fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. RIM1α SUMOylation at lysine residue K502 facilitates the clustering of CaV2.1 calcium channels and enhances the Ca2+ influx necessary for vesicular release, whereas non-SUMOylated RIM1α participates in the docking/priming of synaptic vesicles and maintenance of active zone structure. These results demonstrate that SUMOylation of RIM1α is a key determinant of rapid, synchronous neurotransmitter release, and the SUMO-mediated “switching” of RIM1α between binding proteins provides insight into the mechanisms underpinning synaptic function and dysfunction.

  7. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  8. Structural and kinetic insights into the mechanism of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The crystal structure of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from K. pneumoniae and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the native enzyme as well as several mutants provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme and the possible roles of the active-site residues. The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin has recently been demonstrated to proceed via two unstable intermediates and requires three separate enzymatic reactions. The second step of this reaction, the conversion of 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline, is catalyzed by HIU hydrolase (HIUH). The high-resolution crystal structure of HIUH from the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpHIUH) has been determined. KpHIUH is a homotetrameric protein that, based on sequence and structural similarity, belongs to the transthyretin-related protein family. In addition, the steady-state kinetic parameters for this enzyme and four active-site mutants have been measured. These data provide valuable insight into the functional roles of the active-site residues. Based upon the structural and kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed for the KpHIUH-catalyzed reaction.

  9. Structure of Human GIVD Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Reveals Insights into Substrate Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Klein, Michael G.; Snell, Gyorgy; Lane, Weston; Zou, Hua; Levin, Irena; Li, Ke; Sang, Bi-Ching (Takeda Cali)

    2016-07-01

    Cytosolic phospholipases A2 (cPLA2s) consist of a family of calcium-sensitive enzymes that function to generate lipid second messengers through hydrolysis of membrane-associated glycerophospholipids. The GIVD cPLA2 (cPLA2δ) is a potential drug target for developing a selective therapeutic agent for the treatment of psoriasis. Here, we present two X-ray structures of human cPLA2δ, capturing an apo state, and in complex with a substrate-like inhibitor. Comparison of the apo and inhibitor-bound structures reveals conformational changes in a flexible cap that allows the substrate to access the relatively buried active site, providing new insight into the mechanism for substrate recognition. The cPLA2δ structure reveals an unexpected second C2 domain that was previously unrecognized from sequence alignments, placing cPLA2δ into the class of membrane-associated proteins that contain a tandem pair of C2 domains. Furthermore, our structures elucidate novel inter-domain interactions and define three potential calcium-binding sites that are likely important for regulation and activation of enzymatic activity. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing cPLA2's function in signal transduction.

  10. Rapid synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cone photoreceptors of salamander retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    Following synaptic vesicle exocytosis, neurons retrieve the fused membrane by a process of endocytosis in order to provide a supply of vesicles for subsequent release and maintain the presynaptic active zone. Rod and cone photoreceptors use a specialized structure called the synaptic ribbon that enables them to sustain high rates of neurotransmitter release. They must also employ mechanisms of synaptic vesicle endocytosis capable of keeping up with release. While much is known about endocytosis at another retinal ribbon synapse, that of the goldfish Mb1 bipolar cell, less is known about endocytosis in photoreceptors. We used capacitance recording techniques to measure vesicle membrane fusion and retrieval in photoreceptors from salamander retinal slices. We found that application of brief depolarizing steps (endocytosis with a time constant ~250 ms. In some cases, the capacitance trace overshot the baseline, indicating excess endocytosis. Calcium had no effect on the time constant, but enhanced excess endocytosis resulting in a faster rate of membrane retrieval. Surprisingly, endocytosis was unaffected by blockers of dynamin, suggesting that cone endocytosis is dynamin-independent. This contrasts with synaptic vesicle endocytosis in rods, which was inhibited by the dynamin inhibitor dynasore and GTPγS introduced through the patch pipette, suggesting that the two photoreceptor types employ distinct pathways for vesicle retrieval. The fast kinetics of synaptic vesicle endocytosis in photoreceptors likely enables these cells to maintain a high rate of transmitter release, allowing them to faithfully signal changes in illumination to second-order neurons. PMID:23238726

  11. Structural and kinetic insights into the mechanism of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell)

    2011-07-19

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin has recently been demonstrated to proceed via two unstable intermediates and requires three separate enzymatic reactions. The second step of this reaction, the conversion of 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline, is catalyzed by HIU hydrolase (HIUH). The high-resolution crystal structure of HIUH from the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpHIUH) has been determined. KpHIUH is a homotetrameric protein that, based on sequence and structural similarity, belongs to the transthyretin-related protein family. In addition, the steady-state kinetic parameters for this enzyme and four active-site mutants have been measured. These data provide valuable insight into the functional roles of the active-site residues. Based upon the structural and kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed for the KpHIUH-catalyzed reaction.

  12. Crystal structure of a claudin provides insight into the architecture of tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Tani, Kazutoshi; Yamazaki, Yuji; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Tsukita, Sachiko; Nureki, Osamu; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2014-04-18

    Tight junctions are cell-cell adhesion structures in epithelial cell sheets that surround organ compartments in multicellular organisms and regulate the permeation of ions through the intercellular space. Claudins are the major constituents of tight junctions and form strands that mediate cell adhesion and function as paracellular barriers. We report the structure of mammalian claudin-15 at a resolution of 2.4 angstroms. The structure reveals a characteristic β-sheet fold comprising two extracellular segments, which is anchored to a transmembrane four-helix bundle by a consensus motif. Our analyses suggest potential paracellular pathways with distinctive charges on the extracellular surface, providing insight into the molecular basis of ion homeostasis across tight junctions.

  13. The Vesicle Priming Factor CAPS Functions as a Homodimer via C2 Domain Interactions to Promote Regulated Vesicle Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Matt; Esquibel, Joseph; Kabachinski, Greg; Maciuba, Stephanie; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J Michael; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-09-30

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted by regulated vesicle exocytosis. CAPS (also known as CADPS) is a 145-kDa cytosolic and peripheral membrane protein required for vesicle docking and priming steps that precede Ca 2+ -triggered vesicle exocytosis. CAPS binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) and SNARE proteins and is proposed to promote SNARE protein complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. We characterized purified soluble CAPS as mainly monomer in equilibrium with small amounts of dimer. However, the active form of CAPS bound to PC12 cell membranes or to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P 2 and Q-SNARE proteins was mainly dimer. CAPS dimer formation required its C2 domain based on mutation or deletion studies. Moreover, C2 domain mutations or deletions resulted in a loss of CAPS function in regulated vesicle exocytosis, indicating that dimerization is essential for CAPS function. Comparison of the CAPS C2 domain to a structurally defined Munc13-1 C2A domain dimer revealed conserved residues involved in CAPS dimerization. We conclude that CAPS functions as a C2 domain-mediated dimer in regulated vesicle exocytosis. The unique tandem C2-PH domain of CAPS may serve as a PI(4,5)P 2 -triggered switch for dimerization. CAPS dimerization may be coupled to oligomeric SNARE complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Terminal complexes of the complement system: new structural insights and their relevance to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Bryan Paul; Walters, David; Serna, Marina; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-11-01

    Complement is a key component of innate immunity in health and a powerful driver of inflammation and tissue injury in disease. The biological and pathological effects of complement activation are mediated by activation products. These come in two flavors: (i) proteolytic fragments of complement proteins (C3, C4, C5) generated during activation that bind specific receptors on target cells to mediate effects; (ii) the multimolecular membrane attack complex generated from the five terminal complement proteins that directly binds to and penetrates target cell membranes. Several recent publications have described structural insights that have changed perceptions of the nature of this membrane attack complex. This review will describe these recent advances in understanding of the structure of the membrane attack complex and its by-product the fluid-phase terminal complement complex and relate these new structural insights to functional consequences and cell responses to complement membrane attack. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Structural insights into the mycobacteria transcription initiation complex from analysis of X-ray crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Lilic, Mirjana; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2017-07-13

    The mycobacteria RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a target for antimicrobials against tuberculosis, motivating structure/function studies. Here we report a 3.2 Å-resolution crystal structure of a Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) open promoter complex (RPo), along with structural analysis of the Msm RPo and a previously reported 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of an Msm transcription initiation complex with a promoter DNA fragment. We observe the interaction of the Msm RNAP α-subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) with DNA, and we provide evidence that the αCTD may play a role in Mtb transcription regulation. Our results reveal the structure of an Actinobacteria-unique insert of the RNAP β' subunit. Finally, our analysis reveals the disposition of the N-terminal segment of Msm σA, which may comprise an intrinsically disordered protein domain unique to mycobacteria. The clade-specific features of the mycobacteria RNAP provide clues to the profound instability of mycobacteria RPo compared with E. coli.

  16. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S. [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schreiber, Kathrin [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Becker, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Usón, Isabel [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB–CSIC), Barcelona Science Park, Baldiri Reixach 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de; Steinfeld, Robert, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  17. Mutations in the major gas vesicle protein GvpA and impacts on gas vesicle formation in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knitsch, Regine; Schneefeld, Marie; Weitzel, Kerstin; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2017-09-12

    Gas vesicles are proteinaceous, gas-filled nanostructures produced by some bacteria and archaea. The hydrophobic major structural protein GvpA forms the ribbed gas vesicle wall. An in-silico 3D-model of GvpA of the predicted coil-α1-β1-β2-α2-coil structure is available and implies that the two β-chains constitute the hydrophobic interior surface of the gas vesicle wall. To test the importance of individual amino acids in GvpA we performed 85 single substitutions and analyzed these variants in Haloferax volcanii ΔA + Amut transformants for their ability to form gas vesicles (Vac(+) phenotype). In most cases, an alanine substitution of a non-polar residue did not abolish gas vesicle formation, but the replacement of single non-polar by charged residues in β1 or β2 resulted in Vac(-) transformants. A replacement of residues near the β-turn altered the spindle-shape to a cylindrical morphology of the gas vesicles. Vac(-) transformants were also obtained with alanine substitutions of charged residues of helix α1 suggesting that these amino acids form salt-bridges with another GvpA monomer. In helix α2, only the alanine substitution of His53 or Tyr54, led to Vac(-) transformants, whereas most other substitutions had no effect. We discuss our results in respect to the GvpA structure and data available from solid-state NMR. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Structural insight into host recognition by aggregative adherence fimbriae of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A Berry

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC is a leading cause of acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide. A recently emerged Shiga-toxin-producing strain of EAEC resulted in significant mortality and morbidity due to progressive development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The attachment of EAEC to the human intestinal mucosa is mediated by aggregative adherence fimbria (AAF. Using X-ray crystallography and NMR structures, we present new atomic resolution insight into the structure of AAF variant I from the strain that caused the deadly outbreak in Germany in 2011, and AAF variant II from archetype strain 042, and propose a mechanism for AAF-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Our work shows that major subunits of AAF assemble into linear polymers by donor strand complementation where a single minor subunit is inserted at the tip of the polymer by accepting the donor strand from the terminal major subunit. Whereas the minor subunits of AAF have a distinct conserved structure, AAF major subunits display large structural differences, affecting the overall pilus architecture. These structures suggest a mechanism for AAF-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Binding experiments using wild type and mutant subunits (NMR and SPR and bacteria (ELISA revealed that despite the structural differences AAF recognize a common receptor, fibronectin, by employing clusters of basic residues at the junction between subunits in the pilus. We show that AAF-fibronectin attachment is based primarily on electrostatic interactions, a mechanism not reported previously for bacterial adhesion to biotic surfaces.

  19. Large Deformation Mechanics of Plasma Membrane Chained Vesicles in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosawada, Tadashi; Sanada, Kouichi; Takano, Tetsuo

    The clathrin-coated pits, vesicles and chained vesicles on the inner surface of the plasma membrane facilitate the cell to transport specific extracellular macromolecules. This cellular process is strongly involved with large mechanical deformations of the plasma membrane accompanied by changes in membrane curvature. The assembly of the clathrin coat is thought to provide curvature into the membrane. Hence, effects of in-plane shear elasticity due to these coat structure may be significant on the vesicular mechanics. In this study, large deformation mechanics of plasma membrane chained vesicles in cells have been formulated based on minimization of bending and in-plane shear strain energy of the membrane. Effects of outer surrounding cytoplasmic flat membrane upon mechanically stable shapes of the vesicles were revealed, while effects of in-plane shear elasticity were partly discussed.

  20. Crystal Structures of Human and Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase and Molecular Insights into the Carboxyltransfer Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang,S.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the biotin-dependent production of oxaloacetate and has important roles in gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, insulin secretion and other cellular processes. PC contains the biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains. We report here the crystal structures at 2.8-Angstroms resolution of full-length PC from Staphylococcus aureus and the C-terminal region (missing only the BC domain) of human PC. A conserved tetrameric association is observed for both enzymes, and our structural and mutagenesis studies reveal a previously uncharacterized domain, the PC tetramerization (PT) domain, which is important for oligomerization. A BCCP domain is located in the active site of the CT domain, providing the first molecular insights into how biotin participates in the carboxyltransfer reaction. There are dramatic differences in domain positions in the monomer and the organization of the tetramer between these enzymes and the PC from Rhizobium etli.

  1. New insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the etiological agent of fatal neurodegenerative diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious disorders. Prions are due to post-translational modifications of the cellular prion protein leading to the formation of a β-sheet enriched conformer with altered biochemical properties. The molecular events causing prion formation in sporadic prion diseases are still elusive. Recently, we published a research elucidating the contribution of major structural determinants and environmental factors in prion protein folding and stability. Our study highlighted the crucial role of octarepeats in stabilizing prion protein; the presence of a highly enthalpically stable intermediate state in prion-susceptible species; and the role of disulfide bridge in preserving native fold thus avoiding the misfolding to a β-sheet enriched isoform. Taking advantage from these findings, in this work we present new insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

  2. Structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of myasthenia gravis and their therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noridomi, Kaori; Watanabe, Go; Hansen, Melissa N.; Han, Gye Won; Chen, Lin (USC)

    2017-04-25

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a major target of autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disease that causes neuromuscular transmission dysfunction. Despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms underlying MG have not been fully elucidated. Here, we present the crystal structure of the nAChR α1 subunit bound by the Fab fragment of mAb35, a reference monoclonal antibody that causes experimental MG and competes with ~65% of antibodies from MG patients. Our structures reveal for the first time the detailed molecular interactions between MG antibodies and a core region on nAChR α1. These structures suggest a major nAChR-binding mechanism shared by a large number of MG antibodies and the possibility to treat MG by blocking this binding mechanism. Structure-based modeling also provides insights into antibody-mediated nAChR cross-linking known to cause receptor degradation. Our studies establish a structural basis for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic development of MG.

  3. Crystal structure of EHEC intimin: insights into the complementarity between EPEC and EHEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yi

    Full Text Available Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7 is a primary food-borne bacterial pathogen capable of causing life-threatening human infections which poses a serious challenge to public health worldwide. Intimin, the bacterial outer-membrane protein, plays a key role in the initiating process of EHEC infection. This activity is dependent upon translocation of the intimin receptor (Tir, the intimin binding partner of the bacteria-encoded host cell surface protein. Intimin has attracted considerable attention due to its potential function as an antibacterial drug target. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Tir-binding domain of intimin (Int188 from E. coli O157:H7 at 2.8 Å resolution, together with a mutant (IntN916Y at 2.6 Å. We also built the structural model of EHEC intimin-Tir complex and analyzed the key binding residues. It suggested that the binding pattern of intimin and Tir between EHEC and Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC adopt a similar mode and they can complement with each other. Detailed structural comparison indicates that there are four major points of structural variations between EHEC and EPEC intimins: one in Domain I (Ig-like domain, the other three located in Domain II (C-type lectin-like domain. These variations result in different binding affinities. These findings provide structural insight into the binding pattern of intimin to Tir and the molecular mechanism of EHEC O157: H7.

  4. Cortical Structural Connectivity Alterations in Primary Insomnia: Insights from MRI-Based Morphometric Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and maintenance of insomnia are proposed to be associated with increased cognitive and physiological arousal caused by acute stressors and associated cognitive rumination. A core feature of such hyperarousal theory of insomnia involves increased sensory processing that interferes with the onset and maintenance of sleep. In this work, we collected structural magnetic resonance imaging data from 35 patients with primary insomnia and 35 normal sleepers and applied structural covariance analysis to investigate whether insomnia is associated with disruptions in structural brain networks centered at the sensory regions (primary visual, primary auditory, and olfactory cortex. As expected, insomnia patients showed increased structural covariance in cortical thickness between sensory and motor regions. We also observed trends of increased covariance between sensory regions and the default-mode network, and the salience network regions, and trends of decreased covariance between sensory regions and the frontoparietal working memory network regions, in insomnia patients. The observed changes in structural covariance tended to correlated with poor sleep quality. Our findings support previous functional neuroimaging studies and provide novel insights into variations in brain network configuration that may be involved in the pathophysiology of insomnia.

  5. An Insight into the Pharmacophores of Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors from Synthetic and Crystal Structural Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen,G.; Wang, H.; Robinson, H.; Cai, J.; Wan, Y.; Ke, H.

    2008-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) have been used as drugs for treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. An insight into the pharmacophores of PDE5 inhibitors is essential for development of second generation of PDE5 inhibitors, but has not been completely illustrated. Here we report the synthesis of a new class of the sildenafil derivatives and a crystal structure of the PDE5 catalytic domain in complex with 5-(2-ethoxy-5-(sulfamoyl)-3-thienyl)-1-methyl-3-propyl-1, 6-dihydro-7H-pyrazolo[4, 3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (12). Inhibitor 12 induces conformational change of the H-loop (residues 660-683), which is different from any of the known PDE5 structures. The pyrazolopyrimidinone groups of 12 and sildenafil are well superimposed, but their sulfonamide groups show a positional difference of as much as 1.5 Angstroms . The structure-activity analysis suggests that a small hydrophobic pocket and the H-loop of PDE5 are important for the inhibitor affinity, in addition to two common elements for binding of almost all the PDE inhibitors: the stack against the phenylalanine and the hydrogen bond with the invariant glutamine. However, the PDE5-12 structure does not provide a full explanation to affinity changes of the inhibitors. Thus alternatives such as conformational change of the M-loop are open and further structural study is required.

  6. Crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana provides insights into its product specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Wenhe; Liu, Zihe; Xie, Yongchao; Wang, Hao; Mu, Yajuan; Huang, Yao; Feng, Yue

    2016-09-16

    Specifier proteins are important components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, which mediate plant defense against herbivory and pathogen attacks. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed to instable aglucones by myrosinases, and then aglucones will rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. Specifier proteins can redirect this reaction to form other products, such as simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates instead of isothiocyanates based on the side chain structure of glucosinolate and the type of the specifier proteins. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the different product spectrums of various specifier proteins was not fully understood. Here in this study, we solved the crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtESP) at 2.3 Å resolution. Structural comparisons with the previously solved structure of thiocyanate forming protein, TFP from Thlaspi arvense (TaTFP) reveal that AtESP shows a dimerization pattern different from TaTFP. Moreover, AtESP harbors a slightly larger active site pocket than TaTFP and several residues around the active site are different between the two proteins, which might account for the different product spectrums of the two proteins. Together, our structural study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms of specifier proteins and shed light on the basis of their different product spectrums. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Insights into the Mechanism of Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases from Structures of Reaction Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon (NWU); (UIC)

    2012-02-27

    The biosynthetic shikimate pathway consists of seven enzymes that catalyze sequential reactions to generate chorismate, a critical branch point in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids. The third enzyme in the pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD), catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate to 3-dehydroshikimate. We present three crystal structures of the type I DHQD from the intestinal pathogens Clostridium difficile and Salmonella enterica. Structures of the enzyme with substrate and covalent pre- and post-dehydration reaction intermediates provide snapshots of successive steps along the type I DHQD-catalyzed reaction coordinate. These structures reveal that the position of the substrate within the active site does not appreciably change upon Schiff base formation. The intermediate state structures reveal a reaction state-dependent behavior of His-143 in which the residue adopts a conformation proximal to the site of catalytic dehydration only when the leaving group is present. We speculate that His-143 is likely to assume differing catalytic roles in each of its observed conformations. One conformation of His-143 positions the residue for the formation/hydrolysis of the covalent Schiff base intermediates, whereas the other conformation positions the residue for a role in the catalytic dehydration event. The fact that the shikimate pathway is absent from humans makes the enzymes of the pathway potential targets for the development of non-toxic antimicrobials. The structures and mechanistic insight presented here may inform the design of type I DHQD enzyme inhibitors.

  8. Structural conversion of the transformer protein RfaH: new insights derived from protein structure prediction and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasco, Nicole; Barone, Daniela; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Recent structural investigations have shown that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the transcription factor RfaH undergoes unique structural modifications that have a profound impact into its functional properties. These modifications cause a complete change in RfaH(CTD) topology that converts from an α-hairpin to a β-barrel fold. To gain insights into the determinants of this major structural conversion, we here performed computational studies (protein structure prediction and molecular dynamics simulations) on RfaH(CTD). Although these analyses, in line with literature data, suggest that the isolated RfaH(CTD) has a strong preference for the β-barrel fold, they also highlight that a specific region of the protein is endowed with a chameleon conformational behavior. In particular, the Leu-rich region (residues 141-145) has a good propensity to adopt both α-helical and β-structured states. Intriguingly, in the RfaH homolog NusG, whose CTD uniquely adopts the β-barrel fold, the corresponding region is rich in residues as Val or Ile that present a strong preference for the β-structure. On this basis, we suggest that the presence of this Leu-rich element in RfaH(CTD) may be responsible for the peculiar structural behavior of the domain. The analysis of the sequences of RfaH family (PfamA code PF02357) unraveled that other members potentially share the structural properties of RfaH(CTD). These observations suggest that the unusual conformational behavior of RfaH(CTD) may be rare but not unique.

  9. Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Bei, Yihua; Das, Saumya; Rodosthenous, Rodosthenis S.; Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Monteiro,Marta Chagas; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Radosinska, Jana; Bartekova, Monika; Jansen, Felix; Li, Qian; Rajasingh, Johnson; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small bilayer lipid membrane vesicles that can be released by most cell types and detected in most body fluids. EVs exert key functions for intercellular communication via transferring their bioactive cargos to recipient cells or activating signaling pathways in target cells. Increasing evidence has shown the important regulatory effects of EVs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). EVs secreted by cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem cells pla...

  10. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Extracellular Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bin; Yin, Yijun; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicle or EV is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes, the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized...

  11. RNA in extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Mustapic, Maja; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Gorospe, Myriam

    2017-07-01

    Cells release a range of membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the environment. Among them, exosomes and microvesicles (collectively measuring 40-1000 nm in diameter) carry proteins, signaling lipids, and nucleic acids from donor cells to recipient cells, and thus have been proposed to serve as intercellular mediators of communication. EVs transport cellular materials in many physiologic processes, including differentiation, stem cell homeostasis, immune responses, and neuronal signaling. EVs are also increasingly recognized as having a direct role in pathologies such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Accordingly, EVs have been the focus of intense investigation as biomarkers of disease, prognostic indicators, and even therapeutic tools. Here, we review the classes of RNAs present in EVs, both coding RNAs (messenger RNAs) and noncoding RNAs (long noncoding RNAs, microRNAs, and circular RNAs). The rising attention to EV-resident RNAs as biomarkers stems from the fact that RNAs can be detected at extremely low quantities using a number of methods. To illustrate the interest in EV biology, we discuss EV RNAs in cancer and neurodegeneration, two major age-associated disease processes. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1413. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1413 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Neurocognition, insight and medication nonadherence in schizophrenia: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Boyer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the complex relationships among neurocognition, insight and nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Diagnosis of schizophrenia according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria. DATA COLLECTION: Neurocognition was assessed using a global approach that addressed memory, attention, and executive functions; insight was analyzed using the multidimensional 'Scale to assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder;' and nonadherence was measured using the multidimensional 'Medication Adherence Rating Scale.' ANALYSIS: Structural equation modeling (SEM was applied to examine the non-straightforward relationships among the following latent variables: neurocognition, 'awareness of positive symptoms' and 'negative symptoms', 'awareness of mental disorder' and nonadherence. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were enrolled. The final testing model showed good fit, with normed χ(2 = 1.67, RMSEA = 0.063, CFI = 0.94, and SRMR = 0.092. The SEM revealed significant associations between (1 neurocognition and 'awareness of symptoms,' (2 'awareness of symptoms' and 'awareness of mental disorder' and (3 'awareness of mental disorder' and nonadherence, mainly in the 'attitude toward taking medication' dimension. In contrast, there were no significant links between neurocognition and nonadherence, neurocognition and 'awareness of mental disorder,' and 'awareness of symptoms' and nonadherence. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the hypothesis that neurocognition influences 'awareness of symptoms,' which must be integrated into a higher level of insight (i.e., the 'awareness of mental disorder' to have an impact on nonadherence. These findings have important implications for the development of effective strategies to enhance medication adherence.

  13. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomatto, Margherita A C; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  15. Structure of human POFUT2: insights into thrombospondin type 1 repeat fold and O-fucosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-I; Keusch, Jeremy J; Klein, Dominique; Hess, Daniel; Hofsteenge, Jan; Gut, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Protein O-fucosylation is a post-translational modification found on serine/threonine residues of thrombospondin type 1 repeats (TSR). The fucose transfer is catalysed by the enzyme protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (POFUT2) and >40 human proteins contain the TSR consensus sequence for POFUT2-dependent fucosylation. To better understand O-fucosylation on TSR, we carried out a structural and functional analysis of human POFUT2 and its TSR substrate. Crystal structures of POFUT2 reveal a variation of the classical GT-B fold and identify sugar donor and TSR acceptor binding sites. Structural findings are correlated with steady-state kinetic measurements of wild-type and mutant POFUT2 and TSR and give insight into the catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity. By using an artificial mini-TSR substrate, we show that specificity is not primarily encoded in the TSR protein sequence but rather in the unusual 3D structure of a small part of the TSR. Our findings uncover that recognition of distinct conserved 3D fold motifs can be used as a mechanism to achieve substrate specificity by enzymes modifying completely folded proteins of very wide sequence diversity and biological function. PMID:22588082

  16. Structural insights into binding of small molecule inhibitors to Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinić, Marko; Zloh, Mire; Erić, Slavica

    2014-11-01

    Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is a SET domain protein lysine methyltransferase (PKMT) which has recently emerged as a chemically tractable and therapeutically promising epigenetic target, evidenced by the discovery and characterization of potent and highly selective EZH2 inhibitors. However, no experimental structures of the inhibitors co-crystallized to EZH2 have been resolved, and the structural basis for their activity and selectivity remains unknown. Considering the need to minimize cross-reactivity between prospective PKMT inhibitors, much can be learned from understanding the molecular basis for selective inhibition of EZH2. Thus, to elucidate the binding of small-molecule inhibitors to EZH2, we have developed a model of its fully-formed cofactor binding site and used it to carry out molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand complexes, followed by molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area calculations. The obtained results are in good agreement with biochemical inhibition data and reflect the structure-activity relationships of known ligands. Our findings suggest that the variable and flexible post-SET domain plays an important role in inhibitor binding, allowing possibly distinct binding modes of inhibitors with only small variations in their structure. Insights from this study present a good basis for design of novel and optimization of existing compounds targeting the cofactor binding site of EZH2.

  17. Insights into the aggregation/deposition and structure of a polydopamine film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yonghui; Weng, Lu-Tao; Yang, Meng; Yang, Zhilu; Lu, Xiong; Huang, Nan; Leng, Yang

    2014-10-21

    Surface-adherent polydopamine (PDA) films as multifunctional coatings can be easily deposited onto a wide range of materials through dopamine self-polymerization. However, a lack of in-depth understanding of PDA aggregation and deposition processes and definite structure elucidation of PDA make it challenging to tailor the surface characteristic and functionality of the PDA films. Herein, we demonstrate that the surface characteristics of the PDA films can be readily tuned by controlling the competitive interplay between PDA aggregation in solution and deposition on the substrate. Moreover, a structural investigation of the PDA films using analytical tools such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) allows us to propose a new structure model for the PDA building block. The (DHI)2/PCA trimer complex, which consists of two 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) units and one pyrrolecarboxylic acid (PCA) moiety, is definitely identified as a primary building block of PDA, and its formation is steered by covalent interactions in the initial stages of polymerization. In latter stages, the (DHI)2/PCA trimer complexes are further linked primarily through noncovalent interactions to build up the supramolecular structure of PDA. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of PDA buildup.

  18. Enhanced dewaterability of sludge during anaerobic digestion with thermal hydrolysis pretreatment: New insights through structure evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingsi; Li, Ning; Dai, Xiaohu; Tao, Wenquan; Jenkinson, Ian R; Li, Zhuo

    2017-12-19

    Comprehensive insights into the sludge digestate dewaterability were gained through porous network structure of sludge. We measured the evolution of digestate dewaterability, represented by the solid content of centrifugally dewatered cake, in high-solids sequencing batch digesters with and without thermal hydrolysis pretreatment (THP). The results show that the dewaterability of the sludge after digestion was improved by 3.5% (±0.5%) for unpretreated sludge and 5.1% (±0.4%) for thermally hydrolyzed sludge. Compared to the unpretreated sludge digestate, thermal hydrolysis pretreatment eventually resulted in an improvement of dewaterability by 4.6% (±0.5%). Smaller particle size and larger surface area of sludge were induced by thermal hydrolysis and anaerobic digestion treatments. The structure strength and compactness of sludge, represented by elastic modulus and fractal dimension respectively, decreased with increase of digestion time. The porous network structure was broken up by thermal hydrolysis pretreatment and was further weakened during anaerobic digestion, which correspondingly improved the dewaterability of digestates. The logarithm of elastic modulus increased linearly with fractal dimension regardless of the pretreatment. Both fractal dimension and elastic modulus showed linear relationship with dewaterability. The rheological characterization combined with the analysis of fractal dimension of sewage sludge porous network structure was found applicable in quantitative evaluation of sludge dewaterability, which depended positively on both thermal hydrolysis and anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel insights through the integration of structural and functional genomics data with protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Declan; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Gerstein, Mark B

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, major advances in genomics, proteomics, macromolecular structure determination, and the computational resources capable of processing and disseminating the large volumes of data generated by each have played major roles in advancing a more systems-oriented appreciation of biological organization. One product of systems biology has been the delineation of graph models for describing genome-wide protein-protein interaction networks. The network organization and topology which emerges in such models may be used to address fundamental questions in an array of cellular processes, as well as biological features intrinsic to the constituent proteins (or "nodes") themselves. However, graph models alone constitute an abstraction which neglects the underlying biological and physical reality that the network's nodes and edges are highly heterogeneous entities. Here, we explore some of the advantages of introducing a protein structural dimension to such models, as the marriage of conventional network representations with macromolecular structural data helps to place static node and edge constructs in a biologically more meaningful context. We emphasize that 3D protein structures constitute a valuable conceptual and predictive framework by discussing examples of the insights provided, such as enabling in silico predictions of protein-protein interactions, providing rational and compelling classification schemes for network elements, as well as revealing interesting intrinsic differences between distinct node types, such as disorder and evolutionary features, which may then be rationalized in light of their respective functions within networks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deformation analysis of vesicles in an alternating-current electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu-Gang; Liu, Ying; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-08-01

    In this paper the shape equation for axisymmetric vesicles subjected to an ac electric field is derived on the basis of the liquid-crystal model. The equilibrium morphology of a lipid vesicle is determined by the minimization of its free energy in coupled mechanical and ac electric fields. Besides elastic bending, the effects of the osmotic pressure difference, surface tension, Maxwell pressure, and flexoelectric and dielectric properties of phospholipid membrane as well are taken into account. The influences of elastic bending, osmotic pressure difference, and surface tension on the frequency-dependent behavior of a vesicle membrane in an ac electric field are examined. The singularity of the ac electric field is also investigated. Our theoretical results of vesicle deformation agree well with previous experimental and numerical results. The present study provides insights into the physical mechanisms underpinning the frequency-dependent morphological evolution of vesicles in the electric and mechanical fields.

  1. Induced structural changes of humic acid by exposure of polystyrene microplastics: A spectroscopic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Ouyang, Zhen-Yu; Qian, Chen; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-10-16

    The occurrence of microplastics (MPs) as emerging contaminants in the environment may cause changes in water or sediment characteristics, and further affect their biogeochemical cycles. Thus, insights into the interactions between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and MPs are essential for the assessment of environmental impacts of MPs in ecosystems. Integrating spectroscopic methods with chemometric analyses, this work explored the chemical and microstructural changes of DOM-MP complex to reveal the mechanism of DOM-MP interaction at a molecular level. MPs were found to interact with the aromatic structure of DOM via π-π conjugation, then be entrapped in the DOM polymers by the carboxyl groups and C=O bonds, constituting a highly conjugated co-polymer with increased electron density. This induced the fluorescence intensity increase in DOM. The interaction affinity of DOM-MP was highly dependent on the MP size and solution pH. This work offers a new insight into the impact of MP discharge on environment and may provide an analytical framework for evaluating MP hetero-aggregation and the roles of MPs in the transportation of other contaminants. Furthermore, the integrated methods used in this work exhibit potential applications in exploring the fragmentation processes of MPs and formation of secondary MPs under natural conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Formation of asymmetric vesicles via phospholipase D-mediated transphosphatidylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Rina; Kurosaki, Haruko; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Keisuke; Nakano, Minoru

    2018-02-01

    Most biomembranes have an asymmetric structure with regard to phospholipid distribution between the inner and outer leaflets of the lipid bilayers. Control of the asymmetric distribution plays a pivotal role in several cellular functions such as intracellular membrane fusion and cell division. The mechanism by which membrane asymmetry and its alteration function in these transformation processes is not yet clear. To understand the significance of membrane asymmetry on trafficking and metabolism of intracellular vesicular components, a system that experimentally reproduces the asymmetric nature of biomembranes is essential. Here, we succeeded in obtaining asymmetric vesicles by means of transphosphatidylation reactions with phospholipase D (PLD), which acts exclusively on phosphatidylcholine (PC) present in the outer leaflet of vesicles. By treating PC vesicles with PLD in the presence of 1.7M serine and 0.3M ethanolamine, we obtained asymmetric vesicles that are topologically similar to intracellular vesicles containing phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine in the cytosolic leaflet. PLD and other unwanted compounds could be removed by trypsin digestion followed by dialysis. Our established technique has a great advantage over conventional methods in that asymmetric vesicles can be provided at high yield and high efficiency, which is requisite for most physicochemical assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I Structure: Insights into HDL Formation and Atherosclerosis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaohu; Atkinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is the major protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and plays an important role during the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Knowledge of the high-resolution structure of full-length apoA-I is vital for a molecular understanding of the function of HDL at the various steps of the RCT pathway. Due to the flexible nature of apoA-I and aggregation properties, the structure of full-length lipid-free apoA-I has evaded description for over three decades. Sequence analysis of apoA-I suggested that the amphipathic α-helix is the structural motif of exchangeable apolipoprotein, and NMR, X-ray and MD simulation studies have confirmed this. Different laboratories have used different methods to probe the secondary structure distribution and organization of both the lipid-free and lipid-bound apoA-I structure. Mutation analysis, synthetic peptide models, surface chemistry and crystal structures have converged on the lipid-free apoA-I domain structure and function: the N-terminal domain [1–184] forms a helix bundle while the C-terminal domain [185–243] mostly lacks defined structure and is responsible for initiating lipid-binding, aggregation and is also involved in cholesterol efflux. The first 43 residues of apoA-I are essential to stabilize the lipid-free structure. In addition, the crystal structure of C-terminally truncated apoA-I suggests a monomer-dimer conversation mechanism mediated through helix 5 reorganization and dimerization during the formation of HDL. Based on previous research, we have proposed a structural model for full-length monomeric apoA-I in solution and updated the HDL formation mechanism through three intermediate states. Mapping the known natural mutations on the full-length monomeric apoA-I model provides insight into atherosclerosis development through disruption of the N-terminal helix bundle or deletion of the C-terminal lipid-binding domain. PMID:26048453

  4. Lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I Structure: Insights into HDL Formation and Atherosclerosis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaohu; Atkinson, David

    2015-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is the major protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and plays an important role during the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Knowledge of the high-resolution structure of full-length apoA-I is vital for a molecular understanding of the function of HDL at the various steps of the RCT pathway. Due to the flexible nature of apoA-I and aggregation properties, the structure of full-length lipid-free apoA-I has evaded description for over three decades. Sequence analysis of apoA-I suggested that the amphipathic α-helix is the structural motif of exchangeable apolipoprotein, and NMR, X-ray and MD simulation studies have confirmed this. Different laboratories have used different methods to probe the secondary structure distribution and organization of both the lipid-free and lipid-bound apoA-I structure. Mutation analysis, synthetic peptide models, surface chemistry and crystal structures have converged on the lipid-free apoA-I domain structure and function: the N-terminal domain [1-184] forms a helix bundle while the C-terminal domain [185-243] mostly lacks defined structure and is responsible for initiating lipid-binding, aggregation and is also involved in cholesterol efflux. The first 43 residues of apoA-I are essential to stabilize the lipid-free structure. In addition, the crystal structure of C-terminally truncated apoA-I suggests a monomer-dimer conversation mechanism mediated through helix 5 reorganization and dimerization during the formation of HDL. Based on previous research, we have proposed a structural model for full-length monomeric apoA-I in solution and updated the HDL formation mechanism through three states. Mapping the known natural mutations on the full-length monomeric apoA-I model provides insight into atherosclerosis development through disruption of the N-terminal helix bundle or deletion of the C-terminal lipid-binding domain. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function. Copyright 2008 IUBMB

  6. Self-assembly of poly(ionic liquid) (PIL)-based amphiphilic homopolymers into vesicles and supramolecular structures with dyes and silver nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Manojkumar, Kasina

    2017-04-27

    The incorporation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments in homopolymers leads to their self-assembly into nanostructures in selective solvents, owing to their amphiphilic character. Here we report the RAFT polymerization of N-imidazole-3-propylmethacrylamide and the further quaternization of the resulting polymer with different alkyl bromides of a varying chain length, which afforded well-defined polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) 1-4. These PILs are characterized by the presence of both hydrophobic alkyl chains and hydrophilic ionic moieties, allowing their spontaneous self-assembly in water, forming distinct polymeric vesicles (= polymersomes) the size of which can be varied as a function of alkyl chain length. As demonstrated by the dye-encapsulation study, a particular organic-soluble PIL, 3, consisting of a dodecyl side-chain enabled the transfer of the water-soluble Rose Bengal dye, from an aqueous solution to the organic phase. In addition, polymersomes obtained from a PIL (2) featuring butyl side chains were used as templates and polymeric stabilizers of silver nanoparticles (NPs), i.e. leading to AgNP@PIL hybrids, as observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the extent of functionalization of polymersomes by the Ag-based NPs varied greatly before and after the end-group removal of the PIL. Altogether, this report emphasizes the facile synthesis of amphiphilic homoPILs and their manipulation in water for dye encapsulation and for stabilization of silver NPs.

  7. Novel Structural Insights into GPCR-β-Arrestin Interaction and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Ravi; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Baidya, Mithu; Kumar, Mohit; Shukla, Arun K

    2017-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are major signal recognition and transmission units in the plasma membrane. The interaction of activated and phosphorylated GPCRs with the multifunctional adaptor proteins β-arrestins (βarrs) is crucial for regulation of their signaling and functional outcomes. Over the past few years, a range of structural, biochemical, and cellular studies have revealed novel insights into GPCR-βarr interaction and signaling. Some of these findings have come as a surprise and therefore have the potential to significantly refine the conceptual framework of the GPCR-βarr system. Here we discuss these recent advances with particular emphasis on biphasic GPCR-βarr interaction, the formation of GPCR-G-protein-βarr supercomplexes, and receptor-specific conformational signatures in βarrs. We also underline the emerging research areas that are likely to be at the center stage of investigations in the coming years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Insights into the structure and architecture of the CCR4–NOT complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Bai, Yuwei; Zhang, Aili; Zhang, Qionglin; Bartlam, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    The CCR4–NOT complex is a highly conserved, multifunctional machinery with a general role in controlling mRNA metabolism. It has been implicated in a number of different aspects of mRNA and protein expression, including mRNA degradation, transcription initiation and elongation, ubiquitination, and protein modification. The core CCR4–NOT complex is evolutionarily conserved and consists of at least three NOT proteins and two catalytic subunits. The L-shaped complex is characterized by two functional modules bound to the CNOT1/Not1 scaffold protein: the deadenylase or nuclease module containing two enzymes required for deadenylation, and the NOT module. In this review, we will summarize the currently available information regarding the three-dimensional structure and assembly of the CCR4–NOT complex, in order to provide insight into its roles in mRNA degradation and other biological processes. PMID:24904637

  9. Insights into the structure and architecture of the CCR4-NOT complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Bai, Yuwei; Zhang, Aili; Zhang, Qionglin; Bartlam, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is a highly conserved, multifunctional machinery with a general role in controlling mRNA metabolism. It has been implicated in a number of different aspects of mRNA and protein expression, including mRNA degradation, transcription initiation and elongation, ubiquitination, and protein modification. The core CCR4-NOT complex is evolutionarily conserved and consists of at least three NOT proteins and two catalytic subunits. The L-shaped complex is characterized by two functional modules bound to the CNOT1/Not1 scaffold protein: the deadenylase or nuclease module containing two enzymes required for deadenylation, and the NOT module. In this review, we will summarize the currently available information regarding the three-dimensional structure and assembly of the CCR4-NOT complex, in order to provide insight into its roles in mRNA degradation and other biological processes.

  10. Molecular recognition and organizational and polyvalent effects in vesicles induce the formation of artificial multicompartment cells as model systems of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleos, Constantinos M; Pantos, A

    2014-05-20

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in the preparation and characterization of artificial cells based on amphiphilic molecules. In particular, artificial cells with multiple compartments are primitive mimics of the structure of eukaryotic cells. Endosymbiotic theory, widely accepted among biologists, states that eukaryotic cells arose from the assembly of prokaryotic cells inside other cells. Therefore, replicating this process in a synthetic system could allow researchers to model molecular and supramolecular processes that occur in living cells, shed light on mass and energy transport through cell membranes, and provide a unique, isolated space for conducting chemical reactions. In addition, such structures can serve as drug delivery systems that encapsulate both bioactive and nonbiocompatible compounds. In this Account, we present various coating, incubation, and electrofusion strategies for forming multicompartment vesicle systems, and we are focusing on strategies that rely on involving molecular recognition of complementary vesicles. All these methods afforded multicompartment systems with similar structures, and these nanoparticles have potential applications as drug delivery systems or nanoreactors for conducting diverse reactions. The complementarity of interacting vesicles allows these artificial cells to form, and the organization and polyvalency of these interacting vesicles further promote their formation. The incorporation of cholesterol in the bilayer membrane and the introduction of PEG chains at the surface of the interacting vesicles also support the structure of these multicompartment systems. PEG chains appear to destabilize the bilayers, which facilitates the fusion and transport of the small vesicles to the larger ones. Potential applications of these well-structured and reproducibly produced multicompartment systems include drug delivery, where researchers could load a cocktail of drugs within the encapsulated vesicles, a process

  11. Phosphorylation of Synaptojanin Differentially Regulates Endocytosis of Functionally Distinct Synaptic Vesicle Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Junhua; Wang, Liping; Lee, Joo Yeun; Chen, Chun-Kan; Chang, Karen T

    2016-08-24

    maintaining synaptic vesicle pool size and in reserve vesicle endocytosis. As Synaptojanin and Minibrain perturbations are associated with various neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's, autism, and Down syndrome, understanding mechanisms modulating Synaptojanin function provides valuable insights into processes affecting neuronal communication. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/368882-13$15.00/0.

  12. Comparative riftology: insights from crustal structure into the evolution of continental rifts and passive continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, Jonas; Stein, Carol; Stein, Seth; Keller, Randy; Wysession, Michael; Frederiksen, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Continental rifts evolve to seafloor spreading and are preserved in passive margins, or fail and remain as fossil features in continents. Rifts at different stages give insight into these different evolutionary paths. Of particular interest is how volcanic passive margins evolve. These features are characterized by sequences of volcanic rocks yielding magnetic anomalies landward of and sometimes larger than the oldest spreading anomalies. Seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) occur in stretched continental crust landward of the oldest oceanic crust and are underplated by high-velocity lower crustal bodies. How and when these features form remains unclear. Insights are given by the Midcontinent Rift (MCR), formed by 1.1 Ga rifting of Amazonia from Laurentia, that failed once seafloor spreading was established elsewhere. MCR volcanics are much thicker than other continental flood basalts, due to deposition in a narrow rift rather than a broad region, giving a rift's geometry but a LIP's magma volume. The MCR provides a snapshot of the deposition of a thick highly magnetized volcanic section during rifting. Surface exposures and seismic-reflection data in and near Lake Superior show a rift basin filled by inward-dipping flood basalt layers. Had the rift evolved to seafloor spreading, the basin would have split into two sets of volcanics with opposite-facing SDRs, each with a strong magnetic anomaly. Because the rift formed as a series of alternating half-grabens, structural asymmetries between conjugate margins can naturally occur. Hence the MCR shows that many features form prior to breakup. Because the MCR was massively inverted by regional compression long after it failed and was uplifted, its structure is better known than failed rifts that incurred lesser degrees of inversion. It provides an end member for the evolution of actively extending rifts, characterized by upwelling mantle and negative gravity anomalies, in contrast to failed and inverted rifts without

  13. Insights into Caco-2 cell culture structure using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Jukka; Sözeri, Erkan; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Peltonen, Leena; Santos, Hélder A; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-05-15

    We have used coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel and rapid, label-free and non-destructive imaging method to gain structural insights into live intestinal epithelial cell cultures used for drug permeability testing. Specifically we have imaged live Caco-2 cells in (bio)pharmaceutically relevant conditions grown on membrane inserts. Imaging conditions were optimized, including evaluation of suitable membrane materials and media solutions, as well as tolerable laser powers for non-destructive imaging of the live cells. Lipid structures, in particular lipid droplets, were imaged within the cells on the insert membranes. The size of the individual lipid droplets increased substantially over the 21-day culturing period up to approximately 10% of the volume of the cross section of individual cells. Variation in lipid content has important implications for intestinal drug permeation testing during drug development but has received limited attention to date due to a lack of suitable analytical techniques. CARS microscopy was shown to be well suited for such analysis with the potential for in situ imaging of the same individual cell-cultures that are used for permeation studies. Overall, the method may be used to provide important information about cell monolayer structure to better understand drug permeation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. New insights into Hoogsteen base pairs in DNA duplexes from a structure-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huiqing; Hintze, Bradley J; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Yang, Shan; Richardson, Jane S; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-04-20

    Hoogsteen (HG) base pairs (bps) provide an alternative pairing geometry to Watson-Crick (WC) bps and can play unique functional roles in duplex DNA. Here, we use structural features unique to HG bps (syn purine base, HG hydrogen bonds and constricted C1'-C1' distance across the bp) to search for HG bps in X-ray structures of DNA duplexes in the Protein Data Bank. The survey identifies 106 A•T and 34 G•C HG bps in DNA duplexes, many of which are undocumented in the literature. It also uncovers HG-like bps with syn purines lacking HG hydrogen bonds or constricted C1'-C1' distances that are analogous to conformations that have been proposed to populate the WC-to-HG transition pathway. The survey reveals HG preferences similar to those observed for transient HG bps in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance, including stronger preferences for A•T versus G•C bps, TA versus GG steps, and also suggests enrichment at terminal ends with a preference for 5'-purine. HG bps induce small local perturbations in neighboring bps and, surprisingly, a small but significant degree of DNA bending (∼14°) directed toward the major groove. The survey provides insights into the preferences and structural consequences of HG bps in duplex DNA. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Structure-based mechanistic insights into catalysis by small self-cleaving ribozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aiming; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2017-12-01

    Small self-cleaving ribozymes are widely distributed in nature and are essential for rolling-circle-based replication of satellite and pathogenic RNAs. Earlier structure-function studies on the hammerhead, hairpin, glmS, hepatitis delta virus and Varkud satellite ribozymes have provided insights into their overall architecture, their catalytic active site organization, and the role of nearby nucleobases and hydrated divalent cations in facilitating general acid-base and electrostatic-mediated catalysis. This review focuses on recent structure-function research on active site alignments and catalytic mechanisms of the Rzb hammerhead ribozyme, as well as newly-identified pistol, twister and twister-sister ribozymes. In contrast to an agreed upon mechanistic understanding of self-cleavage by Rzb hammerhead and pistol ribozymes, there exists a divergence of views as to the cleavage site alignments and catalytic mechanisms adopted by twister and twister-sister ribozymes. One approach to resolving this conundrum would be to extend the structural studies from currently available pre-catalytic conformations to their transition state mimic vanadate counterparts for both ribozymes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Revealing New Structural Insights from Surfactant Micelles through DLS, Microrheology and Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiul Amin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between molecular changes and microstructural evolution of rheological properties has been demonstrated for the first time in a mixed anionic/zwitterionic surfactant-based wormlike micellar system. Utilizing a novel combination of DLS-microrheology and Raman Spectroscopy, the effect of electrostatic screening on these properties of anionic (SLES and zwitterionic (CapB surfactant mixtures was studied by modulating the NaCl concentration. As Raman Spectroscopy delivers information about the molecular structure and DLS-microrheology characterizes viscoelastic properties, the combination of data delivered allows for a deeper understanding of the molecular changes underlying the viscoelastic ones. The high frequency viscoelastic response obtained through DLS-microrheology has shown the persistence of the Maxwell fluid response for low viscosity solutions at high NaCl concentrations. The intensity of the Raman band at 170 cm−1 exhibits very strong correlation with the viscosity variation. As this Raman band is assigned to hydrogen bonding, its variation with NaCl concentration additionally indicates differences in water structuring due to potential microstructural differences at low and high NaCl concentrations. The microstructural differences at low and high NaCl concentrations are further corroborated by persistence of a slow mode at the higher NaCl concentrations as seen through DLS measurements. The study illustrates the utility of the combined DLS, DLS-optical microrheology and Raman Spectroscopy in providing new molecular structural insights into the self-assembly process in complex fluids.

  17. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and ‘molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  18. Structural Insights into DD-Fold Assembly and Caspase-9 Activation by the Apaf-1 Apoptosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tsung-Wei; Yang, Chao-Yu; Kao, Wen-Pin; Kuo, Bai-Jiun; Lin, Shan-Meng; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Lo, Yu-Chih; Lin, Su-Chang

    2017-03-07

    Death domain (DD)-fold assemblies play a crucial role in regulating the signaling to cell survival or death. Here we report the crystal structure of the caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-CARD disk of the human apoptosome. The structure surprisingly reveals that three 1:1 Apaf-1:procaspase-9 CARD protomers form a novel helical DD-fold assembly on the heptameric wheel-like platform of the apoptosome. The small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle light scattering data also support that three protomers could form an oligomeric complex similar to the crystal structure. Interestingly, the quasi-equivalent environment of CARDs could generate different quaternary CARD assemblies. We also found that the type II interaction is conserved in all DD-fold complexes, whereas the type I interaction is found only in the helical DD-fold assemblies. This study provides crucial insights into the caspase activation mechanism, which is tightly controlled by a sophisticated and highly evolved CARD assembly on the apoptosome, and also enables better understanding of the intricate DD-fold assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The narrative structure as a way to gain insight into peoples' experiences: one methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejnö, Åsa; Berg, Linda; Danielson, Ella

    2014-09-01

    The narrative method is used in healthcare research, mostly in data collection but also in the analysis. Narrative approaches draw attention to how people tell about and create meaning of experiences. The aim of the article was to examine the narrative structure, the elements in the structure and their function and how these can be used in research to gain insights into experiences. Examples are taken from a material of narratives from a study where next of kin were asked to narrate their experiences of sudden and unexpected death from stroke. The narratives had a clear beginning, midpoint and ending. In the beginning, orientation of the narrated events was given. The narrated events were told to have a turning point constituted of complicating actions that lead to a resolution that solved the narrated event. The narratives were built up by multiple recaps into the narrated events and also consisted of asides - side narratives and flashbacks - events back in time. Use of a narrative structure can contribute with valuable information that might be missed with other analysis. The analysis can be used on its own, as a complement to other narrative analysis or even as a complement to other qualitative analysis. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Structure and stability insights into tumour suppressor p53 evolutionary related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pagano

    Full Text Available The p53 family of genes and their protein products, namely, p53, p63 and p73, have over one billion years of evolutionary history. Advances in computational biology and genomics are enabling studies of the complexities of the molecular evolution of p53 protein family to decipher the underpinnings of key biological conditions spanning from cancer through to various metabolic and developmental disorders and facilitate the design of personalised medicines. However, a complete understanding of the inherent nature of the thermodynamic and structural stability of the p53 protein family is still lacking. This is due, to a degree, to the lack of comprehensive structural information for a large number of homologous proteins and to an incomplete knowledge of the intrinsic factors responsible for their stability and how these might influence function. Here we investigate the thermal stability, secondary structure and folding properties of the DNA-binding domains (DBDs of a range of proteins from the p53 family using biophysical methods. While the N- and the C-terminal domains of the p53 family show sequence diversity and are normally targets for post-translational modifications and alternative splicing, the central DBD is highly conserved. Together with data obtained from Molecular Dynamics simulations in solution and with structure based homology modelling, our results provide further insights into the molecular properties of evolutionary related p53 proteins. We identify some marked structural differences within the p53 family, which could account for the divergence in biological functions as well as the subtleties manifested in the oligomerization properties of this family.

  1. Insights on the structure and activity of Lusi mud edifice from land gravity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Guillaume; Husein, Alwi; Karyono, Karyono; Hadi, Soffian; Prasetyo, Hardi; Lupi, Matteo; Obermann, Anne; Mazzini, Adriano; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption in East Java, Indonesia, active since May 2006, is a sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system (SHHS) fed by magmatic fluids connected to the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. The aims of the present study are to investigate changes in the local gravity field to obtain new insight into: 1) the evolution of the collapse structure ten years after its inception, 2) provide new insights on the thickening of the mud edifice for constraints on 3D numerical models, and 3) the pulsating phases characterizing the Lusi activity, which result in temporal density variations of the mudflow inside the active conduit. To investigate the structure of the mud edifice, we conducted a gravity spatial mapping over an area of 56 km2 with 390 new gravity stations. To investigate the density changes happening over time, we conducted several continuous gravity monitoring. We present results from gravity measurement collected during field campaigns in June and August 2016, and augmented by passive seismic and environmental parameter monitoring. We calculated for a reference density of 2,670 kg m-3 a new Bouguer anomaly map, which shows significant changes in the local gravity field in comparison to the previously published 2006-gravity map. In the west and south part of the edifice, maximum gravity decreases (-1 mGal) characterize the collapse of part of the edifice. In the southeast and east of the central area of flooded mud breccia, the gravity field increases locally (+1 mGal) along the limit defined by a previous study on the surface deformation of the mud edifice. The 3D model supports the hypothesis of a locally pinched volume of either mud, sediment, or mix of both between the subsiding volume and the uplifting volume of mud. The continuous gravity monitoring experiments were located at 320 and 380m away from the central area of a mud breccia flooded region. Over time, residual gravity variations reach up to 0.020 mGal in amplitude and occur at wavelengths

  2. Wolbachia bacteria reside in host Golgi-related vesicles whose position is regulated by polarity proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ok Cho

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis are intracellular symbiotic bacteria extremely common in various organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, and are known for their ability to induce changes in host reproduction. These bacteria are present in astral microtubule-associated vesicular structures in host cytoplasm, but little is known about the identity of these vesicles. We report here that Wolbachia are restricted only to a group of Golgi-related vesicles concentrated near the site of membrane biogenesis and minus-ends of microtubules. The Wolbachia vesicles were significantly mislocalized in mutant embryos defective in cell/planar polarity genes suggesting that cell/tissue polarity genes are required for apical localization of these Golgi-related vesicles. Furthermore, two of the polarity proteins, Van Gogh/Strabismus and Scribble, appeared to be present in these Golgi-related vesicles. Thus, establishment of polarity may be closely linked to the precise insertion of Golgi vesicles into the new membrane addition site.

  3. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural insights into lipid-dependent reversible dimerization of human GLTP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samygina, Valeria R.; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja [CIC bioGUNE, Technology Park of Bizkaia, 48160 Derio (Spain); Popov, Alexander N. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France); Cabo-Bilbao, Aintzane; Goni-de-Cerio, Felipe [CIC bioGUNE, Technology Park of Bizkaia, 48160 Derio (Spain); Molotkovsky, Julian G. [Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Patel, Dinshaw J. [Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Brown, Rhoderick E., E-mail: reb@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Malinina, Lucy, E-mail: reb@umn.edu [CIC bioGUNE, Technology Park of Bizkaia, 48160 Derio (Spain)

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that dimerization is promoted by glycolipid binding to human GLTP. The importance of dimer flexibility in wild-type protein is manifested by point mutation that ‘locks’ the dimer while diversifying ligand/protein adaptations. Human glycolipid transfer protein (hsGLTP) forms the prototypical GLTP fold and is characterized by a broad transfer selectivity for glycosphingolipids (GSLs). The GLTP mutation D48V near the ‘portal entrance’ of the glycolipid binding site has recently been shown to enhance selectivity for sulfatides (SFs) containing a long acyl chain. Here, nine novel crystal structures of hsGLTP and the SF-selective mutant complexed with short-acyl-chain monoSF and diSF in different crystal forms are reported in order to elucidate the potential functional roles of lipid-mediated homodimerization. In all crystal forms, the hsGLTP–SF complexes displayed homodimeric structures supported by similarly organized intermolecular interactions. The dimerization interface always involved the lipid sphingosine chain, the protein C-terminus (C-end) and α-helices 6 and 2, but the D48V mutant displayed a ‘locked’ dimer conformation compared with the hinge-like flexibility of wild-type dimers. Differences in contact angles, areas and residues at the dimer interfaces in the ‘flexible’ and ‘locked’ dimers revealed a potentially important role of the dimeric structure in the C-end conformation of hsGLTP and in the precise positioning of the key residue of the glycolipid recognition centre, His140. ΔY207 and ΔC-end deletion mutants, in which the C-end is shifted or truncated, showed an almost complete loss of transfer activity. The new structural insights suggest that ligand-dependent reversible dimerization plays a role in the function of human GLTP.

  5. Structural insights into methanol-stable variants of lipase T6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Adi; Kanteev, Margarita; Kagan, Irit; Gihaz, Shalev; Shahar, Anat; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic production of biodiesel by transesterification of triglycerides and alcohol, catalyzed by lipases, offers an environmentally friendly and efficient alternative to the chemically catalyzed process while using low-grade feedstocks. Methanol is utilized frequently as the alcohol in the reaction due to its reactivity and low cost. However, one of the major drawbacks of the enzymatic system is the presence of high methanol concentrations which leads to methanol-induced unfolding and inactivation of the biocatalyst. Therefore, a methanol-stable lipase is of great interest for the biodiesel industry. In this study, protein engineering was applied to substitute charged surface residues with hydrophobic ones to enhance the stability in methanol of a lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. We identified a methanol-stable variant, R374W, and combined it with a variant found previously, H86Y/A269T. The triple mutant, H86Y/A269T/R374W, had a half-life value at 70 % methanol of 324 min which reflects an 87-fold enhanced stability compared to the wild type together with elevated thermostability in buffer and in 50 % methanol. This variant also exhibited an improved biodiesel yield from waste chicken oil compared to commercial Lipolase 100L® and Novozyme® CALB. Crystal structures of the wild type and the methanol-stable variants provided insights regarding structure-stability correlations. The most prominent features were the extensive formation of new hydrogen bonds between surface residues directly or mediated by structural water molecules and the stabilization of Zn and Ca binding sites. Mutation sites were also characterized by lower B-factor values calculated from the X-ray structures indicating improved rigidity.

  6. The structure of psychological life satisfaction: insights from farmers and a general community sample in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological life satisfaction is a robust predictor of wellbeing. Public health measures to improve wellbeing would benefit from an understanding of how overall life satisfaction varies as a function of satisfaction with multiple life domains, an area that has been little explored. We examine a sample of drought-affected Australian farmers and a general community sample of Australians to investigate how domain satisfaction combines to form psychological satisfaction. In particular, we introduce a way of statistically testing for the presence of “supra-domains” of satisfaction to propose a novel way of examining the composition of psychological life satisfaction to gain insights for health promotion and policy. Methods Covariance between different perceptions of life domain satisfaction was identified by conducting correlation, regression, and exploratory factor analyses on responses to the Personal Wellbeing Index. Structural equations modelling was then used to (a) validate satisfaction supra-domain constructs emerging from different perceptions of life domain satisfaction, and (b) model relationships between supra-domains and an explicit measure of psychological life satisfaction. Results Perceived satisfaction with eight different life domains loaded onto a single unitary satisfaction construct adequately in each sample. However, in both samples, different domains better loaded onto two separate but correlated constructs (‘supra-domains’): “satisfaction with connectedness” and “satisfaction with efficacy”. Modelling reciprocal pathways between these supra-domains and an explicit measure of psychological life satisfaction revealed that efficacy mediated the link between connectedness and psychological satisfaction. Conclusions If satisfaction with connectedness underlies satisfaction with efficacy (and thus psychological satisfaction), a novel insight for health policy emerges: psychological life satisfaction, a vital part of

  7. The structure of psychological life satisfaction: insights from farmers and a general community sample in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OBrien Léan V

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological life satisfaction is a robust predictor of wellbeing. Public health measures to improve wellbeing would benefit from an understanding of how overall life satisfaction varies as a function of satisfaction with multiple life domains, an area that has been little explored. We examine a sample of drought-affected Australian farmers and a general community sample of Australians to investigate how domain satisfaction combines to form psychological satisfaction. In particular, we introduce a way of statistically testing for the presence of “supra-domains” of satisfaction to propose a novel way of examining the composition of psychological life satisfaction to gain insights for health promotion and policy. Methods Covariance between different perceptions of life domain satisfaction was identified by conducting correlation, regression, and exploratory factor analyses on responses to the Personal Wellbeing Index. Structural equations modelling was then used to (a validate satisfaction supra-domain constructs emerging from different perceptions of life domain satisfaction, and (b model relationships between supra-domains and an explicit measure of psychological life satisfaction. Results Perceived satisfaction with eight different life domains loaded onto a single unitary satisfaction construct adequately in each sample. However, in both samples, different domains better loaded onto two separate but correlated constructs (‘supra-domains’: “satisfaction with connectedness” and “satisfaction with efficacy”. Modelling reciprocal pathways between these supra-domains and an explicit measure of psychological life satisfaction revealed that efficacy mediated the link between connectedness and psychological satisfaction. Conclusions If satisfaction with connectedness underlies satisfaction with efficacy (and thus psychological satisfaction, a novel insight for health policy emerges: psychological life satisfaction

  8. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  9. Structural insight into the active site of mushroom tyrosinase using phenylbenzoic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Takahiro; Yoshimori, Atsushi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Akira; Kamiya, Takanori; Abe, Hideaki; Abe, Takehiko; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi

    2017-07-01

    So far, many inhibitors of tyrosinase have been discovered for cosmetic and clinical agents. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition in the active site of tyrosinase have not been well understood. To explore this problem, we examined here the inhibitory effects of 4'-hydroxylation and methoxylation of phenylbenzoic acid (PBA) isomers, which have a unique scaffold to inhibit mushroom tyrosinase. The inhibitory effect of 3-PBA, which has the most potent inhibitory activity among the isomers, was slightly decreased by 4'-hydroxylation and further decreased by 4'-methoxylation against mushroom tyrosinase. Surprisingly, 4'-hydroxylation but not methoxylation of 2-PBA appeared inhibitory activity. On the other hand, both 4'-hydroxylation and methoxylation of 4-PBA increased the inhibitory activity against mushroom tyrosinase. In silico docking analyses using the crystallographic structure of mushroom tyrosinase indicated that the carboxylic acid or 4'-hydroxyl group of PBA derivatives could chelate with cupric ions in the active site of mushroom tyrosinase, and that the interactions of Asn260 and Phe264 in the active site with the adequate-angled biphenyl group are involved in the inhibitory activities of the modified PBAs, by parallel and T-shaped π-π interactions, respectively. Furthermore, Arg268 could fix the angle of the aromatic ring of Phe264, and Val248 is supposed to interact with the inhibitors as a hydrophobic manner. These results may enhance the structural insight into mushroom tyrosinase for the creation of novel tyrosinase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of promoter-bound TFIID and insight into human PIC assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louder, Robert K.; He, Yuan; López-Blanco, José Ramón; Fang, Jie; Chacón, Pablo; Nogales, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) plays a central role in the initiation of RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription by nucleating pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly at the core promoter. TFIID comprises the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and 13 TBP-associated factors (TAF1-13), which specifically interact with a variety of core promoter DNA sequences. Here we present the structure of human TFIID in complex with TFIIA and core promoter DNA, determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) at sub-nanometer resolution. All core promoter elements are contacted by subunits of TFIID, with TAF1 and TAF2 mediating major interactions with the downstream promoter. TFIIA bridges the TBP-TATA complex with lobe B of TFIID. We also present the cryo-EM reconstruction of a fully-assembled human TAF-less PIC. Superposition of common elements between the two structures provides novel insights into the general role of TFIID in promoter recognition, PIC assembly, and transcription initiation. PMID:27007846

  11. Genetic population structure in the Antarctic benthos: insights from the widespread amphipod, Orchomenella franklini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Phoenix Baird

    Full Text Available Currently there is very limited understanding of genetic population structure in the Antarctic benthos. We conducted one of the first studies of microsatellite variation in an Antarctic benthic invertebrate, using the ubiquitous amphipod Orchomenella franklini (Walker, 1903. Seven microsatellite loci were used to assess genetic structure on three spatial scales: sites (100 s of metres, locations (1-10 kilometres and regions (1000 s of kilometres sampled in East Antarctica at Casey and Davis stations. Considerable genetic diversity was revealed, which varied between the two regions and also between polluted and unpolluted sites. Genetic differentiation among all populations was highly significant (F(ST = 0.086, R(ST = 0.139, p<0.001 consistent with the brooding mode of development in O. franklini. Hierarchical AMOVA revealed that the majority of the genetic subdivision occurred across the largest geographical scale, with N(em≈1 suggesting insufficient gene flow to prevent independent evolution of the two regions, i.e., Casey and Davis are effectively isolated. Isolation by distance was detected at smaller scales and indicates that gene flow in O. franklini occurs primarily through stepping-stone dispersal. Three of the microsatellite loci showed signs of selection, providing evidence that localised adaptation may occur within the Antarctic benthos. These results provide insights into processes of speciation in Antarctic brooders, and will help inform the design of spatial management initiatives recently endorsed for the Antarctic benthos.

  12. Crystal structures of nitric oxide reductases provide key insights into functional conversion of respiratory enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosha, Takehiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2013-03-01

    Respiration is an essential biological process to get bioenergy, ATP, for all kingdoms of life. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays central role in aerobic respiration, catalyzing the reduction of O(2) coupled with pumping proton across the biological membrane. Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration is suggested to be evolutionary related to COX and share the same progenitor with COX, on the basis of the amino acid sequence homology. Contrary to COX, NOR catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide and shows no proton pumping ability. Thus, the respiratory enzyme acquires (or loses) proton pumping ability in addition to the conversion of the catalytic property along with the environmental change on earth. Recently, we solved the structures of two types of NORs, which provides novel insights into the functional conversion of the respiratory enzymes. In this review, we focus on the structural similarities and differences between COXs and NORs and discuss possible mechanism for the functional conversion of these enzymes during molecular evolution. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Structural insights into the inhibition mechanism of bacterial toxin LsoA by bacteriophage antitoxin Dmd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hua; Otsuka, Yuichi; Gao, Zeng-Qiang; Wei, Yong; Chen, Zhen; Masuda, Michiaki; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria have obtained a variety of resistance mechanisms including toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems against bacteriophages (phages), whereas phages have also evolved to overcome bacterial anti-phage mechanisms. Dmd from T4 phage can suppress the toxicities of homologous toxins LsoA and RnlA from Escherichia coli, representing the first example of a phage antitoxin against multiple bacterial toxins in known TA systems. Here, the crystal structure of LsoA-Dmd complex showed Dmd is inserted into the deep groove between the N-terminal repeated domain (NRD) and the Dmd-binding domain (DBD) of LsoA. The NRD shifts significantly from a 'closed' to an 'open' conformation upon Dmd binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of Dmd revealed the conserved residues (W31 and N40) are necessary for LsoA binding and the toxicity suppression as determined by pull-down and cell toxicity assays. Further mutagenesis identified the conserved Dmd-binding residues (R243, E246 and R305) of LsoA are vital for its toxicity, and suggested Dmd and LsoB may possess different inhibitory mechanisms against LsoA toxicity. Our structure-function studies demonstrate Dmd can recognize LsoA and inhibit its toxicity by occupying the active site possibly via substrate mimicry. These findings have provided unique insights into the defense and counter-defense mechanisms between bacteria and phages in their co-evolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Human acid sphingomyelinase structures provide insight to molecular basis of Niemann–Pick disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Garman, Scott C.; Edmunds, Tim; Qiu, Huawei; Wei, Ronnie R. (Sanofi Aventis); (UMASS, Amherst)

    2016-10-26

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphocholine, essential components of myelin in neurons. Genetic alterations in ASM lead to ASM deficiency (ASMD) and have been linked to Niemann–Pick disease types A and B. Olipudase alfa, a recombinant form of human ASM, is being developed as enzyme replacement therapy to treat the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. Here we present the human ASM holoenzyme and product bound structures encompassing all of the functional domains. The catalytic domain has a metallophosphatase fold, and two zinc ions and one reaction product phosphocholine are identified in a histidine-rich active site. The structures reveal the underlying catalytic mechanism, in which two zinc ions activate a water molecule for nucleophilic attack of the phosphodiester bond. Docking of sphingomyelin provides a model that allows insight into the selectivity of the enzyme and how the ASM domains collaborate to complete hydrolysis. Mapping of known mutations provides a basic understanding on correlations between enzyme dysfunction and phenotypes observed in ASMD patients.

  15. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.elias@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Liebschner, Dorothee [CRM2, Nancy Université (France); Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric [AFMB, Université Aix-Marseille II (France)

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.

  16. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray induced structural perturbation of macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Kristin A.

    This dissertation focuses on the structural changes induced by X-rays during macromolecular crystallographic data collection. This damage cannot be prevented and often leads to degradation in the data quality, which can affect the resulting structure and thus the biological interpretation. The aim of this research was to understand the radiation chemistry of the damage process. This includes the protein components most susceptible to damage, the disulfide bond and metal atoms. By providing some insight into the mechanism for disulfide bond cleavage and the role the active site metal and its surrounding environment plays in the extent of the damage that occurs we have proposed an initial, generalized model for radiation damage. The results indicate that this multi-track process is due to the overlap of two one-electron reductions or two one-electron oxidations. A reaction scheme for the most susceptible residues (cystine, cysteine, methionine, aspartate, glutamate and tyrosine) is provided with experimental evidence of the predicted damage from crystallographic data collected on lysozyme and xylose isomerase.

  17. Structural and Functional Insights into the Unwinding Mechanism of Bacteroides sp Pif1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglian Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pif1 is a conserved SF1B DNA helicase involved in maintaining genome stability through unwinding double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs, DNA/RNA hybrids, and G quadruplex (G4 structures. Here, we report the structures of the helicase domain of human Pif1 and Bacteroides sp Pif1 (BaPif1 in complex with ADP-AlF4– and two different single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs. The wedge region equivalent to the β hairpin in other SF1B DNA helicases folds into an extended loop followed by an α helix. The Pif1 signature motif of BaPif1 interacts with the wedge region and a short helix in order to stabilize these ssDNA binding elements, therefore indirectly exerting its functional role. Domain 2B of BaPif1 undergoes a large conformational change upon concomitant binding of ATP and ssDNA, which is critical for Pif1’s activities. BaPif1 cocrystallized with a tailed dsDNA and ADP-AlF4–, resulting in a bound ssDNA bent nearly 90° at the ssDNA/dsDNA junction. The conformational snapshots of BaPif1 provide insights into the mechanism governing the helicase activity of Pif1.

  18. Insights into molecular properties of the human monocarboxylate transporter 8 by combining functional with structural information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinau Gunnar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8 is a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS and transports specificly iodothyronines. MCT8 mutations are the underlying cause of a syndrome of severe X-linked psychomotor retardation known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by abnormally high T3, low/normal T4 serum levels and slightly elevated serum TSH. To date, more than 25 pathogenic mutations in hMCT8 are known and they are valuable indicators of important regions for structural and functional MCT8 properties. Methods We designed a structural human MCT8 model and studied reported pathogenic missense mutations with focus on the estimation of those amino acid positions which are probably sensitive for substrate transport. Furthermore, assuming similarities between determinants of T3 binding observed in the published crystal structure of the thyroid hormone receptor beta occupied by its ligand T3 and the structural MCT8 model, we explore potential T3 binding sites in the MCT8 substrate channel cavity. Results We found that all known pathogenic missense mutations are located exclusively in the transmembrane helices and to a high degree at conserved residues among the MCT family. Furthermore, mutations either of or to prolines/glycines are located mainly at helices 9-12 and are expected to cause steric clashes or structural misfolding. In contrast, several other mutations are close to the potential substrate channel and affected amino acids are likely involved in the switching mechanism between different transporter conformations. Finally, three potential substrate binding sites are predicted for MCT8. Conclusions Naturally occurring mutations of MCT8 provide molecular insights into protein regions important for protein folding, substrate binding and the switching mechanism during substrate transport. Future studies guided by this information should help to clarify structure

  19. Cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Antônio O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumors of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare. Among them, there is a spectrum of tumors derived from both epithelium and stroma and so classified as epithelial-stromal tumors. Herein, we report a case of a cystadenoma in a 49-year-old asymptomatic man, detected in a routine ultrasonography for liver disease follow-up. The digital rectal examination detected a large mass anterior to rectum and posterior to bladder. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a normal prostate and a 9.0 cm cystic tumor, replacing the left seminal vesicle. The gross appearance and microscopic aspect was compatible with cystadenoma of seminal vesicle. Patient's postoperative recovery was uneventful. He is currently alive, 3 years after the diagnosis, with no signs of recurrence.

  20. Discovering vesicle traffic network constraints by model checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ankit; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Kuppusamy, Lakshmanan; Srivas, Mandayam; Thattai, Mukund

    2017-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell contains multiple membrane-bound compartments. Transport vesicles move cargo between these compartments, just as trucks move cargo between warehouses. These processes are regulated by specific molecular interactions, as summarized in the Rothman-Schekman-Sudhof model of vesicle traffic. The whole structure can be represented as a transport graph: each organelle is a node, and each vesicle route is a directed edge. What constraints must such a graph satisfy, if it is to represent a biologically realizable vesicle traffic network? Graph connectedness is an informative feature: 2-connectedness is necessary and sufficient for mass balance, but stronger conditions are required to ensure correct molecular specificity. Here we use Boolean satisfiability (SAT) and model checking as a framework to discover and verify graph constraints. The poor scalability of SAT model checkers often prevents their broad application. By exploiting the special structure of the problem, we scale our model checker to vesicle traffic systems with reasonably large numbers of molecules and compartments. This allows us to test a range of hypotheses about graph connectivity, which can later be proved in full generality by other methods.

  1. Secretable Small RNAs via Outer Membrane Vesicles in Periodontal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-C; Hong, S-H; Lee, H-J

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be major regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. However, bacterial RNAs comparable in size to eukaryotic miRNAs (18-22 nucleotides) have received little attention. Recently, a novel class of small RNAs similar in size to miRNAs (miRNA-size, small RNAs or msRNAs) have also been found in several bacteria. Like miRNAs, msRNAs are approximately 15 to 25 nucleotides in length, and their precursors are predicted to form a hairpin loop secondary structure. Here, we identified msRNAs in the periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Treponema denticola. We examined these msRNAs using a deep sequencing method and characterized dozens of msRNAs through bioinformatic analysis. Highly expressed msRNAs were selected for further validation. The findings suggest that this class of small RNAs is well conserved across the domains of life. Indeed, msRNAs secreted via bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) were detected. The ability of bacterial OMVs to deliver RNAs into eukaryotic cells was also observed. These msRNAs in OMVs allowed us to identify their potential human immune-related target genes. Furthermore, we found that exogenous msRNAs could suppress expression of certain cytokines in Jurkat T cells. We propose msRNAs may function as novel bacterial signaling molecules that mediate bacteria-to-human interactions. Furthermore, this study may provide fresh insight into bacterial pathogenic mechanisms of periodontal diseases.

  2. When to biopsy seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panach-Navarrete, J; García-Morata, F; Hernández-Medina, J A; Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M

    2015-05-01

    The involvement of seminal vesicles in prostate cancer can affect the prognosis and determine the treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether we could predict its infiltration at the time of the prostate biopsy to know when to indicate the biopsy of the seminal vesicles. observational retrospective study of 466 patients who underwent seminal vesicle biopsy. The indication for this biopsy was a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 10 ng/ml or an asymmetric or obliterated prostatoseminal angle. The following variables were included in the analysis: PSA level, PSA density, prostate volume, number of cores biopsied, suspicious rectal examination, and preservation of the prostatoseminal angle, studying its relationship with the involvement of the seminal vesicles. Forty-one patients (8.8%) had infiltrated seminal vesicles and 425 (91.2%) had no involvement. In the univariate analysis, the cases with infiltration had a higher mean PSA level (P 19.60 ng/dL (P < .01) and 2.95 times higher if there is a suspicious rectal examination (P = .014). Furthermore, this probability increases by 1.04 times for each unit of prostate volume lower (P < .01). The ROC curves showed maximum sensitivity and specificity at 19.6 ng/mL for PSA and 0.39 for PSA density. In this series, greater involvement of seminal vesicles was associated with a PSA level ≥20 ng/ml, a suspicious rectal examination and a lack of prostatoseminal angle preservation. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolation and characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles: implications for biomarker discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merchant, M.L.; Rood, I.M.; Deegens, J.K.J.; Klein, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Urine is a valuable diagnostic medium and, with the discovery of urinary extracellular vesicles, is viewed as a dynamic bioactive fluid. Extracellular vesicles are lipid-enclosed structures that can be classified into three categories: exosomes, microvesicles (or ectosomes) and apoptotic bodies.

  4. SMALL VESICLES, BIG VEHICLES: EXOSOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiz-Lopez P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles released by different cell types. Since their discovery, they have evolved from being considered simple vehicles for the liberation of cellular wastes, to become one of the most promising fields in the area of biomedical research, and more specifically in oncology, since the different malignant tumors release exosomes to all biological fluids, being involved in various functions of the neoplastic process. At present, it is possible to study these vesicles by minimally invasive techniques in patients, which approach us to obtain a more detailed diagnosis and prognosis, as well as to the discovery of new antitumoral therapies

  5. [Structural plasticity of the adult central nervous system: insights from the neuroendocrine hypothalamus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardet, Clémence; Bosler, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence renders the dogma obsolete according to which the structural organization of the brain would remain essentially stable in adulthood, changing only in response to a need for compensatory processes during increasing age and degeneration. It has indeed become clear from investigations on various models that the adult nervous system can adapt to physiological demands by altering reversibly its synaptic circuits. This potential for structural and functional modifications results not only from the plastic properties of neurons but also from the inherent capacity of the glial cellular components to undergo remodeling as well. This is currently known for astrocytes, the major glial cells in brain which are well-recognized as dynamic partners in the mechanisms of synaptic transmission, and for the tanycytes and pituicytes which contribute to the regulation of neurosecretory processes in neurohemal regions of the hypothalamus. Studies on the neuroendocrine hypothalamus, whose role is central in homeostatic regulations, have gained good insights into the spectacular neuronal-glial rearrangements that may subserve functional plasticity in the adult brain. Following pioneering works on the morphological reorganizations taking place in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system under certain physiological conditions such as dehydration and lactation, studies on the gonadotropic system that orchestrates reproductive functions have re-emphasized the dynamic interplay between neurons and glia in brain structural plasticity processes. This review summarizes the major contributions provided by these researches in the field and also addresses the question of the morphological rearrangements that occur on a 24-h basis in the central component of the circadian clock responsible for the temporal aspects of endocrine regulations. Taken together, the reviewed data highlight the close cooperation between neurons and glia in developing strategies for functional adaptation

  6. Comprehensive whole genome sequence analyses yields novel genetic and structural insights for Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, Farah R; Mwenifumbo, Jill C; Chun, Hye-Jung E; Lim, Emilia L; Van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Couse, Madeline; Mungall, Karen L; Lee, Leora; Makela, Nancy; Armstrong, Linlea; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Langlois, Sylvie L; McGillivray, Barbara M; Jones, Steven J M; Friedman, Jan M; Marra, Marco A

    2017-05-24

    Intellectual Disability (ID) is among the most common global disorders, yet etiology is unknown in ~30% of patients despite clinical assessment. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is able to interrogate the entire genome, providing potential to diagnose idiopathic patients. We conducted WGS on eight children with idiopathic ID and brain structural defects, and their normal parents; carrying out an extensive data analyses, using standard and discovery approaches. We verified de novo pathogenic single nucleotide variants (SNV) in ARID1B c.1595delG and PHF6 c.820C > T, potentially causative de novo two base indels in SQSTM1 c.115_116delinsTA and UPF1 c.1576_1577delinsA, and de novo SNVs in CACNB3 c.1289G > A, and SPRY4 c.508 T > A, of uncertain significance. We report results from a large secondary control study of 2081 exomes probing the pathogenicity of the above genes. We analyzed structural variation by four different algorithms including de novo genome assembly. We confirmed a likely contributory 165 kb de novo heterozygous 1q43 microdeletion missed by clinical microarray. The de novo assembly resulted in unmasking hidden genome instability that was missed by standard re-alignment based algorithms. We also interrogated regulatory sequence variation for known and hypothesized ID genes and present useful strategies for WGS data analyses for non-coding variation. This study provides an extensive analysis of WGS in the context of ID, providing genetic and structural insights into ID and yielding diagnoses.

  7. Structures of foot and mouth disease virus pentamers: Insight into capsid dissociation and unexpected pentamer reassociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayab Malik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV belongs to the Aphthovirus genus of the Picornaviridae, a family of small, icosahedral, non-enveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses. It is a highly infectious pathogen and is one of the biggest hindrances to the international trade of animals and animal products. FMDV capsids (which are unstable below pH6.5 release their genome into the host cell from an acidic compartment, such as that of an endosome, and in the process dissociate into pentamers. Whilst other members of the family (enteroviruses have been visualized to form an expanded intermediate capsid with holes from which inner capsid proteins (VP4, N-termini (VP1 and RNA can be released, there has been no visualization of any such state for an aphthovirus, instead the capsid appears to simply dissociate into pentamers. Here we present the 8-Å resolution structure of isolated dissociated pentamers of FMDV, lacking VP4. We also found these pentamers to re-associate into a rigid, icosahedrally symmetric assembly, which enabled their structure to be solved at higher resolution (5.2 Å. In this assembly, the pentamers unexpectedly associate 'inside out', but still with their exposed hydrophobic edges buried. Stabilizing interactions occur between the HI loop of VP2 and its symmetry related partners at the icosahedral 3-fold axes, and between the BC and EF loops of VP3 with the VP2 βB-strand and the CD loop at the 2-fold axes. A relatively extensive but subtle structural rearrangement towards the periphery of the dissociated pentamer compared to that in the mature virus provides insight into the mechanism of dissociation of FMDV and the marked difference in antigenicity.

  8. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I; Kuil, Maxim E; Rensen, Patrick C N; Koster, Abraham J; Bertina, Rogier M; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-12-31

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles). In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25-260 nm). The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV.

  9. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuana Yuana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EV are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. Objectives: To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM. Methods: Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. Results: EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles. In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25–260 nm. The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Conclusions: Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV.

  10. Vesicles and vesicle fusion: coarse-grained simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Biological cells are highly dynamic, and continually move material around their own volume and between their interior and exterior. Much of this transport encapsulates the material inside phospholipid vesicles that shuttle to and fro, fusing with, and budding from, other membranes. A feature of v...

  11. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Buck, Amy H; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Knox, David P; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-05-15

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles: implications for biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Michael L; Rood, Ilse M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Klein, Jon B

    2017-12-01

    Urine is a valuable diagnostic medium and, with the discovery of urinary extracellular vesicles, is viewed as a dynamic bioactive fluid. Extracellular vesicles are lipid-enclosed structures that can be classified into three categories: exosomes, microvesicles (or ectosomes) and apoptotic bodies. This classification is based on the mechanisms by which membrane vesicles are formed: fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membranes (exosomes), budding of vesicles directly from the plasma membrane (microvesicles) or those shed from dying cells (apoptotic bodies). During their formation, urinary extracellular vesicles incorporate various cell-specific components (proteins, lipids and nucleic acids) that can be transferred to target cells. The rigour needed for comparative studies has fueled the search for optimal approaches for their isolation, purification, and characterization. RNA, the newest extracellular vesicle component to be discovered, has received substantial attention as an extracellular vesicle therapeutic, and compelling evidence suggests that ex vivo manipulation of microRNA composition may have uses in the treatment of kidney disorders. The results of these studies are building the case that urinary extracellular vesicles act as mediators of renal pathophysiology. As the field of extracellular vesicle studies is burgeoning, this Review focuses on primary data obtained from studies of human urine rather than on data from studies of laboratory animals or cultured immortalized cells.

  13. Structural Insights into the Abscisic Acid Stereospecificity by the ABA Receptors PYR/PYL/RCAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Yu, Lin; Zhang, Qi; Xin, Qi; Wu, Wei; Gong, Zhizhong; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2013-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid ((+)-ABA) plays a key role in many processes. The biological and biochemical activities of unnatural (−)-ABA have been extensively investigated since 1960s. However, the recognition mechanism by which only a few members among PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) family can bind (−)-ABA remains largely unknown. Here we systematically characterized the affinity of PYLs binding to the (−)-ABA and reported the crystal structures of apo-PYL5, PYL3-(−)-ABA and PYL9-(+)-ABA. PYL5 showed the strongest binding affinity with (−)-ABA among all the PYLs. PYL9 is a stringently exclusive (+)-ABA receptor with interchangeable disulfide bonds shared by a subclass of PYLs. PYL3 is a dual receptor to both ABA enantiomers. The binding orientation and pocket of (−)-ABA in PYLs are obviously different from those of (+)-ABA. Steric hindrance and hydrophobic interaction are the two key factors in determining the stereospecificity of PYLs binding to (−)-ABA, which is further confirmed by gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutagenesis. Our results provide novel insights of the bioactivity of ABA enantiomers onto PYLs, and shed light on designing the selective ABA receptors agonists. PMID:23844015

  14. Extracellular vesicles in physiological and pathological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuana, Yuana; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Body fluids contain surprising numbers of cell-derived vesicles which are now thought to contribute to both physiology and pathology. Tools to improve the detection of vesicles are being developed and clinical applications using vesicles for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy are under investigation.

  15. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion: Post-Palade Era Researchers Win the Nobel Prize. Riddhi Atul Jani Subba Rao Gangi Setty. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 421-445 ...

  16. Structure of PlcR: Insights into virulence regulation and evolution of quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Declerck, Nathalie; Bouillaut, Laurent; Chaix, Denis; Rugani, Nathalie; Slamti, Leyla; Hoh, François; Lereclus, Didier; Arold, Stefan T.

    2007-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria use a wealth of extracellular signaling peptides, so-called autoinducers, to regulate gene expression according to population densities. These “quorum sensing” systems control vital processes such as virulence, sporulation, and gene transfer. Using x-ray analysis, we determined the structure of PlcR, the major virulence regulator of the Bacillus cereus group, and obtained mechanistic insights into the effects of autoinducer binding. Our structural and phylogenetic analy...

  17. Insights on Forest Structure and Composition from Long-Term Research in the Luquillo Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The science of ecology fundamentally aims to understand species and their relation to the environment. At sites where hurricane disturbance is part of the environmental context, permanent forest plots are critical to understand ecological vegetation dynamics through time. An overview of forest structure and species composition from two of the longest continuously measured tropical forest plots is presented. Long-term measurements, 72 years at the leeward site, and 25 years at windward site, of stem density are similar to initial and pre-hurricane values at both sites. For 10 years post-hurricane Hugo (1989, stem density increased at both sites. Following that increase period, stem density has remained at 1400 to 1600 stems/ha in the leeward site, and at 1200 stems/ha in the windward site. The forests had similar basal area values before hurricane Hugo in 1989, but these sites are following different patterns of basal area accumulation. The leeward forest site continues to accumulate and increase basal area with each successive measurement, currently above 50 m2/ha. The windward forest site maintains its basal area values close to an asymptote of 35 m2/ha. Currently, the most abundant species at both sites is the sierra palm. Ordinations to explore variation in tree species composition through time present the leeward site with a trajectory of directional change, while at the windward site, the composition of species seems to be converging to pre-hurricane conditions. The observed differences in forest structure and composition from sites differently affected by hurricane disturbance provide insight into how particular forest characteristics respond at shorter or longer time scales in relation to previous site conditions and intensity of disturbance effects.

  18. Crustal Structure and Deformation of the Yakutat Microplate: New Insights From STEEP Marine Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, L. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G.; van Avendonk, H.; Reece, R.; Elmore, R.; Pavlis, T.

    2008-12-01

    In fall 2008, we will conduct an active source marine seismic experiment of the offshore Yakutat microplate in the northern Gulf of Alaska. The survey will be conducted aboard the academic research vessel, R/V Marcus Langseth, collecting deep-penetrating multi-channel seismic reflection survey using an 8-km, 640 channel hydrophone streamer and a 6600 cu. in., 36 airgun array. The survey is the concluding data acquisition phase for the ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP), a multi-institution NSF-Continental Dynamics project investigating the interplay of climate and tectonics in the Chugach-St. Elias Mountains in southern Alaska. The experiment will also provide important site survey information for possible future Integrated Ocean Drilling Program investigations. Two profiles coincident with wide-angle refraction data (see Christeson, et al., this session) will image structural changes across the Dangerous River Zone from east to west and the Transition Fault from south to north. We will also image the western portion of the Transition Fault to determine the nature of faulting along this boundary including whether or not the Pacific Plate is underthrusting beneath the Yakutat microplate as part of this collision. Our westernmost profile will image the Kayak Island Zone, typically described as the northern extension of the Aleutian megathrust but which may be a forming suture acting as a deformation backstop for the converging Yakutat and North American plates. Profiles across the Pamplona Zone, the current Yakutat-North America deformation front, will further constrain relative timing of structural development and the depth of deformation on the broad folds and thrust faults that comprise the area. This new dataset will allow further insight into regional tectonics of the St. Elias region as well as provide more detail regarding the development of the south Alaskan margin during major Plio-Pleistocene glacial- interglacial periods.

  19. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of biomembrane structural changes and interactions by optical biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Hirst, Daniel J; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular-membrane interactions play a critical role in the regulation of many important biological processes such as protein trafficking, cellular signalling and ion channel formation. Peptide/protein-membrane interactions can also destabilise and damage the membrane which can lead to cell death. Characterisation of the molecular details of these binding-mediated membrane destabilisation processes is therefore central to understanding cellular events such as antimicrobial action, membrane-mediated amyloid aggregation, and apoptotic protein induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation. Optical biosensors have provided a unique approach to characterising membrane interactions allowing quantitation of binding events and new insight into the kinetic mechanism of these interactions. One of the most commonly used optical biosensor technologies is surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and there have been an increasing number of studies reporting the use of this technique for investigating biophysical analysis of membrane-mediated events. More recently, a number of new optical biosensors based on waveguide techniques have been developed, allowing membrane structure changes to be measured simultaneously with mass binding measurements. These techniques include dual polarisation interferometry (DPI), plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR) and optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS). These techniques have expanded the application of optical biosensors to allow the analysis of membrane structure changes during peptide and protein binding. This review provides a theoretical and practical overview of the application of biosensor technology with a specific focus on DPI, PWR and OWLS to study biomembrane-mediated events and the mechanism of biomembrane disruption. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Plant pectin acetylesterase structure and function: new insights from bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Florian; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2017-06-08

    Pectins are plant cell wall polysaccharides that can be acetylated on C2 and/or C3 of galacturonic acid residues. The degree of acetylation of pectin can be modulated by pectin acetylesterase (EC 3.1.1.6, PAE). The function and structure of plant PAEs remain poorly understood and the role of the fine-tuning of pectin acetylation on cell wall properties has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, a bioinformatic approach was used on 72 plant PAEs from 16 species among 611 plant PAEs available in plant genomic databases. An overview of plant PAE proteins, particularly Arabidopsis thaliana PAEs, based on phylogeny analysis, protein motif identification and modeled 3D structure is presented. A phylogenetic tree analysis using protein sequences clustered the plant PAEs into five clades. AtPAEs clustered in four clades in the plant kingdom PAE tree while they formed three clades when a phylogenetic tree was performed only on Arabidopsis proteins, due to isoform AtPAE9. Primitive plants that display a smaller number of PAEs clustered into two clades, while in higher plants, the presence of multiple members of PAE genes indicated a diversification of AtPAEs. 3D homology modeling of AtPAE8 from clade 2 with a human Notum protein showed an α/β hydrolase structure with the hallmark Ser-His-Asp of the active site. A 3D model of AtPAE4 from clade 1 and AtPAE10 from clade 3 showed a similar shape suggesting that the diversification of AtPAEs is unlikely to arise from the shape of the protein. Primary structure prediction analysis of AtPAEs showed a specific motif characteristic of each clade and identified one major group of AtPAEs with a signal peptide and one group without a signal peptide. A multiple sequence alignment of the putative plant PAEs revealed consensus sequences with important putative catalytic residues: Ser, Asp, His and a pectin binding site. Data mining of gene expression profiles of AtPAE revealed that genes from clade 2 including AtPAE7, AtPAE8 and

  1. Overall energy conversion efficiency of a photosynthetic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-08-26

    The chromatophore of purple bacteria is an intracellular spherical vesicle that exists in numerous copies in the cell and that efficiently converts sunlight into ATP synthesis, operating typically under low light conditions. Building on an atomic-level structural model of a low-light-adapted chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we investigate the cooperation between more than a hundred protein complexes in the vesicle. The steady-state ATP production rate as a function of incident light intensity is determined after identifying quinol turnover at the cytochrome bc1 complex (cytb⁢c1) as rate limiting and assuming that the quinone/quinol pool of about 900 molecules acts in a quasi-stationary state. For an illumination condition equivalent to 1% of full sunlight, the vesicle exhibits an ATP production rate of 82 ATP molecules/s. The energy conversion efficiency of ATP synthesis at illuminations corresponding to 1%-5% of full sunlight is calculated to be 0.12-0.04, respectively. The vesicle stoichiometry, evolutionarily adapted to the low light intensities in the habitat of purple bacteria, is suboptimal for steady-state ATP turnover for the benefit of protection against over-illumination.

  2. Biodegradable theranostic plasmonic vesicles of amphiphilic gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Pu, Lu; Zhou, Jiajing; Duan, Bo; Duan, Hongwei

    2013-11-26

    We have developed surface-initiated organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization on functional nanocrystals and synthesized amphiphilic gold nanorods carrying well-defined mixed polymer brushes of poly(ethylene glycol) and polylactide. Self-assembly of the amphiphilic gold nanorods affords biodegradable plasmonic vesicles that can be destructed by both enzymatic degradation and near-infrared photothermal heating. When tagged with Raman probes, strongly coupled gold nanorods in the self-assembled vesicles give rise to highly active SERS signals. The biodegradable plasmonic vesicles exhibit a unique combination of optical and structural properties that are of particular interest for theranostic applications. We have demonstrated that bioconjugated SERS-active plasmonic vesicles can specifically target EpCAM-positive cancer cells, leading to ultrasensitive spectroscopic detection of cancer cells. Furthermore, integration of photothermal effect of gold nanorods and large loading capacity of the vesicles provides opportunities for localized synergistic photothermal ablation and photoactivated chemotherapy, which have shown higher efficiency in killing targeted cancer cells than either single therapeutic modality. The versatile chemistry of organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization, in conjugation with recent development in synthesizing functional nanocrystals with tailored optical, electronic, and magnetic properties opens the possibilities for constructing multifunctional biodegradable platforms for clinical translation.

  3. Placental Nano-vesicles Target to Specific Organs and Modulate Vascular Tone In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mancy; Stanley, Joanna L; Chen, Q; James, Joanna L; Stone, Peter R; Chamley, Larry W

    2017-11-01

    pregnant women, pregnant CD1 mice were used as a model of pregnancy. This is the first study to report the localization of placental nano-vesicles and their vascular effects in vivo. This work provides new insight into how the dramatic maternal cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy may occur and indicates that placental extracellular vesicles may be important mediators of feto-maternal communication in a healthy pregnancy. This research was supported by the Faculty of Medical and Health Science (FMHS) School of Medicine PBRF research fund to L.W.C. M.T. is a recipient of a University of Auckland Health Research Doctoral Scholarship and the Freemasons Postgraduate Scholarship. No authors have any competing interests to disclose.

  4. The function of vesicles in the actinomycete Frankia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, T.

    1988-01-01

    The actinomycete Frankia is a symbiotic nitrogen fixer, living in root nodules of many non-leguminous plants. A typical characteristic of this endophytic organism is the formation of specialized swollen cell structures, called vesicles. Frankia

  5. Effect of the achondroplasia mutation on FGFR3 dimerization and FGFR3 structural response to fgf1 and fgf2: A quantitative FRET study in osmotically derived plasma membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-07-01

    The G380R mutation in the transmembrane domain of FGFR3 is a germline mutation responsible for most cases of Achondroplasia, a common form of human dwarfism. Here we use quantitative Fӧster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and osmotically derived plasma membrane vesicles to study the effect of the achondroplasia mutation on the early stages of FGFR3 signaling in response to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2. Using a methodology that allows us to capture structural changes on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane in response to ligand binding to the extracellular domain of FGFR3, we observe no measurable effects of the G380R mutation on FGFR3 ligand-bound dimer configurations. Instead, the most notable effect of the achondroplasia mutation is increased propensity for FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand. This work reveals new information about the molecular events that underlie the achondroplasia phenotype, and highlights differences in FGFR3 activation due to different single amino-acid pathogenic mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological reference materials for extracellular vesicle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, S; van der Pol, E; Böing, A; Yuana, Y; Yliperttula, M; Nieuwland, R; Laitinen, S; Siljander, P R M

    2017-02-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate normal physiological homeostasis and pathological processes by facilitating intercellular communication. Research of EVs in basic science and clinical settings requires both methodological standardization and development of reference materials (RM). Here, we show insights and results of biological RM development for EV studies. We used a three-step approach to find and develop a biological RM. First, a literature search was done to find candidates for biological RMs. Second, a questionnaire was sent to EV researchers querying the preferences for RM and their use. Third, a biological RM was selected, developed, characterized, and evaluated. The responses to the survey demonstrated a clear and recognized need for RM optimized for the calibration of EV measurements. Based on the literature, naturally occurring and produced biological RM, such as virus particles and liposomes, were proposed as RM. However, none of these candidate RMs have properties completely matching those of EVs, such as size and refractive index distribution. Therefore, we evaluated the use of nanoerythrosomes (NanoE), vesicles produced from erythrocytes, as a potential biological RM. The strength of NanoE is their resemblance to EVs. Compared to the erythrocyte-derived EVs (eryEVs), NanoE have similar morphology, a similar refractive index (1.37), larger diameter (70% of the NanoE are over 200nm), and increased positive staining for CD235a and lipids (Di-8-ANEPPS) (58% and 67% in NanoE vs. 21% and 45% in eryEVs, respectively). Altogether, our results highlight the general need to develop and validate new RM with similar physical and biochemical properties as EVs to standardize EV measurements between instruments and laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2017-04-01

    Each presynaptic bouton is densely packed with many vesicles, only a small fraction of which are available for immediate release. These vesicles constitute the readily releasable pool (RRP). The RRP size, and the probability of release of each vesicle within the RRP, together determine synaptic strength. Here, we discuss complications and recent advances in determining the size of the physiologically relevant RRP. We consider molecular mechanisms to generate and regulate the RRP, and discuss the relationship between vesicle docking and the RRP. We conclude that many RRP vesicles are docked, that some docked vesicles may not be part of the RRP, and that undocked vesicles can contribute to the RRP by rapid recruitment to unoccupied, molecularly activated ready-to-release sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The vertebrate RCAN gene family: novel insights into evolution, structure and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Serrano-Candelas

    Full Text Available Recently there has been much interest in the Regulators of Calcineurin (RCAN proteins which are important endogenous modulators of the calcineurin-NFATc signalling pathway. They have been shown to have a crucial role in cellular programmes such as the immune response, muscle fibre remodelling and memory, but also in pathological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy and neurodegenerative diseases. In vertebrates, the RCAN family form a functional subfamily of three members RCAN1, RCAN2 and RCAN3 whereas only one RCAN is present in the rest of Eukarya. In addition, RCAN genes have been shown to collocate with RUNX and CLIC genes in ACD clusters (ACD21, ACD6 and ACD1. How the RCAN genes and their clustering in ACDs evolved is still unknown. After analysing RCAN gene family evolution using bioinformatic tools, we propose that the three RCAN vertebrate genes within the ACD clusters, which evolved from single copy genes present in invertebrates and lower eukaryotes, are the result of two rounds of whole genome duplication, followed by a segmental duplication. This evolutionary scenario involves the loss or gain of some RCAN genes during evolution. In addition, we have analysed RCAN gene structure and identified the existence of several characteristic features that can be involved in RCAN evolution and gene expression regulation. These included: several transposable elements, CpG islands in the 5' region of the genes, the existence of antisense transcripts (NAT associated with the three human genes, and considerable evidence for bidirectional promoters that regulate RCAN gene expression. Furthermore, we show that the CpG island associated with the RCAN3 gene promoter is unmethylated and transcriptionally active. All these results provide timely new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying RCAN function and a more in depth knowledge of this gene family whose members are obvious candidates for the development of future therapies.

  9. CYANOMETHANIMINE ISOMERS IN COLD INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS: INSIGHTS FROM ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND KINETIC CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazart, Fanny; Latouche, Camille; Skouteris, Dimitrios; Barone, Vincenzo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56125 Pisa (Italy); Balucani, Nadia [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Universitá degli Studi di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-09-10

    New insights into the formation of interstellar cyanomethanimine, a species of great relevance in prebiotic chemistry, are provided by electronic structure and kinetic calculations for the reaction CN + CH{sub 2} = NH. This reaction is a facile formation route of Z,E-C-cyanomethanimine, even under the extreme conditions of density and temperature typical of cold interstellar clouds. E-C-cyanomethanimine has been recently identified in Sgr B2(N) in the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) PRIMOS survey by P. Zaleski et al. and no efficient formation routes have been envisaged so far. The rate coefficient expression for the reaction channel leading to the observed isomer E-C-cyanomethanimine is 3.15 × 10-10 × (T/300){sup 0.152} × e{sup (−0.0948/T)}. According to the present study, the more stable Z-C-cyanomethanimine isomer is formed with a slightly larger yield (4.59 × 10{sup −10} × (T/300){sup 0.153} × e{sup (−0.0871/T)}. As the detection of E-isomer is favored due to its larger dipole moment, the missing detection of the Z-isomer can be due to the sensitivity limit of the GBT PRIMOS survey and the detection of the Z-isomer should be attempted with more sensitive instrumentation. The CN + CH{sub 2} = NH reaction can also play a role in the chemistry of the upper atmosphere of Titan where the cyanomethanimine products can contribute to the buildup of the observed nitrogen-rich organic aerosols that cover the moon.

  10. 3D-structured illumination microscopy provides novel insight into architecture of human centrosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina F. Sonnen

    2012-08-01

    Centrioles are essential for the formation of cilia and flagella. They also form the core of the centrosome, which organizes microtubule arrays important for cell shape, polarity, motility and division. Here, we have used super-resolution 3D-structured illumination microscopy to analyse the spatial relationship of 18 centriole and pericentriolar matrix (PCM components of human centrosomes at different cell cycle stages. During mitosis, PCM proteins formed extended networks with interspersed γ-Tubulin. During interphase, most proteins were arranged at specific distances from the walls of centrioles, resulting in ring staining, often with discernible density masses. Through use of site-specific antibodies, we found the C-terminus of Cep152 to be closer to centrioles than the N-terminus, illustrating the power of 3D-SIM to study protein disposition. Appendage proteins showed rings with multiple density masses, and the number of these masses was strongly reduced during mitosis. At the proximal end of centrioles, Sas-6 formed a dot at the site of daughter centriole assembly, consistent with its role in cartwheel formation. Plk4 and STIL co-localized with Sas-6, but Cep135 was associated mostly with mother centrioles. Remarkably, Plk4 formed a dot on the surface of the mother centriole before Sas-6 staining became detectable, indicating that Plk4 constitutes an early marker for the site of nascent centriole formation. Our study provides novel insights into the architecture of human centrosomes and illustrates the power of super-resolution microscopy in revealing the relative localization of centriole and PCM proteins in unprecedented detail.

  11. Mechanistic and structural insight into promiscuity based metabolism of cardiac drug digoxin by gut microbial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kundan; Jaiswal, Shubham K; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Srivastava, Gopal N; Sharma, Ashok K; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-12-23

    The recent advances in microbiome studies have revealed the role of gut microbiota in altering the pharmacological properties of oral drugs, which contributes to patient-response variation and undesired effect of the drug molecule. These studies are essential to guide us for achieving the desired efficacy and pharmacological activity of the existing drug molecule or for discovering novel and more effective therapeutics. However, one of the main limitations is the lack of atomistic details on the binding and metabolism of these drug molecules by gut-microbial enzymes. Therefore, in this study, for a well-known and important FDA-approved cardiac glycoside drug, digoxin, we report the atomistic details and energy economics for its binding and metabolism by the Cgr2 protein of Eggerthela lenta DSM 2243. It was observed that the binding pocket of digoxin to Cgr2 primarily involved the negatively charged polar amino acids and a few non-polar hydrophobic residues. The drug digoxin was found to bind Cgr2 at the same binding site as that of fumarate, which is the proposed natural substrate. However, digoxin showed a much lower binding energy (17.75 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) than the binding energy (42.17 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) of fumarate. This study provides mechanistic insights into the structural and promiscuity-based metabolism of widely used cardiac drug digoxin and presents a methodology, which could be useful to confirm the promiscuity-based metabolism of other orally administrated drugs by gut microbial enzymes and also help in designing strategies for improving the efficacy of the drugs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Decoding the Secret of Cancer by Means of Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Kosaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the recent outstanding developments in cancer biology is the emergence of extracellular vesicles (EVs. EVs, which are small membrane vesicles that contain proteins, mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, are secreted by a variety of cells and have been revealed to play an important role in intercellular communications. These molecules function in the recipient cells; this has brought new insight into cell-cell communication. Recent reports have shown that EVs contribute to cancer cell development, including tumor initiation, angiogenesis, immune surveillance, drug resistance, invasion, metastasis, maintenance of cancer stem cells, and EMT phenotype. In this review, I will summarize recent studies on EV-mediated miRNA transfer in cancer biology. Furthermore, I will also highlight the possibility of novel diagnostics and therapy using miRNAs in EVs against cancer.

  13. Decoding the Secret of Cancer by Means of Extracellular Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    One of the recent outstanding developments in cancer biology is the emergence of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, which are small membrane vesicles that contain proteins, mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs), are secreted by a variety of cells and have been revealed to play an important role in intercellular communications. These molecules function in the recipient cells; this has brought new insight into cell-cell communication. Recent reports have shown that EVs contribute to cancer cell development, including tumor initiation, angiogenesis, immune surveillance, drug resistance, invasion, metastasis, maintenance of cancer stem cells, and EMT phenotype. In this review, I will summarize recent studies on EV-mediated miRNA transfer in cancer biology. Furthermore, I will also highlight the possibility of novel diagnostics and therapy using miRNAs in EVs against cancer. PMID:26861408

  14. Shear-Induced Deformation of Surfactant Multilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommella, Angelo; Caserta, Sergio; Guida, Vincenzo; Guido, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    Surfactant multilamellar vesicles (SMLVs) play a key role in the formulation of many industrial products, such as detergents, foodstuff, and cosmetics. In this Letter, we present the first quantitative investigation of the flow behavior of single SMLVs in a shearing parallel plate apparatus. We found that SMLVs are deformed and oriented by the action of shear flow while keeping constant volume and exhibit complex dynamic modes (i.e., tumbling, breathing, and tank treading). This behavior can be explained in terms of an excess area (as compared to a sphere of the same volume) and of microstructural defects, which were observed by 3D shape reconstruction through confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the deformation and orientation of SMLVs scale with radius R in analogy with emulsion droplets and elastic capsules (instead of R3, such as in unilamellar vesicles). A possible application of the physical insight provided by this Letter is in the rationale design of processing methods of surfactant-based systems.

  15. Composition Effect of the Outer Layer on the Vesicle Fusion Catalyzed by Phospholipase D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Won [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzed the generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) from phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the outer layer of the vesicles prepared through layer by layer via a double emulsion technique. The generation induced a curvature change in the vesicles, which eventually led them to fuse each other. The ratio of two-fattyacid-tail ethanolamine (PE) to one-fatty-acid-tail ethanolamine (PE) was found to acquire the condition where the mixed-phospholipid vesicles were stable identically with pure two-fatty-acid-tail PC. The effect of the outer-layer mixture on the PLD-induced vesicle fusion was investigated using the fluorescence intensity change. 8-Aminonaph- thalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid disodium salt (ANTS) and p-Xylene-bis(N-pyridinium bromide) (DPX) were encapsulated in the vesicles, respectively, for the quantification of the fusion. The fluorescence scale was calibrated with the fluorescence of a 1/1 mixture of ANTS and DPX vesicles in NaCl buffer taken as 100% fluorescence (0% fusion) and the vesicles containing both ANTS and DPX as 0% fluorescence (100% fusion), considering the leakage into the medium studied directly in a separate experiment using vesicles containing both ANTS and DPX. The fusion data for each composition were acquired with the subtraction of the leakage from the quenching. From the monitoring, the vesicle fusion caused by the PLD reaction seems dominantly to occur rather than the vesicle lysis, because the composition effect on the fusion was observed identically with that on the change in the vesicle structure. Furthermore, the diameter measurements also support the fusion dominancy.

  16. A Perspective on Extracellular Vesicles Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Rosa-Fernandes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieved from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  17. A Perspective on Extracellular Vesicles Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Fernandes, Livia; Rocha, Victória Bombarda; Carregari, Victor Corasolla; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieved from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  18. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granick, Steve [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  19. Dynamics of endocytic vesicle creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Merrifield, Christien J

    2005-11-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the main path for receptor internalization in metazoans and is essential for controlling cell integrity and signaling. It is driven by a large array of protein and lipid interactions that have been deciphered mainly by biochemical and genetic means. To place these interactions into context, and ultimately build a fully operative model of endocytosis at the molecular level, it is necessary to know the kinetic details of the role of each protein in this process. In this review, we describe the recent efforts made, by using live cell imaging, to define clear steps in the formation of endocytic vesicles and to observe the recruitment of key proteins during membrane invagination, the scission of a newly formed vesicle, and its movement away from the plasma membrane.

  20. Extracellular vesicles and blood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shosaku

    2017-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by the exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis. EVs disseminate various bioactive effectors originating from the parent cells and transfer functional RNA and protein between cells, enabling them to alter vascular function and induce biological responses involved in vascular homeostasis. Although most EVs in human blood originate from platelets, EVs are also released from leukocytes, erythrocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and cancer cells. EVs were initially thought to be small particles with procoagulant activity; however, they can also evoke cellular responses in the immediate microenvironments and transport microRNAs (miRNA) into target cells. In this review, we summarize the recent literature relevant to EVs, including a growing list of clinical disorders that are associated with elevated EV levels. These studies suggest that EVs play roles in various blood diseases.

  1. A novel isolation strategy for obtaining crude membrane vesicles from bovine skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blans, Kristine; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Wiking, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Bovine milks content of phospholipid membranes have largely been explored in the cream fraction, and known as the milk fat globule membrane that surrounds fat droplets. In skim milk, the population of phospholipid membranes is reported to constitute membrane vesicles with a soluble content known...... components. Here we present a novel strategy for a short, gentle and non-denaturing isolation of skim milk-derived membrane vesicles. Methods: Untreated fresh bovine milk was defatted to remove milk fat globules. The resulting skim milk was subjected to ultracentrifugation. The resulting ochre...... fraction can be obtained from skim milk by ultracentrifugation. Casein micelle remnants as well as smaller protein components in the crude vesicle fraction can be successfully removed by size chromatography. Electron microscopy of the vesicle isolate reveals circular structures with membrane vesicle...

  2. Complex dynamics of a bilamellar vesicle as a simple model for leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoui, Badr; Krüger, Timm; Harting, Jens

    The influence of the internal structure of a biological cell (e.g., a leukocyte) on its dynamics and rheology is not yet fully understood. By using 2D numerical simulations of a bilamellar vesicle (BLV) consisting of two vesicles as a cell model, we find that increasing the size of the inner vesicle (mimicking the nucleus) triggers a tank-treading-to-tumbling transition. A new dynamical state is observed, the undulating motion: the BLV inclination with respect to the imposed flow oscillates while the outer vesicle develops rotating lobes. The BLV exhibits a non-Newtonian behavior with a time-dependent apparent viscosity during its unsteady motion. Depending on its inclination and on its inner vesicle dynamical state, the BLV behaves like a solid or a liquid.

  3. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current data, these vesicular components play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with cancer development, progression and therapeutic failures. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, and genetic exchange. These tumor-derived extracellular vesicles not only to represent a central mediator of the tumor microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for tumor biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. PMID:23908664

  4. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  5. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  6. SnoRNAs from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa: structural, functional and evolutionary insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun-Long

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SnoRNAs represent an excellent model for studying the structural and functional evolution of small non-coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional modification machinery for rRNAs and snRNAs in eukaryotic cells. Identification of snoRNAs from Neurospora crassa, an important model organism playing key roles in the development of modern genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology will provide insights into the evolution of snoRNA genes in the fungus kingdom. Results Fifty five box C/D snoRNAs were identified and predicted to guide 71 2'-O-methylated sites including four sites on snRNAs and three sites on tRNAs. Additionally, twenty box H/ACA snoRNAs, which potentially guide 17 pseudouridylations on rRNAs, were also identified. Although not exhaustive, the study provides the first comprehensive list of two major families of snoRNAs from the filamentous fungus N. crassa. The independently transcribed strategy dominates in the expression of box H/ACA snoRNA genes, whereas most of the box C/D snoRNA genes are intron-encoded. This shows that different genomic organizations and expression modes have been adopted by the two major classes of snoRNA genes in N. crassa . Remarkably, five gene clusters represent an outstanding organization of box C/D snoRNA genes, which are well conserved among yeasts and multicellular fungi, implying their functional importance for the fungus cells. Interestingly, alternative splicing events were found in the expression of two polycistronic snoRNA gene hosts that resemble the UHG-like genes in mammals. Phylogenetic analysis further revealed that the extensive separation and recombination of two functional elements of snoRNA genes has occurred during fungus evolution. Conclusion This is the first genome-wide analysis of the filamentous fungus N. crassa snoRNAs that aids in understanding the differences between unicellular fungi and multicellular fungi. As compared with two yeasts, a more complex

  7. Synaptic Vesicles Studied by SAXS: Derivation and Validation of a Model Form Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorph, S; Ghosh, S K; Salditt, T [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Arleth, L [Biophysics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Sztucki, M [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Vainio, U [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Holt, M; Jahn, R, E-mail: scastor@gwdg.d, E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.d [Max Planck Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Department of Neurobiology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    We discuss different spherically symmetric and anisotropic form factor models and test them against high resolution synchrotron based small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) data from synaptic vesicles (SVs), isolated from rat brain. Anisotropy of the model form factors is found to be a key ingredient for the description of the native synaptic vesicle structure. We describe changes in structural parameters due to protease digestion of SVs, and present SAXS data of SVs recorded under different pH conditions.

  8. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farsi, Z.; Preobraschenski, J.; Bogaart, G. van den; Riedel, D.; Jahn, R.; Woehler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided

  9. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Contributors in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiougiannis, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including microvesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies are recognized as carriers of pathogen-associated molecules with direct involvement in immune signaling and inflammation. Those observations have enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as promising immunotherapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in autoimmunity and highlights their potential use as disease biomarkers as well as targets for ...

  10. Exosomes: secreted vesicles and intercellular communications

    OpenAIRE

    Théry, Clotilde

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin secreted by most cell types, and are thought to play important roles in intercellular communications. Although exosomes were originally described in 1983, interest in these vesicles has really increased dramatically in the last 3 years, after the finding that they contain mRNA and microRNA. This discovery sparked renewed interest for the general field of membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communications, and research on these s...

  11. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    1997-01-01

    orders of magnitude larger than where the local free energy minima of the equilibrium vesicle actually occur. Moreover, according to our analysis, the relative width of a vesicle size distribution, sigma(R)/R-max, is generally at full equilibrium equal to 0.283, independently of the energetic vesicle....... and a statistical-mechanical factor that accounts for the fluctuations in composition, chain packing density and shape. We demonstrate that the free energy required to form a spherical vesicle is made up of two main contributions: the (size-independent) work of bending the constituent monolayers and the work...

  12. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Shigeru; Lotz, Martin K

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles carry bioactive molecules that can be transferred between cells and tissues. The purpose of this review is to describe how extracellular vesicles regulate functions of cells in cartilage and other joint tissues. The potential application of extracellular vesicles in the treatment of osteoarthritis and as biomarkers will also be discussed. Extracellular vesicles are found in synovial fluid, in articular cartilage and in the supernatants of synoviocytes and chondrocytes. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage have been proposed to be involved in cross talk between cells in joint tissues and to affect extracellular matrix turnover and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles from arthritic joints can promote abnormal gene expression and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, including abnormal mineralization. Promising results were obtained in the therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles for cartilage repair and experimental osteoarthritis. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as vehicles for the exchange of bioactive signaling molecules within cartilage and between joint tissues to promote joint homeostasis and arthritis pathogenesis. As the molecular content of extracellular vesicles can be customized, they offer utility in therapeutic applications.

  13. Kinetic partitioning between aggregation and vesicle permeabilization by modified ADan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesgaard, Lise W.; Vad, Brian; Christiansen, Gunna

    2009-01-01

    changed to serines to emulate the reduced peptide. SerADan aggregates rapidly at pH 5.0 and 7.5 in a series of conformational transitions to form beta-sheet rich fibril-like structures, which nevertheless do not bind amyloid-specific dyes, probably due to the absence of organized beta-sheet contacts....... Aggregation is prevented at neutral/acidic pH and low ionic strength by anionic lipid vesicles. These vesicles are permeabilized by monomeric SerADan assembling on the membrane to form stable beta-sheet structures which are different from the solution aggregates. In contrast, solution ageing of SerADan first......-fibrillar aggregates can assemble in a series of steps to form a hierarchy of higher-order assemblies, where rapid formation of stable local beta-sheet structure may prevent rearrangement to amyloid proper....

  14. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Fathi-Azarbayjani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes, were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05. FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p < 0.01. Low skin permeability of drug from the other lipid suspensions could be due to the entrapment of diclofenac within these vesicles which decreased the solubility of the hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively.

  15. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weimin; Chen, Mingxue; Huang, Jingxiang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Mingjie; Li, Penghao; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Zhang, Li; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies. PMID:28078284

  17. Polymeric vesicles: from drug carriers to nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Pascal; Baumann, Patric; Enea, Ramona; Onaca, Ozana; Palivan, Cornelia; Meier, Wolfgang

    2011-10-18

    One strategy in modern medicine is the development of new platforms that combine multifunctional compounds with stable, safe carriers in patient-oriented therapeutic strategies. The simultaneous detection and treatment of pathological events through interactions manipulated at the molecular level offer treatment strategies that can decrease side effects resulting from conventional therapeutic approaches. Several types of nanocarriers have been proposed for biomedical purposes, including inorganic nanoparticles, lipid aggregates, including liposomes, and synthetic polymeric systems, such as vesicles, micelles, or nanotubes. Polymeric vesicles--structures similar to lipid vesicles but created using synthetic block copolymers--represent an excellent candidate for new nanocarriers for medical applications. These structures are more stable than liposomes but retain their low immunogenicity. Significant efforts have been made to improve the size, membrane flexibility, and permeability of polymeric vesicles and to enhance their target specificity. The optimization of these properties will allow researchers to design smart compartments that can co-encapsulate sensitive molecules, such as RNA, enzymes, and proteins, and their membranes allow insertion of membrane proteins rather than simply serving as passive carriers. In this Account, we illustrate the advances that are shifting these molecular systems from simple polymeric carriers to smart-complex protein-polymer assemblies, such as nanoreactors or synthetic organelles. Polymeric vesicles generated by the self-assembly of amphiphilic copolymers (polymersomes) offer the advantage of simultaneous encapsulation of hydrophilic compounds in their aqueous cavities and the insertion of fragile, hydrophobic compounds in their membranes. This strategy has permitted us and others to design and develop new systems such as nanoreactors and artificial organelles in which active compounds are simultaneously protected and allowed to

  18. Effects of Curvature and Composition on α-Synuclein Binding to Lipid Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth R.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the presence of intracellular aggregates composed primarily of the neuronal protein α-synuclein (αS). Interactions between αS and various cellular membranes are thought to be important to its native function as well as relevant to its role in disease. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate binding of αS to lipid vesicles as a function of the lipid composition and membrane curvature. We determine how these parameters affect the molar partition coefficient of αS, providing a quantitative measure of the binding energy, and calculate the number of lipids required to bind a single protein. Specific anionic lipids have a large effect on the free energy of binding. Lipid chain saturation influences the binding interaction to a lesser extent, with larger partition coefficients measured for gel-phase vesicles than for fluid-phase vesicles, even in the absence of anionic lipid components. Although we observe variability in the binding of the mutant proteins, differences in the free energies of partitioning are less dramatic than with varied lipid compositions. Vesicle curvature has a strong effect on the binding affinity, with a >15-fold increase in affinity for small unilamellar vesicles over large unilamellar vesicles, suggesting that αS may be a curvature-sensing protein. Our findings provide insight into how physical properties of the membrane may modulate interactions of αS with cellular membranes. PMID:20923663

  19. Fibronectin-Containing Extracellular Vesicles Protect Melanocytes against Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Nan-Hyung; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kim, Sung Tae; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Ai-Young; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Eun-Gyung

    2016-05-01

    Skin melanocytes are activated by exposure to UV radiation to secrete melanin-containing melanosomes to protect the skin from UV-induced damage. Despite the continuous renewal of the epidermis, the turnover rate of melanocytes is very slow, and they survive for long periods. However, the mechanisms underlying the survival of melanocytes exposed to UV radiation are not known. Here, we investigated the role of melanocyte-derived extracellular vesicles in melanocyte survival. Network analysis of the melanocyte extracellular vesicle proteome identified the extracellular matrix component fibronectin at a central node, and the release of fibronectin-containing extracellular vesicles was increased after exposure of melanocytes to UVB radiation. Using an anti-fibronectin neutralizing antibody and specific inhibitors of extracellular vesicle secretion, we demonstrated that extracellular vesicles enriched in fibronectin were involved in melanocyte survival after UVB radiation. Furthermore, we observed that in the hyperpigmented lesions of patients with melasma, the extracellular space around melanocytes contained more fibronectin compared with normal skin, suggesting that fibronectin is involved in maintaining melanocytes in pathological conditions. Collectively, our findings suggest that melanocytes secrete fibronectin-containing extracellular vesicles to increase their survival after UVB radiation. These data provide important insight into how constantly stimulated melanocytes can be maintained in pathological conditions such as melasma. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sites of glucose transporter-4 vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane correlate spatially with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennine M Dawicki-McKenna

    Full Text Available In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin, preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion.

  1. Sites of Glucose Transporter-4 Vesicle Fusion with the Plasma Membrane Correlate Spatially with Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicki-McKenna, Jennine M.; Goldman, Yale E.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2012-01-01

    In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin), preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion. PMID:22916292

  2. Aggregates of Two-Dimensional Vesicles: Rouleaux, Sheets, and Convergent Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziherl, P.

    2007-09-01

    Using both numerical and variational minimization of the bending and adhesion energy of two-dimensional lipid vesicles, we study their aggregation, and we find that the stable aggregates include an infinite number of vesicles and that they arrange either in a columnar or in a sheetlike structure. We calculate the stability diagram and we show that the sheetlike aggregate can be transformed into the columnar aggregate via vesicle intercalation, which makes the transformation reminiscent of the process of convergent extension observed in some biological tissues.

  3. Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Das, Saumya; Rodosthenous, Rodosthenis S; Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Radosinska, Jana; Bartekova, Monika; Jansen, Felix; Li, Qian; Rajasingh, Johnson; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small bilayer lipid membrane vesicles that can be released by most cell types and detected in most body fluids. EVs exert key functions for intercellular communication via transferring their bioactive cargos to recipient cells or activating signaling pathways in target cells. Increasing evidence has shown the important regulatory effects of EVs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). EVs secreted by cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem cells play essential roles in pathophysiological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte survival and apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, and angiogenesis in relation to CVDs. In this review, we will first outline the current knowledge about the physical characteristics, biological contents, and isolation methods of EVs. We will then focus on the functional roles of cardiovascular EVs and their pathophysiological effects in CVDs, as well as summarize the potential of EVs as therapeutic agents and biomarkers for CVDs. Finally, we will discuss the specific application of EVs as a novel drug delivery system and the utility of EVs in the field of regenerative medicine.

  4. Intact deposition of cationic vesicles on anionic cellulose fibers: Role of vesicle size, polydispersity, and substrate roughness studied via streaming potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhijeet; Gilson, Laurent; Henrich, Franziska; Dahl, Verena; Kleinen, Jochen; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Venzmer, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanism of intact vesicle deposition on solid surfaces is important for effective utilization of vesicles as active ingredient carriers in applications such as drug delivery and fabric softening. In this study, the deposition of large (davg=12μm) and small (davg=0.27μm) cationic vesicles of ditallowethylester dimethylammonium chloride (DEEDMAC) on smooth and rough anionic cellulose fibers is investigated. The deposition process is studied quantitatively using streaming potential measurements and spectrophotometric determination of DEEDMAC concentrations. Natural and regenerated cellulose fibers, namely cotton and viscose, having rough and smooth surfaces, respectively, are used as adsorbents. Equilibrium deposition data and profiles of substrate streaming potential variation with deposition are used to gain insights into the fate of vesicles upon deposition and the deposition mechanism. Intact deposition of DEEDMAC vesicles is ascertained based on streaming potential variation with deposition in the form of characteristic saturating profiles which symbolize particle-like deposition. The same is also confirmed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Substrate roughness is found to considerably influence the deposition mechanism which, in a novel application of electrokinetic methods, is elucidated via streaming potential measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The NMR structure of human obestatin in membrane-like environments: insights into the structure-bioactivity relationship of obestatin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alén, Begoña O; Nieto, Lidia; Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Álvarez-Pérez, Juan C; Otero-Alén, María; Camiña, Jesús P; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Martín-Pastor, Manuel; Casanueva, Felipe F; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Pazos, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    The quest for therapeutic applications of obestatin involves, as a first step, the determination of its 3D solution structure and the relationship between this structure and the biological activity of obestatin...

  6. Thin shell vesicles composed of hydrophilic plate-like nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    Nanopowders of graphene oxide, montmorillonite and laponite spontaneously delaminate into ultrathin nanoscopic plates when dispersed in water. These plates, which are typically ~ 1 nm thick and microns in lateral dimension, have found many uses as precursors to graphene, ceramics, layer-by-layer structures, and as structural modifiers of nanocomposites. Here we show that mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap can assemble hydrophilic plate-like particles on air bubbles, forming stable nanoplated armored bubbles. Translucent inorganic vesicles (vesicles defined here as closed thin-shelled structures with the same liquid inside and outside) of these particles are produced when the nanoplated armored bubbles are exposed to common water-miscible organic liquids and surfactants. These inorganic vesicles are mechanically robust, have walls that are about six nanometres thick, and are perforated with pores of submicron dimensions. We characterize the phenomenon and find that a wetting transition at the scale of the nanoparticles is the primary mechanism of formation. The discovery of these novel inorganic structures raises a wealth of questions of fundamental interest in materials and surface science.

  7. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario (JHU); (Florida)

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  8. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for trackin...

  9. Amyloglucosidase enzymatic reactivity inside lipid vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin-Woo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient functioning of enzymes inside liposomes would open new avenues for applications in biocatalysis and bioanalytical tools. In this study, the entrapment of amyloglucosidase (AMG (EC 3.2.1.3 from Aspergillus niger into dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs and large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated. Negative-stain, freeze-fracture, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy images verified vesicle formation in the presence of AMG. Vesicles with entrapped AMG were isolated from the solution by centrifugation, and vesicle lamellarity was identified using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. The kinetics of starch hydrolysis by AMG was modeled for two different systems, free enzyme in aqueous solution and entrapped enzyme within vesicles in aqueous suspension. For the free enzyme system, intrinsic kinetics were described by a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with product inhibition. The kinetic constants, Vmax and Km, were determined by initial velocity measurements, and Ki was obtained by fitting the model to experimental data of glucose concentration-time curves. Predicted concentration-time curves using these kinetic constants were in good agreement with experimental measurements. In the case of the vesicles, the time-dependence of product (glucose formation was experimentally determined and simulated by considering the kinetic behavior of the enzyme and the permeation of substrate into the vesicle. Experimental results demonstrated that entrapped enzymes were much more stable than free enyzme. The entrapped enzyme could be recycled with retention of 60% activity after 3 cycles. These methodologies can be useful in evaluating other liposomal catalysis operations.

  10. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  11. Detection of extracellular vesicles: size does matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cells release small sacks filled with fluid, which are called "extracellular vesicles". The diameter of extracellular vesicles (EV) typically ranges from 30 nm to 1 µm. Because cells release EV into their environment, our body fluids contain numerous EV. Cells release EV to remove waste and to

  12. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-02

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Urinary extracellular vesicles: biomarkers and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Salih (Mahdi)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractExtracellular vesicles have been isolated in various body fluids including urine. The cargo of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) is composed of proteins and nucleic acids reflecting the physiological and possibly the pathophysiological state of cells lining the nephron. Because

  14. Energy transduction inside vesicles, photocatalysis by titanium dioxide and formation of NADH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David; Noveron, Juan; Rodoni, David; Basa, Ranor

    A number of theories on the origin and early evolution of life have focused on the role of lipid bilayer membrane structures (vesicles). These vesicles are similar to modern cellular membranes , and have been postulated to have been abiotically formed and spontaneously assemble on the prebiotic Earth to provide compartments for early cellular life. They can contain water-soluble species, concentrate species, and have the potential to catalyze reactions. The origin of the use of photochemical energy to drive metabolism (ie. energy transduction) is also one of the central issues in our attempts to understand the origin and evolution of life. When did energy transduction and photosynthesis begin? What was the original system for capturing photochemical energy? How simple can such a system be? It has been postulated that vesicle structures developed the ability to capture and transduce light, providing energy for reactions. It has been shown that pH gradients can be photo-chemically created, but it has been found difficult to couple these to drive chemical reactions. Minerals can introduce a number of properties to a vesicle system. The incorporation of clay particles into vesicles can provide catalytic activity that mediates both vesicle assembly and RNA oligomerization. It is known that colloidal semiconducting mineral particles can act as photocatalysts and drive redox chemistry. We show that encapsulation of these particles has the potential to provide a source of energy transduction inside vesicles, and thereby drive protocellular chemistry and represent a model system for early photosynthesis. TiO2 particles can be incorporated into vesicles and retain their photoactivity through the dehydration/rehydration cycles that have been shown to be able concentrate species inside a vesicle. It is shown that these can be used to produce biochemical species such as enzymatically active NADH in such structures. This system demonstrates a simple energy source inside vesicles

  15. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Best practice of identification and proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kovács, Árpád; Visnovitz, Tamás; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Turiák, Lilla; Buzás, Edit I

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles are emerging sources of biomarkers for modern preventive and precision medicine. Extracellular vesicles in body fluids offer a unique opportunity for integrative biomarker approaches due to their complex biocargo that includes proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and metabolites. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics data suggest that a significant portion of human proteins are sorted into extracellular vesicles and amenable for biomarker discovery schemes. Areas covered: this review focuses on key aspects of isolation, quality control and subsequent analysis of blood plasma- and conditioned medium-derived extracellular vesicle proteins, and summarizes the current state-of-the-art in the field. Furthermore, it provides introduction and guidelines for mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles. Expert commentary: Comparison of newly developed isolation and purification techniques with classical ultracentrifugation-based approaches are highly recommended. It is also essential to use multiple analytical approaches to characterize the isolated extracellular vesicles prior to characterization of their biocargo. Rigor in data reproducibility, critical data analysis, awareness of potential pitfalls, standardization and benchmarking are required for extracellular vesicle research to fulfil the current expectation that these subcellular structures can become a valid source of next generation biomarkers.

  17. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  18. Extracellular vesicles: new players in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaceb, Abderahim; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular vesicles, particles released by all cell types, represent a new way to convey information between cells such as proteins, second messengers, and genetic information to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. Recent data suggest that extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in both physiology and pathology, including coagulation, angiogenesis, cell survival, modulation of the immune response, and inflammation. Thus extracellular vesicles participate in the processes of cardiovascular diseases from atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction to heart failure. Consequently, extracellular vesicles can potentially be exploited for therapy, prognosis, and biomarkers for health and disease. This review focuses on the role of extracellular vesicles in the development of cardiovascular diseases, as well as the deleterious and beneficial effects that they may provide in vascular cells and myocardium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Transvesical Removal of Seminal Vesicle Cystadenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Kenta; Harada, Jiro; Kawa, Gen; Ota, Syuichi; Sakurai, Takanori

    2015-07-01

    Primary tumors of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. There have been 25 reports of this tumor from overseas and most cases are cystadenoma. We report a case of seminal vesicle cystadenoma in a 70-year-old man who presented with lower abdominal pain and urinary frequency. A digital rectal examination detected a projecting and hard mass in the right side of the prostate. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 15 cm multiple cystic mass continuous with the right seminal vesicle. A transrectal needle biopsy revealed benign tissue. The tumor was resected using an open transvesical approach that enabled full exposure of the seminal vesicle without damaging the nerves and blood supply of the bladder. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. We describe the natural history, pathology,and surgical approach in this case.

  20. Pushing synaptic vesicles over the RIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S

    2011-05-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, neurotransmitter release is largely restricted to specialized sites called active zones. Active zones consist of a complex protein network, and they organize fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in response to action potentials. Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs) are central components of active zones. In a recent series of experiments, we have systematically dissected the molecular mechanisms by which RIMs operate in synaptic vesicle release. We found that RIMs execute two critical functions of active zones by virtue of independent protein domains. They tether presyanptic Ca(2+) channels to the active zone, and they activate priming of synaptic vesicles by monomerizing homodimeric, constitutively inactive Munc13. These data indicate that RIMs orchestrate synaptic vesicle release into a coherent process. In conjunction with previous studies, they suggest that RIMs form a molecular platform on which plasticity of synaptic vesicle release can operate.

  1. Apoptotic Bodies: Selective Detection in Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul; Wang, Sha; Didenko, Vladimir V

    2017-01-01

    Normal and dying cells release various types of membrane-bound vesicles including microvesicles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication and signal transduction. However, their diverse forms and subtypes fluctuate in size and other properties. In result current purification approaches do not fully discriminate between different categories of extracellular vesicles. Here, we present a fluorescence technique that specifically identifies apoptotic bodies in preparations of microvesicles, exosomes, and other extracellular vesicles.The approach exclusively labels the vesicles that contain DNA with 5'PO 4 blunt-ended DNA breaks, such as those produced by the apoptotic CAD nuclease during apoptotic DNA degradation. The technique can be useful in studies of apoptosis involving microvesicles and exosomes.

  2. Influences of the Living World on Architectural Structures: An Analytical Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülcan MİNSOLMAZ YELER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structures in the nature motivate innovation in architectural and engineering disciplines in termsof aesthetical, functional and structural advantages. Using efficient, lightweight structural forms similar tothose in nature reduces material and energy usage and waste amount. In this sense, it can be clearly seenthat based on learning from nature in relation to meeting gradually increasing and changing requirementsthrough limited resources and creating modern structural designs, biomimicry will provide much morecontribution on architecture and related fields. In this direction, in the study based on comprehensiveliterature research, lots of varying living organisms in the nature have been analyzed in terms of structure;architectural structures developed by inspiring from natural structures have been sampled and influencesof solutions inspired from nature on architectural environment have been focused.

  3. Monosaccharide transport in protein-depleted vesicles from erythrocyte membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M A Zoccoli; G E Lienhard

    1977-01-01

    .... Based on comparisons between erythrocytes and vesicles with regard to specificity, temparture dependence, and effects of inhibitors, we conclude that sorbose uptake into the vesicles occurs by way...

  4. The Structure of Allophanate Hydrolase from Granulibacter bethesdensis Provides Insights into Substrate Specificity in the Amidase Signature Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Maurice, Martin [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Allophanate hydrolase (AH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of allophanate, an intermediate in atrazine degradation and urea catabolism pathways, to NH3 and CO2. AH belongs to the amidase signature family, which is characterized by a conserved block of 130 amino acids rich in Gly and Ser and a Ser-cis-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. In this study, the first structures of AH fromGranulibacter bethesdensis were determined, with and without the substrate analogue malonate, to 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures confirm the identity of the catalytic triad residues and reveal an altered dimerization interface that is not conserved in the amidase signature family. The structures also provide insights into previously unrecognized substrate specificity determinants in AH. Two residues, Tyr299 and Arg307, are within hydrogen bonding distance of a carboxylate moiety of malonate. Both Tyr299 and Arg307 were mutated, and the resulting modified enzymes revealed >3 order of magnitude reductions in both catalytic efficiency and substrate stringency. It is proposed that Tyr299 and Arg307 serve to anchor and orient the substrate for attack by the catalytic nucleophile, Ser172. The structure further suggests the presence of a unique C-terminal domain in AH. While this domain is conserved, it does not contribute to catalysis or to the structural integrity of the core domain, suggesting that it may play a role in mediating transient and specific interactions with the urea carboxylase component of urea amidolyase. Analysis of the AH active site architecture offers new insights into common determinants of catalysis and specificity among divergent members of the amidase signature family.

  5. Exploring the potential of a structural alphabet-based tool for mining multiple target conformations and target flexibility insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regad, Leslie; Chéron, Jean-Baptiste; Triki, Dhoha; Senac, Caroline; Flatters, Delphine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Protein flexibility is often implied in binding with different partners and is essential for protein function. The growing number of macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank entries and their redundancy has become a major source of structural knowledge of the protein universe. The analysis of structural variability through available redundant structures of a target, called multiple target conformations (MTC), obtained using experimental or modeling methods and under different biological conditions or different sources is one way to explore protein flexibility. This analysis is essential to improve the understanding of various mechanisms associated with protein target function and flexibility. In this study, we explored structural variability of three biological targets by analyzing different MTC sets associated with these targets. To facilitate the study of these MTC sets, we have developed an efficient tool, SA-conf, dedicated to capturing and linking the amino acid and local structure variability and analyzing the target structural variability space. The advantage of SA-conf is that it could be applied to divers sets composed of MTCs available in the PDB obtained using NMR and crystallography or homology models. This tool could also be applied to analyze MTC sets obtained by dynamics approaches. Our results showed that SA-conf tool is effective to quantify the structural variability of a MTC set and to localize the structural variable positions and regions of the target. By selecting adapted MTC subsets and comparing their variability detected by SA-conf, we highlighted different sources of target flexibility such as induced by binding partner, by mutation and intrinsic flexibility. Our results support the interest to mine available structures associated with a target using to offer valuable insight into target flexibility and interaction mechanisms. The SA-conf executable script, with a set of pre-compiled binaries are available at http://www.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr/recherche/plateformes/logiciels.

  6. Exploring the potential of a structural alphabet-based tool for mining multiple target conformations and target flexibility insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Regad

    Full Text Available Protein flexibility is often implied in binding with different partners and is essential for protein function. The growing number of macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank entries and their redundancy has become a major source of structural knowledge of the protein universe. The analysis of structural variability through available redundant structures of a target, called multiple target conformations (MTC, obtained using experimental or modeling methods and under different biological conditions or different sources is one way to explore protein flexibility. This analysis is essential to improve the understanding of various mechanisms associated with protein target function and flexibility. In this study, we explored structural variability of three biological targets by analyzing different MTC sets associated with these targets. To facilitate the study of these MTC sets, we have developed an efficient tool, SA-conf, dedicated to capturing and linking the amino acid and local structure variability and analyzing the target structural variability space. The advantage of SA-conf is that it could be applied to divers sets composed of MTCs available in the PDB obtained using NMR and crystallography or homology models. This tool could also be applied to analyze MTC sets obtained by dynamics approaches. Our results showed that SA-conf tool is effective to quantify the structural variability of a MTC set and to localize the structural variable positions and regions of the target. By selecting adapted MTC subsets and comparing their variability detected by SA-conf, we highlighted different sources of target flexibility such as induced by binding partner, by mutation and intrinsic flexibility. Our results support the interest to mine available structures associated with a target using to offer valuable insight into target flexibility and interaction mechanisms. The SA-conf executable script, with a set of pre-compiled binaries are available at

  7. New insight into the structure and function of Hfq C-terminus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fortas, Emilie; Piccirilli, Federica; Malabirade, Antoine; Militello, Valeria; Trépout, Sylvain; Marco, Sergio; Taghbalout, Aziz; Arluison, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that RNA metabolism components assemble into supramolecular cellular structures to mediate functional compartmentalization within the cytoplasmic membrane of the bacterial cell...

  8. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Weck, P F; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D

    2015-10-21

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence-expressed in terms of total cross sections-as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies.

  9. Widespread Structural and Functional Connectivity Changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Insights from Advanced Neuroimaging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojsi, Francesca; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease principally affecting motor neurons. Besides motor symptoms, a subset of patients develop cognitive disturbances or even frontotemporal dementia (FTD), indicating that ALS may also involve extramotor brain regions. Both neuropathological and neuroimaging findings have provided further insight on the widespread effect of the neurodegeneration on brain connectivity and the underlying neurobiology of motor neurons degeneration. However, associated effects on motor and extramotor brain networks are largely unknown. Particularly, neuropathological findings suggest that ALS not only affects the frontotemporal network but rather is part of a wide clinicopathological spectrum of brain disorders known as TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the neuropsychological and neuropathological sequelae of TDP-43 proteinopathies, with special focus on the neuroimaging findings associated with cognitive change in ALS. PMID:22720174

  10. An Insight towards Conceptual Understanding: Looking into the Molecular Structures of Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyulgan, Melis Arzu; Akkuzu, Nalan

    2016-01-01

    The subject of molecular structures is one of the most important and complex subject in chemistry which a majority of the undergraduate students have difficulties to understand its concepts and characteristics correctly. To comprehend the molecular structures and their characteristics the students need to understand related subjects such as Lewis…

  11. Sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation in an unstable oxide glass former: insights into the structural heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Zhang, Yanfei

    Structural heterogeneity plays a crucial role in determining functionality of glasses. In this work we have found that the sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation pattern in a hyperquenched glass is highly sensitive to structural heterogeneity. As a consequence, the former can be used as an effective approach...... we chose the glass compositions with very different glass stabilities to crystallization. By using hyperquenching-annealing-calorimetry approach, we have observed that the pattern of calorimetric response below Tg dramatically varies with glass composition. The variations are attributed to different...... to detect and quantify the structural heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. However, the chemical nature of structural heterogeneity should be revealed by other means such as high resolution microscopic and spectroscopic methods. To study the impact of the structural heterogeneity on the sub-Tg relaxation...

  12. Insights into the architecture of the replicative helicase from the structure of an archaeal MCM homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Brian; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Costa, Alessandro; Onesti, Silvia; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Lin, Yuyen; Cann, Isaac K O; Nair, Satish K

    2009-02-13

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins, members of the AAA+ (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) superfamily, are believed to constitute the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal species. Here, we present the 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of a monomeric MCM homolog from Methanopyrus kandleri, the first crystallographic structure of a full-length MCM. We also present an 18 A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the hexameric MCM from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, and fit the atomic resolution crystal structure into the reconstruction in order to generate an atomic model for the oligomeric assembly. These structural data reveal a distinct active site topology consisting of a unique arrangement of critical determinants. The structures also provide a molecular framework for understanding the functional contributions of trans-acting elements that facilitate intersubunit crosstalk in response to DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis.

  13. Structural Insights on the bacteriolytic and self-protection mechanism of muramidase effector Tse3 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianbo; Zhang, Weili; Liu, Qisong; Gao, Yu; Gao, Ying; Wang, Yun; Wang, David Zhigang; Li, Zigang; Wang, Tao

    2013-10-18

    The warfare among microbial species as well as between pathogens and hosts is fierce, complicated, and continuous. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the muramidase effector Tse3 (Type VI secretion exported 3) can be injected into the periplasm of neighboring bacterial competitors by a Type VI secretion apparatus, eventually leading to cell lysis and death. However, P. aeruginosa protects itself from lysis by expressing immune protein Tsi3 (Type six secretion immunity 3). Here, we report the crystal structure of the Tse3-Tsi3 complex at 1.8 Å resolution, revealing that Tse3 possesses one open accessible, goose-type lysozyme-like domain with peptidoglycan hydrolysis activity. Calcium ions bind specifically in the Tse3 active site and are identified to be crucial for its bacteriolytic activity. In combination with biochemical studies, the structural basis of self-protection mechanism of Tsi3 is also elucidated, thus providing an understanding and new insights into the effectors of Type VI secretion system.

  14. New Insights into the Structure of the Vapor/Water Interface from Large-Scale First-Principles Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Thomas D; Pascal, Tod A; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Jung, Yousung

    2011-01-20

    We present extensive ab initio simulations of the molecular arrangements at the vapor/water interface, which provide valuable insights into the interface structure. In particular, the simulations address the controversy of whether there is a significant amount of nondonor configurations at this prototypical interface, using a novel Car-Parrinello-like ab initio molecular dynamics approach. The interface is modeled by a system of 384 water molecules for 125 ps in a two-dimensional periodic slab, the most extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulation to date. In contrast to previous theoretical simulations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, but consistent with sum-frequency generation experiments, we observe no evidence for a significant occurrence of acceptor-only species at the vapor/water interface. Besides a distinct surface relaxation effect, we find that only the topmost layers of the interface obey structural order.

  15. Interaction between compressional and transcurrent structures: insights from the Sicilian Channel and SW Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorik, J.; Toscani, G.; Lodolo, E.; Bonini, L.; Seno, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Sicilian Channel presents a very remarkable structural complexity due to the presence and superposition of compressional, extensional and transcurrent structures. In particular, the SW Sicily and its offshore area are affected by two different tectonic processes: (1) compressional, responsible of the Late Miocene Maghrebian Fold-Thrust Belt; (2) transcurrent, responsible of the NS trending lineaments modeled offshore. A geophysical data set composed by seismic reflection profiles (VIDEPI, MS, CROP, OGS profiles) and GEBCO bathymetric data, in addition with analog models, have been used here to shed light on the interaction between the thrust belt and transcurrent deformation.We use clay box with thrust front precut and an undergoing mobile plate for the simulation of the transcurrent movement. Through this setup the interaction angle between the thrust belt and transcurrent displacement was varied in order to check the influence of the interaction angle on the newly formed structures. From the 3D model, we have seen that the region is dominated by N-NE transpressional structure called Sciacca structural high. In the southern part of this structure some faults are still active, as they deform the sea-floor. Lateral branches composing positive flower structures form an open horsetail splays. The plate on the eastern side of the Sciacca high is uplifted due a transpressional displacement and shortening in front of Maghrebian Fold-Thrust Belt. The analog modelling supports the structural setting of Sciacca high, where we equally observe comparable positive flower structures, horsetail splays, and uplift of the moving plate. From the offshore dataset we have seen that these two geodynamic processes coexist independently, but from the onshore structural map, the transcurrent strike-slip deformation affects the Maghrebian Fold-Thrust Belt. These two coexisting geodynamic processes can help in interpreting the 1968 Belice earthquake sequence, where both right

  16. U{sup 6+} minerals and inorganic compounds: insights into an expanded structural hierarchy of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, P.C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, Notre Dame, Indiana (United States); Argonne National Lab., Chemistry Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States)], E-mail: pburns@ndu.edu

    2005-12-15

    The crystal structures of uranyl minerals and inorganic uranyl compounds are important for understanding the genesis of U deposits, the interaction of U mine and mill tailings with the environment, transport of actinides in soils and the vadose zone, the performance of geological repositories for nuclear waste, and for the development of advanced materials with novel applications. Over the past decade, the number of inorganic uranyl compounds (including minerals) with known structures has more than doubled, and reconsideration of the structural hierarchy of uranyl compounds is warranted. Here, 368 inorganic crystal structures that contain essential U{sup 6+} are considered (of which 89 are minerals). They are arranged on the basis of the topological details of their structural units, which are formed by the polymerization of polyhedra containing higher-valence cations. Overarching structural categories correspond to those based upon isolated polyhedra (8), finite clusters (43), chains (57), sheets (204), and frameworks (56) of polyhedra. Within these categories, structures are organized and compared upon the basis of either their graphical representations, or in the case of sheets involving sharing of edges of polyhedra, upon the topological arrangement of anions within the sheets. (author)

  17. Extracellular vesicles as emerging intercellular communicasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-10-01

    All living cells release extracellular vesicles having pleiotropic functions in intercellular communication. Mammalian extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes and microvesicles, are spherical bilayered proteolipids composed of various bioactive molecules, including RNAs, DNAs, proteins, and lipids. Extracellular vesicles directly and indirectly control a diverse range of biological processes by transferring membrane proteins, signaling molecules, mRNAs, and miRNAs, and activating receptors of recipient cells. The active interaction of extracellular vesicles with other cells regulates various physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent developments in high-throughput proteomics, transcriptomics, and lipidomics tools have provided ample data on the common and specific components of various types of extracellular vesicles. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in vesicular cargo sorting and the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, and, further, to the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. This review focuses on the components, functions, and therapeutic and diagnostic potential of extracellular vesicles under various pathophysiological conditions.

  18. Structural insights into the catalytic mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, María Fernanda; Watts, Andrew G; Damager, Iben; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Nguyen, Tong; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Paris, Gastón; Frasch, A Carlos; Withers, Stephen G; Alzari, Pedro M

    2004-05-01

    Sialidases are a superfamily of sialic-acid-releasing enzymes that are of significant interest due to their implication as virulence factors in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. However, extensive studies of viral and microbial sialidases have failed to provide a comprehensive picture of their mechanistic properties, in part because the structures of competent enzyme-substrate complexes and reaction intermediates have never been described. Here we report these structures for the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS), showing that catalysis by sialidases occurs via a similar mechanism to that of other retaining glycosidases, but with some intriguing differences that may have evolved in response to the substrate structure.

  19. The structural flexibility of the human copper chaperone Atox1: Insights from combined pulsed EPR studies and computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Ariel R; Turgeman, Meital; Gevorkyan-Aiapetov, Lada; Ruthstein, Sharon

    2017-08-01

    Metallochaperones are responsible for shuttling metal ions to target proteins. Thus, a metallochaperone's structure must be sufficiently flexible both to hold onto its ion while traversing the cytoplasm and to transfer the ion to or from a partner protein. Here, we sought to shed light on the structure of Atox1, a metallochaperone involved in the human copper regulation system. Atox1 shuttles copper ions from the main copper transporter, Ctr1, to the ATP7b transporter in the Golgi apparatus. Conventional biophysical tools such as X-ray or NMR cannot always target the various conformational states of metallochaperones, owing to a requirement for crystallography or low sensitivity and resolution. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has recently emerged as a powerful tool for resolving biological reactions and mechanisms in solution. When coupled with computational methods, EPR with site-directed spin labeling and nanoscale distance measurements can provide structural information on a protein or protein complex in solution. We use these methods to show that Atox1 can accommodate at least four different conformations in the apo state (unbound to copper), and two different conformations in the holo state (bound to copper). We also demonstrate that the structure of Atox1 in the holo form is more compact than in the apo form. Our data provide insight regarding the structural mechanisms through which Atox1 can fulfill its dual role of copper binding and transfer. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  20. Structural analysis of the α-glucosidase HaG provides new insights into substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xing; Saburi, Wataru; Gai, Zuoqi; Kato, Koji; Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Yu, Jian; Komoda, Keisuke; Kido, Yusuke; Matsui, Hirokazu; Mori, Haruhide; Yao, Min

    2015-06-01

    α-Glucosidases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of the α-glucosidic linkage at the nonreducing end of the substrate, are important for the metabolism of α-glucosides. Halomonas sp. H11 α-glucosidase (HaG), belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), only has high hydrolytic activity towards the α-(1 → 4)-linked disaccharide maltose among naturally occurring substrates. Although several three-dimensional structures of GH13 members have been solved, the disaccharide specificity and α-(1 → 4) recognition mechanism of α-glucosidase are unclear owing to a lack of corresponding substrate-bound structures. In this study, four crystal structures of HaG were solved: the apo form, the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate complex, the E271Q mutant in complex with its natural substrate maltose and a complex of the D202N mutant with D-glucose and glycerol. These structures explicitly provide insights into the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of HaG. A peculiar long β → α loop 4 which exists in α-glucosidase is responsible for the strict recognition of disaccharides owing to steric hindrance. Two residues, Thr203 and Phe297, assisted with Gly228, were found to determine the glycosidic linkage specificity of the substrate at subsite +1. Furthermore, an explanation of the α-glucosidase reaction mechanism is proposed based on the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate structure.

  1. Insight into the structure of amyloid fibrils from the analysis of globular proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trovato, Antonio; Chiti, Fabrizio; Maritan, Amos; Seno, Flavio

    2006-01-01

    .... Here we assume a universal mechanism is responsible for beta-structure formation and deduce sequence-specific interaction energies between pairs of protein fragments from a statistical analysis...

  2. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  3. New Insight into the Toughening Mechanisms of Seashell: From Arch Shape to Multilayer Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A seashell is a closed three-dimensional curved surface formed by two symmetrical open shells. Three-point bending is performed on a pure aragonite straight beam (PASB model and a multilayer structure curved beam (MSCB model to elucidate the structure-property relationships of seashells. The integrity of the PASB is broken because of the introduction of a soft layer, but this drawback is compensated by the peculiar arch shape and the internal multilayer structure. The effective modulus, stiffness, and fracture energy of MSCB increase with an increase in volume fraction, aspect ratio of aragonite platelet, overlap ratio of hard layers, and ratio of the elastic modulus of the hard layer to the shear modulus of the soft layer. New design disciplines drawn from the MSCB model are peculiar arch shape, internal multilayer structure of larger volume fraction, and aspect ratio of hard layers and nanoscaled soft layers.

  4. Structure of the Aeropyrum pernix L7Ae multifunctional protein and insight into its extreme thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Suryadi, Jimmy; Zhou, Zholi; Brown, Bernard Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Archaeal ribosomal protein L7Ae is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein that directs post-transcriptional modification of archaeal RNAs. The L7Ae protein from Aeropyrum pernix (Ap L7Ae), a member of the Crenarchaea, was found to have an extremely high melting temperature (>383 K). The crystal structure of Ap L7Ae has been determined to a resolution of 1.56 Å. The structure of Ap L7Ae was compared with the structures of two homologs: hyperthermophilic Methanocaldococcus jannaschii L7Ae and the mesophilic counterpart mammalian 15.5 kD protein. The primary stabilizing feature in the Ap L7Ae protein appears to be the large number of ion pairs and extensive ion-pair network that connects secondary-structural elements. To our knowledge, Ap L7Ae is among the most thermostable single-domain monomeric proteins presently observed.

  5. Optimized expression and purification of NavAb provide the structural insight into the voltage dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Katsumasa; Haga, Yukari; Shimomura, Takushi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are crucial for electro-signalling in living systems. Analysis of the molecular mechanism requires both fine electrophysiological evaluation and high-resolution channel structures. Here, we optimized a dual expression system of NavAb, which is a well-established standard of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels, for E. coli and insect cells using a single plasmid vector to analyse high-resolution protein structures and measure large ionic currents. Using this expression system, we evaluated the voltage dependence and determined the crystal structures of NavAb wild-type and two mutants, E32Q and N49K, whose voltage dependence were positively shifted and essential interactions were lost in voltage sensor domain. The structural and functional comparison elucidated the molecular mechanisms of the voltage dependence of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. New insights into nucleosome and chromatin structure: an ordered state or a disordered affair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Karolin; Dechassa, Mekonnen L.; Tremethick, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The compaction of genomic DNA into chromatin has profound implications for the regulation of key processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes, the repeating building blocks of chromatin, vary in the composition of their histone protein components. This is the result of the incorporation of variant histones and post-translational modifications of histone amino acid side chains. The resulting changes in nucleosome structure, stability and dynamics affect the compaction of nucleosomal arrays into higher-order structures. It is becoming clear that chromatin structures are not nearly as uniform and regular as previously assumed. This implies that chromatin structure must also be viewed in the context of specific biological functions. PMID:22722606

  7. Metamict Minerals: an Insight into a Relic Crystal Structure Using XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, SAED and HRTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Tomašić, Nenad; Bermanec, Vladimir; Gajović, Andreja; Rajić Linarić, Maša

    2008-01-01

    Metamict minerals are characterized by an amorphization of their crystal structure due to radiation damage, and they present an interesting challenge to the mineral and material scientist. The mechanisms of the crystal structure's metamictization and thermally induced recrystallization have been found not only to be of interest for solving mineralogical and geological problems, but also for helping with practical problems, like nuclear-waste storage. This paper gives an overview of the common...

  8. Insights into the structural perturbations of spliced variants of CD44: a modeling and simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shanaya; Shaikh, Faraz; Devaraji, Vinod; Radadiya, Ashish; Shah, Kanisha; Shah, Anamik; Rawal, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    Transient interactions between cancer stem cells and components of the tumor microenvironment initiate various signaling pathways crucial for carcinogenesis. Predominant hyaluronan (HA) receptor, CD44 is structurally and functionally one of the most variable cell surface receptors having the potential to generate a diverse repertory of CD44 isoforms by alternative splicing of variant exons and post-translational modifications. A structurally distinctive variant of CD44, CD44v10, has an inevitable role in malignant progression, invasion, and metastasis. This can be attributed to the binding of HA with CD44v10, which demonstrates a completely different behavioral pattern as compared to the other spliced variants of CD44 molecule. Absence of a comprehensively predicted crystal structure of human CD44s and CD44v10 is an impediment in understanding the resultant structural alterations caused by the binding of HA. Thus, in this study, we aim to predict the CD44s and CD44v10 structures to their closest native confirmation and study the HA binding-induced structural perturbations using homology modeling, molecular docking, and MD simulation approach. The results depicted that modeled 3D structures of CD44s and CD44v10 isoforms were found to be stable throughout MD simulations; however, a substantial decrease was observed in the binding affinity of HA with CD44v10 (-5.355 kcal/mol) as compared to CD44s. Furthermore, loss and gain of several H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions in CD44v10-HA complex during the simulation process not only elucidated the reason for decreased binding affinity for HA but also prompted toward the plausible role of HA-induced structural perturbations in occurrence and progression of carcinogenesis.

  9. Emergent Properties of Giant Vesicles Formed by a Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly (PISA) Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Anders N.; Szymański, Jan K.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Giant micrometer sized vesicles are of obvious interest to the natural sciences as well as engineering, having potential application in fields ranging from drug delivery to synthetic biology. Their formation often requires elaborate experimental techniques and attempts to obtain giant vesicles from chemical media in a one-pot fashion have so far led to much smaller nanoscale structures. Here we show that a tailored medium undergoing controlled radical polymerization is capable of forming giant polymer vesicles. Using a protocol which allows for an aqueous reaction under mild conditions, we observe the macroscale consequences of amphiphilic polymer synthesis and the resulting molecular self-assembly using fluorescence microscopy. The polymerization process is photoinitiated by blue light granting complete control of the reaction, including on the microscope stage. The self-assembly process leads to giant vesicles with radii larger than 10 microns, exhibiting several emergent properties, including periodic growth and collapse as well as phototaxis.

  10. Transport vesicle tethering at the trans Golgi network: coiled coil proteins in action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-yan Patricia Cheung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network. How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress towards understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed.

  11. Extension of Helix 12 in Munc18-1 Induces Vesicle Priming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders S; Kedar, Girish H; van Weering, Jan R T

    2016-01-01

    Munc18-1 is essential for vesicle fusion and participates in the docking of large dense-core vesicles to the plasma membrane. Recent structural data suggest that conformational changes in the 12th helix of the Munc18-1 domain 3a within the Munc18-1:syntaxin complex result in an additional...... interaction with synaptobrevin-2/VAMP2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), leading to SNARE complex formation. To test this hypothesis in living cells, we examined secretion from Munc18-1-null mouse adrenal chromaffin cells expressing Munc18-1 mutants designed to either perturb the extension of helix 12...... findings support the notion that a conformational transition within the Munc18-1 domain 3a helix 12 leads to opening of a closed Munc18-1:syntaxin complex, followed by productive SNARE complex assembly and vesicle priming. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The essential postdocking role of Munc18-1 in vesicular...

  12. Size control of giant unilamellar vesicles prepared from inverted emulsion droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toyota, Taro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2012-06-15

    The production of giant lipid vesicles with controlled size and structure will be an important technology in the design of quantitative biological assays in cell-mimetic microcompartments. For establishing size control of giant vesicles, we investigated the vesicle formation process, in which inverted emulsion droplets are transformed into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) when they pass through an oil/water interface. The relationship between the size of the template emulsion and the converted GUVs was studied using inverted emulsion droplets with a narrow size distribution, which were prepared by microfluidics. We successfully found an appropriate centrifugal acceleration condition to obtain GUVs that had a desired size and narrow-enough size distribution with an improved yield so that emulsion droplets can become the template for GUVs. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reconstitution of cytochrome c oxidase in phospholipid vesicles containing polyvinylic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, P; Antonini, G; Malatesta, F; Vallone, B; Villaschi, S; Brunori, M; Hider, R C; Hamed, K

    1989-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase was reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles in the presence of highly hydrophobic poly(vinyl alkanoate) polymers. Electron-microscopy observations demonstrated that polymer interaction with the lipid phase induces vesicles to adopt smaller diameters than those typical of standard proteoliposomes. Functional characterization of these polymer-proteoliposome structures indicates that the reconstitution of the enzyme proceeds efficiently without causing either scrambling of the protein orientation in the membrane or loss of respiratory control. A clear dependence of respiratory control ratio on vesicle size was also demonstrated, which is in agreement with a previous model proposed for control of activity of cytochrome c oxidase vesicles [Brunori, Sarti, Colosimo, Antonini, Malatesta, Jones & Wilson (1985) EMBO J. 4, 2365-2368]. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2539096

  14. Structural insights into DNA sequence recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Manasi; Nirwan, Neha; van Aelst, Kara; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2016-05-19

    Engineering restriction enzymes with new sequence specificity has been an unaccomplished challenge, presumably because of the complexity of target recognition. Here we report detailed analyses of target recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes. We determined the structure of the Type ISP enzyme LlaGI bound to its target and compared it with the previously reported structure of a close homologue that binds to a distinct target, LlaBIII. The comparison revealed that, although the two enzymes use almost a similar set of structural elements for target recognition, the residues that read the bases vary. Change in specificity resulted not only from appropriate substitution of amino acids that contacted the bases but also from new contacts made by positionally distinct residues directly or through a water bridge. Sequence analyses of 552 Type ISP enzymes showed that the structural elements involved in target recognition of LlaGI and LlaBIII were structurally well-conserved but sequentially less-conserved. In addition, the residue positions within these structural elements were under strong evolutionary constraint, highlighting the functional importance of these regions. The comparative study helped decipher a partial consensus code for target recognition by Type ISP enzymes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Structural insights into substrate and inhibitor binding sites in human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Pham, Khoa N.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Karkashon, Shay; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru (Einstein); (UCI)

    2017-11-22

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (hIDO1) is an attractive cancer immunotherapeutic target owing to its role in promoting tumoral immune escape. However, drug development has been hindered by limited structural information. Here, we report the crystal structures of hIDO1 in complex with its substrate, Trp, an inhibitor, epacadostat, and/or an effector, indole ethanol (IDE). The data reveal structural features of the active site (Sa) critical for substrate activation; in addition, they disclose a new inhibitor-binding mode and a distinct small molecule binding site (Si). Structure-guided mutation of a critical residue, F270, to glycine perturbs the Si site, allowing structural determination of an inhibitory complex, where both the Sa and Si sites are occupied by Trp. The Si site offers a novel target site for allosteric inhibitors and a molecular explanation for the previously baffling substrate-inhibition behavior of the enzyme. Taken together, the data open exciting new avenues for structure-based drug design.

  16. Understanding the biosynthesis of platelets-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Adjei, Jonathan; Aryeh, Claudia; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Kyei, Foster; Seidu, Mahmood A

    2015-09-01

    Platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (PEVs) are described as sub-cellular vesicles released into circulation upon platelets shear stress, activation, injury, or apoptosis. They are considered as universal biomarkers in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. They are of tremendous significance for the prediction, diagnosis, and observation of the therapeutic success of many diseases. Understanding their biosynthesis and therefore functional properties would contribute to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms leading to various diseases in which their levels are raised and they are implicated. The review takes a critical look at the historical background of PEVs, their structural components, the mechanism of their formation, physiological, and exogenous stimuli inducing their release and their detection. It concludes by highlighting on the importance of undertaking in-depth studies into PEVs biosynthesis and subsequently gaining a better understanding of their biological role in general.

  17. Morphological and topological transformations of lipid bilayer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Honda, Makoto; Takeda, Shuichi; Umeda, Tamiki; Takiguchi, Kingo; Hotani, Hirokazu

    2000-06-01

    Liposomes are the micro compartments made of lipid bilayer membrane of which characteristics are quite similar to those of biological membrane. To form artificial cell-like structure, we made liposomes that contained subunit of cytoskeletons: tubulin or actin. Spherical liposomes were transformed into bipolar or cell-like shape by mechanical force generated by the polymerization of encapsulated subunits of microtubules. Disk or dumbbell shape was generated by the polymerization of encapsulated action. Dynamic processes of morphological transformations of liposomes were visualized by the high intensity dark-field light microscopy. Topological changes such as fusion and division of membrane vesicles also play an essential role in cellular activities. We investigated the mechanism of these topological transformations by visualizing their real-time processes. A variety of novel topological transformations were found, including the opening-up of liposomes and the direct expulsion of inner vesicles. .

  18. Charged copolypeptide vesicles with controlled size for intracellular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowka, Eric Peter

    Much focus has been given to the synthesis of polypeptidic based materials due to their unique structural features. These polypeptides commonly are amphiphilic in character that benefit from secondary structural features associated with one of the polymer blocks. These features, such as alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformations, allow for control over nanoscale ordering through self-assembly for use in biological sensors and therapeutic drug delivery. We report the preparation and characterization of charged amphiphilic block copolypeptide vesicle formers using transition metal mediated living ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs). The vesicle membranes show fluidic properties suggested by dynamic physical behavior allowing for fine size adjustments using liposomal extrusion methods. This extrusion also allows for a facile mode of encapsulation of biomolecules for drug delivery. Modification of the charged residues has shown vesicle stability under osmotic and thermal stress, in pH buffers, and serum cell media, as well as the ability for lipid interaction and cellular interactions.

  19. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-04-16

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for tracking and imaging extracellular vesicles in vivo and critically discuss their systemic distribution, targeting, and kinetics based on up-to-date evidence in the literature.

  20. Self-assembly in aqueous solution of wheel-shaped Mo154 oxide clusters into vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianbo; Diemann, Ekkehard; Li, Huilin; Dress, Andreas W M; Müller, Achim

    2003-11-06

    Surfactants and membrane lipids readily assemble into complex structures such as micelles, liposomes or hollow vesicles owing to their amphiphilic character-the fact that part of their structure is attracted to polar environments while another part is attracted to non-polar environments. The self-assembly of complex structures also occurs in polyoxometallate chemistry, as exemplified by the molybdenum blue solutions known for centuries. But while the presence of nanometre-sized metal oxide aggregates in these solutions has long been recognized, unravelling the composition and formation process of these aggregates proved difficult. Recent work has indicated that discrete, wheel-shaped mixed-valence polyoxomolybdate clusters of the type [Mo154] (refs 2-4) assemble into well-defined nanometre-sized aggregates, including spherical structures. Here we report light-scattering data and transmission electron microscopy images of hollow spherical structures with an average, almost monodisperse radius of about 45 nm and composed of approximately 1,165 [Mo154] wheel-shaped clusters. The clusters appear to lie flat and homogeneously distributed on the vesicle surface. Unlike conventional lipid vesicles, the structures we observe are not stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Instead, we believe the polyoxomolybdate-based vesicles form owing to a subtle interplay between short-range van der Waals attraction and long-range electrostatic repulsion, with important further stabilization arising from hydrogen bonding involving water molecules encapsulated between the wheel-shaped clusters and in the vesicles' interior.

  1. Crystal structures of an intrinsically active cholera toxin mutant yield insight into the toxin activation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Claire J; Amaya, Edward I; Jobling, Michael G; Holmes, Randall K; Hol, Wim G J

    2004-04-06

    Cholera toxin (CT) is a heterohexameric bacterial protein toxin belonging to a larger family of A/B ADP-ribosylating toxins. Each of these toxins undergoes limited proteolysis and/or disulfide bond reduction to form the enzymatically active toxic fragment. Nicking and reduction render both CT and the closely related heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (LT) unstable in solution, thus far preventing a full structural understanding of the conformational changes resulting from toxin activation. We present the first structural glimpse of an active CT in structures from three crystal forms of a single-site A-subunit CT variant, Y30S, which requires no activational modifications for full activity. We also redetermined the structure of the wild-type, proenzyme CT from two crystal forms, both of which exhibit (i) better geometry and (ii) a different A2 "tail" conformation than the previously determined structure [Zhang et al. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. 251, 563-573]. Differences between wild-type CT and active CTY30S are observed in A-subunit loop regions that had been previously implicated in activation by analysis of the structure of an LT A-subunit R7K variant [van den Akker et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 10996-11004]. The 25-36 activation loop is disordered in CTY30S, while the 47-56 active site loop displays varying degrees of order in the three CTY30S structures, suggesting that disorder in the activation loop predisposes the active site loop to a greater degree of flexibility than that found in unactivated wild-type CT. On the basis of these six new views of the CT holotoxin, we propose a model for how the activational modifications experienced by wild-type CT are communicated to the active site.

  2. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi-Azarbayjani, Anahita; Ng, Kai Xin; Chan, Yew Weng; Chan, Sui Yung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes), were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05). FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC) lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively. PMID:25789216

  4. AN INSIGHT INTO THE MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF POLYGALACTURONASE INHIBITING PROTEIN (PGIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Meshram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants lack the system of circulating antibodies, thus defense mechanism in plants depends on the capability of recognition and interaction with the invading pathogenic microorganisms and neutralising their effect via specific interactions. The first barrier of defense in plants is the cell wall made up of pectin consisting of homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan I and rhamnogalacturonan II. The major component of pectin is homogalacturonan. Pathogenic fungi secrete polygalacturonase (PG to degrade the homopolygalacturonan of cell wall. Thus plants have pathogenesis-related protein in the cell wall to neutralise the effect of PG known as polygalacturonase inhibiting protein (PGIP. The interaction between PGIP and PG is very specific and effective and differs in different pathogenic fungi and plant species due to the components of plant system. The article presents a critical review on the molecular association of PGIP with PG in nature. An insight has been provided for the use of PGIP in the extracellular localization of mature proteins, in the inhibition of fungal infection, as an elicitor of immune response in plants with great economic and agricultural importance across the world.

  5. Structural Insights into the Molecular Design of Flutolanil Derivatives Targeted for Fumarate Respiration of Parasite Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Shiba, Tomoo; Sato, Dan; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Nagahama, Madoka; Oda, Masatsugu; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Ohmori, Junko; Honma, Teruki; Inoue, Masayuki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on the respiratory chain of Ascaris suum showed that the mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system composed of complex I, rhodoquinone and complex II plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of adult A. suum. The system is the major pathway of energy metabolism for adaptation to a hypoxic environment not only in parasitic organisms, but also in some types of human cancer cells. Thus, enzymes of the pathway are potential targets for chemotherapy. We found that flutolanil is an excellent inhibitor for A. suum complex II (IC50 = 0.058 μM) but less effectively inhibits homologous porcine complex II (IC50 = 45.9 μM). In order to account for the specificity of flutolanil to A. suum complex II from the standpoint of structural biology, we determined the crystal structures of A. suum and porcine complex IIs binding flutolanil and its derivative compounds. The structures clearly demonstrated key interactions responsible for its high specificity to A. suum complex II and enabled us to find analogue compounds, which surpass flutolanil in both potency and specificity to A. suum complex II. Structures of complex IIs binding these compounds will be helpful to accelerate structure-based drug design targeted for complex IIs. PMID:26198225

  6. Structural Insights into the Molecular Design of Flutolanil Derivatives Targeted for Fumarate Respiration of Parasite Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ken Inaoka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the respiratory chain of Ascaris suum showed that the mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system composed of complex I, rhodoquinone and complex II plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of adult A. suum. The system is the major pathway of energy metabolism for adaptation to a hypoxic environment not only in parasitic organisms, but also in some types of human cancer cells. Thus, enzymes of the pathway are potential targets for chemotherapy. We found that flutolanil is an excellent inhibitor for A. suum complex II (IC50 = 0.058 μM but less effectively inhibits homologous porcine complex II (IC50 = 45.9 μM. In order to account for the specificity of flutolanil to A. suum complex II from the standpoint of structural biology, we determined the crystal structures of A. suum and porcine complex IIs binding flutolanil and its derivative compounds. The structures clearly demonstrated key interactions responsible for its high specificity to A. suum complex II and enabled us to find analogue compounds, which surpass flutolanil in both potency and specificity to A. suum complex II. Structures of complex IIs binding these compounds will be helpful to accelerate structure-based drug design targeted for complex IIs.

  7. Structural Insights into the Molecular Design of Flutolanil Derivatives Targeted for Fumarate Respiration of Parasite Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Shiba, Tomoo; Sato, Dan; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Nagahama, Madoka; Oda, Masatsugu; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Ohmori, Junko; Honma, Teruki; Inoue, Masayuki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu

    2015-07-07

    Recent studies on the respiratory chain of Ascaris suum showed that the mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system composed of complex I, rhodoquinone and complex II plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of adult A. suum. The system is the major pathway of energy metabolism for adaptation to a hypoxic environment not only in parasitic organisms, but also in some types of human cancer cells. Thus, enzymes of the pathway are potential targets for chemotherapy. We found that flutolanil is an excellent inhibitor for A. suum complex II (IC50 = 0.058 μM) but less effectively inhibits homologous porcine complex II (IC50 = 45.9 μM). In order to account for the specificity of flutolanil to A. suum complex II from the standpoint of structural biology, we determined the crystal structures of A. suum and porcine complex IIs binding flutolanil and its derivative compounds. The structures clearly demonstrated key interactions responsible for its high specificity to A. suum complex II and enabled us to find analogue compounds, which surpass flutolanil in both potency and specificity to A. suum complex II. Structures of complex IIs binding these compounds will be helpful to accelerate structure-based drug design targeted for complex IIs.

  8. 11-Substituted Benzo[c]phenanthridines: New Structures and Insight into Their Mode of Antiproliferative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Bernd; Girreser, Ulrich; Steinhauer, Tamara N; Meier, Christopher; Marko, Doris; Aichinger, Georg; Kaltefleiter, Ilka; Stenzel, Lars; Heber, Dieter; Weide, Matthias; Wolschendorf, Ulrich; Zebothsen, Inga; Zur Nieden, Dana

    2016-10-06

    The synthesis of various new structures of a library of 11-substituted 6-amino-11,12-dihydrobenzo[c]phenanthridines (BP) and 11-substituted 6-aminobenzo[c]phenanthridines (BP-D) is presented. These structures, further synthetic modifications, and the preparation of follow-up products which delivered about 40 new derivatives are described. Their potential as antiproliferative drug candidates was investigated by comparison of NCI 60 developmental therapeutics program (DTP) human tumor cell line screening data based on the results of in vitro tumor cell growth inhibition, including about 40 hitherto unpublished compound test results with up to 60 cancer cell lines. NCI-COMPARE studies helped to suggest the modes of action of the highly active antiproliferative drugs. These findings are supported by in vitro biological investigations showing either inhibition of tubulin polymerization and depolymerization or topoisomerase inhibition. Together with physicochemical parameters of the drug candidates, structure-activity relationships are critically discussed. Tubulin interaction or inhibition of topoisomerase I and IIα/β activity are two rationales that can explain the antiproliferative activity observed in the NCI 60 DTP human tumor cell line screen. However, it can also be reasonably assumed that these compounds address several targets, thus prohibiting the identification of simple structure-activity relationships. The new structures described herein are thought to act as so-called multitarget drugs, thus being of special interest in the area of multidrug resistance. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  10. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans NONO-1: Insights into DBHS protein structure, architecture, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gavin J; Lee, Mihwa; Passon, Daniel M; Fox, Archa H; Bond, Charles S

    2015-12-01

    Members of the Drosophila behavior/human splicing (DBHS) protein family have been characterized in the vertebrates Homo sapiens and Mus musculus, and the invertebrates Drosophila melanogaster and Chironomus tentans. Collectively, both vertebrate and invertebrate DBHS proteins function throughout gene regulation, largely but not always, within the nucleus. In this study, we report a structural and bioinformatic analysis of the DBHS protein family to guide future studies into DBHS protein function. To explore the structural plasticity of the family, we describe the 2.4 Å crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein 1 (NONO-1). The structure is dimeric, with a domain arrangement consistent with mammalian DBHS proteins. Comparison with the DBHS structures available from H. sapiens reveals that there is inherent domain flexibility within the homologous DBHS region. Mapping amino acid similarity within the family to the NONO-1 dimer highlights the dimer interface, coiled-coil oligomerization motif, and putative RNA binding surfaces. Surprisingly, the interior surface of RNA recognition motif 2 (RRM2) that faces a large internal void is highly variable, but the external β2-β3 loops of RRM2 show remarkable preservation. Overall, the DBHS region is under strong purifying selection, whereas the sequences N- and C-terminal to the DBHS region are less constrained. The findings described in this study provide a molecular basis for further investigation into the mechanistic function of the DBHS protein family in biology. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  12. The RIG-I ATPase domain structure reveals insights into ATP-dependent antiviral signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civril, Filiz; Bennett, Matthew; Moldt, Manuela; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Schiesser, Stefan; Carell, Thomas; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2011-10-28

    RIG-I detects cytosolic viral dsRNA with 5' triphosphates (5'-ppp-dsRNA), thereby initiating an antiviral innate immune response. Here we report the crystal structure of superfamily 2 (SF2) ATPase domain of RIG-I in complex with a nucleotide analogue. RIG-I SF2 comprises two RecA-like domains 1A and 2A and a helical insertion domain 2B, which together form a 'C'-shaped structure. Domains 1A and 2A are maintained in a 'signal-off' state with an inactive ATP hydrolysis site by an intriguing helical arm. By mutational analysis, we show surface motifs that are critical for dsRNA-stimulated ATPase activity, indicating that dsRNA induces a structural movement that brings domains 1A and 2A/B together to form an active ATPase site. The structure also indicates that the regulatory domain is close to the end of the helical arm, where it is well positioned to recruit 5'-ppp-dsRNA to the SF2 domain. Overall, our results indicate that the activation of RIG-I occurs through an RNA- and ATP-driven structural switch in the SF2 domain.

  13. Population structure and genetic diversity in tristylous Narcissus triandrus: insights from microsatellite and chloroplast DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2007-06-01

    We investigated cpDNA sequence and nuclear microsatellite variation among populations of the wild daffodil Narcissus triandrus to examine the role of historical vs. contemporary forces in shaping population structure, morphological differentiation and sexual-system evolution. This wide-ranging heterostylous species of the Iberian Peninsula is largely composed of two allopatric varieties (vars. cernuus and triandrus), and populations with either stylar trimorphism or dimorphism. Dimorphic populations only occur in var. triandrus, are mainly restricted to the northwestern portion of the species range, and uniformly lack the mid-styled morph (M-morph). Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence variation revealed strong geographical structuring and evidence for a fragmentation event associated with differentiation of the two varieties. In var. triandrus, population fragmentation, restricted gene flow and isolation-by-distance were also inferred. Significant differences in genetic diversity and population structure between the two varieties likely reflect historical and contemporary differences in demography and gene flow among populations. Discordance between cpDNA markers and both microsatellite and morphological variation indicate that hybridization has occurred between the two varieties at contact zones. There were no differences in genetic diversity or population structure between dimorphic and trimorphic populations, and chloroplast haplotypes were not associated with either sexual system, indicating transitions in morph structure within each maternal lineage. M-morph frequencies were positively correlated with differentiation at microsatellite loci, indicating that the evolutionary processes influencing these neutral markers also influence alleles controlling the style morphs.

  14. Structural insights into the membrane fusion mechanism mediated by influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Fengyun; Chen, Xiaorui; Shen, Jun; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-02-11

    Membrane fusion is involved in many fundamental cellular processes and entry of enveloped viruses into host cells. Influenza type A virus HA has long served as a paradigm for mechanistic studies of protein-mediated membrane fusion via large-scale structural rearrangements induced by acidic pH. Here we report the newly determined crystal structure of influenza B virus HA2 in the postfusion state. Together with a large number of previously determined prefusion structures of influenza A and B virus HA and a postfusion structure of influenza A/H3N2 HA2, we identified conserved features that are shared between influenza A and B virus HA in the conformational transition and documented substantial differences that likely influence the detailed mechanisms of this process. Further studies are needed to dissect the effects of these and other structural differences in HA conformational changes and influenza pathogenicity and transmission, which may ultimately expedite the discovery of novel anti-influenza fusion inhibitors.

  15. Crystal structure of class III chitinase from pomegranate provides the insight into its metal storage capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Taro; Zhao, Guanghua; Mikami, Bunzo

    2015-01-01

    Chitinase hydrolyzes the β-1,4-glycosidic bond in chitin. In higher plants, this enzyme has been regarded as a pathogenesis-related protein. Recently, we identified a class III chitinase, which functions as a calcium storage protein in pomegranate (Punica granatum) seed (PSC, pomegranate seed chitinase). Here, we solved a crystal structure of PSC at 1.6 Å resolution. Although its overall structure, including the structure of catalytic site and non-proline cis-peptides, was closely similar to those of other class III chitinases, PSC had some unique structural characteristics. First, there were some metal-binding sites with coordinated water molecules on the surface of PSC. Second, many unconserved aspartate residues were present in the PSC sequence which rendered the surface of PSC negatively charged. This acidic electrostatic property is in contrast to that of hevamine, well-characterized plant class III chitinase, which has rather a positively charged surface. Thus, the crystal structure provides a clue for metal association property of PSC.

  16. Investigating dynamical information transfer in the brain following a TMS pulse: Insights from structural architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Enrico; Van Mierlo, Pieter; Marinazzo, Daniele; Laureys, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used for more than 20 years to investigate connectivity and plasticity in the human cortex. By combining TMS with high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG), one can stimulate any cortical area and measure the effects produced by this perturbation in the rest of the cerebral cortex. The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes of information flow in the brain after TMS from a functional and structural perspective, using multimodal modeling of source reconstructed TMS/hd-EEG recordings and DTI tractography. We prove how brain dynamics induced by TMS is constrained and driven by its structure, at different spatial and temporal scales, especially when considering cross-frequency interactions. These results shed light on the function-structure organization of the brain network at the global level, and on the huge variety of information contained in it.

  17. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly...... in the layer deposited at age 3, considered to be the one best representing the baseline of the breeding ground, in delta N-15, delta C-13 and delta O-18 values in the period up to age 20, and in the ontogenetic variation of delta N-15 and delta O-18 values. These differences evidence that diet composition......, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted....

  18. Structural insights into substrate selectivity of ribosomal RNA methyltransferase RlmCD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyang Jiang

    Full Text Available RlmCD has recently been identified as the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-dependent methyltransferase responsible for the formation of m5U at U747 and U1939 of 23S ribosomal RNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this research, we determine the high-resolution crystal structures of apo-form RlmCD and its complex with SAH. Using an in-vitro methyltransferase assay, we reveal the crucial residues for its catalytic functions. Furthermore, structural comparison between RlmCD and its structural homologue RumA, which only catalyzes the m5U1939 in Escherichia coli, implicates that a unique long linker in the central domain of RlmCD is the key factor in determining its substrate selectivity. Its significance in the enzyme activity of RlmCD is further confirmed by in-vitro methyltransferase assay.

  19. Orientation of aromatic residues in amyloid cores: Structural insights into prion fiber diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2014-11-17

    Structural conversion of one given protein sequence into different amyloid states, resulting in distinct phenotypes, is one of the most intriguing phenomena of protein biology. Despite great efforts the structural origin of prion diversity remains elusive, mainly because amyloids are insoluble yet noncrystalline and therefore not easily amenable to traditional structural-biology methods. We investigate two different phenotypic prion strains, weak and strong, of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 with respect to angular orientation of tyrosines using polarized light spectroscopy. By applying a combination of alignment methods the degree of fiber orientation can be assessed, which allows a relatively accurate determination of the aromatic ring angles. Surprisingly, the strains show identical average orientations of the tyrosines, which are evenly spread through the amyloid core. Small variations between the two strains are related to the local environment of a fraction of tyrosines outside the core, potentially reflecting differences in fibril packing.

  20. Classification, Functions, and Clinical Relevance of Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Böing, Anita N.; Harrison, Paul; Sturk, Augueste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2012-01-01

    Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells release small, phospholipid-enclosed vesicles into their environment. Why do cells release vesicles? Initial studies showed that eukaryotic vesicles are used to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Although this release of vesicles is beneficial to the cell, the

  1. Structural Insights Into DNA Repair by RNase T—An Exonuclease Processing 3′ End of Structured DNA in Repair Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Fang, Woei-Horng; Lee, Chia-Chia; Chen, Yi-Ping; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are essential for preservation of genome integrity. However, it is not clear how DNA are selected and processed at broken ends by exonucleases during repair pathways. Here we show that the DnaQ-like exonuclease RNase T is critical for Escherichia coli resistance to various DNA-damaging agents and UV radiation. RNase T specifically trims the 3′ end of structured DNA, including bulge, bubble, and Y-structured DNA, and it can work with Endonuclease V to restore the deaminated base in an inosine-containing heteroduplex DNA. Crystal structure analyses further reveal how RNase T recognizes the bulge DNA by inserting a phenylalanine into the bulge, and as a result the 3′ end of blunt-end bulge DNA can be digested by RNase T. In contrast, the homodimeric RNase T interacts with the Y-structured DNA by a different binding mode via a single protomer so that the 3′ overhang of the Y-structured DNA can be trimmed closely to the duplex region. Our data suggest that RNase T likely processes bulge and bubble DNA in the Endonuclease V–dependent DNA repair, whereas it processes Y-structured DNA in UV-induced and various other DNA repair pathways. This study thus provides mechanistic insights for RNase T and thousands of DnaQ-like exonucleases in DNA 3′-end processing. PMID:24594808

  2. Protein kinase CK2 in health and disease: Protein kinase CK2: from structures to insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Raaf, J; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decade, 40 crystal structures corresponding to protein kinase CK2 (former name 'casein kinase 2'), to its catalytic subunit CK2alpha and to its regulatory subunit CK2beta were published. Together they provide a valuable, yet by far not complete basis to rationalize the biochemical...... the critical region of CK2alpha recruitment is pre-formed in the unbound state. In CK2alpha the activation segment - a key element of protein kinase regulation - adapts invariably the typical conformation of the active enzymes. Recent structures of human CK2alpha revealed a surprising plasticity in the ATP...

  3. Structural insights for engineering binding proteins based on non-antibody scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Koide, Shohei

    2012-08-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these 'alternative' scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering strategies. Furthermore, the structural features of these synthetic proteins produced under tightly controlled, directed evolution deepen our understanding of the underlying principles governing molecular recognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. TAR cloning: insights into gene function, long-range haplotypes and genome structure and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2006-10-01

    The structural and functional analysis of mammalian genomes would benefit from the ability to isolate from multiple DNA samples any targeted chromosomal segment that is the size of an average human gene. A cloning technique that is based on transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae satisfies this need. It is a unique tool to selectively recover chromosome segments that are up to 250 kb in length from complex genomes. In addition, TAR cloning can be used to characterize gene function and genome variation, including polymorphic structural rearrangements, mutations and the evolution of gene families, and for long-range haplotyping.

  5. Structural Insight into the Unique Properties of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 9

    OpenAIRE

    DiMattia, Michael A.; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Van Vliet, Kim; Mitchell, Matthew; Bennett, Antonette; Gurda, Brittney L.; McKenna, Robert; Olson, Norman H.; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Potter, Mark; Byrne, Barry J.; Aslanidi, George; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Baker, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has enhanced capsid-associated tropism for cardiac muscle and the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier compared to other AAV serotypes. To help identify the structural features facilitating these properties, we have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction (cryo-reconstruction) and X-ray crystallography to determine the structure of the AAV9 capsid at 9.7- and 2.8-Å resolutions, respectively. The AAV9 capsi...

  6. Role of charged lipids in membrane structuresInsight given by simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-01-01

    to fruitful directions. In this paper, we review studies that have utilized molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the roles of charged lipids in membrane structures. We focus on lipids as active constituents of the membranes, affecting both general membrane properties as well as non-lipid membrane......Lipids and proteins are the main components of cell membranes. It is becoming increasingly clear that lipids, in addition to providing an environment for proteins to work in, are in many cases also able to modulate the structure and function of those proteins. Particularly charged lipids...

  7. Expression, purification and insights into structure and folding of the ADAM22 pro domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Jacobsen, Jonas; Nielbo, Steen

    2008-01-01

    and NMR spectroscopy. An ADAM22-P fragment encoding residues 26-199 could be expressed in high amounts, remained soluble above 1 mM, and was suitable for structural studies by NMR spectroscopy. CD spectroscopy and predictions suggest that the secondary structure in ADAM22-P consists of beta......-strands. Furthermore, our data indicate that the pro domains of ADAMs are expressed as two subdomains. The most N-terminal subdomain (ADAM22-P(N)) was found to be susceptible to proteolysis and was required for folding stability of the second subdomain (ADAM22-P(C))....

  8. Structural Insights into the Mechanisms of Action of Short-Peptide HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting the Gp41 Pocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 gp41 has been considered a drug target, but short-peptides targeting this site usually lack potent antiviral activity. By applying the M-T hook structure, we previously generated highly potent short-peptide fusion inhibitors that specifically targeted the pocket site, such as MT-SC22EK, HP23L, and LP-11. Here, the crystal structures of HP23L and LP-11 bound to the target mimic peptide N36 demonstrated the critical intrahelical and interhelical interactions, especially verifying that the hook-like conformation was finely adopted while the methionine residue was replaced by the oxidation-less prone residue leucine, and that addition of an extra glutamic acid significantly enhanced the binding and inhibitory activities. The structure of HP23L bound to N36 with two mutations (E49K and L57R revealed the critical residues and motifs mediating drug resistance and provided new insights into the mechanism of action of inhibitors. Therefore, the present data help our understanding for the structure-activity relationship (SAR of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and facilitate the development of novel antiviral drugs.

  9. Crystal structure of RNA-DNA duplex provides insight into conformational changes induced by RNase H binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan R; Shaban, Nadine M; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    RNA-DNA hybrids play essential roles in a variety of biological processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and viral integration. Ribonucleotides incorporated within DNA are hydrolyzed by RNase H enzymes in a removal process that is necessary for maintaining genomic stability. In order to understand the structural determinants involved in recognition of a hybrid substrate by RNase H we have determined the crystal structure of a dodecameric non-polypurine/polypyrimidine tract RNA-DNA duplex. A comparison to the same sequence bound to RNase H, reveals structural changes to the duplex that include widening of the major groove to 12.5 Å from 4.2 Å and decreasing the degree of bending along the axis which may play a crucial role in the ribonucleotide recognition and cleavage mechanism within RNase H. This structure allows a direct comparison to be made about the conformational changes induced in RNA-DNA hybrids upon binding to RNase H and may provide insight into how dysfunction in the endonuclease causes disease.

  10. Structure of EspB from the ESX-1 type VII secretion system and insights into its export mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonson, Matthew; Setiaputra, Dheva; Makepeace, Karl A T; Lameignere, Emilie; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Conrady, Deborah G; Bergeron, Julien R; Vuckovic, Marija; DiMaio, Frank; Borchers, Christoph H; Yip, Calvin K; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2015-03-03

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) uses the ESX-1 type VII secretion system to export virulence proteins across its lipid-rich cell wall, which helps permeabilize the host's macrophage phagosomal membrane, facilitating the escape and cell-to-cell spread of Mtb. ESX-1 membranolytic activity depends on a set of specialized secreted Esp proteins, the structure and specific roles of which are not currently understood. Here, we report the X-ray and electron microscopic structures of the ESX-1-secreted EspB. We demonstrate that EspB adopts a PE/PPE-like fold that mediates oligomerization with apparent heptameric symmetry, generating a barrel-shaped structure with a central pore that we propose contributes to the macrophage killing functions of EspB. Our structural data also reveal unexpected direct interactions between the EspB bipartite secretion signal sequence elements that form a unified aromatic surface. These findings provide insight into how specialized proteins encoded within the ESX-1 locus are targeted for secretion, and for the first time indicate an oligomerization-dependent role for Esp virulence factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Insights into biodegradation through depth-resolved microbial community functional and structural profiling of a crude-oil contaminant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bailey, Zach; Pruden, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale geochemical gradients are a key feature of aquifer contaminant plumes, highlighting the need for functional and structural profiling of corresponding microbial communities on a similar scale. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial functional and structural diversity with depth across representative redox zones of a hydrocarbon plume and an adjacent wetland, at the Bemidji Oil Spill site. A combination of quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and pyrosequencing were applied to vertically sampled sediment cores. Levels of the methanogenic marker gene, methyl coenzyme-M reductase A (mcrA), increased with depth near the oil body center, but were variable with depth further downgradient. Benzoate degradation N (bzdN) hydrocarbon-degradation gene, common to facultatively anaerobic Azoarcus spp., was found at all locations, but was highest near the oil body center. Microbial community structural differences were observed across sediment cores, and bacterial classes containing known hydrocarbon degraders were found to be low in relative abundance. Depth-resolved functional and structural profiling revealed the strongest gradients in the iron-reducing zone, displaying the greatest variability with depth. This study provides important insight into biogeochemical characteristics in different regions of contaminant plumes, which will aid in improving models of contaminant fate and natural attenuation rates.

  12. Mechanistic insights into validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate synthesis by VldE using the structure of the entire product complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Cavalier

    Full Text Available The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an "open" and "closed" conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  13. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data in...

  14. Recent insights from single-molecule studies into nucleosome structure and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordu, O.; Lusser, A; Dekker, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is tightly packed into a hierarchically ordered structure called chromatin in order to fit into the micron-scaled nucleus. The basic unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of a short piece of DNA wrapped around a core of eight histone proteins. In addition to their role

  15. Structural insights into the enzymatic mechanism of the pathogenic MAPK phosphothreonine lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongqun; Li, Hongtao; Long, Chengzu; Hu, Liyan; Xu, Hao; Liu, Liping; Chen, She; Wang, Da-Cheng; Shao, Feng

    2007-12-14

    The OspF family of phosphothreonine lyase, including SpvC from Salmonella, irreversibly inactivates the dual-phosphorylated host MAPKs (pT-X-pY) through beta elimination. We determined crystal structures of SpvC and its complex with a phosphopeptide substrate. SpvC adopts a unique fold of alpha/beta type. The disordered N terminus harbors a canonical D motif for MAPK substrate docking. The enzyme-substrate complex structure indicates that recognition of the phosphotyrosine followed by insertion of the threonine phosphate into an arginine pocket places the phosphothreonine into the enzyme active site. This requires the conformational flexibility of pT-X-pY, which suggests that p38 (pT-G-pY) is likely the preferred physiological substrate. Structure-based biochemical and enzymatic analysis allows us to propose a general acid/base mechanism for beta elimination reaction catalyzed by the phosphothreonine lyase. The mechanism described here provides a structural understanding of MAPK inactivation by a family of pathogenic effectors conserved in plant and animal systems and may also open a new route for biological catalysis.

  16. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel; Sturzenegger, Andreas; Huttner, Diana; Janscak, Pavel; Hickson, Ian D.; Gileadi, Opher; Rothenberg, Eli

    2014-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA strands and play an important role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we used single-molecule FRET to define the mechanism of interaction of BLM helicase with intra-stranded G4 structures. We show that the activity of BLM is substrate dependent, and highly regulated by a short-strand DNA (ssDNA) segment that separates the G4 motif from double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate cooperativity between the RQC and HRDC domains of BLM during binding and unfolding of the G4 structure, where the RQC domain interaction with G4 is stabilized by HRDC binding to ssDNA. We present a model that proposes a unique role for G4 structures in modulating the activity of DNA processing enzymes.

  17. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M; Kinze, Carl; Lockyer, Christina H; Vighi, Morgana; Aguilar, Alex

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the eastern North Atlantic, an ocean basin in which a single population is believed to occur. To do so, we examined stable isotope values in sequential growth layer groups of teeth from individuals sampled in Denmark and NW Spain. In each layer we measured oxygen- isotope ratios (δ(18)O) in the inorganic component (hydroxyapatite), and nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (δ(15)N: δ(13)C) in the organic component (primarily collagenous). We found significant differences between Denmark and NW Spain in δ(15)N and δ(18)O values in the layer deposited at age 3, considered to be the one best representing the baseline of the breeding ground, in δ(15)N, δ(13)C and δ(18)O values in the period up to age 20, and in the ontogenetic variation of δ(15)N and δ(18)O values. These differences evidence that diet composition, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted.

  18. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA...

  19. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Borrell

    Full Text Available In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the eastern North Atlantic, an ocean basin in which a single population is believed to occur. To do so, we examined stable isotope values in sequential growth layer groups of teeth from individuals sampled in Denmark and NW Spain. In each layer we measured oxygen- isotope ratios (δ(18O in the inorganic component (hydroxyapatite, and nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (δ(15N: δ(13C in the organic component (primarily collagenous. We found significant differences between Denmark and NW Spain in δ(15N and δ(18O values in the layer deposited at age 3, considered to be the one best representing the baseline of the breeding ground, in δ(15N, δ(13C and δ(18O values in the period up to age 20, and in the ontogenetic variation of δ(15N and δ(18O values. These differences evidence that diet composition, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted.

  20. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  1. Insights on Forest Structure and Composition from Long-Term Research in the Luquillo Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley

    2017-01-01

    The science of ecology fundamentally aims to understand species and their relation to the environment. At sites where hurricane disturbance is part of the environmental context, permanent forest plots are critical to understand ecological vegetation dynamics through time. An overview of forest structure and species composition from two of the longest continuously...

  2. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  3. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  4. Editorial for Special Issue “New Insights in Stability, Structure and Properties of Porous Materials”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Martucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous materials (such as zeolites, clay minerals, and assemblies of oxide nanoparticles are of great importance for the progress in many technological and environmental fields, such as catalysis, adsorption, separation, and ion exchange, because of their unique pore topologies, tunable structures, and the possibility of introducing active reaction sites.[...

  5. Structure of an asymmetric ternary protein complex provides insight for membrane interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Brian R; Rezvanpour, Atoosa; Lee, Ting-Wai; Barber, Kathryn R; Junop, Murray S; Shaw, Gary S

    2012-10-10

    Plasma membrane repair involves the coordinated effort of proteins and the inner phospholipid surface to mend the rupture and return the cell back to homeostasis. Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of a multiprotein complex that includes S100A10, annexin A2, and AHNAK, which along with dysferlin, functions in muscle and cardiac tissue repair. The 3.5 Å resolution X-ray structure shows that a single region from the AHNAK C terminus is recruited by an S100A10-annexin A2 heterotetramer, forming an asymmetric ternary complex. The AHNAK peptide adopts a coil conformation that arches across the heterotetramer contacting both annexin A2 and S100A10 protomers with tight affinity (∼30 nM) and establishing a structural rationale whereby both S100A10 and annexin proteins are needed in AHNAK recruitment. The structure evokes a model whereby AHNAK is targeted to the membrane surface through sandwiching of the binding region between the S100A10/annexin A2 complex and the phospholipid membrane. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural and mechanistic insights into prokaryotic energy-coupling factor transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporter family and mediate the uptake of essential micronutrients in many prokaryotic species. Two crystal structures of bacterial ECF transporters have recently been obtained and suggest that transport involves

  7. New insight into the formation of structural defects in poly(vinyl chloride)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purmova, J; Pauwels, KFD; van Zoelen, W; Vorenkamp, EJ; Schouten, AJ; Coote, ML; Pauwels, Kim F.D.; Coote, Michelle L.

    2005-01-01

    The monomer conversion dependence of the formation of the various types of defect structures in radical suspension polymerization of vinyl chloride was examined via both H-1 and C-13 NMR spectrometry. The rate coefficients for model propagation and intra- and intermolecular hydrogen abstraction

  8. Structural insight into proteolytic activation and regulation of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus A; Pedersen, Dennis V; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-11-01

    The complement system is a highly complex and carefully regulated proteolytic cascade activated through three different pathways depending on the activator recognized. The structural knowledge regarding the intricate proteolytic enzymes that activate and control complement has increased dramatically over the last decade. This development has been pivotal for understanding how mutations within complement proteins might contribute to pathogenesis and has spurred new strategies for development of complement therapeutics. Here we describe and discuss the complement system from a structural perspective and integrate the most recent findings obtained by crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy. In particular, we focus on the proteolytic enzymes governing activation and their products carrying the biological effector functions. Additionally, we present the structural basis for some of the best known complement inhibitors. The large number of accumulated molecular structures enables us to visualize the relative size, position, and overall orientation of many of the most interesting complement proteins and assembled complexes on activator surfaces and in membranes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. New insights into structure and function of the different types of fatty acid-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, Augusta Wilhelmina

    2002-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. They may also modulate the effect of fatty acids on various metabolic enzymes and receptors and on cellular

  10. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  11. Cross-Language Transfer of Insight into the Structure of Compound Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Anderson, Richard C.; Li, Hong; Dong, Qiong; Wu, Xinchun; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Cross-language transfer of awareness of the structure of compound words was investigated among native speakers of Chinese who were learning English as a second language. Chinese fifth graders received instruction in the morphology of four types of compound words in either Chinese or English. They then completed both the Chinese and English…

  12. Recent insights into the structure and mechanism of the sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisberger, J-D

    2004-12-01

    The sodium pump (or Na-K-ATPase) is essential to the function of animal cells. Publication of the related calcium pump (SERCA) structure together with several recent results from a variety of approaches allow us to propose a mechanistic model to answer the question: "How does the sodium pump pump?"

  13. Structural insights into the effector-immunity system Tse1/Tsi1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Benz

    Full Text Available During an interbacterial battle, the type-6-secretion-system (T6SS of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects the peptidoglycan(PG-hydrolase Tse1 into the periplasm of gram-negative enemy cells and induces their lysis. However, for its own benefit, P. aeruginosa produces and transports the immunity-protein Tsi1 into its own periplasm where in prevents accidental exo- and endogenous intoxication. Here we present the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the lytic enzyme Tse1 and describe the mechanism by which Tse1 cleaves the γ-D-glutamyl-l-meso-diaminopimelic acid amide bond of crosslinked PG. Tse1 belongs to the superfamily of N1pC/P60 peptidases but is unique among described members of this family of which the structure was described, since it is a single domain protein without any putative localization domain. Most importantly, we present the crystal structure of Tse1 bound to its immunity-protein Tsi1 as well and describe the mechanism of enzyme inhibition. Tsi1 occludes the active site of Tse1 and abolishes its enzyme activity by forming a hydrogen bond to a catalytically important histidine residue in Tse1. Based on our structural findings in combination with a bioinfomatic approach we also identified a related system in Burkholderia phytofirmans. Not only do our findings point to a common catalytic mechanism of the Tse1 PG-hydrolases, but we can also show that it is distinct from other members of this superfamily. Furthermore, we provide strong evidence that the mechanism of enzyme inhibition between Tsi1 orthologues is conserved. This work is the first structural description of an entire effector/immunity pair injected by the T6SS system. Moreover, it is also the first example of a member of the N1pC/P60 superfamily which becomes inhibited upon binding to its cognate immunity protein.

  14. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52 angstrom resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over alpha-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria.

  15. Structural Insights of Glucan Phosphatase Dynamics using Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Simon; Kim, Youngjun; Li, Sheng; Durrant, Eric S.; Pace, Rachel M.; Woods, Virgil L.; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2009-01-01

    Laforin and Starch Excess 4 (SEX4) are founding members of a class of phosphatases that dephosphorylate phosphoglucans. Each protein contains a carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and a dual specificity phosphatase (DSP) domain. The gene encoding laforin is mutated in a fatal neurodegenerative disease called Lafora disease (LD). In the absence of laforin function, insoluble glucans accumulate that are hyperphosphorylated and exhibit sparse branching. It is hypothesized that these accumulations trigger the neurodegeneration and premature death of LD patients. We recently demonstrated that laforin removes phosphate from phosphoglucans and hypothesized that this function inhibits insoluble glucan accumulation. Loss of SEX4 function in plants yields a similar cellular phenotype; cells accumulate an excess amount of insoluble, hyperphosphorylated glucans. While multiple groups have shown that these phosphatases dephosphorylate phosphoglucans, there is no structure of a glucan phosphatase and little is known about the mechanism whereby they perform this action. We utilized hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) and structural modeling to probe the conformational and structural dynamics of the glucan phosphatase SEX4. We found that the enzyme does not undergo a global conformational change upon glucan binding, but instead undergoes minimal rearrangement upon binding. The CBM undergoes increased protection from deuteration when bound to glucans, confirming its role in glucan binding. More interestingly, we identified structural components of the DSP that also undergo increased protection from deuteration upon glucan addition. To determine the position of these regions, we generated a homology model of the SEX4 DSP. The homology model shows that all of these regions are adjacent the DSP active site. Therefore, our results suggest that these regions of the DSP participate in presenting the phosphoglucan to the active site and provide the first structural analysis

  16. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 × 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell−Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  17. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  18. Cross-over between discrete and continuous protein structure space: insights into automatic classification and networks of protein structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pascual-García

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural classifications of proteins assume the existence of the fold, which is an intrinsic equivalence class of protein domains. Here, we test in which conditions such an equivalence class is compatible with objective similarity measures. We base our analysis on the transitive property of the equivalence relationship, requiring that similarity of A with B and B with C implies that A and C are also similar. Divergent gene evolution leads us to expect that the transitive property should approximately hold. However, if protein domains are a combination of recurrent short polypeptide fragments, as proposed by several authors, then similarity of partial fragments may violate the transitive property, favouring the continuous view of the protein structure space. We propose a measure to quantify the violations of the transitive property when a clustering algorithm joins elements into clusters, and we find out that such violations present a well defined and detectable cross-over point, from an approximately transitive regime at high structure similarity to a regime with large transitivity violations and large differences in length at low similarity. We argue that protein structure space is discrete and hierarchic classification is justified up to this cross-over point, whereas at lower similarities the structure space is continuous and it should be represented as a network. We have tested the qualitative behaviour of this measure, varying all the choices involved in the automatic classification procedure, i.e., domain decomposition, alignment algorithm, similarity score, and clustering algorithm, and we have found out that this behaviour is quite robust. The final classification depends on the chosen algorithms. We used the values of the clustering coefficient and the transitivity violations to select the optimal choices among those that we tested. Interestingly, this criterion also favours the agreement between automatic and expert classifications

  19. Crystal Structure of UBA2ufd-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2010-01-01

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2ufd), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2ufd and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2ufd-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2ufd-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades. PMID:21209884

  20. Crystal Structure of UBA2[superscript ufd]-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Taherbhoy, Asad M.; Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A. (SJCH)

    2012-04-30

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2{sup ufd}), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2{sup ufd} and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades.

  1. Crystal structure of UBA2(ufd)-Ubc9: insights into E1-E2 interactions in Sumo pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Taherbhoy, Asad M; Hunt, Harold W; Seyedin, Steven N; Miller, David W; Miller, Darcie J; Huang, Danny T; Schulman, Brenda A

    2010-12-30

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2(ufd)), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2(ufd) and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2(ufd)-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2(ufd)-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades.

  2. Crystal structure of UBA2(ufd-Ubc9: insights into E1-E2 interactions in Sumo pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2, which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd from yeast Uba2 (Uba2(ufd, alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2(ufd and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2(ufd-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2(ufd-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades.

  3. Insights on the structural perturbations in human MTHFR Ala222Val mutant by protein modeling and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhinand, P A; Shaikh, Faraz; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Radadiya, Ashish; Bhaskar, L V K S; Shah, Anamik; Ragunath, P K

    2016-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) protein catalyzes the only biochemical reaction which produces methyltetrahydrofolate, the active form of folic acid essential for several molecular functions. The Ala222Val polymorphism of human MTHFR encodes a thermolabile protein associated with increased risk of neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. Experimental studies have shown that the mutation does not affect the kinetic properties of MTHFR, but inactivates the protein by increasing flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) loss. The lack of completely solved crystal structure of MTHFR is an impediment in understanding the structural perturbations caused by the Ala222Val mutation; computational modeling provides a suitable alternative. The three-dimensional structure of human MTHFR protein was obtained through homology modeling, by taking the MTHFR structures from Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus as templates. Subsequently, the modeled structure was docked with FAD using Glide, which revealed a very good binding affinity, authenticated by a Glide XP score of -10.3983 (kcal mol(-1)). The MTHFR was mutated by changing Alanine 222 to Valine. The wild-type MTHFR-FAD complex and the Ala222Val mutant MTHFR-FAD complex were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation over 50 ns period. The average difference in backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) between wild and mutant variant was found to be ~.11 Å. The greater degree of fluctuations in the mutant protein translates to increased conformational stability as a result of mutation. The FAD-binding ability of the mutant MTHFR was also found to be significantly lowered as a result of decreased protein grip caused by increased conformational flexibility. The study provides insights into the Ala222Val mutation of human MTHFR that induces major conformational changes in the tertiary structure, causing a significant reduction in the FAD-binding affinity.

  4. Mutations in Synaptojanin Disrupt Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Todd W.; Hartwieg, Erika; Horvitz, H. Robert; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2000-01-01

    Synaptojanin is a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase that is found at synapses and binds to proteins implicated in endocytosis. For these reasons, it has been proposed that synaptojanin is involved in the recycling of synaptic vesicles. Here, we demonstrate that the unc-26 gene encodes the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of synaptojanin. unc-26 mutants exhibit defects in vesicle trafficking in several tissues, but most defects are found at synaptic termini. Specifically, we observed defects in ...

  5. Concentration-Independent Spontaneously Forming Biomimetric Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, M.-P.; Harroun, T. A.; Raghunathan, V. A.; Glinka, C. J.; Katsaras, J.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we present small-angle neutron scattering data from a biomimetic system composed of the phospholipids dimyristoyl and dihexanoyl phosphorylcholine (DMPC and DHPC, respectively). Doping DMPC-DHPC multilamellar vesicles with either the negatively charged lipid dimyristoyl phosphorylglycerol (DMPG, net charge -1) or the divalent cation, calcium (Ca2+), leads to the spontaneous formation of energetically stabilized monodisperse unilamellar vesicles whose radii are concentration independent and in contrast with previous experimental observations.

  6. Labeling Extracellular Vesicles for Nanoscale Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Aizea Morales-Kastresana; Bill Telford; Musich, Thomas A.; Katherine McKinnon; Cassandra Clayborne; Zach Braig; Ari Rosner; Thorsten Demberg; Watson, Dionysios C.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; Freeman, Gordon J.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Pavlakis, George N.; Masaki Terabe; Marjorie Robert-Guroff

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, are 30?800?nm vesicles that are released by most cell types, as biological packages for intercellular communication. Their importance in cancer and inflammation makes EVs and their cargo promising biomarkers of disease and cell-free therapeutic agents. Emerging high-resolution cytometric methods have created a pressing need for efficient fluorescent labeling procedures to visualize and detect EVs. Suitable labels must be brig...

  7. The CRIPTO/FRL-1/CRYPTIC (CFC) domain of human Cripto. Functional and structural insights through disulfide structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Susan F; van Vlijmen, Herman W T; Boynton, Raymond E; Adkins, Heather B; Cheung, Anne E; Singh, Juswinder; Sanicola, Michele; Young, Carmen N; Wen, Dingyi

    2003-09-01

    The disulfide structure of the CRIPTO/FRL-1/CRYPTIC (CFC) domain of human Cripto protein was determined by a combination of enzymatic and chemical fragmentation, followed by chromatographic separation of the fragments, and characterization by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. These studies showed that Cys115 forms a disulfide bond with Cys133, Cys128 with Cys149, and Cys131 with Cys140. Protein database searching and molecular modeling revealed that the pattern of disulfide linkages in the CFC domain of Cripto is the same as that in PARS intercerebralis major Peptide C (PMP-C), a serine protease inhibitor, and that the EGF-CFC domains of Cripto are predicted to be structurally homologous to the EGF-VWFC domains of the C-terminal extracellular portions of Jagged 1 and Jagged 2. Biochemical studies of the interactions of ALK4 with the CFC domain of Cripto by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicate that the CFC domain binds to ALK4 independent of the EGF domain. A molecular model of the CFC domain of Cripto was constructed based on the nuclear magnetic resonance structure of PMP-C. This model reveals a hydrophobic patch in the domain opposite to the presumed ALK4 binding site. This hydrophobic patch may be functionally important for the formation of intra or intermolecular complexes.

  8. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaidong Zhang

    Full Text Available Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme.

  9. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P. (Harvard-Med); (Cornell); (MSKCC)

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  10. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  11. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinase Structure-Function Relationships: Insights From Molecular Dynamics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana G; Christov, Christo Z; Fields, Gregg B

    2017-01-01

    Several members of the zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family catalyze collagen degradation. Experimental data reveal a collaboration between different MMP domains in order to achieve efficient collagenolysis. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to provide atomistic details of the collagenolytic process. The triple-helical structure of collagen exhibits local regions of flexibility, with modulation of interchain salt bridges and water bridges contributing to accessibility of individual chains by the enzyme. In turn, the hemopexin-like (HPX) domain of the MMP initially binds the triple helix and facilitates the presentation of individual strands to active site in the catalytic (CAT) domain. Extensive positive and negative correlated motions are observed between the CAT and HPX domains when collagen is bound. Ultimately, the MD simulation studies have complemented structural (NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography) and kinetic analyses to provide a more detailed mechanistic view of MMP-catalyzed collagenolysis. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. First principles insight into the α-glucan structures of starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damager, Iben; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Blennow, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate the synthesis, conformation, and hydration of the α-glucan structures of starch. Starch and glycogen were synthesized by sets of specific enzyme activities that directly determined their molecular structures and physical properties. It was demonstrated...... that the extent of crystallinity, aggregation and hydration was of fundamental importance for starch and its human analogue glycogen. Starch was deposited in the plant as a stable form in highly organized and semicrystalline granules having specific crystalline polymorphs as determined by powder X......-ray crystallography. The investigations mainly focused on the bottom-up approach of synthesis, conformation, and hydration of starch. Starch and glycogen were found to be polymers that were built up from a single monomer, D-glucopyranose, or for short D-glucose....

  13. From DNA to proteins via the ribosome: Structural insights into the workings of the translation machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agirrezabala Xabier

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding protein synthesis in bacteria and humans is important for understanding the origin of many human diseases and devising treatments for them. Over the past decade, the field of structural biology has made significant advances in the visualisation of the molecular machinery involved in protein synthesis. It is now possible to discern, at least in outline, the way that interlocking ribosomal components and factors adapt their conformations throughout this process. The determination of structures in various functional contexts, along with the application of kinetic and fluorescent resonance energy transfer approaches to the problem, has given researchers the frame of reference for what remains as the greatest challenge: the complete dynamic portrait of protein synthesis in the cell.

  14. Structural insight into inhibitors of flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hideaki; Umehara, Takashi

    2017-05-04

    Until 2004, many researchers believed that protein methylation in eukaryotic cells was an irreversible reaction. However, the discovery of lysine-specific demethylase 1 in 2004 drastically changed this view and the concept of chromatin regulation. Since then, the enzymes responsible for lysine demethylation and their cellular substrates, biological significance, and selective regulation have become major research topics in epigenetics and chromatin biology. Many cell-permeable inhibitors for lysine demethylases have been developed, including both target-specific and nonspecific inhibitors. Structural understanding of how these inhibitors bind to lysine demethylases is crucial both for validation of the inhibitors as chemical probes and for the rational design of more potent, target-specific inhibitors. This review focuses on published small-molecule inhibitors targeted at the two flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent lysine demethylases, lysine-specific demethylases 1 and 2, and how the inhibitors interact with the tertiary structures of the enzymes.

  15. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreth, Ryan N.; Koide, Shohei

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  16. Insights into the structural patterns of the antileishmanial activity of bi- and tricyclic N-heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Lizzi; Stephens, David E; D'Avila, Abigail; George, Kathryn G; Arman, Hadi; Zhang, Yu; Perry, George; Lleonart, Ricardo; Larionov, Oleg V; Fernández, Patricia L

    2016-08-07

    The influence of various structural patterns in a series of novel bi- and tricyclic N-heterocycles on the activity against Leishmania major and Leishmania panamensis has been studied and compounds that are active in the low micromolar region have been identified. Both quinolines and tetrahydrooxazinoindoles (TOI) proved to have significant antileishmanial activities, while substituted indoles were inactive. We have also showed that a chloroquine analogue induces Leishmania killing by modulating macrophage activation.

  17. Structural insight into the unique properties of adeno-associated virus serotype 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMattia, Michael A; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Van Vliet, Kim; Mitchell, Matthew; Bennett, Antonette; Gurda, Brittney L; McKenna, Robert; Olson, Norman H; Sinkovits, Robert S; Potter, Mark; Byrne, Barry J; Aslanidi, George; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Baker, Timothy S; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2012-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has enhanced capsid-associated tropism for cardiac muscle and the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier compared to other AAV serotypes. To help identify the structural features facilitating these properties, we have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction (cryo-reconstruction) and X-ray crystallography to determine the structure of the AAV9 capsid at 9.7- and 2.8-Å resolutions, respectively. The AAV9 capsid exhibits the surface topology conserved in all AAVs: depressions at each icosahedral two-fold symmetry axis and surrounding each five-fold axis, three separate protrusions surrounding each three-fold axis, and a channel at each five-fold axis. The AAV9 viral protein (VP) has a conserved core structure, consisting of an eight-stranded, β-barrel motif and the αA helix, which are present in all parvovirus structures. The AAV9 VP differs in nine variable surface regions (VR-I to -IX) compared to AAV4, but at only three (VR-I, VR-II, and VR-IV) compared to AAV2 and AAV8. VR-I differences modify the raised region of the capsid surface between the two-fold and five-fold depressions. The VR-IV difference produces smaller three-fold protrusions in AAV9 that are less "pointed" than AAV2 and AAV8. Significantly, residues in the AAV9 VRs have been identified as important determinants of cellular tropism and transduction and dictate its antigenic diversity from AAV2. Hence, the AAV9 VRs likely confer the unique infection phenotypes of this serotype.

  18. New insights into the structure, chemistry, and properties of Cu4SnS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Amitava; Mohapatra, Sudip; Yaghoobnejad Asl, Hooman; Lee, Seng Huat; Hor, Yew San; Medvedeva, Julia E.; McClane, Devon L.; Hilmas, Gregory E.; McGuire, Michael A.; May, Andrew F.; Wang, Hsin; Dash, Shreeram; Welton, Aaron; Boolchand, Punit; Devlin, Kasey P.; Aitken, Jennifer; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Petříček, Váčlav

    2017-09-01

    The ambient temperature structure of Cu4SnS4 has been revisited and the recently reported low temperature structure has been confirmed from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. A structural phase transition from a large monoclinic unit cell at low temperature to a smaller orthorhombic unit cell at high temperature has been observed. The room temperature phase exhibited disorder in the two copper sites, which is a different finding from earlier reports. The low temperature monoclinic form crystallizes in P21/c space group, which is isostructural with Cu4GeS4. The phase transition has also been studied with variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction and 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivity of polycrystalline Cu4SnS4 are reported from 16 to 400 K on hot pressed pellets. Thermal conductivity measurements at high temperatures, 350 - 750 K exhibited very low thermal conductivities in the range 0.28 - 0.35 W K-1 m-1. In all the transport measurements the phase transition has been observed at around 232 K. Resistivity decreases, while Seebeck coefficient increases after the phase transition during warming up from low to high temperatures. This change in resistivity has been correlated with the results of first-principles electronic band structure calculations using highly-accurate screened-exchange local density approximation. It was found that both the low hole effective mass of 0.63 me for the Γ→Y crystallographic direction and small band gap, 0.49 eV, are likely to contribute to the observed higher conductivity of the orthorhombic phase. Cu4SnS4 is also electrochemically active and shows reversible reaction with lithium between 1.7 and 3.5 volts.

  19. Insights into Diterpene Cyclization from Structure of Bifunctional Abietadiene Synthase from Abies grandis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ke; Gao, Yang; Hoy, Julie A.; Mann, Francis M.; Honzatko, Richard B.; Peters, Reuben J. (Iowa State)

    2013-09-24

    Abietadiene synthase from Abies grandis (AgAS) is a model system for diterpene synthase activity, catalyzing class I (ionization-initiated) and class II (protonation-initiated) cyclization reactions. Reported here is the crystal structure of AgAS at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and molecular dynamics simulations of that structure with and without active site ligands. AgAS has three domains ({alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma}). The class I active site is within the C-terminal {alpha} domain, and the class II active site is between the N-terminal {gamma} and {beta} domains. The domain organization resembles that of monofunctional diterpene synthases and is consistent with proposed evolutionary origins of terpene synthases. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to determine the effect of substrate binding on enzymatic structure. Although such studies of the class I active site do lead to an enclosed substrate-Mg{sup 2+} complex similar to that observed in crystal structures of related plant enzymes, it does not enforce a single substrate conformation consistent with the known product stereochemistry. Simulations of the class II active site were more informative, with observation of a well ordered external loop migration. This 'loop-in' conformation not only limits solvent access but also greatly increases the number of conformational states accessible to the substrate while destabilizing the nonproductive substrate conformation present in the 'loop-out' conformation. Moreover, these conformational changes at the class II active site drive the substrate toward the proposed transition state. Docked substrate complexes were further assessed with regard to the effects of site-directed mutations on class I and II activities.

  20. New insights into Alzheimer's disease progression: a combined TMS and structural MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eini Niskanen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combination of structural and functional data of the human brain can provide detailed information of neurodegenerative diseases and the influence of the disease on various local cortical areas. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine the relationship between structure and function of the brain the cortical thickness based on structural magnetic resonance images and motor cortex excitability assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation were correlated in Alzheimer's disease (AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI patients as well as in age-matched healthy controls. Motor cortex excitability correlated negatively with cortical thickness on the sensorimotor cortex, the precuneus and the cuneus but the strength of the correlation varied between the study groups. On the sensorimotor cortex the correlation was significant only in MCI subjects. On the precuneus and cuneus the correlation was significant both in AD and MCI subjects. In healthy controls the motor cortex excitability did not correlate with the cortical thickness. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy subjects the motor cortex excitability is not dependent on the cortical thickness, whereas in neurodegenerative diseases the cortical thinning is related to weaker cortical excitability, especially on the precuneus and cuneus. However, in AD subjects there seems to be a protective mechanism of hyperexcitability on the sensorimotor cortex counteracting the prominent loss of cortical volume since the motor cortex excitability did not correlate with the cortical thickness. Such protective mechanism was not found on the precuneus or cuneus nor in the MCI subjects. Therefore, our results indicate that the progression of the disease proceeds with different dynamics in the structure and function of neuronal circuits from normal conditions via MCI to AD.

  1. Structure of active IspH enzyme from escherichia coli provides mechanistic insights into substrate reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Gräwert, Tobias

    2009-07-20

    The terminal step of the non-mevalonate pathway of terpene biosynthesis is catalyzed by IspH (see scheme). In the crystal structure of IspH from E. coli, a bound inorganic diphosphate ligand occupies the position of the diphosphate residue of the substrate. Together with mutation studies and theoretical calculations, these data support a mechanism which is analogous to the Birch reduction of allylic alcohols. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Structural Insights into a Novel Class of Aspartate Aminotransferase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeoncheol Francis Son

    Full Text Available Aspartate aminotransferase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAspAT is a PLP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the production of L-aspartate and α-ketoglutarate from L-glutamate and oxaloacetate in L-lysine biosynthesis. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of CgAspAT and compare it with those of other aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs from the aminotransferase class I, we determined the crystal structure of CgAspAT. CgAspAT functions as a dimer, and the CgAspAT monomer consists of two domains, the core domain and the auxiliary domain. The PLP cofactor is found to be bound to CgAspAT and stabilized through unique residues. In our current structure, a citrate molecule is bound at the active site of one molecule and mimics binding of the glutamate substrate. The residues involved in binding of the PLP cofactor and the glutamate substrate were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, compared with other AspATs from aminotransferase subgroup Ia and Ib, CgAspAT exhibited unique binding sites for both cofactor and substrate; moreover, it was found to have unusual structural features in the auxiliary domain. Based on these structural differences, we propose that CgAspAT does not belong to either subgroup Ia or Ib, and can be categorized into a subgroup Ic. The phylogenetic tree and RMSD analysis also indicates that CgAspAT is located in an independent AspAT subgroup.

  3. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  4. Structural and mechanistic insight into DNA unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Stelter

    Full Text Available DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement around duplexed DNA. Our structural data also improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA unwinding by Superfamily 1A (SF1A helicases. Our biochemical data reveal that drUvrD is a DNA-stimulated ATPase, can translocate along ssDNA in the 3'-5' direction and shows ATP-dependent 3'-5', and surprisingly also, 5'-3' helicase activity. Interestingly, we find that these translocase and helicase activities of drUvrD are modulated by the ssDNA binding protein. Analysis of drUvrD mutants indicate that the conserved β-hairpin structure of drUvrD that functions as a separation pin is critical for both drUvrD's 3'-5' and 5'-3' helicase activities, whereas the GIG motif of drUvrD involved in binding to the DNA duplex is essential for the 5'-3' helicase activity only. These special features of drUvrD may reflect its involvement in a wide range of DNA repair processes in vivo.

  5. Chlorobium Tepidum: Insights into the Structure, Physiology, and Metabolism of a Green Sulfur Bacterium Derived from the Complete Genome Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Chew, Aline Gomez Maqueo; Li, Hui

    2003-01-01

    ease of cultivation and natural transformability. This review focuses on insights into the physiology and biochemistry of the green sulfur bacteria that have been derived from the recently completed analysis of the 2.15-Mb genome of Chl. tepidum. About 40 mutants of Chl. tepidum have been generated......Green sulfur bacteria are obligate, anaerobic photolithoautotrophs that synthesize unique bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and a unique light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome. One organism, Chlorobium tepidum, has emerged as a model for this group of bacteria primarily due to its relative...... within the last 3 years, most of which have been made based on analyses of the genome. This has allowed a nearly complete elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways for the carotenoids and BChls in Chl. tepidum, which include several novel enzymes specific for BChl c biosynthesis. Facilitating...

  6. Insights into the Structural Changes Occurring upon Photoconversion in the Orange Carotenoid Protein from Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Re, Eleonora; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Leverenz, Ryan L.; Huxter, Vanessa M.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Mathies, Richard A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-05-22

    Carotenoids play an essential role in photoprotection, interacting with other pigments to safely dissipate excess absorbed energy as heat. In cyanobacteria, the short time scale photoprotective mechanisms involve the photoactive orange carotenoid protein (OCP), which binds a single carbonyl carotenoid. Blue-green light induces the photoswitching of OCP from its ground state form (OCPO) to a metastable photoproduct (OCPR). OCPR can bind to the phycobilisome antenna and induce fluorescence quenching. The photoswitching is accompanied by structural and functional changes at the level of the protein and of the bound carotenoid. In this study, we use broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to look at the differences in excited state dynamics of the carotenoid in the two forms of OCP. Our results provide insight into the origin of the pronounced vibrational lineshape and oscillatory dynamics observed in linear absorption and 2D electronic spectroscopy of OCPO and the large inhomogeneous broadening in OCPR, with consequences for the chemical function of the two forms.

  7. Mechanism-Based Inhibitors of the Human Sirtuin 5 Deacylase: Structure-Activity Relationship, Biostructural, and Kinetic Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Nima; Auth, Marina; Troelsen, Kathrin R; Pannek, Martin; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Fontenas, Martin; Hirschey, Matthew D; Steegborn, Clemens; Madsen, Andreas S; Olsen, Christian A

    2017-11-20

    The sirtuin enzymes are important regulatory deacylases in a variety of biochemical contexts and may therefore be potential therapeutic targets through either activation or inhibition by small molecules. Here, we describe the discovery of the most potent inhibitor of sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) reported to date. We provide rationalization of the mode of binding by solving co-crystal structures of selected inhibitors in complex with both human and zebrafish SIRT5, which provide insight for future optimization of inhibitors with more "drug-like" properties. Importantly, enzyme kinetic evaluation revealed a slow, tight-binding mechanism of inhibition, which is unprecedented for SIRT5. This is important information when applying inhibitors to probe mechanisms in biology. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  9. Structural insights into a unique Hsp70-Hsp40 interaction in the eukaryotic ribosome-associated complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Felix Alexander; Gumiero, Andrea; Gesé, Genís Valentín; Lapouge, Karine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-02-01

    Cotranslational chaperones assist de novo folding of nascent polypeptides, prevent them from aggregating and modulate translation. The ribosome-associated complex (RAC) is unique in that the Hsp40 protein Zuo1 and the atypical Hsp70 chaperone Ssz1 form a stable heterodimer, which acts as a cochaperone for the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. Here we present the structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum RAC core comprising Ssz1 and the Zuo1 N terminus. We show how the conserved allostery of Hsp70 proteins is abolished and this Hsp70-Hsp40 pair is molded into a functional unit. Zuo1 stabilizes Ssz1 in trans through interactions that in canonical Hsp70s occur in cis. Ssz1 is catalytically inert and cannot adopt the closed conformation, but the substrate binding domain β is completed by Zuo1. Our study offers insights into the coupling of a special Hsp70-Hsp40 pair, which evolved to link protein folding and translation.

  10. Structural insights into substrate and coenzyme preference by SDR family protein Gox2253 from Gluconobater oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Cui, Dongbing; Zhang, Lujia; Jiang, Shuiqin; Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Gox2253 from Gluconobacter oxydans belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, and catalyzes the reduction of heptanal, octanal, nonanal, and decanal with NADPH. To develop a robust working platform to engineer novel G. oxydans oxidoreductases with designed coenzyme preference, we adopted a structure based rational design strategy using computational predictions that considers the number of hydrogen bonds formed between enzyme and docked coenzyme. We report the crystal structure of Gox2253 at 2.6 Å resolution, ternary models of Gox2253 mutants in complex with NADH/short-chain aldehydes, and propose a structural mechanism of substrate selection. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that hydrogen bonds could form between 2'-hydroxyl group in the adenosine moiety of NADH and the side chain of Gox2253 mutant after arginine at position 42 is replaced with tyrosine or lysine. Consistent with the molecular dynamics prediction, Gox2253-R42Y/K mutants can use both NADH and NADPH as a coenzyme. Hence, the strategies here could provide a practical platform to engineer coenzyme selectivity for any given oxidoreductase and could serve as an additional consideration to engineer substrate-binding pockets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Structural and functional insights into Saccharomyces cerevisiae riboflavin biosynthesis reductase RIB7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyang Lv

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae RIB7 (ScRIB7 is a potent target for anti-fungal agents because of its involvement in the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway as a NADPH-dependent reductase. However, the catalytic mechanism of riboflavin biosynthesis reductase (RBSRs is controversial, and enzyme structure information is still lacking in eukaryotes. Here we report the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RIB7 at 2.10 Å resolution and its complex with NADPH at 2.35 Å resolution. ScRIB7 exists as a stable homodimer, and each subunit consists of nine central β-sheets flanked by five helices, resembling the structure of RIB7 homologues. A conserved G(76-X-G(78-Xn-G(181-G(182 motif is present at the NADPH pyrophosphate group binding site. Activity assays confirmed the necessity of Thr79, Asp83, Glu180 and Gly182 for the activity of ScRIB7. Substrate preference of ScRIB7 was altered by mutating one residue (Thr35 to a Lysine, implying that ScRIB7 Thr35 and its corresponding residue, a lysine in bacteria, are important in substrate-specific recognition.

  12. Nervous system and ciliary structures of Micrognathozoa (Gnathifera): evolutionary insight from an early branch in Spiralia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsaae, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show that Gnathifera, comprising Rotifera, Gnathostomulida and Micrognathozoa, constitute the sister group to the remaining Spiralia (containing, e.g. flatworms, segmented worms and molluscs). Therefore, a better understanding of Gnathifera is central for unravelling the evolution of the highly diverse Spiralia. Here, we describe the previously unstudied nervous system and ciliary structures of Micrognathozoa, using immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The nervous system is simple with a large brain, paired sub-esophageal ganglia, two trunk commissures, two pairs of ventral longitudinal nerves and peripheral nerves. The paired ventro-lateral nerve cords are confirmed to be a symplesiomorphy of Gnathifera (possibly even Spiralia), whereas the paired ventro-median nerves are not previously reported in Gnathifera. A pharyngeal ganglion is described for Micrognathozoa: a complex structure with two apical tufts of ciliary receptors, now shown to be shared by all Gnathifera. The ventral pattern of external ciliophores is re-described, and protonephridia with multi-ciliated collecting tubules similar to those of Rotifera are confirmed. A range of new details from a simple nervous system and complex set of ciliary structures in a microscopic metazoan are hereby unravelled. The many resemblances with Rotifera corroborate their close relationship, and shed more light on the evolution of Gnathifera. PMID:27853545

  13. Structure of the Arabidopsis TOPLESS corepressor provides insight into the evolution of transcriptional repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Arevalillo, Raquel; Nanao, Max H.; Vinos-Poyo, Thomas; Mast, David; Galvan-Ampudia, Carlos; Brunoud, Géraldine; Dumas, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional repression involves a class of proteins called corepressors that link transcription factors to chromatin remodeling complexes. In plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana, the most prominent corepressor is TOPLESS (TPL), which plays a key role in hormone signaling and development. Here we present the crystallographic structure of the Arabidopsis TPL N-terminal region comprising the LisH and CTLH (C-terminal to LisH) domains and a newly identified third region, which corresponds to a CRA domain. Comparing the structure of TPL with the mammalian TBL1, which shares a similar domain structure and performs a parallel corepressor function, revealed that the plant TPLs have evolved a new tetramerization interface and unique and highly conserved surface for interaction with repressors. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we validated those surfaces in vitro and in vivo and showed that TPL tetramerization and repressor binding are interdependent. Our results illustrate how evolution used a common set of protein domains to create a diversity of corepressors, achieving similar properties with different molecular solutions. PMID:28698367

  14. Structural Insights into the Tumor-Promoting Function of the MTDH-SND1 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Guo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metadherin (MTDH and Staphylococcal nuclease domain containing 1 (SND1 are overexpressed and interact in diverse cancer types. The structural mechanism of their interaction remains unclear. Here, we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of MTDH-SND1 complex, which reveals an 11-residue MTDH peptide motif occupying an extended protein groove between two SN domains (SN1/2, with two MTDH tryptophan residues nestled into two well-defined pockets in SND1. At the opposite side of the MTDH-SND1 binding interface, SND1 possesses long protruding arms and deep surface valleys that are prone to binding with other partners. Despite the simple binding mode, interactions at both tryptophan-binding pockets are important for MTDH and SND1’s roles in breast cancer and for SND1 stability under stress. Our study reveals a unique mode of interaction with SN domains that dictates cancer-promoting activity and provides a structural basis for mechanistic understanding of MTDH-SND1-mediated signaling and for exploring therapeutic targeting of this complex.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Enzymatic Chlorite Detoxification: Insights from Structural and Kinetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Flego, Nicola; Pühringer, Dominic; Libiseller-Egger, Julian; Coates, Leighton; Hofbauer, Stefan; Bellei, Marzia; Furtmüller, Paul G; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Smulevich, Giulietta; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Obinger, Christian

    2017-11-03

    The heme enzyme chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyzes the degradation of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. Although structure and steady-state kinetics of Clds have been elucidated, many questions remain (e.g., the mechanism of chlorite cleavage and the pH dependence of the reaction). Here, we present high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of a dimeric Cld at pH 6.5 and 8.5, its fluoride and isothiocyanate complexes and the neutron structure at pH 9.0 together with the pH dependence of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple, and the UV-vis and resonance Raman spectral features. We demonstrate that the distal Arg127 cannot act as proton acceptor and is fully ionized even at pH 9.0 ruling out its proposed role in dictating the pH dependence of chlorite degradation. Stopped-flow studies show that (i) Compound I and hypochlorite do not recombine and (ii) Compound II is the immediately formed redox intermediate that dominates during turnover. Homolytic cleavage of chlorite is proposed.

  16. Azaphenothiazines - promising phenothiazine derivatives. An insight into nomenclature, synthesis, structure elucidation and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Krystian; Jeleń, Małgorzata; Morak-Młodawska, Beata; Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocięba, Maja; Zaczyńska, Ewa

    2017-09-29

    For the last two decades, classical phenothiazines have attracted attention of researchers, as the hitherto investigations have revealed many significant biological activities within this class of compounds, other than originally discovered neuroleptic ones. Important, new pharmaceutical results on phenothiazines, as 10-substituted dibenzothiazines, were recently highlighted in several reviews. Azaphenothiazines are structurally modified phenothiazines by substitution of one or both benzene rings in the phenothiazine ring system with the azine rings, such as: pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, 1,2,4-triazine, quinoline, quinoxaline, benzoxazine and benzothiazine. They form over 50 different heterocyclic systems, of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexacyclic structures, and contain from one to even four azine nitrogen atoms. This review summarizes the methodical knowledge on azaphenothiazines, referring to their nomenclature, synthesis, structure analysis and above all significant varied biological activities, examined in vitro and in vivo. It describes, in addition, current trends in the synthesis of azaphenothiazines. The influence of the azaphenothiazine ring system, the nature of the substituents, predominantly at the thiazine nitrogen atom, as well as at the azine nitrogen atom and carbon atom, on the biological activities, were also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic structure of carbon dioxide under pressure and insights into the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Sean R; Jarrige, Ignace; Wu, Min; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tse, John S; Mi, Zhongying; Kaci, Linada; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Cai, Yong Q

    2013-11-12

    Knowledge of the high-pressure behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2), an important planetary material found in Venus, Earth, and Mars, is vital to the study of the evolution and dynamics of the planetary interiors as well as to the fundamental understanding of the C-O bonding and interaction between the molecules. Recent studies have revealed a number of crystalline polymorphs (CO2-I to -VII) and an amorphous phase under high pressure-temperature conditions. Nevertheless, the reported phase stability field and transition pressures at room temperature are poorly defined, especially for the amorphous phase. Here we shed light on the successive pressure-induced local structural changes and the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition of CO2 at room temperature by performing an in situ study of the local electronic structure using X-ray Raman scattering, aided by first-principle exciton calculations. We show that the transition from CO2-I to CO2-III was initiated at around 7.4 GPa, and completed at about 17 GPa. The present study also shows that at ~37 GPa, molecular CO2 starts to polymerize to an extended structure with fourfold coordinated carbon and minor CO3 and CO-like species. The observed pressure is more than 10 GPa below previously reported. The disappearance of the minority species at 63(± 3) GPa suggests that a previously unknown phase transition within the nonmolecular phase of CO2 has occurred.

  18. Insights on the Structural Details of Endonuclease EcoRI-DNA Complexes by Electron Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Jessica

    2009-03-01

    Pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to probe the binding specificity of EcoRI, a restriction endonuclease. Using site-directed spin labeling, a nitroxide side chain was incorporated into the protein, enabling the use of ESR to study structural details of EcoRI. Distance measurements were performed on EcoRI mutants when bound to varying sequences of DNA using the Double Electron-Electron Resonance experiment. These distances demonstrated that the average structure in the arm regions of EcoRI, thought to play a major role in binding specificity, is the same when the protein binds to different sequences of DNA. Also, it was determined that the arms exhibit higher flexibility when bound to sequences other than the specific sequence due to the larger distance distributions acquired from these spin labeled complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on the spin-label-modified specific EcoRI-DNA crystal structure to model the average nitroxide orientation. The distance distributions from MD were found to be narrower than experiment, indicating the need for a more rigorous sampling of the nitroxide conformers in silico.

  19. Structural insights into the molecular mechanism of the m(6)A writer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śledź, Paweł; Jinek, Martin

    2016-09-14

    Methylation of adenosines at the N(6) position (m(6)A) is a dynamic and abundant epitranscriptomic mark that regulates critical aspects of eukaryotic RNA metabolism in numerous biological processes. The RNA methyltransferases METTL3 and METTL14 are components of a multisubunit m(6)A writer complex whose enzymatic activity is substantially higher than the activities of METTL3 or METTL14 alone. The molecular mechanism underpinning this synergistic effect is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic core of the human m(6)A writer complex comprising METTL3 and METTL14. The structure reveals the heterodimeric architecture of the complex and donor substrate binding by METTL3. Structure-guided mutagenesis indicates that METTL3 is the catalytic subunit of the complex, whereas METTL14 has a degenerate active site and plays non-catalytic roles in maintaining complex integrity and substrate RNA binding. These studies illuminate the molecular mechanism and evolutionary history of eukaryotic m(6)A modification in post-transcriptional genome regulation.

  20. Cellular Phenotype and Extracellular Vesicles: Basic and Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Goldberg, Laura R.; Aliotta, Jason M.; Mark S Dooner; Pereira, Mandy G.; Wen, Sicheng; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Early work on platelet and erythrocyte vesicles interpreted the phenomena as a discard of material from cells. Subsequently, vesicles were studied as possible vaccines and, most recently, there has been a focus on the effects of vesicles on cell fate. Recent studies have indicated that extracellular vesicles, previously referred to as microvesicles or exosomes, have the capacity to change the phenotype of neighboring cells. Extensive work has shown that vesicles derived from either the lung o...

  1. Elastic energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A; Phillips, Rob

    2011-06-01

    In recent experiments [M. Dubois, B. Demé, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J.-C. Dedieu, C. Vautrin, S. Désert, E. Perez, and T. Zemb, Nature (London) 411, 672 (2001)] the spontaneous formation of hollow bilayer vesicles with polyhedral symmetry has been observed. On the basis of the experimental phenomenology it was suggested [M. Dubois, V. Lizunov, A. Meister, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J. M. Verbavatz, E. Perez, J. Zimmerberg, and T. Zemb, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 15082 (2004)] that the mechanism for the formation of bilayer polyhedra is minimization of elastic bending energy. Motivated by these experiments, we study the elastic bending energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles. In agreement with experiments, and provided that excess amphiphiles exhibiting spontaneous curvature are present in sufficient quantity, we find that polyhedral bilayer vesicles can indeed be energetically favorable compared to spherical bilayer vesicles. Consistent with experimental observations we also find that the bending energy associated with the vertices of bilayer polyhedra can be locally reduced through the formation of pores. However, the stabilization of polyhedral bilayer vesicles over spherical bilayer vesicles relies crucially on molecular segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges rather than the vertices of bilayer polyhedra. Furthermore, our analysis implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the icosahedron does not minimize elastic bending energy among arbitrary polyhedral shapes and sizes. Instead, we find that, for large polyhedron sizes, the snub dodecahedron and the snub cube both have lower total bending energies than the icosahedron.

  2. Endothelial Extracellular Vesicles-Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromada, Carina; Mühleder, Severin; Grillari, Johannes; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microparticles, and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles that have once been considered as cell debris lacking biological functions. However, they have recently gained immense interest in the scientific community due to their role in intercellular communication, immunity, tissue regeneration as well as in the onset, and progression of various pathologic conditions. Extracellular vesicles of endothelial origin have been found to play a versatile role in the human body, since they are on the one hand known to contribute to cardiovascular diseases, but on the other hand have also been reported to promote endothelial cell survival. Hence, endothelial extracellular vesicles hold promising therapeutic potential to be used as a new tool to detect as well as treat a great number of diseases. This calls for clinically approved, standardized, and efficient isolation and characterization protocols to harvest and purify endothelial extracellular vesicles. However, such methods and techniques to fulfill stringent requirements for clinical trials have yet to be developed or are not harmonized internationally. In this review, recent advances and challenges in the field of endothelial extracellular vesicle research are discussed and current problems and limitations regarding isolation and characterization are pointed out.

  3. Physical and biochemical insights on DNA structures in artificial and living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Li, Jiang; Song, Haiyun; Chao, Jie; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Highly specific DNA base-pairing is the basis for both fulfilling its genetic role and constructing novel nanostructures and hybrid conjugates with inorganic nanomaterials (NMs). There exist many remarkable differences in the physical properties of single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA, which play important roles in regulation of biological processes in nature. Rapid advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology pose new questions on how DNA and DNA structures interact with inorganic nanomaterials or cells and animals, which should be important for their biological and biomedical applications. In this Account, we intend to provide an overview on many facets of DNA and DNA structures in artificial and living systems, with the focus on their properties and functions at the interfaces of inorganic nanomaterials and biological systems. ssDNA, dsDNA, and DNA nanostructures interact with NMs in different ways. In particular, gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide exhibit strikingly different affinity toward ssDNA and dsDNA. Such binding differences can be coupled with optical properties of NMs. For example, DNA hybridization can effectively modulate the plasmonic and catalytic properties of gold nanoparticles. By exploitation of these interactions, there have been many ways for sensitive transduction of biomolecular recognition for various sensing applications. Alternatively, modulation of the properties of DNA and DNA structures with NMs has led to new tools for genetic analysis including genotyping and haplotyping. Self-assembled DNA nanostructures have emerged as a new type of NMs with pure biomolecules. These nanostructures can be designed in one, two, or three dimensions with various sizes, shapes, and geometries. They also have characteristics of uniform size, precise addressability, excellent water solubility, and biocompatibility. These nanostructures provide a new toolbox for biophysical studies with unparalleled advantages, for example, NMR

  4. NMR structure of temporin-1 ta in lipopolysaccharide micelles: mechanistic insight into inactivation by outer membrane.

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    Rathi Saravanan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs play important roles in the innate defense mechanism. The broad spectrum of activity of AMPs requires an efficient permeabilization of the bacterial outer and inner membranes. The outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria is made of a specialized lipid called lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The LPS layer is an efficient permeability barrier against anti-bacterial agents including AMPs. As a mode of protection, LPS can induce self associations of AMPs rendering them inactive. Temporins are a group of short-sized AMPs isolated from frog skin, and many of them are inactive against Gram negative bacteria as a result of their self-association in the LPS-outer membrane. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using NMR spectroscopy, we have determined atomic resolution structure and characterized localization of temporin-1Ta or TA (FLPLIGRVLSGIL-amide in LPS micelles. In LPS micelles, TA adopts helical conformation for residues L4-I12, while residues F1-L3 are found to be in extended conformations. The aromatic sidechain of residue F1 is involved in extensive packing interactions with the sidechains of residues P3, L4 and I5. Interestingly, a number of long-range NOE contacts have been detected between the N-terminal residues F1, P3 with the C-terminal residues S10, I12, L13 of TA in LPS micelles. Saturation transfer difference (STD NMR studies demonstrate close proximity of residues including F1, L2, P3, R7, S10 and L13 with the LPS micelles. Notably, the LPS bound structure of TA shows differences with the structures of TA determined in DPC and SDS detergent micelles. SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that TA, in LPS lipids, forms helical oligomeric structures employing N- and C-termini residues. Such oligomeric structures may not be translocated across the outer membrane; resulting in the inactivation of the AMP. Importantly, the results of our studies will be useful for the development of antimicrobial agents with a

  5. Direct structural insight into the substrate-shuttling mechanism of yeast fatty acid synthase by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Preeti; Mills, Deryck J; Wouts, Remco; Grininger, Martin; Vonck, Janet; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2010-05-18

    Yeast fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a 2.6-MDa barrel-shaped multienzyme complex, which carries out cyclic synthesis of fatty acids. By electron cryomicroscopy of single particles we obtained a three-dimensional map of yeast FAS at 5.9-A resolution. Compared to the crystal structures of fungal FAS, the EM map reveals major differences and new features that indicate a considerably different arrangement of the complex in solution compared to the crystal structures, as well as a high degree of variance inside the barrel. Distinct density regions in the reaction chambers next to each of the catalytic domains fitted the substrate-binding acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In each case, this resulted in the expected distance of approximately 18 A from the ACP substrate-binding site to the active site of the catalytic domains. The multiple, partially occupied positions of the ACP within the reaction chamber provide direct structural insight into the substrate-shuttling mechanism of fatty acid synthesis in this large cellular machine.

  6. The structure of adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B): Insights into receptor binding and immune evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are leading candidate vectors for human gene therapy. AAV serotypes have broad cellular tropism and use a variety of cellular receptors. AAV serotype 3 binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycan prior to cell entry and is serologically distinct from other serotypes. The capsid features that distinguish AAV-3B from other serotypes are poorly understood. The structure of AAV-3B has been determined to 2.6Å resolution from twinned crystals of an infectious virus. The most distinctive structural features are located in regions implicated in receptor and antibody binding, providing insights into the cell entry mechanisms and antigenic nature of AAVs. We show that AAV-3B has a lower affinity for heparin than AAV-2, which can be rationalized by the distinct features of the AAV-3B capsid. The structure of AAV-3B provides an additional foundation for the future engineering of improved gene therapy vectors with modified receptor binding or antigenic characteristics. PMID:20444480

  7. Structural insights into mouse anti-apoptotic Bcl-xl reveal affinity for Beclin 1 and gossypol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyadarshi, Amit [Biomedical Research Center, KIST (Korea, Republic of); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, 305-333 Gawak-Ro, Yusong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Roy, Ankoor [Centre for Neural Sciences, KIST, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, 305-333 Gawak-Ro, Yusong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Key-Sun, E-mail: keysun@kist.re.kr [Centre for Neural Sciences, KIST, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, 305-333 Gawak-Ro, Yusong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eunice EunKyeong, E-mail: eunice@kist.re.kr [Biomedical Research Center, KIST (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, 305-333 Gawak-Ro, Yusong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon, E-mail: chahong@korea.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-09

    This study reports the crystal structures of Bcl-xl wild type and three Bcl-xl mutants (Y101A, F105A, and R139A) with amino acid substitutions in the hydrophobic groove of the Bcl-xl BH3 domain. An additional 12 ordered residues were observed in a highly flexible loop between the {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 helices, and were recognized as an important deamidation site for the regulation of apoptosis. The autophagy-effector protein, Beclin 1, contains a novel BH3 domain (residues 101-125), which binds to the surface cleft of Bcl-xl, as confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and analytical gel-filtration results. Gossypol, a potent inhibitor of Bcl-xl, had a K{sub d} value of 0.9 {mu}M. In addition, the structural and biochemical analysis of five Bcl-xl substitution mutants will provide structural insights into the design and development of anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Discovery of anabaenopeptin 679 from freshwater algal bloom material: Insights into the structure-activity relationship of anabaenopeptin protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Henrik; Kurita, Kenji L; Pan, Li; Wahome, Paul G; He, Haiyin; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Carter, Guy T; Linington, Roger G

    2016-10-15

    Cyanobacteria possess a unique capacity for the production of structurally novel secondary metabolites compared to the biosynthetic abilities of other environmental prokaryotes such as bacteria of the genus Streptomyces. Two different strategies to explore cyanobacteria-derived natural products have been explored previously: (1) cultivation of single cyanobacterial strains, in bioreactors for example; (2) bulk collections from the environment of so called 'algal blooms' that are dominated by cyanobacteria. In this study a new environmentally friendly collection technique for obtaining large quantities of algal bloom biomass was utilized. Algal biomass derived from eight million liters of lake water was concentrated using a novel continuous countercurrent filtration system. Analysis of this freshwater algal bloom from Grand Lake-Saint Marys, Ohio led to the discovery of anabaenopeptin 679 (1), as well as the known anabaenopeptins B, F, H and 908. Anabaenopeptin 679 is unusual in that it possesses the classical anabaenopeptin-like cyclic pentapeptide core, but lacks the typical sidechain attached to the constitutive ureido group. Screening of all anabaenopeptin derivatives in an enzymatic assay for inhibitory activity toward carboxypeptidase A identified anabaenopeptin 679 as a strong inhibitor of carboxypeptidase A with an IC50 value of 4.6μg/mL. This result defines a new minimal core structure for carboxypeptidase activity among the anabaenopeptin class, and provides further insight into the structure-activity relationship of anabaenopeptin-like carboxypeptidase A inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment nitrogenase component 1: insights into phylogenetics and structure-function relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Howard

    Full Text Available Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as "core" for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification

  10. Structural and Functional Insight into Canarypox Virus CNP058 Mediated Regulation of Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ishtiaq Anasir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death or apoptosis is an important component of host defense systems against viral infection. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 proteins family is the main arbiter of mitochondrially mediated apoptosis, and viruses have evolved sequence and structural mimics of Bcl-2 to subvert premature host cell apoptosis in response to viral infection. The sequencing of the canarypox virus genome identified a putative pro-survival Bcl-2 protein, CNP058. However, a role in apoptosis inhibition for CNP058 has not been identified to date. Here, we report that CNP058 is able to bind several host cell pro-death Bcl-2 proteins, including Bak and Bax, as well as several BH3 only-proteins including Bim, Bid, Bmf, Noxa, Puma, and Hrk with high to moderate affinities. We then defined the structural basis for CNP058 binding to pro-death Bcl-2 proteins by determining the crystal structure of CNP058 bound to Bim BH3. CNP058 adopts the conserved Bcl-2 like fold observed in cellular pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins, and utilizes the canonical ligand binding groove to bind Bim BH3. We then demonstrate that CNP058 is a potent inhibitor of ultraviolet (UV induced apoptosis in a cell culture model. Our findings suggest that CNP058 is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis that is able to bind to BH3 domain peptides from a broad range of pro-death Bcl-2 proteins, and may play a key role in countering premature host apoptosis.

  11. Insights into the structure and activity of prototype foamy virus RNase H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Berit

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNase H is an endonuclease that hydrolyzes the RNA strand in RNA/DNA hybrids. Retroviral reverse transcriptases harbor a C-terminal RNase H domain whose activity is essential for viral replication. The RNase H degrades the viral genomic RNA after the first DNA strand is synthesized. Here, we report the biophysical and enzymatic properties of the RNase H domain of prototype foamy virus (PFV as an independently purified protein. Sequence comparisons with other retroviral RNases H indicated that PFV RNase H harbors a basic protrusion, including a basic loop and the so-called C-helix, which was suggested to be important for activity and substrate binding and is absent in the RNase H domain of human immunodeficiency virus. So far, no structure of a retroviral RNase H containing a C-helix is available. Results RNase H activity assays demonstrate that the PFV RNase H domain is active, although its activity is about 200-fold reduced as compared to the full length protease-reverse transcriptase enzyme. Fluorescence equilibrium titrations with an RNA/DNA substrate revealed a KD for the RNase H domain in the low micromolar range which is about 4000-fold higher than that of the full-length protease-reverse transcriptase enzyme. Analysis of the RNase H cleavage pattern using a [32P]-labeled substrate indicates that the independent RNase H domain cleaves the substrate non-specifically. The purified RNase H domain exhibits a well defined three-dimensional structure in solution which is stabilized in the presence of Mg2+ ions. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the independent PFV RNase H domain is structured and active. The presence of the C-helix in PFV RNase H could be confirmed by assigning the protein backbone and calculating the chemical shift index using NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Thermodynamic and structural insights into nanocomposites engineering by comparing two materials assembly techniques for graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Huanan; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-06-25

    Materials assembled by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly and vacuum-assisted flocculation (VAF) have similarities, but a systematic study of their comparative advantages and disadvantages is missing. Such a study is needed from both practical and fundamental perspectives aiming at a better understanding of structure-property relationships of nanocomposites and purposeful engineering of materials with unique properties. Layered composites from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and reduced graphene (RG) are made by both techniques. We comparatively evaluate their structure, mechanical, and electrical properties. LBL and VAF composites demonstrate clear differences at atomic and nanoscale structural levels but reveal similarities in micrometer and submicrometer organization. Epitaxial crystallization and suppression of phase transition temperatures are more pronounced for PVA in LBL than for VAF composites. Mechanical properties are virtually identical for both assemblies at high RG contents. We conclude that mechanical properties in layered RG assemblies are largely determined by the thermodynamic state of PVA at the polymer/nanosheet interface rather than the nanometer scale differences in RG packing. High and nearly identical values of toughness for LBL and VAF composites reaching 6.1 MJ/m(3) observed for thermodynamically optimal composition confirm this conclusion. Their toughness is the highest among all other layered assemblies from RG, cellulose, clay, etc. Electrical conductivity, however, is more than 10× higher for LBL than for VAF composites for the same RG contents. Electrical properties are largely determined by the tunneling barrier between RG sheets and therefore strongly dependent on atomic/nanoscale organization. These findings open the door for application-oriented methods of materials engineering using both types of layered assemblies.

  13. Structural and functional insights into the mode of action of a universally conserved Obg GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boya Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obg proteins are a family of P-loop GTPases, conserved from bacteria to human. The Obg protein in Escherichia coli (ObgE has been implicated in many diverse cellular functions, with proposed molecular roles in two global processes, ribosome assembly and stringent response. Here, using pre-steady state fast kinetics we demonstrate that ObgE is an anti-association factor, which prevents ribosomal subunit association and downstream steps in translation by binding to the 50S subunit. ObgE is a ribosome dependent GTPase; however, upon binding to guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp, the global regulator of stringent response, ObgE exhibits an enhanced interaction with the 50S subunit, resulting in increased equilibrium dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. Furthermore, our cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM structure of the 50S·ObgE·GMPPNP complex indicates that the evolutionarily conserved N-terminal domain (NTD of ObgE is a tRNA structural mimic, with specific interactions with peptidyl-transferase center, displaying a marked resemblance to Class I release factors. These structural data might define ObgE as a specialized translation factor related to stress responses, and provide a framework towards future elucidation of functional interplay between ObgE and ribosome-associated (pppGpp regulators. Together with published data, our results suggest that ObgE might act as a checkpoint in final stages of the 50S subunit assembly under normal growth conditions. And more importantly, ObgE, as a (pppGpp effector, might also have a regulatory role in the production of the 50S subunit and its participation in translation under certain stressed conditions. Thus, our findings might have uncovered an under-recognized mechanism of translation control by environmental cues.

  14. High Resolution Structure of Deinococcus Bacteriophytochrome Yields New Insights into Phytochrome Architecture and Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Forest, Katrina T. (NWU); (UW)

    2010-03-08

    Phytochromes are red/far red light photochromic photoreceptors that direct many photosensory behaviors in the bacterial, fungal, and plant kingdoms. They consist of an N-terminal domain that covalently binds a bilin chromophore and a C-terminal region that transmits the light signal, often through a histidine kinase relay. Using x-ray crystallography, we recently solved the first three-dimensional structure of a phytochrome, using the chromophore-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome assembled with its chromophore, biliverdin IX{alpha}. Now, by engineering the crystallization interface, we have achieved a significantly higher resolution model. This 1.45 {angstrom} resolution structure helps identify an extensive buried surface between crystal symmetry mates that may promote dimerization in vivo. It also reveals that upon ligation of the C3{sup 2} carbon of biliverdin to Cys{sup 24}, the chromophore A-ring assumes a chiral center at C2, thus becoming 2(R),3(E)-phytochromobilin, a chemistry more similar to that proposed for the attached chromophores of cyanobacterial and plant phytochromes than previously appreciated. The evolution of bacterial phytochromes to those found in cyanobacteria and higher plants must have involved greater fitness using more reduced bilins, such as phycocyanobilin, combined with a switch of the attachment site from a cysteine near the N terminus to one conserved within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA domain. From analysis of site-directed mutants in the D. radiodurans phytochrome, we show that this bilin preference was partially driven by the change in binding site, which ultimately may have helped photosynthetic organisms optimize shade detection. Collectively, these three-dimensional structural results better clarify bilin/protein interactions and help explain how higher plant phytochromes evolved from prokaryotic progenitors.

  15. Structural insights into the metabolism of 2-chlorodibenzofuran by an evolved biphenyl dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pravindra [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Cancer Research, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Mohammadi, Mahmood [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier), Laval, QC, Canada H7V 1B7 (Canada); Dhindwal, Sonali [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Pham, Thi Thanh My [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier), Laval, QC, Canada H7V 1B7 (Canada); Bolin, Jeffrey T. [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Cancer Research, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sylvestre, Michel, E-mail: Michel.Sylvestre@iaf.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier), Laval, QC, Canada H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regiospecificity of BphAE{sub RR41} toward dibenzofuran and 2-chlorodibenzofuran differs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compared the structures of the substrate-bound forms of the enzyme with both substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dibenzofuran is compelled to move during the catalytic reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser283 contact with 2-chlorodibenzofuran helps prevent substrate movement during the reaction. -- Abstract: The biphenyl dioxygenase of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (BphAE{sub LB400}) is a Rieske-type oxygenase that catalyzes the stereospecific oxygenation of many heterocyclic aromatics including dibenzofuran. In a previous work, we evolved BphAE{sub LB400} and obtained BphAE{sub RR41}. This variant metabolizes dibenzofuran and 2-chlorodibenzofuran more efficiently than BphAE{sub LB400}. However, the regiospecificity of BphAE{sub RR41} toward these substrates differs. Dibenzofuran is metabolized principally through a lateral dioxygenation whereas 2-chlorodibenzofuran is metabolized principally through an angular dioxygenation. In order to explain this difference, we examined the crystal structures of both substrate-bound forms of BphAE{sub RR41} obtained under anaerobic conditions. This structure analysis, in combination with biochemical data for a Ser283Gly mutant provided evidences that the substrate is compelled to move after oxygen-binding in BphAE{sub RR41}:dibenzofuran. In BphAE{sub RR41}:2-chlorodibenzofuran, the chlorine atom is close to the side chain of Ser283. This contact is missing in the BphAE{sub RR41}:dibenzofuran, and strong enough in the BphAE{sub RR41}:2-chlorodibenzofuran to help prevent substrate movement during the catalytic reaction.

  16. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  17. Structural and functional insights into the malaria parasite moving junction complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Vulliez-Le Normand

    Full Text Available Members of the phylum Apicomplexa, which include the malaria parasite Plasmodium, share many features in their invasion mechanism in spite of their diverse host cell specificities and life cycle characteristics. The formation of a moving junction (MJ between the membranes of the invading apicomplexan parasite and the host cell is common to these intracellular pathogens. The MJ contains two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON complex, which is targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. In particular, RON2, a transmembrane component of the RON complex, interacts directly with AMA1. Here, we report the crystal structure of AMA1 from Plasmodium falciparum in complex with a peptide derived from the extracellular region of PfRON2, highlighting clear specificities of the P. falciparum RON2-AMA1 interaction. The receptor-binding site of PfAMA1 comprises the hydrophobic groove and a region that becomes exposed by displacement of the flexible Domain II loop. Mutations of key contact residues of PfRON2 and PfAMA1 abrogate binding between the recombinant proteins. Although PfRON2 contacts some polymorphic residues, binding studies with PfAMA1 from different strains show that these have little effect on affinity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the PfRON2 peptide inhibits erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and that this strong inhibitory potency is not affected by AMA1 polymorphisms. In parallel, we have determined the crystal structure of PfAMA1 in complex with the invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 derived by phage display, revealing an unexpected structural mimicry of the PfRON2 peptide. These results identify the key residues governing the interactions between AMA1 and RON2 in P. falciparum and suggest novel approaches to antimalarial therapeutics.

  18. Structural and functional insights into enzymes of the vitamin K cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, J-K; Stafford, D W

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin K-dependent proteins require carboxylation of certain glutamates for their biological functions. The enzymes involved in the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation include: gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) and an as-yet-unidentified vitamin K reductase (VKR). Due to the hydrophobicity of vitamin K, these enzymes are likely to be integral membrane proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, structure-function studies on these enzymes have been challenging, and some of the results are notably controversial. Patients with naturally occurring mutations in these enzymes, who mainly exhibit bleeding disorders or are resistant to oral anticoagulant treatment, provide valuable information for the functional study of the vitamin K cycle enzymes. In this review, we discuss: (i) the discovery of the enzymatic activities and gene identifications of the vitamin K cycle enzymes; (ii) the identification of their functionally important regions and their active site residues; (iii) the membrane topology studies of GGCX and VKOR; and (iv) the controversial issues regarding the structure and function studies of these enzymes, particularly, the membrane topology, the role of the conserved cysteines and the mechanism of active site regeneration of VKOR. We also discuss the possibility that a paralogous protein of VKOR, VKOR-like 1 (VKORL1), is involved in the vitamin K cycle, and the importance of and possible approaches for identifying the unknown VKR. Overall, we describe the accomplishments and the remaining questions in regard to the structure and function studies of the enzymes in the vitamin K cycle. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  20. Synaptic vesicle dynamic changes in a model of fragile X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broek, Jantine A C; Lin, Zhanmin; de Gruiter, H Martijn; van 't Spijker, Heleen; Haasdijk, Elize D; Cox, David; Ozcan, Sureyya; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Willemsen, Rob; de Zeeuw, Chris I; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single-gene disorder that is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). FXS is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats in the promoter region of the fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1). This leads to a lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which regulates translation of a wide range of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The extent of expression level alterations of synaptic proteins affected by FMRP loss and their consequences on synaptic dynamics in FXS has not been fully investigated. Here, we used an Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying FXS by monitoring protein expression changes using shotgun label-free liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) in brain tissue and synaptosome fractions. FXS-associated candidate proteins were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in synaptosome fractions for targeted protein quantification. Furthermore, functional alterations in synaptic release and dynamics were evaluated using live-cell imaging, and interpretation of synaptic dynamics differences was investigated using electron microscopy. Key findings relate to altered levels of proteins involved in GABA-signalling, especially in the cerebellum. Further exploration using microscopy studies found reduced synaptic vesicle unloading of hippocampal neurons and increased vesicle unloading in cerebellar neurons, which suggests a general decrease of synaptic transmission. Our findings suggest that FMRP is a regulator of synaptic vesicle dynamics, which supports the role of FMRP in presynaptic functions. Taken together, these studies provide novel insights into the molecular changes associated with FXS.

  1. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its...... crystallization, we engineered a beta2AR fusion protein in which T4 lysozyme (T4L) replaces most of the third intracellular loop of the GPCR ("beta2AR-T4L") and showed that this protein retains near-native pharmacologic properties. Analysis of adrenergic receptor ligand-binding mutants within the context...

  2. Insights into the structural and functional aspects of rela by molecular modeling and docking calculations.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath I.V.A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Deobagkar, D.D.

    ]. The systematic and programmed expression of RelA and SpoT together regulate the (p)ppGpp biosynthesis pathway in Gram negative bacteria [11, 17-19]. The molecular architecture of SpoT and RelA is characterized by a catalytic N-terminus and a regulatory C... in vacuo by GROMOS96 force field implemented in SPDBV [44]. The stereochemical quality of the refined structures was evaluated by Profunc PROCHECK [45] and ProSA Z-score [46] programs. A) B) Fig. 1: Sequence alignment of RelA sequences with 1VJ7A. A...

  3. Introduction of a Minkowski space structure for a deeper insight in Euclidean issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Jean-Marie, E-mail: becker@cpe.f [Ecole Superieure de Chimie Physique Electronique de Lyon, 69616 Lyon (France)

    2010-02-01

    nxn symmetrical positive definite matrices are present in many applications. In the n = 2 case, these matrices constitute a 3D-space, denoted by S{sup +}{sub 2}. The determinant of A is an element of S{sub 2}{sup +} a natural quadratic form, giving S{sub 2}{sup +} a Minkowski space structure. This paper shows how this theory quite naturally provides a graphical interpretation to formulas that have been defined elsewhere. An original application to discrete curves is given.

  4. Insights into the role of hydration in protein structure and stability obtained through hydrostatic pressure studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Royer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of protein structure and stability requires that we elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of both temperature and pressure on protein conformational transitions. While temperature effects are relatively well understood and the change in heat capacity upon unfolding has been reasonably well parameterized, the state of understanding of pressure effects is much less advanced. Ultimately, a quantitative parameterization of the volume changes (at the basis of pressure effects accompanying protein conformational transitions will be required. The present report introduces a qualitative hypothesis based on available model compound data for the molecular basis of volume change upon protein unfolding and its dependence on temperature.

  5. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data show...... with a model in which HMW-GS are extended but not highly rigid. Application of a pattern recognition technique, based on principal component analysis (PCA), to the ROA spectra reinforces these conclusions....

  6. Crystal Structure of Methylornithine Synthase (PylB): Insights into the Pyrrolysine Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2011-11-16

    Made by the barrel load: The biosynthetic pathway of the recently discovered 22nd amino acid, pyrrolysine, starts with an isomerization of lysine to methylornithine, catalyzed by PylB. The X-ray crystal structure of PylB is determined (see picture) and shows it has a TIM barrel fold. The sealed central cavity contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and methylornithine, whose 2R,3R configuration could be confirmed. The data suggest a fragmentation-recombination mechanism via a glycyl radical intermediate. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Structural insight into inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by a small-molecule antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Zhonghui; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Hong, Zebin

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serpin, is the physiological inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators and thus also an inhibitor of fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. It is a potential therapeutic target in many pathological conditions, including thrombosis...... of PAI-1 into a substrate for its target proteases and the subsequent slow conversion of PAI-1 into an irreversibly inactivated form. Our work provides structural clues to an understanding of PAI-1 inactivation by small-molecule antagonists and an important step toward the design of drugs targeting PAI-1....

  8. The Structure of Intrinsically Disordered Peptides Implicated in Amyloid Diseases: Insights from Fully Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Protein aggregation involves the self-assembly of proteins into large β-sheet-rich complexes. This process can be the result of aberrant protein folding and lead to "amyloidosis," a condition characterized by deposits of protein aggregates known as amyloids on various organs of the body [1]. Amyloid-related diseases include, among others, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and type II diabetes [2, 3, 4]. In other instances, however, protein aggregation is not a pathological process, but rather a functional one, with aggregates serving as structural scaffolds in a number of organisms [5].

  9. Atomic resolution structure of CAG RNA repeats: structural insights and implications for the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Ryszard; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2010-12-01

    CAG repeats occur predominantly in the coding regions of human genes, which suggests their functional importance. In some genes, these sequences can undergo pathogenic expansions leading to neurodegenerative polyglutamine (poly-Q) diseases. The mutant transcripts containing expanded CAG repeats possibly contribute to pathogenesis in addition to the well-known pathogenic effects of mutant proteins. We have analysed two crystal forms of RNA duplexes containing CAG repeats: (GGCAGCAGCC)(2). One of the structures has been determined at atomic resolution (0.95 Å) and the other at 1.9 Å. The duplexes include non-canonical A-A pairs that fit remarkably well within a regular A-helix. All the adenosines are in the anti-conformation and the only interaction within each A-A pair is a single C2-H2···N1 hydrogen bond. Both adenosines in each A-A pair are shifted towards the major groove, although to different extents; the A which is the H-bond donor stands out more (the 'thumbs-up' conformation). The main effect on the helix conformation is a local unwinding. The CAG repeats and the previously examined CUG structures share a similar pattern of electrostatic charge distribution in the minor groove, which could explain their affinity for the pathogenesis-related MBNL1 protein.

  10. Crystal structure of human dynein light chain Dnlc2A: structural insights into the interaction with IC74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Feng; Wang, Zhan-Xin; Wang, Xin-Quan; Tang, Qun; An, Xiao-Min; Gui, Lu-Lu; Liang, Dong-Cai

    2006-10-27

    The human light chain of the motor protein dynein, Dnlc2A, is also a novel TGF-beta-signaling component, which is altered with high frequency in epithelial ovarian cancer. It is an important mediator of dynein and the development of cancer, owing to its ability to bind to the dynein intermediate light chain (DIC) IC74 and to regulate TGF-beta-dependent transcriptional events. Here we report the 2.1-A crystal structure of Dnlc2A using single anomalous diffraction. The proteins form a homodimer in solution and interact mainly through the helix alpha(2), strand beta(3), and the loop following this strand in each protein to generate a 10-stranded beta-sheet core. The surface of the beta-sheet core is mainly positively charged and predicted (by software PPI-Pred) to be the site that interacts with other partners. At the same time, the residues 79-82, 88, and 90 of each molecule formed two holes in the core. Residue 89 of each molecule, which is crucial for the DIC binding function of Dnlc2A, is within the holes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the homodimer is the structural and functional unit maintained by hydrogen bonding interactions and hydrophobic packing, and that the patch of the surface of the beta-sheet core is the main area of interaction with other partners. Furthermore, the two holes would be the key sites to interact with IC74.

  11. Neutron scattering determination of the binding of prothrombin to lipid vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torbet, J.

    1987-12-01

    Low-angle neutron scattering is used to study the binding of human prothrombin to small single-bilayer vesicles consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (1/1 w/w). The radius of gyration of prothrombin indicates that it is an elongated molecule. The vesicles alone were not observed to coalesce, and their molecular weight, outer radius, and average surface area per lipid were respectively (1.6 +/- 0.32) x 10/sup 6/, 114 +/- 4 A, and 110 +/- 18 A/sup 2/. These values were independent of the presence of calcium and were not altered significantly by prothrombin, which binds reversibly to the vesicle outer surface with its long axis projecting approximately radially forming a 90-A thick protein shell. From the titration of the protein-vesicle interaction, the apparent dissociation constant of the binding of prothrombin to these vesicles is estimated to be 0.8 +/- 0.4 ..mu..M. At saturation, 57 +/- 7 prothrombin molecules bind, giving 25 +/- 6 lipid residues and an area of 2900 +/- 400 A/sup 2/ per prothrombin molecule on the vesicle outer surface. This area is about twice that calculated from a prolate ellipsoid model for prothrombin. However, it is close to the maximum cross-sectional area of fragment 1, the lipid binding region of prothrombin, which is coin-shaped in the high-resolution X-ray structure. This similarity suggests that prothrombin binding could be sterically limited.

  12. Extracellular vesicles and a novel form of communication in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela eBasso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In numerous neurodegenerative diseases, the interplay between neurons and glia modulates the outcome and progression of pathology. One particularly intriguing mode of interaction between neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes is characterized by the release of extracellular vesicles that transport proteins, lipids, and nucleotides from one cell to another. Notably, several proteins that cause disease, including the prion protein and mutant SOD1, have been detected in glia-derived extracellular vesicles and observed to fuse with neurons and trigger pathology in vitro. Here we review the structural and functional characterization of such extracellular vesicles in neuron-glia interactions. Furthermore, we discuss possible mechanisms of extracellular vesicle biogenesis and release from activated glia and microglia, and their effects on neurons. Given that exosomes, the smallest type of extracellular vesicles, have been reported to recognize specific cellular populations and act as carriers of very specialized cargo, a thorough analysis of these vesicles may aid in their engineering in vitro and targeted delivery in vivo, opening opportunities for therapeutics.

  13. A Preferentially Segregated Recycling Vesicle Pool of Limited Size Supports Neurotransmission in Native Central Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Vincenzo; Burden, Jemima J.; Thorpe, Julian R.; Smith, Ikuko T.; Smith, Spencer L.; Häusser, Michael; Branco, Tiago; Staras, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Summary At small central synapses, efficient turnover of vesicles is crucial for stimulus-driven transmission, but how the structure of this recycling pool relates to its functional role remains unclear. Here we characterize the organizational principles of functional vesicles at native hippocampal synapses with nanoscale resolution using fluorescent dye labeling and electron microscopy. We show that the recycling pool broadly scales with the magnitude of the total vesicle pool, but its average size is small (∼45 vesicles), highly variable, and regulated by CDK5/calcineurin activity. Spatial analysis demonstrates that recycling vesicles are preferentially arranged near the active zone and this segregation is abolished by actin stabilization, slowing the rate of activity-driven exocytosis. Our approach reveals a similarly biased recycling pool distribution at synapses in visual cortex activated by sensory stimulation in vivo. We suggest that in small native central synapses, efficient release of a limited pool of vesicles relies on their favored spatial positioning within the terminal. PMID:23141069

  14. AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce extracellular vesicles that increase neighboring fibroblast cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thaiomara A; Smuczek, Basílio; Valadão, Iuri C; Dzik, Luciana M; Iglesia, Rebeca P; Cruz, Mário C; Zelanis, André; de Siqueira, Adriane S; Serrano, Solange M T; Goldberg, Gary S; Jaeger, Ruy G; Freitas, Vanessa M

    2016-08-02

    Extracellular vesicles play important roles in tumor development. Many components of these structures, including microvesicles and exosomes, have been defined. However, mechanisms by which extracellular vesicles affect tumor progression are not fully understood. Here, we investigated vesicular communication between mammary carcinoma cells and neighboring nontransformed mammary fibroblasts. Nonbiased proteomic analysis found that over 1% of the entire proteome is represented in these vesicles, with the neuroblast differentiation associated protein AHNAK and annexin A2 being the most abundant. In particular, AHNAK was found to be the most prominent component of these vesicles based on peptide number, and appeared necessary for their formation. In addition, we report here that carcinoma cells produce vesicles that promote the migration of recipient fibroblasts. These data suggest that AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce and release extracellular vesicles that cause disruption of the stroma by surrounding fibroblasts. This paradigm reveals fundamental mechanisms by which vesicular communication between carcinoma cells and stromal cells can promote cancer progression in the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Exocytosis and Endocytosis of Small Vesicles across the Plasma Membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kathryn; Chiang, Hui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    When Saccharomyces cerevisiae is starved of glucose, the gluconeogenic enzymes fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, isocitrate lyase, and malate dehydrogenase, as well as the non-gluconeogenic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and cyclophilin A, are secreted into the periplasm. In the extracellular fraction, these secreted proteins are associated with small vesicles that account for more than 90% of the total number of extracellular structures observed. When glucose is added to glucose-starved cells, FBPase is internalized and associated with clusters of small vesicles in the cytoplasm. Specifically, the internalization of FBPase results in the decline of FBPase and vesicles in the extracellular fraction and their appearance in the cytoplasm. The clearance of extracellular vesicles and vesicle-associated proteins from the extracellular fraction is dependent on the endocytosis gene END3. This internalization is regulated when cells are transferred from low to high glucose. It is rapidly occurring and is a high capacity process, as clusters of vesicles occupy 10%–20% of the total volume in the cytoplasm in glucose re-fed cells. FBPase internalization also requires the VPS34 gene encoding PI3K. Following internalization, FBPase is delivered to the vacuole for degradation, whereas proteins that are not degraded may be recycled. PMID:25192542

  16. X-ray microanalysis of mineralized matrix vesicles of experimental saccular aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhill, N.S.; Presland, M.R.; Rogers, K.M.; Stehbens, W.E.

    1985-10-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray microanalytical study was designed to examine the mineral deposits in matrix vesicles found in the walls of experimental aneurysms from two rabbits (103 and 1071 days postoperatively) and two sheep aneurysms (234 and 1202 days postoperatively). The freeze-substitution technique was adopted for use to retain inorganic ions in situ. Numerous, various sized extracellular electron-dense structures, believed to be matrix vesicles were observed. Size histograms for the mineralized vesicles showed that the proportion of smaller vesicles was higher in the older animals. A total of 370 vesicles were analyzed. Calcium and phosphorus with small amounts of magnesium were identified. No particular calcium phosphate mineral was dominant with the mean Ca/P molar ratio for all animals falling in the 1.1-1.2 range. Correlation coefficients for interrelationships between calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and size were weak except for calcium vs phosphorus which was close to one, consistent with some type of calcium phosphate being the major constituent of the mineralized vesicles. Smaller electron-dense particles, probably mitochondrial granules were seen in some smooth muscle cells; a small number were analyzed and contained calcium and phosphorus (mean Ca/P molar ratio of 0.86) but no magnesium.

  17. Single-step isolation of extracellular vesicles by size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böing, Anita N; van der Pol, Edwin; Grootemaat, Anita E; Coumans, Frank A W; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of extracellular vesicles from plasma is a challenge due to the presence of proteins and lipoproteins. Isolation of vesicles using differential centrifugation or density-gradient ultracentrifugation results in co-isolation of contaminants such as protein aggregates and incomplete separation of vesicles from lipoproteins, respectively. To develop a single-step protocol to isolate vesicles from human body fluids. Platelet-free supernatant, derived from platelet concentrates, was loaded on a sepharose CL-2B column to perform size-exclusion chromatography (SEC; n=3). Fractions were collected and analysed by nanoparticle tracking analysis, resistive pulse sensing, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and protein were measured in each fraction. Fractions 9-12 contained the highest concentrations of particles larger than 70 nm and platelet-derived vesicles (46%±6 and 61%±2 of totals present in all collected fractions, respectively), but less than 5% of HDL and less than 1% of protein (4.8%±1 and 0.65%±0.3, respectively). HDL was present mainly in fractions 18-20 (32%±2 of total), and protein in fractions 19-21 (36%±2 of total). Compared to the starting material, recovery of platelet-derived vesicles was 43%±23 in fractions 9-12, with an 8-fold and 70-fold enrichment compared to HDL and protein. SEC efficiently isolates extracellular vesicles with a diameter larger than 70 nm from platelet-free supernatant of platelet concentrates. Application SEC will improve studies on the dimensional, structural and functional properties of extracellular vesicles.

  18. Single-step isolation of extracellular vesicles by size-exclusion chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita N. Böing

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation of extracellular vesicles from plasma is a challenge due to the presence of proteins and lipoproteins. Isolation of vesicles using differential centrifugation or density-gradient ultracentrifugation results in co-isolation of contaminants such as protein aggregates and incomplete separation of vesicles from lipoproteins, respectively. Aim: To develop a single-step protocol to isolate vesicles from human body fluids. Methods: Platelet-free supernatant, derived from platelet concentrates, was loaded on a sepharose CL-2B column to perform size-exclusion chromatography (SEC; n=3. Fractions were collected and analysed by nanoparticle tracking analysis, resistive pulse sensing, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL and protein were measured in each fraction. Results: Fractions 9–12 contained the highest concentrations of particles larger than 70 nm and platelet-derived vesicles (46%±6 and 61%±2 of totals present in all collected fractions, respectively, but less than 5% of HDL and less than 1% of protein (4.8%±1 and 0.65%±0.3, respectively. HDL was present mainly in fractions 18–20 (32%±2 of total, and protein in fractions 19–21 (36%±2 of total. Compared to the starting material, recovery of platelet-derived vesicles was 43%±23 in fractions 9–12, with an 8-fold and 70-fold enrichment compared to HDL and protein. Conclusions: SEC efficiently isolates extracellular vesicles with a diameter larger than 70 nm from platelet-free supernatant of platelet concentrates. Application SEC will improve studies on the dimensional, structural and functional properties of extracellular vesicles.

  19. Single-step isolation of extracellular vesicles by size-exclusion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böing, Anita N.; van der Pol, Edwin; Grootemaat, Anita E.; Coumans, Frank A. W.; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    Background Isolation of extracellular vesicles from plasma is a challenge due to the presence of proteins and lipoproteins. Isolation of vesicles using differential centrifugation or density-gradient ultracentrifugation results in co-isolation of contaminants such as protein aggregates and incomplete separation of vesicles from lipoproteins, respectively. Aim To develop a single-step protocol to isolate vesicles from human body fluids. Methods Platelet-free supernatant, derived from platelet concentrates, was loaded on a sepharose CL-2B column to perform size-exclusion chromatography (SEC; n=3). Fractions were collected and analysed by nanoparticle tracking analysis, resistive pulse sensing, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and protein were measured in each fraction. Results Fractions 9–12 contained the highest concentrations of particles larger than 70 nm and platelet-derived vesicles (46%±6 and 61%±2 of totals present in all collected fractions, respectively), but less than 5% of HDL and less than 1% of protein (4.8%±1 and 0.65%±0.3, respectively). HDL was present mainly in fractions 18–20 (32%±2 of total), and protein in fractions 19–21 (36%±2 of total). Compared to the starting material, recovery of platelet-derived vesicles was 43%±23 in fractions 9–12, with an 8-fold and 70-fold enrichment compared to HDL and protein. Conclusions SEC efficiently isolates extracellular vesicles with a diameter larger than 70 nm from platelet-free supernatant of platelet concentrates. Application SEC will improve studies on the dimensional, structural and functional properties of extracellular vesicles. PMID:25279113

  20. Designing anti-influenza aptamers: novel quantitative structure activity relationship approach gives insights into aptamer-virus interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Musafia

    Full Text Available This study describes the development of aptamers as a therapy against influenza virus infection. Aptamers are oligonucleotides (like ssDNA or RNA that are capable of binding to a variety of molecular targets with high affinity and specificity. We have studied the ssDNA aptamer BV02, which was designed to inhibit influenza infection by targeting the hemagglutinin viral protein, a protein that facilitates the first stage of the virus' infection. While testing other aptamers and during lead optimization, we realized that the dominant characteristics that determine the aptamer's binding to the influenza virus may not necessarily be sequence-specific, as with other known aptamers, but rather depend on general 2D structural motifs. We adopted QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship tool and developed computational algorithm that correlate six calculated structural and physicochemical properties to the aptamers' binding affinity to the virus. The QSAR study provided us with a predictive tool of the binding potential of an aptamer to the influenza virus. The correlation between the calculated and actual binding was R2 = 0.702 for the training set, and R2 = 0.66 for the independent test set. Moreover, in the test set the model's sensitivity was 89%, and the specificity was 87%, in selecting aptamers with enhanced viral binding. The most important properties that positively correlated with the aptamer's binding were the aptamer length, 2D-loops and repeating sequences of C nucleotides. Based on the structure-activity study, we have managed to produce aptamers having viral affinity that was more than 20 times higher than that of the original BV02 aptamer. Further testing of influenza infection in cell culture and animal models yielded aptamers with 10 to 15 times greater anti-viral activity than the BV02 aptamer. Our insights concerning the mechanism of action and the structural and physicochemical properties that govern the interaction

  1. Structural insights into the cold adaptation of the photosynthetic pigment-protein C-phycocyanin from an Arctic cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai-Nan; Wang, Qian-Min; Li, Chun-Yang; Li, Kang; Luo, Wei; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2017-04-01

    The cold adaptation mechanism of phycobiliproteins, the major photosynthetic pigment-proteins in cyanobacteria and red algae, has rarely been studied. Here we reported the biochemical, structural, and molecular dynamics simulation study of the C-phycocyanin from Arctic cyanobacterial strain Pseudanabaena sp. LW0831. We characterized the phycobilisome components of LW0831 and obtained their gene sequences. Compared to the mesophilic counterpart from Arthrospira platensis (Ar-C-PC), LW0831 C-phycocyanin (Ps-C-PC) has a decreased thermostability (∆Tm of -16°C), one of the typical features of cold-adapted enzymes. To uncover its structural basis, we resolved the crystal structure of Ps-C-PC 1 at 2.04Å. Consistent with the decrease in thermostability, comparative structural analyses revealed decreased intra-trimer and inter-trimer interactions in Ps-C-PC 1, compared to Ar-C-PC. However, comparative molecular dynamics simulations indicated that Ps-C-PC 1 shows similar flexibilities to Ar-C-PC for both the (αβ)3 trimer and (αβ)6 hexamer. Therefore, the optimization mode is clearly different from cold-adapted enzymes, which usually have increased flexibilities. Detailed analyses demonstrated different optimization modes for the α and β subunits and it was revealed that hydrophobic interactions are key to this difference, though salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, and surface hydrophobicity are also involved. This study is the first report of the structure of cold-adapted phycobiliproteins and provides insights into the cold-adaptation strategies of non-enzyme proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Designing anti-influenza aptamers: novel quantitative structure activity relationship approach gives insights into aptamer-virus interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musafia, Boaz; Oren-Banaroya, Rony; Noiman, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of aptamers as a therapy against influenza virus infection. Aptamers are oligonucleotides (like ssDNA or RNA) that are capable of binding to a variety of molecular targets with high affinity and specificity. We have studied the ssDNA aptamer BV02, which was designed to inhibit influenza infection by targeting the hemagglutinin viral protein, a protein that facilitates the first stage of the virus' infection. While testing other aptamers and during lead optimization, we realized that the dominant characteristics that determine the aptamer's binding to the influenza virus may not necessarily be sequence-specific, as with other known aptamers, but rather depend on general 2D structural motifs. We adopted QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) tool and developed computational algorithm that correlate six calculated structural and physicochemical properties to the aptamers' binding affinity to the virus. The QSAR study provided us with a predictive tool of the binding potential of an aptamer to the influenza virus. The correlation between the calculated and actual binding was R2 = 0.702 for the training set, and R2 = 0.66 for the independent test set. Moreover, in the test set the model's sensitivity was 89%, and the specificity was 87%, in selecting aptamers with enhanced viral binding. The most important properties that positively correlated with the aptamer's binding were the aptamer length, 2D-loops and repeating sequences of C nucleotides. Based on the structure-activity study, we have managed to produce aptamers having viral affinity that was more than 20 times higher than that of the original BV02 aptamer. Further testing of influenza infection in cell culture and animal models yielded aptamers with 10 to 15 times greater anti-viral activity than the BV02 aptamer. Our insights concerning the mechanism of action and the structural and physicochemical properties that govern the interaction with the influenza

  3. Solid-state NMR and computational insights into the crystal structure of silicocarnotite-based bioceramic materials synthesized mechanochemically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A S; Bulina, N V; Chaikina, M V; Prosanov, I Yu; Terskikh, V V; Lapina, O B

    In this work, we report the results of a detailed structural study of a promising bioceramic material silicocarnotite Ca5(PO4)2SiO4 (SC) synthesized from mechanochemically treated nanosized silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite by annealing at 1000°C. This novel synthetic approach represents an attractive and efficient route towards large-scale manufacturing of the silicocarnotite-based bioceramics. A combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), powder X-ray crystallography and density function theory (DFT) calculations has been implemented to characterize the phase composition of the prepared composite materials and to gain insight into the crystal structure of silicocarnotite. The phase composition analysis based on the multinuclear solid-state NMR has been found in agreement with X-ray powder diffraction indicating the minority phases of CaO (5-6wt%) and residual silicon-apatite (7-8wt%), while the rest of the material being a fairly crystalline silicocarnotite phase (86-88wt%). A combination of computational (CASTEP) and experimental methods was used to address the anionic site disorder in the silicocarnotite crystal structure. Distorted [OPO3] pyramids have appeared as an important structural motif in the SC crystal structure. The ratio between regular [PO4] and distorted [OPO3] tetrahedra is found between 2:1 and 3:1 based on XRD experiments and CASTEP calculations. The natural abundance (43)Ca magic angle spinning NMR spectra of silicocarnotite are reported for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tectonic structure and evolution of Eastern Anatolia - insights from new petrologic data and possible lateral correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhänsli, Roland; Pourteau, Amaury; Candan, Osman; Bousquet, Romain; Çetinkaplan, Mete; Koralay, Ersin

    2013-04-01

    Modern Eastern Anatolia is a high-plateau region characterized by active N-S crustal shortening, mostly accommodated along strike-slip faults, and recent, abundant volcanism. Due to the extensive Cenozoic marine and Quaternary volcano-sedimentary covers, Tetyhan palaeogeography and related tectonic settings, and thence their impact on modern strain partitioning, in this region are particularly difficult to unravel, and therefore remains strongly debated. According to recent works in Armenia and northernmost Eastern Anatolia, blueschists dated to middle Cretaceous times record the accretion of the South-Armenian Block to the southern Eurasian margin, now separated by the Sevan-Akera Suture. Further south, we recently documented Late Cretaceous HP-LT metamorphism in the Bitlis Complex, which belongs to a micro-continental block isolated between the South-Armenian Block and the Arabian Platform. In order to gain further insights into Eastern Anatolia's tectonic architecture, and its continuation into the better-established Central and Western Anatolian tectonic domains, we collected petrologic data from slightly- to strongly metamorphosed sedimentary and crustal lithologies of scattered localities of SE Anatolia, west and north of the Bitlis Complex. From our field observations, we report only low-grade metamorphic assemblages in metasedimentary rocks of the Pütürge Massif, which was commonly considered as the western equivalent of the Bitlis Massif, but obviously did, in contrast to the latter, not experienced HP-LT metamorphism. Nevertheless, glaucophane-bearing rocks were found farther west, north of Adıyaman, might represent the west continuation of the Bitlis HP Complex. From near Malatya, north of the Pütürge Massif and south of the Eastern Tauride non-metamorphosed carbonate platform, eastwards via Elazig and Bingöl, to Aǧrı, between the Bitlis Massif and the South-Armenian Block, we found numerous, scattered occurrences of HT metamorphic assemblages in

  5. Structural and functional insight into ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kun; Liao, Shanhui; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The ADF/cofilin family has been characterized as a group of actin-binding proteins critical for controlling the assembly of actin within the cells. In this study, the solution structure of the ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei (TbCof) was determined by NMR spectroscopy. TbCof adopts the conserved ADF/cofilin fold with a central β-sheet composed of six β-strands surrounded by five α-helices. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments denoted a submicromolar affinity between TbCof and G-actin, and the affinity between TbCof and ADP-G-actin was five times higher than that between TbCof and ATP-G-actin at low ionic strength. The results obtained from electron microscopy and actin filament sedimentation assays showed that TbCof depolymerized but did not co-sediment with actin filaments and its ability of F-actin depolymerization was pH independent. Similar to actin, TbCof was distributed throughout the cytoplasm. All our data indicate a structurally and functionally conserved ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei.

  6. Trophic structure in a seabird host-parasite food web: insights from stable isotope analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gómez-Díaz

    Full Text Available Ecological studies on food webs rarely include parasites, partly due to the complexity and dimensionality of host-parasite interaction networks. Multiple co-occurring parasites can show different feeding strategies and thus lead to complex and cryptic trophic relationships, which are often difficult to disentangle by traditional methods. We analyzed stable isotope ratios of C ((13C/(12C, delta(13C and N ((15N/(14N, delta(15N of host and ectoparasite tissues to investigate trophic structure in 4 co-occurring ectoparasites: three lice and one flea species, on two closely related and spatially segregated seabird hosts (Calonectris shearwaters. delta(13C isotopic signatures confirmed feathers as the main food resource for the three lice species and blood for the flea species. All ectoparasite species showed a significant enrichment in delta(15N relatively to the host tissue consumed (discrimination factors ranged from 2 to 5 per thousand depending on the species. Isotopic differences were consistent across multiple host-ectoparasite locations, despite of some geographic variability in baseline isotopic levels. Our