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Sample records for vesicle curvature promotes

  1. Curvature-Mediated Assembly of Janus Nanoparticles on Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Amir Houshang; Weikl, Thomas R

    2018-01-08

    Besides direct particle-particle interactions, nanoparticles adsorbed to biomembranes experience indirect interactions that are mediated by the membrane curvature arising from particle adsorption. In this Letter, we show that the curvature-mediated interactions of adsorbed Janus particles depend on the initial curvature of the membrane prior to adsorption, that is, on whether the membrane initially bulges toward or away from the particles in our simulations. The curvature-mediated interaction can be strongly attractive for Janus particles adsorbed to the outside of a membrane vesicle, which initially bulges away from the particles. For Janus particles adsorbed to the vesicle inside, in contrast, the curvature-mediated interactions are repulsive. We find that the area fraction of the adhesive Janus particle surface is an important control parameter for the curvature-mediated interaction and assembly of the particles, besides the initial membrane curvature.

  2. Conformation of charged vesicles: the Debye Huckel and the low curvature limit

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    Sinha, Kumari Priti; Thaokar, Rochish M., , Prof.

    The shape as well as tension and pressure inside an uncharged vesicle are determined by the reduced volume. These parameters are important for a vesicle or a biological cell, since it can affect bio-physical processes such as osmosis and permeation, interaction with external agents such as bio- macromolecules and thermal fluctuations of the bilayer membrane of a vesicle. Charged membranes are ubiquitous in nature, most biological cell bio-membranes are charged, and therefore the knowledge of shape, tension and pressure of charged vesicles is critical. Additionally, the distribution of charges in the inner and outer leaflets is also important as it can affect the spatial interaction of a bilayer membrane with proteins. This work addresses these issues in the low charge and curvature limit. Our analysis indicates that despite a very strong two-way coupling between the charge and the curvature, the shapes of charged vesicles remain similar to that of uncharged vesicles at comparable reduced volumes, even for reasonable values of total charge. However, the tension and pressure values are higher, and are accurately estimated. Similarly the charge distribution on the outer and inner leaflet is strongly affected by the curvature. The value of spontaneous curvature due to charge redistribution is estimated. The insensitivity of the shape to charges persists even when only the outer leaflet is charged instead of charged inner and outer leaflets

  3. Effects of Curvature and Composition on α-Synuclein Binding to Lipid Vesicles

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    Middleton, Elizabeth R.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the presence of intracellular aggregates composed primarily of the neuronal protein α-synuclein (αS). Interactions between αS and various cellular membranes are thought to be important to its native function as well as relevant to its role in disease. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate binding of αS to lipid vesicles as a function of the lipid composition and membrane curvature. We determine how these parameters affect the molar partition coefficient of αS, providing a quantitative measure of the binding energy, and calculate the number of lipids required to bind a single protein. Specific anionic lipids have a large effect on the free energy of binding. Lipid chain saturation influences the binding interaction to a lesser extent, with larger partition coefficients measured for gel-phase vesicles than for fluid-phase vesicles, even in the absence of anionic lipid components. Although we observe variability in the binding of the mutant proteins, differences in the free energies of partitioning are less dramatic than with varied lipid compositions. Vesicle curvature has a strong effect on the binding affinity, with a >15-fold increase in affinity for small unilamellar vesicles over large unilamellar vesicles, suggesting that αS may be a curvature-sensing protein. Our findings provide insight into how physical properties of the membrane may modulate interactions of αS with cellular membranes. PMID:20923663

  4. Poxviruses Encode a Reticulon-Like Protein that Promotes Membrane Curvature

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    Karl J. Erlandson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses are enveloped DNA viruses that replicate within the cytoplasm. The first viral structures are crescents and spherical particles, with a lipoprotein membrane bilayer, that are thought to be derived from the ER. We determined that A17, a conserved viral transmembrane protein essential for crescent formation, forms homo-oligomers and shares topological features with cellular reticulon-like proteins. The latter cell proteins promote membrane curvature and contribute to the tubular structure of the ER. When the purified A17 protein was incorporated into liposomes, 25 nm diameter vesicles and tubules formed at low and high A17 concentrations, respectively. In addition, intracellular expression of A17 in the absence of other viral structural proteins transformed the ER into aggregated three-dimensional (3D tubular networks. We suggest that A17 is a viral reticulon-like protein that contributes to curvature during biogenesis of the poxvirus membrane.

  5. The Curvature-Augmented Closest Point method with vesicle inextensibility application

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    Vogl, Christopher J.

    2017-09-01

    The Closest Point method, initially developed by Ruuth and Merriman, allows for the numerical solution of surface partial differential equations without the need for a parameterization of the surface itself. Surface quantities are embedded into the surrounding domain by assigning each value at a given spatial location to the corresponding value at the closest point on the surface. This embedding allows for surface derivatives to be replaced by their Cartesian counterparts (e.g. ∇s = ∇). This equivalence is only valid on the surface, and thus, interpolation is used to enforce what is known as the side condition away from the surface. To improve upon the method, this work derives an operator embedding that incorporates curvature information, making it valid in a neighborhood of the surface. With this, direct enforcement of the side condition is no longer needed. Comparisons in R2 and R3 show that the resulting Curvature-Augmented Closest Point method has better accuracy and requires less memory, through increased matrix sparsity, than the Closest Point method, while maintaining similar matrix condition numbers. To demonstrate the utility of the method in a physical application, simulations of inextensible, bi-lipid vesicles evolving toward equilibrium shapes are also included.

  6. The Curvature-Augmented Closest Point method with vesicle inextensibility application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Christopher J.

    2017-09-01

    The Closest Point method, initially developed by Ruuth and Merriman, allows for the numerical solution of surface partial differential equations without the need for a parameterization of the surface itself. Surface quantities are embedded into the surrounding domain by assigning each value at a given spatial location to the corresponding value at the closest point on the surface. This embedding allows for surface derivatives to be replaced by their Cartesian counterparts (e.g. ∇s=∇). This equivalence is only valid on the surface, and thus, interpolation is used to enforce what is known as the side condition away from the surface. To improve upon the method, this work derives an operator embedding that incorporates curvature information, making it valid in a neighborhood of the surface. With this, direct enforcement of the side condition is no longer needed. Comparisons in R2 and R3 show that the resulting Curvature-Augmented Closest Point method has better accuracy and requires less memory, through increased matrix sparsity, than the Closest Point method, while maintaining similar matrix condition numbers. To demonstrate the utility of the method in a physical application, simulations of inextensible, bi-lipid vesicles evolving toward equilibrium shapes are also included.

  7. CALM regulates clathrin-coated vesicle size and maturation by directly sensing and driving membrane curvature.

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    Miller, Sharon E; Mathiasen, Signe; Bright, Nicholas A; Pierre, Fabienne; Kelly, Bernard T; Kladt, Nikolay; Schauss, Astrid; Merrifield, Christien J; Stamou, Dimitrios; Höning, Stefan; Owen, David J

    2015-04-20

    The size of endocytic clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) is remarkably uniform, suggesting that it is optimized to achieve the appropriate levels of cargo and lipid internalization. The three most abundant proteins in mammalian endocytic CCVs are clathrin and the two cargo-selecting, clathrin adaptors, CALM and AP2. Here we demonstrate that depletion of CALM causes a substantial increase in the ratio of "open" clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) to "necked"/"closed" CCVs and a doubling of CCP/CCV diameter, whereas AP2 depletion has opposite effects. Depletion of either adaptor, however, significantly inhibits endocytosis of transferrin and epidermal growth factor. The phenotypic effects of CALM depletion can be rescued by re-expression of wild-type CALM, but not with CALM that lacks a functional N-terminal, membrane-inserting, curvature-sensing/driving amphipathic helix, the existence and properties of which are demonstrated. CALM is thus a major factor in controlling CCV size and maturation and hence in determining the rates of endocytic cargo uptake. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. TNF-? promotes extracellular vesicle release in mouse astrocytes through glutaminase

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    Wang, Kaizhe; Ye, Ling; Lu, Hongfang; Chen, Huili; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Yunlong; Zheng, Jialin C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-contained vesicles shed from cells. EVs contain proteins, lipids, and nucleotides, all of which play important roles in intercellular communication. The release of EVs is known to increase during neuroinflammation. Glutaminase, a mitochondrial enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate, has been implicated in the biogenesis of EVs. We have previously demonstrated that TNF-? promotes glutaminase expression in neurons. However, the expressio...

  9. Implications of surface charge and curvature for the binding orientation of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase on negatively charged or zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles as studied by ESR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, E.M.K.; Høyrup, Lise Pernille Kristine; Patkar, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    ) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin-labeling [Hedin, E. M. K., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 1418514196]. In our investigation, we have studied the interfacial orientation of TLL when bound to large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) consisting of POPG, and bound to SUV consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2...... fluorescence quenching efficiency between each spin-label positioned on TLL, and the lipid membrane. ESR exposure and fluorescence quenching data show that TILL associates closer to the negatively charged PG surface than the zwitterionic PC surface, and binds to both POPG LUV and POPC SUV predominantly through...... (curvature) of the vesicle surface determine the TLL orientation at the phospholipid interface....

  10. The Vesicle Priming Factor CAPS Functions as a Homodimer via C2 Domain Interactions to Promote Regulated Vesicle Exocytosis.

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    Petrie, Matt; Esquibel, Joseph; Kabachinski, Greg; Maciuba, Stephanie; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J Michael; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-09-30

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted by regulated vesicle exocytosis. CAPS (also known as CADPS) is a 145-kDa cytosolic and peripheral membrane protein required for vesicle docking and priming steps that precede Ca 2+ -triggered vesicle exocytosis. CAPS binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) and SNARE proteins and is proposed to promote SNARE protein complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. We characterized purified soluble CAPS as mainly monomer in equilibrium with small amounts of dimer. However, the active form of CAPS bound to PC12 cell membranes or to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P 2 and Q-SNARE proteins was mainly dimer. CAPS dimer formation required its C2 domain based on mutation or deletion studies. Moreover, C2 domain mutations or deletions resulted in a loss of CAPS function in regulated vesicle exocytosis, indicating that dimerization is essential for CAPS function. Comparison of the CAPS C2 domain to a structurally defined Munc13-1 C2A domain dimer revealed conserved residues involved in CAPS dimerization. We conclude that CAPS functions as a C2 domain-mediated dimer in regulated vesicle exocytosis. The unique tandem C2-PH domain of CAPS may serve as a PI(4,5)P 2 -triggered switch for dimerization. CAPS dimerization may be coupled to oligomeric SNARE complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Extracellular vesicles in human follicular fluid do not promote coagulation.

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    Franz, Cordula; Böing, Anita N; Montag, Markus; Strowitzki, Thomas; Markert, Udo R; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Nieuwland, Rienk; Toth, Bettina

    2016-11-01

    Body fluids contain extracellular vesicles expressing tissue factor on their surface and serve as an additional trigger for coagulation. During the menstrual cycle ovarian tissue restoration is mandatory and it is unknown whether follicular fluid might provide procoagulant substances. Within an observational study, follicular fluid from women undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was analysed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), electron microscopy, resistive pulse sensing (RPS), nanoparticle-tracking analysis (NTA) and fibrin generation tests (FGT). The presence of extracellular vesicles, especially CD9-positive extracellular vesicles in follicular fluid, was proven. However, clotting tests revealed no procoagulant properties of the detected extracellular vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracellular vesicles in human follicular fluid do not promote coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, Cordula; Böing, Anita N.; Montag, Markus; Strowitzki, Thomas; Markert, Udo R.; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Nieuwland, Rienk; Toth, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Body fluids contain extracellular vesicles expressing tissue factor on their surface and serve as an additional trigger for coagulation. During the menstrual cycle ovarian tissue restoration is mandatory and it is unknown whether follicular fluid might provide procoagulant substances. Within an

  13. Piccolo Promotes Vesicle Replenishment at a Fast Central Auditory Synapse

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    Tanvi Butola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Piccolo and Bassoon are the two largest cytomatrix of the active zone (CAZ proteins involved in scaffolding and regulating neurotransmitter release at presynaptic active zones (AZs, but have long been discussed as being functionally redundant. We employed genetic manipulation to bring forth and segregate the role of Piccolo from that of Bassoon at central auditory synapses of the cochlear nucleus—the endbulbs of Held. These synapses specialize in high frequency synaptic transmission, ideally poised to reveal even subtle deficits in the regulation of neurotransmitter release upon molecular perturbation. Combining semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology we first studied signal transmission in Piccolo-deficient mice. Our analysis was not confounded by a cochlear deficit, as a short isoform of Piccolo (“Piccolino” present at the upstream ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells (IHC, is unaffected by the mutation. Disruption of Piccolo increased the abundance of Bassoon at the AZs of endbulbs, while that of RIM1 was reduced and other CAZ proteins remained unaltered. Presynaptic fiber stimulation revealed smaller amplitude of the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSC, while eEPSC kinetics as well as miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs remained unchanged. Cumulative analysis of eEPSC trains indicated that the reduced eEPSC amplitude of Piccolo-deficient endbulb synapses is primarily due to a reduced readily releasable pool (RRP of synaptic vesicles (SV, as was corroborated by a reduction of vesicles at the AZ found on an ultrastructural level. Release probability seemed largely unaltered. Recovery from short-term depression was slowed. We then performed a physiological analysis of endbulb synapses from mice which, in addition to Piccolo deficiency, lacked one functional allele of the Bassoon gene. Analysis of the double-mutant endbulbs revealed an increase in release probability

  14. CAPS1 RNA Editing Promotes Dense Core Vesicle Exocytosis.

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    Miyake, Kotaro; Ohta, Toshio; Nakayama, Hisako; Doe, Nobutaka; Terao, Yuri; Oiki, Eiji; Nagatomo, Izumi; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Nishikura, Kazuko; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Kawahara, Yukio

    2016-11-15

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) plays a distinct role in the priming step of dense core vesicle (DCV) exocytosis. CAPS1 pre-mRNA is known to undergo adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in its coding region, which results in a glutamate-to-glycine conversion at a site in its C-terminal region. However, the physiological significance of CAPS1 RNA editing remains elusive. Here, we created mutant mice in which edited CAPS1 was solely expressed. These mice were lean due to increased energy expenditure caused by physical hyperactivity. Electrophysiological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that the exocytosis of DCVs was upregulated in the chromaffin cells and neurons of these mice. Furthermore, we showed that edited CAPS1 bound preferentially to the activated form of syntaxin-1A, a component of the exocytotic fusion complex. These findings suggest that RNA editing regulates DCV exocytosis in vivo, affecting physical activity. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TNF-α promotes extracellular vesicle release in mouse astrocytes through glutaminase.

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    Wang, Kaizhe; Ye, Ling; Lu, Hongfang; Chen, Huili; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Yunlong; Zheng, Jialin C

    2017-04-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-contained vesicles shed from cells. EVs contain proteins, lipids, and nucleotides, all of which play important roles in intercellular communication. The release of EVs is known to increase during neuroinflammation. Glutaminase, a mitochondrial enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate, has been implicated in the biogenesis of EVs. We have previously demonstrated that TNF-α promotes glutaminase expression in neurons. However, the expression and the functionality of glutaminase in astrocytes during neuroinflammation remain unknown. We posit that TNF-α can promote the release of EVs in astrocytes through upregulation of glutaminase expression. Release of EVs, which was demonstrated by electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), and Western Blot, increased in mouse astrocytes when treated with TNF-α. Furthermore, TNF-α treatment significantly upregulated protein levels of glutaminase and increased the production of glutamate, suggesting that glutaminase activity is increased after TNF-α treatment. Interestingly, pretreatment with a glutaminase inhibitor blocked TNF-α-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species in astrocytes, which indicates that glutaminase activity contributes to stress in astrocytes during neuroinflammation. TNF-α-mediated increased release of EVs can be blocked by either the glutaminase inhibitor, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, or genetic knockout of glutaminase, suggesting that glutaminase plays an important role in astrocyte EV release during neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that glutaminase is an important metabolic factor controlling EV release from astrocytes during neuroinflammation.

  16. Interferon regulatory factor 1-Rab27a regulated extracellular vesicles promote liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

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    Yang, Mu-Qing; Du, Qiang; Goswami, Julie; Varley, Patrick R; Chen, Bin; Wang, Rong-Hua; Morelli, Adrian E; Stolz, Donna B; Billiar, Timothy R; Li, Jiyu; Geller, David A

    2017-10-23

    The role and regulators of extracellular vesicles (EV) secretion in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury have not been defined. Rab27a is a GTPase known to control EVs release. Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is a transcription factor that plays an important role in liver IR and regulates certain GTPases. However, the relationships among IRF-1, Rab27a, and EVs secretion are largely unknown. Here, we show induction of IRF-1 and Rab27a both in vitro in hypoxic hepatocytes and in vivo in warm IR and orthotopic liver transplantation livers. Interferon γ stimulation, IRF-1 transduction, or IR promoted Rab27a expression and EVs secretion. Meanwhile, silencing of IRF-1 decreased Rab27a expression and EVs secretion. Rab27a silencing decreased EVs secretion and liver IR injury. Ten putative IRF-1 binding motifs in the 1,692 base pairs Rab27a promoter region were identified. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay verified five functional IRF-1 binding motifs, which were confirmed by Rab27a promoter luciferase assay. IR-induced EVs contained higher oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). OxPLs on EVs surface activated neutrophil through toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4) pathway. OxPL-neutralizing E06 antibody blocked the effect of EVs and decreased liver IR injury. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which IRF-1 regulates Rab27a transcription and EVs secretion, leading to OxPL activation of neutrophils and subsequent hepatic IR injury. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Suppression of autophagy by extracellular vesicles promotes myofibroblast differentiation in COPD pathogenesis

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    Yu Fujita

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, such as exosomes and microvesicles, encapsulate proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs as new modulators of both intercellular crosstalk and disease pathogenesis. The composition of EVs is modified by various triggers to maintain physiological homeostasis. In response to cigarette smoke exposure, the lungs develop emphysema, myofibroblast accumulation and airway remodelling, which contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the lung disease pathogenesis through modified EVs in stress physiology is not understood. Here, we investigated an EV-mediated intercellular communication mechanism between primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs and lung fibroblasts (LFs and discovered that cigarette smoke extract (CSE-induced HBEC-derived EVs promote myofibroblast differentiation in LFs. Thorough evaluations of the modified EVs and COPD lung samples showed that cigarette smoke induced relative upregulation of cellular and EV miR-210 expression of bronchial epithelial cells. Using co-culture assays, we showed that HBEC-derived EV miR-210 promotes myofibroblast differentiation in LFs. Surprisingly, we found that miR-210 directly regulates autophagy processes via targeting ATG7, and expression levels of miR-210 are inversely correlated with ATG7 expression in LFs. Importantly, autophagy induction was significantly decreased in LFs from COPD patients, and silencing ATG7 in LFs led to myofibroblast differentiation. These findings demonstrate that CSE triggers the modification of EV components and identify bronchial epithelial cell-derived miR-210 as a paracrine autophagy mediator of myofibroblast differentiation that has potential as a therapeutic target for COPD. Our findings show that stressor exposure changes EV compositions as emerging factors, potentially controlling pathological disorders such as airway remodelling in COPD.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles from Vascular Endothelial Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation and Motility of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells.

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    Masashi Kurachi

    Full Text Available We previously examined the effect of brain microvascular endothelial cell (MVEC transplantation on rat white matter infarction, and found that MVEC transplantation promoted remyelination of demyelinated axons in the infarct region and reduced apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs. We also found that the conditioned medium (CM from cultured MVECs inhibited apoptosis of cultured OPCs. In this study, we examined contribution of extracellular vesicles (EVs contained in the CM to its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. Removal of EVs from the CM by ultracentrifugation reduced its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. To confirm whether EVs derived from MVECs are taken up by cultured OPCs, we labeled EVs with PKH67, a fluorescent dye, and added them to OPC cultures. Many vesicular structures labeled with PKH67 were found within OPCs immediately after their addition. Next we examined the effect of MVEC-derived EVs on OPC behaviors. After 2 days in culture with EVs, there was significantly less pyknotic and more BrdU-positive OPCs when compared to control. We also examined the effect of EVs on motility of OPCs. OPCs migrated longer in the presence of EVs when compared to control. To examine whether these effects on cultured OPCs are shared by EVs from endothelial cells, we prepared EVs from conditioned media of several types of endothelial cells, and tested their effects on cultured OPCs. EVs from all types of endothelial cells we examined reduced apoptosis of OPCs and promoted their motility. Identification of the molecules contained in EVs from endothelial cells may prove helpful for establishment of effective therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal/stem Cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles Promote Human Cartilage RegenerationIn Vitro.

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    Vonk, Lucienne A; van Dooremalen, Sanne F J; Liv, Nalan; Klumperman, Judith; Coffer, Paul J; Saris, Daniël B F; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a rheumatic disease leading to chronic pain and disability with no effective treatment available. Recently, allogeneic human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) entered clinical trials as a novel therapy for OA. Increasing evidence suggests that therapeutic efficacy of MSC depends on paracrine signalling. Here we investigated the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by human bone marrow derived MSC (BMMSC) in human OA cartilage repair. To test the effect of BMMSC-EVs on OA cartilage inflammation, TNF-alpha-stimulated OA chondrocyte monolayer cultures were treated with BMMSC-EVs and pro-inflammatory gene expression was measured by qRT-PCR after 48 h. To assess the impact of BMMSC-EVs on cartilage regeneration, BMMSC-EVs were added to the regeneration cultures of human OA chondrocytes, which were analyzed after 4 weeks for glycosaminoglycan content by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. Furthermore, paraffin sections of the regenerated tissue were stained for proteoglycans (safranin-O) and type II collagen (immunostaining). We show that BMMSC-EVs inhibit the adverse effects of inflammatory mediators on cartilage homeostasis. When co-cultured with OA chondrocytes, BMMSC-EVs abrogated the TNF-alpha-mediated upregulation of COX2 and pro-inflammatory interleukins and inhibited TNF-alpha-induced collagenase activity. BMMSC-EVs also promoted cartilage regeneration in vitro . Addition of BMMSC-EVs to cultures of chondrocytes isolated from OA patients stimulated production of proteoglycans and type II collagen by these cells. Our data demonstrate that BMMSC-EVs can be important mediators of cartilage repair and hold great promise as a novel therapeutic for cartilage regeneration and osteoarthritis.

  20. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages.

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    Anna Lena Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila, a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a's targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host.

  1. CAPS and Munc13 utilize distinct PIP2-linked mechanisms to promote vesicle exocytosis

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    Kabachinski, Greg; Yamaga, Masaki; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Bruinsma, Stephen; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides provide compartment-specific signals for membrane trafficking. Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is required for Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis, but whether vesicles fuse into PIP2-rich membrane domains in live cells and whether PIP2 is metabolized during Ca2+-triggered fusion were unknown. Ca2+-dependent activator protein in secretion 1 (CAPS-1; CADPS/UNC31) and ubMunc13-2 (UNC13B) are PIP2-binding proteins required for Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine PC12 cells. These proteins are likely effectors for PIP2, but their localization during exocytosis had not been determined. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live cells, we identify PIP2-rich membrane domains at sites of vesicle fusion. CAPS is found to reside on vesicles but depends on plasma membrane PIP2 for its activity. Munc13 is cytoplasmic, but Ca2+-dependent translocation to PIP2-rich plasma membrane domains is required for its activity. The results reveal that vesicle fusion into PIP2-rich membrane domains is facilitated by sequential PIP2-dependent activation of CAPS and PIP2-dependent recruitment of Munc13. PIP2 hydrolysis only occurs under strong Ca2+ influx conditions sufficient to activate phospholipase Cη2 (PLCη2). Such conditions reduce CAPS activity and enhance Munc13 activity, establishing PLCη2 as a Ca2+-dependent modulator of exocytosis. These studies provide a direct view of the spatial distribution of PIP2 linked to vesicle exocytosis via regulation of lipid-dependent protein effectors CAPS and Munc13. PMID:24356451

  2. Promoting Glucose Transporter-4 Vesicle Trafficking along Cytoskeletal Tracks: PAK-Ing Them Out

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    Ragadeepthi Tunduguru

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is the principal cellular energy source in humans and maintenance of glucose homeostasis is critical for survival. Glucose uptake into peripheral skeletal muscle and adipose tissues requires the trafficking of vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 from the intracellular storage compartments to the cell surface. Trafficking of GLUT4 storage vesicles is initiated via the canonical insulin signaling cascade in skeletal muscle and fat cells, as well as via exercise-induced contraction in muscle cells. Recent studies have elucidated steps in the signaling cascades that involve remodeling of the cytoskeleton, a process that underpins the mechanical movement of GLUT4 vesicles. This review is focused upon an alternate phosphoinositide-3 kinase-dependent pathway involving Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 signaling through the p21-activated kinase p21-activated kinase 1 and showcases related signaling events that co-regulate both the depolymerization and re-polymerization of filamentous actin. These new insights provide an enriched understanding into the process of glucose transport and yield potential new targets for interventions aimed to improve insulin sensitivity and remediate insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and the progression to type 2 diabetes.

  3. Interaction of n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside with giant magnetic-fluid-loaded phosphatidylcholine vesicles: direct visualization of membrane curvature fluctuations as a function of surfactant partitioning between water and lipid bilayer.

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    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2010-10-05

    The present study deals with the morphological modifications of giant dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles (DOPC GUVs) induced by the nonionic surfactant n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside at sublytic levels, i.e., in the first steps of the vesicle-to-micelle transition process, when surfactant inserts into the vesicle bilayer without disruption. Experimental conditions were perfected to exactly control the surfactant bilayer composition of the vesicles, in line with former work focused on the mechanical properties of the membrane of magnetic-fluid-loaded DOPC GUVs submitted to a magnetic field. The purpose here was to systematically examine, in the absence of any external mechanical constraint, the dynamics of giant vesicle shape and membrane deformations as a function of surfactant partitioning between the aqueous phase and the lipid membrane, beforehand established by turbidity measurements from small unilamellar vesicles.

  4. Carcinogenic Liver Fluke Secretes Extracellular Vesicles That Promote Cholangiocytes to Adopt a Tumorigenic Phenotype.

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    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Sotillo, Javier; Smout, Michael; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jones, Malcolm K; Johnson, Michael S; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Potriquet, Jeremy; Laohaviroj, Marut; Mulvenna, Jason; Brindley, Paul J; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Loukas, Alex

    2015-11-15

    Throughout Asia, there is an unprecedented link between cholangiocarcinoma and infection with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. Multiple processes, including chronic inflammation and secretion of parasite proteins into the biliary epithelium, drive infection toward cancer. Until now, the mechanism and effects of parasite protein entry into cholangiocytes was unknown. Various microscopy techniques were used to identify O. viverrini extracellular vesicles (EVs) and their internalization by human cholangiocytes. Using mass spectrometry we characterized the EV proteome and associated changes in cholangiocytes after EV uptake, and we detected EV proteins in bile of infected hamsters and humans. Cholangiocyte proliferation and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was measured to assess the impact of EV internalization. EVs were identified in fluke culture medium and bile specimens from infected hosts. EVs internalized by cholangiocytes drove cell proliferation and IL-6 secretion and induced changes in protein expression associated with endocytosis, wound repair, and cancer. Antibodies to an O. viverrini tetraspanin blocked EV uptake and IL-6 secretion by cholangiocytes. This is the first time that EVs from a multicellular pathogen have been identified in host tissues. Our findings imply a role for O. viverrini EVs in pathogenesis and highlight an approach to vaccine development for this infectious cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Maternal extracellular vesicles and platelets promote preeclampsia via inflammasome activation in trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Shrey; Ranjan, Satish; Hoffmann, Juliane; Kashif, Muhammed; Daniel, Evelyn A; Al-Dabet, Moh'd Mohanad; Bock, Fabian; Nazir, Sumra; Huebner, Hanna; Mertens, Peter R; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Zenclussen, Ana C; Offermanns, Stefan; Aharon, Anat; Brenner, Benjamin; Shahzad, Khurrum; Ruebner, Matthias; Isermann, Berend

    2016-10-27

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a placenta-induced inflammatory disease associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms underlying PE remain enigmatic and delivery of the placenta is the only known remedy. PE is associated with coagulation and platelet activation and increased extracellular vesicle (EV) formation. However, thrombotic occlusion of the placental vascular bed is rarely observed and the mechanistic relevance of EV and platelet activation remains unknown. Here we show that EVs induce a thromboinflammatory response specifically in the placenta. Following EV injection, activated platelets accumulate particularly within the placental vascular bed. EVs cause adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release from platelets and inflammasome activation within trophoblast cells through purinergic signaling. Inflammasome activation in trophoblast cells triggers a PE-like phenotype, characterized by pregnancy failure, elevated blood pressure, increased plasma soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, and renal dysfunction. Intriguingly, genetic inhibition of inflammasome activation specifically in the placenta, pharmacological inhibition of inflammasome or purinergic signaling, or genetic inhibition of maternal platelet activation abolishes the PE-like phenotype. Inflammasome activation in trophoblast cells of women with preeclampsia corroborates the translational relevance of these findings. These results strongly suggest that EVs cause placental sterile inflammation and PE through activation of maternal platelets and purinergic inflammasome activation in trophoblast cells, uncovering a novel thromboinflammatory mechanism at the maternal-embryonic interface. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Deep

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa.

  7. Vesicle amine transport protein-1 (VAT-1) is upregulated in glioblastomas and promotes migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, S; Becker, M; Lichota, A; Paulus, W; Senner, V

    2009-08-01

    Diffuse invasion of single-glioma cells is the main obstacle to successful therapy of these tumours. After identifying vesicle amine transport protein-1 (VAT-1) as being upregulated in invasive human gliomas, we study its possible function in glioblastoma cell migration. Based on data obtained from previous oligonucleotide arrays, we investigated expression of VAT-1 in glioblastoma tissue and cell lines on mRNA levels using reverse transcriptase PCR. Furthermore, we examined the amount and localization of VAT-1 protein using immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Using small interfering RNA technology we repressed VAT-1 expression in human glioma cell lines and analysed their migration using wound healing and transwell migration assays. Increased VAT-1 mRNA and protein levels were found in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines compared with normal human brain. Small interfering RNA-mediated VAT-1 knockdown led to significantly reduced migration of human glioma cells. VAT-1 is overexpressed in glioblastomas and functionally involved in glioma cell migration, representing a new component involved in glioma invasion

  8. Vesicle Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, S.; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-07-01

    Amphiphiles, under appropriate conditions, can self-assemble into nanoscale thin membrane vessels (vesicles) that encapsulate and hence protect and transport molecular payloads. Vesicles assemble naturally within cells but can also be artificially synthesized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and applications of light-field interactions with vesicles. By being associated with light-emitting entities (e.g., dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as imaging agents in addition to cargo carriers. Vesicles can also be optically probed on the basis of their nonlinear response, typically from the vesicle membrane. Light fields can be employed to transport vesicles by using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or can directly perturb the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy). We conclude with emerging vesicle applications in biology and photochemical microreactors.

  9. WDR8 is a centriolar satellite and centriole-associated protein that promotes ciliary vesicle docking during ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Wang, Wenbo; Ruppert, Thomas; Neuner, Annett; Cerikan, Berati; Viol, Linda; Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Gruss, Oliver J; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-02-01

    Ciliogenesis initiates at the mother centriole through a series of events that include membrane docking, displacement of cilia-inhibitory proteins and axoneme elongation. Centriolar proteins, in particular at distal and subdistal appendages, carry out these functions. Recently, cytoplasmic complexes named centriolar satellites have also been shown to promote ciliogenesis. Little is known about the functional and molecular relationship between appendage proteins, satellites and cilia biogenesis. Here, we identified the WD-repeat protein 8 (WDR8, also known as WRAP73) as a satellite and centriolar component. We show that WDR8 interacts with the satellite proteins SSX2IP and PCM1 as well as the centriolar proximal end component Cep135. Cep135 is required for the recruitment of WDR8 to centrioles. Depletion experiments revealed that WDR8 and Cep135 have strongly overlapping functions in ciliogenesis. Both are indispensable for ciliary vesicle docking to the mother centriole and for unlocking the distal end of the mother centriole from the ciliary inhibitory complex CP110-Cep97. Our data thus point to an important function of centriolar proximal end proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis, and establish WDR8 and Cep135 as two factors that are essential for the initial steps of ciliation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Hepatic stellate cell-derived PDGFRα-enriched extracellular vesicles promote liver fibrosis in mice through SHP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostallari, Enis; Hirsova, Petra; Prasnicka, Alena; Verma, Vikas K; Yaqoob, Usman; Wongjarupong, Nicha; Roberts, Lewis R; Shah, Vijay H

    2018-01-23

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation and migration of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) followed by matrix deposition. Recently, several studies have shown the importance of extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from liver cells, such as hepatocytes and endothelial cells, in liver pathobiology. While most of the studies describe how liver cells modulate HSC behavior, an important gap exists in the understanding of HSC-derived signals and more specifically HSC-derived EVs in liver fibrosis. Here, we investigated the molecules released through HSC-derived EVs, the mechanism of their release and the role of these EVs in fibrosis. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α (PDGFRα) was enriched in EVs derived from PDGF-BB-treated HSCs. Moreover, patients with liver fibrosis had increased PDGFRα levels in serum EVs compared to healthy individuals. Mechanistically, in vitro tyrosine720-to-phenylalanine mutation (Y720F) on PDGFRα sequence abolished enrichment of PDGFRα in EVs and redirected the receptor towards degradation. Congruently, the inhibition of Src homology 2 domain tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2), the regulatory binding partner of phosphorylated Y720, also inhibited PDGFRα enrichment in EVs. EVs derived from PDGFRα-overexpressing cells promoted in vitro HSC migration and in vivo liver fibrosis. Finally, administration of SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, to carbon tetrachloride-administered mice inhibited PDGFRα enrichment in serum EVs and reduced liver fibrosis. PDGFRα is enriched in EVs derived from PDGF-BB-treated HSCs in an SHP2-dependent manner and these PDGFRα-enriched EVs participate in development of liver fibrosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Monocyte activation drives preservation of membrane thiols by promoting release of oxidised membrane moieties via extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, K É; Tóth, E Á; Balogh, A M; Sódar, B W; Kádár, L; Pálóczi, K; Fekete, N; Németh, A; Osteikoetxea, X; Vukman, K V; Holub, M; Pállinger, É; Nagy, Gy; Winyard, P G; Buzás, E I

    2017-07-01

    The redox state of cellular exofacial molecules is reflected by the amount of available thiols. Furthermore, surface thiols can be considered as indicators of immune cell activation. One group of thiol containing proteins, peroxiredoxins, in particular, have been associated with inflammation. In this study, we assessed surface thiols of the U937 and Thp1 monocyte cell lines and primary monocytes in vitro upon inflammatory stimulation by irreversibly labelling the cells with a fluorescent derivative of maleimide. We also investigated exofacial thiols on circulating blood mononuclear cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls. When analysing extracellular vesicles, we combined thiol labelling with the use of antibodies to specific CD markers to exclude extracellular vesicle mimicking signals from thiol containing protein aggregates. Furthermore, differential detergent lysis was applied to confirm the vesicular nature of the detected extracellular events in blood plasma. We found an increase in exofacial thiols on monocytes upon in vitro stimulation by LPS or TNF, both in primary monocytes and monocytic cell lines (pextracellular vesicles showed a decrease in their exofacial thiols compared with those from unstimulated cells (pextracellular vesicles of isolated CD14 + cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients had decreased thiol levels compared with healthy subjects (pextracellular vesicles was increased in rheumatoid arthritis blood plasma (pextracellular vesicle-enriched preparations from blood plasma. Our data show that cell surface thiols play a protective role and reflect oxidative stress resistance state in activated immune cells. Furthermore, they support a role of extracellular vesicles in the redox regulation of human monocytes, possibly representing an antioxidant mechanism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Selective secretion of microRNAs from lung cancer cells via extracellular vesicles promotes CAMK1D-mediated tube formation in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James; Dickman, Christopher; MacLellan, Sara; Towle, Rebecca; Jabalee, James; Lam, Stephen; Garnis, Cathie

    2017-10-13

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are key signaling mediators between cancer cells and their supporting stroma, and regulate critical processes such as invasion, metastases, and angiogenesis. We have identified a subset of miRNAs (miR-142-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-145-5p, miR-150-5p, miR-223-3p, miR-451a, miR-486-5p, miR-605-5p) that are enriched in lung adenocarcinoma extracellular vesicles compared to the donor cells from which they were derived. Two well-known tumor suppressors, miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p, were also enriched in serum samples collected during surgery from blood vessels draining directly from lung adenocarcinoma tumor beds. Recently, both miRNAs were found to promote neoangiogenesis in endothelial cells in mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma through targeting of CAMK1D, an inhibitory kinase that can impair angiogenesis when over-expressed. We show that the transfer of miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p within extracellular vesicles from lung adenocarcinoma cells to endothelial cells reduces the levels of CAMK1D and increases tube formation by endothelial cells. This finding suggests that transfer of miRNAs within extracellular vesicles is a method of communication between cancer and endothelial cells which promotes angiogenesis while simultaneously removing tumor suppressive miRNAs within the tumor cells, thus driving tumorigenesis.

  13. The curvature coordinate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a concept for a curvature coordinate system on regular curved surfaces from which faceted surfaces with plane quadrangular facets can be designed. The lines of curvature are used as parametric lines for the curvature coordinate system on the surface. A new conjugate set of lines......, called middle curvature lines, is introduced. These lines define the curvature coordinate system. Using the curvature coordinate system, the surface can be conformally mapped on the plane. In this mapping, elliptic sections are mapped as circles, and hyperbolic sections are mapped as equilateral...... hyperbolas. This means that when a plane orthogonal system of curves for which the vertices in a mesh always lie on a circle is mapped on a surface with positive Gaussian curvature using inverse mapping, and the mapped vertices are connected by straight lines, this network will form a faceted surface...

  14. The meaning of curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (geodesic) triangles and negative curvatures slim triangles. Some basic ideas from metric (length-)space geometry and from the geometric analysis of the Laplacian will be surveyed and applied. Via the Laplacian the curvature tensor is in control of a variety of very natural phenomena ranging from heat......This talk is essentially concerned with the shape molding forces of curvature and with the old question of how to detect the presence of curvature in manifolds and length spaces at various scales ranging from global to local to microlocal. As the old saying goes: Positive curvatures produce fat...... diffusion to volume growth. We are e.g. interested in obtaining precise bounds for mean exit times for Brownian motions and for isoperimetric inequalities. One way to obtain such bounds are via curvature controlled comparison with corresponding values in constant curvature spaces and in other tailor-made so...

  15. Spheres of influence: Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, M J; Dashper, S G; Slakeski, N; Chen, Y-Y; Reynolds, E C

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are asymmetrical single bilayer membranous nanostructures produced by Gram-negative bacteria important for bacterial interaction with the environment. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis, produces OMVs that act as a virulence factor secretion system contributing to its pathogenicity. Despite their biological importance, the mechanisms of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated. The ~14 times more curvature of the OMV membrane than cell outer membrane (OM) indicates that OMV biogenesis requires energy expenditure for significant curvature of the OMV membrane. In P. gingivalis, we propose that this may be achieved by upregulating the production of certain inner or outer leaflet lipids, which causes localized outward curvature of the OM. This results in selection of anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) and associated C-terminal domain (CTD) -family proteins on the outer surface due to their ability to accommodate the curvature. Deacylation of A-LPS may further enable increased curvature leading to OMV formation. Porphyromonas gingivalis OMVs that are selectively enriched in CTD-family proteins, largely the gingipains, can support bacterial coaggregation, promote biofilm development and act as an intercessor for the transport of non-motile bacteria by motile bacteria. The P. gingivalis OMVs are also believed to contribute to host interaction and colonization, evasion of immune defense mechanisms, and destruction of periodontal tissues. They may be crucial for both micro- and macronutrient capture, especially heme and probably other assimilable compounds for its own benefit and that of the wider biofilm community. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Sea Cucumber Body Wall Extract Promoted in Vitro Maturation of NMRI Mice Follicles at Germinal Vesicle Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Khalilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background IVM (in vitro maturation appear to be certified high pregnancy outcome. Therefore, attempt to find an appropriate culture system using natural products for increasing developmental competencies fascinating. Objectives This experiment is aimed to evaluate the effect of sea cucumber methanol extract on in vitro maturation of immature mouse oocyte. Methods In this experimental study, Preantral follicles at germinal vesicle stage were collected from 24 - 26 days NMRI female mouse ovaries and transferred to IVM medium supplemented with different concentration of sea cucumber methanol extract (5, 10, 20, 30 µg/mL. Antioxidant capacity of sea cucumber extract was evaluated using DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. Further, oocyte maturation and TNF-α expression were recorded till day 10th. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA through SPSS 16. Results The percentage of arrested oocyte at germinal vesicle stage in the control group was significantly (P < 0.05 higher than treated group (20 µg/mL. There were significant (P < 0.01 differences in percentage of maturated oocyte to metaphase II (MII stage between treated and control group. DPPH radical scavenging capacity and reduction of TNF-α expression in treated oocyte demonstrated that sea cucumber increased rate of oocyte maturation. In addition, the treated oocyte (20 µg/mL achieved the highest percentage of MII stage. Conclusions It was concluded that the sea cucumber extract with optimum concentration can improve oocyte maturation. Sea cucumber extract treatment can be suggested as a novel therapeutic strategy to be used in infertility modality in the future.

  17. Effect of membrane curvature on lateral distribution of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Several membrane proteins exhibit interesting shapes that increases their preference for certain membrane curvatures. Both peripheral and transmembrane proteins are tested with respect to their affinity for a spectrum of high membrane curvatures. We generate high membrane curvatures by pulling...... membrane tubes out of Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). The tube diameter can be tuned by aspirating the GUV into a micropipette for controlling the membrane tension. By using fluorescently labled proteins we have shown that sorting of proteins like e.g. FBAR onto tubes is significantly increased...

  18. Supported lipid bilayers with controlled curvature via colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Maria; Manandhar, Michal; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    , is presented, utilizing lipid vesicle rupture onto nanostructured sensor substrates. Heat treated colloidal particle masks were used as templates to produce silicon dioxide films with systematically varied radius of curvature (ROC, 70 to 170 nm are demonstrated) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation...

  19. An erythrocyte vesicle protein exported by the malaria parasite promotes tubovesicular lipid import from the host cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela A Tamez

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite that causes the most virulent of human malarias. The blood stage parasites export several hundred proteins into their host erythrocyte that underlie modifications linked to major pathologies of the disease and parasite survival in the blood. Unfortunately, most are 'hypothetical' proteins of unknown function, and those that are essential for parasitization of the erythrocyte cannot be 'knocked out'. Here, we combined bioinformatics and genome-wide expression analyses with a new series of transgenic and cellular assays to show for the first time in malaria parasites that microarray read out from a chemical perturbation can have predictive value. We thereby identified and characterized an exported P. falciparum protein resident in a new vesicular compartment induced by the parasite in the erythrocyte. This protein, named Erythrocyte Vesicle Protein 1 (EVP1, shows novel dynamics of distribution in the parasite and intraerythrocytic membranes. Evidence is presented that its expression results in a change in TVN-mediated lipid import at the host membrane and that it is required for intracellular parasite growth, but not invasion. This exported protein appears to be needed for the maintenance of an essential tubovesicular nutrient import pathway induced by the pathogen in the host cell. Our approach may be generalized to the analysis of hundreds of 'hypothetical' P. falciparum proteins to understand their role in parasite entry and/or growth in erythrocytes as well as phenotypic contributions to either antigen export or tubovesicular import. By functionally validating these unknowns, one may identify new targets in host-microbial interactions for prophylaxis against this major human pathogen.

  20. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 × 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell−Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  1. The Sox2 promoter-driven CD63-GFP transgenic rat model allows tracking neural stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Aya; Adachi, Naoki; Matsuno, Hitomi; Kawamata, Masaki; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Hisae; Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Tamai, Yoshitaka

    2017-11-30

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can modulate microenvironments by transferring biomolecules including RNAs and proteins derived from releasing cells to target cells. To understand the molecular mechanisms maintaining the neural stem cell (NSC) niche through EVs, a new transgenic (Tg) rat strain that can release human CD63-GFP expressed EVs from the NSCs was established. Human CD63-GFP expression was controlled under the rat Sox2 promoter (Sox2/human CD63-GFP), and it was expressed in undifferentiated foetal brains. GFP signals were specifically observed in in vitro cultured NSCs obtained from embryonic brains of the Tg rats. We also demonstrate that embryonic NSC (eNSC)-derived EVs were labelled by human CD63-GFP. Furthermore, when we examined the transfer of EVs, eNSC-derived EVs were found to be incorporated into astrocytes and eNSCs, thus implying an EV-mediated communication between different cell types around NSCs. This novel Sox2/human CD63-GFP Tg rat strain should provide resources to analyse the cell-to-cell communications via EVs in NSC microenvironments. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Curvature of the penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if: You have symptoms of curvature of the penis. Erections are painful. You have a sharp pain in ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  3. Large Deformation Mechanics of Plasma Membrane Chained Vesicles in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosawada, Tadashi; Sanada, Kouichi; Takano, Tetsuo

    The clathrin-coated pits, vesicles and chained vesicles on the inner surface of the plasma membrane facilitate the cell to transport specific extracellular macromolecules. This cellular process is strongly involved with large mechanical deformations of the plasma membrane accompanied by changes in membrane curvature. The assembly of the clathrin coat is thought to provide curvature into the membrane. Hence, effects of in-plane shear elasticity due to these coat structure may be significant on the vesicular mechanics. In this study, large deformation mechanics of plasma membrane chained vesicles in cells have been formulated based on minimization of bending and in-plane shear strain energy of the membrane. Effects of outer surrounding cytoplasmic flat membrane upon mechanically stable shapes of the vesicles were revealed, while effects of in-plane shear elasticity were partly discussed.

  4. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Aikawa, Elena

    2018-02-19

    Extracellular vesicles have emerged as one of the most important means through which cells interact with each other and the extracellular environment, but extracellular vesicle research remains challenging due to their small size, limited amount of material required for traditional molecular biology assays and inconsistency in the methods of their isolation. The advent of new technologies and standards in the field, however, have led to increased mechanistic insight into extracellular vesicle function. Herein, the latest studies on the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular physiology and disease are discussed. Extracellular vesicles help control cardiovascular homeostasis and remodelling by mediating communication between cells and directing alterations in the extracellular matrix to respond to changes in the environment. The message carried from the parent cell to extracellular space can be intended for both local (within the same tissue) and distal (downstream of blood flow) targets. Pathological cargo loaded within extracellular vesicles could further result in various diseases. On the contrary, new studies indicate that injection of extracellular vesicles obtained from cultured cells into diseased tissues can promote restoration of normal tissue function. Extracellular vesicles are an integral part of cell and tissue function, and harnessing the properties inherent to extracellular vesicles may provide a therapeutic strategy to promote tissue regeneration.

  5. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Shigeru; Lotz, Martin K

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles carry bioactive molecules that can be transferred between cells and tissues. The purpose of this review is to describe how extracellular vesicles regulate functions of cells in cartilage and other joint tissues. The potential application of extracellular vesicles in the treatment of osteoarthritis and as biomarkers will also be discussed. Extracellular vesicles are found in synovial fluid, in articular cartilage and in the supernatants of synoviocytes and chondrocytes. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage have been proposed to be involved in cross talk between cells in joint tissues and to affect extracellular matrix turnover and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles from arthritic joints can promote abnormal gene expression and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, including abnormal mineralization. Promising results were obtained in the therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles for cartilage repair and experimental osteoarthritis. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as vehicles for the exchange of bioactive signaling molecules within cartilage and between joint tissues to promote joint homeostasis and arthritis pathogenesis. As the molecular content of extracellular vesicles can be customized, they offer utility in therapeutic applications.

  6. Elastic energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A; Phillips, Rob

    2011-06-01

    In recent experiments [M. Dubois, B. Demé, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J.-C. Dedieu, C. Vautrin, S. Désert, E. Perez, and T. Zemb, Nature (London) 411, 672 (2001)] the spontaneous formation of hollow bilayer vesicles with polyhedral symmetry has been observed. On the basis of the experimental phenomenology it was suggested [M. Dubois, V. Lizunov, A. Meister, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J. M. Verbavatz, E. Perez, J. Zimmerberg, and T. Zemb, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 15082 (2004)] that the mechanism for the formation of bilayer polyhedra is minimization of elastic bending energy. Motivated by these experiments, we study the elastic bending energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles. In agreement with experiments, and provided that excess amphiphiles exhibiting spontaneous curvature are present in sufficient quantity, we find that polyhedral bilayer vesicles can indeed be energetically favorable compared to spherical bilayer vesicles. Consistent with experimental observations we also find that the bending energy associated with the vertices of bilayer polyhedra can be locally reduced through the formation of pores. However, the stabilization of polyhedral bilayer vesicles over spherical bilayer vesicles relies crucially on molecular segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges rather than the vertices of bilayer polyhedra. Furthermore, our analysis implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the icosahedron does not minimize elastic bending energy among arbitrary polyhedral shapes and sizes. Instead, we find that, for large polyhedron sizes, the snub dodecahedron and the snub cube both have lower total bending energies than the icosahedron.

  7. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  8. Dynamics of multicomponent vesicles in a viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jin Sun; Tseng, Yu-Hau; Li, Shuwang; Voigt, Axel; Lowengrub, John S.

    2010-01-01

    We develop and investigate numerically a thermodynamically consistent model of two-dimensional multicomponent vesicles in an incompressible viscous fluid. The model is derived using an energy variation approach that accounts for different lipid surface phases, the excess energy (line energy) associated with surface phase domain boundaries, bending energy, spontaneous curvature, local inextensibility and fluid flow via the Stokes equations. The equations are high-order (fourth order) nonlinear and nonlocal due to incompressibil-ity of the fluid and the local inextensibility of the vesicle membrane. To solve the equations numerically, we develop a nonstiff, pseudo-spectral boundary integral method that relies on an analysis of the equations at small scales. The algorithm is closely related to that developed very recently by Veerapaneni et al. [81] for homogeneous vesicles although we use a different and more efficient time stepping algorithm and a reformulation of the inextensibility equation. We present simulations of multicomponent vesicles in an initially quiescent fluid and investigate the effect of varying the average surface concentration of an initially unstable mixture of lipid phases. The phases then redistribute and alter the morphology of the vesicle and its dynamics. When an applied shear is introduced, an initially elliptical vesicle tank-treads and attains a steady shape and surface phase distribution. A sufficiently elongated vesicle tumbles and the presence of different surface phases with different bending stiffnesses and spontaneous curvatures yields a complex evolution of the vesicle morphology as the vesicle bends in regions where the bending stiffness and spontaneous curvature are small. PMID:20808718

  9. Chern and Total Curvature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characteristic, Chern class. Siddhartha Gadgil. Shiing-Shen Chern 1 was one of the great math- ematicians of the twentieth century, and a tow- ering figure in the field of differential geometry, where one studies curvatures of spaces. In this article we give the reader a glimpse into differ- ential geometry and the work of Chern.

  10. Forman curvature for directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sreejith, R P; Saucan, Emil; Samal, Areejit

    2016-01-01

    A goal in network science is the geometrical characterization of complex networks. In this direction, we have recently introduced the Forman's discretization of Ricci curvature to the realm of undirected networks. Investigation of Forman curvature in diverse model and real-world undirected networks revealed that this measure captures several aspects of the organization of complex undirected networks. However, many important real-world networks are inherently directed in nature, and the Forman curvature for undirected networks is unsuitable for analysis of such directed networks. Hence, we here extend the Forman curvature for undirected networks to the case of directed networks. The simple mathematical formula for the Forman curvature in directed networks elegantly incorporates node weights, edge weights and edge direction. By applying the Forman curvature for directed networks to a variety of model and real-world directed networks, we show that the measure can be used to characterize the structure of complex ...

  11. On Gauss-Bonnet Curvatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Larbi Labbi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The $(2k$-th Gauss-Bonnet curvature is a generalization to higher dimensions of the $(2k$-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet integrand, it coincides with the usual scalar curvature for $k = 1$. The Gauss-Bonnet curvatures are used in theoretical physics to describe gravity in higher dimensional space times where they are known as the Lagrangian of Lovelock gravity, Gauss-Bonnet Gravity and Lanczos gravity. In this paper we present various aspects of these curvature invariants and review their variational properties. In particular, we discuss natural generalizations of the Yamabe problem, Einstein metrics and minimal submanifolds.

  12. A Curvature Flow Unifying Symplectic Curvature Flow And Pluriclosed Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Song

    2013-01-01

    Streets and Tian introduced pluriclosed flow and symplectic curvature flow in recent years. Here we construct a curvature flow to unify these two flows. We show the short time existence of our flow and exhibit an obstruction to long time existence.

  13. Secretion of novel SEL1L endogenous variants is promoted by ER stress/UPR via endosomes and shed vesicles in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cattaneo

    Full Text Available We describe here two novel endogenous variants of the human endoplasmic reticulum (ER cargo receptor SEL1LA, designated p38 and p28. Biochemical and RNA interference studies in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells indicate that p38 and p28 are N-terminal, ER-anchorless and more stable relative to the canonical transmembrane SEL1LA. P38 is expressed and constitutively secreted, with increase after ER stress, in the KMS11 myeloma line and in the breast cancer lines MCF7 and SKBr3, but not in the non-tumorigenic breast epithelial MCF10A line. P28 is detected only in the poorly differentiated SKBr3 cell line, where it is secreted after ER stress. Consistently with the presence of p38 and p28 in culture media, morphological studies of SKBr3 and KMS11 cells detect N-terminal SEL1L immunolabeling in secretory/degradative compartments and extracellularly-released membrane vesicles. Our findings suggest that the two new SEL1L variants are engaged in endosomal trafficking and secretion via vesicles, which could contribute to relieve ER stress in tumorigenic cells. P38 and p28 could therefore be relevant as diagnostic markers and/or therapeutic targets in cancer.

  14. Environmental influences on DNA curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Higgins, C.F.; Bolshoy, A.

    1999-01-01

    DNA curvature plays an important role in many biological processes. To study environmentalinfluences on DNA curvature we compared the anomalous migration on polyacrylamide gels ofligation ladders of 11 specifically-designed oligonucleotides. At low temperatures (25 degreesC and below) most of the...... for DNAcurvature and for environmentally-sensitive DNA conformations in the regulation of geneexpression....

  15. Vesicle shape, molecular tilt, and the suppression of necks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Huber, Greg; Pelcovits, Robert A.; Powers, Thomas R.

    2007-09-01

    Can the presence of molecular-tilt order significantly affect the shapes of lipid bilayer membranes, particularly membrane shapes with narrow necks? Motivated by the propensity for tilt order and the common occurrence of narrow necks in the intermediate stages of biological processes such as endocytosis and vesicle trafficking, we examine how tilt order inhibits the formation of necks in the equilibrium shapes of vesicles. For vesicles with a spherical topology, point defects in the molecular order with a total strength of +2 are required. We study axisymmetric shapes and suppose that there is a unit-strength defect at each pole of the vesicle. The model is further simplified by the assumption of tilt isotropy: invariance of the energy with respect to rotations of the molecules about the local membrane normal. This isotropy condition leads to a minimal coupling of tilt order and curvature, giving a high energetic cost to regions with Gaussian curvature and tilt order. Minimizing the elastic free energy with constraints of fixed area and fixed enclosed volume determines the allowed shapes. Using numerical calculations, we find several branches of solutions and identify them with the branches previously known for fluid membranes. We find that tilt order changes the relative energy of the branches, suppressing thin necks by making them costly, leading to elongated prolate vesicles as a generic family of tilt-ordered membrane shapes.

  16. MAA-1, a novel acyl-CoA-binding protein involved in endosomal vesicle transport in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobæk Larsen, Morten; Tuck, Simon; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2006-01-01

    The budding and fission of vesicles during membrane trafficking requires many proteins, including those that coat the vesicles, adaptor proteins that recruit components of the coat, and small GTPases that initiate vesicle formation. In addition, vesicle formation in vitro is promoted by the hydro...

  17. Lectures on mean curvature flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xi-Ping

    2002-01-01

    "Mean curvature flow" is a term that is used to describe the evolution of a hypersurface whose normal velocity is given by the mean curvature. In the simplest case of a convex closed curve on the plane, the properties of the mean curvature flow are described by Gage-Hamilton's theorem. This theorem states that under the mean curvature flow, the curve collapses to a point, and if the flow is diluted so that the enclosed area equals \\pi, the curve tends to the unit circle. In this book, the author gives a comprehensive account of fundamental results on singularities and the asymptotic behavior of mean curvature flows in higher dimensions. Among other topics, he considers in detail Huisken's theorem (a generalization of Gage-Hamilton's theorem to higher dimension), evolution of non-convex curves and hypersurfaces, and the classification of singularities of the mean curvature flow. Because of the importance of the mean curvature flow and its numerous applications in differential geometry and partial differential ...

  18. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  19. EAU guidelines on penile curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos; Eardley, Ian; Giuliano, François; Hatzichristou, Dimitrios; Moncada, Ignacio; Salonia, Andrea; Vardi, Yoram; Wespes, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Penile curvature can be congenital or acquired. Acquired curvature is secondary due to La Peyronie (Peyronie's) disease. To provide clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of penile curvature. A systematic literature search on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of penile curvature was performed. Articles with the highest evidence available were selected and formed the basis for assigning levels of evidence and grades of recommendations. The pathogenesis of congenital penile curvature is unknown. Peyronie's disease is a poorly understood connective tissue disorder most commonly attributed to repetitive microvascular injury or trauma during intercourse. Diagnosis is based on medical and sexual histories, which are sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Physical examination includes assessment of palpable nodules and penile length. Curvature is best documented by a self-photograph or pharmacologically induced erection. The only treatment option for congenital penile curvature is surgery based on plication techniques. Conservative treatment for Peyronie's disease is associated with poor outcomes. Pharmacotherapy includes oral potassium para-aminobenzoate, intralesional treatment with verapamil, clostridial collagenase or interferon, topical verapamil gel, and iontophoresis with verapamil and dexamethasone. They can be efficacious in some patients, but none of these options carry a grade A recommendation. Steroids, vitamin E, and tamoxifen cannot be recommended. Extracorporeal shock wave treatment and penile traction devices may only be used to treat penile pain and reduce penile deformity, respectively. Surgery is indicated when Peyronie's disease is stable for at least 3 mo. Tunical shortening procedures, especially plication techniques, are the first treatment options. Tunical lengthening procedures are preferred in more severe curvatures or in complex deformities. Penile prosthesis implantation is recommended in patients with erectile dysfunction

  20. Sigma Models with Negative Curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-01-01

    We construct Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) based on the scalar manifold H^n, which is a hyperbolic space of constant negative curvature. The Lagrangian has a non-compact O(n,1) global symmetry group, but it gives a unitary theory as long as only a compact subgroup of the global symmetry is gauged. Whether the HEFT manifold has positive or negative curvature can be tested by measuring the S-parameter, and the cross sections for longitudinal gauge boson and Higgs boson scattering, since the curvature (including its sign) determines deviations from Standard Model values.

  1. Endothelial Extracellular Vesicles-Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromada, Carina; Mühleder, Severin; Grillari, Johannes; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microparticles, and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles that have once been considered as cell debris lacking biological functions. However, they have recently gained immense interest in the scientific community due to their role in intercellular communication, immunity, tissue regeneration as well as in the onset, and progression of various pathologic conditions. Extracellular vesicles of endothelial origin have been found to play a versatile role in the human body, since they are on the one hand known to contribute to cardiovascular diseases, but on the other hand have also been reported to promote endothelial cell survival. Hence, endothelial extracellular vesicles hold promising therapeutic potential to be used as a new tool to detect as well as treat a great number of diseases. This calls for clinically approved, standardized, and efficient isolation and characterization protocols to harvest and purify endothelial extracellular vesicles. However, such methods and techniques to fulfill stringent requirements for clinical trials have yet to be developed or are not harmonized internationally. In this review, recent advances and challenges in the field of endothelial extracellular vesicle research are discussed and current problems and limitations regarding isolation and characterization are pointed out.

  2. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, John W; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behaviour of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier--)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier--)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite element method to solve this complex free boundary problem, and present the first three dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier--)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosit...

  3. Human mammospheres secrete hormone-regulated active extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. One of the most important prognostic factors for survival is the early detection of the disease. Recent studies indicate that extracellular vesicles may provide diagnostic information for cancer management. We demonstrate the secretion of extracellular vesicles by primary breast epithelial cells enriched for stem/progenitor cells cultured as mammospheres, in non-adherent conditions. Using a proteomic approach we identified proteins contained in these vesicles whose expression is affected by hormonal changes in the cellular environment. In addition, we showed that these vesicles are capable of promoting changes in expression levels of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell markers. Our findings suggest that secreted extracellular vesicles could represent potential diagnostic and/or prognostic markers for breast cancer and support a role for extracellular vesicles in cancer progression.

  4. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  5. Solving higher curvature gravity theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta [IUCAA, Pune (India); SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Theoretical Physics Department, Kolkata (India)

    2016-10-15

    Solving field equations in the context of higher curvature gravity theories is a formidable task. However, in many situations, e.g., in the context of f(R) theories, the higher curvature gravity action can be written as an Einstein-Hilbert action plus a scalar field action. We show that not only the action but the field equations derived from the action are also equivalent, provided the spacetime is regular. We also demonstrate that such an equivalence continues to hold even when the gravitational field equations are projected on a lower-dimensional hypersurface. We have further addressed explicit examples in which the solutions for Einstein-Hilbert and a scalar field system lead to solutions of the equivalent higher curvature theory. The same, but on the lower-dimensional hypersurface, has been illustrated in the reverse order as well. We conclude with a brief discussion on this technique of solving higher curvature field equations. (orig.)

  6. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzad eKarim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbour the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologues to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e, have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologues of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (VIPP1, thylakoid formation 1 (THF1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor (SCO2/CYO1, curvature thylakoid 1 (CURT1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like (FZL protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components.

  7. Moraxella catarrhalis Outer Membrane Vesicles Carry β-Lactamase and Promote Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae by Inactivating Amoxicillin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaar, Viveka; Nordström, Therése; Mörgelin, Matthias; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common pathogen found in children with upper respiratory tract infections and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during exacerbations. The bacterial species is often isolated together with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released by M. catarrhalis and contain phospholipids, adhesins, and immunomodulatory compounds such as lipooligosaccharide. We have recently shown that M. catarrhalis OMVs exist in patients upon nasopharyngeal colonization. As virtually all M. catarrhalis isolates are β-lactamase positive, the goal of this study was to investigate whether M. catarrhalis OMVs carry β-lactamase and to analyze if OMV consequently can prevent amoxicillin-induced killing. Recombinant β-lactamase was produced and antibodies were raised in rabbits. Transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blotting verified that OMVs carried β-lactamase. Moreover, enzyme assays revealed that M. catarrhalis OMVs contained active β-lactamase. OMVs (25 μg/ml) incubated with amoxicillin for 1 h completely hydrolyzed amoxicillin at concentrations up to 2.5 μg/ml. In functional experiments, preincubation of amoxicillin (10× MIC) with M. catarrhalis OMVs fully rescued amoxicillin-susceptible M. catarrhalis, S. pneumoniae, and type b or nontypeable H. influenzae from β-lactam-induced killing. Our results suggest that the presence of amoxicillin-resistant M. catarrhalis originating from β-lactamase-containing OMVs may pave the way for respiratory pathogens that by definition are susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:21576428

  8. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures ar...... a barrier to fusion changing from 15 k(B)T at T = 26 degrees C to 10k(H) T at T = 35 degrees C. These results are compatible with the theoretical predictions using the stalk model of vesicle fusion....

  9. Discrete Curvature Theories and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2016-08-25

    Discrete Di erential Geometry (DDG) concerns discrete counterparts of notions and methods in di erential geometry. This thesis deals with a core subject in DDG, discrete curvature theories on various types of polyhedral surfaces that are practically important for free-form architecture, sunlight-redirecting shading systems, and face recognition. Modeled as polyhedral surfaces, the shapes of free-form structures may have to satisfy di erent geometric or physical constraints. We study a combination of geometry and physics { the discrete surfaces that can stand on their own, as well as having proper shapes for the manufacture. These proper shapes, known as circular and conical meshes, are closely related to discrete principal curvatures. We study curvature theories that make such surfaces possible. Shading systems of freeform building skins are new types of energy-saving structures that can re-direct the sunlight. From these systems, discrete line congruences across polyhedral surfaces can be abstracted. We develop a new curvature theory for polyhedral surfaces equipped with normal congruences { a particular type of congruences de ned by linear interpolation of vertex normals. The main results are a discussion of various de nitions of normality, a detailed study of the geometry of such congruences, and a concept of curvatures and shape operators associated with the faces of a triangle mesh. These curvatures are compatible with both normal congruences and the Steiner formula. In addition to architecture, we consider the role of discrete curvatures in face recognition. We use geometric measure theory to introduce the notion of asymptotic cones associated with a singular subspace of a Riemannian manifold, which is an extension of the classical notion of asymptotic directions. We get a simple expression of these cones for polyhedral surfaces, as well as convergence and approximation theorems. We use the asymptotic cones as facial descriptors and demonstrate the

  10. Sorting of integral membrane proteins mediated by curvature-dependent protein-lipid bilayer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božič, Bojan; Das, Sovan L; Svetina, Saša

    2015-03-28

    Cell membrane proteins, both bound and integral, are known to preferentially accumulate at membrane locations with curvatures favorable to their shape. This is mainly due to the curvature dependent interaction between membrane proteins and their lipid environment. Here, we analyze the effects of the protein-lipid bilayer interaction energy due to mismatch between the protein shape and the principal curvatures of the surrounding bilayer. The role of different macroscopic parameters that define the interaction energy term is elucidated in relation to recent experiment in which the lateral distribution of a membrane embedded protein potassium channel KvAP is measured on a giant unilamellar lipid vesicle (reservoir) and a narrow tubular extension - a tether - kept at constant length. The dependence of the sorting ratio, defined as the ratio between the areal density of the protein on the tether and on the vesicle, on the inverse tether radius is influenced by the strength of the interaction, the intrinsic shape of the membrane embedded protein, and its abundance in the reservoir. It is described how the values of these constants can be extracted from experiments. The intrinsic principal curvatures of a protein are related to the tether radius at which the sorting ratio attains its maximum value. The estimate of the principal intrinsic curvature of the protein KvAP, obtained by comparing the experimental and theoretical sorting behavior, is consistent with the available information on its structure.

  11. Surface meshing with curvature convergence

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin

    2014-06-01

    Surface meshing plays a fundamental role in graphics and visualization. Many geometric processing tasks involve solving geometric PDEs on meshes. The numerical stability, convergence rates and approximation errors are largely determined by the mesh qualities. In practice, Delaunay refinement algorithms offer satisfactory solutions to high quality mesh generations. The theoretical proofs for volume based and surface based Delaunay refinement algorithms have been established, but those for conformal parameterization based ones remain wide open. This work focuses on the curvature measure convergence for the conformal parameterization based Delaunay refinement algorithms. Given a metric surface, the proposed approach triangulates its conformal uniformization domain by the planar Delaunay refinement algorithms, and produces a high quality mesh. We give explicit estimates for the Hausdorff distance, the normal deviation, and the differences in curvature measures between the surface and the mesh. In contrast to the conventional results based on volumetric Delaunay refinement, our stronger estimates are independent of the mesh structure and directly guarantee the convergence of curvature measures. Meanwhile, our result on Gaussian curvature measure is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric and independent of the embedding. In practice, our meshing algorithm is much easier to implement and much more efficient. The experimental results verified our theoretical results and demonstrated the efficiency of the meshing algorithm. © 2014 IEEE.

  12. Recognition and tethering of transport vesicles at the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The Golgi apparatus occupies a central position within the secretory pathway where it is a hub for vesicle trafficking. Distinct classes of transport vesicles traffic diverse cargoes into and out of this organelle, as well as between the different Golgi subcompartments. A key feature of Golgi trafficking is the specific recognition of transport vesicles at the different regions of the Golgi apparatus, required for the correct cargo delivery. Specificity is ensured by coiled-coil golgins and multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), which act together to capture vesicles and promote their subsequent fusion with the Golgi membrane. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how golgins and MTCs function together to mediate the specific recognition of vesicles at the Golgi apparatus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonlinear Sorting, Curvature Generation, and Crowding of Endophilin N-BAR on Tubular Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chen; Das, Sovan L.; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The curvature of biological membranes is controlled by membrane-bound proteins. For example, during endocytosis, the sorting of membrane components, vesicle budding, and fission from the plasma membrane are mediated by adaptor and accessory proteins. Endophilin is a peripherally binding membrane protein that functions as an endocytic accessory protein. Endophilin's membrane tubulation capacity is well known. However, to understand the thermodynamic and mechanical aspects of endophilin functio...

  14. Elastic Torques about Membrane Edges: A Study of Pierced Egg Lecithin Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, S; Servuss, R M; Helfrich, W

    1986-10-01

    The shape of mechanically pierced giant vesicles is studied to obtain the elastic modulus of Gaussian curvature of egg lecithin bilayers. It is argued that such experiments are governed by an apparent modulus, kappa(app), not the true modulus of Gaussian curvature, kappa. A theory of kappa(app) is proposed, regarding the pierced bilayer vesicle as a closed monolayer vesicle. The quantity measured, i.e. kappa(app)/kappa, where kappa is the rigidity, agrees satisfactorily with the theory. We find kappa(app) = -(1.9 +/- 0.3) . 10(-12) erg (on the basis of kappa = (2.3 +/- 0.3) . 10(-12) erg). The result may have implications for bilayer fusion.

  15. Cholesterol Induces Uneven Curvature of Asymmetric Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Yesylevskyy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable flexibility is observed in biological membranes, which allows them to form the structures of different curvatures. We addressed the question of intrinsic ability of phospholipid membranes to form highly curved structures and the role of cholesterol in this process. The distribution of cholesterol in the highly curved asymmetric DOPC/DOPS lipid bilayer was investigated by the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations in the membrane patches with large aspect ratio. It is shown that cholesterol induces uneven membrane curvature promoting the formation of extended flattened regions of the membrane interleaved by sharp bends. It is shown that the affinity of cholesterol to anionic DOPS or neutral DOPC lipids is curvature dependent. The cholesterol prefers DOPS to DOPC in either planar or highly curved parts of the membrane. In contrast, in the narrow interval of moderate membrane curvatures this preference is inverted. Our data suggest that there is a complex self-consistent interplay between the membrane curvature and cholesterol distribution in the asymmetric lipid bilayers. The suggested new function of cholesterol may have a biological relevance.

  16. Extracellular vesicles are the Trojan horses of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles have recently emerged as a novel mode of viral propagation exploited by both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. In particular non-enveloped viruses utilize the hosts' production of extracellular vesicles to exit from cells non-lytically and to hide and manipulate the immune system. Moreover, challenging the long held idea that viruses behave as independent genetic units, extracellular vesicles enable multiple viral particles and genomes to collectively traffic in and out of cells, which can promote genetic cooperativity among viral quasispecies and enhance the fitness of the overall viral population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Modern approaches to discrete curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Romon, Pascal

    2017-01-01

     This book provides a valuable glimpse into discrete curvature, a rich new field of research which blends discrete mathematics, differential geometry, probability and computer graphics. It includes a vast collection of ideas and tools which will offer something new to all interested readers. Discrete geometry has arisen as much as a theoretical development as in response to unforeseen challenges coming from applications. Discrete and continuous geometries have turned out to be intimately connected. Discrete curvature is the key concept connecting them through many bridges in numerous fields: metric spaces, Riemannian and Euclidean geometries, geometric measure theory, topology, partial differential equations, calculus of variations, gradient flows, asymptotic analysis, probability, harmonic analysis, graph theory, etc. In spite of its crucial importance both in theoretical mathematics and in applications, up to now, almost no books have provided a coherent outlook on this emerging field.

  18. Sites of glucose transporter-4 vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane correlate spatially with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennine M Dawicki-McKenna

    Full Text Available In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin, preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion.

  19. Sites of Glucose Transporter-4 Vesicle Fusion with the Plasma Membrane Correlate Spatially with Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicki-McKenna, Jennine M.; Goldman, Yale E.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2012-01-01

    In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin), preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion. PMID:22916292

  20. Equi-Gaussian curvature folding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure 10. Note that the graph Gf of any equi-Gaussian curvature of #nT 2 is a regular graph of valency 4. 2. References. [1] Farran H R, El-Kholy E and Robertson S A, Folding a surface to a polygon, Geometric. Dedicatiae 33 (1996) 255–266. [2] Zeen El-Deen M R, Cellular and fuzzy folding, Ph.D. thesis (Egypt: Tanta Univ.) ...

  1. How pure are your vesicles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  2. Microelectrofluidic lens for variable curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jong-hyeon; Lee, Eunsung; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Minseog; Kim, Woonbae

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a tunable liquid lens based on microelectrofluidic technology which integrates electrowetting and microfluidics. In the novel microelectrofluidic lens (MEFL), electrowetting in the hydrophobic surface channel induces the Laplace pressure difference between two fluidic interfaces on the lens aperture and the surface channel. Then, the pressure difference makes the lens curvature tunable. The previous electrowetting lens in which the contact angle changes at the side wall has a certain limitation of the curvature variation because of the contact angle saturation. Although the contact angle saturation also appears in the surface channel of the MEFL, the low surface channel increases the Laplace pressure and it makes the MEFL to have full variation of the optical power possible. The magnitude of the applied voltage determines the lens curvature in the analog mode MEFL as well as the electrowetting lens. Digital operation is also possible when the control electrodes of the MEFL are patterned to have an array. It is expected that the proposed MEFL is able to be widely used because of its full variation of the optical power without the use of oil and digital operation with fast response.

  3. Disformal invariance of curvature perturbation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, Hayato [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, 60637 (United States); White, Jonathan, E-mail: motohashi@kicp.uchicago.edu, E-mail: jwhite@post.kek.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU), The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Tokyo, 113-0033 Japan (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    We show that under a general disformal transformation the linear comoving curvature perturbation is not identically invariant, but is invariant on superhorizon scales for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's theory. The difference between disformally related curvature perturbations is found to be given in terms of the comoving density perturbation associated with a single canonical scalar field. In General Relativity it is well-known that this quantity vanishes on superhorizon scales through the Poisson equation that is obtained on combining the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints, and we confirm that a similar result holds for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's scalar-tensor theory so long as the invertibility condition for the disformal transformation is satisfied. We also consider the curvature perturbation at full nonlinear order in the unitary gauge, and find that it is invariant under a general disformal transformation if we assume that an attractor regime has been reached. Finally, we also discuss the counting of degrees of freedom in theories disformally related to Horndeski's.

  4. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa vesicles associate with and are internalized by human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Meta J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen associated with chronic and ultimately fatal lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. To investigate how P. aeruginosa-derived vesicles may contribute to lung disease, we explored their ability to associate with human lung cells. Results Purified vesicles associated with lung cells and were internalized in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Vesicles from a CF isolate exhibited a 3- to 4-fold greater association with lung cells than vesicles from the lab strain PAO1. Vesicle internalization was temperature-dependent and was inhibited by hypertonic sucrose and cyclodextrins. Surface-bound vesicles rarely colocalized with clathrin. Internalized vesicles colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER marker, TRAPα, as well as with ER-localized pools of cholera toxin and transferrin. CF isolates of P. aeruginosa abundantly secrete PaAP (PA2939, an aminopeptidase that associates with the surface of vesicles. Vesicles from a PaAP knockout strain exhibited a 40% decrease in cell association. Likewise, vesicles from PAO1 overexpressing PaAP displayed a significant increase in cell association. Conclusion These data reveal that PaAP promotes the association of vesicles with lung cells. Taken together, these results suggest that P. aeruginosa vesicles can interact with and be internalized by lung epithelial cells and contribute to the inflammatory response during infection.

  6. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  7. BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins use the same mechanism to sense membrane curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bhatia, V K; Gether, U

    2010-01-01

    The internal membranes of eukaryotic cells are all twists and bends characterized by high curvature. During recent years it has become clear that specific proteins sustain these curvatures while others simply recognize membrane shape and use it as "molecular information" to organize cellular...... processes in space and time. Here we discuss this new important recognition process termed membrane curvature sensing (MCS). First, we review a new fluorescence-based experimental method that allows characterization of MCS using measurements on single vesicles and compare it to sensing assays that use bulk...... on curved membranes instead of higher affinity as assumed so far. Finally, we integrate these new insights into the debate about which motifs are involved in sensing versus induction of membrane curvature and what role MCS proteins may play in biology....

  8. Composition Effect of the Outer Layer on the Vesicle Fusion Catalyzed by Phospholipase D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Won [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzed the generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) from phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the outer layer of the vesicles prepared through layer by layer via a double emulsion technique. The generation induced a curvature change in the vesicles, which eventually led them to fuse each other. The ratio of two-fattyacid-tail ethanolamine (PE) to one-fatty-acid-tail ethanolamine (PE) was found to acquire the condition where the mixed-phospholipid vesicles were stable identically with pure two-fatty-acid-tail PC. The effect of the outer-layer mixture on the PLD-induced vesicle fusion was investigated using the fluorescence intensity change. 8-Aminonaph- thalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid disodium salt (ANTS) and p-Xylene-bis(N-pyridinium bromide) (DPX) were encapsulated in the vesicles, respectively, for the quantification of the fusion. The fluorescence scale was calibrated with the fluorescence of a 1/1 mixture of ANTS and DPX vesicles in NaCl buffer taken as 100% fluorescence (0% fusion) and the vesicles containing both ANTS and DPX as 0% fluorescence (100% fusion), considering the leakage into the medium studied directly in a separate experiment using vesicles containing both ANTS and DPX. The fusion data for each composition were acquired with the subtraction of the leakage from the quenching. From the monitoring, the vesicle fusion caused by the PLD reaction seems dominantly to occur rather than the vesicle lysis, because the composition effect on the fusion was observed identically with that on the change in the vesicle structure. Furthermore, the diameter measurements also support the fusion dominancy.

  9. Mixed lipid bilayers with locally varying spontaneous curvature and bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Guillaume; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2014-08-01

    A model of lipid bilayers made of a mixture of two lipids with different average compositions on both leaflets, is developed. A Landau Hamiltonian describing the lipid-lipid interactions on each leaflet, with two lipidic fields ψ 1 and ψ 2, is coupled to a Helfrich one, accounting for the membrane elasticity, via both a local spontaneous curvature, which varies as C 0 + C 1(ψ 1 - ψ 2/2), and a bending modulus equal to κ 0 + κ 1(ψ 1 + ψ 2)/2. This model allows us to define curved patches as membrane domains where the asymmetry in composition, ψ 1 - ψ 2, is large, and thick and stiff patches where ψ 1 + ψ 2 is large. These thick patches are good candidates for being lipidic rafts, as observed in cell membranes, which are composed primarily of saturated lipids forming a liquid-ordered domain and are known to be thick and flat nano-domains. The lipid-lipid structure factors and correlation functions are computed for globally spherical membranes and planar ones and for a whole set of parameters including the surface tension and the coupling in the two leaflet compositions. Phase diagrams are established, within a Gaussian approximation, showing the occurrence of two types of Structure Disordered phases, with correlations between either curved or thick patches, and an Ordered phase, corresponding to the divergence of the structure factor at a finite wave vector. The varying bending modulus plays a central role for curved membranes, where the driving force κ 1 C 0 (2) is balanced by the line tension, to form raft domains of size ranging from 10 to 100 nm. For planar membranes, raft domains emerge via the cross-correlation with curved domains. A global picture emerges from curvature-induced mechanisms, described in the literature for planar membranes, to coupled curvature- and bending-induced mechanisms in curved membranes forming a closed vesicle.

  10. The toolbox of vesicle sidedness determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, Peter; Hoekstra, Dick; Kok, Jan Willem

    2012-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from cellular plasma membranes are widely used in science for different purposes. The outer membrane leaflet differs from the inner membrane leaflet of the vesicle, and during vesicle preparation procedures two types of vesicles will be generated: right-side-out vesicles, of which

  11. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N.; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding–deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  12. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  13. Nuclear curvature energy in relativistic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centelles, M.; Vinas, X. [Departament dEstructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Schuck, P. [Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS--IN2P3), Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    1996-02-01

    The difficulties arising in the calculation of the nuclear curvature energy are analyzed in detail, especially with reference to relativistic models. It is underlined that the implicit dependence on curvature of the quantal wave functions is directly accessible only in a semiclassical framework. It is shown that also in the relativistic models quantal and semiclassical calculations of the curvature energy are in good agreement. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. The Curvature of the Hitchin Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Poulsen, Niccolo Skovgård

    In this paper we calculate the curvature of the Hitchin connection. We further show that a slight (possibly trivial) modification of the Hitchin connection has curvature equal to an explict given multiple of the Weil-Petersen symplectic form on Teichmüller space.......In this paper we calculate the curvature of the Hitchin connection. We further show that a slight (possibly trivial) modification of the Hitchin connection has curvature equal to an explict given multiple of the Weil-Petersen symplectic form on Teichmüller space....

  15. Vesicles and vesicle gels - structure and dynamics of formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gradzielski, M

    2003-01-01

    Vesicles constitute an interesting morphology formed by self-aggregating amphiphilic molecules. They exhibit a rich structural variety and are of interest both from a fundamental point of view (for studying closed bilayer systems) and from a practical point of view (whenever one is interested in the encapsulation of active molecules). In many circumstances vesicular structures have to be formed by external forces, but of great interest are amphiphilic systems, where they form spontaneously. Here the question arises of whether this means that they are also thermodynamically stable structures, which at least in some systems appears to be the case. If such vesicles are well defined in size, it is possible to pack them densely and thereby form vesicle gels that possess highly elastic properties even for relatively low volume fractions of amphiphile. Conditions for the formation and the microstructure of such vesicle gels have been studied in some detail for the case of unilamellar vesicles. Another important and ...

  16. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  17. On the nuclear curvature energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, M. (Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, Univ. Joseph Fourier, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Schuck, P. (Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, Univ. Joseph Fourier, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Vinas, X. (Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia)

    1993-08-01

    The curvature energy coefficient of the nuclear mass formula [alpha][sub c] is first calculated for the model case of a Fermi gas bounded by an external Woods-Saxon potential. The semiclassical theory of Wigner and Kirkwood is used and [alpha][sub c] is found to be close to zero. It is, however, shown that this low value is due to the lack of selfconsistency of the potential. When available, the results of the model compare very well with quantal values and the extrapolation to the spherical cavity (billiard) checks with the value for [alpha][sub c] known from the Balian-Bloch theory. Second, the selfconsistent case is generalised to finite range forces. No indication is found that this modifies the fact that all theoretical values for [alpha][sub c] are larger than about 7 MeV which is an order of magnitude above the empirical value. (orig.)

  18. GDP growth and the yield curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stig Vinther

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the forecastability of GDP growth using information from the term structure of yields. In contrast to previous studies, the paper shows that the curvature of the yield curve contributes with much more forecasting power than the slope of yield curve. The yield curvature also...

  19. CONGENITAL PENILE CURVATURE WITH ORTHOTOPIC MEATUS:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    curvatures (6 cases) were managed by ventral Nesbit in four (67%) and ventral. TAP in the remaining two cases (33%). Pa, tients with a complex curvature (8 cases) were managed by sequential TAP on an in- dividual basis according to the results of in- traoperative artificial erection in 6 cases. (63%) and by complete penile ...

  20. Biogenesis and function of ESCRT-dependent extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Thomas; Fürthauer, Maximilian

    2018-02-01

    From bacteria to humans, cells secrete a large variety of membrane-bound extracellular vesicles. Only relatively recently has it however started to become clear that the exovesicular transport of proteins and RNAs is important for normal physiology and numerous pathological conditions. Extracellular vesicles can be formed through the release of the intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes as so-called exosomes, or through direct, ectosomal, budding from the cell surface. Through their ability to promote the bending of membranes away from the cytoplasm, the components of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) have been implicated in both exo- and ectosomal biogenesis. Studies of the ESCRT machinery may therefore provide important insights into the formation and function of extracellular vesicles. In the present review, we first describe the cell biological mechanisms through which ESCRT components contribute to the biogenesis of different types of extracellular vesicles. We then discuss how recent functional studies have started to uncover important roles of ESCRT-dependent extracellular vesicles in a wide variety of processes, including the transport of developmental signaling molecules and embryonic morphogenesis, the regulation of social behavior and host-pathogen interactions, as well as the etiology and progression of neurodegenerative pathologies and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Extracellular Vesicles: An Epigenetic View of the Cancer Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhongrun; Shen, Qi; Yang, Xi; Qiu, Yongming; Zhang, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, microvesicles, and other extracellular vesicles are released by many cell types, including cancer cells and cancer-related immune cells. Extracellular vesicles can directly or indirectly facilitate the transfer of bioinformation to recipient cells or to the extracellular environment. In cancer, exosomes have been implicated in tumor initiation, proliferation, and metastasis. Extracellular vesicles can transmit proteins and nucleic acids that participate in DNA methylation, histone modification, and posttranscriptional regulation of RNA. Factors transmitted by extracellular vesicles reflect the donor cell status, and extracellular vesicles derived from tumor cells may be also responsible for altering expression of tumor promoting and tumor suppressing genes in recipient cells. Thus, circulating extracellular vesicles may act as biomarkers of cancer, and detection of these biomarkers may be applied to diagnosis or assessment of prognosis in patients with cancer.

  2. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  3. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  4. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Pors, A.; Gravesen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important......-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute...

  5. A novel synaptic vesicle fusion path in the rat cerebral cortex: the "saddle" point hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampighi, Guido A; Serrano, Raul; Vergara, Julio L

    2014-01-01

    We improved freeze-fracture electron microscopy to study synapses in the neuropil of the rat cerebral cortex at ∼2 nm resolution and in three-dimensions. In the pre-synaptic axon, we found that "rods" assembled from short filaments protruding from the vesicle and the plasma membrane connects synaptic vesicles to the membrane of the active zone. We equated these "connector rods" to protein complexes involved in "docking" and "priming" vesicles to the active zone. Depending on their orientation, the "rods" define two synaptic vesicle-fusion paths: When parallel to the plasma membrane, the vesicles hemi-fuse anywhere ("randomly") in the active zone following the conventional path anticipated by the SNARE hypothesis. When perpendicular to the plasma membrane, the vesicles hemi-fuse at the base of sharp crooks, called "indentations," that are spaced 75-85 nm center-to-center, arranged in files and contained within gutters. They result from primary and secondary membrane curvatures that intersect at stationary inflection ("saddle") points. Computer simulations indicate that this novel vesicle-fusion path evokes neurotransmitter concentration domains on the post-synaptic spine that are wider, shallower, and that reach higher average concentrations than the more conventional vesicle fusion path. In the post-synaptic spine, large (∼9× ∼15 nm) rectangular particles at densities of 72±10/ µm2 (170-240/spine) match the envelopes of the homotetrameric GluR2 AMPA-sensitive receptor. While these putative receptors join clusters, called the "post-synaptic domains," the overwhelming majority of the rectangular particles formed bands in the "non-synaptic" plasma membrane of the spine. In conclusion, in the neuropil of the rat cerebral cortex, curvatures of the plasma membrane define a novel vesicle-fusion path that preconditions specific regions of the active zone for neurotransmitter release. We hypothesize that a change in the hybridization of the R-SNARE synaptobrevin

  6. Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Bei, Yihua; Das, Saumya; Rodosthenous, Rodosthenis S.; Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Monteiro,Marta Chagas; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Radosinska, Jana; Bartekova, Monika; Jansen, Felix; Li, Qian; Rajasingh, Johnson; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small bilayer lipid membrane vesicles that can be released by most cell types and detected in most body fluids. EVs exert key functions for intercellular communication via transferring their bioactive cargos to recipient cells or activating signaling pathways in target cells. Increasing evidence has shown the important regulatory effects of EVs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). EVs secreted by cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem cells pla...

  7. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Extracellular Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bin; Yin, Yijun; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicle or EV is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes, the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized...

  8. RNA in extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Mustapic, Maja; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Gorospe, Myriam

    2017-07-01

    Cells release a range of membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the environment. Among them, exosomes and microvesicles (collectively measuring 40-1000 nm in diameter) carry proteins, signaling lipids, and nucleic acids from donor cells to recipient cells, and thus have been proposed to serve as intercellular mediators of communication. EVs transport cellular materials in many physiologic processes, including differentiation, stem cell homeostasis, immune responses, and neuronal signaling. EVs are also increasingly recognized as having a direct role in pathologies such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Accordingly, EVs have been the focus of intense investigation as biomarkers of disease, prognostic indicators, and even therapeutic tools. Here, we review the classes of RNAs present in EVs, both coding RNAs (messenger RNAs) and noncoding RNAs (long noncoding RNAs, microRNAs, and circular RNAs). The rising attention to EV-resident RNAs as biomarkers stems from the fact that RNAs can be detected at extremely low quantities using a number of methods. To illustrate the interest in EV biology, we discuss EV RNAs in cancer and neurodegeneration, two major age-associated disease processes. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1413. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1413 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomatto, Margherita A C; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  11. Defect Motifs for Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J.

    2013-04-01

    The energy landscapes of electrostatically charged particles embedded on constant mean curvature surfaces are analyzed for a wide range of system size, curvature, and interaction potentials. The surfaces are taken to be rigid, and the basin-hopping method is used to locate the putative global minimum structures. The defect motifs favored by potential energy agree with experimental observations for colloidal systems: extended defects (scars and pleats) for weakly positive and negative Gaussian curvatures, and isolated defects for strongly negative Gaussian curvatures. Near the phase boundary between these regimes, the two motifs are in strong competition, as evidenced from the appearance of distinct funnels in the potential energy landscape. We also report a novel defect motif consisting of pentagon pairs.

  12. Higher Curvature Supergravity, Supersymmetry Breaking and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In these lectures, after a short introduction to cosmology, we discuss the supergravity embedding of higher curvature models of inflation. The supergravity description of such models is presented for the two different formulations of minimal supergravity.

  13. Higher Curvature Supergravity, Supersymmetry Breaking and Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Sergio; Kehagias, Alex

    In these lectures, after a short introduction to cosmology, we discuss the supergravity embedding of higher curvature models of inflation. The supergravity description of such models is presented for the two different formulations of minimal supcrgravity.

  14. Curvature of Indoor Sensor Network: Clustering Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariaei F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate the geometric properties of the communication graph in realistic low-power wireless networks. In particular, we explore the concept of the curvature of a wireless network via the clustering coefficient. Clustering coefficient analysis is a computationally simplified, semilocal approach, which nevertheless captures such a large-scale feature as congestion in the underlying network. The clustering coefficient concept is applied to three cases of indoor sensor networks, under varying thresholds on the link packet reception rate (PRR. A transition from positive curvature ("meshed" network to negative curvature ("core concentric" network is observed by increasing the threshold. Even though this paper deals with network curvature per se, we nevertheless expand on the underlying congestion motivation, propose several new concepts (network inertia and centroid, and finally we argue that greedy routing on a virtual positively curved network achieves load balancing on the physical network.

  15. Curvature of Indoor Sensor Network: Clustering Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the geometric properties of the communication graph in realistic low-power wireless networks. In particular, we explore the concept of the curvature of a wireless network via the clustering coefficient. Clustering coefficient analysis is a computationally simplified, semilocal approach, which nevertheless captures such a large-scale feature as congestion in the underlying network. The clustering coefficient concept is applied to three cases of indoor sensor networks, under varying thresholds on the link packet reception rate (PRR. A transition from positive curvature (“meshed” network to negative curvature (“core concentric” network is observed by increasing the threshold. Even though this paper deals with network curvature per se, we nevertheless expand on the underlying congestion motivation, propose several new concepts (network inertia and centroid, and finally we argue that greedy routing on a virtual positively curved network achieves load balancing on the physical network.

  16. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  17. Phosphorylation of Synaptojanin Differentially Regulates Endocytosis of Functionally Distinct Synaptic Vesicle Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Junhua; Wang, Liping; Lee, Joo Yeun; Chen, Chun-Kan; Chang, Karen T

    2016-08-24

    The rapid replenishment of synaptic vesicles through endocytosis is crucial for sustaining synaptic transmission during intense neuronal activity. Synaptojanin (Synj), a phosphoinositide phosphatase, is known to play an important role in vesicle recycling by promoting the uncoating of clathrin following synaptic vesicle uptake. Synj has been shown to be a substrate of the minibrain (Mnb) kinase, a fly homolog of the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A); however, the functional impacts of Synj phosphorylation by Mnb are not well understood. Here we identify that Mnb phosphorylates Synj at S1029 in Drosophila We find that phosphorylation of Synj at S1029 enhances Synj phosphatase activity, alters interaction between Synj and endophilin, and promotes efficient endocytosis of the active cycling vesicle pool (also referred to as exo-endo cycling pool) at the expense of reserve pool vesicle endocytosis. Dephosphorylated Synj, on the other hand, is deficient in the endocytosis of the active recycling pool vesicles but maintains reserve pool vesicle endocytosis to restore total vesicle pool size and sustain synaptic transmission. Together, our findings reveal a novel role for Synj in modulating reserve pool vesicle endocytosis and further indicate that dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Synj differentially maintain endocytosis of distinct functional synaptic vesicle pools. Synaptic vesicle endocytosis sustains communication between neurons during a wide range of neuronal activities by recycling used vesicle membrane and protein components. Here we identify that Synaptojanin, a protein with a known role in synaptic vesicle endocytosis, is phosphorylated at S1029 in vivo by the Minibrain kinase. We further demonstrate that the phosphorylation status of Synaptojanin at S1029 differentially regulates its participation in the recycling of distinct synaptic vesicle pools. Our results reveal a new role for Synaptojanin in

  18. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in host–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Yong; Singh, Prachi P; Smith, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    An effective immune response requires the engagement of host receptors by pathogen-derived molecules and the stimulation of an appropriate cellular response. Therefore, a crucial factor in our ability to control an infection is the accessibility of our immune cells to the foreign material. Exosomes—which are extracellular vesicles that function in intercellular communication—may play a key role in the dissemination of pathogen- as well as host-derived molecules during infection. In this review, we highlight the composition and function of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles produced during viral, parasitic, fungal and bacterial infections and describe how these vesicles could function to either promote or inhibit host immunity. PMID:25488940

  19. Polyamide Curvature and DNA Sequence Selective Recognition: Use of 4-Aminobenzamide to Adjust Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajiness, Jamie; Sielaff, Alan; Mackay, Hilary; Brown, Toni; Kluza, Jerome; Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W. David; Lee, Moses; Hartley, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Imidazole and pyrrole-containing polyamides belong to an important class of compounds that can be designed to target specific DNA sequences, and they are potentially useful in applications of controlling gene expression. The extent of polyamide curvature is an important consideration when studying the ability of such compounds to bind in the minor groove of DNA. The current study investigates the importance of curvature using polyamides of the form f-Im-Phenyl-Im, in which the imidazole heterocycles are placed in ortho-, meta-, and para-configurations of the phenyl moiety. The synthesis and biophysical evaluation of each compound binding to its cognate DNA sequence (5′-ACGCGT-3′) and a negative control sequence (5′-AAATTT-3′) is reported, along with their comparison to the parent binder, f-Im-Py-Im (3). ACGCGT is a medicinally significant sequence present in the MluI cell-cycle box (MCB) transcriptional element found in the promoter of a gene associated with cell division. The results demonstrated that the para-derivative has the greatest affinity for its cognate sequence, as indicated via thermal denaturation, CD, ITC, SPR analyses, and DNase I footprinting. ITC studies showed that binding of the para-isomer (2c) to ACGCGT was significantly more exothermic than binding to AAATTT. In contrast, no heat change was observed for binding of the meta- (2b) and ortho- (2a) isomers to both DNAs, due to low binding affinities. This is consistent with results from SPR studies, which indicate that the para-derivative binds in a 2:1 fashion to ACGCGT and binds weakly to ACCGGT (K = 1.8 × 106 and 4.0 × 104 M−1, respectively). Interestingly, it binds in a 1:1 fashion to AAATTT (K = 5.4 × 105 M−1). The meta-compound does not bind to any sequence. The para-derivative also was the only compound to show an induced peak via CD at 330 nm, indicative of minor groove binding, and produced a ΔTm value of 5.8 ºC. Molecular modeling experiments have been performed to

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Curvature-undulation coupling as a basis for curvature sensing and generation in bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Ryan P; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-08-30

    We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the epsin N-terminal homology domain interacting with a lipid bilayer and demonstrate a rigorous theoretical formalism and analysis method for computing the induced curvature field in varying concentrations of the protein in the dilute limit. Our theory is based on the description of the height-height undulation spectrum in the presence of a curvature field. We formulated an objective function to compare the acquired undulation spectrum from the simulations to that of the theory. We recover the curvature field parameters by minimizing the objective function even in the limit where the protein-induced membrane curvature is of the same order as the amplitude due to thermal undulations. The coupling between curvature and undulations leads to significant predictions: (i) Under dilute conditions, the proteins can sense a site of spontaneous curvature at distances much larger than their size; (ii) as the density of proteins increases the coupling focuses and stabilizes the curvature field to the site of the proteins; and (iii) the mapping of the protein localization and the induction of a stable curvature is a cooperative process that can be described through a Hill function.

  2. Cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Antônio O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumors of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare. Among them, there is a spectrum of tumors derived from both epithelium and stroma and so classified as epithelial-stromal tumors. Herein, we report a case of a cystadenoma in a 49-year-old asymptomatic man, detected in a routine ultrasonography for liver disease follow-up. The digital rectal examination detected a large mass anterior to rectum and posterior to bladder. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a normal prostate and a 9.0 cm cystic tumor, replacing the left seminal vesicle. The gross appearance and microscopic aspect was compatible with cystadenoma of seminal vesicle. Patient's postoperative recovery was uneventful. He is currently alive, 3 years after the diagnosis, with no signs of recurrence.

  3. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current data, these vesicular components play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with cancer development, progression and therapeutic failures. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, and genetic exchange. These tumor-derived extracellular vesicles not only to represent a central mediator of the tumor microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for tumor biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. PMID:23908664

  4. When to biopsy seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panach-Navarrete, J; García-Morata, F; Hernández-Medina, J A; Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M

    2015-05-01

    The involvement of seminal vesicles in prostate cancer can affect the prognosis and determine the treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether we could predict its infiltration at the time of the prostate biopsy to know when to indicate the biopsy of the seminal vesicles. observational retrospective study of 466 patients who underwent seminal vesicle biopsy. The indication for this biopsy was a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 10 ng/ml or an asymmetric or obliterated prostatoseminal angle. The following variables were included in the analysis: PSA level, PSA density, prostate volume, number of cores biopsied, suspicious rectal examination, and preservation of the prostatoseminal angle, studying its relationship with the involvement of the seminal vesicles. Forty-one patients (8.8%) had infiltrated seminal vesicles and 425 (91.2%) had no involvement. In the univariate analysis, the cases with infiltration had a higher mean PSA level (P 19.60 ng/dL (P < .01) and 2.95 times higher if there is a suspicious rectal examination (P = .014). Furthermore, this probability increases by 1.04 times for each unit of prostate volume lower (P < .01). The ROC curves showed maximum sensitivity and specificity at 19.6 ng/mL for PSA and 0.39 for PSA density. In this series, greater involvement of seminal vesicles was associated with a PSA level ≥20 ng/ml, a suspicious rectal examination and a lack of prostatoseminal angle preservation. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. SMALL VESICLES, BIG VEHICLES: EXOSOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiz-Lopez P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles released by different cell types. Since their discovery, they have evolved from being considered simple vehicles for the liberation of cellular wastes, to become one of the most promising fields in the area of biomedical research, and more specifically in oncology, since the different malignant tumors release exosomes to all biological fluids, being involved in various functions of the neoplastic process. At present, it is possible to study these vesicles by minimally invasive techniques in patients, which approach us to obtain a more detailed diagnosis and prognosis, as well as to the discovery of new antitumoral therapies

  6. Coarse-grained molecular simulations of the melting kinetics of small unilamellar vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Lara A; Kindt, James T

    2016-02-14

    Simulations of small unilamellar lipid bilayer vesicles have been performed to model their response to an instantaneous rise in temperature, starting from an initial low-temperature structure, to temperatures near or above the main chain transition temperature. The MARTINI coarse-grained force-field was used to construct slabs of gel-phase DPPC bilayers, which were assembled into truncated icosahedral structures containing 13,165 or 31,021 lipids. Equilibration at 280 K produced structures with several (5-8) domains, characterized by facets of lipids packed in the gel phase connected by disordered ridges. Instantaneous heating to final temperatures ranging from 290 K to 310 K led to partial or total melting over 500 ns trajectories, accompanied by changes in vesicle shape and the sizes and arrangements of remaining gel-phase domains. At temperatures that produced partial melting, the gel-phase lipid content of the vesicles followed an exponential decay, similar in form and timescale to the sub-microsecond phase of melting kinetics observed in recent ultrafast IR temperature-jump experiments. The changing rate of melting appears to be the outcome of a number of competing contributions, but changes in curvature stress arising from the expansion of the bilayer area upon melting are a major factor. The simulations give a more detailed picture of the changes that occur in frozen vesicles following a temperature jump, which will be of use for the interpretation of temperature-jump experiments on vesicles.

  7. Vesicles and vesicle fusion: coarse-grained simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Biological cells are highly dynamic, and continually move material around their own volume and between their interior and exterior. Much of this transport encapsulates the material inside phospholipid vesicles that shuttle to and fro, fusing with, and budding from, other membranes. A feature of v...

  8. Cosmic curvature from de Sitter equilibrium cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    I show that the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology generically predicts observable levels of curvature in the Universe today. The predicted value of the curvature, Ω(k), depends only on the ratio of the density of nonrelativistic matter to cosmological constant density ρ(m)(0)/ρ(Λ) and the value of the curvature from the initial bubble that starts the inflation, Ω(k)(B). The result is independent of the scale of inflation, the shape of the potential during inflation, and many other details of the cosmology. Future cosmological measurements of ρ(m)(0)/ρ(Λ) and Ω(k) will open up a window on the very beginning of our Universe and offer an opportunity to support or falsify the de Sitter equilibrium cosmology.

  9. [The occlusal curvature and masticatory function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kota

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the association between masticatory movement and occlusal curvature in dentate adults. Forty-six subjects (mean age : 25.0 years) with complete permanent dentition except for their third molars participated in this study. A mandibular cast mounted on the lower member of an articulator was fixed to a three-dimensional measuring gauge (QM-Measure 353). Approximate spheres were calculated from the measurements according to the Broadrick Occlusal Plane Analyser. Subjects were asked to chew raw carrot, cheese, fish paste, boiled beef and gummy candy prepared to the size of 10 x 10 x 20 mm. Three-dimensional chewing movements of the mandibular central incisor point were measured using a Gnatho-analyzer. The Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis were used to test the relationship between the occlusal curvature and masticatory movement. Significant correlations were found between masticatory movement and occlusal curvature in dentate adults (p masticatory movements.

  10. Cholesterol mediates membrane curvature during fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankin, Andrey; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Gidalevitz, David

    2012-06-08

    Biomembranes undergo extensive shape changes as they perform vital cellular functions. The mechanisms by which lipids and proteins control membrane curvature remain unclear. We use x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and epifluorescence microscopy to study binding of HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41's membrane-bending domain to DPPC/cholesterol monolayers of various compositions at the air-liquid interface. The results offer a new insight into how membrane curvature could be regulated by cholesterol during fusion of the viral lipid envelope and the host cell membranes.

  11. Hydrogen-bond-regulated distinct functional-group display at the inner and outer wall of vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Amrita; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2015-06-01

    A unique supramolecular strategy enables the unidirectional assembly of two bola-shaped unsymmetric π-amphiphiles, NDI-1 and NDI-2, which feature a naphthalene-diimide chromophore connected to nonionic and anionic head groups on opposite arms. The amphiphiles differ only in the location of a hydrazide group, which is placed either on the nonionic or on the anionic arm of NDI-1 and NDI-2, respectively. The formation of hydrogen bonds between the hydrazides, which compensates for electrostatic and steric factors, promotes unidirectional alignment and the formation of monolayer vesicles. The zeta potentials and cation-assisted quantitative precipitation reveal negatively charged and nonionic outer surfaces for NDI-1 and NDI-2, respectively, indicating that hydrogen bonding also dictates the directionality of the monolayer curvature, ensuring that in both cases, the hydrazides remain at the inner wall to benefit from stronger hydrogen bonding where they are in closer proximity. This is reflected in their different abilities to inhibit α-chymotrypsin, which possesses a positively charged surface: NDI-1 induced an inhibition of 80% whereas hardly any inhibition was observed with NDI-2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Modeling the Mechanics of Cell Division: Influence of Spontaneous Membrane Curvature, Surface Tension, and Osmotic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Heredia, Elena; Almendro-Vedia, Víctor G.; Monroy, Francisco; Cao, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Many cell division processes have been conserved throughout evolution and are being revealed by studies on model organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa. Cellular membrane constriction is one of these processes, observed almost universally during cell division. It happens similarly in all organisms through a mechanical pathway synchronized with the sequence of cytokinetic events in the cell interior. Arguably, such a mechanical process is mastered by the coordinated action of a constriction machinery fueled by biochemical energy in conjunction with the passive mechanics of the cellular membrane. Independently of the details of the constriction engine, the membrane component responds against deformation by minimizing the elastic energy at every constriction state following a pathway still unknown. In this paper, we address a theoretical study of the mechanics of membrane constriction in a simplified model that describes a homogeneous membrane vesicle in the regime where mechanical work due to osmotic pressure, surface tension, and bending energy are comparable. We develop a general method to find approximate analytical expressions for the main descriptors of a symmetrically constricted vesicle. Analytical solutions are obtained by combining a perturbative expansion for small deformations with a variational approach that was previously demonstrated valid at the reference state of an initially spherical vesicle at isotonic conditions. The analytic approximate results are compared with the exact solution obtained from numerical computations, getting a good agreement for all the computed quantities (energy, area, volume, constriction force). We analyze the effects of the spontaneous curvature, the surface tension and the osmotic pressure in these quantities, focusing especially on the constriction force. The more favorable conditions for vesicle constriction are determined, obtaining that smaller constriction forces are required for positive spontaneous

  13. Modeling the Mechanics of Cell Division: Influence of Spontaneous Membrane Curvature, Surface Tension, and Osmotic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Heredia, Elena; Almendro-Vedia, Víctor G; Monroy, Francisco; Cao, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Many cell division processes have been conserved throughout evolution and are being revealed by studies on model organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa. Cellular membrane constriction is one of these processes, observed almost universally during cell division. It happens similarly in all organisms through a mechanical pathway synchronized with the sequence of cytokinetic events in the cell interior. Arguably, such a mechanical process is mastered by the coordinated action of a constriction machinery fueled by biochemical energy in conjunction with the passive mechanics of the cellular membrane. Independently of the details of the constriction engine, the membrane component responds against deformation by minimizing the elastic energy at every constriction state following a pathway still unknown. In this paper, we address a theoretical study of the mechanics of membrane constriction in a simplified model that describes a homogeneous membrane vesicle in the regime where mechanical work due to osmotic pressure, surface tension, and bending energy are comparable. We develop a general method to find approximate analytical expressions for the main descriptors of a symmetrically constricted vesicle. Analytical solutions are obtained by combining a perturbative expansion for small deformations with a variational approach that was previously demonstrated valid at the reference state of an initially spherical vesicle at isotonic conditions. The analytic approximate results are compared with the exact solution obtained from numerical computations, getting a good agreement for all the computed quantities (energy, area, volume, constriction force). We analyze the effects of the spontaneous curvature, the surface tension and the osmotic pressure in these quantities, focusing especially on the constriction force. The more favorable conditions for vesicle constriction are determined, obtaining that smaller constriction forces are required for positive spontaneous

  14. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  15. Block liposomes from curvature-stabilizing lipids: connected nanotubes, -rods, or -spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Ewert, Kai K; Quispe, Joel; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2009-03-03

    We report on the discovery of block liposomes, a new class of chain-melted (liquid) vesicles, with membranes comprised of mixtures of the membrane-curvature-stabilizing multivalent lipid MVLBG2 of colossal charge +16 e and neutral 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC). In a narrow MVLBG2 composition range (8-10 mol%), cryo-TEM revealed block liposomes consisting of distinctly shaped, yet connected, nanoscale spheres, pears, tubes, or rods. Unlike typical liposome systems, where spherical vesicles, tubular vesicles, and cylindrical micelles are separated on the macroscopic scale, within a block liposome, shapes are separated on the nanometer scale. Diblock (pear-tube) and triblock (pear-tube-pear) liposomes contain nanotubes with inner lumen diameter of 10-50 nm. Diblock (sphere-rod) liposomes were found to contain micellar nanorods approximately 4 nm in diameter and several micrometers in length, analogous to cytoskeletal filaments of eukaryotic cells. Block liposomes may find a range of applications in chemical and nucleic acid delivery and as building blocks in the design of templates for hierarchical structures.

  16. Ca2+ Dependence of Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jeremy; Kavalali, Ege T

    2016-10-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent synaptic vesicle recycling is essential for structural homeostasis of synapses and maintenance of neurotransmission. Although, the executive role of intrasynaptic Ca(2+) transients in synaptic vesicle exocytosis is well established, identifying the exact role of Ca(2+) in endocytosis has been difficult. In some studies, Ca(2+) has been suggested as an essential trigger required to initiate synaptic vesicle retrieval, whereas others manipulating synaptic Ca(2+) concentrations reported a modulatory role for Ca(2+) leading to inhibition or acceleration of endocytosis. Molecular studies of synaptic vesicle endocytosis, on the other hand, have consistently focused on the roles of Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent phosphatase calcineurin and synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin as potential Ca(2+) sensors for endocytosis. Most studies probing the role of Ca(2+) in endocytosis have relied on measurements of synaptic vesicle retrieval after strong stimulation. Strong stimulation paradigms elicit fusion and retrieval of multiple synaptic vesicles and therefore can be affected by several factors besides the kinetics and duration of Ca(2+) signals that include the number of exocytosed vesicles and accumulation of released neurotransmitters thus altering fusion and retrieval processes indirectly via retrograde signaling. Studies monitoring single synaptic vesicle endocytosis may help resolve this conundrum as in these settings the impact of Ca(2+) on synaptic fusion probability can be uncoupled from its putative role on synaptic vesicle retrieval. Future experiments using these single vesicle approaches will help dissect the specific role(s) of Ca(2+) and its sensors in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Extracellular vesicles in physiological and pathological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuana, Yuana; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Body fluids contain surprising numbers of cell-derived vesicles which are now thought to contribute to both physiology and pathology. Tools to improve the detection of vesicles are being developed and clinical applications using vesicles for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy are under investigation.

  18. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion: Post-Palade Era Researchers Win the Nobel Prize. Riddhi Atul Jani Subba Rao Gangi Setty. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 421-445 ...

  19. A novel isolation strategy for obtaining crude membrane vesicles from bovine skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blans, Kristine; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Wiking, Lars

    Bovine milks content of phospholipid membranes have largely been explored in the cream fraction, and known as the milk fat globule membrane that surrounds fat droplets. In skim milk, the population of phospholipid membranes is reported to constitute membrane vesicles with a soluble content known...... as exosomes and microvesicles. These vesicles contain various types of RNAs and proteins, suggested to transfer health-promoting messages from mother to offspring. However, the variety of the vesicles in milk is less understood and, additionally, complicated by the complexity of more pronounced milk...

  20. The Role of Osmotically-induced Tension in Binding of N-BAR to Lipid Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, Anthony D.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Wood, Derek A.; Weis, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    We measured the binding affinity of a curvature-sensing protein domain (N-BAR) as a function of applied membrane tension while the membrane curvature was held nearly constant. We focus on the N-BAR domain of Drosophila amphiphysin, which participates in a range of key cell functions including synaptic vesicle endocytosis. We monitored N-BAR binding on unilamellar vesicles composed of 90 mol% DOPC and 10 mol% PIP. Controlled tension was applied by osmotic stress. We found that the bound fraction of N-BAR was enhanced by a factor 6.5 when the tension increased from zero to 2.6 mN/m. This tension-induced response can be explained by the hydrophobic insertion mechanism with a hydrophobic domain area that is consistent with known structure. These results suggest that membrane strain might explain the previously reported curvature affinity of N-BAR. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through grant DMR-0907195.

  1. Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in cellular senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasugi, Masaki

    2018-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a cellular program that prevents the proliferation of cells at risk of neoplastic transformation. On the other hand, age-related accumulation of senescent cells promotes aging at least partially due to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, whereby cells secrete high levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases. Emerging evidence, however, indicates that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of the effects of senescent cells on their microenvironment. Senescent cells secrete more EphA2 and DNA via EVs, which can promote cancer cell proliferation and inflammation, respectively. Extracellular vesicles secreted from DNA-damaged cells can also affect telomere regulation. Furthermore, it has now become clear that EVs actually play important roles in many aspects of aging. This review is intended to summarize these recent progresses, with emphasis on relationships between cellular senescence and EVs. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Holdbrook

    Full Text Available The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model.

  3. Timelike Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces with Singularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Svensson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We use integrable systems techniques to study the singularities of timelike non-minimal constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in the Lorentz–Minkowski 3-space. The singularities arise at the boundary of the Birkhoff big cell of the loop group involved. We examine the behavior of the surfaces...

  4. Local surface orientation dominates haptic curvature discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntjes, M.W.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831816; Sato, A.; Hayward, V.; Kappers, A.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07445370X

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that local surface orientation is a dominant source of information for haptic curvature perception in static conditions. We show that this dominance holds for dynamic touch, just as was shown earlier for static touch. Using an apparatus specifically developed for this

  5. Riemann curvature of a boosted spacetime geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Scudellaro, Paolo; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The ultrarelativistic boosting procedure had been applied in the literature to map the metric of Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime into a metric describing de Sitter spacetime plus a shock-wave singularity located on a null hypersurface. This paper evaluates the Riemann curvature tensor of the boosted Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric by means of numerical calculations, which make it possible to reach the ultrarelativistic regime gradually by letting the boost velocity approach the speed of light. Thus, for the first time in the literature, the singular limit of curvature, through Dirac’s δ distribution and its derivatives, is numerically evaluated for this class of spacetimes. Moreover, the analysis of the Kretschmann invariant and the geodesic equation shows that the spacetime possesses a “scalar curvature singularity” within a 3-sphere and it is possible to define what we here call “boosted horizon”, a sort of elastic wall where all particles are surprisingly pushed away, as numerical analysis demonstrates. This seems to suggest that such “boosted geometries” are ruled by a sort of “antigravity effect” since all geodesics seem to refuse to enter the “boosted horizon” and are “reflected” by it, even though their initial conditions are aimed at driving the particles toward the “boosted horizon” itself. Eventually, the equivalence with the coordinate shift method is invoked in order to demonstrate that all δ2 terms appearing in the Riemann curvature tensor give vanishing contribution in distributional sense.

  6. Curvature controlled wetting in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Mikheev, Lev V.

    1995-01-01

    layer lW, leading to a power law lW∝r01/3. At a critical wetting transition of a planar substrate, curvature adds a relevant field; the corresponding multiscaling forms are readily available. The method allows for the systematic evaluation of corrections to the leading behavior; the next to the leading...

  7. Constraining inverse curvature gravity with supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab; Weller, Jochen; /University Coll., London /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    We show that the current accelerated expansion of the Universe can be explained without resorting to dark energy. Models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature can have late time accelerating attractors without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedman equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe. This allows us to perform a detailed analysis of Supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. Hence, inverse curvature gravity models represent an example of phenomenologically viable models in which the current acceleration of the Universe is driven by curvature instead of dark energy. If we further include constraints on the current expansion rate of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope and on the age of the Universe from globular clusters, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07 {le} {omega}{sub m} {le} 0.21 (95% Confidence). Hence the inverse curvature gravity models considered can not explain the dynamics of the Universe just with a baryonic matter component.

  8. Spinfoams near a classical curvature singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Muxin; Zhang, Mingyi

    2016-11-01

    We apply the technique of the spinfoam to study space-time, which, classically, contains a curvature singularity. We derive from the full covariant loop quantum gravity (LQG) that the region near curvature singularity has to be of the strong quantum gravity effect. We show that the spinfoam configuration describing the near-singularity region has to be of small spins j , in order that its contribution to the full spinfoam amplitude is nontrivial. The spinfoams in low and high-curvature regions of space-time may be viewed as in two different phases of covariant LQG. There should be a phase transition as space-time described by the spinfoam becomes more and more curved. A candidate of the order parameter is proposed for understanding the phase transition. Moreover, we also analyze the spin-spin correlation function of the spinfoam and show the correlation is of long range in the low-curvature phase. This work is a first step toward understanding the physics of black hole and early Universe from the full covariant LQG theory.

  9. Resolving curvature singularities in holomorphic gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantz, C.L.M.; Prokopec, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326113398

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a holomorphic theory of gravity and study how the holomorphy symmetry alters the two most important singular solutions of general relativity: black holes and cosmology. We show that typical observers (freely) falling into a holomorphic black hole do not encounter a curvature

  10. Change in corneal curvature induced by surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. van Rij (Gabriel)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe first section deals with the mechanisms by which sutures, incisions and intracorneal contact lenses produce a change in corneal curvature. To clarify the mechanisms by which incisions and sutures produce astigmatism, we made incisions and placed sutures in the corneoscleral limbus

  11. Metric Ricci Curvature for PL Manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Xianfeng Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a metric notion of Ricci curvature for PL manifolds and study its convergence properties. We also prove a fitting version of the Bonnet-Myers theorem, for surfaces as well as for a large class of higher dimensional manifolds.

  12. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell–promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stroma...

  13. The readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2017-04-01

    Each presynaptic bouton is densely packed with many vesicles, only a small fraction of which are available for immediate release. These vesicles constitute the readily releasable pool (RRP). The RRP size, and the probability of release of each vesicle within the RRP, together determine synaptic strength. Here, we discuss complications and recent advances in determining the size of the physiologically relevant RRP. We consider molecular mechanisms to generate and regulate the RRP, and discuss the relationship between vesicle docking and the RRP. We conclude that many RRP vesicles are docked, that some docked vesicles may not be part of the RRP, and that undocked vesicles can contribute to the RRP by rapid recruitment to unoccupied, molecularly activated ready-to-release sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser triangulation measurements of scoliotic spine curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelan, Dušan; Jesenšek Papež, Breda; Poredoš, Primož; Možina, Janez

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to develop a new method for differentiating between scoliotic and healthy subjects by analysing the curvatures of their spines in the cranio-caudal view. The study included 247 subjects with physiological curvatures of the spine and 28 subjects with clinically confirmed scoliosis. The curvature of the spine was determined by a computer analysis of the surface of the back, measured with a non-invasive, 3D, laser-triangulation system. The determined spinal curve was represented in the transversal plane, which is perpendicular to the line segment that was defined by the initial point and the end point of the spinal curve. This was achieved using a rotation matrix. The distances between the extreme points in the antero-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) views were calculated in relation to the length of the spine as well as the quotient of these two values LR/AP. All the measured parameters were compared between the scoliotic and control groups using the Student's t-Test in case of normal data and Kruskal-Wallis test in case of non-normal data. Besides, a comprehensive diagram representing the distances between the extreme points in the AP and LR views was introduced, which clearly demonstrated the direction and the size of the thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures for each individual subject. While the distances between the extreme points of the spine in the AP view were found to differ only slightly between the groups (p = 0.1), the distances between the LR extreme points were found to be significantly greater in the scoliosis group, compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The quotient LR/AP was statistically significantly different in both groups (p < 0.001). The main innovation of the presented method is the ability to differentiate a scoliotic subject from a healthy subject by assessing the curvature of the spine in the cranio-caudal view. Therefore, the proposed method could be useful for human posture

  15. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granick, Steve [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  16. Dynamics of endocytic vesicle creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Merrifield, Christien J

    2005-11-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the main path for receptor internalization in metazoans and is essential for controlling cell integrity and signaling. It is driven by a large array of protein and lipid interactions that have been deciphered mainly by biochemical and genetic means. To place these interactions into context, and ultimately build a fully operative model of endocytosis at the molecular level, it is necessary to know the kinetic details of the role of each protein in this process. In this review, we describe the recent efforts made, by using live cell imaging, to define clear steps in the formation of endocytic vesicles and to observe the recruitment of key proteins during membrane invagination, the scission of a newly formed vesicle, and its movement away from the plasma membrane.

  17. Extracellular vesicles and blood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shosaku

    2017-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by the exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis. EVs disseminate various bioactive effectors originating from the parent cells and transfer functional RNA and protein between cells, enabling them to alter vascular function and induce biological responses involved in vascular homeostasis. Although most EVs in human blood originate from platelets, EVs are also released from leukocytes, erythrocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and cancer cells. EVs were initially thought to be small particles with procoagulant activity; however, they can also evoke cellular responses in the immediate microenvironments and transport microRNAs (miRNA) into target cells. In this review, we summarize the recent literature relevant to EVs, including a growing list of clinical disorders that are associated with elevated EV levels. These studies suggest that EVs play roles in various blood diseases.

  18. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  19. On hypersurfaces with two distinct principal curvatures in space forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the immersed hypersurfaces in space forms Nn+1(c), n ≥4 with two distinct non-simple principal curvatures without the assumption that the (high order) mean curvature is constant. We prove that any immersed hypersurface in space forms with two distinct non-simple principal curvatures is locally ...

  20. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Curvature collineations for the curvature tensor, constructed from a fundamental Bianchi Type-V metric, are studied. We are concerned with a symmetry property of space-time which is called curvature collineation, and we briefly discuss the physical and kinematical properties of the models.

  1. Self-Dual Manifolds with Positive Ricci Curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, C; Nitta, T; Brun, Claude Le; Nayatani, Shin; Nitta, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    We prove that the connected sums CP_2 # CP_2 and CP_2 # CP_2 # CP_2 admit self-dual metrics with positive Ricci curvature. Moreover, every self-dual metric of positive scalar curvature on CP_2 # CP_2 is conformal to a metric with positive Ricci curvature.

  2. On a curvature-statistics theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, M [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain); Aldaya, V [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: Manuel.Calixto@upct.es

    2008-08-15

    The spin-statistics theorem in quantum field theory relates the spin of a particle to the statistics obeyed by that particle. Here we investigate an interesting correspondence or connection between curvature ({kappa} = {+-}1) and quantum statistics (Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein, respectively). The interrelation between both concepts is established through vacuum coherent configurations of zero modes in quantum field theory on the compact O(3) and noncompact O(2; 1) (spatial) isometry subgroups of de Sitter and Anti de Sitter spaces, respectively. The high frequency limit, is retrieved as a (zero curvature) group contraction to the Newton-Hooke (harmonic oscillator) group. We also make some comments on the physical significance of the vacuum energy density and the cosmological constant problem.

  3. Discrete Curvatures and Discrete Minimal Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2012-06-01

    This thesis presents an overview of some approaches to compute Gaussian and mean curvature on discrete surfaces and discusses discrete minimal surfaces. The variety of applications of differential geometry in visualization and shape design leads to great interest in studying discrete surfaces. With the rich smooth surface theory in hand, one would hope that this elegant theory can still be applied to the discrete counter part. Such a generalization, however, is not always successful. While discrete surfaces have the advantage of being finite dimensional, thus easier to treat, their geometric properties such as curvatures are not well defined in the classical sense. Furthermore, the powerful calculus tool can hardly be applied. The methods in this thesis, including angular defect formula, cotangent formula, parallel meshes, relative geometry etc. are approaches based on offset meshes or generalized offset meshes. As an important application, we discuss discrete minimal surfaces and discrete Koenigs meshes.

  4. Flow in sigmoid diffusers of moderate curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1984-01-01

    Developing laminar and turbulent flows have been measured in two diffusers with S- and C-shaped center-lines, small divergence angle and moderate curvature. The square inlet cross-section expanded in the plane of curvature to a rectangle with an exit-to-inlet area ratio of 1.5. Laser-Doppler anemometry was used to measure three velocity components and, in turbulent flow, the associated fluctuations and cross-correlations. Wall static pressure measurements are also reported. Flow visualization did not reveal the presence of any recirculation regions. Pressure-driven secondary flows are present in both ducts, but are generally smaller than those measured in similar ducts of uniform cross-section area.

  5. Scaling up the curvature of mammalian metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eBueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A curvilinear relationship between mammalian metabolic rate and body size on a log-log scale has been adopted in lieu of thelongstanding concept of a 3/4 allometric relationship (Kolokotrones et al. 2010. The central tenet of Metabolic Ecology (ME states that metabolism at the individual level scales-up to drive the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems. If this tenet is correct, the curvature of metabolism should be perceived in other ecological traits. By analyzing the size scaling allometry of eight different mammalian traits including basal and field metabolic rate, offspring biomass production, ingestion rate, costs of locomotion, life span, population growth rate and population density we show that the curvature affects most ecological rates and

  6. α-Synuclein binds large unilamellar vesicles as an extended helix†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Adam J.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between the synaptic protein α-Synuclein and cellular membranes may be relevant both to its native function as well as its role in Parkinson’s disease. We use single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the structure of α-Synuclein bound to detergent micelles and lipid vesicles. We find evidence that it forms a bent-helix when bound to highly curved detergent micelles, whereas it binds more physiological 100 nm diameter lipid vesicles as an elongated helix. Our results highlight the influence of membrane curvature in determining α-Synuclein conformation, which may be important for both its normal and disease-associated functions. PMID:19220042

  7. Gravitational curvature an introduction to Einstein's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Frankel, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    This classic text and reference monograph applies modern differential geometry to general relativity. A brief mathematical introduction to gravitational curvature, it emphasizes the subject's geometric essence, replacing the often-tedious analytical computations with geometric arguments. Clearly presented and physically motivated derivations express the deflection of light, Schwarzchild's exterior and interior solutions, and the Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations. A perfect choice for advanced students of mathematics, this volume will also appeal to mathematicians interested in physics. It stresses

  8. Gravitational curvature an introduction to Einstein's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Frankel, Theodore Thomas

    1979-01-01

    This classic text and reference monograph applies modern differential geometry to general relativity. A brief mathematical introduction to gravitational curvature, it emphasizes the subject's geometric essence, replacing the often-tedious analytical computations with geometric arguments. Clearly presented and physically motivated derivations express the deflection of light, Schwarzchild's exterior and interior solutions, and the Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations. A perfect choice for advanced students of mathematics, this volume will also appeal to mathematicians interested in physics. It stresses

  9. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonera, Cezary, E-mail: cgonera@uni.lodz.pl; Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-15

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand’s theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) and Post–Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest). -- Highlights: •Classifying 2D superintegrable, separable (polar coordinates) systems on S{sup 2}, R{sup 2}, H{sup 2}. •Construction of radial, angular potentials leading to superintegrability. •Generalization of Bertrand’s theorem covering known models, e.g. Higgs, TTW, PW, and Coulomb.

  10. Inflationary scenario from higher curvature warped spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Narayan [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Department of Physical Sciences, Nadia, West Bengal (India); Paul, Tanmoy [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-10-15

    We consider a five dimensional warped spacetime, in presence of the higher curvature term like F(R) = R + αR{sup 2} in the bulk, in the context of the two-brane model. Our universe is identified with the TeV scale brane and emerges as a four dimensional effective theory. From the perspective of this effective theory, we examine the possibility of ''inflationary scenario'' by considering the on-brane metric ansatz as an FRW one. Our results reveal that the higher curvature term in the five dimensional bulk spacetime generates a potential term for the radion field. Due to the presence of radion potential, the very early universe undergoes a stage of accelerated expansion and, moreover, the accelerating period of the universe terminates in a finite time. We also find the spectral index of curvature perturbation (n{sub s}) and the tensor to scalar ratio (r) in the present context, which match with the observational results based on the observations of Planck (Astron. Astrophys. 594, A20, 2016). (orig.)

  11. Multiple Manifold Clustering Using Curvature Constrained Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeian, Amir; Bayestehtashk, Alireza; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The problem of multiple surface clustering is a challenging task, particularly when the surfaces intersect. Available methods such as Isomap fail to capture the true shape of the surface near by the intersection and result in incorrect clustering. The Isomap algorithm uses shortest path between points. The main draw back of the shortest path algorithm is due to the lack of curvature constrained where causes to have a path between points on different surfaces. In this paper we tackle this problem by imposing a curvature constraint to the shortest path algorithm used in Isomap. The algorithm chooses several landmark nodes at random and then checks whether there is a curvature constrained path between each landmark node and every other node in the neighborhood graph. We build a binary feature vector for each point where each entry represents the connectivity of that point to a particular landmark. Then the binary feature vectors could be used as a input of conventional clustering algorithm such as hierarchical clustering. We apply our method to simulated and some real datasets and show, it performs comparably to the best methods such as K-manifold and spectral multi-manifold clustering.

  12. Multiple Manifold Clustering Using Curvature Constrained Path.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Babaeian

    Full Text Available The problem of multiple surface clustering is a challenging task, particularly when the surfaces intersect. Available methods such as Isomap fail to capture the true shape of the surface near by the intersection and result in incorrect clustering. The Isomap algorithm uses shortest path between points. The main draw back of the shortest path algorithm is due to the lack of curvature constrained where causes to have a path between points on different surfaces. In this paper we tackle this problem by imposing a curvature constraint to the shortest path algorithm used in Isomap. The algorithm chooses several landmark nodes at random and then checks whether there is a curvature constrained path between each landmark node and every other node in the neighborhood graph. We build a binary feature vector for each point where each entry represents the connectivity of that point to a particular landmark. Then the binary feature vectors could be used as a input of conventional clustering algorithm such as hierarchical clustering. We apply our method to simulated and some real datasets and show, it performs comparably to the best methods such as K-manifold and spectral multi-manifold clustering.

  13. Stiffness Modulation of Rayed Fins by Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoi; Yu, Ning; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Bandi, Mahesh; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-11-01

    Fishes with rayed fins comprise over 99% of all extant fish species. Multifunctional use of fins, from propulsion to station holding, requires substantial modulation of stiffness. We propose that fishes stiffen the fin by curving it transverse to its length. This effect is similar to stiffening a dollar bill by curling it because of curvature-induced coupling of out-of-plane bending with in-plane stretching. Unlike a piece of paper, rayed fins are a composite of rays and membranes. We model this as parallel elastic beams (rays) with springy interconnections (membranes). Our analysis shows that the key parameters stiffening the fin are the ray anisotropy to bending, the misalignment of principal bending directions of adjacent rays, and the membrane elasticity. The composite fin stiffens when the principal bending directions of adjacent rays are misaligned due to fin curvature, which necessarily causes the membrane to stretch. Unlike a homogenous thin sheet, composite rayed structures are able to mimic curvature-induced stiffening by using misaligned rays even if the fin appears geometrically flat. Preliminary radiographic evidence from the rays of fish fins supports such a mechanism. Funding by Human Frontier Science Program.

  14. Spontaneous formation of nanometer scale tubular vesicles in aqueous mixtures of lipid and block copolymer amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Wong, Andrew S W; de Hoog, Hans-Peter M; Rangamani, Padmini; Parikh, Atul N; Nallani, Madhavan; Sandin, Sara; Liedberg, Bo

    2017-02-08

    Many common amphiphiles self-assemble in water to produce heterogeneous populations of discrete and symmetric but polydisperse and multilamellar vesicles isolating the encapsulated aqueous core from the surrounding bulk. But when mixtures of amphiphiles of vastly different elastic properties co-assemble, their non-uniform molecular organization can stabilize lower symmetries and produce novel shapes. Here, using high resolution electron cryomicroscopy and tomography, we identify the spontaneous formation of a membrane morphology consisting of unilamellar tubular vesicles in dilute aqueous solutions of binary mixtures of two different amphiphiles of vastly different origins. Our results show that aqueous phase mixtures of a fluid-phase phospholipid and an amphiphilic block copolymer spontaneously assume a bimodal polymorphic character in a composition dependent manner: over a broad range of compositions (15-85 mol% polymer component), a tubular morphology co-exists with spherical vesicles. Strikingly, in the vicinity of equimolar compositions, an exclusively tubular morphology (Lt; diameter, ∼15 nm; length, >1 μm; core, ∼2.0 nm; wall, ∼5-6 nm) emerges in an apparent steady state. Theory suggests that the spontaneous stabilization of cylindrical vesicles, unaided by extraneous forces, requires a significant spontaneous bilayer curvature, which in turn necessitates a strongly asymmetric membrane composition. We confirm that such dramatic compositional asymmetry is indeed produced spontaneously in aqueous mixtures of a lipid and polymer through two independent biochemical assays - (1) reduction in the quenching of fluorophore-labeled lipids and (2) inhibition in the activity of externally added lipid-hydrolyzing phospholipase A2, resulting in a significant enrichment of the polymer component in the outer leaflet. Taken together, these results illustrate the coupling of the membrane shape with local composition through spontaneous curvature generation under

  15. Polymeric vesicles: from drug carriers to nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Pascal; Baumann, Patric; Enea, Ramona; Onaca, Ozana; Palivan, Cornelia; Meier, Wolfgang

    2011-10-18

    act in situ. In recent years, we have created a variety of multifunctional, proteinpolymersomes combinations for biomedical applications. The insertion of membrane proteins or biopores into the polymer membrane supported the activity of co-encapsulated enzymes that act in tandem inside the cavity or of combinations of drugs and imaging agents. Surface functionalization of these nanocarriers permitted specific targeting of the desired biological compartments. Polymeric vesicles alone are relatively easy to prepare and functionalize. Those features, along with their stability and multifunctionality, promote their use in the development of new theranostic strategies. The combination of polymer vesicles and biological entities will serve as tools to improve the observation and treatment of pathological events and the overall condition of the patient.

  16. A curvature theory for discrete surfaces based on mesh parallelity

    KAUST Repository

    Bobenko, Alexander Ivanovich

    2009-12-18

    We consider a general theory of curvatures of discrete surfaces equipped with edgewise parallel Gauss images, and where mean and Gaussian curvatures of faces are derived from the faces\\' areas and mixed areas. Remarkably these notions are capable of unifying notable previously defined classes of surfaces, such as discrete isothermic minimal surfaces and surfaces of constant mean curvature. We discuss various types of natural Gauss images, the existence of principal curvatures, constant curvature surfaces, Christoffel duality, Koenigs nets, contact element nets, s-isothermic nets, and interesting special cases such as discrete Delaunay surfaces derived from elliptic billiards. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  18. AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce extracellular vesicles that increase neighboring fibroblast cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thaiomara A; Smuczek, Basílio; Valadão, Iuri C; Dzik, Luciana M; Iglesia, Rebeca P; Cruz, Mário C; Zelanis, André; de Siqueira, Adriane S; Serrano, Solange M T; Goldberg, Gary S; Jaeger, Ruy G; Freitas, Vanessa M

    2016-08-02

    Extracellular vesicles play important roles in tumor development. Many components of these structures, including microvesicles and exosomes, have been defined. However, mechanisms by which extracellular vesicles affect tumor progression are not fully understood. Here, we investigated vesicular communication between mammary carcinoma cells and neighboring nontransformed mammary fibroblasts. Nonbiased proteomic analysis found that over 1% of the entire proteome is represented in these vesicles, with the neuroblast differentiation associated protein AHNAK and annexin A2 being the most abundant. In particular, AHNAK was found to be the most prominent component of these vesicles based on peptide number, and appeared necessary for their formation. In addition, we report here that carcinoma cells produce vesicles that promote the migration of recipient fibroblasts. These data suggest that AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce and release extracellular vesicles that cause disruption of the stroma by surrounding fibroblasts. This paradigm reveals fundamental mechanisms by which vesicular communication between carcinoma cells and stromal cells can promote cancer progression in the tumor microenvironment.

  19. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farsi, Z.; Preobraschenski, J.; Bogaart, G. van den; Riedel, D.; Jahn, R.; Woehler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided

  20. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Contributors in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiougiannis, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including microvesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies are recognized as carriers of pathogen-associated molecules with direct involvement in immune signaling and inflammation. Those observations have enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as promising immunotherapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in autoimmunity and highlights their potential use as disease biomarkers as well as targets for ...

  1. Exosomes: secreted vesicles and intercellular communications

    OpenAIRE

    Théry, Clotilde

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin secreted by most cell types, and are thought to play important roles in intercellular communications. Although exosomes were originally described in 1983, interest in these vesicles has really increased dramatically in the last 3 years, after the finding that they contain mRNA and microRNA. This discovery sparked renewed interest for the general field of membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communications, and research on these s...

  2. A novel isolation strategy for obtaining crude membrane vesicles from bovine skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blans, Kristine; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Wiking, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Bovine milks content of phospholipid membranes have largely been explored in the cream fraction, and known as the milk fat globule membrane that surrounds fat droplets. In skim milk, the population of phospholipid membranes is reported to constitute membrane vesicles with a soluble content known...... as exosomes and microvesicles. These vesicles contain various types of RNAs and proteins, suggested to transfer health-promoting messages from mother to offspring. However, the variety of the vesicles in milk is less understood and, additionally, complicated by the complexity of more pronounced milk...... components. Here we present a novel strategy for a short, gentle and non-denaturing isolation of skim milk-derived membrane vesicles. Methods: Untreated fresh bovine milk was defatted to remove milk fat globules. The resulting skim milk was subjected to ultracentrifugation. The resulting ochre...

  3. CAPS and Munc13: CATCHRs that SNARE vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan J James

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. CAPS (Calcium-dependent Activator Protein for Secretion, aka CADPS and Munc13 (Mammalian Unc-13 proteins function to prime vesicles for Ca2+-triggered exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. CAPS and Munc13 proteins contain conserved C-terminal domains that promote the assembly of SNARE complexes for vesicle priming. Similarities of the C-terminal domains of CAPS/Munc13 proteins with CATCHR (Complex Associated with Tethering Containing Helical Rods domains in multi-subunit tethering complexes have been reported. Multi-subunit tethering complexes coordinate multiple interactions for SNARE complex assembly at constitutive membrane fusion steps. We review aspects of these diverse tethering and priming factors to identify common operating principles.

  4. Production and Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles in Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbagwu, Smart; Walch, Michael; Filgueira, Luis; Mantel, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Growing attention is drawn toward the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in infectious diseases. EVs, which are small vesicles released by cells, are involved in cellular communication, immune regulation, and pathogenesis. EVs act as messenger carrying functional cargoes, including RNA, DNA, lipids and proteins from a donor cell to regulate the function of a recipient cell. In malaria, EVs play a key role in regulating the progression from the blood to the transmission stage by promoting the switch between asexual and sexual stages that are taken up by mosquitoes. In addition to their role in parasite communication, EVs modulate the immune system and regulate endothelial cell function.In this chapter, we describe protocols to isolate, purify and characterize EVs derived from Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell culture.

  5. Kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing produced by alpha-sarcin on phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylserine vesicles: stopped-flow light scattering and fluorescence energy transfer measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Mancheño, J M; Gasset, M; Lacadena, J.; Ramón, F; Martínez del Pozo, A; Oñaderra, M.; Gavilanes, J G

    1994-01-01

    alpha-Sarcin is a fungal cytotoxic protein that inactivates the eukaryotic ribosomes. A kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing promoted by this protein on phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles has been performed. Egg yolk PG, bovine brain PS, dimyristoyl-PG (DMPG) and dimyristoyl-PS (DMPS) vesicles have been considered. The initial rates of the vesicle aggregation induced by the protein have been measured by stopped-flow 90 degrees light scattering. The for...

  6. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G. [Department of Neuroscience, Room 215, Stemmler Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zorec, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Zorec@mf.uni-lj.si [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  7. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    1997-01-01

    orders of magnitude larger than where the local free energy minima of the equilibrium vesicle actually occur. Moreover, according to our analysis, the relative width of a vesicle size distribution, sigma(R)/R-max, is generally at full equilibrium equal to 0.283, independently of the energetic vesicle....... and a statistical-mechanical factor that accounts for the fluctuations in composition, chain packing density and shape. We demonstrate that the free energy required to form a spherical vesicle is made up of two main contributions: the (size-independent) work of bending the constituent monolayers and the work...

  8. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell-promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stromal cells depleted of Drosha to alter microRNA expression. Drosha-knockdown cells produced extracellular vesicles that did not differ from those of wild-type cells in quantity, surface molecule expression, and internalization within renal tubular epithelial cells. However, these vesicles showed global downregulation of microRNAs. Whereas wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles administered intravenously induced morphologic and functional recovery in AKI, the Drosha-knockdown counterparts were ineffective. RNA sequencing analysis showed that kidney genes deregulated after injury were restored by treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles but not with Drosha-knockdown cells and vesicles. Gene ontology analysis showed in AKI an association of downregulated genes with fatty acid metabolism and upregulated genes with inflammation, matrix-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. These alterations reverted after treatment with wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles but not after treatment with the Drosha-knockdown counterparts. In conclusion, microRNA depletion in mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles significantly reduced their intrinsic regenerative potential in AKI, suggesting a critical role of microRNAs in recovery after AKI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. Gaussian curvature on hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a compact Riemann surface of genus g ≥ 1 , 1 , … , g be a basis of holomorphic 1-forms on and let H = ( h i j ) i , j = 1 g be a positive definite Hermitian matrix. It is well known that the metric defined as d s H 2 = ∑ i , j = 1 g h i j i ⊗ j ¯ is a K\\"a hler metric on of non-positive curvature. Let K H : C → R be ...

  10. Curvature, zero modes and quantum statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, M [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y EstadIstica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain); Aldaya, V [Instituto de AstrofIsica de AndalucIa, Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain)

    2006-08-18

    We explore an intriguing connection between the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics and the thermal baths obtained from a vacuum radiation of coherent states of zero modes in a second quantized (many-particle) theory on the compact O(3) and noncompact O(2, 1) isometry subgroups of the de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spaces, respectively. The high frequency limit is retrieved as a (zero-curvature) group contraction to the Newton-Hooke (harmonic oscillator) group. We also make some comments on the vacuum energy density and the cosmological constant problem. (letter to the editor)

  11. Origin of matter out of pure curvature

    OpenAIRE

    Dadhich, Naresh; Maeda, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for origin of matter in the universe in the framework of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in higher dimensions. The recently discovered new static black hole solution by the authors \\cite{md2006} with the Kaluza-Klein split up of spacetime as a product of the usual ${\\ma M}^4$ with a space of negative constant curvature is indeed a pure gravitational creation of a black hole which is also endowed with a Maxwell-like {\\it gravitational charge} in four-dimensional vacuum spa...

  12. Differential geometry bundles, connections, metrics and curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Taubes, Clifford Henry

    2011-01-01

    Bundles, connections, metrics and curvature are the 'lingua franca' of modern differential geometry and theoretical physics. This book will supply a graduate student in mathematics or theoretical physics with the fundamentals of these objects. Many of the tools used in differential topology are introduced and the basic results about differentiable manifolds, smooth maps, differential forms, vector fields, Lie groups, and Grassmanians are all presented here. Other material covered includes the basic theorems about geodesics and Jacobi fields, the classification theorem for flat connections, the

  13. Zero curvature-surface driven small objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous migration of small objects driven by surface tension on a catenoid, formed by a layer of soap constrained by two rings. Although the average curvature of the catenoid is zero at each point, the small objects always migrate to the position near the ring. The force and energy analyses have been performed to uncover the mechanism, and it is found that the small objects distort the local shape of the liquid film, thus making the whole system energetically favorable. These findings provide some inspiration to design microfluidics, aquatic robotics, and miniature boats.

  14. Higher curvature gravity at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2014-08-01

    We investigate brane-world models in different viable F(R) gravity theories where the Lagrangian is an arbitrary function of the curvature scalar. Deriving the warped metric for this model, resembling Randal-Sundrum (RS)-like solutions, we determine the graviton KK modes. The recent observations at the LHC, which constrain the RS graviton KK modes to a mass range greater than 3 TeV, are incompatible with RS model predictions. It is shown that the models with F(R) gravity in the bulk address the issue, which in turn constrains the F(R) model itself.

  15. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Das, Saumya; Rodosthenous, Rodosthenis S; Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Radosinska, Jana; Bartekova, Monika; Jansen, Felix; Li, Qian; Rajasingh, Johnson; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small bilayer lipid membrane vesicles that can be released by most cell types and detected in most body fluids. EVs exert key functions for intercellular communication via transferring their bioactive cargos to recipient cells or activating signaling pathways in target cells. Increasing evidence has shown the important regulatory effects of EVs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). EVs secreted by cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem cells play essential roles in pathophysiological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte survival and apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, and angiogenesis in relation to CVDs. In this review, we will first outline the current knowledge about the physical characteristics, biological contents, and isolation methods of EVs. We will then focus on the functional roles of cardiovascular EVs and their pathophysiological effects in CVDs, as well as summarize the potential of EVs as therapeutic agents and biomarkers for CVDs. Finally, we will discuss the specific application of EVs as a novel drug delivery system and the utility of EVs in the field of regenerative medicine.

  17. Structure-directing star-shaped block copolymers: supramolecular vesicles for the delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Liu, Shao Qiong; Venkataraman, Shrinivas; Gao, Shu Jun; Ke, Xiyu; Chia, Xin Tian; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan

    2015-06-28

    Amphiphilic polycarbonate/PEG copolymer with a star-like architecture was designed to facilitate a unique supramolecular transformation of micelles to vesicles in aqueous solution for the efficient delivery of anticancer drugs. The star-shaped amphipilic block copolymer was synthesized by initiating the ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) from methyl cholate through a combination of metal-free organo-catalytic living ring-opening polymerization and post-polymerization chain-end derivatization strategies. Subsequently, the self-assembly of the star-like polymer in aqueous solution into nanosized vesicles for anti-cancer drug delivery was studied. DOX was physically encapsulated into vesicles by dialysis and drug loading level was significant (22.5% in weight) for DOX. Importantly, DOX-loaded nanoparticles self-assembled from the star-like copolymer exhibited greater kinetic stability and higher DOX loading capacity than micelles prepared from cholesterol-initiated diblock analogue. The advantageous disparity is believed to be due to the transformation of micelles (diblock copolymer) to vesicles (star-like block copolymer) that possess greater core space for drug loading as well as the ability of such supramolecular structures to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded vesicles effectively inhibited the proliferation of 4T1, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells, with IC50 values of 10, 1.5 and 1.0mg/L, respectively. DOX-loaded vesicles injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice exhibited enhanced accumulation in tumor tissue due to the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Importantly, DOX-loaded vesicles demonstrated greater tumor growth inhibition than free DOX without causing significant body weight loss or cardiotoxicity. The unique ability of the star-like copolymer emanating from the methyl cholate core provided the requisite modification in the block copolymer interfacial curvature to generate vesicles of high loading capacity for DOX with significant

  18. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for trackin...

  19. Amyloglucosidase enzymatic reactivity inside lipid vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin-Woo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient functioning of enzymes inside liposomes would open new avenues for applications in biocatalysis and bioanalytical tools. In this study, the entrapment of amyloglucosidase (AMG (EC 3.2.1.3 from Aspergillus niger into dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs and large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated. Negative-stain, freeze-fracture, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy images verified vesicle formation in the presence of AMG. Vesicles with entrapped AMG were isolated from the solution by centrifugation, and vesicle lamellarity was identified using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. The kinetics of starch hydrolysis by AMG was modeled for two different systems, free enzyme in aqueous solution and entrapped enzyme within vesicles in aqueous suspension. For the free enzyme system, intrinsic kinetics were described by a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with product inhibition. The kinetic constants, Vmax and Km, were determined by initial velocity measurements, and Ki was obtained by fitting the model to experimental data of glucose concentration-time curves. Predicted concentration-time curves using these kinetic constants were in good agreement with experimental measurements. In the case of the vesicles, the time-dependence of product (glucose formation was experimentally determined and simulated by considering the kinetic behavior of the enzyme and the permeation of substrate into the vesicle. Experimental results demonstrated that entrapped enzymes were much more stable than free enyzme. The entrapped enzyme could be recycled with retention of 60% activity after 3 cycles. These methodologies can be useful in evaluating other liposomal catalysis operations.

  20. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  1. Detection of extracellular vesicles: size does matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cells release small sacks filled with fluid, which are called "extracellular vesicles". The diameter of extracellular vesicles (EV) typically ranges from 30 nm to 1 µm. Because cells release EV into their environment, our body fluids contain numerous EV. Cells release EV to remove waste and to

  2. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-02

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Urinary extracellular vesicles: biomarkers and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Salih (Mahdi)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractExtracellular vesicles have been isolated in various body fluids including urine. The cargo of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) is composed of proteins and nucleic acids reflecting the physiological and possibly the pathophysiological state of cells lining the nephron. Because

  4. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  6. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Miami,1320 Campo Sano Ave, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)

    2017-03-07

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  7. Curvature dependent modulation of fish fin stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoi; Yu, Ning; Bandi, Mahesh; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Mandre, Shreyas

    Propulsion and maneuvering ability of fishes depends on the stiffness of their fins. However, increasing stiffness by simply adding material to thicken the fin would incur a substantial energetic cost associated with flapping the fin. We propose that fishes increase stiffness of the fin not by building thicker fins, but by geometrically coupling out-of-plane bending of the fin's rays with in-plane stretching of a stiff membrane that connects the rays. We present a model of fin elasticity for ray-finned fish, where we decompose the fin into a series of elastic beams (rays) with springy interconnections (membrane). In one limit, where the membranes are infinitely extensible, the fin's stiffness is no more than the sum of the stiffness of individual rays. At the other limit of an inextensible membrane, fin stiffness reaches an asymptotic maximum. The asymptote value increases monotonically with curvature. We propose that musculature at the base of the fin controls fin curvature, and thereby modulates stiffness.

  8. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  9. Extracellular vesicles: new players in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaceb, Abderahim; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular vesicles, particles released by all cell types, represent a new way to convey information between cells such as proteins, second messengers, and genetic information to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. Recent data suggest that extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in both physiology and pathology, including coagulation, angiogenesis, cell survival, modulation of the immune response, and inflammation. Thus extracellular vesicles participate in the processes of cardiovascular diseases from atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction to heart failure. Consequently, extracellular vesicles can potentially be exploited for therapy, prognosis, and biomarkers for health and disease. This review focuses on the role of extracellular vesicles in the development of cardiovascular diseases, as well as the deleterious and beneficial effects that they may provide in vascular cells and myocardium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Transvesical Removal of Seminal Vesicle Cystadenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Kenta; Harada, Jiro; Kawa, Gen; Ota, Syuichi; Sakurai, Takanori

    2015-07-01

    Primary tumors of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. There have been 25 reports of this tumor from overseas and most cases are cystadenoma. We report a case of seminal vesicle cystadenoma in a 70-year-old man who presented with lower abdominal pain and urinary frequency. A digital rectal examination detected a projecting and hard mass in the right side of the prostate. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 15 cm multiple cystic mass continuous with the right seminal vesicle. A transrectal needle biopsy revealed benign tissue. The tumor was resected using an open transvesical approach that enabled full exposure of the seminal vesicle without damaging the nerves and blood supply of the bladder. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. We describe the natural history, pathology,and surgical approach in this case.

  11. Pushing synaptic vesicles over the RIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S

    2011-05-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, neurotransmitter release is largely restricted to specialized sites called active zones. Active zones consist of a complex protein network, and they organize fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in response to action potentials. Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs) are central components of active zones. In a recent series of experiments, we have systematically dissected the molecular mechanisms by which RIMs operate in synaptic vesicle release. We found that RIMs execute two critical functions of active zones by virtue of independent protein domains. They tether presyanptic Ca(2+) channels to the active zone, and they activate priming of synaptic vesicles by monomerizing homodimeric, constitutively inactive Munc13. These data indicate that RIMs orchestrate synaptic vesicle release into a coherent process. In conjunction with previous studies, they suggest that RIMs form a molecular platform on which plasticity of synaptic vesicle release can operate.

  12. Apoptotic Bodies: Selective Detection in Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul; Wang, Sha; Didenko, Vladimir V

    2017-01-01

    Normal and dying cells release various types of membrane-bound vesicles including microvesicles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication and signal transduction. However, their diverse forms and subtypes fluctuate in size and other properties. In result current purification approaches do not fully discriminate between different categories of extracellular vesicles. Here, we present a fluorescence technique that specifically identifies apoptotic bodies in preparations of microvesicles, exosomes, and other extracellular vesicles.The approach exclusively labels the vesicles that contain DNA with 5'PO 4 blunt-ended DNA breaks, such as those produced by the apoptotic CAD nuclease during apoptotic DNA degradation. The technique can be useful in studies of apoptosis involving microvesicles and exosomes.

  13. Monosaccharide transport in protein-depleted vesicles from erythrocyte membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M A Zoccoli; G E Lienhard

    1977-01-01

    .... Based on comparisons between erythrocytes and vesicles with regard to specificity, temparture dependence, and effects of inhibitors, we conclude that sorbose uptake into the vesicles occurs by way...

  14. Lecture notes on mean curvature flow, barriers and singular perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Bellettini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the book is to study some aspects of geometric evolutions, such as mean curvature flow and anisotropic mean curvature flow of hypersurfaces. We analyze the origin of such flows and their geometric and variational nature. Some of the most important aspects of mean curvature flow are described, such as the comparison principle and its use in the definition of suitable weak solutions. The anisotropic evolutions, which can be considered as a generalization of mean curvature flow, are studied from the view point of Finsler geometry. Concerning singular perturbations, we discuss the convergence of the Allen–Cahn (or Ginsburg–Landau) type equations to (possibly anisotropic) mean curvature flow before the onset of singularities in the limit problem. We study such kinds of asymptotic problems also in the static case, showing convergence to prescribed curvature-type problems.

  15. Ricci Curvature on Polyhedral Surfaces via Optimal Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Loisel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correctly defining geometric objects, such as the curvature, is a hard one in discrete geometry. In 2009, Ollivier defined a notion of curvature applicable to a wide category of measured metric spaces, in particular to graphs. He named it coarse Ricci curvature because it coincides, up to some given factor, with the classical Ricci curvature, when the space is a smooth manifold. Lin, Lu and Yau and Jost and Liu have used and extended this notion for graphs, giving estimates for the curvature and, hence, the diameter, in terms of the combinatorics. In this paper, we describe a method for computing the coarse Ricci curvature and give sharper results, in the specific, but crucial case of polyhedral surfaces.

  16. PI(4,5)P2-binding effector proteins for vesicle exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2014-01-01

    PI(4,5)P2 participates directly in priming and possibly fusion steps of Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis. High concentration nanodomains of PI(4,5)P2 reside on the plasma membrane of neuroendocrine cells. A subset of vesicles that co-localize with PI(4,5)P2 domains appear to undergo preferential exocytosis in stimulated cells. PI(4,5)P2 directly regulates vesicle exocytosis by recruiting and activating PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins that regulate SNARE protein function including CAPS, Munc13-1/2, synaptotagmin-1, and other C2 domain-containing proteins. These PI(4,5)P2 effector proteins are coincidence detectors that engage in multiple interactions at vesicle exocytic sites. The SNARE protein syntaxin-1 also binds to PI(4,5)P2, which promotes clustering, but an activating role for PI(4,5)P2 in syntaxin-1 function remains to be fully characterized. Similar principles underlie polarized constitutive vesicle fusion mediated in part by the PI(4,5)P2-binding subunits of the exocyst complex (Sec3, Exo70). Overall, focal vesicle exocytosis occurs at sites landmarked by PI(4,5)P2, which serves to recruit and/or activate multifunctional PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins. PMID:25280637

  17. PI(4,5)P₂-binding effector proteins for vesicle exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas F J

    2015-06-01

    PI(4,5)P₂participates directly in priming and possibly in fusion steps of Ca²⁺-triggered vesicle exocytosis. High concentration nanodomains of PI(4,5)P₂reside on the plasma membrane of neuroendocrine cells. A subset of vesicles that co-localize with PI(4,5)P₂ domains appear to undergo preferential exocytosis in stimulated cells. PI(4,5)P₂directly regulates vesicle exocytosis by recruiting and activating PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins that regulate SNARE protein function including CAPS, Munc13-1/2, synaptotagmin-1, and other C2 domain-containing proteins. These PI(4,5)P₂effector proteins are coincidence detectors that engage in multiple interactions at vesicle exocytic sites. The SNARE protein syntaxin-1 also binds to PI(4,5)P₂, which promotes clustering, but an activating role for PI(4,5)P₂in syntaxin-1 function remains to be fully characterized. Similar principles underlie polarized constitutive vesicle fusion mediated in part by the PI(4,5)P₂-binding subunits of the exocyst complex (Sec3, Exo70). Overall, focal vesicle exocytosis occurs at sites landmarked by PI(4,5)P2, which serves to recruit and/or activate multifunctional PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phosphoinositides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D face recognition with asymptotic cones based principal curvatures

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Yinhang

    2015-05-01

    The classical curvatures of smooth surfaces (Gaussian, mean and principal curvatures) have been widely used in 3D face recognition (FR). However, facial surfaces resulting from 3D sensors are discrete meshes. In this paper, we present a general framework and define three principal curvatures on discrete surfaces for the purpose of 3D FR. These principal curvatures are derived from the construction of asymptotic cones associated to any Borel subset of the discrete surface. They describe the local geometry of the underlying mesh. First two of them correspond to the classical principal curvatures in the smooth case. We isolate the third principal curvature that carries out meaningful geometric shape information. The three principal curvatures in different Borel subsets scales give multi-scale local facial surface descriptors. We combine the proposed principal curvatures with the LNP-based facial descriptor and SRC for recognition. The identification and verification experiments demonstrate the practicability and accuracy of the third principal curvature and the fusion of multi-scale Borel subset descriptors on 3D face from FRGC v2.0.

  19. Membrane Curvature Affects the Formation of α-Hemolysin Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-07-17

    Membrane proteins perform their functions within or on the lipid membrane, and lipid compositions are known to affect membrane protein integration and activity. Recently, the geometric aspect of membrane curvature was shown to play an important role in membrane protein behavior. Certain membrane proteins are known to sense the curvature of the membrane and to preferentially bind to highly curved membranes. However, although numerous membrane proteins assemble to form homo- or heterocomplexes and perform their biological functions, the dependence of membrane protein assembly on membrane curvature remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the membrane curvature on the nanopore formation of α-hemolysin (AH), which is a toxic membrane protein derived from Staphylococcus aureus. The AH protein binds to the membrane as a monomer, assembles to form a heptamer, and forms a nanopore. By simultaneously measuring the molecules bound to the membrane and the activities of the nanopore on the membrane, we determined the nanopore formation ratio of AH. We used various sizes of liposomes and analyzed the dependence on the membrane curvature by using flow cytometry. Combining the results for positive and negative curvature, we found that the nanopore formation ratio of AH was curvature sensitive and was higher in a flat membrane than in a curved membrane. Furthermore, the nanopore formation ratio was almost identical or relatively higher in membranes with negative curvature than those with positive curvature.

  20. Synaptopathy under conditions of altered gravity: changes in synaptic vesicle fusion and glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisanova, N V; Trikash, I O; Borisova, T A

    2009-12-01

    Glutamate release and synaptic vesicle heterotypic/homotypic fusion were characterized in brain synaptosomes of rats exposed to hypergravity (10 G, 1h). Stimulated vesicular exocytosis determined as KCl-evoked fluorescence spike of pH-sensitive dye acridine orange (AO) was decreased twice in synaptosomes under hypergravity conditions as compared to control. Sets of measurements demonstrated reduced ability of synaptic vesicles to accumulate AO ( approximately 10% higher steady-state baseline level of AO fluorescence). Experiments with preloaded l-[(14)C]glutamate exhibited similar amount of total glutamate accumulated by synaptosomes, equal concentration of ambient glutamate, but the enlarged level of cytoplasmic glutamate measuring as leakage from digitonin-permeabilized synaptosomes in hypergravity. Thus, it may be suggested that +G-induced changes in stimulated vesicular exocytosis were a result of the redistribution of intracellular pool of glutamate, i.e. a decrease in glutamate content of synaptic vesicles and an enrichment of the cytoplasmic glutamate level. To investigate the effect of hypergravity on the last step of exocytosis, i.e. membrane fusion, a cell-free system consisted of synaptic vesicles, plasma membrane vesicles, cytosolic proteins isolated from rat brain synaptosomes was used. It was found that hypergravity reduced the fusion competence of synaptic vesicles and plasma membrane vesicles, whereas synaptosomal cytosolic proteins became more active to promote membrane fusion. The total rate of homo- and heterotypic fusion reaction initiated by Ca(2+) or Mg(2+)/ATP remained unchanged under hypergravity conditions. Thus, hypergravity could induce synaptopathy that was associated with incomplete filling of synaptic vesicles with the neuromediator and changes in exocytotic release.

  1. Hair curvature: a natural dialectic and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Joseph N; Das Chaudhuri, Asit Baran

    2014-08-01

    Although hair forms (straight, curly, wavy, etc.) are present in apparently infinite variations, each fibre can be reduced to a finite sequence of tandem segments of just three types: straight, bent/curly, or twisted. Hair forms can thus be regarded as resulting from genetic pathways that induce, reverse or modulate these basic curvature modes. However, physical interconversions between twists and curls demonstrate that strict one-to-one correspondences between them and their genetic causes do not exist. Current hair-curvature theories do not distinguish between bending and twisting mechanisms. We here introduce a multiple papillary centres (MPC) model which is particularly suitable to explain twisting. The model combines previously known features of hair cross-sectional morphology with partially/completely separated dermal papillae within single follicles, and requires such papillae to induce differential growth rates of hair cortical material in their immediate neighbourhoods. The MPC model can further help to explain other, poorly understood, aspects of hair growth and morphology. Separate bending and twisting mechanisms would be preferentially affected at the major or minor ellipsoidal sides of fibres, respectively, and together they exhaust the possibilities for influencing hair-form phenotypes. As such they suggest dialectic for hair-curvature development. We define a natural-dialectic (ND) which could take advantage of speculative aspects of dialectic, but would verify its input data and results by experimental methods. We use this as a top-down approach to first define routes by which hair bending or twisting may be brought about and then review evidence in support of such routes. In particular we consider the wingless (Wnt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways as paradigm pathways for molecular hair bending and twisting mechanisms, respectively. In addition to the Wnt canonical pathway, the Wnt/Ca(2+) and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways

  2. Extracellular vesicles as emerging intercellular communicasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-10-01

    All living cells release extracellular vesicles having pleiotropic functions in intercellular communication. Mammalian extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes and microvesicles, are spherical bilayered proteolipids composed of various bioactive molecules, including RNAs, DNAs, proteins, and lipids. Extracellular vesicles directly and indirectly control a diverse range of biological processes by transferring membrane proteins, signaling molecules, mRNAs, and miRNAs, and activating receptors of recipient cells. The active interaction of extracellular vesicles with other cells regulates various physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent developments in high-throughput proteomics, transcriptomics, and lipidomics tools have provided ample data on the common and specific components of various types of extracellular vesicles. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in vesicular cargo sorting and the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, and, further, to the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. This review focuses on the components, functions, and therapeutic and diagnostic potential of extracellular vesicles under various pathophysiological conditions.

  3. Structure of Amphiphilic Terpolymer Raspberry Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Guo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Terpolymer raspberry vesicles contain domains of different chemical affinities. They are potential candidates as multi-compartment cargo carriers. Their efficacy depends on their stability and load capacity. Using a model star terpolymer system in an aqueous solution, a dissipative particle dynamic (DPD simulation is employed to investigate how equilibrium aggregate structures are affected by polymer concentration and pairwise interaction energy in a solution. It is shown that a critical mass of polymer is necessary for vesicle formation. The free energy of the equilibrium aggregates are calculated and the results show that the transition from micelles to vesicles is governed by the interactions between the longest solvophobic block and the solvent. In addition, the ability of vesicles to encapsulate solvent is assessed. It is found that reducing the interaction energy favours solvent encapsulation, although solvent molecules can permeate through the vesicle’s shell when repulsive interactions among monomers are low. Thus, one can optimize the loading capacity and the release rate of the vesicles by turning pairwise interaction energies of the polymer and the solvent. The ability to predict and control these aspects of the vesicles is an essential step towards designing vesicles for specific purposes.

  4. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Klein, Michael L; Shinoda, Wataru

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle-vesicle, vesicle-planar, and planar-planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  5. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Klein, Michael L.; Shinoda, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle-vesicle, vesicle-planar, and planar-planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  6. A Field Theory with Curvature and Anticurvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Wanas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is an attempt to construct a unified field theory in a space with curvature and anticurvature, the PAP-space. The theory is derived from an action principle and a Lagrangian density using a symmetric linear parameterized connection. Three different methods are used to explore physical contents of the theory obtained. Poisson’s equations for both material and charge distributions are obtained, as special cases, from the field equations of the theory. The theory is a pure geometric one in the sense that material distribution, charge distribution, gravitational and electromagnetic potentials, and other physical quantities are defined in terms of pure geometric objects of the structure used. In the case of pure gravity in free space, the spherical symmetric solution of the field equations gives the Schwarzschild exterior field. The weak equivalence principle is respected only in the case of pure gravity in free space; otherwise it is violated.

  7. Differential geometry connections, curvature, and characteristic classes

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Loring W

    2017-01-01

    This text presents a graduate-level introduction to differential geometry for mathematics and physics students. The exposition follows the historical development of the concepts of connection and curvature with the goal of explaining the Chern–Weil theory of characteristic classes on a principal bundle. Along the way we encounter some of the high points in the history of differential geometry, for example, Gauss' Theorema Egregium and the Gauss–Bonnet theorem. Exercises throughout the book test the reader’s understanding of the material and sometimes illustrate extensions of the theory. Initially, the prerequisites for the reader include a passing familiarity with manifolds. After the first chapter, it becomes necessary to understand and manipulate differential forms. A knowledge of de Rham cohomology is required for the last third of the text. Prerequisite material is contained in author's text An Introduction to Manifolds, and can be learned in one semester. For the benefit of the reader and to establ...

  8. The TIP30 protein complex, arachidonic acid and coenzyme A are required for vesicle membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengliang Zhang

    Full Text Available Efficient membrane fusion has been successfully mimicked in vitro using artificial membranes and a number of cellular proteins that are currently known to participate in membrane fusion. However, these proteins are not sufficient to promote efficient fusion between biological membranes, indicating that critical fusogenic factors remain unidentified. We have recently identified a TIP30 protein complex containing TIP30, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 4 (ACSL4 and Endophilin B1 (Endo B1 that promotes the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles, which transport endosomal acidification enzymes vacuolar (H⁺-ATPases (V-ATPases to the early endosomes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the TIP30 protein complex facilitates the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles in vitro. Fusion of the two vesicles also depends on arachidonic acid, coenzyme A and the synthesis of arachidonyl-CoA by ACSL4. Moreover, the TIP30 complex is able to transfer arachidonyl groups onto phosphatidic acid (PA, producing a new lipid species that is capable of inducing close contact between membranes. Together, our data suggest that the TIP30 complex facilitates biological membrane fusion through modification of PA on membranes.

  9. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-04-16

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for tracking and imaging extracellular vesicles in vivo and critically discuss their systemic distribution, targeting, and kinetics based on up-to-date evidence in the literature.

  10. Remotely controlled fusion of selected vesicles and living cells: a key issue review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Azra; Moreno-Pescador, Guillermo; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2018-03-01

    Remote control over fusion of single cells and vesicles has a great potential in biological and chemical research allowing both transfer of genetic material between cells and transfer of molecular content between vesicles. Membrane fusion is a critical process in biology that facilitates molecular transport and mixing of cellular cytoplasms with potential formation of hybrid cells. Cells precisely regulate internal membrane fusions with the aid of specialized fusion complexes that physically provide the energy necessary for mediating fusion. Physical factors like membrane curvature, tension and temperature, affect biological membrane fusion by lowering the associated energy barrier. This has inspired the development of physical approaches to harness the fusion process at a single cell level by using remotely controlled electromagnetic fields to trigger membrane fusion. Here, we critically review various approaches, based on lasers or electric pulses, to control fusion between individual cells or between individual lipid vesicles and discuss their potential and limitations for present and future applications within biochemistry, biology and soft matter.

  11. Characterizing detergent mediated reconstitution of viral protein M2 in large unilamellar vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyre, Mariel; Grossman, Carl; Crouch, Catherine; Howard, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Influenza M2 is a model membrane protein whose function is to induce curvature and vesicle formation in the process of viral infection. To study embedded M2 in synthetic phospholipid vesicles (large unilamellar vesicles or LUVs), a concentration of detergent and buffer is optimized to balance protein solubility, proteolipid concentration, and LUV stability. Adding detergent also causes the LUVs to partially disassemble and form micelles, which warrants detergent removal to restore LUV integrity. We explore methods of measuring the coexistence of detergent micelles and LUVs to track the different phases of the system as detergent is removed. A combination of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and chemical analysis are used to measure the properties of this system. With detergent/LUV number densities as high as 5 we find coexistence of micelles and LUVs at 50% to 60%. As the detergent is removed, the micelle concentration drops to lower than 30% while detergent levels drop to nearly zero. These results may indicate a polydispersed LUV size distribution after detergent mediated reconstitution. Supported by HHMI and Swarthmore College.

  12. Fusogenicity of Naja naja atra cardiotoxin-like basic protein on sphingomyelin vesicles containing oxidized phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Chen, Ying-Jung; Yang, Shin-Yi; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPC) and cholesterol (Chol) on Naja naja atra cardiotoxin-like basic protein (CLBP)-induced fusion and leakage in sphingomyelin (SM) vesicles. Compared with those on PC/SM/Chol vesicles, CLBP showed a lower activity to induce membrane permeability but a higher fusogenicity on oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles. A reduction in inner-leaflet fusion elucidated that CLBP fusogenicity was not in parallel to its membrane-leakage activity on oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles. The lipid domain formed by Chol and SM supported CLBP fusogenicity on oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles, while oxPC altered the interacted mode of CLBP with oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles as evidenced by Fourier transform infrared spectra analyses and colorimetric phospholipid/polydiacetylene membrane assay. Although CLBP showed similar binding affinity with PC/SM/Chol and oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles, the binding capability of CLBP with PC/SM/Chol and oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles was affected differently by NaCl. This emphasized that CLBP adopted different membrane interaction modes upon binding with PC/SM/Chol and oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles. CLBP induced fusion in vesicles containing oxPC bearing the aldehyde group, and aldehyde scavenger methoxyamine abrogated the CLBP ability to induce oxPC/SM/Chol fusion. Taken together, our data indicate that Chol and oxPC bearing aldehyde group alter the CLBP membrane-binding mode, leading to fusogenicity promotion while reducing the membrane-damaging activity of CLBP.

  13. Classification, Functions, and Clinical Relevance of Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Böing, Anita N.; Harrison, Paul; Sturk, Augueste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2012-01-01

    Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells release small, phospholipid-enclosed vesicles into their environment. Why do cells release vesicles? Initial studies showed that eukaryotic vesicles are used to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Although this release of vesicles is beneficial to the cell, the

  14. Ricci flow of warped product metrics with positive isotropic curvature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the asymptotic behaviour of the ODE associated to the evolution of curvature operator in the Ricci flow of a doubly warped product metric on S p + 1 × S 1 with positive isotropic curvature. Author Affiliations. H A Gururaja1. Department of Mathematics, St. Aloysius College, Mangalore 575 003, India. Dates.

  15. On the projective curvature tensor of generalized Sasakian-space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... some conditions regarding projective curvature tensor. All the results obtained in this paper are in the form of necessary and sufficient conditions. Keywords: Generalized Sasakian-space-forms; projectively flat; projectively-semisymmetric; projectively symmetric; projectively recurrent; Einstein manifold; scalar curvature

  16. How to obtain Transience from Bounded Radial Mean Curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    We show that Brownian motion on any unbounded submanifold P in an ambient manifold N with a pole P is transient if the following conditions are satisfied: The p-radial mean curvatures of P are sufficiently small outsidea compact set and the p-radial sectional curvatures of N are sufficiently...

  17. Surfaces of Constant Curvature in the Pseudo-Galilean Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željka Milin Šipuš

    2012-01-01

    constant curvature, so-called the Tchebyshev coordinates, and show that the angle between parametric curves satisfies the Klein-Gordon partial differential equation. We determine the Tchebyshev coordinates for surfaces of revolution and construct a surface with constant curvature from a particular solution of the Klein-Gordon equation.

  18. Finsler metrics with constant (or scalar) flag curvature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of new Finsler metrics of constant (or scalar) flag curvature and determine their scalar curvature. Keywords. ... For instance, Li, Chang and Mo related some Killing fields of Finsler metrics to the symmetry of very ...... [13] Shen Z, Differential Geometry of Spray and Finsler Spaces (Kluwer Academic Publish- ers) (2001) 258 ...

  19. Constant mean curvature surfaces via integrable dynamical system

    CERN Document Server

    Konopelchenko, B G

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the equation which describes constant mean curvature surface via the generalized Weierstrass-Enneper inducing has Hamiltonian form. Its simplest finite-dimensional reduction has two degrees of freedom, integrable and its trajectories correspond to well-known Delaunay and do Carmo-Dajzcer surfaces (i.e., helicoidal constant mean curvature surfaces).

  20. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data in...

  1. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  2. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  3. Haptic perception of object curvature in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Konczak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The haptic perception of the curvature of an object is essential for adequate object manipulation and critical for our guidance of actions. This study investigated how the ability to perceive the curvature of an object is altered by Parkinson's disease (PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight healthy subjects and 11 patients with mild to moderate PD had to judge, without vision, the curvature of a virtual "box" created by a robotic manipulandum. Their hands were either moved passively along a defined curved path or they actively explored the curved curvature of a virtual wall. The curvature was either concave or convex (bulging to the left or right and was judged in two locations of the hand workspace--a left workspace location, where the curved hand path was associated with curved shoulder and elbow joint paths, and a right workspace location in which these joint paths were nearly linear. After exploring the curvature of the virtual object, subjects had to judge whether the curvature was concave or convex. Based on these data, thresholds for curvature sensitivity were established. The main findings of the study are: First, 9 out 11 PD patients (82% showed elevated thresholds for detecting convex curvatures in at least one test condition. The respective median threshold for the PD group was increased by 343% when compared to the control group. Second, when distal hand paths became less associated with proximal joint paths (right workspace, haptic acuity was reduced substantially in both groups. Third, sensitivity to hand trajectory curvature was not improved during active exploration in either group. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that PD is associated with a decreased acuity of the haptic sense, which may occur already at an early stage of the disease.

  4. Mutations in Synaptojanin Disrupt Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Todd W.; Hartwieg, Erika; Horvitz, H. Robert; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2000-01-01

    Synaptojanin is a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase that is found at synapses and binds to proteins implicated in endocytosis. For these reasons, it has been proposed that synaptojanin is involved in the recycling of synaptic vesicles. Here, we demonstrate that the unc-26 gene encodes the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of synaptojanin. unc-26 mutants exhibit defects in vesicle trafficking in several tissues, but most defects are found at synaptic termini. Specifically, we observed defects in ...

  5. Concentration-Independent Spontaneously Forming Biomimetric Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, M.-P.; Harroun, T. A.; Raghunathan, V. A.; Glinka, C. J.; Katsaras, J.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we present small-angle neutron scattering data from a biomimetic system composed of the phospholipids dimyristoyl and dihexanoyl phosphorylcholine (DMPC and DHPC, respectively). Doping DMPC-DHPC multilamellar vesicles with either the negatively charged lipid dimyristoyl phosphorylglycerol (DMPG, net charge -1) or the divalent cation, calcium (Ca2+), leads to the spontaneous formation of energetically stabilized monodisperse unilamellar vesicles whose radii are concentration independent and in contrast with previous experimental observations.

  6. Labeling Extracellular Vesicles for Nanoscale Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Aizea Morales-Kastresana; Bill Telford; Musich, Thomas A.; Katherine McKinnon; Cassandra Clayborne; Zach Braig; Ari Rosner; Thorsten Demberg; Watson, Dionysios C.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; Freeman, Gordon J.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Pavlakis, George N.; Masaki Terabe; Marjorie Robert-Guroff

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, are 30?800?nm vesicles that are released by most cell types, as biological packages for intercellular communication. Their importance in cancer and inflammation makes EVs and their cargo promising biomarkers of disease and cell-free therapeutic agents. Emerging high-resolution cytometric methods have created a pressing need for efficient fluorescent labeling procedures to visualize and detect EVs. Suitable labels must be brig...

  7. Cellular Phenotype and Extracellular Vesicles: Basic and Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Goldberg, Laura R.; Aliotta, Jason M.; Mark S Dooner; Pereira, Mandy G.; Wen, Sicheng; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Early work on platelet and erythrocyte vesicles interpreted the phenomena as a discard of material from cells. Subsequently, vesicles were studied as possible vaccines and, most recently, there has been a focus on the effects of vesicles on cell fate. Recent studies have indicated that extracellular vesicles, previously referred to as microvesicles or exosomes, have the capacity to change the phenotype of neighboring cells. Extensive work has shown that vesicles derived from either the lung o...

  8. Toward a theory of curvature-scaling gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hoang Ky

    2013-01-01

    A salient feature of Horava gravity is the anisotropic time variable. We propose an alternative construction of the spacetime manifold which naturally enables time anisotropy. We promote the role of curvature: the Ricci scalar R at a given point sets the length scales for physical processes - including gravity - in the local inertial frames enclosing that point. The manifold is a patchwork of local regions; each region is Lorentz invariant and adopts a local scale a_R defined as a_R = 1/sqrt|R|. In each local patch, the length scales of physical processes are measured relatively to a_R, and only their dimensionless ratios partake in the dynamics of physical processes. Time anisotropy arises by requiring that the form - but not necessarily the parameters - of physical laws be unchanged under variations of the local a_R as one moves on the manifold. The time scaling is found to be dt ~ a_R^(3/2) whereas the spatial part scales as dx ~ a_R. We show how to conjoin the local patches of the manifold in a way which ...

  9. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  10. Curvature Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Curvature was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using the ArcGIS 3D Analyst "Curvature" Tool. Curvature describes the rate of change of...

  11. Profile Curvature Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profile curvature was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using the ArcGIS 3D Analyst "Curvature" Tool. Profile curvature describes the rate...

  12. Plan Curvature Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plan curvature was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using the ArcGIS 3D Analyst "Curvature" Tool. Plan curvature describes the rate of...

  13. Planck-Scale Dual-Curvature Lensing and Spacetime Noncommutativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Amelino-Camelia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It was recently realized that Planck-scale momentum-space curvature, which is expected in some approaches to the quantum-gravity problem, can produce dual-curvature lensing, a feature which mainly affects the direction of observation of particles emitted by very distant sources. Several gray areas remain in our understanding of dual-curvature lensing, including the possibility that it might be just a coordinate artifact and the possibility that it might be in some sense a by-product of the better studied dual-curvature redshift. We stress that data reported by the IceCube neutrino telescope should motivate a more vigorous effort of investigation of dual-curvature lensing, and we observe that studies of the recently proposed “ρ-Minkowski noncommutative spacetime” could be valuable from this perspective. Through a dedicated ρ-Minkowski analysis, we show that dual-curvature lensing is not merely a coordinate artifact and that it can be present even in theories without dual-curvature redshift.

  14. Spontaneous curvature of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Chupin, Vladimir; Fuller, Nola L; Kozlov, Michael M; de Kruijff, Ben; Burger, Koert N J; Rand, Peter R

    2005-02-15

    The formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) from lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), diacylglycerol, or phosphatidylcholine plays a key role in the regulation of intracellular membrane fission events, but the underlying molecular mechanism has not been resolved. A likely possibility is that PA affects local membrane curvature facilitating membrane bending and fission. To examine this possibility, we determined the spontaneous radius of curvature (R(0p)) of PA and LPA, carrying oleoyl fatty acids, using well-established X-ray diffraction methods. We found that, under physiological conditions of pH and salt concentration (pH 7.0, 150 mM NaCl), the R(0p) values of PA and LPA were -46 A and +20 A, respectively. Thus PA has considerable negative spontaneous curvature while LPA has the most positive spontaneous curvature of any membrane lipid measured to date. The further addition of Ca(2+) did not significantly affect lipid spontaneous curvature; however, omitting NaCl from the hydration buffer greatly reduced the spontaneous curvature of PA, turning it into a cylindrically shaped lipid molecule (R(0p) of -1.3 x 10(2) A). Our quantitative data on the spontaneous radius of curvature of PA and LPA at a physiological pH and salt concentration will be instrumental in developing future models of biomembrane fission.

  15. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  16. Extracellular Vesicles in Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2017-05-12

    Metabolic syndrome defines a cluster of interrelated risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. These factors include metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, elevated triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and obesity, mainly central adiposity. In this context, extracellular vesicles (EVs) may represent novel effectors that might help to elucidate disease-specific pathways in metabolic disease. Indeed, EVs (a terminology that encompasses microparticles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies) are emerging as a novel mean of cell-to-cell communication in physiology and pathology because they represent a new way to convey fundamental information between cells. These microstructures contain proteins, lipids, and genetic information able to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. EVs carry specific markers of the cell of origin that make possible monitoring their fluctuations in the circulation as potential biomarkers inasmuch their circulating levels are increased in metabolic syndrome patients. Because of the mixed components of EVs, the content or the number of EVs derived from distinct cells of origin, the mode of cell stimulation, and the ensuing mechanisms for their production, it is difficult to attribute specific functions as drivers or biomarkers of diseases. This review reports recent data of EVs from different origins, including endothelial, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, hepatocytes, adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and finally, those from microbiota as bioeffectors of message, leading to metabolic syndrome. Depicting the complexity of the mechanisms involved in their functions reinforce the hypothesis that EVs are valid biomarkers, and they represent targets that can be harnessed for innovative therapeutic approaches. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Geometry-specific scaling of detonation parameters from front curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-20

    It has previously been asserted that classical detonation curvature theory predicts that the critical diameter and the diameter-effect curve of a cylindrical high-explosive charge should scale with twice the thickness of an analogous two-dimensional explosive slab. The varied agreement of experimental results with this expectation have led some to question the ability of curvature-based concepts to predict detonation propagation in non-ideal explosives. This study addresses such claims by showing that the expected scaling relationship (hereafter referred to d = 2w) is not consistent with curvature-based Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory.

  18. On the transverse Scalar Curvature of a Compact Sasaki Manifold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiyong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We show that the standard picture regarding the notion of stability of constant scalar curvature metrics in Kähler geometry described by S.K. Donaldson [10, 11], which involves the geometry of infinitedimensional groups and spaces, can be applied to the constant scalar curvature metrics in Sasaki geometry with only few modification. We prove that the space of Sasaki metrics is an infinite dimensional symmetric space and that the transverse scalar curvature of a Sasaki metric is a moment map of the strict contactomophism group

  19. Motion on constant curvature spaces and quantization using Noether symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Paul

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is presented for quantizing a metric nonlinear system on a manifold of constant curvature. It makes use of a curvature dependent procedure which relies on determining Noether symmetries from the metric. The curvature of the space functions as a constant parameter. For a specific metric which defines the manifold, Lie differentiation of the metric gives these symmetries. A metric is used such that the resulting Schrödinger equation can be solved in terms of hypergeometric functions. This permits the investigation of both the energy spectrum and wave functions exactly for this system.

  20. A two phase field model for tracking vesicle-vesicle adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Rui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Gunzburger, Max

    2016-11-01

    A multi-phase-field model for simulating the adhesion between two vesicles is constructed. Two phase field functions are introduced to simulate each of the two vesicles. An energy model is defined which accounts for the elastic bending energy of each vesicle and the contact potential energy between the two vesicles; the vesicle volume and surface area constraints are imposed using a penalty method. Numerical results are provided to verify the efficacy of our model and to provide visual illustrations of the different types of contact. The method can be adjusted to solve endocytosis problems by modifying the bending rigidity coefficients of the two elastic bending energies. The method can also be extended to simulate multi-cell adhesions, one example of which is erythrocyte rouleaux. A comparison with laboratory observations demonstrates the effectiveness of the multi-phase field approach.

  1. Insights into the self-reproduction of oleate vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P [' Enrico Fermi' Centre, Compendio Viminale, 00184 Rome (Italy); Wehrli, E [Electron Microscopy Centre (EMEZ), Applied Physics Institute, ETH Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Luisi, P L [Biology Department, University of RomaTre, Viale Marconi 446, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    In view of the importance of vesicles as models for early cells, several groups have started work looking for conditions under which vesicles can undergo growth and division. Evidence for growth and division has been obtained with the help of ferritin-labelled vesicles; furthermore, it has been shown that in such processes the vesicle size distribution is largely conserved. In both cases, the data suggest that the process under study is mainly characterized by vesicle growth and eventually division into daughter vesicles. However, direct evidence for vesicle division has not been obtained. In this paper, mostly based on freeze-fracture electron microscopy, we describe conditions under which for the first time division intermediates can be trapped in the form of twin vesicles. This finding, together with supporting dynamic light scattering and fluorescence investigations, permits us to establish some additional points in the mechanism of vesicle self-reproduction.

  2. Measurement of radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture by optical profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang; Yi, Shengzhen; Chen, Shenghao; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-11-01

    Monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope is one of key diagnostic tools for researches on inertial confinement fusion. It is composed by two orthogonal concave spherical mirrors with small curvature and aperture, and produce the image of an object by collecting X-rays in each orthogonal direction, independently. Accurate measurement of radius of curvature of concave spherical mirrors is very important to achieve its design optical properties including imaging quality, optical throughput and energy resolution. However, it is difficult to measure the radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture by conventional methods, for the produced reflective intensity of glass is too low to correctly test. In this paper, we propose an improved measuring method of optical profiler to accomplish accurate measurement of radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture used in the monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope. Firstly, we use a standard super-smooth optical flat to calibrate reference mirror before each experiment. Following, deviation of central position between measurement area and interference pattern is corrected by the theory of Newton's rings, and the zero-order fringe position is derived from the principle of interference in which surface roughness has minimum values in the position of zero light path difference. Measured results by optical profiler show the low relative errors and high repeatability. Eventually, an imaging experiment of monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope determines the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature.

  3. Mechanics of post-fusion exocytotic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Thomas; Wu, Zhanghan; Liu, Jian

    2017-05-23

    Exocytosis is an important cellular process controlled by metabolic signaling. It involves vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane, followed by the opening of a fusion pore, and the subsequent release of the vesicular lumen content into the extracellular space. While most modeling efforts focus on the events leading to membrane fusion, how the vesicular membrane remodels after fusing to plasma membrane remains unclear. This latter event dictates the nature and the efficiency of exocytotic vesicular secretions, and is thus critical for exocytotic function. We provide a generic membrane mechanical model to systematically study the fate of post-fusion vesicles. We show that while membrane stiffness favors full-collapse vesicle fusion into the plasma membrane, the intravesicular pressure swells the vesicle and causes the fusion pore to shrink. Dimensions of the vesicle and its associated fusion pore further modulate this mechanical antagonism. We systematically define the mechanical conditions that account for the full spectrum of the observed vesicular secretion modes. Our model therefore can serve as a unified theoretical framework that sheds light on the elaborate control mechanism of exocytosis.

  4. Astrocytic Vesicle Mobility in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zorec

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are no longer considered subservient to neurons, and are, instead, now understood to play an active role in brain signaling. The intercellular communication of astrocytes with neurons and other non-neuronal cells involves the exchange of molecules by exocytotic and endocytotic processes through the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Recent studies of single vesicle mobility in astrocytes have prompted new views of how astrocytes contribute to information processing in nervous tissue. Here, we review the trafficking of several types of membrane-bound vesicles that are specifically involved in the processes of (i intercellular communication by gliotransmitters (glutamate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, atrial natriuretic peptide, (ii plasma membrane exchange of transporters and receptors (EAAT2, MHC-II, and (iii the involvement of vesicle mobility carrying aquaporins (AQP4 in water homeostasis. The properties of vesicle traffic in astrocytes are discussed in respect to networking with neighboring cells in physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and states in which astrocytes contribute to neuroinflammatory conditions.

  5. Mechanics of post-fusion exocytotic vesicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Thomas; Wu, Zhanghan; Liu, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Exocytosis is an important cellular process controlled by metabolic signaling. It involves vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane, followed by the opening of a fusion pore, and the subsequent release of the vesicular lumen content into the extracellular space. While most modeling efforts focus on the events leading to membrane fusion, how the vesicular membrane remodels after fusing to plasma membrane remains unclear. This latter event dictates the nature and the efficiency of exocytotic vesicular secretions, and is thus critical for exocytotic function. We provide a generic membrane mechanical model to systematically study the fate of post-fusion vesicles. We show that while membrane stiffness favors full-collapse vesicle fusion into the plasma membrane, the intravesicular pressure swells the vesicle and causes the fusion pore to shrink. Dimensions of the vesicle and its associated fusion pore further modulate this mechanical antagonism. We systematically define the mechanical conditions that account for the full spectrum of the observed vesicular secretion modes. Our model therefore can serve as a unified theoretical framework that sheds light on the elaborate control mechanism of exocytosis.

  6. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  7. Synaptic vesicle dynamic changes in a model of fragile X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broek, Jantine A C; Lin, Zhanmin; de Gruiter, H Martijn; van 't Spijker, Heleen; Haasdijk, Elize D; Cox, David; Ozcan, Sureyya; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Willemsen, Rob; de Zeeuw, Chris I; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single-gene disorder that is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). FXS is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats in the promoter region of the fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1). This leads to a lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which regulates translation of a wide range of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The extent of expression level alterations of synaptic proteins affected by FMRP loss and their consequences on synaptic dynamics in FXS has not been fully investigated. Here, we used an Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying FXS by monitoring protein expression changes using shotgun label-free liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) in brain tissue and synaptosome fractions. FXS-associated candidate proteins were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in synaptosome fractions for targeted protein quantification. Furthermore, functional alterations in synaptic release and dynamics were evaluated using live-cell imaging, and interpretation of synaptic dynamics differences was investigated using electron microscopy. Key findings relate to altered levels of proteins involved in GABA-signalling, especially in the cerebellum. Further exploration using microscopy studies found reduced synaptic vesicle unloading of hippocampal neurons and increased vesicle unloading in cerebellar neurons, which suggests a general decrease of synaptic transmission. Our findings suggest that FMRP is a regulator of synaptic vesicle dynamics, which supports the role of FMRP in presynaptic functions. Taken together, these studies provide novel insights into the molecular changes associated with FXS.

  8. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Young, Erin C.; Robertson, Christian A.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Romanov, Alexey E. [Materials Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Beltz, Glenn E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  9. Curvature Control of Silicon Microlens for THz Dielectric Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cooper, Ken; Mehdi, Imran

    2012-01-01

    We have controlled the curvature of silicon microlens by changing the amount of photoresist in order to microfabricate hemispherical silicon microlens which can improve the directivity and reduce substrate mode losses.

  10. Changes on the corneal thickness and curvature after orthokeratology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate the corneal thickness and curvature changes after Orthokeratology contact lens wear, using the ORBSCAN II corneal topography system, corneal thickness and corneal curvature were measured on one hundred and twenty eyes of sixty patients before and after wearing the custom rigid gas permeable contact lenses for Orthokeratology. The contact lenses were specially designed for each eye. The subjects wore the orthokeratology lenses for approximately Four hours with their eyes closed. The corneal thickness of the subjects was increased on fifty-five eyes at not only the peripheral zone but also the center of the cornea. The average increase of central and peripheral corneal thickness was 18 micrometer and 22micrometer, respectively. The mean anterior curvature of corneal surface changed 1.25D. The mean posterior curvature of corneal endothelium side changed 0.75D.

  11. Spacetime curvature and the Higgs stability during inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranen, M; Markkanen, T; Nurmi, S; Rajantie, A

    2014-11-21

    It has been claimed that the electroweak vacuum may be unstable during inflation due to large fluctuations of the order H in the case of a high inflationary scale as suggested by BICEP2. We compute the standard model Higgs effective potential including UV-induced curvature corrections at one-loop level. We find that for a high inflationary scale a large curvature mass is generated due to renormalization group running of nonminimal coupling ξ, which either stabilizes the potential against fluctuations for ξEW≳6×10(-2), or destabilizes it for ξEW≲2×10(-2) when the generated curvature mass is negative. Only in the narrow intermediate region may the effect of the curvature mass be significantly smaller.

  12. Abnormalities of Penile Curvature: Chordee and Penile Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Montag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital chordee and penile torsion are commonly observed in the presence of hypospadias, but can also be seen in boys with the meatus in its orthotopic position. Varying degrees of penile curvature are observed in 4–10% of males in the absence of hypospadias. Penile torsion can be observed at birth or in older boys who were circumcised at birth. Surgical management of congenital curvature without hypospadias can present a challenge to the pediatric urologist. The most widely used surgical techniques include penile degloving and dorsal plication. This paper will review the current theories for the etiology of penile curvature, discuss the spectrum of severity of congenital chordee and penile torsion, and present varying surgical techniques for the correction of penile curvature in the absence of hypospadias.

  13. The weighted curvature approximation in scattering from sea surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    GUERIN, Charles-Antoine; Soriano, Gabriel; Chapron, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    A family of unified models in scattering from rough surfaces is based on local corrections of the tangent plane approximation through higher-order derivatives of the surface. We revisit these methods in a common framework when the correction is limited to the curvature, that is essentially the second-order derivative. The resulting expression is formally identical to the weighted curvature approximation, with several admissible kernels, however. For sea surfaces under the Gaussian assumption,...

  14. Memory for curvature of objects: Haptic touch vs. vision

    OpenAIRE

    Ittyerah, Miriam; Lawrence E Marks

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the role of vision and haptics in memory for stimulus objects that vary along the dimension of curvature. Experiment 1 measured haptic–haptic (T–T) and haptic–visual (T–V) discrimination of curvature in a short-term memory paradigm, using 30-second retention intervals containing five different interpolated tasks. Results showed poorest performance when the interpolated tasks required spatial processing or movement, thereby suggesting that haptic information about sh...

  15. Static Characterization of Curvature Sensors Based on Plastic Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Casalicchio, Maria Luisa; Perrone, Guido; Vallan, Alberto; Carullo, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Sensors able to measure curvature changes are emerging as an effective alternative to the more common strain gauges for structural health monitoring applications. Particularly interesting is the all-optical fiber implementation for its unique properties and the possibility of being embedded. This paper, after a brief description of curvature sensors using plastic optical fibers, focuses on their characterization in applications where high sensitivity is required, and compares their performanc...

  16. No fast food for solving higher curvature gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Liu

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, gravity theories with higher curvature terms have attracted considerable attentions. Due to the complicated form of the equations of motion, an effective action method, basically based on substituting a metric ansatz into the action and then replacing the original action by the resulting "effective action", is often practiced while finding solutions to such theories. We indicate via explicit example, however, that this procedure is mathematically inconsistent, thus calling for an end for using this method in analyzing higher curvature gravities.

  17. Functionally polymerized surfactant vesicles: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tundo, P.; Kippenberger, D.J.; Klahn, P.L.; Prieto, N.E.; Fendler, J.H.

    1982-01-27

    Bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony bromide, bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony (2-hydroxyethyl)methylammonium bromide, bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony acid, bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony allylbis(2-dodecanoyloxycarbon bromide, and dimethyl-n-hexadecyl (10-(p-vin decyl)ammonium bromide have been synthesized. The predominantly single compartment bilayer vesicles formed from these surfactants could be polymerized either by exposure to ultraviolet irradiation or by the use of azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator. The presence of vesicles (unpolymerized and polymeric) has been demonstrated by electron micrography, H/sup 1/ NMR, gel filtration, phase transition, turbidity changes, substrate entrapment, and permeability. Polymerized vesicles are considerably more stable and less permeable and have reduced rates of turbidity changes compared to their unpolymerized counterparts. 19 references.

  18. Directed vesicle transport by diffusio-osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michler, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.; Sprik, R.; Bonn, D.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study on surfactant vesicles that spontaneously move towards an oil droplet that is deposited on a glass substrate. Tracer particles in the surfactant solution show that the motion is not self-propelled: the vesicles are entrained by a macroscopic hydrodynamic flow. Measurements of the flow velocity suggest that the flow is of diffusio-osmotic nature. The surfactant is observed to move into the oil phase which creates a gradient in ion concentration in the vicinity of the droplet. As the diffusion coefficients of the surfactant's co- and counter-ions differ, a charge separation takes place and an electric field arises. This electric field then generates a hydrodynamic flow along the charged glass substrate in which the vesicles are entrained.

  19. Functionalization of Block Copolymer Vesicle Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Meier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In dilute aqueous solutions certain amphiphilic block copolymers self-assemble into vesicles that enclose a small pool of water with a membrane. Such polymersomes have promising applications ranging from targeted drug-delivery devices, to biosensors, and nanoreactors. Interactions between block copolymer membranes and their surroundings are important factors that determine their potential biomedical applications. Such interactions are influenced predominantly by the membrane surface. We review methods to functionalize block copolymer vesicle surfaces by chemical means with ligands such as antibodies, adhesion moieties, enzymes, carbohydrates and fluorophores. Furthermore, surface-functionalization can be achieved by self-assembly of polymers that carry ligands at their chain ends or in their hydrophilic blocks. While this review focuses on the strategies to functionalize vesicle surfaces, the applications realized by, and envisioned for, such functional polymersomes are also highlighted.

  20. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle McCabe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading.

  1. Design of a curvature sensor using a flexoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X.; Huang, W. B.; Kwon, S. R.; Yang, S. R.; Jiang, X. N.; Yuan, F. G.

    2013-04-01

    A curvature sensor based on flexoelectricity using Ba0.64Sr0.36TiO3 (BST) material is proposed and developed in this paper. The working principle of the sensor is based on the flexoelectricity, exhibiting coupling between mechanical strain gradient and electric polarization. A BST curvature sensor is lab prepared using a conventional solid state processing method. The curvature sensing is demonstrated in four point bending tests of the beam under harmonic loads. BST sensors are attached on both side surfaces of an aluminum beam, located symmetrically with respect to its neutral axis. Analyses have shown that the epoxy bonding layer plays a critical role for curvature transfer. Consequently a shear lag effect is taken into account for extracting actual curvature from the sensor measurement. Experimental results demonstrated good linearity from the charge outputs under the frequencies tests and showed a sensor sensitivity of 30.78pC•m in comparison with 32.48pC•m from theoretical prediction. The BST sensor provides a direct curvature measure instead of using traditional strain gage through interpolation and may offer an optional avenue for on-line and in-situ structural health monitoring.

  2. Electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle under an AC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kumari Priti; Thaokar, Rochish M

    2017-07-12

    Compound vesicles are relevant as simplified models for biological cells as well as in technological applications such as drug delivery. Characterization of these compound vesicles, especially the inner vesicle, remains a challenge. Similarly their response to electric field assumes importance in light of biomedical applications such as electroporation. Fields lower than that required for electroporation cause electrodeformation in vesicles and can be used to characterize their mechanical and electrical properties. A theoretical analysis of the electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle with outer vesicle of radius R o and an inner vesicle of radius [Formula: see text], is presented. A phase diagram for the compound vesicle is presented and elucidated using detailed plots of electric fields, free charges and electric stresses. The electrohydrodynamics of the outer vesicle in a compound vesicle shows a prolate-sphere and prolate-oblate-sphere shape transitions when the conductivity of the annular fluid is greater than the outer fluid, and vice-versa respectively, akin to single vesicle electrohydrodynamics reported in the literature. The inner vesicle in contrast shows sphere-prolate-sphere and sphere-prolate-oblate-sphere transitions when the inner fluid conductivity is greater and smaller than the annular fluid, respectively. Equations and methodology are provided to determine the bending modulus and capacitance of the outer as well as the inner membrane, thereby providing an easy way to characterize compound vesicles and possibly biological cells.

  3. Electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle under an AC electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti Sinha, Kumari; Thaokar, Rochish M.

    2017-07-01

    Compound vesicles are relevant as simplified models for biological cells as well as in technological applications such as drug delivery. Characterization of these compound vesicles, especially the inner vesicle, remains a challenge. Similarly their response to electric field assumes importance in light of biomedical applications such as electroporation. Fields lower than that required for electroporation cause electrodeformation in vesicles and can be used to characterize their mechanical and electrical properties. A theoretical analysis of the electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle with outer vesicle of radius R o and an inner vesicle of radius λ {{R}o} , is presented. A phase diagram for the compound vesicle is presented and elucidated using detailed plots of electric fields, free charges and electric stresses. The electrohydrodynamics of the outer vesicle in a compound vesicle shows a prolate-sphere and prolate-oblate-sphere shape transitions when the conductivity of the annular fluid is greater than the outer fluid, and vice-versa respectively, akin to single vesicle electrohydrodynamics reported in the literature. The inner vesicle in contrast shows sphere-prolate-sphere and sphere-prolate-oblate-sphere transitions when the inner fluid conductivity is greater and smaller than the annular fluid, respectively. Equations and methodology are provided to determine the bending modulus and capacitance of the outer as well as the inner membrane, thereby providing an easy way to characterize compound vesicles and possibly biological cells.

  4. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  5. Histamine stimulates secretion of extracellular vesicles with nucleotidase activity in rat submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Débora Alejandra; Barbieri van Haaster, Martín Matías; Quinteros Villarruel, Emmanuel; Brandt, Macarena; Benítez, María Belén; Stranieri, Graciela Mabel; Orman, Betina

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles released by different cells have been isolated from diverse fluids including saliva. We previously reported that rat submandibular glands secrete nanovesicles that catalyze hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP, which are actors of the purinergic signaling system along with adenosine. Extracellular nucleotides like ATP and adenosine are involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and apoptosis. Histamine, a widely distributed biogenic amine, is involved in inflammatory response. To test if activation of histamine receptors in rat submandibular gland promotes changes in the release of vesicles with nucleotidase activity that could modulate purinergic signaling. Rat submandibular glands were incubated in the absence or presence of histamine and JNJ7777120, an antagonist for H 4 receptors. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from incubation media by differential centrifugation. Vesicular nucleotidase activity was measured following Pi release by 3mM MgATP, MgADP or MgAMP. Histamine increased the release of vesicles with nucleotidase activity in a concentration dependent manner. JNJ7777120 significantly reduced this effect. Vesicular nucleotidases obtained in the absence or presence of histamine promoted Pi production from ATP, ADP and AMP. The results show a relationship between histamine and the regulation of purinergic signaling, which could be important in the modulation of inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Curvature recognition and force generation in phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prassler Jana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of particles by actin-powered invagination of the plasma membrane is common to protozoa and to phagocytes involved in the immune response of higher organisms. The question addressed here is how a phagocyte may use geometric cues to optimize force generation for the uptake of a particle. We survey mechanisms that enable a phagocyte to remodel actin organization in response to particles of complex shape. Results Using particles that consist of two lobes separated by a neck, we found that Dictyostelium cells transmit signals concerning the curvature of a surface to the actin system underlying the plasma membrane. Force applied to a concave region can divide a particle in two, allowing engulfment of the portion first encountered. The phagosome membrane that is bent around the concave region is marked by a protein containing an inverse Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (I-BAR domain in combination with an Src homology (SH3 domain, similar to mammalian insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate p53. Regulatory proteins enable the phagocyte to switch activities within seconds in response to particle shape. Ras, an inducer of actin polymerization, is activated along the cup surface. Coronin, which limits the lifetime of actin structures, is reversibly recruited to the cup, reflecting a program of actin depolymerization. The various forms of myosin-I are candidate motor proteins for force generation in particle uptake, whereas myosin-II is engaged only in retracting a phagocytic cup after a switch to particle release. Thus, the constriction of a phagocytic cup differs from the contraction of a cleavage furrow in mitosis. Conclusions Phagocytes scan a particle surface for convex and concave regions. By modulating the spatiotemporal pattern of actin organization, they are capable of switching between different modes of interaction with a particle, either arresting at a concave region and applying force in an attempt to sever the particle

  7. Extracellular vesicles as therapeutic tools in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eFleury

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including microvesicles (MVs and exosomes, are small vesicles secreted from a wide variety of cells. Whereas MVs are particles released by the outward budding of the plasma membrane, exosomes are derived from endocytic compartments. Secretion of EVs can be enhanced by specific stimuli, and increased plasma circulating levels of EVs have been correlated with pathophysiological situations.MVs, already present in the blood of healthy individuals, are considerably elevated in several cardiovascular diseases associated with inflammation, suggesting that they can mediate deleterious effects such as endothelial dysfunction or thrombosis. Nonetheless, very recent studies also demonstrate that MVs may act as biological information vectors transferring proteins or genetic material to maintain cell homeostasis, favor cell repair or even promote angiogenesis. Additionally, exosomes have also been shown to have proangiogenic and cardioprotective properties. These beneficial effects therefore reveal the potential therapeutical use of EVs in the field of cardiovascular medicine and regenerative therapy.In this review, we will provide an update of cellular processes modulated by EVs of specific interest in the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies. A special focus will be made on the morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh associated with EVs (EVsShh+, which have been shown to mediate many pro-angiogenic effects. In addition to offer a potential source of cardiovascular markers, therapeutical potential of EVs reveal exciting opportunities to deliver specific agents by non-immunogenic means to cardiovascular system.

  8. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data integration in the field. In this review, we provide an updated view of the potential of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers and the available technologies for their isolation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of extracellular vesicles in malaria biology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Natalia Guimaraes; Cheng, Lesley; Eriksson, Emily M

    2017-06-09

    In the past decade, research on the functions of extracellular vesicles in malaria has expanded dramatically. Investigations into the various vesicle types, from both host and parasite origin, has revealed important roles for extracellular vesicles in disease pathogenesis and susceptibility, as well as cell-cell communication and immune responses. Here, work relating to extracellular vesicles in malaria is reviewed, and the areas that remain unknown and require further investigations are highlighted.

  10. Novel tilt-curvature coupling in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, M. Mert; Deserno, Markus

    2017-08-01

    On mesoscopic scales, lipid membranes are well described by continuum theories whose main ingredients are the curvature of a membrane's reference surface and the tilt of its lipid constituents. In particular, Hamm and Kozlov [Eur. Phys. J. E 3, 323 (2000)] have shown how to systematically derive such a tilt-curvature Hamiltonian based on the elementary assumption of a thin fluid elastic sheet experiencing internal lateral pre-stress. Performing a dimensional reduction, they not only derive the basic form of the effective surface Hamiltonian but also express its emergent elastic couplings as trans-membrane moments of lower-level material parameters. In the present paper, we argue, though, that their derivation unfortunately missed a coupling term between curvature and tilt. This term arises because, as one moves along the membrane, the curvature-induced change of transverse distances contributes to the area strain—an effect that was believed to be small but nevertheless ends up contributing at the same (quadratic) order as all other terms in their Hamiltonian. We illustrate the consequences of this amendment by deriving the monolayer and bilayer Euler-Lagrange equations for the tilt, as well as the power spectra of shape, tilt, and director fluctuations. A particularly curious aspect of our new term is that its associated coupling constant is the second moment of the lipid monolayer's lateral stress profile—which within this framework is equal to the monolayer Gaussian curvature modulus, κ¯ m. On the one hand, this implies that many theoretical predictions now contain a parameter that is poorly known (because the Gauss-Bonnet theorem limits access to the integrated Gaussian curvature); on the other hand, the appearance of κ¯ m outside of its Gaussian curvature provenance opens opportunities for measuring it by more conventional means, for instance by monitoring a membrane's undulation spectrum at short scales.

  11. Adsorption of DOPC vesicles on hydrophobic substrates in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    In the present study, the interaction between an intact DOPC vesicle and the hydropho- bic surface is mainly through van der Waals interac- tion. In presence of increasing concentrations of electrolytes, counter ions are present in the vicinity of the DOPC vesicle. As the vesicle approaches the solid substrate, the counter ions ...

  12. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Zohreh; Preobraschenski, Julia; van den Bogaart, Geert; Riedel, Dietmar; Jahn, Reinhard; Woehler, Andrew

    2016-02-26

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided by an electrochemical proton gradient. However, it is unclear how transmitter molecules carrying different net charges can be efficiently sequestered while maintaining charge neutrality and osmotic balance. We used single-vesicle imaging to monitor pH and electrical gradients and directly showed different uptake mechanisms for glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) operating in parallel. In contrast to glutamate, GABA was exchanged for protons, with no other ions participating in the transport cycle. Thus, only a few components are needed to guarantee reliable vesicle filling with different neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Role of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Role of Outer Membrance Vesicles of Bacteria. M V Jagannadham M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 20 Issue 8 ... Keywords. Outer membrane ves ic les (OMVs); secretion; communication; virulence; antibiotic resistance; vaccines.

  14. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Stevens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP and a slowly releasable (SRP pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles.

  15. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchmitt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, like permeability, stability or chemical reactivity.In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multi-compartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nano-scale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nano-reactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

  16. Towards traceable size determination of extracellular vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, Zoltán; Yuana, Yuana; Grootemaat, Anita E.; van der Pol, Edwin; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have clinical importance due to their roles in a wide range of biological processes. The detection and characterization of EVs are challenging because of their small size, low refractive index, and heterogeneity. In this manuscript, the size distribution of an

  17. Functional transferred DNA within extracellular vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jin [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Jiangsu Province (China); Wu, Gengze [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Jose, Pedro A. [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine and Physiology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zeng, Chunyu, E-mail: Chunyuzeng01@163.com [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles including exosomes and shedding vesicles that mediated a cell-to-cell communication. EVs are released from almost all cell types under both physiological and pathological conditions and incorporate nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules for intercellular delivery. Besides protein, mRNA, and microRNA of these molecules, as recent studies show, specific DNA are prominently packaged into EVs. It appears likely that some of exosomes or shedding vesicles, bearing nuclear molecules are released upon bubble-like blebs. Specific interaction of EVs with susceptible recipients performs the uptake of EVs into the target cells, discharging their cargo including nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules into the cytosol. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of EVs to include increased levels of specific DNA. Thus, EVs contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer and atherosclerosis. In this review, the focus is on the characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases of DNA within EVs. - Highlights: • This review is focused on the DNA within EVs including its characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases. • It is clear that DNA within EVs might have important physiological and pathological roles in various diseases. • Knowledge in this area may provides us alternative methods for disease diagnosis or therapy in the future.

  18. Theory of Disk-to-Vesicle Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Shi, An-Chang

    2009-03-01

    Self-assembled membranes from amphiphilic molecules, such as lipids and block copolymers, can assume a variety of morphologies dictated by energy minimization of system. The membrane energy is characterized by a bending modulus (κ), a Gaussian modulus (κG), and the line tension (γ) of the edge. Two basic morphologies of membranes are flat disks that minimize the bending energy at the cost of the edge energy, and enclosed vesicles that minimize the edge energy at the cost of bending energy. In our work, the transition from disk to vesicle is studied theoretically using the string method, which is designed to find the minimum energy path (MEP) or the most probable transition path between two local minima of an energy landscape. Previous studies of disk-to-vesicle transition usually approximate the transitional states by a series of spherical cups, and found that the spherical cups do not correspond to stable or meta-stable states of the system. Our calculation demonstrates that the intermediate shapes along the MEP are very different from spherical cups. Furthermore, some of these transitional states can be meta-stable. The disk-to-vesicle transition pathways are governed by two scaled parameters, κG/κ and γR0/4κ, where R0 is the radius of the disk. In particular, a meta-stable intermediate state is predicted, which may correspond to the open morphologies observed in experiments and simulations.

  19. Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles using Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Wooje; Nanou, Afroditi; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Rho, Hoon Suk; le Gac, Severine; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we aim to characterize extracellular vesicles(EVs) with Confocal Raman spectroscopy to reveal relevant spectral lines that signify differences between EVs derived from different cell lines. In the first stage we performed confocal Raman measurements on various EV samples. For these

  20. The speed-curvature power law of movements: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Myrka; Matic, Adam; Flash, Tamar; Gomez-Marin, Alex; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2017-10-25

    Several types of curvilinear movements obey approximately the so called 2/3 power law, according to which the angular speed varies proportionally to the 2/3 power of the curvature. The origin of the law is debated but it is generally thought to depend on physiological mechanisms. However, a recent paper (Marken and Shaffer, Exp Brain Res 88:685-690, 2017) claims that this power law is simply a statistical artifact, being a mathematical consequence of the way speed and curvature are calculated. Here we reject this hypothesis by showing that the speed-curvature power law of biological movements is non-trivial. First, we confirm that the power exponent varies with the shape of human drawing movements and with environmental factors. Second, we report experimental data from Drosophila larvae demonstrating that the power law does not depend on how curvature is calculated. Third, we prove that the law can be violated by means of several mathematical and physical examples. Finally, we discuss biological constraints that may underlie speed-curvature power laws discovered in empirical studies.

  1. The role of curvature in silica mesoporous crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Miyasaka, Keiichi

    2012-02-08

    Silica mesoporous crystals (SMCs) offer a unique opportunity to study micellar mesophases. Replication of non-equilibrium mesophases into porous silica structures allows the characterization of surfactant phases under a variety of chemical and physical perturbations, through methods not typically accessible to liquid crystal chemists. A poignant example is the use of electron microscopy and crystallography, as discussed herein, for the purpose of determining the fundamental role of amphiphile curvature, namely mean curvature and Gaussian curvature, which have been extensively studied in various fields such as polymer, liquid crystal, biological membrane, etc. The present work aims to highlight some current studies devoted to the interface curvature on SMCs, in which electron microscopy and electron crystallography (EC) are used to understand the geometry of silica wall surface in bicontinuous and cage-type mesostructures through the investigation of electrostatic potential maps. Additionally, we show that by altering the synthesis conditions during the preparation of SMCs, it is possible to isolate particles during micellar mesophase transformations in the cubic bicontinuous system, allowing us to view and study epitaxial relations under the specific synthesis conditions. By studying the relationship between mesoporous structure, interface curvature and micellar mesophases using electron microscopy and EC, we hope to bring new insights into the formation mechanism of these unique materials but also contribute a new way of understanding periodic liquid crystal systems. © 2012 The Royal Society.

  2. Membrane curvature based lipid sorting using a nanoparticle patterned substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua C; Cheney, Philip P; Campbell, Travis; Knowles, Michelle K

    2014-03-28

    Cellular membranes contain a variety of shapes that likely act as motifs for sorting lipids and proteins. To understand the sorting that takes place within cells, a continuous, fluid bilayer with regions of membrane curvature was designed and characterized using confocal fluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy techniques. A supported lipid bilayer was formed over fluorescently labelled nanoparticles deposited on a glass surface. The lipid composition and membrane shape are separately controlled and the nanoparticle dimensions (d = 40-200 nm) determine the extent of curvature. The bulk membrane is fluid as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) using dye labelled lipids. In bilayers that contain fluorescently labelled, single-tailed lipids, accumulation is observed at regions of curvature, yet the molecules retain fluidity. Using single particle imaging methods, lipids are observed to visit regions of curvature and exchange with the surrounding flat membrane. The nanoparticle patterned substrate described here allows for quantitative measurement of the transient interactions between fluorescently labelled biomolecules and regions of membrane curvature.

  3. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  4. Morphology of fluctuating spherical vesicles with internal bond-orientational order

    CERN Document Server

    Ghim, C M

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the tangent-plane n-atic bond-orientational order on a deformable spherical vesicle to explore continuous shape changes accompanied by the development of quasi-long-range order below the critical temperature. The n-atic order parameter psi = psi sub 0 e sup i sup n supTHETA, in which THETA denotes a local bond orientation, describes vector, nematic and hexatic orders for n = 1, 2 and 6 respectively. Since the total vorticity of the local order parameter on a surface of genus zero is constrained to 2 by the Gauss-Bonnet theorem, the ordered phase on a spherical surface should have 2n topological vortices of minimum strength 1/n. Using the phenomenological model including a gauge coupling between the n-atic order and the curvature, we find that vortices tend to be separated as far as possible at the cost of local bending, resulting in a non-spherical equilibrium shape, although the tangent-plane n-atic order expels the local curvature deviation from the spherical surface in the ordered phase. Thu...

  5. From glioblastoma to endothelial cells through extracellular vesicles: messages for angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Ilaria; Delle Monache, Simona; Di Francesco, Marianna; Sanità, Patrizia; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Festuccia, Claudio; Dolo, Vincenza

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma has one of the highest mortality rates among cancers, and it is the most common and malignant form of brain cancer. Among the typical features of glioblastoma tumors, there is an aberrant vascularization: all gliomas are among the most vascularized/angiogenic tumors. In recent years, it has become clear that glioblastoma cells can secrete extracellular vesicles which are spherical and membrane-enclosed particles released, in vitro or in vivo, by both normal and tumor cells; they are involved in the regulation of both physiological and pathological processes; among the latter, cancer is the most widely studied. Extracellular vesicles from tumor cells convey messages to other tumor cells, but also to normal stromal cells in order to create a microenvironment that supports cancer growth and progression and are implicated in drug resistance, escape from immunosurveillance and from apoptosis, as well as in metastasis formation; they are also involved in angiogenesis stimulation, inducing endothelial cells proliferation, and other pro-angiogenic activities. To this aim, the present paper assesses in detail the extracellular vesicles phenomenon in the human glioblastoma cell line U251 and evaluates extracellular vesicles ability to promote the processes required to achieve the formation of new blood vessels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, highlighting that they stimulate proliferation, motility, and tube formation in a dose-response manner. Moreover, a molecular characterization shows that extracellular vesicles are fully equipped for angiogenesis stimulation in terms of proteolytic enzymes (gelatinases and plasminogen activators), pro-angiogenic growth factors (VEGF and TGFβ), and the promoting-angiogenic CXCR4 chemokine receptor.

  6. Genetically Controlled Fusion, Exocytosis and Fission of Artificial Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; De Lucrezia, Davide

    if a special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium. In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles...... to induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different mechanisms are available, e.g. addition...... fusion, fission and exocytosis....

  7. Loading of Vesicles into Soft Amphiphilic Nanotubes using Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erne, Petra M; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Štacko, Peter; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Stuart, Marc C A; Boekema, Egbert J; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-12-07

    The facile assembly of higher-order nanoarchitectures from simple building blocks is demonstrated by the loading of vesicles into soft amphiphilic nanotubes using osmosis. The nanotubes are constructed from rigid interdigitated bilayers which are capped with vesicles comprising phospholipid-based flexible bilayers. When a hyperosmotic gradient is applied to these vesicle-capped nanotubes, the closed system loses water and the more flexible vesicle bilayer is pulled inwards. This leads to inclusion of vesicles inside the nanotubes without affecting the tube structure, showing controlled reorganization of the self-assembled multicomponent system upon a simple osmotic stimulus. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Coated vesicles as protein release mechanism in myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, L D; Lazarus, S S

    An electron microscopic study was undertaken of the protein release mechanism within myeloma cells showing a very high degree of protein production. Smooth surfaced vesicles (50 millimicrons) were seen to originate from the outer margin of the perinuclear cistern. Similar vesicles were also associated with distended Golgi sacs. Possible function of these vesicles could not be determined. Coated vesicles (60 millimicrons) originated as evaginations from endoplasmic reticulum in the transitional region. They were present throughout the cytoplasm and were seen to fuse with the cell membrane discharging an electron dense material. These vesicles are, therefore, thought to transport protein from the rough endoplasmic reticulum and discharge it at the cell surface.

  9. Geometric curvature and phase of the Rabi model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Lijun; Huai, Sainan; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Yunbo, E-mail: ybzhang@sxu.edu.cn

    2015-11-15

    We study the geometric curvature and phase of the Rabi model. Under the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), we apply the gauge independent Berry curvature over a surface integral to calculate the Berry phase of the eigenstates for both single and two-qubit systems, which is found to be identical with the system of spin-1/2 particle in a magnetic field. We extend the idea to define a vacuum-induced geometric curvature when the system starts from an initial state with pure vacuum bosonic field. The induced geometric phase is related to the average photon number in a period which is possible to measure in the qubit–cavity system. We also calculate the geometric phase beyond the RWA and find an anomalous sudden change, which implies the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem and the Berry phases in an adiabatic cyclic evolution are ill-defined near the anti-crossing point in the spectrum.

  10. Exploiting cantilever curvature for noise reduction in atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Grütter, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Optical beam deflection is a widely used method for detecting the deflection of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. This paper presents a first order derivation for the angular detection noise density which determines the lower limit for deflection sensing. Surprisingly, the cantilever radius of curvature, commonly not considered, plays a crucial role and can be exploited to decrease angular detection noise. We demonstrate a reduction in angular detection shot noise of more than an order of magnitude on a home-built AFM with a commercial 450 μm long cantilever by exploiting the optical properties of the cantilever curvature caused by the reflective gold coating. Lastly, we demonstrate how cantilever curvature can be responsible for up to 45% of the variability in the measured sensitivity of cantilevers on commercially available AFMs.

  11. Waterfall field in hybrid inflation and curvature perturbation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sasaki, Misao, E-mail: jgong@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    We study carefully the contribution of the waterfall field to the curvature perturbation at the end of hybrid inflation. In particular we clarify the parameter dependence analytically under reasonable assumptions on the model parameters. After calculating the mode function of the waterfall field, we use the δN formalism and confirm the previously obtained result that the power spectrum is very blue with the index 4 and is absolutely negligible on large scales. However, we also find that the resulting curvature perturbation is highly non-Gaussian and hence we calculate the bispectrum. We find that the bispectrum is at leading order independent of momentum and exhibits its peak at the equilateral limit, though it is unobservably small on large scales. We also present the one-point probability distribution function of the curvature perturbation.

  12. Curvature affects Doppler investigation of vessels: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbis, S; Roatta, S; Guiot, C

    2005-01-01

    In clinical practice, blood velocity estimations from Doppler examination of curved vascular segments are normally different from those of nearby straight segments. The observed "accelerations," sometimes considered as a sort of stochastic disturbances, can actually be related to very specific physical effects due to vessel curvature (i.e., the development of nonaxial velocity [NAV] components) and the spreading of the axial velocity direction in the Doppler sample volume with respect to the insonation axis. The relevant phenomena and their dependence on the radius of curvature of the vessels and on the insonation angle are investigated with a beam-vessel geometry as close as possible to clinical setting, with the simplifying assumptions of steady flow, mild vessel curvature, uniform ultrasonic beam and complete vessel insonation. The insonation angles that minimize the errors are provided on the basis of the study results.

  13. Interaction of insulin with SDS/CTAB catanionic Vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tah, Bidisha; Pal, Prabir; Talapatra, G.B., E-mail: spgbt@iacs.res.in

    2014-01-15

    In the present study, a novel method was used for entrapping the protein, insulin into the catanionic SDS/CTAB vesicle membrane. The anionic SDS and cationic CTAB formed catanionic vesicles at particular concentration (35:65 by volume). In this study, vesicle membrane can be considered as model membrane. The vesicle formation and entrapment efficiency depend on the pH of the aqueous solution. The insulin molecules have attached with the vesicular membrane at pH 7.0. However, at acidic pH, the vesicles were ruptured and the insulin did not entrap into the vesicle membrane, whereas at alkaline pH insulin became fibriller. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Zeta potential studies established the self-assembled structure formation of insulin and catanionic vesicles. To know the protein confirmations, Circular dichroism (CD) was also employed. The temperature dependent steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy show that at room temperature (25 °C), apart from the 305 nm tyrosine fluorescence, a new emission peak at 450 nm was observed only in case of insulin-vesicle system, and was assigned as the tyrosine phosphorescence. This phosphorescence peak is the signature of the entrapment of insulin into the vesicle membrane. Highlights: • SDS-CTAB based catanionic vesicle has been fabricated. • Insulin has been successfully immobilized on these vesicles. • Immobilized insulin shows room temperature phosphorescence.

  14. Model-independent Constraints on Cosmic Curvature and Opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Wei, Jun-Jie; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xia, Jun-Qing; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose to estimate the spatial curvature of the universe and the cosmic opacity in a model-independent way with expansion rate measurements, H(z), and type Ia supernova (SNe Ia). On the one hand, using a nonparametric smoothing method Gaussian process, we reconstruct a function H(z) from opacity-free expansion rate measurements. Then, we integrate the H(z) to obtain distance modulus μ H, which is dependent on the cosmic curvature. On the other hand, distances of SNe Ia can be determined by their photometric observations and thus are opacity-dependent. In our analysis, by confronting distance moduli μ H with those obtained from SNe Ia, we achieve estimations for both the spatial curvature and the cosmic opacity without any assumptions for the cosmological model. Here, it should be noted that light curve fitting parameters, accounting for the distance estimation of SNe Ia, are determined in a global fit together with the cosmic opacity and spatial curvature to get rid of the dependence of these parameters on cosmology. In addition, we also investigate whether the inclusion of different priors for the present expansion rate (H 0: global estimation, 67.74 ± 0.46 km s-1 Mpc-1, and local measurement, 73.24 ± 1.74 km s-1 Mpc-1) exert influence on the reconstructed H(z) and the following estimations of the spatial curvature and cosmic opacity. Results show that, in general, a spatially flat and transparent universe is preferred by the observations. Moreover, it is suggested that priors for H 0 matter a lot. Finally, we find that there is a strong degeneracy between the curvature and the opacity.

  15. Control over the color transition behavior of polydiacetylene vesicles using different alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanatornchai, Thanutpon; Charoenthai, Nipaphat; Wacharasindhu, Sumrit; Sukwattanasinitt, Mongkol; Traiphol, Rakchart

    2013-02-01

    In this contribution, we investigate the color transition behavior of polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicles upon exposure to different chemical stimuli. A series of linear and branched alcohols are used as model additives, allowing systematic control of their molecular shape and polarity. The PDA vesicles are fabricated by using three monomers, 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA), 10,12-tricosadyinoic acid (TCDA), and N-(2-amino ethyl)pentacosa-10,12-dyinamide (AEPCDA). When a series of linear alcohols is used, the longer alcohol length causes color transition of all PDA vesicles. In this system, the penetration of linear alcohols into the inner layer of PDA vesicles is dictated by their polarity. The change of -OH position within the alcohol molecule also affects the degree of penetration. It requires a higher amount of the 2-propanol to induce color transitions of the PDAs compared to that of the 1-propanol. The addition of methyl branches into the hydrophobic tail of alcohols causes an increase in steric effect, which hinders the penetration as well. When the 2,2-dimethyl-1-propanol is used as a stimulus, the color transition of PDAs occurs at much higher alcohol concentration compared to 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 1-pentanol. The variation of PDA structures also affects their ability to interact with the alcohols. The modified head group of poly(AEPCDA) promotes the ability to distinguish between 1-propanol and 2-propanol or 1-propanol and ethanol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. RIM Proteins Activate Vesicle Priming by Reversing Auto-Inhibitory Homodimerization of Munc13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lunbin; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Xu, Wei; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    At a synapse, the presynaptic active zone mediates synaptic vesicle exocytosis. RIM proteins are active-zone scaffolding molecules that – among others – mediate vesicle priming, and directly or indirectly interact with most other essential presynaptic proteins. In particular, the Zn2+-finger domain of RIMs binds to the C2A-domain of the priming factor Munc13, which forms a homodimer in the absence of RIM, but a heterodimer with it. Here we show that RIMs mediate vesicle priming not by coupling Munc13 to other active zone proteins as thought, but by directly activating Munc13. Specifically, we found that the isolated Zn2+-finger domain of RIMs autonomously promotes vesicle priming by binding to Munc13, thereby relieving Munc13 homodimerization. Strikingly, constitutively monomeric mutants of Munc13 rescued priming in RIM-deficient synapses, whereas wild-type Munc13 did not. Both mutant and wild-type Munc13, however, rescued priming in Munc13-deficient synapses. Thus, homodimerization of Munc13 inhibits its priming function, and RIMs activate priming by disrupting Munc13 homodimerization. PMID:21262469

  17. Multiple-image shearography: a direct method to determine curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C J; Toh, S L; Shang, H M; Lin, Q Y

    1995-05-01

    We present a modified method of shearography, known herein as multiple-image shearography, whereby the curvatures of an object can be measured directly from the resulting fringes. It employs an image-shearing camera that produces three sheared images simultaneously to interfere with each other in the image plane. When film is doubly exposed before and after an object is deformed, three sets of fringes are observed of which one set would depict the second-order derivatives of surface displacement.The theory of the multiple-image shearography technique and its application to curvature measurements in plate bending are presented.

  18. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from a leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross-section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  19. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  20. Vertex Normals and Face Curvatures of Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2016-08-12

    This study contributes to the discrete differential geometry of triangle meshes, in combination with discrete line congruences associated with such meshes. In particular we discuss when a congruence defined by linear interpolation of vertex normals deserves to be called a ʼnormal’ congruence. Our main results are a discussion of various definitions of normality, a detailed study of the geometry of such congruences, and a concept of curvatures and shape operators associated with the faces of a triangle mesh. These curvatures are compatible with both normal congruences and the Steiner formula.

  1. Optimization of zonal wavefront estimation and curvature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weiyao

    Optical testing in adverse environments, ophthalmology and applications where characterization by curvature is leveraged all have a common goal: accurately estimate wavefront shape. This dissertation investigates wavefront sensing techniques as applied to optical testing based on gradient and curvature measurements. Wavefront sensing involves the ability to accurately estimate shape over any aperture geometry, which requires establishing a sampling grid and estimation scheme, quantifying estimation errors caused by measurement noise propagation, and designing an instrument with sufficient accuracy and sensitivity for the application. Starting with gradient-based wavefront sensing, a zonal least-squares wavefront estimation algorithm for any irregular pupil shape and size is presented, for which the normal matrix equation sets share a pre-defined matrix. A Gerchberg--Saxton iterative method is employed to reduce the deviation errors in the estimated wavefront caused by the pre-defined matrix across discontinuous boundary. The results show that the RMS deviation error of the estimated wavefront from the original wavefront can be less than lambda/130˜ lambda/150 (for lambda equals 632.8nm) after about twelve iterations and less than lambda/100 after as few as four iterations. The presented approach to handling irregular pupil shapes applies equally well to wavefront estimation from curvature data. A defining characteristic for a wavefront estimation algorithm is its error propagation behavior. The error propagation coefficient can be formulated as a function of the eigenvalues of the wavefront estimation-related matrices, and such functions are established for each of the basic estimation geometries (i.e. Fried, Hudgin and Southwell) with a serial numbering scheme, where a square sampling grid array is sequentially indexed row by row. The results show that with the wavefront piston-value fixed, the odd-number grid sizes yield lower error propagation than the even

  2. Soft vesicles in the synthesis of hard materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renhao; Liu, Weimin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2012-04-17

    Vesicles of surfactants in aqueous solution have received considerable attention because of their use as simple model systems for biological membranes and their applications in various fields including colloids, pharmaceuticals, and materials. Because of their architecture, vesicles could prove useful as "soft" templates for the synthesis of "hard materials". The vesicle phase, however, has been challenging and difficult to work with in the construction of hard materials. In the solution-phase synthesis of various inorganic or macromolecular materials, templating methods provide a powerful strategy to control the size, morphology, and composition of the resulting micro- and nanostructures. In comparison with hard templates, soft templates are generally constructed using amphiphilic molecules, especially surfactants and amphiphilic polymers. These types of compounds offer advantages including the wide variety of available templates, simple fabrication processes under mild conditions, and easy removal of the templates with less damage to the final structures. Researchers have used many ordered molecular aggregates such as vesicles, micelles, liquid crystals, emulsion droplets, and lipid nanotubes as templates or structure-directing agents to control the synthesis or assembly hard micro- and nanomaterials composed from inorganic compounds or polymers. In addition to their range of sizes and morphologies, vesicles present unique structures that can simultaneously supply different microenvironments for the growth and assembly of hard materials: the inner chamber of vesicles, the outer surface of the vesicles, and the space between bilayers. Two main approaches for applying vesicles in the field of hard materials have been explored: (i) in situ synthesis of micro- or nanomaterials within a specific microenvironment by vesicle templating and (ii) the assembly or incorporation of guest materials during the formation of vesicles. This Account provides an in-depth look at

  3. Signaling by Extracellular Vesicles Advances Cancer Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Bachmann, Michael H; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian cells secrete various extracellular vesicles (EVs; exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies) that differ in biogenesis, composition, and function. Each vesicle type can originate from normal or cancerous cells, transfer molecular cargo to both neighboring and distant cells, and modulate cellular behaviors involved in eubiology and pathology, such as tumor development. Here, we review evidence for the role of EVs in the establishment and maintenance of cancer hallmarks, including sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppression, resisting cell death, reprogramming energy metabolism, acquiring genomic instability, and remodeling the tumor microenvironment. We also discuss how EVs are implicated in the induction of angiogenesis, control of cellular invasion, initiation of premetastatic niches, maintenance of inflammation, and evasion of immune surveillance. The deeper understanding of the biology of EVs and their contribution to the development and progression of tumors is leading to new opportunities in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Seminal vesicle cystadenoma: a rare clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Gideon; Pizov, Galina; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov

    2011-08-01

    A 52-yr-old man presented with severe obstructive urinary symptoms. Ten years earlier, a digital rectal examination disclosed a small mass above the prostate, and a computed tomography (CT) scan showed a 3.5-cm cystic tumor of the right seminal vesicle. He had been followed conservatively elsewhere. Reevaluation of the mass with a CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed that the mass had grown to a maximal diameter of 14 cm. A transabdominal needle biopsy revealed benign fibromuscular tissue. The tumor was then resected by an open transvesical approach. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. The natural history, pathology, and surgical approach are described. Copyright © 2009 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Docking of secretory vesicles is syntaxin dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi de Wit

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones.

  6. Vitrification of Germinal Vesicle Stage Oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    ABE, Yasuyuki; AONO, Nobuya; Hara, Kenshiro; Matsumoto, Hiromichi; BAKHTIYARI, Mehrdad; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2004-01-01

    In order to cryopreserve germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes, we first need to develop a novel container for keeping large quantities of GV oocytes, because of collecting them as cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) that have bigger size and larger volume than oocytes themselves, and second modify a protocol for optimizing vitrification of them. In this mini-review, we describe our recent progress for attaining these objectives. When 65 bovine COCs having GV oocytes could be placed on a sheet of ...

  7. Inflammatory Stroke Extracellular Vesicles Induce Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Davis, Simon; Fischer, Roman; Dickens, Alex M; Neuhaus, Ain A; Burgess, Annette I; Rothwell, Peter M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are protein-lipid complexes released from cells, as well as actively exocytosed, as part of normal physiology, but also during pathological processes such as those occurring during a stroke. Our aim was to determine the inflammatory potential of stroke EVs. EVs were quantified and analyzed in the sera of patients after an acute stroke (inflammation in immune cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. A readily retrievable pool of synaptic vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Y; Sinha, R.; Thiel, C.; Schmidt, R.; Hueve, J.; Martens, H.; Hell, S.; Egner, A.; Klingauf, J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is thought to be the predominant mechanism of synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling, it seems to be too slow for fast recycling. Therefore, it was suggested that a pre-sorted and pre-assembled pool of SV proteins on the presynaptic membrane might support a first wave of fast CME. In this study we monitored the temporal dynamics of such a 'readily retrievable pool' of SV proteins in rat hippocampal neurons using a novel probe. Applying...

  9. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  10. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  11. Detection of platelet vesicles by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P; Jones, Jennifer C

    2017-05-01

    The composition and function of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in health and in disease are a major topic of investigation in biomedical research. However, efforts to delineate specific molecular repertoires and roles for different types of EVs in the circulation are limited not only by the lack of flow cytometers capable of analyzing submicron- and nano-materials across the full size spectrum of plasma EVs, but also by the lack of standardized methods and reference materials that would permit inter-laboratory reproducibility for these analyses. In this review, we summarize the flow cytometry of EVs, with a focus on platelet vesicles in plasma. In addition to delineating the basic principles that govern what precautions must be considered when using flow cytometry for the analysis of platelet vesicles, we provide an overview for how to standardize, control, annotate, and report EV flow cytometry data reproducibly, while looking forward to a next generation of high sensitivity instruments for the analysis of EVs and other submicron biomaterials in the circulation.

  12. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  13. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular disease: are they Jedi or Sith?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Németh, Andrea; Sódar, Barbara W; Vukman, Krisztina V; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-06-01

    In the recent past, extracellular vesicles have become recognized as important players in cell biology and biomedicine. Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed structures found to be secreted by most if not all cells. Extracellular vesicle secretion represents a universal and highly conserved active cellular function. Importantly, increasing evidence supports that extracellular vesicles may serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets or tools in human diseases. Cardiovascular disease undoubtedly represents one of the most intensely studied and rapidly growing areas of the extracellular vesicle field. However, in different studies related to cardiovascular disease, extracellular vesicles have been shown to exert diverse and sometimes discordant biological effects. Therefore, it might seem a puzzle whether these vesicles are in fact beneficial or detrimental to cardiovascular health. In this review we provide a general introduction to extracellular vesicles and an overview of their biological roles in cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, we aim to untangle the various reasons for the observed discrepancy in biological effects of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we provide several examples that demonstrate that the observed functional diversity is in fact due to inherent differences among various types of extracellular vesicles. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  15. Remarks on the boundary curve of a constant mean curvature topological disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Lopéz, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    We discuss some consequences of the existence of the holomorphic quadratic Hopf differential on a conformally immersed constant mean curvature topological disc with analytic boundary. In particular, we derive a formula for the mean curvature as a weighted average of the normal curvature of the bo......We discuss some consequences of the existence of the holomorphic quadratic Hopf differential on a conformally immersed constant mean curvature topological disc with analytic boundary. In particular, we derive a formula for the mean curvature as a weighted average of the normal curvature...

  16. Curvature Properties of Lorentzian Manifolds with Large Isometry Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batat, Wafaa [Ecole Normale Superieure de L' Enseignement Technique d' Oran, Departement de Mathematiques et Informatique (Algeria)], E-mail: wafa.batat@enset-oran.dz; Calvaruso, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.calvaruso@unile.it; Leo, Barbara De [University of Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica ' E. De Giorgi' (Italy)], E-mail: barbara.deleo@unile.it

    2009-08-15

    The curvature of Lorentzian manifolds (M{sup n},g), admitting a group of isometries of dimension at least 1/2n(n - 1) + 1, is completely described. Interesting behaviours are found, in particular as concerns local symmetry, local homogeneity and conformal flatness.

  17. Automatic quantification of local and global articular cartilage surface curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the surface curvature of the articular cartilage from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and to investigate its role in populations with varying radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA), cross-sectionally and longitudinally. ...

  18. Cosmological models with positive scalar spatial curvature and Λ>0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    1987-12-01

    Some exact spherically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations with Λ>0 and positive three-curvature are given. They have reasonable physical properties and represent universes which do not undergo inflation but have a non-de Sitter behaviour for large times. This paper extends some previous results in the literature. Permanent address: Apartado 2816, Caracas 1010-A, Venezuela.

  19. Generalized Curvature-Matter Couplings in Modified Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Harko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we review a plethora of modified theories of gravity with generalized curvature-matter couplings. The explicit nonminimal couplings, for instance, between an arbitrary function of the scalar curvature R and the Lagrangian density of matter, induces a non-vanishing covariant derivative of the energy-momentum tensor, implying non-geodesic motion and, consequently, leads to the appearance of an extra force. Applied to the cosmological context, these curvature-matter couplings lead to interesting phenomenology, where one can obtain a unified description of the cosmological epochs. We also consider the possibility that the behavior of the galactic flat rotation curves can be explained in the framework of the curvature-matter coupling models, where the extra terms in the gravitational field equations modify the equations of motion of test particles and induce a supplementary gravitational interaction. In addition to this, these models are extremely useful for describing dark energy-dark matter interactions and for explaining the late-time cosmic acceleration.

  20. Slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function using variationally ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 75; Issue 3. Slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function using variationally improved perturbation theory in a quantum chromodynamics inspired potential model. Bhaskar Jyoti Hazarika D K Choudhury. Research Articles Volume 75 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 423- ...

  1. Measurement of sternal curvature angle on patients with pectus excavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cory; Zavala-Garcia, Abraham; Teekappanavar, Neha; Lee, Catherine; Idowu, Olajire; Kim, Sunghoon

    2017-01-01

    Pectus excavatum (PE) is a chest deformity characterized by marked sternal depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the sternal curvature observed in patients diagnosed with PE using the sternal curvature angle (SCA). A retrospective review of lateral chest X-rays of patients with PE from 2006 to 2013 was performed. The SCA was measured in a manner similar to the method of Cobb's angle is used to measure spinal curvature. SCA and Haller index were calculated from the chest X-rays for all patients. Lateral chest X-rays of 202 PE and 196 normal control patients were analyzed. The mean SCA ± SD of PE patients was 40.56° ± 12.88° compared to 22.02° ± 7.65° for normal patients. The difference was statistically significant with a p value of pectus excavatum and normal patients was statistically significant. Our data suggest that sternal depression evident in PE patients is not a simple linear depression of the sternum but due to curvature in the sternal body.

  2. Curvature-induced symmetry breaking in nonlinear Schrodinger models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Mingaleev, S. F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2000-01-01

    We consider a curved chain of nonlinear oscillators and show that the interplay of curvature and nonlinearity leads to a symmetry breaking when an asymmetric stationary state becomes energetically more favorable than a symmetric stationary state. We show that the energy of localized states decrea...

  3. Phase error correction in wavefront curvature sensing via phase retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almoro, Percival; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront curvature sensing with phase error correction system is carried out using phase retrieval based on a partially-developed volume speckle field. Various wavefronts are reconstructed: planar, spherical, cylindrical, and a wavefront passing through the side of a bare optical fiber. Spurious...

  4. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee...

  5. Other Earths: Search for Life and the Constant Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshyaran M. M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a search methodology for finding other exactly similar earth like planets (or sister earths. The theory is based on space consisting of Riemann curves or highways. A mathematical model based on constant curvature, a moving frame bundle, and gravitational dynamics is introduced.

  6. Effect of entry bending moment on exit curvature in asymmetrical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In practice, rolling of plate and sheet asymmetry arises due to inequality in roll radii, roll velocity and interface friction. These ... used modified slab method to analyze the asymmetrical plate rolling and to predict strip curvature. Knight et al. ...... This relative motion makes the rotation toward the rougher roll. By applying ...

  7. Temperature insensitive curvature sensor based on cascading photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangwei; Li, Yunpu; Fu, Xinghu; Jin, Wa; Bi, Weihong

    2018-03-01

    A temperature insensitive curvature sensor is proposed based on cascading photonic crystal fiber. Using the arc fusion splicing method, this sensor is fabricated by cascading together a single-mode fiber (SMF), a three layers air holes structure of photonic crystal fiber (3PCF), a five layers air holes structure of photonic crystal fiber (5PCF) and a SMF in turn. So the structure SMF-3PCF-5PCF-SMF can be obtained with a total length of 20 mm. During the process of fabrication, the splicing machine parameters and the length of each optical fiber are adjusted to obtain a high sensitivity curvature sensor. The experimental results show that the curvature sensitivity is -8.40 nm/m-1 in the curvature variation range of 0-1.09 m-1, which also show good linearity. In the range of 30-90 °C, the temperature sensitivity is only about 3.24 pm/°C, indicating that the sensor is not sensitive to temperature. The sensor not only has the advantages of easy fabricating, simple structure, high sensitivity but also can solve the problem of temperature measurement cross sensitivity, so it can be used for different areas including aerospace, large-scale bridge, architectural structure health monitoring and so on.

  8. A level set crystalline mean curvature flow of surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Giga, Yoshikazu; Požár, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of viscosity solutions for the level set formulation of the motion by crystalline mean curvature in three dimensions. The solutions satisfy the comparison principle, stability with respect to an approximation by regularized problems, and we also show the uniqueness and existence of a level set flow for bounded crystals.

  9. Draping Double-Layer Woven Fabrics Onto Double-Curvature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Draping woven fabrics to complex parts with double curvature leads to complex redistribution and reorientation of the yarns in composites reinforced with woven preforms. To reduce the risk of fabric tearing or wrinkling we propose to use double-layer woven fabrics. This paper presents a simulation model for draping

  10. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, South West ...

  11. A quasifibration of spaces of positive scalar curvature metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Chernysh, Vladislav

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we show that for Riemannian manifolds with boundary the natural restriction map is a quasifibration between spaces of metrics of positive scalar curvature. We apply this result to study homotopy properties of spaces of such metrics on manifolds with boundary.

  12. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile‑Ife, South West Nigeria, free of ...

  13. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, South West ...

  14. Eigenvalue estimates for submanifolds with bounded f-mean curvature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GUANGYUE HUANG

    Abstract. In this paper, we obtain an extrinsic low bound to the first non-zero eigenvalue of the f -Laplacian on complete noncompact submanifolds of the weighted. Riemannian manifold (Hm(−1), e−f dv) with respect to the f -mean curvature. In par- ticular, our results generalize those of Cheung and Leung in Math. Z. 236 ...

  15. Curvature sensing with a Shack-Hartmann sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soloviev, O.A.; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Vdovine, G.V.; Bonora, S

    2015-01-01

    Shack-Hartmann (SH) sensor, based on sampling of wavefront tilts in subapertures, is a simple, reliable, and widely used in adaptive optics wavefront sensor. A wavefront curvature sensor has the advantage of providing the results suitable for direct control of membrane and bimorph deformable mirrors

  16. On the Curvature and Heat Flow on Hamiltonian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohta Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop the differential geometric and geometric analytic studies of Hamiltonian systems. Key ingredients are the curvature operator, the weighted Laplacian, and the associated Riccati equation.We prove appropriate generalizations of the Bochner-Weitzenböck formula and Laplacian comparison theorem, and study the heat flow.

  17. An optomechatronic curvature measurement array based on fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Chang, I.-Nan; Chen, Ya-Hui; Lin, Shyan-Lung; Hung, San-Shan; Lin, Jung-Chih; Liu, Wen-Fung

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated an optomechatronic array-integrated signal processing module and a human-machine interface based on fiber Bragg grating sensing elements embedded in an elastic support matrix that involves using a self-located electromagnetic mechanism for curvature sensing and solid contour reconstruction. Using bilinear interpolation and average calculation methods, the smooth and accurate surface contours of convex and concave lenses are reconstructed in real-time. The elastic supporting optical sensing array is self-balanced to reduce operational errors. Compared with our previous single-head sensor, the sensitivity of the proposed array is improved by more than 15%. In the curvature range from -20.15 to +27.09 m-1, the sensitivities are 3.53 pm m for the convex measurement and 2.15 pm m for the concave measurement with an error rate below 8.89%. The curvature resolutions are 0.283 and 0.465 m-1 for convex and concave lenses, respectively. This array could be applied in the curvature measurement of solar collectors to monitor energy conversion efficiency or could be used to monitor the wafer-level thin-film fabrication process.

  18. The Arabidopsis P4-ATPase ALA3 requires a ß-subunit to function in phospholipid translocation and secretory vesicle formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    The Arabidopsis P4-ATPase ALA3 requires a ß-subunit to function in phospholipid translocation and secretory vesicle formation   Lisbeth R. Poulsen1, Rosa L. López-Marqués1, Stephen C. McDowell2, Juha Okkeri3, Dirk Licht3, Alexander Schulz1, Thomas Pomorski3,  Jeffrey F. Harper2, and Michael G....... Palmgren1 1Centre for Membrane Pumps in Cells and Disease - PUMPKIN, Danish National Research Foundation, Department of Plant Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark 2Biochemistry Department MS200, University of Nevada Reno, NV 89557, USA 3Humboldt-University Berlin, Faculty...... and in inducing membrane curvature, which is a requirement for vesicle formation. We show that Aminophospholipid ATPase3 (ALA3), a member of the P4-ATPase subfamily in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, localizes to the Golgi apparatus and that genetic lesions of ALA3 result in impaired growth of roots and shoots...

  19. Stimulation of root elongation and curvature by calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Scott, T. K.; Suge, H.

    1992-01-01

    Ca2+ has been proposed to mediate inhibition of root elongation. However, exogenous Ca2+ at 10 or 20 millimolar, applied directly to the root cap, significantly stimulated root elongation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings. Furthermore, Ca2+ at 1 to 20 millimolar, applied unilaterally to the caps of Alaska pea roots, caused root curvature away from the Ca2+ source, which was caused by an acceleration of elongation growth on the convex side (Ca2+ side) of the roots. Roots of an agravitropic pea mutant, ageotropum, responded to a greater extent. Roots of Merit and Silver Queen corn also responded to Ca2+ in similar ways but required a higher Ca2+ concentration than that of pea roots. Roots of all other cultivars tested (additional four cultivars of pea and one of corn) curved away from the unilateral Ca2+ source as well. The Ca(2+)-stimulated curvature was substantially enhanced by light. A Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, at 20 micromolar or abscisic acid at 0.1 to 100 micromolar partially substituted for the light effect and enhanced the Ca(2+)-stimulated curvature in the dark. Unilateral application of Ca2+ to the elongation zone of intact roots or to the cut end of detipped roots caused either no curvature or very slight curvature toward the Ca2+. Thus, Ca2+ action on root elongation differs depending on its site of application. The stimulatory action of Ca2+ may involve an elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in root cap cells and may partipate in root tropisms.

  20. Patient satisfaction with correction of congenital penile curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M; Rey Valzacchi, G; Silva Garretón, A; Layus, O; Gueglio, G

    2017-12-29

    Congenital penile curvature is a relatively rare disease, resulting from a deviation of the penis from the body's straight axis when erect. The prevalence is difficult to determine. Although it has been suggested that the condition could affect up to 10% of the male population, most of these deviations are minor, with no clinical or psychological importance, which leads to its underdiagnosis. Effective correction of the deviation can markedly improve the quality of life of adolescents with this condition. To assess the quality of the sex life of patients diagnosed with congenital penile curvature who underwent surgical correction. Design Retrospective, observational cohort study. Data was collected from the medical records of patients who underwent surgical correction of congenital penile curvature from June 2004 to August 2016. The patients completed the following self-administered questionnaires: Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire-Male (SQOL-M), International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF 5) and "How satisfied are you with the results of the surgery? From 0 to 10". Twenty-two corporoplasties were performed to correct the patients' congenital penile curvature. The patients' average age was 23.4 years (range, 17-35). The mean deviation prior to surgery was 47.9° (range, 20°-90°). The average score on the SQOL-M was 52 points (range, 6-66). The average score on the IIEF 5 was 22.4 points. Congenital penile curvature profoundly decreases quality of life, and early surgery is fundamental for repairing the anatomical deformation and thereby significantly restores the patients' psychosocial and sexual wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic and Signaling Functions of Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, P; Vardaki, I; Occhionero, A; Panaretakis, T

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles have gained tremendous attention in the recent years as a novel mechanism of cell to cell communication. There are several types of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles, exosome, like vesicles, apoptotic bodies that differ mainly in the mechanism of biogenesis and secretion. The most well studied type of extracellular vesicles are the exosomes which are endosome-derived vesicles with a diameter of 50-150nm and enriched in ESCRT proteins including Alix, TSG101, Hsp70, and tetraspanins. It is now well established that exosomes promote tumor growth, alter the tumor microenvironment, facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells in an organotropic manner, modulate immune responses, and mediate resistance to therapy. Exosomes have also been recently implicated in an emerging hallmark of cancer, the cancer cell metabolism. The metabolic state of the cell defines, to a certain extent, both the rate of secretion and the molecular content of tumor-derived exosomes. Furthermore, exosomes have been shown to possess intrinsic metabolic activity since they can synthesize ATP by glycolysis. It follows that exosomes carry a number of metabolic enzymes and metabolites, including lactate, PGE, LDH isoforms, pyruvate, and monocarboxylate transporters. Last but not the least, exosomes are implicated in fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol metabolism and are thought to be crucial for the transcellular metabolism procedure. Uptake of exosomes is thought to alter the intracellular metabolic state of the cell. In summary, we describe the state of the art on the role of metabolism in the secretion, uptake, and the biological effects of exosomes in the metabolism of recipient cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing produced by alpha-sarcin on phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylserine vesicles: stopped-flow light scattering and fluorescence energy transfer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheño, J M; Gasset, M; Lacadena, J; Ramón, F; Martínez del Pozo, A; Oñaderra, M; Gavilanes, J G

    1994-09-01

    alpha-Sarcin is a fungal cytotoxic protein that inactivates the eukaryotic ribosomes. A kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing promoted by this protein on phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles has been performed. Egg yolk PG, bovine brain PS, dimyristoyl-PG (DMPG) and dimyristoyl-PS (DMPS) vesicles have been considered. The initial rates of the vesicle aggregation induced by the protein have been measured by stopped-flow 90 degrees light scattering. The formation of a vesicle dimer as the initial step of this process was deduced from the second-order dependence of the initial rates on phospholipid concentration. The highest alpha-sarcin concentration studied did not inhibit the vesicle aggregation, indicating that many protein molecules are involved in the vesicle cross-linking. These are common characteristics of the initial steps of the aggregation produced by alpha-sarcin in the four types of phospholipid vesicles considered. However, the kinetics of the scattering values revealed that more complex changes occurred in the later steps of the aggregation process of egg PG and brain PS vesicles than in those of their synthetic counterparts. alpha-Sarcin produced lipid mixing in vesicles composed of DMPG or DMPS, which was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays. A delay in the onset of the process, dependent on the protein concentration, was observed. Measurement of the rates of lipid mixing revealed that the process is first order on phospholipid concentration. Egg PG and brain PS vesicles did not show lipid mixing, although they avidly aggregated. However, alpha-sarcin was able to promote lipid mixing in heterogeneous systems composed of egg PG+DMPG or brain PS+DMPS vesicles. The dilution of the fluorescence probes was faster when these were incorporated into the bilayers made of synthetic phospholipids than were present in those made of natural phospholipids. The bilayer destabilization produced by the

  3. Neuronal Depolarization Drives Increased Dopamine Synaptic Vesicle Loading via VGLUT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jenny I; Dunn, Matthew; Mingote, Susana; Karam, Caline S; Farino, Zachary J; Sonders, Mark S; Choi, Se Joon; Grygoruk, Anna; Zhang, Yuchao; Cela, Carolina; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Flores, Jorge; Freyberg, Robin J; McCabe, Brian D; Mosharov, Eugene V; Krantz, David E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Rayport, Stephen; Freyberg, Zachary

    2017-08-30

    The ability of presynaptic dopamine terminals to tune neurotransmitter release to meet the demands of neuronal activity is critical to neurotransmission. Although vesicle content has been assumed to be static, in vitro data increasingly suggest that cell activity modulates vesicle content. Here, we use a coordinated genetic, pharmacological, and imaging approach in Drosophila to study the presynaptic machinery responsible for these vesicular processes in vivo. We show that cell depolarization increases synaptic vesicle dopamine content prior to release via vesicular hyperacidification. This depolarization-induced hyperacidification is mediated by the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Remarkably, both depolarization-induced dopamine vesicle hyperacidification and its dependence on VGLUT2 are seen in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons in the mouse. Together, these data suggest that in response to depolarization, dopamine vesicles utilize a cascade of vesicular transporters to dynamically increase the vesicular pH gradient, thereby increasing dopamine vesicle content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Si-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Sic; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Go, Gyeongyun; Park, Seon-Min; Kim, Si Hyun; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Chang, Chulhun L; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-10-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles, also known as outer membrane vesicles, membrane vesicles, exosomes, and microvesicles, is an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon from bacteria to eukaryotes. It has been reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases extracellular vesicles harboring immunologically active molecules, and these extracellular vesicles have been suggested to be applicable in vaccine development and biomarker discovery. However, the comprehensive proteomic analysis has not been performed for M. tuberculosis extracellular vesicles. In this study, we identified a total of 287 vesicular proteins by four LC-MS/MS analyses with high confidence. In addition, we identified several vesicular proteins associated with the virulence of M. tuberculosis. This comprehensive proteome profile will help elucidate the pathogenic mechanism of M. tuberculosis. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001160 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001160). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Post-fusion structural changes and their roles in exocytosis and endocytosis of dense-core vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Shin, Wonchul; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Hamid, Edaeni; Sheng, Jiansong; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wen, Peter J.; Jin, Albert; Momboisse, Fanny; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2014-02-01

    Vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane generates an Ω-shaped membrane profile. Its pore is thought to dilate until flattening (full-collapse), followed by classical endocytosis to retrieve vesicles. Alternatively, the pore may close (kiss-and-run), but the triggering mechanisms and its endocytic roles remain poorly understood. Here, using confocal and stimulated emission depletion microscopy imaging of dense-core vesicles, we find that fusion-generated Ω-profiles may enlarge or shrink while maintaining vesicular membrane proteins. Closure of fusion-generated Ω-profiles, which produces various sizes of vesicles, is the dominant mechanism mediating rapid and slow endocytosis within ~1-30 s. Strong calcium influx triggers dynamin-mediated closure. Weak calcium influx does not promote closure, but facilitates the merging of Ω-profiles with the plasma membrane via shrinking rather than full-collapse. These results establish a model, termed Ω-exo-endocytosis, in which the fusion-generated Ω-profile may shrink to merge with the plasma membrane, change in size or change in size then close in response to calcium, which is the main mechanism to retrieve dense-core vesicles.

  7. Study of lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid protective role in large unilamellar vesicles from a new electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M Fátima; Luna, M Alejandra; Moyano, Fernando; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Correa, N Mariano; Molina, Patricia G

    2017-12-06

    In this contribution an electrochemical study is described for the first time of lipid peroxidation and the role of antioxidant on lipid protection using large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs). In order to simulate the cell membrane, LUVs composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) were used. A vesicle-modified electrode was constructed by immobilizing DOPC LUVs onto carbon paste electrodes (CPEs). Lipid peroxidation was studied electrochemically by incubating the vesicle-modified electrodes with hydroxyl (HO) radicals generated via the Fenton reaction. Oxidative damage induced by HO was verified by using square wave voltammetry (SWV) and was indirectly measured by the increase of electrochemical peak current to [Fe(CN)6]4- which was used as the electrochemical label. Ascorbic acid (AA) was used as the antioxidant model in order to study its efficacy on free radical scavenging. The decrease of the electrochemical signal confirms the protective key role promoted by AA in the prevention of lipid peroxidation in vesicles. Through microscopy, it was possible to observe morphologic modification on vesicle structures after lipid peroxidation in the presence or absence of AA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA-mediated self-assembly of artificial vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadorn, Maik; Eggenberger Hotz, Peter

    2010-03-26

    Although multicompartment systems made of single unilamellar vesicles offer the potential to outperform single compartment systems widely used in analytic, synthetic, and medical applications, their use has remained marginal to date. On the one hand, this can be attributed to the binary character of the majority of the current tethering protocols that impedes the implementation of real multicomponent or multifunctional systems. On the other hand, the few tethering protocols theoretically providing multicompartment systems composed of several distinct vesicle populations suffer from the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as from the loss of specificity of the linking mechanism over time. In previous studies, we presented implementations of multicompartment systems and resolved the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as the loss of specificity by using linkers consisting of biotinylated DNA single strands that were anchored to phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers via streptavidin as a connector. The systematic analysis presented herein provides evidences for the incorporation of phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers to the vesicle membrane during vesicle formation, providing specific anchoring sites for the streptavidin loading of the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, DNA-mediated vesicle-vesicle self-assembly was found to be sequence-dependent and to depend on the presence of monovalent salts. This study provides a solid basis for the implementation of multi-vesicle assemblies that may affect at least three distinct domains. (i) Analysis. Starting with a minimal system, the complexity of a bottom-up system is increased gradually facilitating the understanding of the components and their interaction. (ii) Synthesis. Consecutive reactions may be implemented in networks of vesicles that outperform current single compartment bioreactors in versatility and productivity. (iii) Personalized medicine. Transport and

  9. Cellular phenotype and extracellular vesicles: basic and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesenberry, Peter J; Goldberg, Laura R; Aliotta, Jason M; Dooner, Mark S; Pereira, Mandy G; Wen, Sicheng; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Early work on platelet and erythrocyte vesicles interpreted the phenomena as a discard of material from cells. Subsequently, vesicles were studied as possible vaccines and, most recently, there has been a focus on the effects of vesicles on cell fate. Recent studies have indicated that extracellular vesicles, previously referred to as microvesicles or exosomes, have the capacity to change the phenotype of neighboring cells. Extensive work has shown that vesicles derived from either the lung or liver can enter bone marrow cells (this is a prerequisite) and alter their fate toward that of the originating liver and lung tissue. Lung vesicles interacted with bone marrow cells result in the bone marrow cells expressing surfactants A-D, Clara cell protein, and aquaporin-5 mRNA. In a similar vein, liver-derived vesicles induce albumin mRNA in target marrow cells. The vesicles contain protein, mRNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA and variably some DNA. This genetic package is delivered to cells and alters the phenotype. Further studies have shown that initially the altered phenotype is due to the transfer of mRNA and a transcriptional modulator, but long-term epigenetic changes are induced through transfer of a transcriptional factor, and the mRNA is rapidly degraded in the cell. Studies on the capacity of vesicles to restore injured tissue have been quite informative. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived vesicles are able to reverse the injury to the damaged liver and kidney. Other studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cell-derived vesicles can reverse radiation toxicity of bone marrow stem cells. Extracellular vesicles offer an intriguing strategy for treating a number of diseases characterized by tissue injury.

  10. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compo...

  11. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-03-02

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compositions and distribution of surfactants between the bilayers and the aqueous bulk.

  12. [Seminal vesicle cystadenoma as the cause of a retrovesical tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, A; Kania, U; Ortloff, P; Sperling, H

    2014-04-01

    Tumors of the seminal vesicle are rare. Malignant tumors are more common than benign tumors. A seminal vesicle cystadenoma is a rarity. We report on a 41-year-old man with the incidental finding of an asymptomatic retrovesical tumor. The tumor, the seminal vesicle, and the abdominal part of the ductus deferens were surgically removed. The operative access is variable and surgical treatment is the method of choice. The patient's prognosis is good and there are no signs of recurrence.

  13. Quantifying the Relationship Between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dennis Skjøth; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecul...

  14. Magnetically Triggered Release From Giant Unilamellar Vesicles: Visualization By Means Of Confocal Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Nappini, Silvia

    2011-04-07

    Magnetically triggered release from magnetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) loaded with Alexa fluorescent dye was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) under a low-frequency alternating magnetic field (LF-AMF). Core/shell cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (MP@SiO 2(RITC)) were prepared and adsorbed on the GUV membrane. The MP@SiO 2(RITC) location and distribution on giant lipid vesicles were determined by 3D-CLSM projections, and their effect on the release properties and GUV permeability under a LF-AMF was investigated by CLSM time-resolved experiments. We show that the mechanism of release of the fluorescent dye during the LF-AMF exposure is induced by magnetic nanoparticle energy and mechanical vibration, which promote the perturbation of the GUV membrane without its collapse. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. How cancer cells dictate their microenvironment: present roles of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    Intercellular communication plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression through secretory molecules, including growth factors and cytokines. Recent advances have revealed that small membrane vesicles, termed extracellular vesicles (EVs), served as a regulatory agent in the intercellular communication of cancer. EVs enable the transfer of functional molecules, including proteins, mRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs), into recipient cells. Cancer cells utilize EVs to dictate the unique phenotype of surrounding cells, thereby promoting cancer progression. Against such "education" by cancer cells, non-tumoral cells suppress cancer initiation and progression via EVs. Therefore, researchers consider EVs to be important cues to clarify the molecular mechanisms of cancer biology. Understanding the functions of EVs in cancer progression is an important aspect of cancer biology that has not been previously elucidated. In this review, we summarize experimental data that indicate the pivotal roles of EVs in cancer progression.

  16. Dynamic properties of the alkaline vesicle population at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Röther

    Full Text Available In compensatory endocytosis, scission of vesicles from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm is a prerequisite for intravesicular reacidification and accumulation of neurotransmitter molecules. Here, we provide time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of the alkaline vesicle population which appears upon endocytic retrieval. Using fast perfusion pH-cycling in live-cell microscopy, synapto-pHluorin expressing rat hippocampal neurons were electrically stimulated. We found that the relative size of the alkaline vesicle population depended significantly on the electrical stimulus size: With increasing number of action potentials the relative size of the alkaline vesicle population expanded. In contrast to that, increasing the stimulus frequency reduced the relative size of the population of alkaline vesicles. Measurement of the time constant for reacification and calculation of the time constant for endocytosis revealed that both time constants were variable with regard to the stimulus condition. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of the alkaline vesicle population can be predicted by a simple mathematical model. In conclusion, here a novel methodical approach to analyze dynamic properties of alkaline vesicles is presented and validated as a convenient method for the detection of intracellular events. Using this method we show that the population of alkaline vesicles is highly dynamic and depends both on stimulus strength and frequency. Our results implicate that determination of the alkaline vesicle population size may provide new insights into the kinetics of endocytic retrieval.

  17. Floating Escherichia coli by expressing cyanobacterial gas vesicle genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhe; Kang, Li; Li, Jiaheng; Wu, Wenjie; Zhang, Peiran; Gong, Minghao; Lai, Weihong; Zhang, Chunyan; Chang, Lei; Peng, Yong; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Lian; Bao, Yingying; Xu, Haowen; Zhang, Xiaohua; Sui, Zhenghong; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Xianghong

    2015-02-01

    Gas vesicles are hollow, air-filled polyprotein structures that provide the buoyancy to cells. They are found in a variety of prokaryotes. In this study, we isolated a partial gas vesicle protein gene cluster containing gvpA and gvpC20Ψ from Planktothrix rubescens, and inserted it into an expression vector and expressed it in E. coli. The gas vesicle was developed in bacterial cells, which made bacterial cells to float on medium surface. We also amplified gvpA and gvpC20Ψ separately and synthesized an artificial operon by fusing these two genes with the standardized gene expression controlling elements of E. coli. The artificial operon was expressed in E. coli, forming gas vesicles and floating bacteria cells. Our findings verified that the whole set of genes and the overall structure of gas vesicle gene cluster are not necessary for developing gas vesicles in bacteria cells. Two genes, gvpA and gvpC20Ψ, of the gas vesicle gene cluster are sufficient for synthesizing an artificial operon that can develop gas vesicles in bacteria cells. Our findings provided a wide range of applications including easing the harvest of cultured microalgae and bacteria, as well as enriching and remediating aquatic pollutants by constructing gas vesicles in their cells.

  18. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lässer, Cecilia; Théry, Clotilde; Buzás, Edit I.; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Weian; Gho, Yong Song; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC) on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge. PMID:27989272

  19. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lässer, Cecilia; Théry, Clotilde; Buzás, Edit I; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Weian; Gho, Yong Song; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This course, "Basics of Extracellular Vesicles," uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC) on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform "Coursera" and is free of charge.

  20. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lässer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs. This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge.

  1. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Remarks on the boundary curve of a constant mean curvature topological disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Lopéz, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    We discuss some consequences of the existence of the holomorphic quadratic Hopf differential on a conformally immersed constant mean curvature topological disc with analytic boundary. In particular, we derive a formula for the mean curvature as a weighted average of the normal curvature...

  3. Curvature correction to the mobility of fluid membrane inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, D R

    2016-10-01

    Using rigorous low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic theory on curved surfaces, we provide, via a Stokeslet-type approach, a general and concise expression for the leading-order curvature correction to the canonical, planar, Saffman-Delbrück value of the diffusion constant for a small inclusion embedded in an arbitrarily (albeit weakly) curved fluid membrane. In order to demonstrate the efficacy and utility of this general result, we apply our theory to the specific case of calculating the diffusion coefficient of a locally curvature inducing membrane inclusion. By including both the effects of inclusion and membrane elasticity, as well as their respective thermal shape fluctuations, excellent agreement is found with recently published experimental data on the surface tension dependent mobility of membrane bound inclusions.

  4. Gravitomagnetism and the significance of the curvature scalar invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, L Filipe O; Natário, José

    2016-01-01

    The curvature invariants have been subject of recent interest due to the debate concerning the notions of intrinsic/extrinsic frame-dragging, the use of the electromagnetic analogy in such classification, and the question of whether there is a fundamental difference between the gravitomagnetic field arising from the translational motion of the sources, detected with Lunar Laser Raging and in the observations of binary pulsars, and the gravitomagnetic field produced by the rotation of the Earth, detected in the LAGEOS Satellites data and by the Gravity Probe-B mission. In this work we clarify both the algebraic and physical meaning of the curvature invariants and their electromagnetic counterparts. The structure of the invariants of the astrophysical setups of interest is studied in detail, and its relationship with the gravitomagnetic effects is dissected. Finally, a new classification for intrinsic/extrinsic gravitomagnetism is put forth.

  5. Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity with Curvature Matter Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first and generalized second laws of thermodynamics are studied in f(R,Lm gravity, a more general modified theory with curvature matter coupling. It is found that one can translate the Friedmann equations to the form of first law accompanied with entropy production term. This behavior is due to the nonequilibrium thermodynamics in this theory. We establish the generalized second law of thermodynamics and develop the constraints on coupling parameters for two specific models. It is concluded that laws of thermodynamics in this modified theory are more general and can reproduce the corresponding results in Einstein, f(R gravity, and f(R gravity with arbitrary as well as nonminimal curvature matter coupling.

  6. Glauber theory and the quantum coherence of curvature inhomogeneities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-12

    The curvature inhomogeneities are systematically scrutinized in the framework of the Glauber approach. The amplified quantum fluctuations of the scalar and tensor modes of the geometry are shown to be first-order coherent while the interference of the corresponding intensities is larger than in the case of Bose-Einstein correlations. After showing that the degree of second-order coherence does not suffice to characterize unambiguously the curvature inhomogeneities, we argue that direct analyses of the degrees of third and fourth-order coherence are necessary to discriminate between different correlated states and to infer more reliably the statistical properties of the large-scale fluctuations. We speculate that the moments of the multiplicity distributions of the relic phonons might be observationally accessible thanks to new generations of instruments able to count the single photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background in the THz region.

  7. DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongran; Pal, Suchetan; Nangreave, Jeanette; Deng, Zhengtao; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-04-14

    We present a strategy to design and construct self-assembling DNA nanostructures that define intricate curved surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space using the DNA origami folding technique. Double-helical DNA is bent to follow the rounded contours of the target object, and potential strand crossovers are subsequently identified. Concentric rings of DNA are used to generate in-plane curvature, constrained to 2D by rationally designed geometries and crossover networks. Out-of-plane curvature is introduced by adjusting the particular position and pattern of crossovers between adjacent DNA double helices, whose conformation often deviates from the natural, B-form twist density. A series of DNA nanostructures with high curvature—such as 2D arrangements of concentric rings and 3D spherical shells, ellipsoidal shells, and a nanoflask—were assembled.

  8. On M-theory fourfold vacua with higher curvature terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Grimm

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study solutions to the eleven-dimensional supergravity action, including terms quartic and cubic in the Riemann curvature, that admit an eight-dimensional compact space. The internal background is found to be a conformally Kähler manifold with vanishing first Chern class. The metric solution, however, is non-Ricci-flat even when allowing for a conformal rescaling including the warp factor. This deviation is due to the possible non-harmonicity of the third Chern-form in the leading order Ricci-flat metric. We present a systematic derivation of the background solution by solving the Killing spinor conditions including higher curvature terms. These are translated into first-order differential equations for a globally defined real two-form and complex four-form on the fourfold. We comment on the supersymmetry properties of the described solutions.

  9. Identification of black hole horizons using scalar curvature invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Alan; McNutt, David

    2018-01-01

    We introduce the concept of a geometric horizon, which is a surface distinguished by the vanishing of certain curvature invariants which characterize its special algebraic character. We motivate its use for the detection of the event horizon of a stationary black hole by providing a set of appropriate scalar polynomial curvature invariants that vanish on this surface. We extend this result by proving that a non-expanding horizon, which generalizes a Killing horizon, coincides with the geometric horizon. Finally, we consider the imploding spherically symmetric metrics and show that the geometric horizon identifies a unique quasi-local surface corresponding to the unique spherically symmetric marginally trapped tube, implying that the spherically symmetric dynamical black holes admit a geometric horizon. Based on these results, we propose a suite of conjectures concerning the application of geometric horizons to more general dynamical black hole scenarios.

  10. Substrate Curvature Regulates Cell Migration -A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    Cell migration in host microenvironment is essential to cancer etiology, progression and metastasis. Cellular processes of adhesion, cytoskeletal polymerization, contraction, and matrix remodeling act in concert to regulate cell migration, while local extracellular matrix architecture modulate these processes. In this work we study how stromal microenvironment with native and cell-derived curvature at micron-meter scale regulate cell motility pattern. We developed a 3D model of single cell migration on a curved substrate. Mathematical analysis of cell morphological adaption to the cell-substrate interface shows that cell migration on convex surfaces deforms more than on concave surfaces. Both analytical and simulation results show that curved surfaces regulate the cell motile force for cell's protruding front through force balance with focal adhesion and cell contraction. We also found that cell migration on concave substrates is more persistent. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration. NIH 1U01CA143069.

  11. Magnetic curvature driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pokhotelov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of incomplete finite ion Larmor radius (FLR stabilization of the magnetic curvature driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI in low beta plasma with homogeneous ion temperature is investigated. For this purpose a model hydrodynamic description of nonlinear flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius is developed. It is shown that the RTI is not stabilized by FLR effects in a plasma with cold electrons when the ratio of characteristic spatial scale of the plasma inhomogeneity to local effective radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines is larger than 1/4. The crucial role in the absence of the complete FLR stabilization plays the contribution of the compressibility of the polarization part of the ion velocity.

  12. Timelike Bonnet surfaces with non-constant curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soley Ersoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the criterion of a timelike surface being Bonnet surface in 3-dimensional Minkowski space given by [11] is taken into consideration and by a similar manner of the classification of surfaces in Euclidean space done by I. M. Roussos in [6], timelike surfaces as Bonnet surfaces are investigated in three class as C1, C2 and C3. Timelike surfaces given in the case of C1 have constant mean curvature and were investigated by a detailed way in [11]. In the present study, by investigating the cases of C2 and C3, a criterion of the timelike surfaces with non-constant mean curvature being Bonnet surfaces is determined.

  13. Curvature-Induced Asymmetric Spin-Wave Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Jorge A.; Yan, Ming; Schultheiss, Helmut; Hertel, Riccardo; Kákay, Attila

    2016-11-01

    In magnonics, spin waves are conceived of as electron-charge-free information carriers. Their wave behavior has established them as the key elements to achieve low power consumption, fast operative rates, and good packaging in magnon-based computational technologies. Hence, knowing alternative ways that reveal certain properties of their undulatory motion is an important task. Here, we show using micromagnetic simulations and analytical calculations that spin-wave propagation in ferromagnetic nanotubes is fundamentally different than in thin films. The dispersion relation is asymmetric regarding the sign of the wave vector. It is a purely curvature-induced effect and its fundamental origin is identified to be the classical dipole-dipole interaction. The analytical expression of the dispersion relation has the same mathematical form as in thin films with the Dzyalonshiinsky-Moriya interaction. Therefore, this curvature-induced effect can be seen as a "dipole-induced Dzyalonshiinsky-Moriya-like" effect.

  14. Curvature-Restored Gauge Invariance and Ultraviolet Naturalness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmuş Ali Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that (aΛ2+b|H|2R in a spacetime of curvature R is a natural ultraviolet (UV completion of (aΛ4+bΛ2|H|2 in the flat-spacetime Standard Model (SM with Higgs field H, UV scale Λ, and loop factors a and b. This curvature completion rests on the fact that Λ-mass gauge theory in flat spacetime turns, on the cut view R=4Λ2, into a massless gauge theory in curved spacetime. It provides a symmetry reason for curved spacetime, wherein gravity and matter are both low-energy effective phenomena. Gravity arises correctly if new physics exists with at least 63 more bosons than fermions, with no need to interact with the SM and with dark matter as a natural harbinger. It can source various cosmological, astrophysical, and collider phenomena depending on its spectrum and couplings to the SM.

  15. The Imaginary Starobinsky Model and Higher Curvature Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Riotto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We elaborate on the predictions of the imaginary Starobinsky model of inflation coupled to matter, where the inflaton is identified with the imaginary part of the inflaton multiplet suggested by the Supergravity embedding of a pure R + R^2 gravity. In particular, we study the impact of higher-order curvature terms and show that, depending on the parameter range, one may find either a quadratic model of chaotic inflation or monomial models of chaotic inflation with fractional powers between 1 and 2.

  16. Higher derivative free energy terms and interfacial curvatures

    OpenAIRE

    Mihailescu, M.

    2007-01-01

    High derivative terms do not play a major role in field theories because of the associated complexity and inherent difficulty in connecting these terms to physically measurable quantities. A role for higher derivative terms is analyzed for the case of field theories used to describe phase separated systems. In these theories, higher derivative terms are directly connected to an interfacial free energy which contains the mean and the Gaussian curvature and are shown to determine explicitly the...

  17. Toward assessing the effects of crack front curvature /CFC/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, J. L.; Ritter, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the effect of crack front curvature (CFC) on the K calibration of five special geometries in which CFC occurs. The five cases considered include an elliptical crack in an infinite medium, an internal annular crack in a thick-walled cylinder, a through crack in a flat plate, a part-through crack in a plate, and an irregularly shaped crack in a solid. It is shown that K depends on CFC differently in each case.

  18. Gaussian Curvature as an Identifier of Shell Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunyan, Davit

    2017-11-01

    In the paper we deal with shells with non-zero Gaussian curvature. We derive sharp Korn's first (linear geometric rigidity estimate) and second inequalities on that kind of shell for zero or periodic Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin type boundary conditions. We prove that if the Gaussian curvature is positive, then the optimal constant in the first Korn inequality scales like h, and if the Gaussian curvature is negative, then the Korn constant scales like h 4/3, where h is the thickness of the shell. These results have a classical flavour in continuum mechanics, in particular shell theory. The Korn first inequalities are the linear version of the famous geometric rigidity estimate by Friesecke et al. for plates in Arch Ration Mech Anal 180(2):183-236, 2006 (where they show that the Korn constant in the nonlinear Korn's first inequality scales like h 2), extended to shells with nonzero curvature. We also recover the uniform Korn-Poincaré inequality proven for "boundary-less" shells by Lewicka and Müller in Annales de l'Institute Henri Poincare (C) Non Linear Anal 28(3):443-469, 2011 in the setting of our problem. The new estimates can also be applied to find the scaling law for the critical buckling load of the shell under in-plane loads as well as to derive energy scaling laws in the pre-buckled regime. The exponents 1 and 4/3 in the present work appear for the first time in any sharp geometric rigidity estimate.

  19. Prostasome-like vesicles stimulate acrosome reaction of pig spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianò Vito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of small membranous particles characterizes the male genital fluids of different mammalian species. The influence of semen vesicles, denominated prostasomes, on sperm functional properties has been well documented in humans, but their biological activity is scarcely known in other species. The present work investigated prostasome-like vesicles in pig semen for their ability to interact with spermatozoa and to affect acrosome reaction. Methods Prostasome-like vesicles have been isolated from pig seminal plasma by high-speed centrifugation and Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography. Morphology of purified vesicles has been checked by scanning electron microscopy while their protein pattern has been investigated by SDS-PAGE. Then prostasome- like vesicles have been incubated with pig spermatozoa and their ability to interact with sperm has been tested by the aminopeptidase assay. In addition, the efficiency of vesicles to influence the acrosome reaction has been investigated by assessing the sperm acrosomal status by the PI/FITC-PNA (propidium iodide/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peanut agglutinin stainings. Results Purified vesicles revealed a complex protein pattern with the occurrence of bands in the high, medium and low molecular weight range. However, the two major bands were observed at ~90 kDa and ~60 kDa. A vesicle-mediated transfer of aminopeptidase to sperm cells has been also detected. Furthermore, a significant increase of acrosome reaction extent has been revealed in spermatozoa incubated with prostasome-like vesicles in comparison to control sperm. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating that pig prostasome-like vesicles are able, in vitro, to interact with spermatozoa and to stimulate the acrosome reaction. These findings lead to hypothesize a transfer of molecules from vesicles to sperm membrane, thus sensitizing male gametes to undergo the acrosome reaction

  20. Localized tearing modes in the magnetotail driven by curvature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, A. K.; Fairfield, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The stability of collisionless tearing modes is examined in the presence of curvature drift resonances and the trapped particle effects. A kinetic description for both electrons and ions is employed to investigate the stability of a two-dimensional equilibrium model. The main features of the study are to treat the ion dynamics properly by incorporating effects associated with particle trajectories in the tail fields and to include the linear coupling of trapped particle modes. Generalized dispersion relations are derived in several parameter regimes by considering two important sublayers of the reconnecting region. For a typical choice of parameters appropriate to the current sheet region, we demonstrate that localized tearing modes driven by ion curvature drift resonance effects are excited in the current sheet region with growth time of the order of a few seconds. Also, we examine nonlocal characteristics of tearing modes driven by curvature effects and show that modes growing in a fraction of a second arise when mode widths are larger than the current sheet width. Further, we show that trapped particle effects, in an interesting frequency regime, significantly enhance the growth rate of the tearing mode. The relevance of this theory for substorm onset phase and other features of the substorms is briefly discussed.

  1. Encoding Gaussian curvature in glassy and elastomeric liquid crystal solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostajeran, Cyrus; Warner, Mark; Ware, Taylor H.; White, Timothy J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe shape transitions of thin, solid nematic sheets with smooth, preprogrammed, in-plane director fields patterned across the surface causing spatially inhomogeneous local deformations. A metric description of the local deformations is used to study the intrinsic geometry of the resulting surfaces upon exposure to stimuli such as light and heat. We highlight specific patterns that encode constant Gaussian curvature of prescribed sign and magnitude. We present the first experimental results for such programmed solids, and they qualitatively support theory for both positive and negative Gaussian curvature morphing from flat sheets on stimulation by light or heat. We review logarithmic spiral patterns that generate cone/anti-cone surfaces, and introduce spiral director fields that encode non-localized positive and negative Gaussian curvature on punctured discs, including spherical caps and spherical spindles. Conditions are derived where these cap-like, photomechanically responsive regions can be anchored in inert substrates by designing solutions that ensure compatibility with the geometric constraints imposed by the surrounding media. This integration of such materials is a precondition for their exploitation in new devices. Finally, we consider the radial extension of such director fields to larger sheets using nematic textures defined on annular domains.

  2. Lateral pressure profile in lipid membranes with curvature: Analytical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, A. A.; Mukhin, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    An analytical expression is obtained for the lateral pressure profile in the hydrophobic part of a lipid bilayer of finite curvature. Calculations are carried out within a microscopic model of a lipid bilayer, according to which the energy of a lipid chain represents the energy of a flexible string of finite thickness and the interaction between lipid chains is considered as a steric (entropic) repulsion. This microscopic model allows one to obtain an expression for the distribution of lateral pressure in membranes with given curvature if one considers the bending of a membrane as a small deviation from a flat conformation and applies perturbation theory in the small parameter L 0 J, where L 0 is the hydrophobic thickness of a monolayer and J is the mean curvature of the lipid bilayer. The resulting pressure profile depends on the microscopic parameters of the lipid chain: the bending modulus of the lipid chain, incompressible area per lipid chain, and the thickness of a flat monolayer. The coefficient of entropic repulsion between lipids is calculated self-consistently. The analytical results obtained for the lateral pressure distribution are in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamic simulations.

  3. Curvature-Induced Spatial Ordering of Composition in Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimrit Katz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase segregation of membranal components, such as proteins, lipids, and cholesterols, leads to the formation of aggregates or domains that are rich in specific constituents. This process is important in the interaction of the cell with its surroundings and in determining the cell’s behavior and fate. Motivated by published experiments on curvature-modulated phase separation in lipid membranes, we formulate a mathematical model aiming at studying the spatial ordering of composition in a two-component biomembrane that is subjected to a prescribed (imposed geometry. Based on this model, we identified key nondimensional quantities that govern the biomembrane response and performed numerical simulations to quantitatively explore their influence. We reproduce published experimental observations and extend them to surfaces with geometric features (imposed geometry and lipid phases beyond those used in the experiments. In addition, we demonstrate the possibility for curvature-modulated phase separation above the critical temperature and propose a systematic procedure to determine which mechanism, the difference in bending stiffness or difference in spontaneous curvatures of the two phases, dominates the coupling between shape and composition.

  4. Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David M. G.; Russell, Eric M.; Al-Shawaf, Laith; Ta, Vivian; Senveli, Zeynep; Ickes, William; Buss, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of high-heeled footwear in both developing and modernized societies, we lack an understanding of this behavioral phenomenon at both proximate and distal levels of explanation. The current manuscript advances and tests a novel, evolutionarily anchored hypothesis for why women wear high heels, and provides convergent support for this hypothesis across multiple methods. Using a recently discovered evolved mate preference, we hypothesized that high heels influence women’s attractiveness via effects on their lumbar curvature. Independent studies that employed distinct methods, eliminated multiple confounds, and ruled out alternative explanations showed that when women wear high heels, their lumbar curvature increased and they were perceived as more attractive. Closer analysis revealed an even more precise pattern aligning with human evolved psychology: high-heeled footwear increased women’s attractiveness only when wearing heels altered their lumbar curvature to be closer to an evolutionarily optimal angle. These findings illustrate how human evolved psychology can contribute to and intersect with aspects of cultural evolution, highlighting that the two are not independent or autonomous processes but rather are deeply intertwined. PMID:29180972

  5. Pelvic Floor Symptoms and Spinal Curvature in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Isuzu; McArthur, Tatum A; Tang, Ying; McKinney, Jessica L; Morgan, Sarah L; Richter, Holly E

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the association between thoracic (T) and lumbar (L) spinal curvature and pelvic floor (PF) symptoms (pelvic organ prolapse, urinary incontinence [UI], fecal incontinence [FI]). Of women undergoing a bone mineral density scan from January 2007 to October 2010, patients who completed PF symptom questionnaires and had T and/or L spine radiographs or computed tomography examinations within 3 years of questionnaire completion were included in this study. The spine angles were measured using the Cobb angle method. The T and L curvatures were categorized as hypokyphosis (hyperkyphosis (>40°), hypolordosis (70°). The presence and type of UI were identified with the 3 Incontinence Questionnaire and FI with the Modified Manchester Questionnaire. Pelvic organ prolapse was defined as a positive response to the presence of a bulge question from the PF Distress Inventory-20. Of 1665 eligible women, 824 and 302 (mean age 64 ± 10 for both) had T and L spine images, respectively. No differences in PF symptoms were observed in the T or L spine groups categorized by hypo-, normal, and hyperkyphosis/lordosis except for urgency UI being more prevalent in the hypolordosis group (P = 0.01). However, upon further characterization using logistic regression, no association was noted between PF symptoms and T or L spine angles; no differences in the mean angles were found between women with versus without PF symptoms (P ≥ 0.05). The current study shows that the T and L spinal curvatures are not associated with the presence of PF symptoms.

  6. Bioinformatics Tools for Extracellular Vesicles Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Gho, Yong Song; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a class of membranous vesicles that are released by multiple cell types into the extracellular environment. This unique class of extracellular organelles which play pivotal role in intercellular communication are conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Depending upon the cell origin and the functional state, the molecular cargo including proteins, lipids, and RNA within the EVs are modulated. Owing to this, EVs are considered as a subrepertoire of the host cell and are rich reservoirs of disease biomarkers. In addition, the availability of EVs in multiple bodily fluids including blood has created significant interest in biomarker and signaling research. With the advancement in high-throughput techniques, multiple EV studies have embarked on profiling the molecular cargo. To benefit the scientific community, existing free Web-based resources including ExoCarta, EVpedia, and Vesiclepedia catalog multiple datasets. These resources aid in elucidating molecular mechanism and pathophysiology underlying different disease conditions from which EVs are isolated. Here, the existing bioinformatics tools to perform integrated analysis to identify key functional components in the EV datasets are discussed.

  7. Acceleration and suppression of banana-shaped-protein-induced tubulation by addition of small membrane inclusions of isotropic spontaneous curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    The membrane tubulation induced by banana-shaped protein rods is investigated by using coarse-grained meshless membrane simulations. It is found that the tubulation is promoted by laterally isotropic membrane inclusions that generate the same sign of spontaneous curvature as the adsorbed protein rods. The inclusions are concentrated in the tubules and reduce the bending energy of the tip of the tubules. On the other hand, the inclusions with an opposite curvature suppress the tubulation by percolated-network formation at a high protein-rod density while they induce a spherical membrane bud at a low rod density. When equal amounts of the two types of inclusions (with positive and negative curvatures) are added, their effects cancel each other for the first short period but later the tubulation is slowly accelerated. A positive surface tension suppresses the tubulation. Out results suggest that the cooperation of scaffolding of BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs) domains and isotropic membrane inclusions is important for the tubulation.

  8. New surgical technique for ventral penile curvature without circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alei, Giovanni; Letizia, Piero; Alei, Lavinia; Massoni, Francesco; Ricci, Serafino

    2014-06-01

    To describe and report on our variant of penile corporoplasty, the ‘double-breasted’ corporoplasty, with penoscrotal and infrapubic access not requiring circumcision. The medicolegal aspects of treatment are also discussed. Between February 1995 and October 2012, double-breasted corporoplasty was performed in 93 patients with congenital ventral penile curvature. Preoperative assessment comprised RigiScan monitoring, prostaglandin E1 injection with photographic documentation and measurement of penile angulation, administration of the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaire, and biothesiometry up until 5 years ago when it was substituted with the Genito Sensory Analyser for testing sensitivity. Dorsal infrapubic access was used in the patients with ventral curvature. After preparation and incision of Colles' fascia, the penis is degloved and double-breasted corporoplasty is performed at the site established at preoperative assessment. The tunica albuginea is prepared, an incision is made, and the cavernous tissue is isolated from the albuginea to obtain two flaps that are then overlaid and sutured asymmetrically with interrupted 2-0 polyglactin 910 (Vicryl®) sutures. After the free edge of the albuginea is sutured with a running polyglactin 910 suture, a non-absorbable monofilament and uncoated suture made of polypropylene (Premicron®) suture is placed at the point of maximum traction. Complete correction of penile curvature was achieved in 96% of patients; recurrence occurred in 4%. No major complications were reported, nor were there neurovascular lesions or change in erectile function. Palpable subcutaneous irregularities at the site of the corporoplasty, without functional or aesthetic impairment, were reported by 35% of patients. There was no change in the appearance of the penis as circumcision was not performed and the residual scar was barely noticeable as it was hidden in the infrapubic fold. The corporoplasty technique can

  9. Removal of Vesicle Structures from Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion...

  10. IN-VITRO FUSION OF RETICULOCYTE ENDOCYTIC VESICLES WITH LIPOSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VIDAL, M; HOEKSTRA, D

    1995-01-01

    Since reticulocytes have a high demand for iron, which is required for heme biosynthesis, these cells are highly specialized in the endocytosis of the iron carrier transferrin (Tf). From the resulting endocytic vesicles (EVs), iron is released and the vesicles rapidly return to the cell membrane

  11. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W

    2011-01-01

    a complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...... feature of vesicles carrying PM cargo and suggests a common lipid-based mechanism for their formation....

  12. Vesicle transport and photoreceptor death: fishing for molecular links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2013-06-10

    Intracellular vesicle transport defects can induce retinal degeneration and photoreceptor cell death, but the molecular connections between these processes remains poorly understood. Reporting in Developmental Cell, Nishiwaki et al. (2013) suggest that a vesicle fusion cis-SNARE complex component translates vesicular transport defects into photoreceptor cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Formation and structural properties of multi-block copolymer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Ma, Shiying

    2014-03-01

    Due to the unique structure, vesicles have attracted considerable attention for their potential applications, such as gene and drug delivery, microcapsules, nanoreactors, cell membrane mimetic, synthetic organelles, etc. By using dissipative particle dynamics, we studied the self-assembly of amphiphilic multi-block copolymer. The phase diagram was constructed by varying the interaction parameters and the composition of the block copolymers. The results show that the vesicles are stable in a large region which is different from the diblock copolymer or triblock copolymer. The structural properties of vesicles can be controlled by varying the interaction parameters and the length of the hydrophobic block. The relationship between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic block length vs the aqueous cavity size and vesicle size are revealed. The copolymers with shorter hydrophobic blocks length or the higher hydrophilicity are more likely to form vesicles with larger aqueous cavity size and vesicle size as well as thinner wall thickness. However, the increase in hydrophobic-block length results to form vesicles with smaller aqueous cavity size and larger vesicle size. Acknowledgments. This work has been supported by NNSFC (No. 21074053) and NBRPC (No. 2010CB923303).

  14. Slow Sedimentation and Deformability of Charged Lipid Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Suárez, Iván; Leidy, Chad; Téllez, Gabriel; Gay, Guillaume; Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres

    2013-01-01

    The study of vesicles in suspension is important to understand the complicated dynamics exhibited by cells in in vivo and in vitro. We developed a computer simulation based on the boundary-integral method to model the three dimensional gravity-driven sedimentation of charged vesicles towards a flat surface. The membrane mechanical behavior was modeled using the Helfrich Hamiltonian and near incompressibility of the membrane was enforced via a model which accounts for the thermal fluctuations of the membrane. The simulations were verified and compared to experimental data obtained using suspended vesicles labelled with a fluorescent probe, which allows visualization using fluorescence microscopy and confers the membrane with a negative surface charge. The electrostatic interaction between the vesicle and the surface was modeled using the linear Derjaguin approximation for a low ionic concentration solution. The sedimentation rate as a function of the distance of the vesicle to the surface was determined both experimentally and from the computer simulations. The gap between the vesicle and the surface, as well as the shape of the vesicle at equilibrium were also studied. It was determined that inclusion of the electrostatic interaction is fundamental to accurately predict the sedimentation rate as the vesicle approaches the surface and the size of the gap at equilibrium, we also observed that the presence of charge in the membrane increases its rigidity. PMID:23874582

  15. Lubrication synergy: Mixture of hyaluronan and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raj, Akanksha; Wang, Min; Zander, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    with the outer shell of dipalmitoylphophatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles in bulk solution. Further, we follow adsorption to silica from mixed hyaluronan/DPPC vesicle solution by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation measurements. Atomic Force Microscope imaging visualises the adsorbed layer structure...... and partly removed from between the surfaces under high loads. These layers offer very low friction coefficient (

  16. Block-Copolymer Vesicles as Nanoreactors for Enzymatic Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Qi; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of the spatial confinement of polystyrene-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PS-b-PAA) block copolymer (BCP) vesicles on the reactivity of encapsulated bovine pancreas trypsin is studied. Enzymes, as well as small molecules, are encapsulated with loading efficiencies up to 30% in BCP vesicles with

  17. Vesiclepedia: A Compendium for Extracellular Vesicles with Continuous Community Annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalra, Hina; Simpson, Richard J.; Ji, Hong; Aikawa, Elena; Altevogt, Peter; Askenase, Philip; Bond, Vincent C.; Borràs, Francesc E.; Breakefield, Xandra; Budnik, Vivian; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Gho, Yong Song; Gupta, Dwijendra; Harsha, H. C.; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Inal, Jameel M.; Jenster, Guido; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Lim, Sai Kiang; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Patel, Tushar; Piper, Melissa G.; Pluchino, Stefano; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Rajendran, Lawrence; Raposo, Graca; Record, Michel; Reid, Gavin E.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Siljander, Pia; Stensballe, Allan; Stoorvogel, Willem; Taylor, Douglas; Thery, Clotilde; Valadi, Hadi; van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Vázquez, Jesús; Vidal, Michel; Wauben, Marca H. M.; Yáñez-Mó, María; Zoeller, Margot; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membraneous vesicles released by a variety of cells into their microenvironment. Recent studies have elucidated the role of EVs in intercellular communication, pathogenesis, drug, vaccine and gene-vector delivery, and as possible reservoirs of biomarkers. These

  18. The freezing process of small lipid vesicles at molecular resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    At present very little is known about the kinetic barriers which a small vesicle will face during the transformation from the liquid-crystalline to the gel phase, and what the structure of frozen vesicles looks like at the molecular level. The formation of gel domains in the strongly curved bilayer

  19. A scenario for a genetically controlled fission of artificial vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke

    2011-01-01

    Artificial vesicles have been used for decades as model systems of biological cells to investigate scientific questions in simulacra. In recent years, the significance of artificial vesicles further increased because they represent ideal candidates to become the building block of a de novo...... construction of a cell in a bottom-up manner. Numerous efforts to build an artificial cell that bridge the living and non-living world will most presumably represent one of the main goals of science in the 21st century. It was shown that artificial genetic programs and the required cellular machinery can...... be incorporated into vesicles, and therefore allow the synthesis of a large number of proteins (Noireaux et al. 2005). However, vesicle fission remains one of the upcoming challenges in the artificial cell project (Noireaux et al. 2011). So far, vesicle fission is implemented by applying mechanical stress...

  20. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  1. Membrane Protrusion Coarsening and Nanotubulation within Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    KAUST Repository

    Węgrzyn, Ilona

    2011-11-16

    Hydrophobic side groups on a stimuli-responsive polymer, encapsulated within a single giant unilamellar vesicle, enable membrane attachment during compartment formation at elevated temperatures. We thermally modulated the vesicle through implementation of an IR laser via an optical fiber, enabling localized directed heating. Polymer-membrane interactions were monitored using confocal imaging techniques as subsequent membrane protrusions occurred and lipid nanotubes formed in response to the polymer hydrogel contraction. These nanotubes, bridging the vesicle membrane to the contracting hydrogel, were retained on the surface of the polymer compartment, where they were transformed into smaller vesicles in a process reminiscent of cellular endocytosis. This development of a synthetic vesicle system containing a stimuli-responsive polymer could lead to a new platform for studying inter/intramembrane transport through lipid nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Extracellular vesicles as new pharmacological targets to treat atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Loyer, Xavier; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular vesicles released by most cell types, include apoptotic bodies (ABs), microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. They play a crucial role in physiology and pathology, contributing to "cell-to-cell" communication by modifying the phenotype and the function of target cells. Thus, extracellular vesicles participate in the key processes of atherosclerosis from endothelial dysfunction, vascular wall inflammation to vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on extracellular vesicle formation, structure, release and clearance. We focus on the deleterious and beneficial effects of extracellular vesicles in the development of atherosclerosis. The potential role of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and pharmacological targets, their innate therapeutic capacity, or their use for novel drug delivery devices in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Placental Extracellular Vesicles and Feto-Maternal Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M.; Chamley, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. PMID:25635060

  4. The Effects of Margin Curvature on Load at Fracture of Ceramic Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øilo, Marit; Kvam, Ketil; Reisegg, Kjetil; Gjerdet, Nils Roar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high fracture strength of modern dental core ceramics, fractures are a common cause of clinical failures. The aim of this study was to use a clinically relevant test method to evaluate the effect of the curvature of the cervical crown margins on load at fracture. Thirty zirconia crowns and 30 glass-ceramic crowns were produced for three premolar preparations with variation in the approximal crown margin curvature: low curvature (r=12 mm), moderate curvature (r=2.5 mm), and high curvature (r=1.5). The crowns were loaded until fracture with a method that mimics clinical fracture modes. Statistically significant differences were found among both crown margin curvature and material groups (Pcrown margins increases crown strength compared with a high curvature.

  5. Aceclofenac encapsulated ethanolic nano-vesicles for effective treatment of osteoarthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaur, Arvinder; Jain, Sunil K; Pandey, Ravi S

    2012-01-01

    .... Ethanolic nano-vesicles were prepared by solvent dispersion method. Vesicles were characterized for vesicular size, surface morphology, size and size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency...

  6. Low-resolution simulations of vesicle suspensions in 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabacaoğlu, Gökberk; Quaife, Bryan; Biros, George

    2018-03-01

    Vesicle suspensions appear in many biological and industrial applications. These suspensions are characterized by rich and complex dynamics of vesicles due to their interaction with the bulk fluid, and their large deformations and nonlinear elastic properties. Many existing state-of-the-art numerical schemes can resolve such complex vesicle flows. However, even when using provably optimal algorithms, these simulations can be computationally expensive, especially for suspensions with a large number of vesicles. These high computational costs can limit the use of simulations for parameter exploration, optimization, or uncertainty quantification. One way to reduce the cost is to use low-resolution discretizations in space and time. However, it is well-known that simply reducing the resolution results in vesicle collisions, numerical instabilities, and often in erroneous results. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a number of algorithmic empirical fixes (which are commonly used by many groups) in an attempt to make low-resolution simulations more stable and more predictive. Based on our empirical studies for a number of flow configurations, we propose a scheme that attempts to integrate these fixes in a systematic way. This low-resolution scheme is an extension of our previous work [51,53]. Our low-resolution correction algorithms (LRCA) include anti-aliasing and membrane reparametrization for avoiding spurious oscillations in vesicles' membranes, adaptive time stepping and a repulsion force for handling vesicle collisions and, correction of vesicles' area and arc-length for maintaining physical vesicle shapes. We perform a systematic error analysis by comparing the low-resolution simulations of dilute and dense suspensions with their high-fidelity, fully resolved, counterparts. We observe that the LRCA enables both efficient and statistically accurate low-resolution simulations of vesicle suspensions, while it can be 10× to 100× faster.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuate kidney inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirin, Alfonso; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Tang, Hui; McGurren, Kelly A; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have distinct capability for renal repair, but may have safety concerns. MSC-derived extracellular vesicles emerged as a novel noncellular alternative. Using a porcine model of metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis we tested whether extracellular vesicles attenuate renal inflammation, and if this capacity is mediated by their cargo of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Pigs with metabolic syndrome were studied after 16 weeks of renal artery stenosis untreated or treated four weeks earlier with a single intrarenal delivery of extracellular vesicles harvested from adipose tissue-derived autologous MSCs. Lean and sham metabolic syndrome animals served as controls (seven each). Five additional pigs with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis received extracellular vesicles with pre-silenced IL10 (IL10 knock-down). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were studied in vivo and renal injury pathways ex vivo. Retention of extracellular vesicles in the stenotic kidney peaked two days after delivery and decreased thereafter. Four weeks after injection, extracellular vesicle fragments colocalized with stenotic-kidney tubular cells and macrophages, indicating internalization or fusion. Extracellular vesicle delivery attenuated renal inflammation, and improved medullary oxygenation and fibrosis. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate fell in metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis compared to metabolic syndrome, but was restored in pigs treated with extracellular vesicles. These renoprotective effects were blunted in pigs treated with IL10-depleted extracellular vesicles. Thus, extracellular vesicle-based regenerative strategies might be useful for patients with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The launch of Journal of Extracellular Vesicles (JEV), the official journal of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles ? about microvesicles, exosomes, ectosomes and other extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    L?tvall, Jan; Rajendran, Lawrence; Gho, Yong-Song; Thery, Clotilde; Wauben, Marca; Raposo, Graca; Sj?strand, Margareta; Taylor, Douglas; Telemo, Esbj?rn; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, researchers around the world interested in extracellular vesicles (EV) joined forces and founded the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV). Membership has grown to approximately 750 in eight months, and the Society’s first meeting will take place in Gothenburg, Sweden, on 18-21 April 2012. Already approximately 500 participants have been attracted to this event. These are signs of rapid expansion in global research in the field of EV.(Published: 16 April 2012)Citati...

  9. Raman spectroscopy uncovers biochemical tissue-related features of extracellular vesicles from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualerzi, Alice; Niada, Stefania; Giannasi, Chiara; Picciolini, Silvia; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Rossella, Valeria; Masserini, Massimo; Bedoni, Marzia; Ciceri, Fabio; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Brini, Anna Teresa; Gramatica, Furio

    2017-08-29

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are emerging as valuable therapeutic agents for tissue regeneration and immunomodulation, but their clinical applications have so far been limited by the technical restraints of current isolation and characterisation procedures. This study shows for the first time the successful application of Raman spectroscopy as label-free, sensitive and reproducible means of carrying out the routine bulk characterisation of MSC-derived vesicles before their use in vitro or in vivo, thus promoting the translation of EV research to clinical practice. The Raman spectra of the EVs of bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs were compared with human dermal fibroblast EVs in order to demonstrate the ability of the method to distinguish the vesicles of the three cytotypes automatically with an accuracy of 93.7%. Our data attribute a Raman fingerprint to EVs from undifferentiated and differentiated cells of diverse tissue origin, and provide insights into the biochemical characteristics of EVs from different sources and into the differential contribution of sphingomyelin, gangliosides and phosphatidilcholine to the Raman spectra themselves.

  10. Signal transduction meets vesicle traffic: the software and hardware of GLUT4 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klip, Amira; Sun, Yi; Chiu, Tim Ting; Foley, Kevin P

    2014-05-15

    Skeletal muscle is the major tissue disposing of dietary glucose, a function regulated by insulin-elicited signals that impart mobilization of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. This phenomenon, also central to adipocyte biology, has been the subject of intense and productive research for decades. We focus on muscle cell studies scrutinizing insulin signals and vesicle traffic in a spatiotemporal manner. Using the analogy of an integrated circuit to approach the intersection between signal transduction and vesicle mobilization, we identify signaling relays ("software") that engage structural/mechanical elements ("hardware") to enact the rapid mobilization and incorporation of GLUT4 into the cell surface. We emphasize how insulin signal transduction switches from tyrosine through lipid and serine phosphorylation down to activation of small G proteins of the Rab and Rho families, describe key negative regulation step of Rab GTPases through the GTPase-activating protein activity of the Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), and focus on the mechanical effectors engaged by Rabs 8A and 10 (the molecular motor myosin Va), and the Rho GTPase Rac1 (actin filament branching and severing through Arp2/3 and cofilin). Finally, we illustrate how actin filaments interact with myosin 1c and α-Actinin4 to promote vesicle tethering as preamble to fusion with the membrane. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A Perspective on Extracellular Vesicles Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Rosa-Fernandes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieved from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  12. Versatile roles of extracellular vesicles in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Fujita, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that non–cell-autonomous regulation of cancer cells is an important aspect of tumorigenesis. Cancer cells need to communicate with stromal cells by humoral factors such as VEGF, FGFs, and Wnt in order to survive. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have also been shown to be involved in cell-cell communication between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment and to be important for the development of cancer. In addition, these EVs contain small noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which contribute to the malignancy of cancer cells. Here, we provide an overview of current research on EVs, especially miRNAs in EVs. We also propose strategies to treat cancers by targeting EVs around cancer cells. PMID:26974161

  13. Role of extracellular vesicles in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haitao; Hu, Die; Zhang, Licheng; Tang, Peifu

    2018-01-01

    Cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), playing important roles in antigen presentation, inflammation, angiogenesis, cell-cell signal communication, thrombosis, and articular cartilage extracellular matrix degradation. Understanding the pathogenic mechanism of RA is important for developing therapies. The pathogenic indicators of RA, such as submicron-sized EVs, represent promising biomarkers for evaluating RA activity. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of RA, and sheds light on the pathogenic as well as anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive roles of EVs. We suggest that EVs could be harnessed as tools for drug delivery or targets for RA therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation of Platelet-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatonen, Maria; Valkonen, Sami; Böing, Anita; Yuana, Yuana; Nieuwland, Rienk; Siljander, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Platelets participate in several physiological functions, including hemostasis, immunity, and development. Additionally, platelets play key roles in arterial thrombosis and cancer progression. Given this plethora of functions, there is a strong interest of the role of platelet-derived (extracellular) vesicles (PDEVs) as functional mediators and biomarkers. Moreover, the majority of the blood-borne EVs are thought to originate from either platelets or directly from the platelet precursor cells, the megakaryocytes, which reside in the bone marrow. To circumvent confusion, we use the term PDEVs for both platelet-derived and/or megakaryocyte-derived EVs. PDEVs can be isolated from blood or from isolated platelets after activation. In this chapter, we describe all commonly used PDEV isolation methods from blood and prepurified platelets.

  15. Methods to isolate extracellular vesicles for diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyejin; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, Jaesung

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-bound bodies that are released into extracellular space by diverse cells, and are found in body fluids like blood, urine and saliva. EVs contain RNA, DNA and proteins, which can be biomarkers for diagnosis. EVs can be obtained by minimally-invasive biopsy, so they are useful in disease diagnosis. High yield and purity contribute to precise diagnosis of disease, but damaged EVs and impurities can cause confu sed results. However, EV isolation methods have different yields and purities. Furthermore, the isolation method that is most suitable to maximize EV recovery efficiency depends on the experimental conditions. This review focuses on merits and demerits of several types of EV isolation methods, and provides examples of how to diagnose disease by exploiting information obtained by analysis of EVs.

  16. A Perspective on Extracellular Vesicles Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Fernandes, Livia; Rocha, Victória Bombarda; Carregari, Victor Corasolla; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieved from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  17. Biological reference materials for extracellular vesicle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, S; van der Pol, E; Böing, A; Yuana, Y; Yliperttula, M; Nieuwland, R; Laitinen, S; Siljander, P R M

    2017-02-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate normal physiological homeostasis and pathological processes by facilitating intercellular communication. Research of EVs in basic science and clinical settings requires both methodological standardization and development of reference materials (RM). Here, we show insights and results of biological RM development for EV studies. We used a three-step approach to find and develop a biological RM. First, a literature search was done to find candidates for biological RMs. Second, a questionnaire was sent to EV researchers querying the preferences for RM and their use. Third, a biological RM was selected, developed, characterized, and evaluated. The responses to the survey demonstrated a clear and recognized need for RM optimized for the calibration of EV measurements. Based on the literature, naturally occurring and produced biological RM, such as virus particles and liposomes, were proposed as RM. However, none of these candidate RMs have properties completely matching those of EVs, such as size and refractive index distribution. Therefore, we evaluated the use of nanoerythrosomes (NanoE), vesicles produced from erythrocytes, as a potential biological RM. The strength of NanoE is their resemblance to EVs. Compared to the erythrocyte-derived EVs (eryEVs), NanoE have similar morphology, a similar refractive index (1.37), larger diameter (70% of the NanoE are over 200nm), and increased positive staining for CD235a and lipids (Di-8-ANEPPS) (58% and 67% in NanoE vs. 21% and 45% in eryEVs, respectively). Altogether, our results highlight the general need to develop and validate new RM with similar physical and biochemical properties as EVs to standardize EV measurements between instruments and laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extracellular vesicles in obesity and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Fabián; Villalobos-Labra, Roberto; Sobrevia, Bastián; Toledo, Fernando; Sobrevia, Luis

    2017-11-24

    Cell-to-cell communication happens via diverse mechanisms including the synthesis, release and transfer to target cells of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs include nanovesicles (i.e., exosomes) and microvesicles, including apoptotic bodies. The amount and cargo of released EVs, which consist of microRNAs (miRNAs), mRNA, proteins, DNA, among other molecules, are altered in obesity and diabetes mellitus. EVs from these diseases show with altered cargo including several miRNAs and the enrichment with molecules involved in inflammation, immune efficiency, and cell activation. The role of EVs in obesity regards with adipocytes-released vesicles that may end in a systemic insulin resistance. In diabetes mellitus, the exosomes cargo may signal to transform a normal phenotype into a diabetic phenotype in endothelial cells. The evidence of EVs as modulators of cell function is increasing; however, it is still unclear whether exosomes or microvesicles are a trustable and useful marker for the diagnose or early detection of obesity or diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarise the reported information regarding EVs involvement in obesity, T1 and T2 diabetes mellitus, and gestational diabetes mellitus. We emphasise the fact that studies addressing a potential effect of obesity or diabetes mellitus on cell function and the severity of the diseases are done in patients suffering simultaneously with both of these diseases, i.e., diabesity. Unfortunately, the lack of information regarding the biological effects and the potential involved mechanisms makes difficult to understand the role of the EVs as a marker of these and perhaps other diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro toxicology studies of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Sayantan; Yan, Irene K; Parasramka, Mansi; Mohankumar, Swathi; Matsuda, Akiko; Patel, Tushar

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-bound vesicles released from cells into the extracellular environment. There is emerging interest in the use of EVs as potential therapeutic interventions. We sought to evaluate the safety of EVs that may be therapeutically used by performing in vitro toxicological assessments. EVs were obtained from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EV) or from bovine milk (BM-EV) by differential ultracentrifugation, and quantitated using nanoparticle tracking analysis. Genotoxic effects, hematological effects, immunological effects and endotoxin production were evaluated at two dose levels. Neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs elicited detectable genotoxic effects using either the alkaline comet assay or micronucleus assay. Hemolysis was observed with BM-EVs but not with MSC-EVs. MSC-EVs did not have any significant effect on either spontaneous or collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In contrast, BM-EVs were noted to increase collagen-induced platelet aggregation, even though no spontaneous increase in platelet aggregation was noted. Both types of EVs induced leukocyte proliferation, which was greater with BM-EV. Neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs induced HL-60 phagocytosis, although BM-EVs decreased zymosan-induced phagocytosis. Furthermore, neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs induced nitric oxide production. Unlike MSC-EVs, BM-EVs tested positive for endotoxin and induced complement activation. There are significant differences in toxicological profiles between MSC-EVs and BM-EVs that may reflect variations in techniques for EV isolation, EV content or cross-species differences. The safety of MSC-EV supports their use for disease therapeutics, whereas detailed safety and toxicological assessment will be necessary before the use of BM-EVs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Pelvic Floor Symptoms and Spinal Curvature in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Isuzu; McArthur, Tatum A; Tang, Ying; McKinney, Jessica L; Morgan, Sarah L; Richter, Holly E

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the association between thoracic (T) and lumbar (L) spinal curvature and pelvic floor (PF) symptoms (pelvic organ prolapse [POP], urinary incontinence [UI], fecal incontinence [FI]). Methods Of women undergoing a bone mineral density scan from 1/2007 to 10/2010, patients who completed PF symptom questionnaires and had T and/or L spine radiographs or computerized tomography (CT) exams within 3 years of questionnaire completion were included in this study. The spine angles were measured using the Cobb angle method. The T and L curvature were categorized as hypo-kyphosis (40°), hypo-lordosis (70°). The presence and type of UI were identified with the 3 Incontinence Questionnaire and FI with the Modified Manchester Questionnaire. POP was defined as a positive response to the presence of a bulge question from the PF Distress Inventory-20. Results Of 1665 eligible women, 824 and 302 (mean age 64±10 for both) had T and L spine images, respectively. No differences in PF symptoms were observed in the T or L spine groups categorized by hypo-, normal, and hyper-kyphosis/lordosis except for urgency UI being more prevalent in the hypo-lordosis group (p=0.01). However, upon further characterization using logistic regression, no association was noted between PF symptoms and T or L spine angles; no differences in the mean angles were found between women with versus without PF symptoms (p≥0.05). Conclusions The current study shows that the thoracic and lumbar spinal curvature is not associated with the presence of pelvic floor symptoms. PMID:27054800

  1. New modes from higher curvature corrections in holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksteiner, Steffen; Korovin, Yegor [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)

    2016-03-24

    In gravitational theories involving higher curvature corrections the metric describes additional degrees of freedom beyond the graviton. Holographic duality maps these to operators in the dual CFT. We identify infinite families of theories for which these new modes cannot be truncated and the usual Fefferman-Graham expansion needs to be modified. New massive gravity in three dimensions and critical gravity in four dimensions are particular representatives of these families. We propose modified expansion, study the near-boundary behaviour of the metric and derive fall-off properties of the additional modes in theories involving higher derivative corrections.

  2. Great sphere foliations and manifolds with curvature bounded above

    CERN Document Server

    Rovenskii, V Y; Rovenskii, Vladimir Y.; Toponogov, Victor A.

    1996-01-01

    The survey is devoted to Toponogov's conjecture, that {\\it if a complete simply connected Riemannian manifold with sectional curvature $\\le 4$ and injectivity radius $\\ge \\pi/2$ has extremal diameter $\\pi/2$, then it is isometric to CROSS}. In Section 1 the relations of problem with geodesic foliations of a round sphere are considered, but the proof of conjecture on this way is not complete. In Section 2 the proof based on recent results and methods for topology and volume of Blaschke manifolds is given.

  3. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  4. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  5. [EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: INTERCELLULAR INFORMATION FLOW AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupyshev, A B

    2015-01-01

    The major features of extracellular vesicles secreted by mammalian cells are considered. Cell activation caused by formation of pathology stimulates the secretion acutely. The vesicles (exosomes, microvesicles) are enriched with annexin V, tetraspanin, miRNA. Exosomes are enriched especially by integrins, heat shock proteins. Microvesicles contain elevated amounts of tissue factors, phosphatidylserine, mRNA. The vesicles carry information about the pathological process, and microvesicles contain more proteins characteristic of inflammation and death than exosomes. They are important mediators of inflammation and infection in the body, have different effects on the immune system and the processes of carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. However, antigenic profiles of extracellular vesicles differ not profoundly in various pathologies and so far they help diagnostics limitedly. The vesicles carry signals of genetic reprogramming of the cells and epigenetic stimulation, connected with both protein factors and mRNA and miRNA. Profiles of miRNA vesicles produced by the various pathological sources are studied actively and are useful as indicators of source and stage of cancer. Some ways of therapeutic use of the vesicles are also considered.

  6. Placenta-derived extracellular vesicles: their cargo and possible functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familari, Mary; Cronqvist, Tina; Masoumi, Zahra; Hansson, Stefan R

    2017-03-01

    The literature on extracellular vesicles consists of rapidly expanding and often contradictory information. In this paper we attempt to review what is currently known regarding extracellular vesicles released specifically from human placental syncytiotrophoblast cells with a focus on the common but complex pregnancy-associated syndrome pre-eclampsia, where the level of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicle release is significantly increased. We review common methods for syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicle derivation and isolation and we discuss the cargo of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles including proteins, RNA and lipids and their possible functions. A meta-analysis of available trophoblast-derived extracellular vesicle proteomic datasets revealed only three proteins in common: albumin, fibronectin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, suggesting some variability in vesicle cargo, most likely reflecting stage and cell type of origin. We discuss the possible sources of variability that may have led to the low number of common markers, which has led us to speculate that markers and density in common use may not be strict criteria for identifying and isolating placenta-derived exosomes.

  7. Rapid synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cone photoreceptors of salamander retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    Following synaptic vesicle exocytosis, neurons retrieve the fused membrane by a process of endocytosis in order to provide a supply of vesicles for subsequent release and maintain the presynaptic active zone. Rod and cone photoreceptors use a specialized structure called the synaptic ribbon that enables them to sustain high rates of neurotransmitter release. They must also employ mechanisms of synaptic vesicle endocytosis capable of keeping up with release. While much is known about endocytosis at another retinal ribbon synapse, that of the goldfish Mb1 bipolar cell, less is known about endocytosis in photoreceptors. We used capacitance recording techniques to measure vesicle membrane fusion and retrieval in photoreceptors from salamander retinal slices. We found that application of brief depolarizing steps (endocytosis with a time constant ~250 ms. In some cases, the capacitance trace overshot the baseline, indicating excess endocytosis. Calcium had no effect on the time constant, but enhanced excess endocytosis resulting in a faster rate of membrane retrieval. Surprisingly, endocytosis was unaffected by blockers of dynamin, suggesting that cone endocytosis is dynamin-independent. This contrasts with synaptic vesicle endocytosis in rods, which was inhibited by the dynamin inhibitor dynasore and GTPγS introduced through the patch pipette, suggesting that the two photoreceptor types employ distinct pathways for vesicle retrieval. The fast kinetics of synaptic vesicle endocytosis in photoreceptors likely enables these cells to maintain a high rate of transmitter release, allowing them to faithfully signal changes in illumination to second-order neurons. PMID:23238726

  8. Tomosyn inhibits synaptic vesicle priming in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Gracheva

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans TOM-1 is orthologous to vertebrate tomosyn, a cytosolic syntaxin-binding protein implicated in the modulation of both constitutive and regulated exocytosis. To investigate how TOM-1 regulates exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in vivo, we analyzed C. elegans tom-1 mutants. Our electrophysiological analysis indicates that evoked postsynaptic responses at tom-1 mutant synapses are prolonged leading to a two-fold increase in total charge transfer. The enhanced response in tom-1 mutants is not associated with any detectable changes in postsynaptic response kinetics, neuronal outgrowth, or synaptogenesis. However, at the ultrastructural level, we observe a concomitant increase in the number of plasma membrane-contacting vesicles in tom-1 mutant synapses, a phenotype reversed by neuronal expression of TOM-1. Priming defective unc-13 mutants show a dramatic reduction in plasma membrane-contacting vesicles, suggesting these vesicles largely represent the primed vesicle pool at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction. Consistent with this conclusion, hyperosmotic responses in tom-1 mutants are enhanced, indicating the primed vesicle pool is enhanced. Furthermore, the synaptic defects of unc-13 mutants are partially suppressed in tom-1 unc-13 double mutants. These data indicate that in the intact nervous system, TOM-1 negatively regulates synaptic vesicle priming.

  9. Leukocytospermia and function of the seminal vesicles on seminal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Kortebani, G; Mazzolli, A B

    1992-05-01

    To determine possible relationships between number of leukocytes, function of seminal vesicles, and seminal quality. The study was carried out on men who consecutively attended an infertility clinic between June 1989 to June 1991. This study was conducted in a private immunological center for infertility, a tertiary care center, The Centro Immunológico-Sección Esterilidad y Reproducción. Semen samples from 280 infertility patients attending an Immunological Center for Infertility were analyzed. We evaluated the effect of leukocytospermia in the presence of normal or abnormal function of seminal vesicles on seminal quality. Sperm count, percent of motile sperm, and percent of sperm vitality were significantly reduced when both leukocytospermia and hypofunction of seminal vesicles were present (P less than 0.01). Leukocytospermic subjects with normal function of seminal vesicles showed similar seminal parameters to those nonleukocytspermics. The incidence of subjects with antisperm antibodies measured by direct immunobeads was significantly higher in leukocytospermic men with hypofunction of seminal vesicles. No differences in the incidence of antisperm antibodies with nonleukocytospermic samples were observed in those with both leukocytospermia and normal function of seminal vesicles. These data provide evidence that white blood cells were deleterious for seminal quality when seminal vesicles were also affected.

  10. Defining the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on membrane bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourdot, Richard W.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-08-01

    Curvature-sensing and curvature-remodeling proteins, such as Amphiphysin, Epsin, and Exo70, are known to reshape cell membranes, and this remodeling event is essential for key biophysical processes such as tubulation, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Curvature-inducing proteins can act as curvature sensors; they aggregate to membrane regions matching their intrinsic curvature; as well as induce curvature in cell membranes to stabilize emergent high curvature, nonspherical, structures such as tubules, discs, and caveolae. A definitive understanding of the interplay between protein recruitment and migration, the evolution of membrane curvature, and membrane morphological transitions is emerging but remains incomplete. Here, within a continuum framework and using the machinery of Monte Carlo simulations, we introduce and compare three free-energy methods to delineate the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on bilayer membranes. We demonstrate the utility of the Widom test particle (or field) insertion methodology in computing the excess chemical potentials associated with curvature-inducing proteins on the membrane—in particular, we use this method to track the onset of morphological transitions in the membrane at elevated protein densities. We validate this approach by comparing the results from the Widom method with those of thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance ratio methods. Furthermore, the predictions from the Widom method have been tested against analytical calculations of the excess chemical potential at infinite dilution. Our results are useful in precisely quantifying the free-energy landscape, and also in determining the phase boundaries associated with curvature-induction, curvature-sensing, and morphological transitions. This approach can be extended to studies exploring the role of thermal fluctuations and other external (control) variables, such as membrane excess area, in shaping curvature-mediated interactions on bilayer

  11. Defining the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on membrane bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourdot, Richard W; Ramakrishnan, N; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-08-01

    Curvature-sensing and curvature-remodeling proteins, such as Amphiphysin, Epsin, and Exo70, are known to reshape cell membranes, and this remodeling event is essential for key biophysical processes such as tubulation, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Curvature-inducing proteins can act as curvature sensors; they aggregate to membrane regions matching their intrinsic curvature; as well as induce curvature in cell membranes to stabilize emergent high curvature, nonspherical, structures such as tubules, discs, and caveolae. A definitive understanding of the interplay between protein recruitment and migration, the evolution of membrane curvature, and membrane morphological transitions is emerging but remains incomplete. Here, within a continuum framework and using the machinery of Monte Carlo simulations, we introduce and compare three free-energy methods to delineate the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on bilayer membranes. We demonstrate the utility of the Widom test particle (or field) insertion methodology in computing the excess chemical potentials associated with curvature-inducing proteins on the membrane-in particular, we use this method to track the onset of morphological transitions in the membrane at elevated protein densities. We validate this approach by comparing the results from the Widom method with those of thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance ratio methods. Furthermore, the predictions from the Widom method have been tested against analytical calculations of the excess chemical potential at infinite dilution. Our results are useful in precisely quantifying the free-energy landscape, and also in determining the phase boundaries associated with curvature-induction, curvature-sensing, and morphological transitions. This approach can be extended to studies exploring the role of thermal fluctuations and other external (control) variables, such as membrane excess area, in shaping curvature-mediated interactions on bilayer

  12. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Shinoda, Wataru, E-mail: w.shinoda@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Klein, Michael L. [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Temple University, SERC Building 1925 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle–vesicle, vesicle–planar, and planar–planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  13. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  14. Extracellular Vesicles in Luminal Fluid of the Ovine Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gregory; Brooks, Kelsey; Wildung, Mark; Navakanitworakul, Raphatphorn; Christenson, Lane K.; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Microvesicles and exosomes are nanoparticles released from cells and can contain small RNAs, mRNA and proteins that affect cells at distant sites. In sheep, endogenous beta retroviruses (enJSRVs) are expressed in the endometrial epithelia of the uterus and can be transferred to the conceptus trophectoderm. One potential mechanism of enJSRVs transfer from the uterus to the conceptus is via exosomes/microvesicles. Therefore, studies were conducted to evaluate exosomes in the uterine luminal fluid (ULF) of sheep. Exosomes/microvesicles (hereafter referred to as extracellular vesicles) were isolated from the ULF of day 14 cyclic and pregnant ewes using ExoQuick-TC. Transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis found the isolates contained vesicles that ranged from 50 to 200 nm in diameter. The isolated extracellular vesicles were positive for two common markers of exosomes (CD63 and HSP70) by Western blot analysis. Proteins in the extracellular vesicles were determined by mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis. Extracellular vesicle RNA was analyzed for small RNAs by sequencing and enJSRVs RNA by RT-PCR. The ULF extracellular vesicles contained a large number of small RNAs and miRNAs including 81 conserved mature miRNAs. Cyclic and pregnant ULF extracellular vesicles contained enJSRVs env and gag RNAs that could be delivered to heterologous cells in vitro. These studies support the hypothesis that ULF extracellular vesicles can deliver enJSRVs RNA to the conceptus, which is important as enJSRVs regulate conceptus trophectoderm development. Importantly, these studies support the idea that extracellular vesicles containing select miRNAs, RNAs and proteins are present in the ULF and likely have a biological role in conceptus-endometrial interactions important for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. PMID:24614226

  15. Formation of Giant Protein Vesicles by a Lipid Cosolvent Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Vissing, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method to create giant protein vesicles (GPVs) of ≥10 μm by solvent‐driven fusion of large vesicles (0.1–0.2 μm) with reconstituted membrane proteins. We found that formation of GPVs proceeded from rotational mixing of protein‐reconstituted large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs)...... of spinach SoPIP2;1 and E. coli AqpZ aquaporins. Our findings show that hydrophobic interactions within the bilayer of formed GPVs are influenced not only by the solvent partitioning propensity, but also by lipid composition and membrane protein isoform....

  16. Mating-reactive membrane vesicles from cilia of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Membrane vesicles with a high mating reactivity were obtained from cilia of Paramecium caudatum by treatment with a solution containing 2 M urea and 0.1 mM Na2-EDTA. All processes of conjugation were induced in cells of the complementary mating type by approximately 10 mug/ml proteins of the vesicles. Electron microscope observation showed that the membrane vesicles have a diameter of 100-150 nm. Electrophoretic analysis on SDS polyacrylamide gel revealed no significant difference in polypeptide patterns of the particles from the two complementary mating types. PMID:818093

  17. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  18. Bovine binder-of-sperm protein BSP1 promotes protrusion and nanotube formation from liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, Michel, E-mail: michel.lafleur@umontreal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Courtemanche, Lesley [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Karlsson, Goeran; Edwards, Katarina [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 579, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Schwartz, Jean-Louis [Department of Physiology, Groupe d' etude des Proteines Membranaires, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Manjunath, Puttaswamy [Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center and Faculty of Medecine, Universite de Montreal, 5415 L' Assomption Blvd, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 2M4 (Canada)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Binder-of-sperm protein 1 (BSP1) modifies the morphology of lipidic vesicles inducing bead necklace-like and thread-like structures. {yields} In the presence of multilamellar liposomes, BSP1 leads to the formation of long nanotubes. {yields} The insertion of BSP1 in the external lipid leaflet of membranes induces local changes in bilayer curvature. -- Abstract: Binder-of-sperm (BSP) proteins interact with sperm membranes and are proposed to extract selectively phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from these. This change in lipid composition is a key step in sperm capacitation. The present work demonstrates that the interactions between the protein BSP1 and model membranes composed with phosphatidylcholine lead to drastic changes in the morphology of the lipidic self-assemblies. Using cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, we show that, in the presence of the protein, the lipid vesicles elongate, and form bead necklace-like structures that evolve toward small vesicles or thread-like structures. In the presence of multilamellar vesicles, where a large reservoir of lipid is available, the presence of BSP proteins lead to the formation of long nanotubes. Long spiral-like threads, associated with lipid/protein complexes, are also observed. The local curvature of lipid membranes induced by the BSP proteins may be involved in lipid domain formation and the extraction of some lipids during the sperm maturation process.

  19. Determination of instantaneous curvature and twist by digital shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Guo, Min; Liu, Huan

    2012-08-01

    Shearography is a whole-field, noncontact optical technique that allows the direct measurement of first-order derivatives of deflection on spatial coordinates, depending on the measurement setup. In many cases, the curvatures and twists of an object provide more interesting parameters, as they are directly related to the induced stresses when an object is subjected to external loads. We describe the use of digital shearography for the measurement of these stress-related parameters through phase retrieval when an object is undergoing continuous deformation. A sequence of shearograms is captured by a high-speed camera during the deformation. To avoid the problem of phase ambiguity, either a spatial or temporal carrier is introduced. A comparison of spatial and temporal carrier is also presented. The obtained three-dimensional matrix is then analyzed by Fourier and windowed-Fourier transform in a spatial and temporal domain and a high-quality spatial distribution of the deflection derivative, curvature and twist are extracted at any instant.

  20. Diameter Effect Curve and Detonation Front Curvature Measurements for ANFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanach, R. A.; Hill, L. G.

    2002-07-01

    Diameter effect and front curvature measurements are reported for rate stick experiments on commercially available prilled ANFO (ammonium-nitrate/fuel-oil) at ambient temperature. The shots were fired in paper tubes so as to provide minimal confinement. Diameters ranged from 77 mm (approximately failure diameter) to 205 mm, with the tube length being ten diameters in all cases. Each detonation wave shape was fit with an analytic form, from which the local normal velocity Dn, and local total curvature kappa, were generated as a function of radius R, then plotted parametrically to generate a Dn(kappa) function. The observed behavior deviates substantially from that of previous explosives, for which curves for different diameters overlay well for small kappa but diverge for large kappa, and for which kappa increases monotonically with R. For ANFO, we find that Dn(kappa) curves for individual sticks 1) show little or no overlap--with smaller sticks lying to the right of larger ones, 2) exhibit a large velocity deficit with little kappa variation, and 3) reach a peak kappa at an intermediate R.

  1. Memory for curvature of objects: Haptic touch vs. vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittyerah, Miriam; Marks, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the role of vision and haptics in memory for stimulus objects that vary along the dimension of curvature. Experiment 1 measured haptic–haptic (T–T) and haptic–visual (T–V) discrimination of curvature in a short-term memory paradigm, using 30-second retention intervals containing five different interpolated tasks. Results showed poorest performance when the interpolated tasks required spatial processing or movement, thereby suggesting that haptic information about shape is encoded in a spatial-motor representation. Experiment 2 compared visual–visual (V–V) and visual–haptic (V–T) short-term memory, again using 30-second delay intervals. The results of the ANOVA failed to show a significant effect of intervening activity. Intra-modal visual performance and cross-modal performance were similar. Comparing the four modality conditions (inter-modal V–T, T–V; intra-modal V–V, T–T, by combining the data of Experiments 1 and 2), in a global analysis, showed a reliable interaction between intervening activity and experiment (modality). Although there appears to be a general tendency for spatial and movement activities to exert the most deleterious effects overall, the patterns are not identical when the initial stimulus is encoded haptically (Experiment 1) and visually (Experiment 2). PMID:17535462

  2. The size and direction of saccadic curvatures during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhoff, Albrecht W; Seymour, Bradley A; Schad, Daniel; Greenberg, Seth

    2010-06-11

    Eye movements during the reading of multi-line pages of texts were analyzed to determine the trajectory of reading saccades. The results of two experiments showed that the trajectory of the majority of forward-directed saccades was negatively biased, i.e., the trajectory fell below the start and end location of the saccadic movement. This is attributed to a global top-to-bottom orienting of attention. The curvature size and the proportion of negative trajectories were diminished when linguistic processing demands were high and when the beginning lines of a page were read. Longer pre-saccadic fixations also yielded smaller saccadic curvatures, and they resulted in fewer negatively curved forward-directed saccades in Experiment 1 although not in Experiment 2. These findings indicate that the top-to-bottom pull of saccadic trajectories is modulated by processing demands and processing opportunities. The results are in general agreement with a time-locked attraction-inhibition hypothesis, according to which the horizontal movement component of a saccade is initially subject to an automatic top-to-bottom orienting of attention that is subsequently inhibited. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Amperometric detection of single vesicle acetylcholine release events from an artificial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Wigström, Joakim; Kurczy, Michael E; Bergman, Jenny; Wang, Yuanmo; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2015-01-21

    Acetylcholine is a highly abundant nonelectroactive neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Neurochemical release occurs on the millisecond time scale, requiring a fast, sensitive sensor such as an enzymatic amperometric electrode. Typically, the enzyme used for enzymatic electrochemical sensors is applied in excess to maximize signal. Here, in addition to sensitivity, we have also sought to maximize temporal resolution, by designing a sensor that is sensitive enough to work at near monolayer enzyme coverage. Reducing the enzyme layer thickness increases sensor temporal resolution by decreasing the distance and reducing the diffusion time for the enzyme product to travel to the sensor surface for detection. In this instance, the sensor consists of electrodeposited gold nanoparticle modified carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs). Enzymes often are sensitive to curvature upon surface adsorption; thus, it was important to deposit discrete nanoparticles to maintain enzyme activity while depositing as much gold as possible to maximize enzyme coverage. To further enhance sensitivity, the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO) were immobilized onto the gold nanoparticles at the previously determined optimal ratio (1:10 AChE/ChO) for most efficient sequential enzymatic activity. This optimization approach has enabled the rapid detection to temporally resolve single vesicle acetylcholine release from an artificial cell. The sensor described is a significant advancement in that it allows for the recording of acetylcholine release on the order of the time scale for neurochemical release in secretory cells.

  4. Accuracy evaluation of automatic quantification of the articular cartilage surface curvature from MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To study the articular cartilage surface curvature determined automatically from magnetic resonance (MR) knee scans, evaluate accuracy of the curvature estimates on digital phantoms, and an evaluation of their potential as disease markers for different stages of osteoart......RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To study the articular cartilage surface curvature determined automatically from magnetic resonance (MR) knee scans, evaluate accuracy of the curvature estimates on digital phantoms, and an evaluation of their potential as disease markers for different stages...... for intersubject comparisons. Digital phantoms were created to establish the accuracy of the curvature estimation methods. RESULTS: A comparison of the two curvature estimation methods to ground truth yielded absolute pairwise differences of 1.1%, and 4.8%, respectively. The interscan reproducibility for the two...

  5. Directional curvature sensor based on long period gratings in multicore optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Javier; Barrera, David; Hervás, Javier; Chen, Hailan; Sales, S.

    2017-04-01

    Multicore optical fiber can be used to implement multidimensional optical fiber sensors including curvature sensors. In this paper, a selective core inscription technique is used in order to inscribe a single long period grating in each of the outer cores of the optical fiber. A set of three different long period gratings is inscribed for implementing the curvature sensor. The ability of the sensor for measuring the magnitude and the direction of curvature is demonstrated. The optical fiber sensor is characterized experimentally for curvature magnitudes from 0 m-1 to 1.77 m-1 and curvature directions from 0° to 360°.The maximum curvature sensitivity of the developed sensor is -4.85 nm/m-1.

  6. Amphipathic motifs in BAR domains are essential for membrane curvature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram K; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    nanosized liposomes of different diameters and therefore membrane curvature. Characterization of members of the three BAR domain families showed surprisingly that the crescent-shaped BAR dimer with its positively charged concave face is not able to sense membrane curvature. Mutagenesis on BAR domains showed...... that membrane curvature sensing critically depends on the N-terminal AH and furthermore that BAR domains sense membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion in lipid packing defects and not through electrostatics. Consequently, amphipathic motifs, such as AHs, that are often associated with BAR domains...... emerge as an important means for a protein to sense membrane curvature. Measurements on single liposomes allowed us to document heterogeneous binding behaviour within the ensemble and quantify the influence of liposome polydispersity on bulk membrane curvature sensing experiments. The latter results...

  7. Non-linear curvature inhomogeneities and backreaction for relativistic viscous fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The non-perturbative curvature inhomogeneities induced by relativistic viscous fluids are not conserved in the large-scale limit. However when the bulk viscosity is a function of the total energy density of the plasma (or of the trace of the extrinsic curvature) the relevant evolution equations develop a further symmetry preventing the non-linear growth of curvature perturbations. In this situation the fully inhomogeneous evolution can be solved to leading order in the gradient expansion. Over large-scales both the acceleration and the curvature inhomogeneities are determined by the bulk viscosity coefficients. Conversely the shear viscosity does not affect the evolution of the curvature and does not produce any acceleration. The curvature modes analyzed here do not depend on the choice of time hypersurfaces and are invariant for infinitesimal coordinate transformations in the perturbative regime.

  8. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias

    2015-01-01

    supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced...... by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non...

  9. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  10. Visualization of peptide secretory vesicles in living nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joshua J; Loh, Y Peng

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of real-time movements of peptidergic vesicles in live neurons provides insight into molecular mechanism(s) supporting the activity-dependent secretion of neurotrophins and neuropeptides. We examined the effect of overexpression of exogenous peptides comprising of the cytoplasmic tail sequence of vesicular carboxypeptidase E (CPE), proposed to be involved in the mechanism of trafficking of peptidergic secretory vesicles, in live hippocampal neurons. E16 rat hippocampal neurons were transfected with the peptidergic vesicle markers, CPE C-terminally tagged with red or green fluorescent protein, or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tagged with green fluorescent protein, and grown on dishes specialized for real-time live cell visualization. Movements of peptidergic vesicles were imaged in a temperature-controlled chamber on a confocal inverted microscope and analyzed with respect to their velocity, displacement distance, and processivity.

  11. Tension-induced fusion of bilayer membranes and vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillcock, Julian C.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2005-03-01

    Maintaining the integrity of their protective plasma membrane is a primary requirement of cells. Accordingly, cellular events that breach the membrane are tightly regulated. Artificial vesicles used in drug delivery must also stay intact until they have reached the desired target. In both cases, the intrinsic resistance of the membrane to rupture must be overcome to allow the efflux of the vesicle's contents. Here, we use mesoscopic simulations to study the fusion of 28-nm-diameter vesicles to 50 × 50 nm2 planar membrane patches over 2 μs. We monitor the time evolution of 93 different fusion attempts. This allows us to construct a global morphology diagram, using the initial tensions of the vesicle and the planar membrane patch as control parameters, and to determine the corresponding fusion statistics. All successful fusion events are observed to occur within 350 ns, which reflects the presence of alternative pathways for the tension relaxation.

  12. EVpedia: a community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong-Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyong-Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Gross, Julia Christina; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young-Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming-Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, François; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae-Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stępień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yáñez-Mó, María; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. We present an improved

  13. EVpedia : a community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong-Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyong-Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Desiderio, Dominic M; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W; Gross, Julia Christina; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F; Hill, Michelle M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young-Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming-Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, François; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Roh, Tae-Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/212909509; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stępień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yáñez-Mó, María; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song; Nolte - t Hoen, Esther|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/261632175

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. RESULTS: We

  14. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R-M; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E; Buzas, Edit I; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Cordeiro-da Silva, Anabela; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Ghobrial, Irene M; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H H; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Nyman, Tuula A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412755211; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Wauben, Marca H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological

  15. Theory of dielectric response of charged-bilayer-vesicle solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.-Y. D.

    1996-10-01

    The dielectric response is calculated for a solution containing charged bilayer vesicles and simple electrolyte. The solution is assumed to contain a high salt concentration so that the Debye screening length is small compared to the size of the vesicles. The presence of two (electric) double layers, one on each side of the bilayer, gives low-frequency salt relaxations (kHz for 1 μm vesicles) that explain the experimentally observed α relaxations which are known to appear only for charged vesicles. The double layers also modify the high-frequency β relaxations which have been previously modeled by using the Maxwell-Wagner theory. The calculation method can be easily extended to other bilayer geometries.

  16. Biogenesis and function of Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the keystone pathogens associated with chronic periodontitis. All P. gingivalis strains examined thus far produce outer membrane vesicles. Recent studies have found that vesicles possess some well-known virulence factors of P. gingivalis such as adhesins, toxins and proteolytic enzymes. Carrying most of the characteristic features of their parent P. gingivalis cells, vesicles communicate with host cells and other members of microbial biofilms, resulting in the transmission of virulence factors into these host cells and the formation of pathogenic bacteria-dominated microbial communities. An in-depth understanding of both the nature and role of vesicles in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis is both important and timely, particularly when speaking of periodontitis and its related systemic effects. PMID:26343879

  17. Yeast Membrane Vesicles: Isolation and General Characteristics1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Michael S.; Cirillo, Vincent P.

    1972-01-01

    Yeast membrane vesicles are formed when packed yeast are ground manually in a porcelain mortar and pestle with glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). These vesicles can be separated from the other components of the grinding mixture by a combination of centrifugation steps and elution from a column of the same glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). Isolated vesicles are osmotically sensitive, contain cytoplasmic components, and have energy-independent transport function. They are unable to metabolize glucose, but have respiratory function which is thought to be associated with intravesicular mitochondria. Invertase and oligomycin-insensitive adenosine triphosphatase are present in lysed vesicle preparations, and the appropriateness of these enzyme activities as membrane markers is discussed. Images PMID:4337848

  18. Extracellular vesicles secreted by Schistosoma mansoni contain protein vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Javier; Pearson, Mark; Potriquet, Jeremy; Becker, Luke; Pickering, Darren; Mulvenna, Jason; Loukas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show for the first time that Schistosoma mansoni adult worms secrete exosome-like extracellular vesicles ranging from 50 to 130nm in size. Extracellular vesicles were collected from the excretory/secretory products of cultured adult flukes and purified by Optiprep density gradient, resulting in highly pure extracellular vesicle preparations as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Nanosight tracking analysis. Extracellular vesicle proteomic analysis showed numerous known vaccine candidates, potential virulence factors and molecules implicated in feeding. These findings provide new avenues for the exploration of host-schistosome interactions and offer a potential mechanism by which some vaccine antigens exert their protective efficacy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  20. Sortilin mediates vascular calcification via its recruitment into extracellular vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutscheson, JD; Aikawa, M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of major cardiovascular diseases. Extracellular vesicles participate in the formation of microcalcifications that are implicated in atherosclerotic plaque rupture; however, the mechanisms that regulate formation of calcifying extracellular vesicles remain...... obscure. Here, we have demonstrated that sortilin is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) calcification via its recruitment to extracellular vesicles. Sortilin localized to calcifying vessels in human and mouse atheromata and participated in formation of microcalcifications in SMC culture. Sortilin...... regulated the loading of the calcification protein tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) into extracellular vesicles, thereby conferring its calcification potential. Furthermore, SMC calcification required Rab11-dependent trafficking and FAM20C/casein kinase 2-dependent C-terminal phosphorylation...

  1. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-12-01

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  2. Improved Methods of Producing and Administering Extracellular Vesicles | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient method of producing purified extracellular vesicles (EVs), in conjunction with a method that blocks liver macrophages from clearing EVs from the body, has produced promising results for the use of EVs in cancer therapy.

  3. Unilamellar Vesicle Formation and Encapsulation by Microfluidic Jetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeanne C. Stachowiak; David L. Richmond; Thomas H. Li; Allen P. Liu; Sapun H. Parekh; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    ...) using a pulsed microfluidic jet. Akin to blowing a bubble, the microfluidic jet deforms a planar lipid bilayer into a vesicle that is filled with solution from the jet and separates from the planar bilayer...

  4. A major QTL controls susceptibility to spinal curvature in the curveback guppy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyer Christine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature would benefit medicine and aquaculture. Heritable spinal curvature among otherwise healthy children (i.e. Idiopathic Scoliosis and Scheuermann kyphosis accounts for more than 80% of all spinal curvatures and imposes a substantial healthcare cost through bracing, hospitalizations, surgery, and chronic back pain. In aquaculture, the prevalence of heritable spinal curvature can reach as high as 80% of a stock, and thus imposes a substantial cost through production losses. The genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature is unknown and so the objective of this work is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy. Prior work with curveback has demonstrated phenotypic parallels to human idiopathic-type scoliosis, suggesting shared biological pathways for the deformity. Results A major effect QTL that acts in a recessive manner and accounts for curve susceptibility was detected in an initial mapping cross on LG 14. In a second cross, we confirmed this susceptibility locus and fine mapped it to a 5 cM region that explains 82.6% of the total phenotypic variance. Conclusions We identify a major QTL that controls susceptibility to curvature. This locus contains over 100 genes, including MTNR1B, a candidate gene for human idiopathic scoliosis. The identification of genes associated with heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy has the potential to elucidate the biological basis of spinal curvature among humans and economically important teleosts.

  5. Membrane curvature induction and tubulation are common features of synucleins and apolipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varkey, Jobin; Isas, Jose Mario; Mizuno, Naoko

    2010-01-01

    structures are morphologically similar to those generated by amphiphysin, a curvature-inducing protein involved in endocytosis. Unlike amphiphysin, however, synucleins and apolipoproteins do not require any scaffolding domains and curvature induction is mediated by the membrane insertion and wedging...... and enhances endocytosis. Induction of membrane curvature must be under strict regulation in vivo; however, as we find it can also cause disruption of membrane integrity. Because the degree of membrane curvature induction depends on the concerted action of multiple proteins, controlling the local protein...... density of tubulating proteins may be important. How cellular safeguarding mechanisms prevent such potentially toxic events and whether they go awry in disease remains to be determined....

  6. Measurement of curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Quan, Chenggen; Jui Tay, Cho

    2008-05-20

    Measurement of curvature and twist is an important aspect in the study of object deformation. In recent years, several methods have been proposed to determine curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital shearography. Here we propose a novel method to determine the curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital holography and a complex phasor. A sine/cosine transformation method and two-dimensional short time Fourier transform are proposed subsequently to process the wrapped phase maps. It is shown that high-quality phase maps corresponding to curvature and twist can be obtained. An experiment is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  7. Thermodynamic Study of the Role of Interface Curvature on Multicomponent Vapor-Liquid Phase Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardt, Nadia; Elliott, Janet A W

    2016-04-14

    The effect of interface curvature on phase equilibrium has been much more studied for single-component than multicomponent systems. We isolate the effect of curvature on multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) phase envelopes and phase composition diagrams using the ideal system methanol/ethanol and the nonideal system ethanol/water as illustrative examples. An important finding is how nanoscale interface curvature shifts the azeotrope (equal volatility point) of nonideal systems. Understanding of the effect of curvature on VLE can be exploited in future nanoscale prediction and design.

  8. Linear stability of three-dimensional boundary layers - Effects of curvature and non-parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Balakumar, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of in-plane (wavefront) curvature on the stability of three-dimensional boundary layers. It is found that this effect is stabilizing or destabilizing depending upon the sign of the crossflow velocity profile. We also investigate the effects of surface curvature and nonparallelism on crossflow instability. Computations performed for an infinite-swept cylinder show that while convex curvature stabilizes the three-dimensional boundary layer, nonparallelism is, in general, destabilizing and the net effect of the two depends upon meanflow and disturbance parameters. It is also found that concave surface curvature further destabilizes the crossflow instability.

  9. Curvature Continuous and Bounded Path Planning for Fixed-Wing UAVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs play an important role in applications such as data collection and target reconnaissance. An accurate and optimal path can effectively increase the mission success rate in the case of small UAVs. Although path planning for UAVs is similar to that for traditional mobile robots, the special kinematic characteristics of UAVs (such as their minimum turning radius have not been taken into account in previous studies. In this paper, we propose a locally-adjustable, continuous-curvature, bounded path-planning algorithm for fixed-wing UAVs. To deal with the curvature discontinuity problem, an optimal interpolation algorithm and a key-point shift algorithm are proposed based on the derivation of a curvature continuity condition. To meet the upper bound for curvature and to render the curvature extrema controllable, a local replanning scheme is designed by combining arcs and Bezier curves with monotonic curvature. In particular, a path transition mechanism is built for the replanning phase using minimum curvature circles for a planning philosophy. Numerical results demonstrate that the analytical planning algorithm can effectively generate continuous-curvature paths, while satisfying the curvature upper bound constraint and allowing UAVs to pass through all predefined waypoints in the desired mission region.

  10. Curvature Continuous and Bounded Path Planning for Fixed-Wing UAVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Peng; Li, Deshi; Sun, Tao

    2017-09-19

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) play an important role in applications such as data collection and target reconnaissance. An accurate and optimal path can effectively increase the mission success rate in the case of small UAVs. Although path planning for UAVs is similar to that for traditional mobile robots, the special kinematic characteristics of UAVs (such as their minimum turning radius) have not been taken into account in previous studies. In this paper, we propose a locally-adjustable, continuous-curvature, bounded path-planning algorithm for fixed-wing UAVs. To deal with the curvature discontinuity problem, an optimal interpolation algorithm and a key-point shift algorithm are proposed based on the derivation of a curvature continuity condition. To meet the upper bound for curvature and to render the curvature extrema controllable, a local replanning scheme is designed by combining arcs and Bezier curves with monotonic curvature. In particular, a path transition mechanism is built for the replanning phase using minimum curvature circles for a planning philosophy. Numerical results demonstrate that the analytical planning algorithm can effectively generate continuous-curvature paths, while satisfying the curvature upper bound constraint and allowing UAVs to pass through all predefined waypoints in the desired mission region.

  11. Computational methods for investigation of surface curvature effects on airfoil boundary layer behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Shen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents computational algorithms for the design, analysis, and optimization of airfoil aerodynamic performance. The prescribed surface curvature distribution blade design (CIRCLE method is applied to a symmetrical airfoil NACA0012 and a non-symmetrical airfoil E387 to remove their surface curvature and slope-of-curvature discontinuities. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is used to investigate the effects of curvature distribution on aerodynamic performance of the original and modified airfoils. An inviscid–viscid interaction scheme is introduced to predict the positions of laminar separation bubbles. The results are compared with experimental data obtained from tests on the original airfoil geometry. The computed aerodynamic advantages of the modified airfoils are analyzed in different operating conditions. The leading edge singularity of NACA0012 is removed and it is shown that the surface curvature discontinuity affects aerodynamic performance near the stalling angle of attack. The discontinuous slope-of-curvature distribution of E387 results in a larger laminar separation bubble at lower angles of attack and lower Reynolds numbers. It also affects the inherent performance of the airfoil at higher Reynolds numbers. It is shown that at relatively high angles of attack, a continuous slope-of-curvature distribution reduces the skin friction by suppressing both laminar and turbulent separation, and by delaying laminar-turbulent transition. It is concluded that the surface curvature distribution has significant effects on the boundary layer behavior and consequently an improved curvature distribution will lead to higher aerodynamic efficiency.

  12. Molecular View of the Role of Fusion Peptides in Promoting Positive Membrane Curvature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuhrmans, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion peptides are moderately hydrophobic segments of viral and nonviral membrane fusion proteins that enable these proteins to fuse two closely apposed biological membranes. In vitro assays furthermore show that even isolated fusion peptides alone can support membrane fusion in model systems. In

  13. Interaction and rheology of vesicle suspensions in confined shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zaiyi; Farutin, Alexander; Thiébaud, Marine; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2017-10-01

    Dynamics and rheology of a confined suspension of vesicles (a model for red blood cells) are studied numerically in two dimensions by using an immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method. We pay particular attention to the link between the spatiotemporal organization and the rheology of the suspension. Besides confinement, we analyze the effect of concentration of the suspension, ϕ (defined as the area fraction occupied by the vesicles in the simulation domain), as well as the viscosity contrast λ (defined as the ratio between the viscosity of the fluid inside the vesicles, ηint, and that of the suspending fluid, ηext). The hydrodynamic interaction between two vesicles is shown to play a key role in determining the spatial organization. For λ =1 , the pair of vesicles settles into an equilibrium state with constant interdistance, which is regulated by the confinement. The equilibrium interdistance increases with the gap between walls, following a linear relationship. However, no stable equilibrium interdistance between two tumbling vesicles is observed for λ =10 . A quite ordered suspension is observed concomitant with the existence of an equilibrium interdistance between a vesicle pair. However, a disordered suspension prevails when no pair equilibrium interdistance exists, as occurs for tumbling vesicles. We then analyze the rheology, focusing on the effective viscosity, denoted as η , as well as on normalized viscosity, defined as [η ] =(η -ηext) /(ηextϕ ) . Ordering of the suspension is accompanied by a nonmonotonic behavior of [η ] with ϕ , while η exhibits plateaus. The nonmonotonic behavior of [η ] is suppressed when a disordered pattern prevails.

  14. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I.; Maxim E. Kuil; Rensen, Patrick C.N.; Koster, Abraham J.; Bertina, Rogier M.; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited.Objectives: To image EV and determine the morphology, ...

  15. Cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhus, E; Bundgaard, N; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1984-01-01

    Cystadenomas of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare benign tumours, which only have been reported seven times earlier in the literature. The first Danish case is reported with discussion of symptomatology, pathology and treatment.......Cystadenomas of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare benign tumours, which only have been reported seven times earlier in the literature. The first Danish case is reported with discussion of symptomatology, pathology and treatment....

  16. Luminescent functionalized vesicles: synthesis, characterization and analytical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the membrane functionalization of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles by incorporation of artificial amphiphiles. The presented investigations demonstrate a fast and simple approach for sensing molecular recognition events at the membrane-water interface. Chapter 1 describes the dynamic recognition of multivalent ligands by receptor recruiting in fluid vesicle membranes. Two amphiphilic metal-complexes with attached FRET-pair labels were prepared and embedded into D...

  17. Extracellular vesicles provide a means for tissue crosstalk during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitham, Martin; Parker, Benjamin L; Friedrichsen, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Exercise stimulates the release of molecules into the circulation, supporting the concept that inter-tissue signaling proteins are important mediators of adaptations to exercise. Recognizing that many circulating proteins are packaged in extracellular vesicles (EVs), we employed quantitative...... vesicles. Pulse-chase and intravital imaging experiments suggested EVs liberated by exercise have a propensity to localize in the liver and can transfer their protein cargo. Moreover, by employing arteriovenous balance studies across the contracting human limb, we identified several novel candidate...

  18. Adsorption and encapsulation of flexible polyelectrolytes in charged spherical vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, H. R.; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-06-01

    We present a theory of adsorption of flexible polyelectrolytes on the interior and exterior surfaces of a charged vesicle in an electrolyte solution. The criteria for adsorption and the density profiles of the adsorbed polymer chain are derived in terms of various characteristics of the polymer, vesicle, and medium, such as the charge density and length of the polymer, charge density and size of the vesicle, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant of the medium. For adsorption inside the vesicle, the competition between the loss of conformational entropy and gain in adsorption energy results in two kinds of encapsulated states, depending on the strength of the polymer-vesicle interaction. By considering also the adsorption from outside the vesicle, we derive the entropic and energy contributions to the free energy change to transfer an adsorbed chain in the interior to an adsorbed chain on the exterior. In this paper, we have used the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method to solve the equation for the probability distribution function of the chain. The present WKB results are compared with the previous results based on variational methods. The WKB and variational results are in good agreement for both the interior and exterior states of adsorption, except in the zero-salt limit for adsorption in the exterior region. The adsorption criteria and density profiles for both the interior and exterior states are presented in terms of various experimentally controllable variables. Calculation of the dependencies of free energy change to transfer an adsorbed chain from the interior to the exterior surface on salt concentration and vesicle radius shows that the free energy penalty to expel a chain from a vesicle is only of the order of thermal energy.

  19. Modulation of Immune Responses by Extracellular Vesicles From Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Liu, Baoying; Arakelyan, Anush; Zicari, Sonia; Hannes, Susan; Chen, Ping; Li, Zhiyu; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Sen, H Nida; Margolis, Leonid; Nussenblatt, Robert B

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV), such as exosomes, are important mediators of intercellular communication and have been implicated in modulation of the immune system. We investigated if EV released from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) modulate immune responses in vitro. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from ARPE-19 cultures stimulated or not with the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Isolated EV were characterized by nanoparticle flow and Western blot analyses. Retinal pigment epithelium-derived EV were cultured with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which were assayed for T-cell proliferation by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Retinal pigment epithelium-derived EV were also independently cultured with enriched lymphocytes or monocytes. Cell phenotype and cell death were evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. Cytokine levels were assayed in culture supernatants by multiplex bead analysis. The concentration of ARPE-derived EV from cytokine-stimulated cultures was slightly higher than from nonstimulated cultures. The size of EV was approximately 100 nm in both groups. Extracellular vesicles from both nonstimulated and cytokine-stimulated ARPE-19 significantly inhibited T-cell proliferation without affecting T-cell viability. Culture of EV from nonstimulated ARPE-19 with undifferentiated human monocytes induced an immunoregulatory phenotype with a significantly higher percentage of CD14++CD16+ monocytes and upregulation of TGF-β1. Culture of EV from cytokine-stimulated ARPE-19 cells with human monocytes induced upregulation of several proinflammatory cytokines and monocyte death. Retinal pigment epithelium cells constitutively secrete EV in the size range of exosomes, with increased release from RPE cells stimulated with inflammatory cytokines. Extracellular vesicles from both nonstimulated and cytokine-stimulated RPE inhibited T-cell stimulation. Extracellular vesicles from nonstimulated ARPE-19 cells promoted an immunoregulatory CD14++CD16

  20. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Receptor-Independent Transmission of Novel Tick-Borne Bunyavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvas, Jesus A.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is a newly recognized member of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The virus was isolated from patients presenting with hemorrhagic manifestations and an initial case fatality rate of 12 to 30% was reported. Due to the recent emergence of this pathogen, there is limited knowledge on the molecular virology of SFTS virus. Recently, we reported that the SFTS virus NSs protein inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter. Furthermore, we also found that SFTS virus NSs relocalizes key components of the IFN response into NSs-induced cytoplasmic structures. Due to the important role these structures play during SFTS virus replication, we conducted live cell imaging studies to gain further insight into the role and trafficking of these cytoplasmic structures during virus infection. We found that some of the SFTS virus NSs-positive cytoplasmic structures were secreted to the extracellular space and endocytosed by neighboring cells. We also found that these secreted structures isolated from NSs-expressing cells and SFTS virus-infected cells were positive for the viral protein NSs and the host protein CD63, a protein associated with extracellular vesicles. Electron microscopy studies also revealed that the isolated CD63-immunoprecipitated extracellular vesicles produced during SFTS virus infection contained virions. The virions harbored within these structures were efficiently delivered to uninfected cells and were able to sustain SFTS virus replication. Altogether, these results suggest that SFTS virus exploits extracellular vesicles to mediate virus receptor-independent transmission to host cells and open the avenue for novel therapeutic strategies against SFTS virus and related pathogens. IMPORTANCE SFTS virus is novel bunyavirus associated with hemorrhagic fever illness. Currently, limited information is available about SFTS virus. In the present study, we demonstrated