WorldWideScience

Sample records for vesamicol receptor concentration

  1. Mouse brain distribution of a carbon-11 labeled vesamicol derivative: presynaptic marker of cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, M R; Jung, Y W; Haka, M S; Gildersleeve, D L; Kuhl, D E; Wieland, D M

    1990-01-01

    The regional mouse brain distribution of a new carbon-11 labeled derivative of vesamicol, [11C]-5-(N-methylamino)benzovesamicol [( 11C]MABV) is reported. Radiotracer concentrations in vivo are in the rank order of striatum greater than cortex greater than hippocampus greater than hypothalamus greater than cerebellum, consistent with reported distributions of other presynaptic cholinergic neuronal markers. In time course studies, striatum/cerebellum and cortex/cerebellum ratios for (-)-[11C]MABV continue to increase to values of 13 and 5, respectively, 75 min after i.v. injection of [11C]MABV. The specific binding in striatum and cortex is lowered by pretreatment with (+/-)-vesamicol, and shows stereoselectivity with lower uptake and lower ratios for the (+)-enantiomer. (-)-enantiomer. (-)-[11C]MABV is proposed as a positron-emitting radioligand for the in vivo study of presynaptic cholinergic neurons.

  2. Hypothyroidism leads to increased dopamine receptor sensitivity and concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, A.D.; Overstreet, D.H.; Crocker, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Rats treated with iodine-131 were confirmed to be hypothyroid by their reduced baseline core body temperatures, reduced serum thyroxine concentrations and elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations. When hypothyroid rats were compared to euthyroid controls they were more sensitive to the effects of apomorphine (1.0 mumol/kg) on stereotypy, operant responding and body temperature and showed a smaller reduction in locomotor activity after injection of haloperidol (0.25 mumol/kg). Receptor binding studies on striatal homogenates indicated that hypothyroid rats had increased concentrations of D2 dopamine receptors but there was no change in the affinity. It is concluded that hypothyroidism increases dopamine receptor sensitivity by increasing receptor concentration.

  3. Serum transferrin receptor concentration indicates increased erythropoiesis in Kenyan children with asymptomatic malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, H.; West, C.E.; Ndeto, P.; Burema, J.; Benguin, Y.; Kok, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum transferrin receptor concentrations are not or are only marginally influenced by the inflammatory

  4. Are receptor concentrations correlated across tissues within individuals? A case study examining glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Keniston, Daniel E; Reed, J Michael; Romero, L Michael

    2015-04-01

    Hormone receptors are a necessary (although not sufficient) part of the process through which hormones like corticosterone create physiological responses. However, it is currently unknown to what extent receptor concentrations across different target tissues may be correlated within individual animals. In this study, we examined this question using a large dataset of radioligand binding data for glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) in 13 different tissues in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) (n=72). Our data revealed that individual house sparrows tended to exhibit higher or lower receptor binding across all tissues, which could be part of what creates the physiological and behavioral syndromes associated with different hormonal profiles. However, although statistically significant, the correlations between tissues were very weak. Thus, when each tissue was independently regressed on receptor concentrations in the other tissues, multivariate analysis revealed significant relationships only for sc fat (for GR) and whole brain, hippocampus, kidney, omental fat, and sc fat (for MR). We also found significant pairwise correlations only between receptor concentrations in brain and hippocampus, and brain and kidney (both for MR). This research reveals that although there are generalized individual consistencies in GR and MR concentrations, possibly due to such factors as hormonal regulation and genetic effects, the ability of 2 different tissues to respond to the same hormonal signal appears to be affected by additional factors that remain to be identified.

  5. The serum concentration of soluble interleukin-2 receptor in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraura, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Minami, Takaomi; Takeshima, Taro; Shimooki, Osamu; Kajii, Eiji

    2017-03-01

    Kawasaki disease is a febrile disease of childhood that is associated with increased inflammatory cytokines and immunoregulatory abnormalities. While the serum concentrations of soluble IL-2 receptor can change under such pathologies, the relevance of the soluble IL-2 receptor concentration in patients with Kawasaki disease has not been specified. We aimed to summarize the existing studies that reported the soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations in patients with Kawasaki disease. Original articles that were published up to July 2016 were collected using a PubMed/Medline-based search engine. A total of nine articles that reported the serum soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations in acute-phase Kawasaki disease were eligible. All of the articles described a high soluble IL-2 receptor concentration in patients with Kawasaki disease relative to the level of controls or the reference range. Two of five articles on patients with coronary artery aneurysms described a significantly higher soluble IL-2 receptor concentration in patients with coronary artery aneurysms than patients without. Two articles on patients with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy described a significant decrease of the soluble IL-2 receptor concentration after the therapy. Accordingly, the serum soluble IL-2 receptor can be a potent marker of disease activity and therapeutic effects in patients with Kawasaki disease; further studies are thus warranted for its use in the clinical setting.

  6. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  7. Sigma-1 receptor concentration in plasma of patients with late-life depression: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hideyuki Shimizu,1 Minoru Takebayashi,2 Masayuki Tani,1 Hiroaki Tanaka,1 Bun Yamagata,1 Kenzo Kurosawa,1 Hiroki Yamada,1 Mitsugu Hachisu,3 Kazue Hisaoka-Nakashima,2 Mami Okada-Tsuchioka,2 Masaru Mimura,4 Akira Iwanami11Department of Neuropsychiatry, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry and Institute for Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center, Kure, Japan; 3Department of Clinical Psychopharmacy, Pharmacy School, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Recently, the sigma-1 receptor has been shown to play a significant role in the neural transmission of mood by regulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Additionally, the sigma-1 receptor has been reported to influence cognitive functions including learning and memory. In this study, we measured plasma sigma-1 receptor concentrations before and after antidepressant treatment in patients with late-life major depressive disorder (MDD and explored whether changes in depressive status are related to sigma-1 receptor concentrations.Methods: The study participants were 12 subjects with late-life MDD diagnosed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. All of the participants were over 60 years old. Immediately prior to and 8 weeks after the start of treatment, sigma-1 receptor concentration and mental status, including depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; HAM-D, were measured. Treatment for depression was performed according to a developed algorithm based on the choice of treatments. We examined the association between changes in sigma-1 receptor concentration and HAM-D scores during antidepressant treatment. For the measurement of plasma sigma-1 receptor concentration, blood plasma samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western

  8. Melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Jean A; Suply, Thomas; Audinot, Valérie; Rodriguez, Marianne; Beauverger, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; Galizzi, Jean-Pierre; Fauchère, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic neuropeptide of nineteen amino acids in mammals. Its involvement in the feeding behaviour has been well established during the last few years. A first receptor subtype, now termed MCHIR, was discovered in 1999, following the desorphanisation of the SLCI orphan receptor, using either reverse pharmacology or systematic screening of agonist candidates. A second MCH receptor, MCH2R, has been discovered recently, by several groups working on data mining of genomic banks. The molecular pharmacology of these two receptors is only described on the basis of the action of peptides derived from MCH. The present review tentatively summarizes the knowledge on these two receptors and presents the first attempts to discover new classes of antagonists that might have major roles in the control of obesity and feeding behaviour.

  9. Magnesium modulates parathyroid hormone secretion and upregulates parathyroid receptor expression at moderately low calcium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Canalejo, Antonio; Herencia, Carmen; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Navarro-González, Juan F; Rodríguez, Mariano; Peter, Mirjam; Gundlach, Kristina; Steppan, Sonja; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Almaden, Yolanda

    2014-02-01

    The interest on magnesium (Mg) has grown since clinical studies have shown the efficacy of Mg-containing phosphate binders. However, some concern has arisen for the potential effect of increased serum Mg on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Our objective was to evaluate the direct effect of Mg in the regulation of the parathyroid function; specifically, PTH secretion and the expression of parathyroid cell receptors: CaR, the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and FGFR1/Klotho. The work was performed in vitro by incubating intact rat parathyroid glands in different calcium (Ca) and Mg concentrations. Increasing Mg concentrations from 0.5 to 2 mM produced a left shift of PTH-Ca curves. With Mg 5 mM, the secretory response was practically abolished. Mg was able to reduce PTH only if parathyroid glands were exposed to moderately low Ca concentrations; with normal-high Ca concentrations, the effect of Mg on PTH inhibition was minor or absent. After 6-h incubation at a Ca concentration of 1.0 mM, the expression of parathyroid CaR, VDR, FGFR1 and Klotho (at mRNA and protein levels) was increased with a Mg concentration of 2.0 when compared with 0.5 mM. Mg reduces PTH secretion mainly when a moderate low calcium concentration is present; Mg also modulates parathyroid glands function through upregulation of the key cellular receptors CaR, VDR and FGF23/Klotho system.

  10. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Dual-Tracer Receptor Concentration Imaging in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzei, Nazanin; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Elliott, Jonathan T; Holt, Robert W; Gunn, Jason R; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2014-03-05

    Molecular differences between cancerous and healthy tissue have become key targets for novel therapeutics specific to tumor receptors. However, cancer cell receptor expression can vary within and amongst different tumors, making strategies that can quantify receptor concentration in vivo critical for the progression of targeted therapies. Recently a dual-tracer imaging approach capable of providing quantitative measures of receptor concentration in vivo was developed. It relies on the simultaneous injection and imaging of receptor-targeted tracer and an untargeted tracer (to account for non-specific uptake of the targeted tracer). Early implementations of this approach have been structured on existing "reference tissue" imaging methods that have not been optimized for or validated in dual-tracer imaging. Using simulations and mouse tumor model experimental data, the salient findings in this study were that all widely used reference tissue kinetic models can be used for dual-tracer imaging, with the linearized simplified reference tissue model offering a good balance of accuracy and computational efficiency. Moreover, an alternate version of the full two-compartment reference tissue model can be employed accurately by assuming that the K1s of the targeted and untargeted tracers are similar to avoid assuming an instantaneous equilibrium between bound and free states (made by all other models).

  11. Analyzing the Role of Receptor Internalization in the Regulation of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay I. Moden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of appetite is complex, though our understanding of the process is improving. The potential role for the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH signaling pathway in the treatment of obesity is being explored by many. It was hypothesized that internalization of MCH receptors would act to potently desensitize cells to MCH. Despite potent desensitization of ERK signaling by MCH in BHK-570 cells, we were unable to observe MCH-mediated internalization of MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1 by fluorescence microscopy. A more quantitative approach using a cell-based ELISA indicated only 15% of receptors internalized, which is much lower than that reported in the literature. When -arrestins were overexpressed in our system, removal of receptors from the cell surface was facilitated and signaling to a leptin promoter was diminished, suggesting that internalization of MCHR1 is sensitive to cellular -arrestin levels. A dominant-negative GRK construct completely inhibited loss of receptors from the cell surface in response to MCH, suggesting that the internalization observed is phosphorylation-dependent. Since desensitization of MCH-mediated ERK signaling did not correlate with significant loss of MCHR1 from the cell surface, we hypothesize that in this model system regulation of MCH signaling may be the result of segregation of receptors from signaling components at the plasma membrane.

  12. Lapatinib Plasma and Tumor Concentrations and Effects on HER Receptor Phosphorylation in Tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil L Spector

    Full Text Available The paradigm shift in cancer treatment from cytotoxic drugs to tumor targeted therapies poses new challenges, including optimization of dose and schedule based on a biologically effective dose, rather than the historical maximum tolerated dose. Optimal dosing is currently determined using concentrations of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in plasma as a surrogate for tumor concentrations. To examine this plasma-tumor relationship, we explored the association between lapatinib levels in tumor and plasma in mice and humans, and those effects on phosphorylation of human epidermal growth factor receptors (HER in human tumors.Mice bearing BT474 HER2+ human breast cancer xenografts were dosed once or twice daily (BID with lapatinib. Drug concentrations were measured in blood, tumor, liver, and kidney. In a randomized phase I clinical trial, 28 treatment-naïve female patients with early stage HER2+ breast cancer received lapatinib 1000 or 1500 mg once daily (QD or 500 mg BID before evaluating steady-state lapatinib levels in plasma and tumor.In mice, lapatinib levels were 4-fold higher in tumor than blood with a 4-fold longer half-life. Tumor concentrations exceeded the in vitro IC90 (~ 900 nM or 500 ng/mL for inhibition of HER2 phosphorylation throughout the 12-hour dosing interval. In patients, tumor levels were 6- and 10-fold higher with QD and BID dosing, respectively, compared to plasma trough levels. The relationship between tumor and plasma concentration was complex, indicating multiple determinants. HER receptor phosphorylation varied depending upon lapatinib tumor concentrations, suggestive of changes in the repertoire of HER homo- and heterodimers.Plasma lapatinib concentrations underestimated tumor drug levels, suggesting that optimal dosing should be focused on the site of action to avoid to inappropriate dose escalation. Larger clinical trials are required to determine optimal dose and schedule to achieve tumor concentrations that maximally

  13. Relevance of Serum Leptin and Leptin-Receptor Concentrations in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Koch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin was implicated to link inflammation and metabolic alterations. We investigated the potential role of leptin components in critically ill patients, because systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia are common features of critical illness. Upon admission to Medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU, free leptin and soluble leptin-receptor serum concentrations were determined in 137 critically ill patients (95 with sepsis, 42 without sepsis and 26 healthy controls. Serum leptin or leptin-receptor did not differ between patients or controls and were independent of sepsis. However, serum leptin was closely associated with obesity and diabetes and clearly correlated with markers of metabolism and liver function. Leptin-receptor was an unfavourable prognostic indicator, associated with mortality during three years follow-up. Our study indicates a functional role of leptin in the pathogenesis of severe illness and emphasizes the impact of complex metabolic alterations on the clinical outcome of critically ill patients.

  14. Agonist-selective effects of opioid receptor ligands on cytosolic calcium concentration in rat striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Hooper, Robert; Dun, Nae J; Undieh, Ashiwel S; Adler, Martin W; Benamar, Khalid; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-06-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid receptor ligand whose mechanism of action is incompletely understood. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we assessed the effects of buprenorphine, β-endorphin, and morphine on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i), in rat striatal neurons. Buprenorphine (0.01-1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) in a dose-dependent manner in a subpopulation of rat striatal neurons. The effect of buprenorphine was largely reduced by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, but not by μ, κ, δ or NOP-selective antagonists. β-Endorphin (0.1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) with a lower amplitude and slower time course than buprenorphine. Similar to buprenorphine, the effect of β-endorphin was markedly decreased by naloxone, but not by opioid-selective antagonists. Morphine (0.1-10 μM), did not affect [Ca(2+)](i) in striatal neurons. Our results suggest that buprenorphine and β-endorphin act on a distinct type/subtype of plasmalemmal opioid receptors or activate intracellular opioid-like receptor(s) in rat striatal neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Low concentrations of bisphenol a suppress thyroid hormone receptor transcription through a nongenomic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Tang, Yuan [Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Third Military Medical University, 30 Yanzheng Street, Chongqing 400038 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Yuan, Ye; Zhao, Bao-Quan [Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 27 Taiping Road, Beijing 100850 (China); Chao, Xi-Juan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Bisphenol (BPA) is one of the highest-volume chemicals produced worldwide, and human exposure to BPA is thought to be ubiquitous. Various rodent and in vitro studies have shown that thyroid hormone (TH) function can be impaired by BPA. However, it is still unknown if low concentrations of BPA can suppress the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) transcription. The present study aims to investigate the possible suppressing effects of low concentrations of BPA on TR transcription and the involved mechanism(s) in CV-1 cells derived from cercopithecus aethiops monkey kidneys. Using gene reporter assays, BPA at concentrations as low as 10{sup −9} M suppresses TR or steroid receptor coactivator-1(SRC-1)-enhanced TR transcription, but not reducing TR/SRC-1 interaction in mammalian two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down studies. It has been further shown that both nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) are recruited to the TR-β1 by BPA in the presence of physiologic concentrations of T3 or T4. However, the overexpression of β3 integrin or c-Src significantly reduces BPA-induced recruitment of N-CoR/SMRT to TR or suppression of TR transcription. Furthermore, BPA inhibits the T3/T4-mediated interassociation of the β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways by the co-immunoprecipitation. These results indicate that low concentrations of BPA suppress the TR transcription by disrupting physiologic concentrations of T3/T4-mediated β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways, followed by recruiting N-CoR/SMRT to TR-β1, providing a novel insight regarding the TH disruption effects of low concentration BPA. -- Highlights: ► Environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA suppress TR transcription. ► BPA recruits the N-CoR/SMRT to TR under the physiologic concentrations of T3/T4. ► BPA disrupts T3/T4-mediated β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways.

  16. Deletion of muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors alters splenic lymphocyte functions and splenic noradrenaline concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainke, Susanne; Wildmann, Johannes; Del Rey, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The existence of interactions between the immune and the sympathetic nervous systems is well established. Noradrenaline can promote or inhibit the immune response, and conversely, the immune response itself can affect noradrenaline concentration in lymphoid organs, such as the spleen. It is also well known that acetylcholine released by pre-ganglionic neurons can modulate noradrenaline release by the postsynaptic neuron. The spleen does not receive cholinergic innervation, but it has been reported that lymphocytes themselves can produce acetylcholine, and express acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholinesterase. We found that the spleen of not overtly immunized mice in which muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors have been knocked out (M1KO) has higher noradrenaline concentrations than that of the wildtype mice, without comparable alterations in the heart, in parallel to a decreased number of IgG-producing B cells. Splenic lymphocytes from M1KO mice displayed increased in vitro-induced cytotoxicity, and this was observed only when CD4(+) T cells were present. In contrast, heterozygous acetylcholinesterase (AChE+/-) mice, had no alterations in splenic noradrenaline concentration, but the in vitro proliferation of AChE+/- CD4(+) T cells was increased. It is theoretically conceivable that reciprocal effects between neuronally and non-neuronally derived acetylcholine and noradrenaline might contribute to the results reported. Our results emphasize the need to consider the balance between the effects of these mediators for the final immunoregulatory outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    OpenAIRE

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter ...

  18. The melanin-concentrating hormone receptors: neuronal and non-neuronal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presse, F; Conductier, G; Rovere, C; Nahon, J-L

    2014-07-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic peptide highly conserved in vertebrates and was originally identified as a skin-paling factor in Teleosts. In fishes, MCH also participates in the regulation of the stress-response and feeding behaviour. Mammalian MCH is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that displays multiple functions, mostly controlling feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis. Transgenic mouse models and pharmacological studies have shown the importance of the MCH system as a potential target in the treatment of appetite disorders and obesity as well as anxiety and psychiatric diseases. Two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) binding MCH have been characterized so far. The first, named MCH-R1 and also called SLC1, was identified through reverse pharmacology strategies by several groups as a cognate receptor of MCH. This receptor is expressed at high levels in many brain areas of rodents and primates and is also expressed in peripheral organs, albeit at a lower rate. A second receptor, designated MCH-R2, exhibited 38% identity to MCH-R1 and was identified by sequence analysis of the human genome. Interestingly, although MCH-R2 orthologues were also found in fishes, dogs, ferrets and non-human primates, this MCH receptor gene appeared either lacking or non-functional in rodents and lagomorphs. Both receptors are class I GPCRs, whose main roles are to mediate the actions of peptides and neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. However, examples of action of MCH on neuronal and non-neuronal cells are emerging that illustrate novel MCH functions. In particular, the functionality of endogenously expressed MCH-R1 has been explored in human neuroblastoma cells, SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cells, and in non-neuronal cell types such as the ependymocytes. Indeed, we have identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent or calcium-dependent signalling cascades that ultimately contributed to neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells or to modulation of

  19. Daily variation in plasma concentration of fencamfamine and striatal dopamine receptors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planeta, C S; DeLucia, R; Aizenstein, M L; Oliveira, G H

    1994-03-01

    Fencamfamine (FCF) is a psychostimulant drug classified as an indirect dopamine agonist. In the present study we evaluated the daily variation in plasma FCF concentration and in striatal dopamine receptors. Adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) maintained on a 12-h light/12-h dark cycle (lights on at 07:00 h) were used. Rats received FCF (10.0 mg/kg, ip) at 09:00, 15:00, 21:00 or 03:00 h and blood samples were collected 30 (N = 6) or 60 (N = 6) min after the injections. Plasma FCF was measured by gas chromatography using an electron capture detector. Two-way ANOVA showed significant differences in FCF concentration when blood samples were collected 30 min after the injection, and the highest value was obtained following injection at 21:00 h. Moreover, at 15:00, 21:00 and 03:00 h, plasma FCF levels were significantly lower 60 min after injection when compared to the 30-min interval. Two other groups of rats (N = 6) were decapitated at 09:00 or 21:00 h and the striata were dissected for the binding assays. The Bmax for [3H]-spiroperidol binding to striatal membranes was higher at 21:00 h, without changes in affinity constant (Kd). In conclusion, plasma FCF levels and dopamine receptors undergo daily variation, a phenomenon that should be considered to explain the circadian time-dependent effects of FCF.

  20. Increased concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and decreased concentrations of beta-2-glycoprotein I in Gambian children with cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; McKay, V; Morris-Jones, S D

    1994-01-01

    receptors of tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 (sIL-6R) in serum of Gambian children with cerebral malaria, mild or asymptomatic malaria, or other illnesses unrelated to malaria. Because cytokine secretion may be triggered by toxic structures containing phosphatidylinositol (PI), we also measured......To investigate the pathogenic versus the protective role of cytokines and toxin-binding factors in Plasmodium falciparum infections, we measured the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and IL-6, as well as soluble...... concentrations of anti-PI antibodies and the PI-binding serum protein beta-2-glycoprotein I. We found increased concentrations of IL-6, sIL-6R, IL-1ra, and some immunoglobulin M antibodies against PI in children with cerebral malaria, but those who died had decreased concentrations of beta-2-glycoprotein I. We...

  1. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA) sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2). We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R) relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80% 20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate), EA sources account for approximately 30% 50% (over the Western US) and 10% 20% (over the Eastern US). The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3), and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3). Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m-3 of sulfate originates from EA) over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase). We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be obtained using either sensitivity (i.e., varying emissions from a region to examine the effects on downwind concentrations

  2. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate, EA sources account for approximately 30%–50% (over the Western US and 10%–20% (over the Eastern US. The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3, and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m−3 of sulfate originates from EA over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be

  3. Source-Receptor Relationships for East Asian Sulfur Dioxide Emissions and Northern Hemisphere Sulfate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2007-12-01

    We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA) sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the northern hemisphere based on a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2) driven with NCEP reanalysis meteorology for 1991. We conduct a base and several sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R) relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over the source and downwind regions. We find that reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence over the North Pacific, but raising EA SO2 emissions will not significantly increase the spatial extent of influence. We define a linearity index and find the S-R relationship between EA SO2 emissions and EA sulfate concentrations to be nearly linear over most downwind regions, but to be non-linear over the EA source region, particularly at the surface and in winter. In addition, we find that besides the direct transport of EA sulfate to North America (NA) and Europe (EU), the indirect response of locally-produced NA or EU sulfate to changes in EA SO2 emissions is negative (i.e., offsetting the direct effect) in winter, spring and fall, but becomes positive in summer. In summer the indirect response is as important as direct transport of EA sulfate over the southeastern U.S. and southern EU. This summertime positive indirect effect largely results from induced changes in H2O2 oxidant concentrations over these regions.

  4. Vitellogenin and vitellogenin receptor gene expression and 20-hydroxyecdysone concentration in Macrobrachium rosenbergii exposed to chlordecone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Anne; Hanikenne, Marc; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Forget-Leray, Joëlle; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Gismondi, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Chlordecone is a persistent organochlorine pesticide widely used in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) to control the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus. Although it was previously highlighted that chlordecone may affect the reproduction and growth of vertebrate species, little information is available on the chlordecone effects in invertebrates. The present study investigated the effects of chlordecone on a hormone and a protein having key roles in reproduction and growth of the decapod crustacean Macrobrachium rosenbergii, by measuring the 20-hydroxyecdysone concentration, vitellogenin, and vitellogenin receptor gene expression, as well as the bioconcentration of chlordecone in exposed prawns. First, the results revealed that chlordecone was accumulated in M. rosenbergii. Then, it was found that Vg and VgR gene expression were increased in male and female M. rosenbergii exposed to chlordecone for 90 and 240 days, while the 20-hydroxyecdysone concentrations were decreased. This work suggests that chlordecone accumulates in prawn tissues and could affect key molecules involved in the reproduction and the growth of the invertebrate M. rosenbergii. However, many questions remain unresolved regarding the impacts of chlordecone on growth and reproduction and the signaling pathways responsible for these effects, as well as the potential role of confounding factors present in in situ studies.

  5. Cytoskeleton-related regulation of primary cilia shortening mediated by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoshige, Sakura; Kobayashi, Yuki; Hosoba, Kosuke; Hamamoto, Akie; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Saito, Yumiko

    2017-11-01

    Primary cilia are specialized microtubule-based organelles. Their importance is highlighted by the gamut of ciliary diseases associated with various syndromes including diabetes and obesity. Primary cilia serve as signaling hubs through selective interactions with ion channels and conventional G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1), a key regulator of feeding, is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia in distinct regions of the mouse brain. We previously found that MCH acts on ciliary MCHR1 and induces cilia shortening through a Gi/o-dependent Akt pathway with no cell cycle progression. Many factors can participate in cilia length control. However, the mechanisms for how these molecules are relocated and coordinated to activate cilia shortening are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in regulating MCH-induced cilia shortening using clonal MCHR1-expressing hTERT-RPE1 cells. Pharmacological and biochemical approaches showed that cilia shortening mediated by MCH was associated with increased soluble cytosolic tubulin without changing the total tubulin amount. Enhanced F-actin fiber intensity was also observed in MCH-treated cells. The actions of various pharmacological agents revealed that coordinated actin machinery, especially actin polymerization, was required for MCHR1-mediated cilia shortening. A recent report indicated the existence of actin-regulated machinery for cilia shortening through GPCR agonist-dependent ectosome release. However, our live-cell imaging experiments showed that MCH progressively elicited cilia shortening without exclusion of fluorescence-positive material from the tip. Short cilia phenotypes have been associated with various metabolic disorders. Thus, the present findings may contribute toward better understanding of how the cytoskeleton is involved in the GPCR ligand-triggered cilia shortening with cell mechanical

  6. Modulation of primary cilia length by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Akie; Yamato, Shogo; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Kobayashi, Yuki; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-06-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The MCH-MCHR1 system has been implicated in the regulation of feeding, emotional processing, and sleep in rodents. Recent work revealed that MCHR1 is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia of the central nervous system. Cilia have various chemosensory functions in many types of cell, and ciliary dysfunction is associated with ciliopathies such as polycystic kidney disease and obesity. Although dynamic modulation of neuronal cilia length is observed in obese mice, the functional interaction of neuronal ciliary GPCR and its endogenous ligand has not yet been elucidated. We report here that MCH treatment significantly reduced cilia length in hTERT-RPE1 cells (hRPE1 cells) transfected with MCHR1. Quantitative analyses indicated that MCH-induced cilia shortening progressed in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 lower than 1nM when cells were treated for 6h. Although the assembly and disassembly of primary cilia are tightly coupled to the cell cycle, cell cycle reentry was not a determinant of MCH-induced cilia shortening. We confirmed that MCH elicited receptor internalization, Ca(2+) mobilization, ERK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in MCHR1-expressing hRPE1 cells. Among these diverse pathways, we revealed that Gi/o-dependent Akt phosphorylation was an important component in the initial stage of MCH-induced cilia length shortening. Furthermore, induction of fewer cilia by Kif3A siRNA treatment significantly decreased the MCH-mediated phosphorylation of Akt, indicating the functional importance of the MCHR1-Akt pathway in primary cilia. Taken together, the present data suggest that the MCH-MCHR1 axis may modulate the sensitivity of cells to external environments by controlling the cilia length. Therefore, further characterization of MCHR1 as a ciliary GPCR will provide a potential molecular mechanism to link cilia length

  7. Sleep architecture of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamantidis, Antoine; Salvert, Denise; Goutagny, Romain; Lakaye, Bernard; Gervasoni, Damien; Grisar, Thierry; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2008-04-01

    Growing amounts of data indicate involvement of the posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). Accordingly, we previously showed that the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-producing neurons of the rat hypothalamus are selectively activated during a PS rebound. In addition, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH increases total sleep duration, suggesting a new role for MCH in sleep regulation. To determine whether activation of the MCH system promotes sleep, we studied spontaneous sleep and its homeostatic regulation in mice with deletion of the MCH-receptor 1 gene (MCH-R1-/- vs. MCH-R1+/+) and their behavioural response to modafinil, a powerful antinarcoleptic drug. Here, we show that the lack of functional MCH-R1 results in a hypersomniac-like phenotype, both in basal conditions and after total sleep deprivation, compared to wild-type mice. Further, we found that modafinil was less potent at inducing wakefulness in MCH-R1-/- than in MCH-R1+/+ mice. We report for the first time that animals with genetically inactivated MCH signaling exhibit altered vigilance state architecture and sleep homeostasis. This study also suggests that the MCH system may modulate central pathways involved in the wake-promoting effect of modafinil.

  8. Serum Concentrations of TNF α and Its Soluble Receptors in Patients with Adrenal Tumors Treated by Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Komorowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral blood levels of TNF α and its soluble receptors were studied in 39 patients with malignant and benign adrenal tumors treated by adrenalectomy. The concentrations of TNF α were significantly elevated in patients with malignant tumors of the adrenal cortex and in patients with Conn's syndrome compared to control. In patients with non-functioning adenomas and pheochromocytomas, TNF α levels were similar to those detected in the control. In subjects with myelolipomas, the serum concentration of TNF α was lower compared to the control. After adrenalectomy, the levels of TNF α were decreased in patients with malignant tumors and in patients with Conn's syndrome, non-functioniong adenomas and pheochromocytomas compared to the concentration before surgery. The serum concentrations of soluble receptors of TNF α did not differ among different patient groups and compared to the control. After adrenalectomy, the blood concentrations of TNF α R1 and TNF α R2 were decreased in patients with Conn's syndrome. However, to confirm practicality of the evaluation of TNF α and its soluble receptors in differential diagnosis in patients with adrenal tumors, a larger study group is needed.

  9. Reciprocal regulation of two G protein-coupled receptors sensing extracellular concentrations of Ca2+ and H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Jacobs, Benjamin; Becker, Esther B E; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-08-25

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are cell surface receptors that detect a wide range of extracellular messengers and convey this information to the inside of cells. Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and ovarian cancer gene receptor 1 (OGR1) are two GPCRs that sense extracellular Ca(2+) and H(+), respectively. These two ions are key components of the interstitial fluid, and their concentrations change in an activity-dependent manner. Importantly, the interstitial fluid forms part of the microenvironment that influences cell function in health and disease; however, the exact mechanisms through which changes in the microenvironment influence cell function remain largely unknown. We show that CaSR and OGR1 reciprocally inhibit signaling through each other in central neurons, and that this is lost in their transformed counterparts. Furthermore, strong intracellular acidification impairs CaSR function, but potentiates OGR1 function. Thus, CaSR and OGR1 activities can be regulated in a seesaw manner, whereby conditions promoting signaling through one receptor simultaneously inhibit signaling through the other receptor, potentiating the difference in their relative signaling activity. Our results provide insight into how small but consistent changes in the ionic microenvironment of cells can significantly alter the balance between two signaling pathways, which may contribute to disease progression.

  10. Reciprocal regulation of two G protein-coupled receptors sensing extracellular concentrations of Ca2+ and H+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Jacobs, Benjamin; Becker, Esther B. E.; Glitsch, Maike D.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are cell surface receptors that detect a wide range of extracellular messengers and convey this information to the inside of cells. Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and ovarian cancer gene receptor 1 (OGR1) are two GPCRs that sense extracellular Ca2+ and H+, respectively. These two ions are key components of the interstitial fluid, and their concentrations change in an activity-dependent manner. Importantly, the interstitial fluid forms part of the microenvironment that influences cell function in health and disease; however, the exact mechanisms through which changes in the microenvironment influence cell function remain largely unknown. We show that CaSR and OGR1 reciprocally inhibit signaling through each other in central neurons, and that this is lost in their transformed counterparts. Furthermore, strong intracellular acidification impairs CaSR function, but potentiates OGR1 function. Thus, CaSR and OGR1 activities can be regulated in a seesaw manner, whereby conditions promoting signaling through one receptor simultaneously inhibit signaling through the other receptor, potentiating the difference in their relative signaling activity. Our results provide insight into how small but consistent changes in the ionic microenvironment of cells can significantly alter the balance between two signaling pathways, which may contribute to disease progression. PMID:26261299

  11. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  12. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J S; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-07-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance; thus, mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expresses cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin, but neither orexin nor MCH neurons, expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Melanin concentrating hormone and estrogen receptor-α are coexstensive but not coexpressed in cells of male rat hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Muschamp, John W.; Hull, Elaine M.

    2007-01-01

    In male rats, estradiol (E2) exerts marked anorectic effects. One mechanism proposed for this effect is an E2-mediated down-regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin concentrating hormone (MCH). Previous anatomical work has shown that both MCH and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are found in quantity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), a structure long associated with appetite and ingestive behavior. It has been hypothesized that the most direct manner by which E2 could affect MCH expre...

  14. Low Concentrations of Corticosterone Exert Stimulatory Effects on Macrophage Function in a Manner Dependent on Glucocorticoid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He-Jiang Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs have both stimulatory and suppressive effects on immune cells depending on the concentration. However, the mechanisms underlying the stimulatory effects of GCs remain elusive. Rat peritoneal macrophages were treated with different concentrations of corticosterone (0, 30 nM, 150 nM, and 3 μM. To inhibit the glucocorticoid receptor (GR activity, macrophages were preincubated with the GR antagonist RU486 (mifepristone, 10 μM for 30 min before treatment with corticosterone (150 nM. In the absence of immune stimuli, the chemotactic and phagocytic activities of macrophages were markedly enhanced by low concentrations of corticosterone (30 and 150 nM when compared with vehicle-treated controls. However, these effects were not observed at a high concentration of corticosterone (3 μM. Furthermore, blocking GR activity inhibited 150 nM corticosterone-enhanced chemotaxis and phagocytosis of macrophages. Meanwhile, after treatment with corticosterone (150 nM for 1 h and 3 h, GR protein expression increased to 1.4- and 2.2-fold, respectively, compared to untreated macrophages. These effects were inhibited by RU486. However, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR protein expression was not influenced by 150 nM corticosterone. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of corticosterone exert stimulatory effects on macrophage function in the absence of immune stimuli, and GR is at least partially responsible for these effects.

  15. Changes in plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists in response to adrenaline infusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Ostrowski, K.; Ullum, H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of adrenaline in the response of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonists (ra) to extreme physiological conditions such as trauma and exercise, we examined the concentrations in the plasma of these cytokines during an adrenaline infusion. Given the fact...... that HIV infected patients have elevated levels of IL-6 in plasma, 12 HIV seropositive subjects and 6 HIV seronegative control subjects received a 1-h adrenaline infusion. Baseline concentrations of IL-6 and IL-1ra were higher in the HIV patients compared with the controls (P...), being most pronounced in the untreated subgroup of HIV infected patients (n = 6). The plasma concentration of adrenaline had increased 24-fold after 15 min of adrenaline infusion. The plasma concentration of IL-6 had increased by two- to threefold after 45 min of adrenaline infusion (P

  16. Chronic stress alters concentrations of corticosterone receptors in a tissue-specific manner in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael

    2014-07-15

    The physiological stress response results in release of glucocorticoid hormones such as corticosterone (CORT). Whereas short-term activation of this response helps animals cope with environmental stressors, chronic activation can result in negative effects including metabolic dysregulation and reproductive failure. However, there is no consensus hormonal profile of a chronically stressed animal, suggesting that researchers may need to look beyond hormone titers to interpret the impacts of chronic stress. In this study, we brought wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus) into captivity. We then compared glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor concentrations in sparrows exposed either to a standardized chronic stress protocol (n=26) or to standard husbandry conditions (controls; n=20). We used radioligand binding assays to quantify receptors in whole brain, liver, kidneys, spleen, gonads, gastrocnemius and pectoralis muscle, omental and subcutaneous fat, and bib and back skin. In most tissues, CORT receptors did not differ between controls and stressed animals, although we found marginal increases in receptor density in kidney and testes in stressed birds at some time points. Only in pectoralis muscle was there a robust effect of chronic stress, with both receptor types higher in stressed animals. Increased pectoralis sensitivity to CORT with chronic stress may be part of the underlying mechanism for muscle wasting in animals administered exogenous CORT. Furthermore, the change in pectoralis was not paralleled by gastrocnemius receptors. This difference may help explain previous reports of a greater effect of CORT on pectoralis than on other muscle types, and indicate that birds use this muscle as a protein reserve. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Interleukin-1 contributes to increased concentrations of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type I in sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Fischer, E.; Coyle, S. M.; van Zee, K. J.; Pribble, J. P.; Stiles, D. M.; Barie, P. S.; Buurman, W. A.; Moldawer, L. L.; Lowry, S. F.

    1995-01-01

    Studies were done in baboons and humans to assess the role of interleukin (IL)-1 on the release of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) during sepsis. In baboons, IL-1 alpha induced increased levels of sTNFR types I and II. Infusion of Escherichia coli into baboons also led to higher

  18. INCREASED PLASMA-CONCENTRATIONS OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST IN NEONATAL SEPSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, ESJM; DELEIJ, LHFM; OKKEN, A; BAARSMA, R; KIMPEN, JLL

    Newborns are prone to severe infections and sepsis. Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1 beta play a major role in the initiation of the host response to infections. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is a naturally occurring antagonist of IL-1 beta. we hypothesized that low IL-1ra

  19. Receptor modelling of PM{sub 10} concentrations at a United Kingdom national network monitoring site in central London

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stedman, J.R.; Lineham, E.; Conlan, B. [AEA Technology, National Environmental Technology Centre, Culham (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    A receptor model for predicting future PM{sub 10} concentrations has been developed within the framework of the UK Airborne Particles Expert Group and applied during the recently completed review of the UK National Air Quality Strategy. The model uses a combination of measured PM{sub 10}, oxides of nitrogen and particulate sulphate concentrations to provide daily estimates of the contributions to total particle concentrations from primary combustion, secondary and other (generally coarse) particle sources. Projections of past and future concentrations of PM{sub 10} are estimated by applying appropriate reductions to the current concentrations of the three components based on an understanding of the likely impact of current policies on future levels. Projections have been derived from 1996, 1997 and 1998 monitoring data and compared with UK national air quality objectives and European Union limit values. One of the key uncertainties within the receptor modelling method is the assignment of the residual PM{sub 10}, remaining after the assignment of primary combustion and secondary particle contributions, to the 'other' particle fraction. An examination of the difference between measured PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations confirms our assignment of the bulk of this residual to coarse particles. Projections based on 1996 monitoring data are the highest and those based on 1998 monitoring data are the lowest. Whilst there is considerable difference between these projections they are consistent with measured concentrations for previous years. All three projections suggest that with current agreed policies the EU annual mean limit value will be achieved. The 24-h mean limit value is projected to be achievable when projections are derived from 1997 and 1998 data, but not from 1996 data. All three projections suggest that with current agreed policies the central London site will not achieve the provisional 1997 UK National Air Quality Strategy objective

  20. The Serum Concentrations of Chemokine CXCL12 and Its Specific Receptor CXCR4 in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Łukaszewicz-Zając

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Recent investigations have suggested that upregulated levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as chemokines, may be associated with development of many malignancies, including esophageal cancer (EC. Based on our knowledge, this study is the first to assess the serum concentration of chemokine CXCL12 and its specific receptor CXCR4 in the diagnosis of EC patients. Material and Methods. The present study included 79 subjects: 49 patients with EC and 30 healthy volunteers. The serum concentrations of CXCL12 and CXCR4 and classical tumor markers such as carcinoembryonal antigen (CEA and squamous cell cancer antigen (SCC-Ag were measured using immunoenzyme assays, while C-reactive protein (CRP levels were assessed by immunoturbidimetric method. Moreover, diagnostic criteria of all proteins tested and the survival of EC patients were assessed. Results. The serum concentrations of CXCL12 were significantly higher, while those of its receptor CXCR4 were significantly lower in EC patients compared to healthy controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXCR4 were the highest among all analyzed proteins and increased for combined analysis with classical tumor markers and CRP levels. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that serum CXCR4 may improve the diagnosis of EC patients, especially in combination with classical tumor markers.

  1. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  2. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S.F.; Newport, G.D.; Scallet, A.C.; Gee, K.W.; Paule, M.G.; Brown, R.M.; Slikker, W. Jr. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, Arkansas (USA))

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the (35S)TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of (35S)TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects.

  3. Elevation of serum insulin concentration during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies leads to similar activation of insulin receptor kinase in skeletal muscle of subjects with and without NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, H H; Vestergaard, H; Kotzke, G

    1995-01-01

    The role of skeletal muscle insulin receptor kinase in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was investigated. Muscle biopsies from 13 patients with NIDDM and 10 control subjects at fasting serum insulin concentrations and approximately 1,000 pmol/l steady-state serum...... insulin during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were immediately frozen. The biopsies were then solubilized, and the receptors were immobilized to anti-insulin receptor antibody-coated microwells. Receptor kinase and binding activities were consecutively measured in these wells. The increase in serum...... insulin concentration (73 +/- 14 to 1,004 +/- 83 and 45 +/- 7 to 1,07 +/- 77 pmol/l in the NIDDM and control groups, respectively) had similar effects on receptor kinase activity in both study groups (12 +/- 1 to 42 +/- 5 and 12 +/- 2 to 47 +/- 5 amol P.fmol binding activity-1. min-1 in the NIDDM...

  4. Rosetta Broker for membrane protein structure prediction: concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 test cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota

    2017-08-03

    Membrane proteins are difficult targets for structure prediction due to the limited structural data deposited in Protein Data Bank. Most computational methods for membrane protein structure prediction are based on the comparative modeling. There are only few de novo methods targeting that distinct protein family. In this work an example of such de novo method was used to structurally and functionally characterize two representatives of distinct membrane proteins families of solute carrier transporters and G protein-coupled receptors. The well-known Rosetta program and one of its protocols named Broker was used in two test cases. The first case was de novo structure prediction of three N-terminal transmembrane helices of the human concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 (hCNT3) homotrimer belonging to the solute carrier 28 family of transporters (SLC28). The second case concerned the large scale refinement of transmembrane helices of a homology model of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) belonging to the G protein-coupled receptors family. The inward-facing model of the hCNT3 homotrimer was used to propose the functional impact of its single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, the 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the unliganded hCNT3 model confirmed its validity and revealed mobility of the selected binding site and homotrimer interface residues. The large scale refinement of transmembrane helices of the CRFR1 homology model resulted in the significant improvement of its accuracy with respect to the crystal structure of CRFR1, especially in the binding site area. Consequently, the antagonist CP-376395 could be docked with Autodock VINA to the CRFR1 model without any steric clashes. The presented work demonstrated that Rosetta Broker can be a versatile tool for solving various issues referring to protein biology. Two distinct examples of de novo membrane protein structure prediction presented here provided important insights into three

  5. Effects of a novel potent melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist, AZD1979, on body weight homeostasis in mice and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploj, Karolina; Benthem, Lambertus; Kakol-Palm, Dorota; Gennemark, Peter; Andersson, Liselotte; Bjursell, Mikael; Börjesson, Jenny; Kärrberg, Lillevi; Månsson, Marianne; Antonsson, Madeleine; Johansson, Anders; Iverson, Suzanne; Carlsson, Björn; Turnbull, Andrew; Lindén, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is an orexigen, and while rodents express one MCH receptor (MCH1 receptor), humans, non-human primates and dogs express two MCH receptors (MCH1 and MCH2 ). MCH1 receptor antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and lower body weight in rodents. However, the mechanisms for the body weight loss and whether MCH1 receptor antagonism can lower body weight in species expressing both MCH receptors are not fully understood. A novel recently identified potent MCH1 receptor antagonist, AZD1979, was studied in wild type and Mchr1 knockout (KO) mice and by using pair-feeding and indirect calorimetry in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. The effect of AZD1979 on body weight was also studied in beagle dogs. AZD1979 bound to MCH1 receptors in the CNS and dose-dependently reduced body weight in DIO mice leading to improved homeostasis model assessment-index of insulin sensitivity. AZD1979 did not affect food intake or body weight in Mchr1 KO mice demonstrating specificity for the MCH1 receptor mechanism. In DIO mice, initial AZD1979-mediated body weight loss was driven by decreased food intake, but an additional component of preserved energy expenditure was apparent in pair-feeding and indirect calorimetry studies. AZD1979 also dose-dependently reduced body weight in dogs. AZD1979 is a novel potent MCH1 receptor antagonist that affects both food intake and energy expenditure. That AZD1979 also lowers body weight in a species expressing both MCH receptors holds promise for the use of MCH1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of human obesity. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. [(18)F]FE@SNAP-a specific PET tracer for melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Cécile; Haeusler, Daniela; Scherer, Thomas; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Zeilinger, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Shanab, Karem; Spreitzer, Helmut; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2016-12-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1), which is highly expressed in the lateral hypothalamus, plays a key role in energy homeostasis, obesity and other endocrine diseases. Hence, there is a major interest in in vivo imaging of this receptor. A PET tracer would allow non-invasive in vivo visualization and quantification of the MCHR1. The aim of the study was the ex vivo evaluation of the MCHR1 ligand [(18)F]FE@SNAP as a potential PET tracer for the MCHR1. [(18)F]FE@SNAP was injected directly into the jugular vein of awake naïve rats for ex vivo brain autoradiography, biodistribution and additional blood metabolite analysis. Blocking experiments were conducted using the unlabeled MCHR1 ligand SNAP-7941. A high uptake of [(18)F]FE@SNAP was observed in the lateral hypothalamus and the ventricular system. Both regions were significantly blocked by SNAP-7941. Biodistribution evinced the highest uptake in the kidneys, adrenals, lung and duodenum. Specific blocking with SNAP-7941 led to a significant tracer reduction in the heart and adrenals. In plasma samples, 47.73 ± 6.1 % of a hydrophilic radioactive metabolite was found 45 min after tracer injection. Since [(18)F]FE@SNAP uptake was significantly blocked in the lateral hypothalamus, there is strong evidence that [(18)F]FE@SNAP is a highly suitable agent for specific MCHR1 imaging in the central nervous system. Additionally, this finding is supported by the specific blocking in the ventricular system, where the MCHR1 is expressed in the ependymal cells. These findings suggest that [(18)F]FE@SNAP could serve as a useful imaging and therapy monitoring tool for MCHR1-related pathologies.

  7. Adjusting soluble transferrin receptor concentrations for inflammation: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Fabian; Namaste, Sorrel Ml; Larson, Leila M; Addo, O Yaw; Mei, Zuguo; Suchdev, Parminder S; Williams, Anne M; Sakr Ashour, Fayrouz A; Rawat, Rahul; Raiten, Daniel J; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A

    2017-07-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is thought to be one of the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies globally, but an accurate assessment in populations who are frequently exposed to infections is impeded by the inflammatory response, which causes iron-biomarker alterations. Objectives: We assessed the relation between soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations and inflammation and malaria in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6-59 mo) and women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15-49 y) and investigated adjustment algorithms to account for these effects. Design: Cross-sectional data from the Biomarkers Reflecting the Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project from 11,913 PSC in 11 surveys and from 11,173 WRA in 7 surveys were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis. The following 3 adjustment approaches were compared with estimated iron-deficient erythropoiesis (sTfR concentration >8.3 mg/L): 1 ) the exclusion of individuals with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations >5 mg/L or α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations >1 g/L, 2 ) the application of arithmetic correction factors, and 3 ) the use of regression approaches. Results: The prevalence of elevated sTfR concentrations incrementally decreased as CRP and AGP deciles decreased for PSC and WRA, but the effect was more pronounced for AGP than for CRP. Depending on the approach used to adjust for inflammation, the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis decreased by 4.4-14.6 and 0.3-9.5 percentage points in PSC and WRA, respectively, compared with unadjusted values. The correction-factor approach yielded a more modest reduction in the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis than did the regression approach. Mostly, adjustment for malaria in addition to AGP did not significantly change the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis. Conclusions: sTfR may be useful to assess iron-deficient erythropoiesis, but

  8. Adjusting soluble transferrin receptor concentrations for inflammation: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Leila M; Mei, Zuguo; Sakr Ashour, Fayrouz A; Rawat, Rahul; Raiten, Daniel J; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is thought to be one of the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies globally, but an accurate assessment in populations who are frequently exposed to infections is impeded by the inflammatory response, which causes iron-biomarker alterations. Objectives: We assessed the relation between soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations and inflammation and malaria in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) and women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15–49 y) and investigated adjustment algorithms to account for these effects. Design: Cross-sectional data from the Biomarkers Reflecting the Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project from 11,913 PSC in 11 surveys and from 11,173 WRA in 7 surveys were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis. The following 3 adjustment approaches were compared with estimated iron-deficient erythropoiesis (sTfR concentration >8.3 mg/L): 1) the exclusion of individuals with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations >5 mg/L or α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations >1 g/L, 2) the application of arithmetic correction factors, and 3) the use of regression approaches. Results: The prevalence of elevated sTfR concentrations incrementally decreased as CRP and AGP deciles decreased for PSC and WRA, but the effect was more pronounced for AGP than for CRP. Depending on the approach used to adjust for inflammation, the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis decreased by 4.4–14.6 and 0.3–9.5 percentage points in PSC and WRA, respectively, compared with unadjusted values. The correction-factor approach yielded a more modest reduction in the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis than did the regression approach. Mostly, adjustment for malaria in addition to AGP did not significantly change the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis. Conclusions: sTfR may be useful to assess iron-deficient erythropoiesis

  9. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  10. Interaction of the red pigment-concentrating hormone of the crustacean Daphnia pulex, with its cognate receptor, Dappu-RPCHR: A nuclear magnetic resonance and modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Graham E; Pavadai, Elumalai; Gäde, Gerd; Timol, Zaheer; Andersen, Niels H

    2017-08-22

    The primary sequence of the red pigment-concentrating hormone (RPCH) receptor of the water flea, Daphnia pulex, was used in homology modeling to construct the first 3D model of a crustacean G-protein coupled receptor, Dappu-RPCHR. This receptor was found to belong to the class A subfamily of GPCRs with a disulfide bridge between Cys(72) and Cys(150) and an ionic lock between Arg(97) and Thr(224) and Thr(220). NMR restrained molecular dynamics was used to determine the structure of an agonist, Dappu-RPCH, in a membrane-mimicking environment. The agonist was found to be flexible but has two main conformations in solution, both having β-turns. Docking of the predominant structure was used to find a binding pocket on the receptor. The pocket's spatial location was similar to that of the AKH receptor of Anopheles gambiae. The binding affinity was -69kcalmol(-1) with the N-terminus of Dappu-RPCH inserted between helices 4 and 6, and the C-terminus interacting with extra-cellular loop, ECL2. Upon binding, H-bonding to the peptide may activate the receptor. This development of the first Dappu-RPCH/Dappu-RPCHR model could be useful for understanding ligand-receptor interactions in crustaceans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporal responses of cutaneous blood flow and plasma catecholamine concentrations to histamine H1- or H2-receptor stimulation in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Alsbjørn, B; Thuesen, B

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the effect of histamine and H1- or H2-receptor antagonists on cutaneous blood flow and catecholamine release in man. Histamine was infused alone or in combination with mepyramine, an H1-antagonist or cimetidine, an H2-antagonist for 2 h. Cutaneous blood flow was measured continuou......We have studied the effect of histamine and H1- or H2-receptor antagonists on cutaneous blood flow and catecholamine release in man. Histamine was infused alone or in combination with mepyramine, an H1-antagonist or cimetidine, an H2-antagonist for 2 h. Cutaneous blood flow was measured...... that histamine causes an immediate cutaneous vasodilatation through H1-receptors and a more sustained response through H2-receptors. The vasodilatation is accompanied by an increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations. Despite the continuous infusion of histamine, blood flow decreased during the last hour...

  12. Modifications of receptor concentrations for adrenaline, steroid hormones, prostaglandin F2alpha and gonadotropins in hypophysis and ovary of dairy cows with ovarian cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odore, R; Re, G; Badino, P; Donn, A; Vigo, D; Biolatti, B; Girardi, C

    1999-04-01

    Receptor concentrations for adrenaline, steroid hormones, PGF2alpha, LH and FSH were measured in the hypophysis and ovary of dairy cows with ovarian cysts and the results were compared with those of healthy animals. Significant modifications were found in all receptor concentrations, either between follicular and luteal structures or between the hypophyseal and ovarian receptorial status. The correlations between catecholaminergic and steroidal systems have already been demonstrated, particularly those existing between beta-adrenoceptors and steroid hormone receptors. Particular attention has been given to the possibility that a derangement in neurogenic inputs may be at the basis of some ovarian pathologies. The results of the present study suggest that the modifications of the ovarian and hypophyseal receptorial status of healthy and affected cows could play an important role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cysts. Copyright 1999 The Italian Pharmacological Society.

  13. Melanin concentrating hormone and estrogen receptor-α are coexstensive but not coexpressed in cells of male rat hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschamp, John W.; Hull, Elaine M.

    2009-01-01

    In male rats, estradiol (E2) exerts marked anorectic effects. One mechanism proposed for this effect is an E2-mediated down-regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin concentrating hormone (MCH). Previous anatomical work has shown that both MCH and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are found in quantity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), a structure long associated with appetite and ingestive behavior. It has been hypothesized that the most direct manner by which E2 could affect MCH expression and feeding would be via classical nuclear ERα located in MCH neurons. To evaluate this notion, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry for MCH and ERα in male rat hypothalamus. We report here that MCH neurons do not contain ERα, suggesting that the primary locus for estrogenic control of feeding is not the MCH neurons themselves. Rather, we show substantial overlap in the anatomical distribution of both cell types, raising the possibility that E2 influences MCH signaling indirectly via adjacent ERα-containing cells. PMID:17933463

  14. The gene encoding the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 is associated with schizophrenia in a Danish case-control sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demontis, Ditte; Nyegaard, Mette; Christensen, Jane H

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The MCHR1 gene encoding the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 is located on chromosome 22q13.2 and has previously been associated with schizophrenia in a study of cases and controls from the Faroe Islands and Scotland. Herein we report an association between variations in the MCHR...

  15. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  16. A novel and selective melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist ameliorates obesity and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yayoi; Okuda, Shoki; Hotta, Natsu; Igawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Ikoma, Minoru; Kasai, Shizuo; Ando, Ayumi; Satomi, Yoshinori; Nishida, Mayumi; Nakayama, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Nagisa, Yasutaka; Takekawa, Shiro

    2017-02-05

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a cyclic neuropeptide expressed predominantly in the lateral hypothalamus, plays an important role in the control of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. Mice lacking MCH or MCH1 receptor are resistant to diet-induced obesity (DIO) and MCH1 receptor antagonists show potent anti-obesity effects in preclinical studies, indicating that MCH1 receptor is a promising target for anti-obesity drugs. Moreover, recent studies have suggested the potential of MCH1 receptor antagonists for treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In the present study, we show the anti-obesity and anti-hepatosteatosis effect of our novel MCH1 receptor antagonist, Compound A. Repeated oral administration of Compound A resulted in dose-dependent body weight reduction and had an anorectic effect in DIO mice. The body weight lowering effect of Compound A was more potent than that of pair-feeding. Compound A also reduced lipid content and the expression level of lipogenesis-, inflammation-, and fibrosis-related genes in the liver of DIO mice. Conversely, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH caused induction of hepatic steatosis as well as increase in body weight in high-fat diet-fed wild type mice, but not MCH1 receptor knockout mice. The pair-feeding study revealed the MCH-MCH1 receptor system affects hepatic steatosis through a mechanism that is independent of body weight change. Metabolome analysis demonstrated that Compound A upregulated lipid metabolism-related molecules, such as acylcarnitines and cardiolipins, in the liver. These findings suggest that our novel MCH1 receptor antagonist, Compound A, exerts its beneficial therapeutic effect on NAFLD and obesity through a central MCH-MCH1 receptor pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and soluble TNF receptors in biliary obstruction in mice; soluble TNF receptors as prognostic factors for mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, M. H.; Greve, J. W.; Gouma, D. J.; Buurman, W. A.

    1996-01-01

    Systemic tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is present in jaundiced mice. Two soluble TNF receptors, sTNFr-P55 and sTNFr-P75 are reported to play a part in the natural defence against TNF. This study investigated the properties of circulating TNF and sTNFr in jaundiced mice. The data show that TNF in

  18. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  19. The association among cytochrome P450 3A, progesterone receptor polymorphisms, plasma 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate concentrations, and spontaneous preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Martha L; Caritis, Steve N; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Reddy, Uma M; Sorokin, Yoram; Manuck, Tracy; Varner, Michael W; Wapner, Ronald J; Iams, Jay D; Carpenter, Marshall W; Peaceman, Alan M; Mercer, Brian M; Sciscione, Anthony; Rouse, Dwight J; Ramin, Susan M

    2017-09-01

    Infants born preterm birth are the leading cause of mortality in children preterm birth by 33% in women with history of spontaneous preterm birth. We demonstrated previously that plasma concentrations of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate vary widely among pregnant women and that women with 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate plasma concentrations in the lowest quartile had spontaneous preterm birth rates of 40% vs rates of 25% in those women with higher concentrations. Thus, plasma concentrations are an important factor in determining drug efficacy but the reason 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate plasma concentrations vary so much is unclear. Predominantly, 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate is metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 enzymes. We sought to: (1) determine the relation between 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate plasma concentrations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in CYP3A4 and CYP3A5; (2) test the association between progesterone receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms and spontaneous preterm birth; and (3) test whether the association between plasma concentrations of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate and spontaneous preterm birth varied by progesterone receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms. In this secondary analysis, we evaluated genetic polymorphism in 268 pregnant women treated with 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate, who participated in a placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the benefit of omega-3 supplementation in women with history of spontaneous preterm birth. Trough plasma concentrations of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate were measured between 25-28 weeks of gestation after a minimum of 5 injections of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate. We extracted DNA from maternal blood samples and genotyped the samples using TaqMan (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays for the following single nucleotide polymorphisms: CYP3A4*1B, CYP3A4*1G, CYP3A4*22, and CYP3A5*3; and rs

  20. Characterization of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor in chickens: Tissue expression, functional analysis, and fasting-induced up-regulation of hypothalamic MCH expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Lv, Can; Zhang, Jiannan; Mo, Chunheng; Lin, Dongliang; Li, Juan; Wang, Yajun

    2017-06-05

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide expressed in the brain and exerts its actions through interaction with the two known G protein-coupled receptors, namely melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 and 2 (MCHR1 and MCHR2) in mammals. However, the information regarding the expression and functionality of MCH and MCHR(s) remains largely unknown in birds. In this study, using RT-PCR and RACE PCR, we amplified and cloned a MCHR1-like receptor, which is named cMCHR4 according to its evolutionary origin, and a MCHR2 from chicken brain. The cloned cMCHR4 was predicted to encode a receptor of 367 amino acids, which shares high amino acid identities with MCHR4 of ducks (90%), western painted turtles (85%), and coelacanths (77%), and a comparatively low identity to human MCHR1 (58%) and MCHR2 (38%), whereas chicken MCHR2 encodes a putative C-terminally truncated receptor and is likely a pseudogene. Using cell-based luciferase reporter assays or Western blot, we further demonstrated that chicken (and duck) MCHR4 could be potently activated by chicken MCH 1-19 , and its activation can elevate calcium concentration and activate MAPK/ERK and cAMP/PKA signaling pathways, indicating an important role of MCHR4 in mediating MCH actions in birds. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that both cMCH and cMCHR4 mRNA are expressed in various brain regions including the hypothalamus, and cMCH expression in the hypothalamus of 3-week-old chicks could be induced by 36-h fasting, indicating that cMCH expression is correlated with energy balance. Taken together, characterization of chicken MCH and MCHR4 will aid to uncover the conserved roles of MCH across vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The plasma concentration of HDL-associated apoM is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Benn, Marianne; Christensen, Pernille Møller

    2012-01-01

    ApoM is mainly associated with HDL. Nevertheless, we have consistently observed positive correlations of apoM with plasma LDL cholesterol in humans. Moreover, LDL receptor deficiency is associated with increased plasma apoM in mice. Here, we tested the idea that plasma apoM concentrations...... are affected by the rate of LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles. We measured apoM in humans each carrying one of three different LDL receptor mutations (n = 9) or the apoB3500 mutation (n = 12). These carriers had increased plasma apoM (1.34 ± 0.13 µM, P = 0.003, and 1.23 ± 0.10 µM, P...... = 0.02, respectively) as compared with noncarriers (0.93 ± 0.04 µM). When we injected human apoM-containing HDL into Wt (n = 6) or LDL receptor-deficient mice (n = 6), the removal of HDL-associated human apoM was delayed in the LDL receptor-deficient mice. After 2 h, 54 ± 5% versus 90 ± 8% (P

  2. Melanin-Concentrating Hormone and Its MCH-1 Receptor: Relationship Between Effects on Alcohol and Caloric Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Camilla; Aziz, Abdul Maruf Asif; Rehman, Faazal; Pitcairn, Caleb; Barchiesi, Riccardo; Barbier, Estelle; Wendel Hansen, Mikaela; Gehlert, Don; Steensland, Pia; Heilig, Markus; Thorsell, Annika

    2016-10-01

    Reward and energy homeostasis are both regulated by a network of hypothalamic neuropeptide systems. The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and its MCH-1 receptor (MCH1-R) modulate alcohol intake, but it remains unknown to what extent this reflects actions on energy balance or reward. Here, we evaluated the MCH1-R in regulation of caloric intake and motivation to consume alcohol in states of escalated consumption. Rats had intermittent access (IA) to alcohol and were divided into high- and low-drinking groups. Food and alcohol consumption was assessed after administration of an MCH1-R antagonist, GW803430. Next, GW803430 was evaluated on alcohol self-administration in protracted abstinence induced by IA in high-drinking rats. Finally, the effect of GW803430 was assessed on alcohol self-administration in acute withdrawal in rats exposed to alcohol vapor. Gene expression of MCH and MCH1-R was measured in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in both acute and protracted abstinence. High-drinking IA rats consumed more calories from alcohol than chow and GW803430 decreased both chow and alcohol intake. In low-drinking rats, only food intake was affected. In protracted abstinence from IA, alcohol self-administration was significantly reduced by pretreatment with GW803430 and gene expression of both MCH and the MCH1-R were dysregulated in hypothalamus and NAc. In contrast, during acute withdrawal from vapor exposure, treatment with GW803430 did not affect alcohol self-administration, and no changes in MCH or MCH1-R gene expression were observed. Our data suggest a dual role of MCH and the MCH1-R in regulation of alcohol intake, possibly through mechanisms involving caloric intake and reward motivation. A selective suppression of alcohol self-administration during protracted abstinence by GW803430 was observed and accompanied by adaptations in gene expression of MCH and MCH1-R. Selective suppression of escalated consumption renders the MCH1-R an attractive target

  3. [Effects of ursodeoxycholic acid on the liver plasma membrane fluidity, hepatic glutathione concentration, hepatic estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors in pregnant rats with ethinylestradiol and progesterone induced intrahepatic cholestasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qing-yun; Kong, Bei-hua; Ma, Kai-dong; Zhang, Xiang-li; Jiang, Sen

    2003-11-01

    To explore the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on the fluidity of hepatic plasma membrane, glutathione concentration in liver, hepatic estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors in pregnant rats with ethinylestradiol and progesterone induced intrahepatic cholestasis. sixty clean SD pregnant rats were selected and divided into three groups at random. Since the 13th day of pregnancy after taking blood, normal group was injected subcutaneously with refined vegetable oil 2.5 ml x kg(-1) x d(-1). Control group and treatment group were injected subcutaneously with the solution of progesterone 75 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 17-alpha-ethynylestradio 1.25 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) till the 17th day. Since the 17th day control group, normal group were fedwish 0.9% natriichloridi solution 5 ml x kg(-1) x d(-1); Treatment group was fedwish UDCA 50 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) every day. On the 21th day, all rats were killed. Then the livers were collected for study. Membrane fluidity was measured by fluorescence polarization using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as a probe. Glutathione concentration was measured by 5,5'-dithionbis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). Estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors were measured by flow cytometry. (1) Hepatic plasma membrane fluidity and glutathione (GSH) concentration: significantly lower level of GSH concentration and higher fluorescence polarization (P) were detected in control group (GSH: 1.13 +/- 0.03, P: 0.149 +/- 0.008) in comparison with normal group (GSH: 2.11 +/- 0.07, P: 0.132 +/- 0.004, P 0.05). Ursodeoxycholic acid may be effective drug in treatment intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

  4. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α and its soluble receptors in the serum of teenagers with atherosclerosis risk factors: obesity or obesity combined with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchowicz, Anna; Kniażewska, Maria; Zmudzińska-Kitczak, Joanna; Urban, Katarzyna; Gonciarz-Majda, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Obesity and hypertension are recognised risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis. It has not been proven whether their co-existence increases the synthesis of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and what the levels of soluble receptors of this cytokine (sTNF-R) are. This study is aimed to investigate whether there exists a relationship between TNF-α and sTNF-R concentrations in blood serum with the occurrence of obesity or obesity combined with primary hypertension in teenagers. 68 persons, aged 9-17, including 32 persons with primary obesity (Group I) and 36 with primary obesity combined with primary hypertension (Group II). TNF-α (pg/mL) and sTNF-R (ng/mL) concentrations were determined in serum samples using the ELISA method with sets of reagents manufactured by Bender Med Systems GmbH. No significant differences in TNF-α, sTNF-R, glucose or insulin concentrations were found between Group I and Group II. These concentrations were not correlated with the age and the nutritional status of the patients or with each other in either of the groups. Both obese teenagers and teenagers exhibiting obesity combined with hypertension (as two atherosclerosis risk factors) are characterised by comparable concentrations of TNF-α and its soluble receptors.

  5. Circulating Angiopoietin-2 and Its Soluble Receptor Tie-2 Concentrations Are Related to Renal Function in Two Population-Based Cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hennings

    Full Text Available An intact angiopoietin/Tie-2 ligand receptor system is indispensable for life. High circulating angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2 concentrations are strongly associated with kidney disease involving the progressive loss of glomerular filtration. The aim of our study was to investigate the associations between renal function and serum Ang-2 or serum Tie-2 concentrations in the general population.Data of 3081 and 4088 subjects from two population-based studies, the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-1 and SHIP-Trend, were used. Renal function was assessed by serum creatinine, cystatin C concentration, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR(crea], cystatin C-based eGFR [eGFR(cys] and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR. Analyses of variance and linear regression models were calculated.In both cohorts, strong positive associations between serum cystatin C concentrations and serum Ang-2 or Tie-2 concentrations as well as inverse associations between eGFR(cys and serum Ang-2 or Tie-2 concentrations were found. These relations were also present in a subpopulation without hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2. Furthermore, we detected weak U-shaped associations between serum creatinine concentrations or eGFR(crea and serum Ang-2 concentrations. With respect to uACR a strong positive association with serum Ang-2 concentrations was revealed.Serum Ang-2 concentrations are strongly associated with sensitive parameters of renal impairment like serum cystatin C, uACR and eGFR(cys. These findings persisted even after exclusion of subjects with hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2, conditions that predispose to chronic renal disease and are associated with increased Ang-2 concentrations. Interestingly, we did not detect the same strong relations between serum creatinine and eGFR(crea with serum Ang-2 concentration. Additionally, significant association of serum Tie-2 concentrations with cystatin C and eGFR(cys were detected.

  6. Elevated glucose concentrations promote receptor-independent activation of adherent human neutrophils: an experimental and computational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kummer, Ursula; Zobeley, Jürgen; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    of NO and superoxide formation were observed. However, these changes were not observed for sorbitol, a nonmetabolizable carbohydrate. Glucose transport appears to be important in this process as phloretin interferes with the glucose-specific receptor-independent activation of neutrophils. However, LY83583...

  7. Involvement of neuronal and glial activities in control of the extracellular d-serine concentrations by the AMPA glutamate receptor in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Sayuri; Umino, Asami; Nishikawa, Toru

    2017-09-28

    It has been well accepted that d-serine may be an exclusive endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor in mammalian forebrain regions. We have recently found by using an in vivo dialysis method that an intra-medial prefrontal cortex infusion of S-α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (S-AMPA), a selective AMPA-type glutamate receptor agonist, causes a reduction in the extracellular levels of d-serine in a calcium-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist-sensitive manner. The inhibitory influence by the AMPA receptor on the extracellular d-serine, however, contradicts the data obtained from in vitro experiments that the AMPA receptor stimulation leads to facilitation of the d-serine liberation. This discrepancy appears to be due to the different cell setups between the in vivo and in vitro preparations. From the viewpoints of the previous reports indicating (1) the neuronal presence of d-serine synthesizing enzyme, serine racemase, and d-serine-like immunoreactivity and (2) the same high tissue concentrations of d-serine in the glia-enriched white matter and in the neuron-enriched gray matter of the mammalian neocortex, we have now investigated in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex, the effects of attenuation of neuronal and glial activities, by tetrodotoxin or fluorocitrate, respectively, on the S-AMPA-induced downregulation of the extracellular d-serine contents. In vivo dialysis studies revealed that a local infusion of tetrodotoxin or fluorocitrate eliminated the ability of S-AMPA given intra-cortically to cause a significant decrease in the dialysate concentrations of d-serine without affecting the elevating effects of S-AMPA on those of glycine, another intrinsic coagonist for the NMDA receptor. These findings suggest that the control by the AMPA receptor of the extracellular d-serine levels could be modulated by the neuronal and glial activities in the prefrontal cortex. It cannot be excluded that

  8. Data for the homology modelling of the red pigment-concentrating hormone receptor (Dappu-RPCHR) of the crustacean Daphnia pulex, and docking of its cognate agonist (Dappu-RPCH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Graham E; Pavadai, Elumalai; Gäde, Gerd; Timol, Zaheer; Andersen, Niels H

    2017-12-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the publication "Interaction of the red pigment-concentrating hormone of the crustacean Daphnia pulex, with its cognate receptor, Dappu-RPCHR: A nuclear magnetic resonance and modeling study" (Jackson et al., 2017) [1]. This article contains the data for homology modeling of the red pigment-concentrating hormone (RPCH) receptor of the water flea, Daphnia pulex (Dappu-RPCHR), which was constructed from its primary sequence. This is the first 3D model of a crustacean G-protein coupled receptor. Docking of the agonist, pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Ser-Trp amide (Dappu-RPCH), was used to find a binding pocket on the receptor and compared to the binding pocket of the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) receptor from the malaria mosquito. Data for the receptor, with and without loop refinement, together with the docked agonist, are presented.

  9. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Wei [Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100091 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10{sup −9} M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5′-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-α and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-α, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-α pathways. ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5′-flanking region. ► Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ► Low

  10. Ethanol, not detectably metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via action at specific GABA(A) receptors and has measureable metabolic effects at very low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Caroline D; Davidson, Joanne E; Maher, Anthony D; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Kashem, Mohammed A; Nasrallah, Fatima A; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we measured the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-¹³C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and compared the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol. Analyses of metabolic profile clusters suggest that the significant reductions in metabolism induced by ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) are via action at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, whereas very low concentrations of ethanol may produce metabolic responses owing to release of GABA via GABA transporter 1 (GAT1) and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5- or α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of ¹³C from [1,2-¹³C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabelled ethanol. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Estimating binding affinities of the nicotinic receptor for low-efficacy ligands using mixtures of agonists and two-dimensional concentration-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Yamini; Grosman, Claudio

    2006-06-01

    The phenomenon of ligand-induced ion channel gating hinges upon the ability of a receptor channel to bind ligand molecules with conformation-specific affinities. However, our understanding of this fundamental phenomenon is notably limited, not only because the changes in binding site structure and ligand conformation that occur upon gating are largely unknown but, also, because the strength of these ligand-receptor interactions are experimentally elusive. Both high- and low-efficacy ligands pose a number of analytical and experimental challenges that can render the estimation of their conformation-specific binding affinities impossible. In this paper, we present a novel assay that overcomes some of the hurdles presented by weak agonists of the muscle nicotinic receptor and allows the estimation of their closed-state affinities. The method, which we have termed the "activation-competition" assay, consists of a single-channel concentration-response assay performed in the presence of a binary mixture of ligands of widely different efficacies. By plotting the channel response (i.e., the open probability) as a function of the concentration of each agonist in the mixture, interpreting the observed response in the framework of a plausible kinetic scheme, and fitting the open probability surface with the corresponding function, the affinities of the closed receptor for the two agonists can be simultaneously extracted as free parameters. Here, we applied this methodology to estimate the closed-state affinity of the muscle nicotinic receptor for choline (a very weak agonist) using acetylcholine (ACh) as the partner in the mixture. We estimated the dissociation equilibrium constant of choline (K(D)) from the wild type's closed state to be 4.1 +/- 0.5 mM (and that of ACh to be 106 +/- 6 microM). We also discuss the use of accurate estimates of affinities for low-efficacy agonists as a tool to discriminate between binding and gating effects of mutations, and in the context of

  12. Low concentrations of o,p'-DDT inhibit gene expression and prostaglandin synthesis by estrogen receptor-independent mechanism in rat ovarian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    Full Text Available o,p'-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p'-DDT at range of 0.3-500 ng/g (8.46×10(-10 M-1.41×10(-6 M in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s of o,p'-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p'-DDT (10(-12-10(-8 M suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p'-DDT at 0.5-1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30. Instead, o,p'-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA, rather than protein kinase C (PKC. We further revealed that o,p'-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p'-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p'-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction.

  13. Low concentrations of o,p'-DDT inhibit gene expression and prostaglandin synthesis by estrogen receptor-independent mechanism in rat ovarian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Zhuang, Shulin; Yang, Yan; Yang, Ye; Liu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    o,p'-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p'-DDT at range of 0.3-500 ng/g (8.46×10(-10) M-1.41×10(-6) M) in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s) of o,p'-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p'-DDT (10(-12)-10(-8) M) suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p'-DDT at 0.5-1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs) or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Instead, o,p'-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), rather than protein kinase C (PKC). We further revealed that o,p'-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p'-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p'-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction.

  14. Low Concentrations of o,p’-DDT Inhibit Gene Expression and Prostaglandin Synthesis by Estrogen Receptor-Independent Mechanism in Rat Ovarian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Zhuang, Shulin; Yang, Yan; Yang, Ye; Liu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    o,p’-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p’-DDT at range of 0.3–500 ng/g (8.46×10−10 M−1.41×10−6 M) in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s) of o,p’-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p’-DDT (10−12−10−8 M) suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p’-DDT at 0.5–1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs) or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Instead, o,p’-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), rather than protein kinase C (PKC). We further revealed that o,p’-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p’-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p’-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction. PMID:23209616

  15. Hypertension-Related Gene Polymorphisms of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 4 Are Associated with NT-proBNP Concentration in Normotensive Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Yatabe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4 with activating polymorphisms desensitize the natriuric renal tubular D1 dopamine receptor, and these GRK4 polymorphisms are strongly associated with salt sensitivity and hypertension. Meanwhile, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP may be useful in detecting slight volume expansion. However, relations between hypertension-related gene polymorphisms including GRK4 and cardiovascular indices such as NT-proBNP are not clear, especially in healthy subjects. Therefore, various hypertension-related polymorphisms and cardiovascular indices were analyzed in 97 normotensive, healthy Japanese adults. NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in subjects with two or more GRK4 polymorphic alleles. Other hypertension-related gene polymorphisms, such as those of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes, did not correlate with NT-proBNP. There was no significant association between any of the hypertension-related gene polymorphisms and central systolic blood pressure, cardioankle vascular index, augmentation index, plasma aldosterone concentration, or an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-OHdG. Normotensive individuals with GRK4 polymorphisms show increased serum NT-proBNP concentration and may be at a greater risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  16. Analysis of the prognostic value of soluble epidermal growth factor receptor plasma concentration in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Sirera, Rafael; Cabrera, Andrea; Blasco, Ana; Caballero, Cristina; Iranzo, Vega; Rosell, Rafael; Camps, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a variety of epithelial malignancies including lung cancer. A soluble fragment of the EGFR extracellular domain (sEGFR) can be detected in the blood of patients who have non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but its clinical/ prognostic role must be further elucidated. sEGFR concentration was retrospectively determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in plasma samples from 308 advanced NSCLC patients (before treatment) and 109 healthy controls and correlated with clinico-pathological variables. The concentration of sEGFR was lower in NSCLC patients than in controls (P concentration and demographic/clinical characteristics such as gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, stage, and number or location of the metastatic sites. sEGFR was lower in patients with progressive disease or in squamous cell carcinoma compared with adenocarcinoma, but these differences were not significant. Patients with sEGFR ≤ 34.56 ng/mL showed a shorter overall survival (median 9.1 versus 12.2 months, P = .019) than others. Moreover, in multivariate analysis, sEGFR remained a significant independent prognostic marker. Low baseline sEGFR is associated with reduced survival in advanced NSCLC. Therefore, our findings in this large cohort of patients suggest that the determination of sEGFR concentration provides valuable prognostic information. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CD8+CD28-lymphocytes in peripheral blood and serum concentrations of soluble interleukin 6 receptor are increased in patients with Graves' orbitopathy and correlate with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Miroslaw; Urbaniak-Kujda, Donata; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Kapelko-Slowik, Katarzyna; Dybko, Jaroslaw; Wolowiec, Dariusz; Jazwiec, Bozena; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    The extrathyroid, orbital manifestation of Graves' disease (GD)--Graves' orbitopathy (GO)--presents a difficult clinical problem. The immunological status of GO patients is still under investigation. The aim of this study was to assess the serum concentration of interleukin 6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R), and CD8+CD28- lymphocytes in GO patients and to evaluate if these parameters were associated with disease activity. Thirty-nine patients (29 women and 10 men, aged 24-71, mean 50.18) with newly diagnosed GD were enrolled in the study. Active GO was diagnosed in 20 patients. The control group included 12 healthy individuals. Serum concentrations of IL-6 and sIL-6R were estimated by ELISA. Percentages of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes in peripheral blood were assessed by flow cytometry. Mean serum IL-6 and sIL-6R concentrations were significantly higher in all GD patients and in GO and non-GO patients than in normal controls. In all GD patients and the non-GO group, serum IL-6 and sIL-6R concentrations were significantly reduced after efficient treatment. In GO patients, only serum sIL-6R concentration was significantly lower after efficient treatment. In all GD patients, the mean percentage of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes was significantly lower after efficient treatment. In GO patients, the mean percentage of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes was significantly higher than in the non-GO group or in normals. Moreover, in the GO group, the mean percentage of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes was significantly lower after treatment. Our results have shown that CD8+CD28- lymphocyte percentage in peripheral blood and serum concentration of sIL-6R are increased in GO patients and correlate with disease activity.

  18. C allele of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene A1166C polymorphism affects plasma adiponectin concentrations in healthy young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaga, Katsuko; Fukuo, Keisuke; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Fukada, Rumi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Kazumi, Tsutomu

    2009-10-01

    Angiotensin II and its type 1 receptor (AT1R) are both expressed in the adipose tissue and involved in the genesis of atherosclerosis as well as hypertension. However, the influence of the AT1R gene A1166C polymorphism on atherosclerosis risk factors and on the development of early atherosclerosis is not clear. We evaluated 416 healthy young women to investigate the effects of this genotype on atherosclerosis risk factors and on carotid intima-media thickness as a validated marker of early atherosclerosis. After adjusting for confounding factors including body mass index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels, plasma adiponectin concentrations were significantly lower in carriers of the C allele compared with non-carriers. Moreover, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the C allele was the strongest and most independent determinant of lower plasma adiponectin concentrations. It is noted that the participants with the lowest quartile of plasma adiponectin concentrations had thicker levels of carotid intima-media thickness, lower plasma HDL-cholesterol and lipoprotein lipase levels, as well as higher trunk fat mass compared with the highest quartile. In addition, a weak but significant positive correlation was observed between percentages of fat in the diet and plasma adiponectin concentrations in non-carriers of the C allele. In conclusion, AT1R A1166C was associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations and influenced the correlations between dietary fat intake and plasma concentrations of adiponectin. These findings may help to identify vulnerable populations that are susceptible to the development of atherosclerosis and require early dietary recommendations for young women.

  19. Increased concentrations of the soluble mannose receptor in serum from patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia, and prediction of survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard-Hansen, Sidsel; Rafique, Aisha; Weis, Nina

    2015-01-01

    patients with IPD were collected at the time of firstpositive blood culture and analysed using an in-house sMR assay. Clinical data were retrieved from patient files. The main outcome investigated was in-hospital mortality. Results: The median sMR concentration in the entire group of patients was0.77 mg...... the AUC was lower for all three markers (sMR = 0.56, sCD163 = 0.38, CRP = 0.66).Conclusions: The results of this study designate sMR as a potential new biomarker in infectious disease. Additionally, it emphasizes the importance of research into macrophage malfunction in elderly patients....

  20. GABAAα1 and GABAAρ1 subunits are expressed in cultured human RPE cells and GABAA receptor agents modify the intracellular calcium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhen-Ying; Wang, Xu-Ping; Schmid, Katrina L; Han, Xu-Guang; Song, Hui; Tang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors (GABAARs), which are ionotropic receptors involving chloride channels, have been identified in various neural (e.g., mouse retinal ganglion cells) and nonneural cells (e.g., mouse lens epithelial cells) regulating the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). GABAAR β-subunit protein has been isolated in the cultured human and rat RPE, and GABAAα1 and GABAAρ1 mRNAs and proteins are present in the chick RPE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of GABAAα1 and GABAAρ1, two important subunits in forming functional GABAARs, in the cultured human RPE, and further to explore whether altering receptor activation modifies [Ca(2+)]i. Human RPE cells were separately cultured from five donor eye cups. Real-time PCR, western blots, and immunofluorescence were used to test for GABAAα1 and GABAAρ1 mRNAs and proteins. The effects of the GABAAR agonist muscimol, antagonist picrotoxin, or the specific GABAAρ antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl) methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) on [Ca(2+)]i in cultured human RPE were demonstrated using Fluo3-AM. Both GABAAα1 and GABAAρ1 mRNAs and proteins were identified in cultured human RPE cells; antibody staining was mainly localized to the cell membrane and was also present in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus. Muscimol (100 μM) caused a transient increase of the [Ca(2+)]i in RPE cells regardless of whether Ca(2+) was added to the buffer. Muscimol-induced increases in the [Ca(2+)]i were inhibited by pretreatment with picrotoxin (300 μM) or TPMPA (500 μM). GABAAα1 and GABAAρ1 are expressed in cultured human RPE cells, and GABAA agents can modify [Ca(2+)]i.

  1. Relationship between serum tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 concentration and periodontal destruction in patients with type 2 diabetes: Cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić-Petrović Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα is well documented in pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis (CP and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Considering short half-life of TNFα, tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 (TNFR2 is used as prosperous surrogate marker of TNFα activity. Objective. The aim was to detect TNFR2 serum concentration and correlate it with periodontal destruction in patients with diagnosed T2D and nondiabetics. Methods. The study included 85 patients divided into three groups: T2D + CP (group T2D, n = 34; nondiabetics + CP (Group PD, n = 27; and healthy controls (group HC, n = 24. T2D was diagnosed according to WHO criteria (2013 and periodontitis was diagnosed using International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions criteria (1999. TNFR2 level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. There was no difference in TNFR2 level among the groups (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.482. Significant correlation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient was observed between clinical attachment loss (CAL and TNFR2 concentration in PD group (rp = -0.460, p = 0.016. In T2D group, correlations were observed between TNFR2 concentration and CAL (rp = 0.363, p = 0.005 and periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA (rp = 0.345, p = 0.046 and periodontal epithelial surface area (PESA (rp = 0.578, p = 0.000. Conclusion. Higher concentration of TNFR2 was associated with higher CAL, PESA, and PISA scores in T2D group. Contrary to that, nondiabetics with higher values of CAL exhibited lower concentration of TNFR2, presenting potential protective effect on periodontal destruction. These results imply that diabetes may alter TNFR2 secretion originated from periodontium. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41008

  2. Bisphenol AF as an Inducer of Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ): Evidence for Anti-estrogenic Effects at Higher Concentrations in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shuso; Kakizoe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Aya; Tokuyasu, Miki; Himeno, Taichi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kohro-Ikeda, Eriko; Haraguchi, Koichi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenols are endocrine disruptors that are widely found in the environment. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests an adverse interaction between bisphenols and estrogen signaling. Most studies have performed experiments that focused on estrogen receptor (ER) engagement by bisphenols. Therefore, the effects of bisphenols on the expression of ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2) remain largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of four bisphenols: bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol B (BPB), bisphenol S (BPS), and bisphenol AF (BPAF), on estrogen signaling in two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and SK-BR-3). Among these bisphenols, BPAF up-regulated the expression of ERβ, and this was coupled with the abrogation of estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated transcriptional activities as well as the down-regulation of Cdc2 expression in MCF-7 cells, without influencing the expression of ERα. BPAF functioned as an agonist of ERα at lower concentrations (nanomolar order), but did not exhibit any modulatory action on ERα transiently expressed in SK-BR-3 cells in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol (E2) at higher concentrations (micromolar order). The introduction of ERβ cDNA resulted in greater reductions in MCF-7 cell viability than with BPAF alone. Since ERβ is a suppressive molecule of ERα function, these results provide rational evidence for BPAF functioning as an anti-estrogenic compound via the induction of ERβ at higher concentrations.

  3. Low-concentration heparin suppresses ionomycin-activated CAMK-II/EGF receptor- and ERK-mediated signaling in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lifang; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M

    2010-08-01

    Heparin and endogenous heparinoids inhibit the proliferation of smooth muscle cells, including renal mesangial cells; multiple effects on signaling pathways are well established, including effects on PKC, Erk, and CaMK-II. Many studies have used heparin at concentrations of 100 microg/ml or higher, whereas endogenous concentrations of heparinoids are much lower. Here we report the effects of low-concentration (1 microg/ml) heparin on activation of several kinases and subsequent induction of the c-fos gene in mesangial cells in response to the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, in the absence of serum factors. Ionomycin rapidly increases the phosphorylation of CaMK-II (by 30 s), and subsequently of the EGF receptor (EGFR), c-Src, and Erk 1/2. Low-dose heparin suppresses the ionomycin-dependent phosphorylation of EGFR, c-Src, and Erk 1/2, but not of CaMK-II, whereas inhibition of activated CaMK-II reduces phosphorylation of EGFR, c-Src, and Erk. Our data support a mechanism whereby heparin acts at the cell surface to suppress downstream targets of CaMK-II, including EGFR, leading in turn to a decrease in Erk- (but not c-Src-) dependent induction of c-fos.

  4. In vivo imaging of estrogen receptor concentration in the endometrium and myometrium using FES PET - influence of menstrual cycle and endogenous estrogen level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)]. E-mail: tsucchy@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Okazawa, Hidehiko [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Mori, Tetsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masato [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yoshida, Yoshio [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Itoh, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to measure estrogen receptor (ER) concentration in the endometrium and myometrium using 16{alpha}-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-17{beta}-estradiol (FES) positron emission tomography (PET) and to investigate the relationship between changes in these parameters with the menstrual cycle and endogenous estrogen levels. Methods: Sixteen female healthy volunteers were included in this study. After blood sampling to measure endogenous estrogen level, FES PET image was acquired 60 min postinjection of FES. After whole-body imaging of FES PET, averaged standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the endometrium and myometrium were measured, and the relationship between FES uptake and menstrual cycle or endogenous estrogen level was evaluated. Results: Endometrial SUV was significantly higher in the proliferative phase than in the secretory phase (6.03{+-}1.05 vs. 3.97{+-}1.29, P=.022). In contrast, there was no significant difference in myometrial SUV when the proliferative and secretory phases were compared (P=.23). Further, there was no correlation between SUV and endogenous estrogen level in the proliferative phase. Conclusions: The change of ER concentration relative to menstrual cycle as characterized by FES PET was consistent with those from previous reports that used an immunohistochemical technique. These data suggest that FES PET is a feasible, noninvasive method for characterizing changes in ER concentration.

  5. Cardiac concentric hypertrophy promoted by activated Met receptor is mitigated in vivo by inhibition of Erk1,2 signalling with Pimasertib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Valentina; Gallo, Simona; Gatti, Stefano; Medico, Enzo; Vigna, Elisa; Cantarella, Daniela; Fontani, Lara; Natale, Massimo; Cimino, James; Morello, Mara; Comoglio, Paolo Maria; Ponzetto, Antonio; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for heart failure. Hence, its attenuation represents an important clinical goal. Erk1,2 signalling is pivotal in the cardiac response to stress, suggesting that its inhibition may be a good strategy to revert heart hypertrophy. In this work, we unveiled the events associated with cardiac hypertrophy by means of a transgenic model expressing activated Met receptor. c-Met proto-oncogene encodes for the tyrosine kinase receptor of Hepatocyte growth factor and is a strong inducer of Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk1,2 pathway. We showed that three weeks after the induction of activated Met, the heart presents a remarkable concentric hypertrophy, with no signs of congestive failure and preserved contractility. Cardiac enlargement is accompanied by upregulation of growth-regulating transcription factors, natriuretic peptides, cytoskeletal proteins, and Extracellular Matrix remodelling factors (Timp1 and Pai1). At a later stage, cardiac hypertrophic remodelling results into heart failure with preserved systolic function. Prevention trial by suppressing activated Met showed that cardiac hypertrophy is reversible, and progression to heart failure is prevented. Notably, treatment with Pimasertib, Mek1 inhibitor, attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling. Our results suggest that modulation of Erk1.2 signalling may constitute a new therapeutic approach for treating cardiac hypertrophies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 polymorphisms are associated with components of energy balance in the Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Bisson, Bénédicte; Thorburn, James; Gregory, Anne; Zhang, Hongwei; Sun, Guang

    2014-02-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates energy balance and body composition in animal models. Inconsistent effects of MCHR1 polymorphisms on energy homeostasis in humans may partly be attributable to environmental factors. We examined the effect of 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs133073, rs133074, rs9611386, and rs882111) in the MCHR1 gene on body composition as well as energy-related lifestyle factors (diet and physical activity). We also examined the effect of gene-lifestyle interactions on body composition. A total of 1153 participants (248 men and 905 women) from the cross-sectional Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study were genotyped by using probe-based chemistry validated assays. Diet and physical activity were estimated by using validated frequency questionnaires, and body composition was assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Three polymorphisms (rs9611386, rs882111, and rs133073) were associated with differences in body-composition measurements (all P physical activity score on body-composition measurements (all P composition and interact with physiologic and energy-related lifestyle factors.

  7. Rinsing paired-agent model (RPAM) to quantify cell-surface receptor concentrations in topical staining applications of thick tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Wang, Yu; Xiang, Jialing; Liu, Jonathan T C; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2017-06-21

    Conventional molecular assessment of tissue through histology, if adapted to fresh thicker samples, has the potential to enhance cancer detection in surgical margins and monitoring of 3D cell culture molecular environments. However, in thicker samples, substantial background staining is common despite repeated rinsing, which can significantly reduce image contrast. Recently, 'paired-agent' methods-which employ co-administration of a control (untargeted) imaging agent-have been applied to thick-sample staining applications to account for background staining. To date, these methods have included (1) a simple ratiometric method that is relatively insensitive to noise in the data but has accuracy that is dependent on the staining protocol and the characteristics of the sample; and (2) a complex paired-agent kinetic modeling method that is more accurate but is more noise-sensitive and requires a precise serial rinsing protocol. Here, a new simplified mathematical model-the rinsing paired-agent model (RPAM)-is derived and tested that offers a good balance between the previous models, is adaptable to arbitrary rinsing-imaging protocols, and does not require calibration of the imaging system. RPAM is evaluated against previous models and is validated by comparison to estimated concentrations of targeted biomarkers on the surface of 3D cell culture and tumor xenograft models. This work supports the use of RPAM as a preferable model to quantitatively analyze targeted biomarker concentrations in topically stained thick tissues, as it was found to match the accuracy of the complex paired-agent kinetic model while retaining the low noise-sensitivity characteristics of the ratiometric method.

  8. Rinsing paired-agent model (RPAM) to quantify cell-surface receptor concentrations in topical staining applications of thick tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Wang, Yu; Xiang, Jialing; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2017-06-01

    Conventional molecular assessment of tissue through histology, if adapted to fresh thicker samples, has the potential to enhance cancer detection in surgical margins and monitoring of 3D cell culture molecular environments. However, in thicker samples, substantial background staining is common despite repeated rinsing, which can significantly reduce image contrast. Recently, ‘paired-agent’ methods—which employ co-administration of a control (untargeted) imaging agent—have been applied to thick-sample staining applications to account for background staining. To date, these methods have included (1) a simple ratiometric method that is relatively insensitive to noise in the data but has accuracy that is dependent on the staining protocol and the characteristics of the sample; and (2) a complex paired-agent kinetic modeling method that is more accurate but is more noise-sensitive and requires a precise serial rinsing protocol. Here, a new simplified mathematical model—the rinsing paired-agent model (RPAM)—is derived and tested that offers a good balance between the previous models, is adaptable to arbitrary rinsing-imaging protocols, and does not require calibration of the imaging system. RPAM is evaluated against previous models and is validated by comparison to estimated concentrations of targeted biomarkers on the surface of 3D cell culture and tumor xenograft models. This work supports the use of RPAM as a preferable model to quantitatively analyze targeted biomarker concentrations in topically stained thick tissues, as it was found to match the accuracy of the complex paired-agent kinetic model while retaining the low noise-sensitivity characteristics of the ratiometric method.

  9. Identification of mRNAs coding for mammalian-type melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors in the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusawa, Kanta; Amiya, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Takabe, Souichirou; Amano, Masafumi; Breves, Jason P; Fox, Bradley K; Grau, E Gordon; Hyodo, Susumu; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuromodulator, synthesized in the hypothalamus, that regulates both appetite and energy homeostasis in mammals. MCH was initially identified in teleost fishes as a pituitary gland hormone that induced melanin aggregation in chromatophores in the skin; however, this function of MCH has not been observed in other vertebrates. Recent studies suggest that MCH is involved in teleost feeding behavior, spurring the hypothesis that the original function of MCH in early vertebrates was appetite regulation. The present study reports the results of cDNAs cloning encoding preproMCH and two MCH receptors from an elasmobranch fish, Sphyrna lewini, a member of Chondrichthyes, the earliest diverged class in gnathostomes. The putative MCH peptide is composed of 19 amino acids, similar in length to the mammalian MCH. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that MCH is expressed in the hypothalamus in S. lewini MCH cell bodies and fibers were identified by immunochemistry in the hypothalamus, but not in the pituitary gland, suggesting that MCH is not released via the pituitary gland into general circulation. MCH receptor genes mch-r1 and mch-r2 were expressed in the S. lewini hypothalamus, but were not found in the skin. These results indicate that MCH does not have a peripheral function, such as a melanin-concentrating effect, in the skin of S. lewini hypothalamic MCH mRNA levels were not affected by fasting, suggesting that feeding conditions might not affect the expression of MCH in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of estradiol, progesterone, and nutrition on concentrations of gonadotropins and GnRH receptors, and abundance of mRNA for GnRH receptors and gonadotropin subunits in pituitary glands of beef cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looper, M L; Vizcarra, J A; Wettemann, R P; Malayer, J R; Braden, T D; Geisert, R D; Morgan, G L

    2003-01-01

    Nutritionally induced anovulatory cows (n = 28) were used to determine the effect of steroids on regulation of synthesis and secretion of gonadotropins. Anovulatory cows were ovariectomized and received intravaginal inserts containing estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), E2 and P4 (E2P4), or a sham intravaginal insert (C) for 7 d. Concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were quantified in serum and E2 and P4 were quantified in plasma. Cows were exsanguinated within 1 to 2 h after removal of intravaginal inserts and pituitary glands were collected and stored at -80 degrees C until messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) and gonadotropin subunits, pituitary content of GnRH-R, and LH and FSH were quantified. Pituitary glands from five proestrous cows were harvested to compare gonadotropin characteristics between ovariectomized, anovulatory cows and intact cows. Plasma concentrations of E2 were greater (P cows than in sham-treated cows. Concentrations of P4 were greater (P cows treated with P4 than in sham-treated cows. Mean serum concentrations of LH and FSH were not significantly influenced by steroid treatments. However, frequency of LH pulses of ovariectomized, nutritionally induced anovulatory cows was increased (P cows treated with E2 or P4 than in cows treated with E2P4 or sham-treated. Quantity of mRNA for LHbeta in the pituitary gland was greater when cows were treated with P4. Concentrations of LH in the pituitary gland were not affected by steroid treatments; however, pituitary concentrations of FSH were less (P cows than in sham-treated cows. The number of GnRH-R was increased (P cows treated with E2, but P4 treatment did not influence the number of GnRH-R. Abundance of mRNA for GnRH-R, common alpha-subunit, and FSHbeta were not affected by treatments. Pituitary concentrations of LH were greater (P cows than in ovariectomized, anovulatory cows treated with or without

  11. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  12. Serum Soluble Transferrin Receptor Concentrations Are Elevated in Congolese Children with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Variants, but Not Sickle Cell Variants or α-Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Mikaela K; Henderson, Amanda M; Naguib, Karimah; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Devlin, Angela M; Albert, Arianne Y; Bahizire, Esto; Tugirimana, Pierrot L; Akilimali, Pierre Z; Boy, Erick; Green, Tim J; Karakochuk, Crystal D

    2017-09-01

    Background: Anemia is common in Congolese children, and inherited blood disorders may be a contributing cause. The presence of sickle cell variants, X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and α-thalassemia, has been previously reported. G6PD A- deficiency is characterized by the co-inheritance of G6PD 376 and 202 variants and is common in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective: We aimed to measure the associations between inherited blood disorders and hemoglobin, ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in Congolese children. Methods: Venous blood was collected from 744 children aged 6-59 mo from 2 provinces. We measured biomarkers of nutritional and inflammation status and malaria. Pyrosequencing was used to detect sickle cell variants. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect G6PD variants and α-thalassemia deletions. Results: Overall, 11% of children had a sickle cell variant, 19% of boys were G6PD A- hemizygotes, 12% and 10% of girls were G6PD A- hetero- or homozygotes, respectively, and 12% of children had α-thalassemia. Multivariable linear regression models (adjusted for age, province, altitude, malaria, and biomarkers of nutritional and inflammation status) showed that G6PD A- hemizygous boys and G6PD 376 homozygous girls had higher sTfR concentrations [geometric mean ratios (95% CIs): 1.20 (1.03, 1.39) and 1.25 (1.02, 1.53), respectively] than children with no G6PD variants. Hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations were not independently associated with any of the inherited blood disorder genotypes. Conclusions: We found that 2 G6PD variant genotypes were associated with elevated sTfR concentrations, which limits the accuracy of sTfR as a biomarker of iron status in this population. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Data for the homology modelling of the red pigment-concentrating hormone receptor (Dappu-RPCHR of the crustacean Daphnia pulex, and docking of its cognate agonist (Dappu-RPCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham E. Jackson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the publication “Interaction of the red pigment-concentrating hormone of the crustacean Daphnia pulex, with its cognate receptor, Dappu-RPCHR: A nuclear magnetic resonance and modeling study” (Jackson et al., 2017 [1]. This article contains the data for homology modeling of the red pigment-concentrating hormone (RPCH receptor of the water flea, Daphnia pulex (Dappu-RPCHR, which was constructed from its primary sequence. This is the first 3D model of a crustacean G-protein coupled receptor. Docking of the agonist, pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Ser-Trp amide (Dappu-RPCH, was used to find a binding pocket on the receptor and compared to the binding pocket of the adipokinetic hormone (AKH receptor from the malaria mosquito. Data for the receptor, with and without loop refinement, together with the docked agonist, are presented. Keywords: Daphnia pulex, Red pigment-concentrating hormone, Homology modeling, Molecular docking

  14. Determinants of concentrations of N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and their associations with risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Guoqing; Chen, Liang; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Mannisto, Satu; White, Donna L; Albanes, Demetrius; Jiao, Li

    2014-01-01

    The soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) is shown to mitigate pro-inflammatory effects triggered by ligation of RAGE with N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML)-AGE or other ligands. We examined the associations among host, lifestyle, and genetic determinants of CML-AGE or sRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prospective ATBC Study. We obtained baseline exposure information, data on serological and genetic biomarkers from 141 patients with pancreatic cancer and 141 subcohort controls. Stepwise linear and logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that CML-AGE concentrations were independently inversely correlated with the minor allele of rs640742 of DDOST, physical activity, alcohol consumption, diastolic blood pressure (BP), and positively correlated with heart rate, serum sRAGE and HDL concentrations (P associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (any T compared with CC: multivariate OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.38-0.98). We identified host metabolic profile, lifestyle and genetic factors that explained approximately 50% of variability of CML-AGE or sRAGE in Finnish men smokers. The association between RAGE SNPs and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.

  15. Dopamine D2/3 Receptor Occupancy Following Dose Reduction Is Predictable With Minimal Plasma Antipsychotic Concentrations: An Open-Label Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Bies, Robert R; Caravaggio, Fernando; Suzuki, Takefumi; Plitman, Eric; Mar, Wanna; Gerretsen, Philip; Pollock, Bruce G; Mulsant, Benoit H; Mamo, David C; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetics can predict antipsychotic blood concentrations at a given time point prior to a dosage change. Those predicted blood concentrations could be used to estimate the corresponding dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3R) occupancy by antipsychotics based on the tight relationship between blood and brain pharmacokinetics. However, this 2-step prediction has never been tested. Two blood samples were collected at separate time points from 32 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition; mean ± SD age: 60.1 ± 7.3 years) to measure plasma concentrations of olanzapine or risperidone at baseline. Then, subjects underwent a dose reduction of olanzapine or risperidone and completed a [(11)C]-raclopride positron emission tomography scan to measure D2/3R occupancy in the putamen. The plasma concentration at the time of the scan was predicted with the 2 samples based on population pharmacokinetic model, using NONMEM. D2/3R occupancy was then estimated by incorporating the predicted plasma concentration in a hyperbole saturation model. The predicted occupancy was compared to the observed value. The mean (95% CI) prediction errors for the prediction of D2/3R occupancy were -1.76% (-5.11 to 1.58) for olanzapine and 0.64% (-6.18 to 7.46) for risperidone. The observed and predicted D2/3R occupancy levels were highly correlated (r = 0.67, P = .001 for olanzapine; r = 0.67, P = .02 for risperidone). D2/3R occupancy levels can be predicted from blood drug concentrations collected prior to dosage change. Although this 2-step model is subject to a small degree of error, it could be used to select oral doses aimed at achieving optimal D2/3R occupancy on an individual basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Circulating ghrelin and leptin concentrations and growth hormone secretagogue receptor abundance in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue of beef cattle exhibiting differences in composition of gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, J S; Wertz-Lutz, A E; Pritchard, R H; Weaver, A D; Keisler, D H; Bruns, K

    2011-12-01

    Data from species other than cattle indicate that ghrelin and GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) could play a key role in fat deposition, energy homeostasis, or glucose metabolism by directly affecting liver and adipose tissue metabolism. Beef steers (n = 72) were used to test the hypothesis that plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and abundance of the GHS-R in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues differ in steers exhibiting differences in composition of gain. At trial initiation (d 0), 8 steers were slaughtered for initial carcass composition. The remaining 64 steers were stratified by BW, allotted to pen, and treatment was assigned randomly to pen. Steers were not implanted with anabolic steroids. Treatments were 1) a low-energy (LE) diet fed during the growing period (0 to 111 d) followed by a high-energy (HE) diet during the finishing period (112 to 209 d; LE-HE) or 2) the HE diet for the duration of the trial (1 to 209 d; HE-HE). Eight steers per treatment were slaughtered on d 88, 111, 160, and 209. Carcass ninth, tenth, and eleventh rib sections were dissected for chemical composition and regression equations were developed to predict compositional gain. Liver, muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen for subsequent Western blotting for GHS-R. Replicate blood samples collected before each slaughter were assayed for ghrelin and leptin concentrations. When compared at a common compositional fat end-point, the rate of carcass fat accretion (g·kg of shrunk BW(-1)) was greater (P compositional fat end-point, plasma leptin, ghrelin, and insulin concentrations were greater (P composition of BW gain, feed efficiency, and metabolic disorders such as ketosis and fatty liver.

  17. Complementary Effects of Genetic Variations in LEPR on Body Composition and Soluble Leptin Receptor Concentration after 3-Month Lifestyle Intervention in Prepubertal Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gajewska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In obese individuals, weight loss might be affected by variants of the adipokine-encoding genes. We verified whether selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ are associated with changes in serum levels of the respective adipokines and weight loss in 100 prepubertal obese (SDS-BMI > 2 Caucasian children undergoing lifestyle intervention. Frequencies of the -2548G > A LEP, Q223R LEPR, K656N LEPR, -11377C > G and -11426A > G ADIPOQ polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum adipokine and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R concentrations were measured using the ELISA method. Among the analyzed polymorphisms, only LEPR polymorphisms were associated with changes of SDS-BMI or sOB-R concentrations in children after therapy. Carriers of the wild-type K665N and at least one minor Q223R allele had the greatest likelihood of losing weight (OR = 5.09, p = 0.006, an increase in sOB-R (ptrend = 0.022 and decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with the decrease of fat mass (p < 0.001. In contrast, carrying of the wild-type Q223R and at least one minor K665N allele were associated with a decrease in sOB-R concentrations and a decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with a decrease in fat-free mass (p = 0.002. We suggest that the combination of different LEPR variants, not a single variant, might determine predisposition to weight loss in the prepubertal period.

  18. Expression levels of genes encoding melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and MCH receptor change in taste aversion, but MCH injections do not alleviate aversive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Anaya; Klockars, Anica; Gosnell, Blake A; Le Grevès, Madeleine; Olszewski, Pawel K; Levine, Allen S; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2012-01-01

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) stimulates feeding driven by energy needs and reward and modifies anxiety behavior. Orexigenic peptides of similar characteristics, including nociceptin/orphanin FQ, Agouti-related protein and opioids, increase consumption also by reducing avoidance of potentially tainted food in animals displaying a conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Herein, using real-time PCR, we assessed whether expression levels of genes encoding MCH and its receptor, MCHR1, were affected in CTA in the rat. We also investigated whether injecting MCH intracerebroventricularly (ICV) during the acquisition and retrieval of LiCl-induced CTA, would alleviate aversive responses. MCHR1 gene was upregulated in the hypothalamus and brain stem of aversive animals, MCH mRNA was significantly higher in the hypothalamus, whereas a strong trend suggesting upregulation of MCH and MCHR1 genes was detected in the amygdala. Despite these expression changes associated with aversion, MCH injected prior to the induction of CTA with LiCl as well as later, during the CTA retrieval upon subsequent presentations of the aversive tastant, did not reduce the magnitude of CTA. We conclude that MCH and its receptor form an orexigenic system whose expression is affected in CTA. This altered MCH expression may contribute to tastant-targeted hypophagia in CTA. However, changing the MCH tone in the brain by exogenous peptide was insufficient to prevent the onset or facilitate extinction of LiCl-induced CTA. This designates MCH as one of many accessory molecules associated with shaping an aversive response, but not a critical one for LiCl-dependent CTA to occur. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Aquaporin 2 Interplay in Hypercalciuria-Associated Renal Concentrating Defect in Humans. An In Vivo and In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Tamma, Grazia; Lasorsa, Domenica Rita; Ranieri, Marianna; Stringini, Gilda; Emma, Francesco; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    One mechanism proposed for reducing the risk of calcium renal stones is activation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) on the apical membranes of collecting duct principal cells by high luminal calcium. This would reduce the abundance of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and in turn the rate of water reabsorption. While evidence in cells and in hypercalciuric animal models supports this hypothesis, the relevance of the interplay between the CaR and AQP2 in humans is not clear. This paper reports for the first time a detailed correlation between urinary AQP2 excretion under acute vasopressin action (DDAVP treatment) in hypercalciuric subjects and in parallel analyzes AQP2-CaR crosstalk in a mouse collecting duct cell line (MCD4) expressing endogenous and functional CaR. In normocalciurics, DDAVP administration resulted in a significant increase in AQP2 excretion paralleled by an increase in urinary osmolality indicating a physiological response to DDAVP. In contrast, in hypercalciurics, baseline AQP2 excretion was high and did not significantly increase after DDAVP. Moreover DDAVP treatment was accompanied by a less pronounced increase in urinary osmolality. These data indicate reduced urinary concentrating ability in response to vasopressin in hypercalciurics. Consistent with these results, biotinylation experiments in MCD4 cells revealed that membrane AQP2 expression in unstimulated cells exposed to CaR agonists was higher than in control cells and did not increase significantly in response to short term exposure to forskolin (FK). Interestingly, we found that CaR activation by specific agonists reduced the increase in cAMP and prevented any reduction in Rho activity in response to FK, two crucial pathways for AQP2 translocation. These data support the hypothesis that CaR–AQP2 interplay represents an internal renal defense to mitigate the effects of hypercalciuria on the risk of calcium precipitation during antidiuresis. This mechanism and possibly reduced medulla tonicity

  20. Calcium-sensing receptor and aquaporin 2 interplay in hypercalciuria-associated renal concentrating defect in humans. An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Procino

    Full Text Available One mechanism proposed for reducing the risk of calcium renal stones is activation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR on the apical membranes of collecting duct principal cells by high luminal calcium. This would reduce the abundance of aquaporin-2 (AQP2 and in turn the rate of water reabsorption. While evidence in cells and in hypercalciuric animal models supports this hypothesis, the relevance of the interplay between the CaR and AQP2 in humans is not clear. This paper reports for the first time a detailed correlation between urinary AQP2 excretion under acute vasopressin action (DDAVP treatment in hypercalciuric subjects and in parallel analyzes AQP2-CaR crosstalk in a mouse collecting duct cell line (MCD4 expressing endogenous and functional CaR. In normocalciurics, DDAVP administration resulted in a significant increase in AQP2 excretion paralleled by an increase in urinary osmolality indicating a physiological response to DDAVP. In contrast, in hypercalciurics, baseline AQP2 excretion was high and did not significantly increase after DDAVP. Moreover DDAVP treatment was accompanied by a less pronounced increase in urinary osmolality. These data indicate reduced urinary concentrating ability in response to vasopressin in hypercalciurics. Consistent with these results, biotinylation experiments in MCD4 cells revealed that membrane AQP2 expression in unstimulated cells exposed to CaR agonists was higher than in control cells and did not increase significantly in response to short term exposure to forskolin (FK. Interestingly, we found that CaR activation by specific agonists reduced the increase in cAMP and prevented any reduction in Rho activity in response to FK, two crucial pathways for AQP2 translocation. These data support the hypothesis that CaR-AQP2 interplay represents an internal renal defense to mitigate the effects of hypercalciuria on the risk of calcium precipitation during antidiuresis. This mechanism and possibly reduced

  1. Peripheral injections of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist S38151 decrease food intake and body weight in rodent obesity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Zuana, Odile; Audinot, Valérie; Levenez, Viviane; Ktorza, Alain; Presse, Françoise; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Boutin, Jean A

    2012-01-01

    The compound S38151 is a nanomolar antagonist that acts at the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH(1)). S38151 is more stable than its purely peptide counterpart, essentially because of the blockade of its N-terminus. Therefore, its action on various models of obesity was studied. Acute intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of S38151 in wild-type rats counteracted the effect of the stable precursor of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), NEI-MCH, in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.5 to 50 nmol/kg). In genetically obese Zucker fa/fa rats, daily i.c.v. administration of S38151 induced dose-dependent (5, 10, and 20 nmol/kg) inhibition of food intake, water intake, and body weight gain, as well as increased motility (maximal effect observed at 20 nmol/kg). In Zucker fa/fa rats, intraperitoneal injection of S38151 (30 mg/kg) induced complete inhibition of food consumption within 1 h. Daily intraperitoneal injection of S38151 (10 and 30 mg/kg) into genetically obese ob/ob mice or diet-induced obese mice is able to limit body weight gain. Furthermore, S38151 administration (10 and 30 mg/kg) does not affect food intake, water intake, or body weight gain in MCHR1-deleted mice, demonstrating that its effects are linked to its interaction with MCH(1). These results validate MCH(1) as a target of interest in obesity. S38151 cannot progress to the clinical phase because it is still too poorly stable in vivo.

  2. Altered Expression of Somatostatin Receptors in Pancreatic Islets from NOD Mice Cultured at Different Glucose Concentrations In Vitro and in Islets Transplanted to Diabetic NOD Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ludvigsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin acts via five receptors (sst1-5. We investigated if the changes in pancreatic islet sst expression in diabetic NOD mice compared to normoglycemic mice are a consequence of hyperglycemia or the ongoing immune reaction in the pancreas. Pancreatic islets were isolated from NOD mice precultured for 5 days and further cultured for 3 days at high or low glucose before examined. Islets were also isolated from NOD mice and transplanted to normal or diabetic mice in a number not sufficient to cure hyperglycemia. After three days, the transplants were removed and stained for sst1-5 and islet hormones. Overall, changes in sst islet cell expression were more common in islets cultured in high glucose concentration in vitro as compared to the islet transplantation in vivo to diabetic mice. The beta and PP cells exhibited more frequent changes in sst expression, while the alpha and delta cells were relatively unaffected by the high glucose condition. Our findings suggest that the glucose level may alter sst expressed in islets cells; however, immune mechanisms may counteract such changes in islet sst expression.

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent up-regulation of intracellular calcium concentration by environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human endothelial HMEC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayati, Abdullah; Le Ferrec, Eric; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Fardel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) constitute a major family of widely-distributed environmental toxic contaminants, known as potent ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). B(a)P has been recently shown to trigger an early and transient increase of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), involved in AhR-related up-regulation of target genes by B(a)P. This study was designed to determine whether AhR may play a role in [Ca(2+)](i) induction provoked by B(a)P. We demonstrated that, in addition to B(a)P, various PAHs, including pyrene and benzo(e)pyrene, known to not or only very poorly interact with AhR, similarly up-regulated [Ca(2+)](i) in human endothelial HMEC-1 cells. Moreover, α-naphthoflavone, a flavonoïd antagonist of AhR, was also able to induce [Ca(2+)](i). Knocking-down AhR expression in HMEC-1 cells through transfection of siRNAs, was finally demonstrated to not prevent B(a)P-mediated induction of [Ca(2+)](i), whereas it efficiently counteracted B(a)P-mediated induction of the referent AhR target gene cytochrome P-450 1B1. Taken together, these data demonstrate that environmental PAHs trigger [Ca(2+)](i) induction in an AhR-independent manner.

  4. A new strategy to improve the predictive ability of the local lazy regression and its application to the QSAR study of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Lei, Beilei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Mancang; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-04-15

    In the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study, local lazy regression (LLR) can predict the activity of a query molecule by using the information of its local neighborhood without need to produce QSAR models a priori. When a prediction is required for a query compound, a set of local models including different number of nearest neighbors are identified. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) procedure is usually used to assess the prediction ability of each model, and the model giving the lowest LOO-CV error or highest LOO-CV correlation coefficient is chosen as the best model. However, it has been proved that the good statistical value from LOO cross-validation appears to be the necessary, but not the sufficient condition for the model to have a high predictive power. In this work, a new strategy is proposed to improve the predictive ability of LLR models and to access the accuracy of a query prediction. The bandwidth of k neighbor value for LLR is optimized by considering the predictive ability of local models using an external validation set. This approach was applied to the QSAR study of a series of thienopyrimidinone antagonists of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. The obtained results from the new strategy shows evident improvement compared with the commonly used LOO-CV LLR methods and the traditional global linear model. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Plasma FGF21 concentrations, adipose fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and β-klotho expression decrease with fasting in northern elephant seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miwa; Lee, Andrew Y; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2015-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 is secreted from the liver, pancreas, and adipose in response to prolonged fasting/starvation to facilitate lipid and glucose metabolism. Northern elephant seals naturally fast for several months, maintaining a relatively elevated metabolic rate to satisfy their energetic requirements. Thus, to better understand the impact of prolonged food deprivation on FGF21-associated changes, we analyzed the expression of FGF21, FGF receptor-1 (FGFR1), β-klotho (KLB; a co-activator of FGFR) in adipose, and plasma FGF21, glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate in fasted elephant seal pups. Expression of FGFR1 and KLB mRNA decreased 98% and 43%, respectively, with fasting duration. While the 80% decrease in mean adipose FGF21 mRNA expression with fasting did not reach statistical significance, it paralleled the 39% decrease in plasma FGF21 concentrations suggesting that FGF21 is suppressed with fasting in elephant seals. Data demonstrate an atypical response of FGF21 to prolonged fasting in a mammal suggesting that FGF21-mediated mechanisms have evolved differentially in elephant seals. Furthermore, the typical fasting-induced, FGF21-mediated actions such as the inhibition of lipolysis in adipose may not be required in elephant seals as part of a naturally adapted mechanism to support their unique metabolic demands during prolonged fasting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Translational Modeling to Guide Study Design and Dose Choice in Obesity Exemplified by AZD1979, a Melanin-concentrating Hormone Receptor 1 Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennemark, P; Trägårdh, M; Lindén, D; Ploj, K; Johansson, A; Turnbull, A; Carlsson, B; Antonsson, M

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we present the translational modeling used in the discovery of AZD1979, a melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHr1) antagonist aimed for treatment of obesity. The model quantitatively connects the relevant biomarkers and thereby closes the scaling path from rodent to man, as well as from dose to effect level. The complexity of individual modeling steps depends on the quality and quantity of data as well as the prior information; from semimechanistic body-composition models to standard linear regression. Key predictions are obtained by standard forward simulation (e.g., predicting effect from exposure), as well as non-parametric input estimation (e.g., predicting energy intake from longitudinal body-weight data), across species. The work illustrates how modeling integrates data from several species, fills critical gaps between biomarkers, and supports experimental design and human dose-prediction. We believe this approach can be of general interest for translation in the obesity field, and might inspire translational reasoning more broadly. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Changes of Cerebral and/or Peripheral Adenosine A1 Receptor and IGF-I Concentrations under Extended Sleep Duration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Chennaoui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extended sleep improves sustained attention and reduces sleep pressure in humans. Downregulation of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R and modulation of the neurotrophic factor insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-I in brain structures controlling attentional capacities could be involved. In the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, we measured adenosine A1R and IGF-I protein concentrations after photoperiod-induced sleep extension. Two groups of twelve rats were adapted over 14 days to a habitual (CON 12:12 light–dark (LD schedule and an extended (EXT 16:8 LD schedule. IGF-I content was also measured in plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle. In EXT, compared to CON rats, A1R content in the frontal cortex was significantly lower (p < 0.05, while IGF-I content was higher (p < 0.001, and no significant change was observed in the hippocampus. IGF-I content in plasma and muscle was higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, while it was lower in liver (p < 0.001. The absolute weight and weight gain were higher in EXT rats (p < 0.01. These data suggest that 14 days under a 16:8 LD photoperiod respectively down- and upregulated cortical A1R and IGF-I levels. This photoperiod induced an anabolic profile with increased weight gain and circulating and muscular IGF-I levels. An extension of sleep duration might favor cerebral and peripheral anabolism, which may help attentional and physical capacities.

  8. Flow cytometric detection of growth factor receptors in autografts and analysis of growth factor concentrations in autologous stem cell transplantation: possible significance for platelet recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiødt, I; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Kjaersgaard, E

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve prediction of hematopoietic recovery, we conducted a pilot study, analyzing the significance of growth factor receptor expression in autografts as well as endogenous growth factor levels in blood before, during and after stem cell transplantation. Three early acting (stem cell......-CSF receptor positive, CD34+ progenitor cells were measured by flow cytometry in the leukapheresis product used for transplantation in a subgroup of 15 patients (NHL, n = 8, MM, n = 7). Three factors were identified as having a significant impact on platelet recovery. First, the level of Tpo in blood...... at the time of the nadir (day +7). Second, the percentage of re-infused thrombopoietin receptor positive progenitors and finally, the percentage of Flt3 receptor positive progenitors. On the other hand, none of the analyzed factors significantly predicted myeloid or erythroid recovery. These findings need...

  9. Optimal geometry and dimensions for the receiver of a parabolic solar concentrator with an angle of 90 degrees; Determiancion de la geometria y dimensiones optimas de un receptor para un concentrador solar paraboloidal con angulo de apertura de 90 grados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Claudio A; Arancibia, Camilo [Centro de Investigacion en Energia UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Hernandez, Nestor [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The optimal geometry and dimensions for the receiver of a parabolic solar concentrator based on microwave communication antenna are obtained. First, the experiments for the determination of the angular error of the concentrator and the dimensions of its focal region are described. Results are also presented for the ray tracing study, from which the optimal characteristics of the receiver are obtained according to the experimental results. As the aluminum antenna has a rim angle of 90 Celsius degrees, it is necessary to use a cavity receiver to allow external as well as internal absorption of radiative flux. Cylindrical, conical and spherical geometric were considered, as well as combinations of them. The best results are achieved using a conical cavity. Its dimensions are calculated to maximize the radiative transfer efficiency from the aperture of the concentrator to the receiver. [Spanish] Se determinan la geometria y dimensiones optimas del receptor de un concentrador solar parabolico obtenido a partir de una antena de telecomunicaciones para microondas. Primeramente se describen los experimentos realizados para obtener el valor del error angular asociado al concentrador y de las dimensiones de su region focal. Tambien se presentan los resultados del estudio optico de trazado de rayos, que permitio determinar teoricamente las caracteristicas del receptor, de acuerdo a los resultados de los experimentos. Debido a que la antena de aluminio tiene un angulo de borde de 90 grados Celcius, es necesario usar un receptor tipo cavidad que permita la captacion de energia tanto interna como externa. Se consideraron geometrias cilindrica, conica, esferica y combinaciones entre ellas, resultando ser la conica la que da los mejores resultados. Las dimensiones del receptor fueron determinadas maximizando la eficiencia del transporte de radiacion de la apertura del concentrador al receptor.

  10. Concentration of Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Matrix Gla Protein in Controlled and Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Yuniati Daulay

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE and their receptor (RAGE system play an important role in the development of diabetic vascular complications. Recently, an endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE has been identified as a novel splice variant, which lacks the transmembrane domain and is secreted in human sera. Interestingly, it was reported that esRAGE binds AGE ligands and neutralizes AGE actions. Many studies have reported that diabetes mellitus correlates with vascular calcification event and increases progressively in uncontrolled diabetes. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP is known to act as an inhibitor in vascular calcification. The aim of this study was to observe progress of vascular calcification in uncontrolled diabetes patient by biochemical markers MGP as inhibitor in vascular calcification, via mechanism of AGEs. METHODS: This study was an observational study with cross sectional design on adult type 2 diabetic male patients who were defined by the 2011 Indonesian diabetes mellitus consensus criteria. RESULTS: The results of this study showed that there was a positive significant correlation between esRAGE and HbA1C (r=0.651, p=0.009, and negative correlation between MGP and HbA1C (r=-0.465, p=0.081 in controlled diabetes group. In uncontrolled diabetes group there was a positive significant correlation between MGP and HbA1C (r=0.350, p=0.023, despite the fact esRAGE showed no significant correlation with HbA1C. There was no significant difference in level of esRAGE and MGP in controlled and uncontrolled diabetes group, but MGP showed lower level in uncontrolled diabetes group, contrary to esRAGE that had higher concentration. CONCLUSIONS: In diabetes condition, complications of vascular calcification are caused by the mechanism of increased AGE formation represented by esRAGE. In diabetes control it is very important to keep the blood vessels from complications caused by vascular calcification. KEYWORDS: type 2 diabetes mellitus

  11. A drop in the circulating concentrations of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products is associated with seroconversion to autoantibody positivity but not with subsequent progression to clinical disease in children en route to type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, K M; Ryhänen, S J; Forbes, J M; Härkönen, T; Ilonen, J; Simell, O; Veijola, R; Groop, P-H; Knip, M

    2017-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their interaction with the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) have been studied for their role in the pathogenesis and complications of type 1 diabetes. Decreased concentrations of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) have been reported in acute autoimmune inflammation. We set out to analyze the changes in sRAGE concentration during preclinical diabetes in children seroconverting to islet autoantibody positivity. We measured serum concentrations of sRAGE in 168 children who progressed to clinical disease and 43 children who turned positive for at least 2 diabetes-associated autoantibodies but remained nondiabetic. We analyzed the sRAGE before seroconversion in the first autoantibody-positive sample and annually thereafter until the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes or end of follow-up. Both groups had similar sRAGE before seroconversion, but subsequently, sRAGE concentrations were lower (P disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Circulating Angiopoietin-2 and Its Soluble Receptor Tie-2 Concentrations Are Related to Renal Function in Two Population-Based Cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennings, Anna; Hannemann, Anke; Rettig, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    the associations between renal function and serum Ang-2 or serum Tie-2 concentrations in the general population. METHODS: Data of 3081 and 4088 subjects from two population-based studies, the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-1) and SHIP-Trend, were used. Renal function was assessed by serum creatinine, cystatin...... weak U-shaped associations between serum creatinine concentrations or eGFR(crea) and serum Ang-2 concentrations. With respect to uACR a strong positive association with serum Ang-2 concentrations was revealed. CONCLUSION: Serum Ang-2 concentrations are strongly associated with sensitive parameters...... not detect the same strong relations between serum creatinine and eGFR(crea) with serum Ang-2 concentration. Additionally, significant association of serum Tie-2 concentrations with cystatin C and eGFR(cys) were detected....

  13. The soluble receptor for vitamin B12 uptake (sCD320) increases during pregnancy and occurs in higher concentration in urine than in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Andreasen, Birgitte H; Kronborg, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (B12) demands binding of the vitamin to transcobalamin (TC) and recognition of TC-B12 (holoTC) by the receptor CD320, a receptor expressed in high quantities on human placenta. We have identified a soluble form of CD320 (sCD320) in serum and here we...... gestational weeks 17-41. sCD320, holoTC, total TC and complex formation between holoTC and sCD320 were measured by in-house ELISA methods, while creatinine was measured on the automatic platform Cobas 6000. Size exclusion chromatography was performed on a Superdex 200 column. RESULTS: Median (range) of serum...

  14. Expression of Tas1 taste receptors in mammalian spermatozoa: functional role of Tas1r1 in regulating basal Ca²⁺ and cAMP concentrations in spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorke Meyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During their transit through the female genital tract, sperm have to recognize and discriminate numerous chemical compounds. However, our current knowledge of the molecular identity of appropriate chemosensory receptor proteins in sperm is still rudimentary. Considering that members of the Tas1r family of taste receptors are able to discriminate between a broad diversity of hydrophilic chemosensory substances, the expression of taste receptors in mammalian spermatozoa was examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present manuscript documents that Tas1r1 and Tas1r3, which form the functional receptor for monosodium glutamate (umami in taste buds on the tongue, are expressed in murine and human spermatozoa, where their localization is restricted to distinct segments of the flagellum and the acrosomal cap of the sperm head. Employing a Tas1r1-deficient mCherry reporter mouse strain, we found that Tas1r1 gene deletion resulted in spermatogenic abnormalities. In addition, a significant increase in spontaneous acrosomal reaction was observed in Tas1r1 null mutant sperm whereas acrosomal secretion triggered by isolated zona pellucida or the Ca²⁺ ionophore A23187 was not different from wild-type spermatozoa. Remarkably, cytosolic Ca²⁺ levels in freshly isolated Tas1r1-deficient sperm were significantly higher compared to wild-type cells. Moreover, a significantly higher basal cAMP concentration was detected in freshly isolated Tas1r1-deficient epididymal spermatozoa, whereas upon inhibition of phosphodiesterase or sperm capacitation, the amount of cAMP was not different between both genotypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since Ca²⁺ and cAMP control fundamental processes during the sequential process of fertilization, we propose that the identified taste receptors and coupled signaling cascades keep sperm in a chronically quiescent state until they arrive in the vicinity of the egg - either by constitutive receptor activity and

  15. Concentrations of insulin glargine and its metabolites during long-term insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients and comparison of effects of insulin glargine, its metabolites, IGF-I, and human insulin on insulin and IGF-I receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Varewijck (Aimee); H. Yki-Jarvinen (Hannele); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); N. Tennagels (Norbert); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated 1) the ability of purified glargine (GLA), metabolites 1 (M1) and 2 (M2), IGF-I, and NPH insulin to activate the insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) in vitro; 2) plasma concentrations of GLA, M1, and M2 during longterm insulin therapy in type 2

  16. Association Between Preovulatory Concentrations of Estradiol and Expression of Uterine Milk Protein Precursor, Inhibin Beta A, Period 1, Proenkephalin, and Receptors for Oxytocin, Progesterone, and Estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliminating the preovulatory surge of estradiol decreased uterine weight, uterine protein, RNA to DNA ratio, rate of protein synthesis, and embryo survival following embryo transfer in sheep. Furthermore, cows that did not exhibit standing estrus (decreased preovulatory concentrations of estradiol) ...

  17. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkasap, N; Ozkurt, M; Erkasap, S; Yasar, F; Uzuner, K; Ihtiyar, E; Uslu, S; Kara, M; Bolluk, O

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  18. Leptin receptor (Ob-R mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Erkasap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases and metastatic colon (13 cases cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  19. Leptin receptor (Ob-R mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Erkasap

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases and metastatic colon (13 cases cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  20. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkasap, N.; Ozkurt, M. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Erkasap, S.; Yasar, F. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uzuner, K. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ihtiyar, E. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uslu, S.; Kara, M. [Department of Biochemistry, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Bolluk, O. [Department of Biostatistics, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-03-19

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  1. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom.

  2. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS -diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-01-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time

  3. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS – diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb were obtained by time (1 h and size (PM2.5 particulate matter 2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1 the regional aerosol sources impact both monitoring sites at similar concentrations regardless their different ventilation conditions; (2 by contrast, local industrial aerosol plumes associated with shipping oil combustion and smelters activities have a higher impact on the more ventilated UB site; (3 a unique source of Pb-Cl (associated with combustion emissions is found to be the major (82% source of fine Cl in the urban agglomerate; (4 the mean diurnal variation of PM2.5 primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu suggests that this source is mainly emitted and not resuspended, whereas PM2.5 urban dust (Ca is found mainly resuspended by both traffic vortex and sea breeze; (5 urban dust (Ca is found the aerosol source most affected by land wetness, reduced by a factor of eight during rainy days and suggesting that wet roads may be a solution for reducing urban dust concentrations.

  4. Low interleukin-2 concentration favors generation of early memory T cells over effector phenotypes during chimeric antigen receptor T-cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, Tanja; Luostarinen, Annu; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Keto, Joni; Arvas, Mikko; Belt, Heini; Koponen, Jonna; Loskog, Angelica; Mustjoki, Satu; Porkka, Kimmo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Korhonen, Matti

    2017-06-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy offers new options for cancer treatment. Clinical results suggest that T-cell persistence, depending on T-cell memory, improves efficacy. The use of interleukin (IL)-2 for in vitro T-cell expansion is not straightforward because it drives effector T-cell differentiation but does not promote the formation of T-cell memory. We have developed a cost-effective expansion protocol for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with an early memory phenotype. Lymphocytes were transduced with third-generation lentiviral vectors and expanded using CD3/CD28 microbeads. The effects of altering the IL-2 supplementation (0-300 IU/mL) and length of expansion (10-20 days) on the phenotype of the T-cell products were analyzed. High IL-2 levels led to a decrease in overall generation of early memory T cells by both decreasing central memory T cells and augmenting effectors. T memory stem cells (TSCM, CD95+CD45RO-CD45RA+CD27+) were present variably during T-cell expansion. However, their presence was not IL-2 dependent but was linked to expansion kinetics. CD19-CAR T cells generated in these conditions displayed in vitro antileukemic activity. In summary, production of CAR T cells without any cytokine supplementation yielded the highest proportion of early memory T cells, provided a 10-fold cell expansion and the cells were functionally potent. The number of early memory T cells in a T-cell preparation can be increased by simply reducing the amount of IL-2 and limiting the length of T-cell expansion, providing cells with potentially higher in vivo performance. These findings are significant for robust and cost-effective T-cell manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The maternal plasma soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 concentration is elevated in SGA and the magnitude of the increase relates to Doppler abnormalities in the maternal and fetal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Kim, Yeon Mee; Kim, Gi Jin; Goncalves, Luis F; Edwin, Samuel; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Erez, Offer; Than, Nandor Gabor; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1), an antagonist to vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Preeclampsia and pregnancy complicated with small for gestational age (SGA) fetuses share some pathophysiologic derangements, such as failure of physiologic transformation of the spiral arteries, endothelial cell dysfunction, and leukocyte activation. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine whether plasma concentrations of sVEGFR-1 in mothers with SGA fetuses without preeclampsia at the time of diagnosis are different from those in patients with preeclampsia or normal pregnant women, and (2) examine the relationship between plasma concentrations of sVEGFR-1 and Doppler velocimetry in uterine and umbilical arteries in patients with preeclampsia and those with SGA. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the concentrations of the soluble form of VEGFR-1 in plasma obtained from normal pregnant women (n = 135), women with SGA fetuses (n = 53), and patients with preeclampsia (n = 112). Patients with SGA fetuses and those with preeclampsia were sub-classified according to the results of uterine and umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry examinations. Plasma concentrations of sVEGFR-1 were determined by an ELISA. Since these concentrations change with gestational age, differences among various subgroups were statistically estimated with the delta value, defined as the difference between the observed and expected plasma sVEGFR-1 concentration. The expected values were derived from regression analysis of plasma sVEGFR-1 concentrations in normal pregnancy. Regression analysis and univariate and multivariate analysis were employed. (1) Mothers with SGA fetuses had a mean plasma concentration of sVEGFR-1 higher than normal pregnant women (p SGA fetuses, only those with abnormal uterine artery Doppler velocimetry had a mean plasma sVEGFR-1

  7. Amine-free melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists: Novel non-basic 1-(2H-indazole-5-yl)pyridin-2(1H)-one derivatives and mitigation of mutagenicity in Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Ikoma, Minoru; Kaku, Hiromi; Kakegawa, Keiko; Kina, Asato; Aida, Jumpei; Okuda, Shoki; Kawata, Yayoi; Noguchi, Toshihiro; Hotta, Natsu; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nagisa, Yasutaka; Kasai, Shizuo; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    To develop non-basic melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists with a high probability of target selectivity and therapeutic window, we explored neutral bicyclic motifs that could replace the previously reported imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine or 1H-benzimidazole motif. The results indicated that the binding affinity of a chemically neutral 2H-indazole derivative 8a with MCHR1 (hMCHR1: IC50=35nM) was comparable to that of the imidazopyridine and benzimidazole derivatives (1 and 2, respectively) reported so far. However, 8a was positive in the Ames test using TA1537 in S9- condition. Based on a putative intercalation of 8a with DNA, we introduced a sterically-hindering cyclopropyl group on the indazole ring to decrease planarity, which led to the discovery of 1-(2-cyclopropyl-3-methyl-2H-indazol-5-yl)-4-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)thiophen-3-yl]methoxy}pyridin-2(1H)-one 8l without mutagenicity in TA1537. Compound 8l exerted significant antiobesity effects in diet-induced obese F344 rats and exhibited promising safety profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B. R.; Korte, S. M.; Buwalda, B.; La Fleur, S. E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  9. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  10. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  11. Food extracts consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia reduce protein concentrations of androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaskirat; Xie, Chanlu; Yao, Mu; Hua, Sheng; Vignarajan, Soma; Jardine, Greg; Hambly, Brett D; Sved, Paul; Dong, Qihan

    2010-04-01

    Active surveillance is an emerging management option for the rising number of men with low-grade, clinically localized prostate cancer. However, 30-40% of men on active surveillance will progress to high-grade disease over 5 y. With the ultimate aim of developing a food-based chemoprevention strategy to retard cancer progression in these otherwise healthy men, we have developed a blend of food extracts commonly consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia. The effect of the food extracts known as Blueberry Punch (BBP) on prostate cancer cell growth and key signaling pathways were examined in vitro and in vivo. BBP reduced prostate cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (0.08-2.5%) at 72 h in vitro due to the reduction in cell proliferation and viability. Prostate cancer cell xenograft-bearing mice, administered 10% BBP in drinking water for 2 wk, had a 25% reduction in tumor volume compared with the control (water only). In vitro, BBP reduced protein concentrations in 3 signaling pathways necessary for the proliferation and survival of prostate cancer cells, namely androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B/protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha. The downstream effectors of these pathways, including prostate-specific antigen and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, were also reduced. Thus, this palatable food supplement is a potential candidate for testing in clinical trials and may ultimately prove effective in retarding the progression of low-grade, early-stage prostate cancer in men managed by active surveillance.

  12. Concentration risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentration risk has been gaining a special dimension in the contemporary financial and economic environment. Financial institutions are exposed to this risk mainly in the field of lending, mostly through their credit activities and concentration of credit portfolios. This refers to the concentration of different exposures within a single risk category (credit risk, market risk, operational risk, liquidity risk.

  13. Concentrator Photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio L

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar-energy conversion is one of the most promising technologies for generating renewable energy, and conversion of concentrated sunlight can lead to reduced cost for solar electricity. In fact, photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight insures an efficient and cost-effective sustainable power resource. This book gives an overview of all components, e.g. cells, concentrators, modules and systems, for systems of concentrator photovoltaics. The authors report on significant results related to design, technology, and applications, and also cover the fundamental physics and market considerations. Specific contributions include: theory and practice of sunlight concentrators; an overview of concentrator PV activities; a description of concentrator solar cells; design and technology of modules and systems; manufacturing aspects; and a market study.

  14. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  15. Concentrated Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2014-01-01

    This entry summarizes the main theoretical contributions and empirical findings in relation to concentrated ownership from a law and economics perspective. The various forms of concentrated ownership are described as well as analyzed from the perspective of the legal protection of investors...

  16. Functional characterization by heterologous expression of a novel cloned tachykinin peptide receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, L F; Haskell, C A; Hanley, M R

    1996-01-01

    An orphan receptor resembling the neurokinin 3 tachykinin receptor (NK3), initially claimed to be an atypical opioid receptor, is shown herein to respond potently to the physiological NK3 receptor ligand, neurokinin B. This 'NK4' receptor did not give functional responses in Xenopus oocytes to opioid agonists. However, NK4 receptor activation was inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of dynorphin. The NK4 receptor is therefore a tachykinin receptor which is functionally antagonized by an endo...

  17. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  18. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Zwicker, David; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information-theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor...

  19. Allosteric modulation of chemoattractant receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Candida Cesta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related GPCR. Emerging evidence indicates that the signalling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the endogenous agonist and modulate the receptor signalling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities.

  20. The Ca2+-mobilizing potency of alpha-thrombin and thrombin-receptor-activating peptide on human platelets -- concentration and time effects of thrombin-induced Ca2+ signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, J.W.M.; Feijge, M.A.H.; Henneman, L.; Rosing, J.; Hemker, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Department of Biochemistry, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. jwm.heemskerk@bioch.unimaas.nl In single platelets and in suspensions of platelets, alpha-thrombin evokes dose-dependent, transient increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, which are more prolonged than the [Ca2+]i

  1. Effects of olmesartan medoxomil, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, on plasma concentration of B-type natriuretic peptide, in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a preliminary, observational, open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Toshihide; Takei, Izumi; Shimada, Akira; Hirata, Takumi; Tanaka, Kumiko; Saisho, Yoshifumi; Irie, Junichiro; Horimai, Chihiro; Matsumoto, Hideo; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) are widely used for the treatment of not only hypertension but also cardiac dysfunction. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is secreted mainly by the cardiac ventricle and plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and body fluid. It has been established that the plasma level of BNP is increased in patients with chronic heart failure in proportion to the severity of cardiac dysfunction. Because cardiac dysfunction is closely associated with a high risk of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus, early identification and prevention of cardiac dysfunction are important. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of olmesartan medoxomil, a novel ARB, on the plasma level of BNP in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. This was a preliminary, prospective, observational, open-label study. Sixty-eight type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension (systolic BP [SBP]≥140 mmHg or diastolic BP [DBP]≥90 mmHg) received olmesartan medoxomil 10–20 mg/day for 24 weeks. Plasma levels of BNP, as well as several clinical parameters of glycaemic control and lipid metabolism, were compared before and after 24 weeks of treatment. Another group consisting of 22 age- and body mass index-matched subjects not treated with olmesartan medoxomil was observed for reference purposes. In the olmesartan medoxomil group, mean±SD SBP decreased from 152.8±16.4 at baseline to 146.8±14.4 mmHg after 24 weeks' treatment (p<0.05); similarly, mean±SD DBP decreased from 85.6±10.5 to 81.3±11.6 mmHg (p<0.05). In 53 subjects in whom plasma levels of BNP could be measured both before and after treatment, mean±SD BNP decreased from 41.3±49.9 to 32.5±36.3 pg/mL (p<0.05). Change in plasma BNP level over the 24-week treatment period in the olmesartan medoxomil group was not correlated with change in SBP or DBP. Multiple regression analysis revealed that change

  2. A new family of insect tyramine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klaerke, Dan A; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-12-16

    The Drosophila Genome Project database contains a gene, CG7431, annotated to be an "unclassifiable biogenic amine receptor." We have cloned this gene and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells. After testing various ligands for G protein-coupled receptors, we found that the receptor was specifically activated by tyramine (EC(50), 5x10(-7)M) and that it showed no cross-reactivity with beta-phenylethylamine, octopamine, dopa, dopamine, adrenaline, noradrenaline, tryptamine, serotonin, histamine, and a library of 20 Drosophila neuropeptides (all tested in concentrations up to 10(-5) or 10(-4)M). The receptor was also expressed in Xenopus oocytes, where it was, again, specifically activated by tyramine with an EC(50) of 3x10(-7)M. Northern blots showed that the receptor is already expressed in 8-hour-old embryos and that it continues to be expressed in all subsequent developmental stages. Adult flies express the receptor both in the head and body (thorax/abdomen) parts. In addition to the Drosophila tyramine receptor gene, CG7431, we found another closely related Drosophila gene, CG16766, that probably also codes for a tyramine receptor. Furthermore, we annotated similar tyramine-like receptor genes in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine receptor is, to our knowledge, the first cloned insect G protein-coupled receptor that appears to be fully specific for tyramine.

  3. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  4. Postsynaptic GABAB receptors enhance extrasynaptic GABAA receptor function in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wucheng; Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J; Ransom, Christopher B

    2013-02-27

    Ambient GABA in the brain tonically activates extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors, and activity-dependent changes in ambient GABA concentration can also activate GABA(B) receptors. To investigate an interaction between postsynaptic GABA(B) and GABA(A) receptors, we recorded GABA(A) currents elicited by exogenous GABA (10 μm) from dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGCs) in adult rat hippocampal slices. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (20 μm) enhanced GABA(A) currents. This enhancement was blocked by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP 55845 and intracellular solutions containing the GTP analog GDP-β-s, indicating that baclofen was acting on postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors. Modulation of GABA(A) currents by postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors was not observed in CA1 pyramidal cells or layer 2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons. Baclofen reduced the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) but did not alter sIPSC amplitude or kinetics. Thus, GABA(A) receptors activated at synapses were not modulated by postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors. In contrast, tonic GABA currents and currents activated by the GABA(A) receptor δ subunit-selective agonist THIP (10 μm) were potentiated by baclofen. Our data indicate that postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors enhance the function of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors, including δ subunit-containing receptors that mediate tonic inhibition in DGGCs. The modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors is a newly identified mechanism that will influence the inhibitory tone of DGGCs when GABA(B) and GABA(A) receptors are both activated.

  5. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  6. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty

  7. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  8. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  9. Increased Accuracy of Ligand Sensing by Receptor Internalization and Lateral Receptor Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Endres, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Many types of cells can sense external ligand concentrations with cell-surface receptors at extremely high accuracy. Interestingly, ligand-bound receptors are often internalized, a process also known as receptor-mediated endocytosis. While internalization is involved in a vast number of important functions for the life of a cell, it was recently also suggested to increase the accuracy of sensing ligand as overcounting of the same ligand molecules is reduced. A similar role may be played by receptor diffusion om the cell membrane. Fast, lateral receptor diffusion is known to be relevant in neurotransmission initiated by release of neurotransmitter glutamate in the synaptic cleft between neurons. By binding ligand and removal by diffusion from the region of release of the neurotransmitter, diffusing receptors can be reasonably expected to reduce the local overcounting of the same ligand molecules in the region of signaling. By extending simple ligand-receptor models to out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics, we show that both receptor internalization and lateral diffusion increase the accuracy with which cells can measure ligand concentrations in the external environment. We confirm this with our model and give quantitative predictions for experimental parameters values. We give quantitative predictions, which compare favorably to experimental data of real receptors.

  10. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  11. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja

    2015-01-01

    , and schizophrenia and in the deposition of phosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease. HCAR1 could serve to ameliorate these conditions and might also act through downstream mechanisms other than cAMP. Lactate exits cells through monocarboxylate transporters in an equilibrating manner and through astrocyte......We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes...... the cerebral neocortex and the hippocampus, where it can be stimulated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the HCAR1 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP levels. Cerebral HCAR1 is concentrated on the postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses and also is enriched at the blood...

  12. Generalized paired-agent kinetic model for in vivo quantification of cancer cell-surface receptors under receptor saturation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, N.; Davis, S. C.; Tichauer, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    New precision medicine drugs oftentimes act through binding to specific cell-surface cancer receptors, and thus their efficacy is highly dependent on the availability of those receptors and the receptor concentration per cell. Paired-agent molecular imaging can provide quantitative information on receptor status in vivo, especially in tumor tissue; however, to date, published approaches to paired-agent quantitative imaging require that only ‘trace’ levels of imaging agent exist compared to receptor concentration. This strict requirement may limit applicability, particularly in drug binding studies, which seek to report on a biological effect in response to saturating receptors with a drug moiety. To extend the regime over which paired-agent imaging may be used, this work presents a generalized simplified reference tissue model (GSRTM) for paired-agent imaging developed to approximate receptor concentration in both non-receptor-saturated and receptor-saturated conditions. Extensive simulation studies show that tumor receptor concentration estimates recovered using the GSRTM are more accurate in receptor-saturation conditions than the standard simple reference tissue model (SRTM) (% error (mean  ±  sd): GSRTM 0  ±  1 and SRTM 50  ±  1) and match the SRTM accuracy in non-saturated conditions (% error (mean  ±  sd): GSRTM 5  ±  5 and SRTM 0  ±  5). To further test the approach, GSRTM-estimated receptor concentration was compared to SRTM-estimated values extracted from tumor xenograft in vivo mouse model data. The GSRTM estimates were observed to deviate from the SRTM in tumors with low receptor saturation (which are likely in a saturated regime). Finally, a general ‘rule-of-thumb’ algorithm is presented to estimate the expected level of receptor saturation that would be achieved in a given tissue provided dose and pharmacokinetic information about the drug or imaging agent being used, and physiological

  13. Evidence of paired M2 muscarinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, L.T.; Ballesteros, L.A.; Bichajian, L.H.; Ferrendelli, C.A.; Fisher, A.; Hanchett, H.E.; Zhang, R. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Binding assays involving various antagonists, including N-(3H) methylscopolamine, (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate, AFDX-116, pirenzepine, and propylbenzilylcholine mustard, disclosed only a single population of M2 muscarinic receptors in membranes from the rat brainstem (medulla, pons, and colliculi). However, competition curves between N-(3H)methylscopolamine and various agonists, including oxotremorine, cis-dioxolane, and acetylethylcholine mustard, showed approximately equal numbers of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high affinity (H) sites and guanine nucleotide-insensitive low affinity (L) sites. This 50% H phenomenon persisted in different buffers, at different temperatures, after the number of receptors was halved (and, thus, the remaining receptor to guanine nucleotide-binding protein ratio was doubled), after membrane solubilization with digitonin, and when rabbit cardiac membranes were used instead of rat brainstem membranes. Preferential occupation of H sites with acetylethylcholine mustard, and of L sites with quinuclidinyl benzilate or either mustard, yielded residual free receptor populations showing predominantly L and H sites, respectively. Low concentrations of (3H)-oxotremorine-M labeled only H sites, and the Bmax for these sites was 49% of the Bmax found with (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate plus guanine nucleotide. These and other results are most consistent with the idea that H and L receptor sites exist on separate but dimeric receptor molecules and with the hypothesis that only the H receptors cycle between high and low affinity, depending upon interactions between this receptor molecule and a guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

  14. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  15. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA, and cyto......We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA...

  16. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor. G Ravikumar N B Vijayaprakash. General Article Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 748-755. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  18. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, G. B.; Symons, J. A.; Duff, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations are related to disease activity in atopic eczema. DESIGN--Single cohort longitudinal study with controls. SETTING--Outpatient and general medicine departments in secondary referral centre. PATIENTS--Of 15 patients aged 17-57 with severe atopic eczema, all with acute exacerbations of disease, 13 were admitted to hospital and two treated as outpatients until the skin lesions had resolved or greatly improved. Nineteen controls gave single blood samples. INTERVENTIONS--Daily skin dressing with betamethasone valerate (0.025%) and ichthammol paste and tubular dressings. END POINT--Resolution of or considerable improvement in skin lesions. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations in blood samples taken on admission, at intervals subsequently, and on discharge. Clinical scores of disease activity were also made. Median concentrations on admission were significantly higher (770 U/ml) in the patients than the controls (300 U/ml). Concentrations fell significantly during treatment. In 25 assessments made at different times in 13 patients serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentration correlated significantly (R = 0.73) with clinical disease activity. CONCLUSIONS--Cellular immunopathogenic mechanisms contribute to atopic eczema. Immune activation can be measured in atopic eczema by measurements of soluble interleukin 2 receptor, and this should facilitate assessment of response to treatment. PMID:2568868

  19. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  20. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.A. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hegg, R. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baracat, E.C. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maranhão, R.C. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-04

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  1. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1 receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Pires

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1 receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  2. Metal ions and human sperm mannose receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoff, S; Cooper, G W; Centola, G M; Jacob, A; Hershlag, A; Hurley, I R

    2000-09-01

    Zinc and lead concentrations were measured in seminal plasma from fertile donors, infertile men with varicocoele and men undergoing work-ups for in vitro fertilization. Ejaculated spermatozoa from these subjects were incubated in vitro with various metal ions and/or dibromoethane and dibromochloropropane. Mannose receptor expression was correlated with metal and toxicant levels. Sperm distributions of potassium channels were compared with lead ions and calcium channels with zinc ions. Mannose receptor expression by capacitated spermatozoa increased linearly with seminal plasma zinc levels, and correlated inversely with lead levels. Cobalt had no effect on mannose receptor expression, but nickel had a concentration-dependent biphasic effect. Mannose receptor expression was not affected by dibromoethane and dibromochloropropane if the cholesterol content of the sperm membrane was high, but mannose receptor expression was decreased in low cholesterol spermatozoa by exposures below estimated permissive exposure limits. Potassium channels and lead ions co-localized over the entire head of human spermatozoa, while both calcium channels and zinc ions were confined to the equatorial segment of the head. Mannose receptor expression on the external surface of the human sperm plasma membrane is a biomarker for the effects of transition and heavy metals and organic toxicants on sperm fertility potential.

  3. Steroid hormone receptors in male breast diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, M M; Oshima, C F; Lopes, M P; Widman, A; Franco, E L; Brentani, M M

    1986-01-01

    Estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), glucocorticoid (GR) and androgen (AR) receptors were assayed in tumor samples from 8 cases of male breast cancer (MBC) and 20 cases of male gynecomastia. Seven out of eight (87.5%) male tumor samples had positive ER assays with values ranging from 12 to 180 fmol/mg protein. Of the seven ER positive cases of MBC, six, had positive PR activity with high titers. Positive GR and AR values were also detected in 75% of MBC cases. Concentrations of all four receptors were significantly correlated with each other. With gynecomastic tissue, the proportion of receptor-positive patients was 20% ER, 20% PR, 20% AR, and 45% GR. Except for GR, steroid receptor values for MBC individuals were significantly higher than those of gynecomastia patients.

  4. Effect of nonpersistent pesticides on estrogen receptor, androgen receptor, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Zoechling, Alfred; Gerster, Petra; Ivanova, Margarita M; Teng, Yun; Klinge, Carolyn M; Schildberger, Barbara; Gartner, Michael; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-01

    Nonpersistent pesticides are considered less harmful for the environment, but their impact as endocrine disruptors has not been fully explored. The pesticide Switch was applied to grape vines, and the maximum residue concentration of its active ingredients was quantified. The transactivation potential of the pesticides Acorit, Frupica, Steward, Reldan, Switch, Cantus, Teldor, and Scala and their active compounds (hexythiazox, mepanipyrim, indoxacarb, chlorpyrifos-methyl, cyprodinil, fludioxonil, boscalid, fenhexamid, and pyrimethanil) were tested on human estrogen receptor α (ERα), androgen receptor (AR) and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in vitro. Relative binding affinities of the pure pesticide constituents for AR and their effect on human breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines were evaluated. Residue concentrations of Switch's ingredients were below maximum residue limits. Fludioxonil and fenhexamid were ERα agonists (EC50 -values of 3.7 and 9.0 μM, respectively) and had time-dependent effects on endogenous ERα-target gene expression (cyclin D1, progesterone receptor, and nuclear respiratory factor 1) in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Fludioxonil, mepanipyrim, cyprodinil, pyrimethanil, and chlorpyrifos-methyl were AhR-agonists (EC50 s of 0.42, 0.77, 1.4, 4.6, and 5.1 μM, respectively). Weak AR binding was shown for chlorpyrifos-methyl, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, and fludioxonil. Assuming a total uptake which does not take metabolism and clearance rates into account, our in vitro evidence suggests that pesticides could activate pathways affecting hormonal balance, even within permitted limits, thus potentially acting as endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  5. Evaluation of the bimetallic receiver Cu-Fe under the flexion phenomenon in parabolic concentrators in the direct steam generation; Evaluacion del receptor bimetalico Cu-Fe bajo el fenomeno de flexion, en concentradores parabolicos en la generacion directa de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Vicente; Lentz, Alvaro; Almanza, Rafael [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In this paper the results of experimental tests as a part of the study of the flexion phenomenon of the absorbent tube in concentrators of parabolic channel during the process of direct steam generation (GDV), are presented. The flexion phenomenon of the tube has already been studied, in which it has been established that occurs under conditions of change of temperature gradients in the tube surface, when a stratified flow pattern of appears, which leads to a local overheating of the internal wall of the receiver, when the two phase flow begins, with relatively low massic flows. In the normal configuration of the absorbent iron tube, this one is surrounded with a glass tube to avoid thermal losses to the environment: when the metallic tube bends due to thermal stresses, displacements of 6 cm are reached for wrought iron with a wall thickness of 1.9 mm with selective film: for wrought iron with a wall thickness of 3.8 mm without selective film nor transparent cover bendings of 3 cm have been attained. This way the glass tube is subjected to a cross sectional shearing stress when the absorber touches it during its bending, giving rise also to the rupture of the same. In order to give a solution to this problem, at the Instituto de Engineering, a bi-metallic copper- steel tube 3 m long and 32 mm of diameter was built and installed in the parabolic concentrator and the flexion phenomenon was experienced. Results of experimental tests for the steel and the bimetallic steel receiver, without the glass cover nor the selective film and for the bimetallic receiver with the glass cover, are presented. They are compared among them departing from the temperatures in the lower and the upper part of the cross-sectional section of the tube and of the flexion of each one, concluding that the compound receiver copper-steel, up to now, fulfills better the expectations of eliminating the flexion phenomenon under the operating conditions of the solar plant during the GDV. [Spanish] Se

  6. Plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations and body iron stores identify similar risk factors for iron deficiency but result in different estimates of the national prevalence of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia among women and children in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle-Stone, Reina; Nankap, Martin; Ndjebayi, Alex O; Erhardt, Juergen G; Brown, Kenneth H

    2013-03-01

    Available iron status indicators reflect different aspects of metabolism. We compared the prevalence and distribution of iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) among Cameroonian women and children, as measured by plasma ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, body iron stores (BIS), and hemoglobin, and evaluated the impact of adjustments for inflammation on these measures. In a nationally representative survey, we randomly selected 30 clusters in each of 3 zones (north, south, and large cities) and 10 households/ cluster, each with a child aged 12-59 mo and a woman 15-49 y. Ferritin and BIS were mathematically adjusted for inflammation, using plasma C-reactive protein and α(1)-acid glycoprotein both as continuous and categorical variables. Inflammation was present in 48.0% of children and 20.8% of women and anemia was diagnosed in 57.6% of children and 38.8% of women. Depending on the iron status indicator applied, the prevalence of ID ranged from 14.2 to 68.4% among children and 11.5 to 31.8% among women, and the prevalence of IDA ranged from 12.0 to 47.4% among children and 9.0 to 19.4% among women; the proportion of anemia associated with ID ranged from 20.8 to 82.3% among children and 23.2 to 50.0% among women. The different iron indicators generally identified similar groups at greatest risk of deficiency, using both conventional and derived cutoffs: younger children, pregnant women, and women and children in the north and rural areas. Research is needed to clarify the relationships between iron status indicators, particularly in the presence of inflammation, to harmonize global data on prevalence of ID.

  7. Relationship between respiratory symptoms and cough receptor sensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Riordan, M F; Beardsmore, C S; Brooke, A M; Simpson, H

    1994-01-01

    The relationship was studied between preschool and current respiratory symptoms and cough receptor sensitivity in children. Forty six white children aged 7 years were investigated. They were divided into three groups: (i) healthy children; (ii) children with a history of idiopathic cough; and (iii) children with a history of wheezing. Cough receptor sensitivity was assessed by the inhalation of serially increasing concentrations of nebulised citric acid. The concentration which first induced ...

  8. Class I Cytokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinocher, Helena

    The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce their intr......The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce...... their intracellular response. The overall goal of this thesis was to improve the understanding of class I cytokine receptor activation and regulation at an atomic level. Two members of the class I cytokine receptor family, the human growth hormone receptor (hGHR), and the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) have...... the traptamers on the hEPOR TMD dimeric complex in detergent micelles. To gain a better understanding of hGHR regulation a point mutation in the hGHR intracellular domain (ICD), which has recently been linked to lung cancer, was characterized. The mutation was found to decrease binding of suppressor of cytokine...

  9. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  10. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    and rilmenidine increased, while yohimbine decreased spinal acetylcholine release. Efaroxan affected acetylcholine release differently depending on concentration. Nicotinic receptor blockade attenuated the effect of all ligands. All ligands showed poor binding affinity for muscarinic receptors. On the other hand......Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects...... of various receptor ligands on the cholinergic system must be investigated in detail. This study was initiated to investigate the effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine and the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan on spinal cholinergic receptors...

  11. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors and the canine model of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, T S; Bowersox, S S; Kaitin, K I; Baker, T L; Ciaranello, R D; Dement, W C

    1986-01-01

    The role of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor in narcolepsy was examined using radioligand binding to various brain regions of normal and genetically narcoleptic Doberman pinschers. In this multi-litter study, a previous report of a proliferation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the brainstem was confirmed, and the concentration of the M2 receptor subtype, in particular, was elevated. This up-regulation of brainstem cholinergic receptors suggests a problem with release of acetylcholine, which, together with previous reports of an impairment of dopamine release, may be indicative of a fundamental membrane problem in narcolepsy.

  12. Increased accuracy of ligand sensing by receptor internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Endres, Robert G.

    2010-02-01

    Many types of cells can sense external ligand concentrations with cell-surface receptors at extremely high accuracy. Interestingly, ligand-bound receptors are often internalized, a process also known as receptor-mediated endocytosis. While internalization is involved in a vast number of important functions for the life of a cell, it was recently also suggested to increase the accuracy of sensing ligand as the overcounting of the same ligand molecules is reduced. Here we show, by extending simple ligand-receptor models to out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics, that internalization increases the accuracy with which cells can measure ligand concentrations in the external environment. Comparison with experimental rates of real receptors demonstrates that our model has indeed biological significance.

  13. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  14. Involvement of NMDA receptors in soman-induced neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Groot, D.M.; Bierman, E.P.; Van Huygevoort, A.H.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.

    1993-05-13

    Our current working hypothesis with regard to soman-induced neuropathology is that accumulated ACh, resulting from soman-inhibited ACHE potentiates glutamate-induced neuronal degeneration, most likely by lowering the threshold for glutamate excitation at the NMDA-receptor sites. The activation of the NMDA-ionic channels may lead to massive Ca2+ fluxes into the postsynaptic cell, causing cell degeneration. In this concept the NMDA receptor plays a crucial role. In the present study, the involvement of NMDA receptors in soman-induced convulsions is tested by injecting NMDA receptor antagonists MK801, AP5 and TCP, whether or not in combination with atropine and/or diazepam, either directly into the hippocampal CA1 area or in the lateral ventricle very near to CA1. This area is predominantly affected by soman and contains high concentrations of NMDA receptors. Also the effect of injection with a non-NMDA receptor antagonist is tested.

  15. Topological and functional characterization of an insect gustatory receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Insect gustatory receptors are predicted to have a seven-transmembrane structure and are distantly related to insect olfactory receptors, which have an inverted topology compared with G-protein coupled receptors, including mammalian olfactory receptors. In contrast, the topology of insect gustatory receptors remains unknown. Except for a few examples from Drosophila, the specificity of individual insect gustatory receptors is also unknown. In this study, the total number of identified gustatory receptors in Bombyx mori was expanded from 65 to 69. BmGr8, a silkmoth gustatory receptor from the sugar receptor subfamily, was expressed in insect cells. Membrane topology studies on BmGr8 indicate that, like insect olfactory receptors, it has an inverted topology relative to G protein-coupled receptors. An orphan GR from the bitter receptor family, BmGr53, yielded similar results. We infer, from the finding that two distantly related BmGrs have an intracellular N-terminus and an odd number of transmembrane spans, that this is likely to be a general topology for all insect gustatory receptors. We also show that BmGr8 functions independently in Sf9 cells and responds in a concentration-dependent manner to the polyalcohols myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to a range of mono- and di-saccharides. BmGr8 is the first chemoreceptor shown to respond specifically to inositol, an important or essential nutrient for some Lepidoptera. The selectivity of BmGr8 responses is consistent with the known responses of one of the gustatory receptor neurons in the lateral styloconic sensilla of B. mori, which responds to myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to allo-inositol.

  16. Topological and functional characterization of an insect gustatory receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Jie; Anderson, Alisha R; Trowell, Stephen C; Luo, A-Rong; Xiang, Zhong-Huai; Xia, Qing-You

    2011-01-01

    Insect gustatory receptors are predicted to have a seven-transmembrane structure and are distantly related to insect olfactory receptors, which have an inverted topology compared with G-protein coupled receptors, including mammalian olfactory receptors. In contrast, the topology of insect gustatory receptors remains unknown. Except for a few examples from Drosophila, the specificity of individual insect gustatory receptors is also unknown. In this study, the total number of identified gustatory receptors in Bombyx mori was expanded from 65 to 69. BmGr8, a silkmoth gustatory receptor from the sugar receptor subfamily, was expressed in insect cells. Membrane topology studies on BmGr8 indicate that, like insect olfactory receptors, it has an inverted topology relative to G protein-coupled receptors. An orphan GR from the bitter receptor family, BmGr53, yielded similar results. We infer, from the finding that two distantly related BmGrs have an intracellular N-terminus and an odd number of transmembrane spans, that this is likely to be a general topology for all insect gustatory receptors. We also show that BmGr8 functions independently in Sf9 cells and responds in a concentration-dependent manner to the polyalcohols myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to a range of mono- and di-saccharides. BmGr8 is the first chemoreceptor shown to respond specifically to inositol, an important or essential nutrient for some Lepidoptera. The selectivity of BmGr8 responses is consistent with the known responses of one of the gustatory receptor neurons in the lateral styloconic sensilla of B. mori, which responds to myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to allo-inositol.

  17. Urine concentration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003608.htm Urine concentration test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urine concentration test measures the ability of the kidneys to ...

  18. Air Data - Concentration Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Make a map of daily concentrations over several days. The daily air quality can be displayed in terms of the Air Quality Index or in concentration ranges for certain PM species like organic carbon, nitrates, and sulfates.

  19. National Geochemical Database: Concentrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemistry of concentrates from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US and...

  20. Selective imaging of presynaptic activity in the mouse olfactory bulb shows concentration and structure dependence of odor responses in identified glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Hans U.; Fuss, Stefan H.; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2002-03-01

    More chemicals can be smelled than there are olfactory receptors for them, necessitating a combinatorial representation by somewhat broadly tuned receptors. To understand the perception of odor quality and concentration, it is essential to establish the nature of the receptor repertoires that are activated by particular odorants at particular concentrations. We have taken advantage of the one-to-one correspondence of glomeruli and olfactory receptor molecules in the mouse olfactory bulb to analyze the tuning properties of a major receptor population by high resolution calcium imaging of odor responses selectively in the presynaptic compartment of glomeruli. We show that eighty different olfactory receptors projecting to the dorsal olfactory bulb respond to high concentrations of aldehydes with limited specificity. Varying ensembles of about 10 to 20 receptors encode any particular aldehyde at low stimulus concentrations with high specificity. Even normalized odor response patterns are markedly concentration dependent, caused by pronounced differences in affinity within the aldehyde receptor repertoire.

  1. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.R. Samaniuk; J. Wang; T.W. Root; C.T. Scott; D.J. Klingenberg

    2011-01-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained...

  2. Nanomolar ambient ATP decelerates P2X3 receptor kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Alexander; Hans, Michael; Boldogkoi, Zsolt; Zimmer, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian; Jabs, Ronald

    2008-12-01

    Homomeric P2X receptors differ in their electrophysiological and pharmacological profiles. The rapidly activating and desensitizing P2X3 receptors are known for their involvement in pain signalling pathways. Modulatory effects on P2X3 receptors have been reported for low concentrations of ATP ([ATP]). This includes both, enhancement and reduction of receptor currents. The first has been reported to be mediated by activation of ectoprotein kinases and high affinity desensitization (HAD), respectively. Both processes influence receptor current amplitudes. Here we describe a new phenomenon, the modulatory influence of ambient low [ATP] on P2X3 receptor kinetics. First, we studied in HEK cells whether persistent ATP affects current decay. To this end, P2X3 receptor mediated currents, elicited by pressure application of saturating [ATP], were analyzed after pre-application of low [ATP]. Second, UV-flash photolysis of ATP was employed to investigate whether submicromolar [ATP] affects receptor activation. Finally we confirmed the action of nanomolar [ATP] on native P2X3 receptors of neurons freshly isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. We found that persistent low [ATP] caused pronounced deceleration of receptor current activation and decay. This priming effect indicates a mechanism different from HAD. It could be explained by a pre-opening receptor isomerization, induced by the occupation of a high affinity binding site already at the resting state. The observed modulation of the receptor kinetics could be considered as a physiological fine tuning mechanism of the nociceptive system, driven by the actual ambient agonist concentration.

  3. Calcium and cAMP signaling induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate receptor(s) stimulation in NCB-20 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coune, P; Taleb, O; Mensah-Nyagan, A G; Maitre, M; Kemmel, V

    2010-04-28

    The NCB-20 neurohybridoma cells differentiated with dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP represent an interesting model to study several components of the gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) system in brain. In particular, an active Na(+)-dependent uptake and a depolarization-evoked release of GHB is expressed by these cells, together with high affinity specific binding sites for this substance. However, only little is known about cellular mechanisms following GHB receptor(s) stimulation in these neurons. Electrophysiological data indicate that GHB can differently affect Ca(2+) currents. L-type calcium channels were typically inhibited by GHB when NCB-20 cells were depolarized. In contrast, when NCB-20 cells were at resting potential, GHB induced a specific Ca(2+) entry through T-type calcium channels. In this study, we investigated the effect induced on cytosolic free Ca(2+) level and cAMP production by GHB receptor(s) stimulated with micromolar concentrations of GHB or structural analogues of GHB. Ca(2+) movements studied by cellular imaging were dose-dependently increased but disappeared for GHB concentrations >25 microM. In addition, nanomolar doses of GHB inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. This effect was also rapidly desensitized at higher GHB concentrations. Acting as an antagonist, NCS-382 decreased GHB receptor(s) mediated cAMP and calcium signals. The agonist NCS-356 mimicked GHB effects which were not affected by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-55-845. Our results reveal the occurrence of Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase inhibition in NCB-20 neurons after GHB receptor(s) stimulation by GHB concentrations NCB-20 neurons of GHB receptors belonging to GPCR family that may recruit various G protein subtypes. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The astrocytic GABA(A)/benzodiazepine-like receptor: the Joker receptor for benzodiazepine-mimetic drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Leif; Zhao, Zhong; Chen, Ye

    2006-01-01

    Long-term use of benzodiazepines as hypnotics, anxiolytics, anticonvulsants and muscle relaxing drugs is jeopardized by adverse effects on memory, addictive properties, and development of tolerance. Major efforts have gone into developing 'benzodiazepine-like' drugs that are more selective in their therapeutic effect, have additional uses and/or lack the adverse effects of benzodiazepines. The reviewed prototype patent exemplifies such efforts. Newer drugs are thought to act selectively on one of the two neuronal benzodiazepine receptors, on the astrocytic mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor and/or on GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complexes displaying specific subunits. It is overlooked that astrocytes also express benzodiazepine receptors that enhance depolarization-mediated entry of Ca(2+) by interacting with membrane-associated GABA(A)-like receptors, mediating depolarization because of a high Cl(-) concentration within astrocytes. The resulting increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+), which stimulates glycogenolysis, is inhibited not only by the 'peripheral-type" benzodiazepine antagonist PK11195 but also by the 'neuronal' antagonist flumazenil. Increasing awareness of the role(s) of astrocytic Ca(2+) homeostasis and energy metabolism for CNS function suggests that activation of this receptor might contribute to both therapeutic and adverse effects of benzodiazepine-like drugs. This receptor should be kept in mind when developing and testing new drugs; in turn these drugs may help elucidating its functional role.

  5. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  6. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    five structural and functional domains, which are discussed here. (Figure 1). Figure 1. Structure of lipophorin receptor. 3 Vitellogenesis: The process by which the yolk is formed and accumulated in the ovum as a source of nutrients for the egg development. Vitellogenin and lipophorin are the major yolk pro- tein precursors in ...

  7. Optimal multivalent targeting of membranes with many distinct receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Tine; Dobnikar, Jure; Frenkel, Daan

    2017-07-11

    Cells can often be recognized by the concentrations of receptors expressed on their surface. For better (targeted drug treatment) or worse (targeted infection by pathogens), it is clearly important to be able to target cells selectively. A good targeting strategy would result in strong binding to cells with the desired receptor profile and barely binding to other cells. Using a simple model, we formulate optimal design rules for multivalent particles that allow them to distinguish target cells based on their receptor profile. We find the following: (i) It is not a good idea to aim for very strong binding between the individual ligands on the guest (delivery vehicle) and the receptors on the host (cell). Rather, one should exploit multivalency: High sensitivity to the receptor density on the host can be achieved by coating the guest with many ligands that bind only weakly to the receptors on the cell surface. (ii) The concentration profile of the ligands on the guest should closely match the composition of the cognate membrane receptors on the target surface. And (iii) irrespective of all details, the effective strength of the ligand-receptor interaction should be of the order of the thermal energy [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the absolute temperature and [Formula: see text] is Boltzmann's constant. We present simulations that support the theoretical predictions. We speculate that, using the above design rules, it should be possible to achieve targeted drug delivery with a greatly reduced incidence of side effects.

  8. Perampanel inhibition of AMPA receptor currents in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yin Chen

    Full Text Available Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM, concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M-1 s-1 and 0.58 s-1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM was similar at all kainate concentrations (3-100 µM, demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics.

  9. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-11-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors belong to class A of the GPCR family. Each muscarinic receptor subtype has its own particular distribution throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, muscarinic receptors regulate several sensory, cognitive, and motor functions while, in the peripheral nervous system, they are involved in the regulation of heart rate, stimulation of glandular secretion and smooth muscle contraction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have long been used as a model for the study of GPCR structure and function and to address aspects of GPCR dimerization using a broad range of approaches. In this review, the prevailing knowledge regarding the quaternary arrangement for the various muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been summarized by discussing work ranging from initial results obtained using more traditional biochemical approaches to those generated with more modern biophysical techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  11. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  12. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA.......g., IC(50) = 300 microM for (2R,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5d)]. The two unsaturated analogs (S)- (7a) and (R)-(E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7b) turned out to be a weak AMPA receptor agonist and a weak mixed NMDA/AMPA receptor antagonist, respectively....

  13. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... polyamines are known to modulate the function of these receptors in vivo. In this study, recent developments in the medicinal chemistry of polyamine-based ligands are given, particularly focusing on the use of solid-phase synthesis (SPS) as a tool for the facile generation of libraries of polyamine toxin...

  14. The importance of the adenosine A(2A) receptor-dopamine D(2) receptor interaction in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, M; Zaniewska, M; Frankowska, M; Wydra, K; Fuxe, K

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious brain disorder with somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and legal implications in the developed world. Illegal (e.g., psychostimulants, opioids, cannabinoids) and legal (alcohol, nicotine) drugs of abuse create a complex behavioral pattern composed of drug intake, withdrawal, seeking and relapse. One of the hallmarks of drugs that are abused by humans is that they have different mechanisms of action to increase dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain and indirectly activate DA receptors. Among the DA receptors, D(2) receptors are linked to drug abuse and addiction because their function has been proven to be correlated with drug reinforcement and relapses. The recognition that D(2) receptors exist not only as homomers but also can form heteromers, such as with the adenosine (A)(2A) receptor, that are pharmacologically and functionally distinct from their constituent receptors, has significantly expanded the range of potential drug targets and provided new avenues for drug design in the search for novel drug addiction therapies. The aim of this review is to bring current focus on A(2A) receptors, their physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, and to discuss the therapeutic relevance of these receptors to drug addiction. We concentrate on the contribution of A(2A) receptors to the effects of different classes of drugs of abuse examined in preclinical behavioral experiments carried out with pharmacological and genetic tools. The consequences of chronic drug treatment on A(2A) receptor-assigned functions in preclinical studies are also presented. Finally, the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between A(2A) receptors and drugs of abuse in the context of the heteromeric A(2A)-D(2) receptor complex is discussed. Taken together, a significant amount of experimental analyses provide evidence that targeting A(2A) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies

  15. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  16. Pristanic acid and phytanic acid: naturally occurring ligands for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A. W.; van der Burg, B.; Jansen, G. A.; Wanders, R. J.; Poll-The, B. T.; van der Saag, P. T.

    2000-01-01

    Phytanic acid and pristanic acid are branched-chain fatty acids, present at micromolar concentrations in the plasma of healthy individuals. Here we show that both phytanic acid and pristanic acid activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) in a concentration-dependent

  17. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2 in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation.

  18. Receptors for anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itsikson, N A; Chupakhin, O N [I. Ya. Postovsky Institute of Organic Synthesis, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Morzherin, Yu Yu; Matern, A I [B N Yeltsin Urals State Technical University - UPI (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-30

    The published data on receptors for anions with different geometry are generalised. Special attention is given to the analysis of binding abilities of organic ligands. Structural features of complex-forming agents and their properties are considered.

  19. Somatostatin receptor skintigrafi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nielsen, Jørn Theil; Rehling, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is a very valuable imaging technique for visualisation of a diversity of neuroendocrine tumours. The sensitivity for localisation of carcinoid tumours is high, but somewhat lower for other neuroendocrine tumours. The methodology, multiple clinical aspects...

  20. Strategies to Support Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Annette Haines provides a comprehensive overview of concentration across the planes. She first lays the foundation for thinking about student engagement: It must be understood that concentration is found through the interest of the child, which is guided by the sensitive periods. When we understand the child's development in this way, we can offer…

  1. Frequency-dependent cannabinoid receptor-independent modulation of glycine receptors by endocannabinoid 2-AG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eLozovaya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids are known as retrograde messengers, being released from the postsynaptic neuron and acting on specific presynaptic G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB receptors to decrease neurotransmitter release. Also, at physiologically relevant concentrations cannabinoids can directly modulate the function of voltage-gated and receptor-operated ion channels. Using patch-clamp recording we analyzed the consequences of the direct action of an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, on the functional properties of glycine receptor channels (GlyRs and ionic currents in glycinergic synapses. At physiologically relevant concentrations (0.1-1 µM, 2-AG directly affected the functions of recombinant homomeric alpha1H GlyR: it inhibited peak amplitude and dramatically enhanced desensitization. The action of 2-AG on GlyR-mediated currents developed rapidly, within ~300 milliseconds. Addition of 1 µM 2-AG strongly facilitated the depression of glycine-induced currents during repetitive (4-10 Hz application of short (2-ms duration pulses of glycine to outside-out patches. In brainstem slices from CB1 receptor-knockout mice, 2-AG significantly decreased the extent of facilitation of synaptic currents in hypoglossal motoneurons during repetitive (10-20 Hz stimulation. These observations suggest that endocannabinoids can modulate postsynaptic metaplasticity of glycinergic synaptic currents in a CB1 receptor-independent manner.

  2. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J.; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization...

  3. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bosscher, Karolien

    2010-05-31

    The ancient two-faced Roman god Janus is often used as a metaphor to describe the characteristics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1), which exhibits both a beneficial side, that serves to halt inflammation, and a detrimental side responsible for undesirable effects. However, recent developments suggest that the Glucocorticoid Receptor has many more faces with the potential to express a range of different functionalities, depending on factors that include the tissue type, ligand type, receptor variants, cofactor surroundings and target gene promoters. This behavior of the receptor has made the development of safer ligands, that trigger the expression program of only a desirable subset of genes, a real challenge. Thus more knowledge-based fundamental research is needed to ensure the design and development of selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators capable of reaching the clinic. Recent advances in the characterization of novel selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators, specifically in the context of anti-inflammatory strategies, will be described in this review. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  5. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Autophagy and the (prorenin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Jean Binger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor (PRR is a newly reported member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS; a hormonal cascade responsible for regulating blood pressure. Originally, the identification of PRR was heralded as the next drug target of the RAS, of which such therapies would have increased benefits against target-organ damage and hypertension. However, in the years since its discovery several conditional knockout mouse models of PRR have demonstrated an essential role for this receptor unrelated to the renin-angiotensin system and blood pressure. Deletion of PRR in podocytes or cardiomyocytes resulted in the rapid onset of organ failure, eventuating in animal mortality after only a matter of weeks. In both cases, deletion of PRR resulted in the intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and misfolded proteins, indicating a disturbance in autophagy. In light of the fact that the majority of PRR is located intracellularly, this molecular function appears to be more relevant than its ability to bind to high, non-physiological concentrations of (prorenin. This review will focus on the role of PRR in autophagy and its importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Understanding the link between PRR, autophagy and how its loss results in cell death will be essential for deciphering its role in physiology and pathology.

  7. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Colver, G. B.; Symons, J A; Duff, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations are related to disease activity in atopic eczema. DESIGN--Single cohort longitudinal study with controls. SETTING--Outpatient and general medicine departments in secondary referral centre. PATIENTS--Of 15 patients aged 17-57 with severe atopic eczema, all with acute exacerbations of disease, 13 were admitted to hospital and two treated as outpatients until the skin lesions had resolved or greatly improved. Nin...

  8. Hydrocarbon molar water solubility predicts NMDA vs. GABAA receptor modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pham, Trung L

    2014-11-19

    Many anesthetics modulate 3-transmembrane (such as NMDA) and 4-transmembrane (such as GABAA) receptors. Clinical and experimental anesthetics exhibiting receptor family specificity often have low water solubility. We hypothesized that the molar water solubility of a hydrocarbon could be used to predict receptor modulation in vitro. GABAA (α1β2γ2s) or NMDA (NR1/NR2A) receptors were expressed in oocytes and studied using standard two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. Hydrocarbons from 14 different organic functional groups were studied at saturated concentrations, and compounds within each group differed only by the carbon number at the ω-position or within a saturated ring. An effect on GABAA or NMDA receptors was defined as a 10% or greater reversible current change from baseline that was statistically different from zero. Hydrocarbon moieties potentiated GABAA and inhibited NMDA receptor currents with at least some members from each functional group modulating both receptor types. A water solubility cut-off for NMDA receptors occurred at 1.1 mM with a 95% CI = 0.45 to 2.8 mM. NMDA receptor cut-off effects were not well correlated with hydrocarbon chain length or molecular volume. No cut-off was observed for GABAA receptors within the solubility range of hydrocarbons studied. Hydrocarbon modulation of NMDA receptor function exhibits a molar water solubility cut-off. Differences between unrelated receptor cut-off values suggest that the number, affinity, or efficacy of protein-hydrocarbon interactions at these sites likely differ.

  9. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  10. Mechanisms of μ-opioid receptor inhibition of NMDA receptor-induced substance P release in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenling; Ennes, Helena S; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between NMDA receptors and μ-opioid receptors in primary afferent terminals was studied by using NMDA to induce substance P release, measured as neurokinin 1 receptor internalization. In rat spinal cord slices, the μ-opioid receptor agonists morphine, DAMGO and endomorphin-2 inhibited NMDA-induced substance P release, whereas the antagonist CTAP right-shifted the concentration response of DAMGO. In vivo, substance P release induced by intrathecal NMDA after priming with BDNF was inhibited by DAMGO. ω-Conotoxins MVIIC and GVIA inhibited about half of the NMDA-induced substance P release, showing that it was partially mediated by the opening of voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels. In contrast, DAMGO or ω-conotoxins did not inhibit capsaicin-induced substance P release. In cultured DRG neurons, DAMGO but not ω-conotoxin inhibited NMDA-induced increases in intracellular calcium, indicating that μ-opioid receptors can inhibit NMDA receptor function by mechanisms other than inactivation of Cav channels. Moreover, DAMGO decreased the ω-conotoxin-insensitive component of the substance P release. Potent inhibition by ifenprodil showed that these NMDA receptors have the NR2B subunit. Activators of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A (PKA) induced substance P release and this was decreased by the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801 and by DAMGO. Conversely, inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase and PKA, but not of protein kinase C, decreased NMDA-induced substance P release. Hence, these NMDA receptors are positively modulated by the adenylyl cyclase-PKA pathway, which is inhibited by μ-opioid receptors. In conclusion, μ-opioid receptors inhibit NMDA receptor-induced substance P release through Cav channel inactivation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Receptor Autoradiography Protocol for the Localized Visualization of Angiotensin II Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena E; Carrera, Eduardo J; Speth, Robert C

    2016-06-07

    This protocol describes receptor binding patterns for Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the rat brain using a radioligand specific for Ang II receptors to perform receptor autoradiographic mapping. Tissue specimens are harvested and stored at -80 °C. A cryostat is used to coronally section the tissue (brain) and thaw-mount the sections onto charged slides. The slide-mounted tissue sections are incubated in (125)I-SI-Ang II to radiolabel Ang II receptors. Adjacent slides are separated into two sets: 'non-specific binding' (NSP) in the presence of a receptor saturating concentration of non-radiolabeled Ang II, or an AT1 Ang II receptor subtype (AT1R) selective Ang II receptor antagonist, and 'total binding' with no AT1R antagonist. A saturating concentration of AT2 Ang II receptor subtype (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319, 10 µM) is also present in the incubation buffer to limit (125)I-SI-Ang II binding to the AT1R subtype. During a 30 min pre-incubation at ~22 °C, NSP slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319 and losartan, while 'total binding' slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319. Slides are then incubated with (125)I-SI-Ang II in the presence of PD123319 for 'total binding', and PD123319 and losartan for NSP in assay buffer, followed by several 'washes' in buffer, and water to remove salt and non-specifically bound radioligand. The slides are dried using blow-dryers, then exposed to autoradiography film using a specialized film and cassette. The film is developed and the images are scanned into a computer for visual and quantitative densitometry using a proprietary imaging system and a spreadsheet. An additional set of slides are thionin-stained for histological comparisons. The advantage of using receptor autoradiography is the ability to visualize Ang II receptors in situ, within a section of a tissue specimen, and anatomically identify the region of the tissue by comparing it to an adjacent histological reference section.

  12. Role of formic receptors in soluble urokinase receptor-induced human vascular smooth muscle migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, Enrico A; Fu, Yuyang; Davies, Mark G

    2015-05-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in response to urokinase is dependent on binding of the urokinase molecule to the urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR) and cleavage of the receptor. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the soluble uPAR (suPAR) in VSMC migration. Human VSMCs were cultured in vitro. Linear wound and Boyden microchemotaxis assays of migration were performed in the presence of suPAR. Inhibitors to G-protein signaling and kinase activation were used to study these pathways. Assays were performed for mitogen-activated protein kinase and epidermal growth factor receptor activation. suPAR induced concentration-dependent migration of VSMC, which was G protein-dependent and was blocked by Gαi and Gβγ inhibitors. Removal of the full uPAR molecule by incubation of the cells with a phospholipase did not interfere with this response. suPAR induced ERK1/2, p38(MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK] activation in a Gαi/Gβγ-dependent manner, and interruption of these signaling pathways prevented suPAR-mediated migration. suPAR activity was independent of plasmin activity. suPAR did not activate epidermal growth factor receptor. Interruption of the low affinity N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor (FPRL1) but not high affinity N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor (FPR) prevented cell migration and activation in response to suPAR. suPAR increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and activity, and this was dependent on the low affinity N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor (FPRL1) and ERK1/2. suPAR induces human smooth muscle cell activation and migration independent of the full uPAR through activation of the G protein-coupled receptor FPRL1, which is not linked to the plasminogen activation cascade. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, J M; Agraval, J; Gleeson, D; Heasman, K; Glass, M

    2006-03-01

    Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are expressed in mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The presence of cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates has been controversial, due to conflicting evidence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, using expanded search parameters. Evidence presented in the literature varied in validity, ranging from crude in vivo behavioural assays to robust in silico ortholog discovery. No research existed for several clades of invertebrates; we therefore tested for cannabinoid receptors in seven representative species, using tritiated ligand binding assays with [3H]CP55,940 displaced by the CB1-selective antagonist SR141716A. Specific binding of [3H]CP55,940 was found in neural membranes of Ciona intestinalis (Deuterstoma, a positive control), Lumbricusterrestris (Lophotrochozoa), and three ecdysozoans: Peripatoides novae-zealandiae (Onychophora), Jasus edwardi (Crustacea) and Panagrellus redivivus (Nematoda); the potency of displacement by SR141716A was comparable to measurements on rat cerebellum. No specific binding was observed in Actinothoe albocincta (Cnidaria) or Tethya aurantium (Porifera). The phylogenetic distribution of cannabinoid receptors may address taxonomic questions; previous studies suggested that the loss of CB1 was a synapomorphy shared by ecdysozoans. Our discovery of cannabinoid receptors in some nematodes, onychophorans, and crustaceans does not contradict the Ecdysozoa hypothesis, but gives it no support. We hypothesize that cannabinoid receptors evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterians, with secondary loss occurring in insects and other clades. Conflicting data regarding Cnidarians precludes hypotheses regarding the last common ancestor of eumetazoans. No cannabinoid receptors are expressed in sponges, which probably diverged before the origin of the eumetazoan ancestor.

  14. Concentrated Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dwork, Cynthia; Rothblum, Guy N.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Concentrated Differential Privacy, a relaxation of Differential Privacy enjoying better accuracy than both pure differential privacy and its popular "(epsilon,delta)" relaxation without compromising on cumulative privacy loss over multiple computations.

  15. Concentrations of Indicator Organisms

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — It is a compilation of organism concentrations of 16 sampling events conducted between July 2015 and February 2016. It also includes statistical analysis such as...

  16. Censored correlated cytokine concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas; Benn, Christine Stabell; Jørgensen, Mathias J

    2013-01-01

    Interest in cytokines as markers for the function of the immune system is increasing. Methods quantifying cytokine concentrations are often subject to detection limits, which lead to non-detectable observations and censored distributions. When distributions are skewed, geometric mean ratios (GMRs......) can be used to describe the relative concentration between two cytokines, and the GMR ratio (GMRR) can be used to compare two groups. The problem is how to estimate GMRRs from censored distributions.We evaluated methods, including simple deletion and substitution, in simulated and real data. One...... method applies Tobit directly to the censored difference between the two cytokine log-concentrations (Diff). However, censoring is correlated to the outcome and is therefore not independent. The correlation increases as the correlation between the two log-concentrations decreases. We propose a Tobit...

  17. CMAQ predicted concentration files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — model predicted concentrations. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Muñiz-Unamunzaga, M., R. Borge, G. Sarwar, B. Gantt, D. de la Paz, C....

  18. Know the single-receptor sensing limit? Think again

    CERN Document Server

    Aquino, Gerardo; Endres, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    How cells reliably infer information about their environment is a fundamentally important question. While sensing and signaling generally start with cell-surface receptors, the degree of accuracy with which a cell can measure external ligand concentration with even the simplest device - a single receptor - is surprisingly hard to pin down. Recent studies provide conflicting results for the fundamental physical limits. Comparison is made difficult as different studies either suggest different readout mechanisms of the ligand-receptor occupancy, or differ on how ligand diffusion is implemented. Here we critically analyse these studies and present a unifying perspective on the limits of sensing, with wide-ranging biological implications.

  19. Metformin action: concentrations matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling; Wondisford, Fredric E

    2015-02-03

    Metformin has been used for nearly a century and is now the most widely prescribed oral anti-diabetic agent worldwide. Yet how metformin acts remains only partially understood and controversial. One key reason may be that almost all previous studies were conducted with supra-pharmacological concentrations (doses) of metformin, 10-100 times higher than maximally achievable therapeutic concentrations found in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  1. Identification of the Drosophila and Tribolium receptors for the recently discovered insect RYamide neuropeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Krogh-Meyer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    short neuropeptides F. Amazingly, these neuropeptides show no cross-reactivity to the Tribolium RYamide receptor, while the Drosophila RYamide receptor is only very slightly activated by high concentrations (>10(-6)M) of neuropeptide F and short neuropeptide F-1, showing that the two RYamide receptors...

  2. Computer designed solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliman, O.; Daut, I.; Lim, C.S.; Isa, M.; Adzman, M.R. [Kolej Univ. Kejuruteraan Utara Malaysia, Perlis (Malaysia). School of Electrical System Engineering

    2007-07-01

    A new method of sun tracking has been proposed and demonstrated at the University of Technology Malaysia. The heliostat not only tracks the sun but also concentrates all of the sun images from its mirrors into a single image at a stationary target. Because of this, the target image can be made small enough so that a relatively small concentrator or receiver is required to collect the solar energy. A single cylinder, beta type Stirling engine has been built to work with this heliostat as a whole system. This paper discussed the computer designed optical concentrator, that was providing efficient solar energy transfer to a Stirling engine. The paper discussed the development of a prototype optical concentrator. The computer-simulated characteristics of the receiver as well as the experimental data of its performance were presented. It was concluded that coupling with a non-imaging focusing heliostat, the prototype optical concentrator was successful in running a small scale Stirling engine. The contribution of the optical concentrator to heliostat application was encouraging. 3 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  3. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  4. Taste Receptors in Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors were first identified on the tongue, where they initiate a signaling pathway that communicates information to the brain about the nutrient content or potential toxicity of ingested foods. However, recent research has shown that taste receptors are also expressed in a myriad of other tissues, from the airway and gastrointestinal epithelia to the pancreas and brain. The functions of many of these extraoral taste receptors remain unknown, but emerging evidence suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are important sentinels of innate immunity. This review discusses taste receptor signaling, focusing on the G-protein coupled–receptors that detect bitter, sweet, and savory tastes, followed by an overview of extraoral taste receptors and in-depth discussion of studies demonstrating the roles of taste receptors in airway innate immunity. Future research on extraoral taste receptors has significant potential for identification of novel immune mechanisms and insights into host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25323130

  5. [Significance of serum digoxin concentration and its influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, E; Krawietz, W; Vogt, W

    1976-04-08

    In recent years it has become possible by means of a radioimmunoassay to measure Digoxin concentration in the serum of digitalized patients. With this method it could be shown that the resorption of Digoxin is decreased by partial resection of the samll intestines, by malabsorption syndromes, after ingestion of Neomycin, Colestyramine and antacids. In renal insufficiency, however, the elimination half-life period of Digoxin is increased conspiciously (from about 35 hours up to about 120 hours). This results in a raised serum concentration of cardiac glycosides unless the dosage is decreased considerably. The incidence of Digitalis intoxication in Digitalis treated patients has been reported to rank as high as 20%. There is, however, no strict correlation between the serum glycoside level and the clinical symptoms, because the glykoside concentration in the serum does not represent the pharmacologically active concentration at the receptor. Experimental investigations of cardiac glycoside binding to the receptor for cardiac glycosides in human heart cell membranes revealed, that receptor bound Digoxin for instance is diminished in serious renal insufficiency and it depends on the serum concentration of potassium, calcium and magnesium. In hypoxia, after myocardial infarction and in myxedema the sensitivity for cardiac glycosides is increased. The opposite is true in hyperthyreoidism, fever and in children. All of these factors have to be kept in mind and paid attention to in the clinical evaluation of the measured Digoxin concentration in the serum.

  6. Cannabidiol is a negative allosteric modulator of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprairie, R B; Bagher, A M; Kelly, M E M; Denovan-Wright, E M

    2015-10-01

    Cannabidiol has been reported to act as an antagonist at cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that cannabidiol would inhibit cannabinoid agonist activity through negative allosteric modulation of CB1 receptors. Internalization of CB1 receptors, arrestin2 recruitment, and PLCβ3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, were quantified in HEK 293A cells heterologously expressing CB1 receptors and in the STHdh(Q7/Q7) cell model of striatal neurons endogenously expressing CB1 receptors. Cells were treated with 2-arachidonylglycerol or Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol alone and in combination with different concentrations of cannabidiol. Cannabidiol reduced the efficacy and potency of 2-arachidonylglycerol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on PLCβ3- and ERK1/2-dependent signalling in cells heterologously (HEK 293A) or endogenously (STHdh(Q7/Q7)) expressing CB1 receptors. By reducing arrestin2 recruitment to CB1 receptors, cannabidiol treatment prevented internalization of these receptors. The allosteric activity of cannabidiol depended upon polar residues being present at positions 98 and 107 in the extracellular amino terminus of the CB1 receptor. Cannabidiol behaved as a non-competitive negative allosteric modulator of CB1 receptors. Allosteric modulation, in conjunction with effects not mediated by CB1 receptors, may explain the in vivo effects of cannabidiol. Allosteric modulators of CB1 receptors have the potential to treat CNS and peripheral disorders while avoiding the adverse effects associated with orthosteric agonism or antagonism of these receptors. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Gating and permeation of kainate receptors: differences unveiled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Veran, Julien; Mulle, Christophe

    2010-11-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs) represent, together with α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, one of the three families of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent advances in the study of their biophysical properties have revealed a surprising diversity. KAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) are often much slower than AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs, and this is probably due to the slow deactivation rate of KARs containing the GluK4 or GluK5 subunits. By contrast, GluK3-containing receptors, unlike other AMPA/kainate receptors, desensitize faster at low agonist concentrations, making these receptors insensitive to glutamate spillover from neighboring synapses. Moreover, KARs have a wide range of sensitivities to intracellular polyamines and consequently of voltage dependent activation. Finally, newly discovered associated proteins, such as Neto1 and 2, have marked effects on receptor properties, increasing further the potential diversity of KAR functional properties. Altogether, this functional diversity of KARs could have profound consequences on their ability to shape synaptic transmission under physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adequate tacrolimus concentration for myasthenia gravis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, T; Uzawa, A; Kawaguchi, N; Himuro, K; Oda, F; Ozawa, Y; Kuwabara, S

    2017-02-01

    A single, oral dose of 3 mg/day tacrolimus, approved for myasthenia gravis (MG) treatment in Japan, was shown to reduce steroid dose and anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody titers as well as to improve MG symptoms. However, no studies have investigated the association between tacrolimus concentration and its clinical efficacy in MG. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimal tacrolimus concentration for MG treatment. The trough tacrolimus concentration in 51 patients with MG (positive for anti-AChR antibody, n = 48; negative for anti-AChR and anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies, n = 3) who received 3 mg/day tacrolimus for more than 1 year was measured using a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. The clinical characteristics of patients with MG as well as the dose of prednisolone used before and after tacrolimus treatment were evaluated retrospectively. The median trough tacrolimus concentration was 5.4 (range, 2.9-7.6) ng/mL, which was correlated with 'minimal manifestation or better status' (P = 0.0190, r = 0.3273) and the reduction in anti-AChR antibody 1 year after tacrolimus initiation (P = 0.0170, r = 0.3465). When the cut-off value for tacrolimus was defined as 4.8 ng/mL using a receiver operating characteristic curve, patients with adequate tacrolimus concentration (≥4.8 ng/mL) showed more reduction in anti-AChR antibody titers and more improvement in MG-related activities in daily life scores. More patients with adequate tacrolimus concentration achieved 'minimal manifestation or better status' compared with those with low tacrolimus concentration. An adequate tacrolimus concentration is required for better MG prognosis. © 2016 EAN.

  9. Human presynaptic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Feuerstein, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Presynaptic receptors are sites at which transmitters, locally formed mediators or hormones inhibit or facilitate the release of a given transmitter from its axon terminals. The interest in the identification of presynaptic receptors has faded in recent years and it may therefore be justified to give an overview of their occurrence in the autonomic and central nervous system; this review will focus on presynaptic receptors in human tissues. Autoreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which a given transmitter restrains its further release, though in some instances may also increase its release. Inhibitory autoreceptors represent a typical example of a negative feedback; they are tonically activated by the respective endogenous transmitter and/or are constitutively active. Autoreceptors also play a role under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. by limiting the massive noradrenaline release occurring during congestive heart failure. They can be used for therapeutic purposes; e.g., the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist mirtazapine is used as an antidepressant and the inverse histamine H3 receptor agonist pitolisant has been marketed as a new drug for the treatment of narcolepsy in 2016. Heteroreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which transmitters from adjacent neurons, locally formed mediators (e.g. endocannabinoids) or hormones (e.g. adrenaline) can inhibit or facilitate transmitter release; they may be subject to an endogenous tone. The constipating effect of the sympathetic nervous system or of the antihypertensive drug clonidine is related to the activation of inhibitory α2-adrenoceptors on postganglionic parasympathetic neurons. Part of the stimulating effect of adrenaline on the sympathetic nervous system during stress is related to its facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release via β2-adrenoceptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermal cloak-concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopically manipulating heat flow at will, thermal metamaterials have opened a practical way, which possesses a single function, such as either cloaking or concentrating the flow of heat even though environmental temperature varies. By developing a theory of transformation heat transfer for multiple functions, here we introduce the concept of intelligent thermal metamaterials with a dual function, which is in contrast to the existing thermal metamaterials with single functions. By assembling homogeneous isotropic materials and shape-memory alloys, we experimentally fabricate a kind of intelligent thermal metamaterials, which can automatically change from a cloak (or concentrator) to a concentrator (or cloak) when the environmental temperature changes. This work paves an efficient way for a controllable gradient of heat, and also provides guidance both for arbitrarily manipulating the flow of heat and for efficiently designing similar intelligent metamaterials in other fields.

  11. Pollutant concentrations in placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leino, O.; Kiviranta, H.; Karjalainen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    congeners of persistent organic pollutants, seven organotin compounds, five heavy metals, and methylmercury in 130 randomly selected placentas. Additionally, we examined similarities between pollutant concentrations by analyzing correlations between their placental concentrations. Our results yield new...... information for conducting contaminant risk assessments for the prenatal period. Out of the 117 individual persistent organic pollutants or metals assayed, 46 could be detected in more than half of the placentas. Moreover, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was found in all placentas. The data......Unborn children are exposed to environmental pollutants via the placenta, and there is a causal relationship between maternal intake of pollutants and fetal exposure. Placental examination is an effective way for acquiring data for estimating fetal exposure. We analyzed the concentrations of 104...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor stimulate the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity by cross-linking receptor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, R M; Soos, M A; Siddle, K

    1987-12-20

    The effect of monoclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies on the intrinsic kinase activity of solubilized receptor was investigated. Antibodies for six distinct epitopes stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity towards exogenous substrates. This effect of antibodies was seen only within a narrow concentration range and monovalent antibody fragments were ineffective. Evidence was obtained by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation for the formation of antibody-receptor complexes which involved both inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking, although stimulation of autophosphorylation appeared to be preferentially associated with the latter. There was partial additivity between the effects of insulin and antibodies in stimulating autophosphorylation, although the sites of phosphorylation appeared identical on two-dimensional peptide maps. Antibodies for two further epitopes failed to activate receptor kinase, but inhibited its stimulation by insulin. The effects of antibodies on kinase activity paralleled their metabolic effects on adipocytes, except for one antibody which was potently insulin-like in its metabolic effects, but which antagonized insulin stimulation of kinase activity. It is concluded that antibodies activate the receptor by cross-linking subunits rather than by reacting at specific epitopes. The ability of some antibodies to activate receptor may depend on receptor environment as well as the disposition of epitopes.

  13. Vacancy Concentration in Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1977-01-01

    Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10.......Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10....

  14. Concentrated loads on concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Karen Grøndahl; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas are devel......This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas...

  15. In vitro binding receptors study by Valeriana adscendens, Iresine herbstii and Brugmansia arborea extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Anna; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2007-11-01

    In this work we examined the affinity and the selectivity of V. adscendens, Iresine herbstii Hook. (Amaranthaceae) and Brugmansia arborea (L.) Lagerheim (Solanaceae) towards 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C) serotononergic, D(1) and D(2) dopaminergic, alpha (1) and alpha (2) adrenergic receptors by radioligand assays. The results show weak affinity to 5-HT(1A) only for the aqueous extract of V. adscendens and no affinity for 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C) serotononergic receptors, alpha (1) and alpha(2) adrenergic receptors and D(2) receptors. As it regards D(1) receptors, only for the methanolic extract the IC(50) value was determinable. The data obtained for I. herbstii extracts have shown a low affinity for the 5-HT(1A) receptor (22.44%) and no affinity for 5-HT(2A) receptor. Otherwise these extracts showed affinity for 5-HT(2C) receptor but only for the methanolic extract the IC(50) value (inhibitory concentration 50%) was: 34.8 microg/ml. The B. arborea aqueous extract displayed weak affinity for all receptors tested, the highest levels of inhibition at the maximum concentration tested (125 microg/ml) were 38% for the 5-HT(1A), 16% for the 5-HT(2A) and 39% for the 5-HT(2C) receptor. The results of our experiments indicate that V. adscendens, Iresine herbstii and Brugmansia arborea were able to interact with the central 5-HT receptors thus confirming their ritual use.

  16. From receptor balance to rational glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E Ron

    2014-08-01

    Corticosteroids secreted as end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis act like a double-edged sword in the brain. The hormones coordinate appraisal processes and decision making during the initial phase of a stressful experience and promote subsequently cognitive performance underlying the management of stress adaptation. This action exerted by the steroids on the initiation and termination of the stress response is mediated by 2 related receptor systems: mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). The receptor types are unevenly distributed but colocalized in abundance in neurons of the limbic brain to enable these complementary hormone actions. This contribution starts from a historical perspective with the observation that phasic occupancy of GR during ultradian rhythmicity is needed to maintain responsiveness to corticosteroids. Then, during stress, initially MR activation enhances excitability of limbic networks that are engaged in appraisal and emotion regulation. Next, the rising hormone concentration occupies GR, resulting in reallocation of energy to limbic-cortical circuits with a role in behavioral adaptation and memory storage. Upon MR:GR imbalance, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs, which can enhance an individual's vulnerability. Imbalance is characteristic for chronic stress experience and depression but also occurs during exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Hence, glucocorticoid psychopathology may develop in susceptible individuals because of suppression of ultradian/circadian rhythmicity and depletion of endogenous corticosterone from brain MR. This knowledge generated from testing the balance hypothesis can be translated to a rational glucocorticoid therapy.

  17. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors1234

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Nirupa; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine-5′-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein–coupled receptors,...

  18. The alleged dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 83959 is a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist in primate cells and interacts with other receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, G; Drukarch, B; Leysen, J E; Cools, A R; Stoof, J C

    1999-01-01

    So far, no clear correlation has been found between the effects of dopamine D1 receptor agonists on motor behavior in primate models of Parkinson's disease and their ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase in rats, the benzazepine SKF 83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-]H- 3-benzazepine) being the most striking example. Since this discrepancy might be attributed to: (A) the different species used to study these effects or (B) the interaction of SKF 83959 with other catecholamine receptors, the aims of this study were: (1) to study the ability of SKF 83959 to stimulate adenylate cyclase in cultured human and monkey glial cells equipped with dopamine D1 receptors and (2) to evaluate the affinity for and the functional interaction of SKF 83959 with other catecholamine receptors. Binding studies revealed that SKF 83959 displayed the highest affinity for the dopamine D1 receptor (pKi=6.72) and the alpha2-adrenoceptor (pKi=6.41) and moderate affinity for the dopamine D2 receptor and the noradrenaline transporter. In monkey and human cells, SKF 83959 did not stimulate cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation to a significant extent, but antagonized very potently the dopamine-induced stimulation of cAMP formation in both cell types. The compound stimulated basal dopamine outflow and inhibited depolarization-induced acetylcholine release only at concentrations > 10 microM. Finally, SKF 83959 concentration dependently increased electrically evoked noradrenaline release, indicating that it had alpha2-adrenoceptor blocking activity and interfered with the noradrenaline transporter. In conclusion, SKF 83959 is a potent dopamine D1 receptor and alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Thus, the anti-parkinsonian effects of SKF 83959 in primates are not mediated by striatal dopamine D1 receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase in a stimulatory way.

  19. Solubilized benzodiazepine receptors for use in receptor assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Stegeman, M; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    In the development of non-radioactive receptor assays for benzodiazepines, employing fluorescent ligands, it was observed that the fluorescence measurements were hampered by the background fluorescence of the receptor preparation. This receptor preparation is a brain tissue homogenate in which the

  20. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  1. Concentrating Tripartite Quantum Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Alexander; Lee, Soojoon; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-07-17

    We introduce the concentrated information of tripartite quantum states. For three parties Alice, Bob, and Charlie, it is defined as the maximal mutual information achievable between Alice and Charlie via local operations and classical communication performed by Charlie and Bob. We derive upper and lower bounds to the concentrated information, and obtain a closed expression for it on several classes of states including arbitrary pure tripartite states in the asymptotic setting. We show that distillable entanglement, entanglement of assistance, and quantum discord can all be expressed in terms of the concentrated information, thus revealing its role as a unifying informational primitive. We finally investigate quantum state merging of mixed states with and without additional entanglement. The gap between classical and quantum concentrated information is proven to be an operational figure of merit for mixed state merging in the absence of additional entanglement. Contrary to the pure state merging, our analysis shows that classical communication in both directions can provide an advantage for merging of mixed states.

  2. Solar concentrator/absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  3. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.

  4. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown...

  5. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...

  6. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric [Baylor; (Van Andel); (Globel Phasing); (Grand Valley)

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  7. From anion receptors to transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Philip A

    2011-03-15

    -meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole; with its electron-withdrawing substituents, it can operate through a chloride/bicarbonate antiport process. Moreover, calix[4]pyrroles with additional hydrogen bond donors can operate through a chloride/nitrate antiport process. Thus, increasing the affinity of the receptor in these cases allows the compound to transport an anion in the absence of a cation. Finally, we have studied the transport properties of simple thioureas and shown that these compounds are highly potent chloride/bicarbonate antiport agents that function at low concentrations. In contrast, the urea analogues are inactive. The higher hydrophobicity (reflected in higher values for the logarithm of the water-octanol partition constant, or log P) and lower polar surface areas of the thiourea compounds compared to their urea analogues may provide a clue to the high potency of these compounds. This observation might serve as a basis for designing future small-molecule transporters. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. [In vitro sensitivity of breast cancer tissue to adriablastin in the presence and absence of estrogen receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinia, A Ia; Vitola, G Ia; Nuke, I Ia; Zeĭkate, G A; Emzin'sh, D E

    1984-01-01

    The report deals with a comparison of estrogen receptor concentration in tumor tissue of breast cancer patients and sensitivity of the said tissue to adriablastin in short-term organ cultures. No relationship was established between tumor tissue sensitivity to adriablastin and presence or absence of estrogen receptors. It is necessary to identify both the concentration of specific hormone receptors and individual sensitivity to chemotherapy in order to work out individually-tailored schemes of treatment of breast cancer patients.

  9. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  10. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striking...... the phenomenon of blockade of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] actions by AT2R antagonists and vice versa. Such mechanisms may comprise dimerization of the receptors or dimerization-independent mechanisms such as lack of specificity of the receptor ligands used in the experiments or involvement of the Ang-(1...

  11. Overlap of dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotoninergic receptors and complementarity of their subtypes in primate prefrontal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman-Rakic, P.S.; Lidow, M.S.; Gallager, D.W. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was used to determine and compare the areal and laminar distribution of the major dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotonergic neurotransmitter receptors in 4 cytoarchitectonic regions of the prefrontal cortex in adult rhesus monkeys. The selective ligands, 3H-SCH-23390, 3H-raclopride, 3H-prazosin, and 3H-clonidine were used to label the D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes and the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, respectively, while 125I-iodopindolol was used to detect beta-adrenergic receptors. The radioligands, 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine and 3H-ketanserin labeled, respectively, the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors. Densitometry was performed on all cortical layers and sublayers for each of the 7 ligands to allow quantitative as well as qualitative comparison among them in each cytoarchitectonic area. Although each monoamine receptor was distributed in a distinctive laminar-specific pattern that was remarkably similar from area to area, there was considerable overlap among the dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotoninergic receptors, while subtypes of the same receptor class tended to have complementary laminar profiles and different concentrations. Thus, the D1 dopamine, the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic, and the 5-HT1 receptors were present in highest relative concentration in superficial layers I, II, and IIIa (the S group). In contrast, the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic subtypes and the 5-HT2 receptor had their highest concentrations in the intermediate layers, IIIb and IV (the I group), while the D2 receptor was distinguished by relatively high concentrations in the deep layer V compared to all other layers (the D class). Thus, clear laminar differences were observed in the D1 vs D2 dopaminergic, the alpha- vs beta-adrenergic, and the 5-HT1 vs 5-HT2 serotoninergic receptor subtypes in all 4 areas examined.

  12. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eGuseva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  13. Thrombin-Induced Podocyte Injury Is Protease-Activated Receptor Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ruchika; Waller, Amanda P; Agrawal, Shipra; Wolfgang, Katelyn J; Luu, Hiep; Shahzad, Khurrum; Isermann, Berend; Smoyer, William E; Nieman, Marvin T; Kerlin, Bryce A

    2017-09-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is characterized by massive proteinuria and injury of specialized glomerular epithelial cells called podocytes. Studies have shown that, whereas low-concentration thrombin may be cytoprotective, higher thrombin concentrations may contribute to podocyte injury. We and others have demonstrated that ex vivo plasma thrombin generation is enhanced during nephrosis, suggesting that thrombin may contribute to nephrotic progression. Moreover, nonspecific thrombin inhibition has been shown to decrease proteinuria in nephrotic animal models. We thus hypothesized that thrombin contributes to podocyte injury in a protease-activated receptor-specific manner during nephrosis. Here, we show that specific inhibition of thrombin with hirudin reduced proteinuria in two rat nephrosis models, and thrombin colocalized with a podocyte-specific marker in rat glomeruli. Furthermore, flow cytometry immunophenotyping revealed that rat podocytes express the protease-activated receptor family of coagulation receptors in vivo High-concentration thrombin directly injured conditionally immortalized human and rat podocytes. Using receptor-blocking antibodies and activation peptides, we determined that thrombin-mediated injury depended upon interactions between protease-activated receptor 3 and protease-activated receptor 4 in human podocytes, and between protease-activated receptor 1 and protease-activated receptor 4 in rat podocytes. Proximity ligation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed thrombin-dependent interactions between human protease-activated receptor 3 and protease-activated receptor 4, and between rat protease-activated receptor 1 and protease-activated receptor 4 in cultured podocytes. Collectively, these data implicate thrombinuria as a contributor to podocyte injury during nephrosis, and suggest that thrombin and/or podocyte-expressed thrombin receptors may be novel therapeutic targets for nephrotic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  14. Molecular identification of a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor specific for crustacean cardioactive peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Hauser, Frank; Kobberup, Sune

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website (www.flybase.org) contains the sequence of an annotated gene (CG6111) expected to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We have cloned this receptor and found that its gene was not correctly predicted, because an annotated neighbouring gene (CG14547) was also...... part of the receptor gene. DNA corresponding to the corrected gene CG6111 was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, where it was found to code for a receptor that could be activated by low concentrations of crustacean cardioactive peptide, which is a neuropeptide also known to occur in Drosophila...... and other insects (EC(50), 5.4 x 10(-10)M). Other known Drosophila neuropeptides, such as adipokinetic hormone, did not activate the receptor. The receptor is expressed in all developmental stages from Drosophila, but only very weakly in larvae. In adult flies, the receptor is mainly expressed in the head...

  15. BDNF downregulates 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in hippocampal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, V; Santini, M A; Marcussen, Anders Bue

    2009-01-01

    Both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT(2A)) have been related to depression pathology. Specific 5-HT(2A) receptor changes seen in BDNF conditional mutant mice suggest that BDNF regulates the 5-HT(2A) receptor level. Here we show a direct effect of BDNF...... on 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in primary hippocampal neuronal and mature hippocampal organotypic cultures exposed to different BDNF concentrations for either 1, 3, 5 or 7 days. In vivo effects of BDNF on hippocampal 5-HT(2A) receptor levels were further corroborated in (BDNF +/-) mice...... with reduced BDNF levels. In primary neuronal cultures, 7 days exposure to 25 and 50ng/mL BDNF resulted in downregulation of 5-HT(2A), but not of 5-HT(1A), receptor protein levels. The BDNF-associated downregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptor levels was also observed in mature hippocampal organotypic cultures...

  16. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  17. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Burns, H.D.; Kuhar, M.J.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5..mu..g/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 ..mu..g/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15.

  18. [GABA receptors: structure and functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N

    2010-10-01

    Data on the structure, localization, physiology, and pharmacology of GABA receptors are reviewed. These receptors belong to cis-loop receptors and consist of 16 subunits in various combinations and occur in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. There are a great number of their allosteric modulators, agonists and antagonists. Activation of GABA receptors is accompanied by changes in the permeability of plasmatic membranes for chloride ions, which is followed by depolarization (presynaptic inhibition) or hyperpolarization (postsynaptic inhibition). GABA receptors contain some topographically different binding sites, intended for the interaction both with the main mediator (GABA) and with allosteric regulators such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, convulsants, ethanol, and neurosteroids.

  19. Levamisole receptors: a second awakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J.; Robertson, Alan P.; Buxton, Samuel K.; Beech, Robin N.; Charvet, Claude L.; Neveu, Cedric

    2012-01-01

    Levamisole and pyrantel are old (1965) but useful anthelmintics that selectively activate nematode acetylcholine ion-channel receptors; they are used to treat roundworm infections in humans and animals. Interest in their actions has surged, giving rise to new knowledge and technical advances, including an ability to reconstitute receptors that reveal more details of modes of action/resistance. We now know that the receptors are plastic and may form diverse species-dependent subtypes of receptor with different sensitivities to individual cholinergic anthelmintics. Understanding the biology of the levamisole receptors is expected to inform other studies on anthelmintics (ivermectin and emodepside) that act on ion-channels. PMID:22607692

  20. Structure-function relationships for the interleukin 2 receptor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Robb

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for interleukin 2 (IL-2 esit in at least three forms which differ in their subunit compositio, their affinity for ligand and their ability to mediate a cellular reponse. Type I receptors occur following cellular acitivation and consist of the 55,000 m. w. glycoprotein Tac. These receptors bind IL-2 with a low affinity, do not internalize ligand and have not been definitively associated with any response. Type II receptors, on the other hand, conssit of one or more glycoproteins of 70,000 m. w. which have been termed "beta ([beta] chains." They bind IL-2 with an intermediate affinity and rapidly internalize the ligand. [Beta] proteins mediate many cellular IL-2-dependent reponses, including the short-term activation of natural killer cells and the induction of Tac protein expression. Type III receptors consist of a ternary complex of the Tac protein, the [beta] chain(s and IL-2. They are characterized by a paricularly high affinity for ligand association. Type III receptors also internalize ligand and mediate IL-2-dependent responses at low factor concentrations. The identification of two independent IL-2-binding molecules, Tac and [beta], thus provides the elusive molecular explanation for the differences in IL-2 receptor affinity and suggests the potential for selective therapeutic manipulation of IL-2 reponses.

  1. Molecular cloning and functional expression of the first two specific insect myosuppressin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer; Reynisson, Eyjólfur; Hauser, Frank

    2003-01-01

    expressed the coding regions of the two corrected receptor genes in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that each of them coded for a receptor that could be activated by low concentrations of Drosophila myosuppressin (EC50,4 x 10(-8) M). The insect myosuppressins are decapeptides that generally inhibit...

  2. [H-3]dihydroalprenolol binding to beta adrenergic receptors in multiple sclerosis brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, E; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    By using immunocytochemistry we previously reported the absence of beta(2) adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS) white matter. Here, we measured beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptor concentrations in postmortem brain sections of six MS patients and six controls by using

  3. Adenosine A(3) receptor-induced CCL2 synthesis in cultured mouse astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittendorp, MC; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    During neuropathological conditions, high concentrations of adenosine are released, stimulating adenosine receptors in neurons and glial cells. It has recently been shown that stimulation of adenosine receptors in glial cells induces the release of neuroprotective substances such as NGF, S-100beta,

  4. In depth pharmacological characterization of endothelin B receptors in the rat middle cerebral artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szok, D; Hansen-Schwartz, J; Edvinsson, L

    2001-01-01

    endothelin B receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c in precontracted cerebral arteries and in the presence of the endothelin A receptor blocker FR139317 caused vasodilation in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase significantly reduced the dilation induced by sarafotoxin 6c, whereas...

  5. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-04

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  6. Structural biology of GABAB receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangaj, Aurel; Fan, Qing R

    2017-10-12

    Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates slow and prolonged inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. It functions as a constitutive heterodimer composed of the GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. Each subunit contains three domains; the extracellular Venus flytrap module, seven-helix transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail. In recent years, the three-dimensional structures of GABAB receptor extracellular and intracellular domains have been elucidated. These structures reveal the molecular basis of ligand recognition, receptor heterodimerization and receptor activation. Here we provide a brief review of the GABAB receptor structures, with an emphasis on describing the different ligand-bound states of the receptor. We will also compare these with the known structures of related GPCRs to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation in the GABAB system, as well as GPCR dimers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recruitment of beta-arrestin2 to the dopamine D2 receptor: insights into anti-psychotic and anti-parkinsonian drug receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klewe, Ib V; Nielsen, Søren M; Tarpø, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Drugs acting at dopamine D2-like receptors play a pivotal role in the treatment of both schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for G-protein independent D2 receptor signaling pathways acting through beta-arrestin. In this study we describe the establishment...... of a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assay for measuring dopamine induced recruitment of human beta-arrestin2 to the human dopamine D2 receptor. Dopamine, as well as the dopamine receptor agonists pramipexole and quinpirole, acted as full agonists in the assay as reflected by their ability to elicit...... marked concentration dependent increases in the BRET signal signifying beta-arrestin2 recruitment to the D2 receptor. As expected from their effect on G-protein coupling and cAMP levels mediated through the D2 receptor RNPA, pergolide, apomorphine, ropinirole, bromocriptine, 3PPP, terguride, aripiprazole...

  8. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang [MIT; Ren, Zhifeng [University of Houston

    2015-07-09

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate in the lab that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) can exceed 10% solar-to-electricity efficiency, and STEGs can be integrated with phase-change materials (PCM) for thermal storage, providing operation beyond daylight hours. This project achieved significant progress in many tasks necessary to achieving the overall project goals. An accurate Themoelectric Generator (TEG) model was developed, which included realistic treatment of contact materials, contact resistances and radiative losses. In terms of fabricating physical TEGs, high performance contact materials for skutterudite TE segments were developed, along with brazing and soldering methods to assemble segmented TEGs. Accurate measurement systems for determining device performance (in addition to just TE material performance) were built for this project and used to characterize our TEGs. From the optical components’ side, a spectrally selective cermet surface was developed with high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance, with thermal stability at high temperature. A measurement technique was also developed to determine absorptance and total hemispherical emittance at high temperature, and was used to characterize the fabricated spectrally selective surfaces. In addition, a novel reflective cavity was designed to reduce radiative absorber losses and achieve high receiver efficiency at low concentration ratios. A prototype cavity demonstrated that large reductions in radiative losses were possible through this technique. For the overall concentrating STEG system, a number of devices were fabricated and tested in a custom built test platform to characterize their efficiency performance. Additionally, testing was performed with integration of PCM thermal storage, and the storage time of the lab scale system was evaluated. Our latest testing results showed a STEG efficiency of 9.6%, indicating promising potential for high performance concentrated STEGs.

  9. Molecular evolution of vertebrate VIP receptors and functional characterization of a VIP receptor from goldfish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, B K; Yuen, T T; Chan, K W

    1997-02-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide that has numerous physiological actions and is widely distributed in the body. However, as yet, there is no sequence information about VIP receptors in lower vertebrates. Partial cDNA fragments spanning transmembrane domains 2 to 6 of VIP receptors were isolated from six nonmammalian vertebrate species, including chicken, pigeon, frog, lizard, salmon, and goldfish. Sequence comparison of these receptors revealed essential structural motifs responsible for receptor function. In addition, the first nonmammalian full-length VIP receptor cDNA was obtained by screening a goldfish brain and pituitary cDNA library. Functional expression of this receptor in mammalian COS-7 cells showed that it is coupled to cAMP production in a VIP and PACAP concentration-dependent manner; the EC50 of VIP was determined to be 1 nM. At 100 nM peptide, the relative potency of various peptides in stimulating cAMP in the transfected cells was VIP > PACAP > GHRH = secretin > PHM > PTH > glucagon > GLP-1 > GIP. Characterization of the VIP receptors in lower vertebrates should enhance our understanding of the molecular evolution and physiology of VIP in vertebrates.

  10. Vapor concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  11. Fixed solar energy concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, A.J.; Knasel, T.M.

    1981-01-20

    An apparatus for the concentration of solar energy upon a fixed array of solar cells is disclosed. A transparent material is overlayed upon the cell array, and a diffuse reflective coating is applied to the surface area of the transparent medium in between cells. Radiant light, which reflects through the transparent layer and does not fall directly incident to a cell surface is reflected by the coating layer in an approximate cosine pattern. Thereafter, such light undergoes internal reflection and rediffusion until subsequently it either strikes a solar cell surface or is lost through the upper surface of the transparent material.

  12. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have describ...... models of vortex structures used for interpretation of experimental data which serve as a ground for development of theoretical and numerical approaches to vortex investigation. Achievements in the fields of stability analysis, waves on vortices and vortex breakdown are also presented....

  13. Activation of µ-opioid receptors and block of KIR3 potassium channels and NMDA receptor conductance by l- and d-methadone in rat locus coeruleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Aya; Williams, John T

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methadone activates opioid receptors to increase a potassium conductance mediated by G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying, potassium (KIR3) channels. Methadone also blocks KIR3 channels and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. However, the concentration dependence and stereospecificity of receptor activation and channel blockade by methadone on single neurons has not been characterized. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Intracellular and whole-cell recording were made from locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices and the activation of µ-opioid receptors and blockade of KIR3 and NMDA channels with l- and d-methadone was examined. KEY RESULTS The potency of l-methadone, measured by the amplitude of hyperpolarization was 16.5-fold higher than with d-methadone. A maximum hyperpolarization was caused by both enantiomers (∼30 mV); however, the maximum outward current measured with whole-cell voltage-clamp recording was smaller than the current induced by [Met]5enkephalin. The KIR3 conductance induced by activation of α2-adrenoceptors was decreased with high concentrations of l- and d-methadone (10–30 µM). In addition, methadone blocked the resting inward rectifying conductance (KIR). Both l- and d-methadone blocked the NMDA receptor-dependent current. The block of NMDA receptor-dependent current was voltage-dependent suggesting that methadone acted as a channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Methadone activated µ-opioid receptors at low concentrations in a stereospecific manner. KIR3 and NMDA receptor channel block was not stereospecific and required substantially higher concentrations. The separation in the concentration range suggests that the activation of µ-opioid receptors rather than the channel blocking properties mediate both the therapeutic and toxic actions of methadone. PMID:20659105

  14. Molecular identification of the first insect ecdysis triggering hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Annette; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    be activated by low concentrations of Drosophila ecdysis triggering hormones-1 and -2. Ecdysis (cuticle shedding) is an important behaviour, allowing growth and metamorphosis in insects and other arthropods. Our paper is the first report on the molecular identification of ecdysis triggering hormone receptors...... from insects....

  15. Mas receptor is involved in the estrogen-receptor induced nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Agua; Vallejo, Susana; Novella, Susana; Lázaro-Franco, Macarena; Mompeón, Ana; Bueno-Betí, Carlos; Walther, Thomas; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos; Peiró, Concepción; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    The Mas receptor is involved in the angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) vasodilatory actions by increasing nitric oxide production (NO). We have previously demonstrated an increased production of Ang-(1-7) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to estradiol (E2), suggesting a potential cross-talk between E2 and the Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis. Here, we explored whether the vasoactive response and NO-related signalling exerted by E2 are influenced by Mas. HUVEC were exposed to 10nM E2 for 24h in the presence or absence of the selective Mas receptor antagonist A779, and the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI182780 (ICI). E2 increased Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and protein expression, measured by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Furthermore, E2 increased Akt activity (determined by the levels of phospho-Ser(473)) and eNOS activity (by the enhanced phosphorylation of Ser(1177), the activated form), resulting in increased NO production, which was measured by the fluorescence probe DAF-2-FM. These signalling events were dependent on ER and Mas receptor activation, since they were abolished in the presence of ICI or A779. In ex-vivo functional experiments performed with a small-vessel myograph in isolated mesenteric vessels from wild-type mice pre-contracted with noradrenaline, the relaxant response to physiological concentrations of E2 was blocked by ICI and A779, to the same extent to that obtained in the vessels isolated from Mas-deficient. In conclusion, E2 induces NO production and vasodilation through mechanisms that require Mas receptor activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex and non-redundant signals from individual odor receptors that underlie chemotaxis behavior in Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeewanjot S. Grewal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The rules by which odor receptors encode odors and allow behavior are still largely unexplored. Although large data sets of electrophysiological responses of receptors to odors have been generated, few hypotheses have been tested with behavioral assays. We use a data set on odor responses of Drosophila larval odor receptors coupled with chemotaxis behavioral assays to examine rules of odor coding. Using mutants of odor receptors, we have found that odor receptors with similar electrophysiological responses to odors across concentrations play non-redundant roles in odor coding at specific odor concentrations. We have also found that high affinity receptors for odors determine behavioral response thresholds, but the rules for determining peak behavioral responses are more complex. While receptor mutants typically show loss of attraction to odors, some receptor mutants result in increased attraction at specific odor concentrations. The odor receptor mutants were rescued using transgenic expression of odor receptors, validating assignment of phenotypes to the alleles. Vapor pressures alone cannot fully explain behavior in our assay. Finally, some odors that did not elicit strong electrophysiological responses are associated with behavioral phenotypes upon examination of odor receptor mutants. This result is consistent with the role of sensory neurons in lateral inhibition via local interneurons in the antennal lobe. Taken together, our results suggest a complexity of odor coding rules even in a simple olfactory sensory system.

  17. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebabian, Paul

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  18. concentrate ratio and rumen ammonia concentration on in situ

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roffler, 1975; Roffler et al., 1976) for maximum microbial protein synthesis. Volatile fatty acid concentrations in rumen fluid were not affected by rumen ammonia concentration (P,> 0.05), but the concentration of propionic acid increased (P < 0.05) as dietary roughage was replac"d by concentrate, and acelate concentra-.

  19. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  20. Evolutionary analysis of functional divergence among chemokine receptors, decoy receptors and viral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi eDaiyasu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors (CKRs function in the inflammatory response and in vertebrate homeostasis. Decoy and viral receptors are two types of CKR homologues with modified functions from those of the typical CKRs. The decoy receptors are able to bind ligands without signaling. On the other hand, the viral receptors show constitutive signaling without ligands. We examined the sites related to the functional difference. At first, the decoy and viral receptors were each classified into five groups, based on the molecular phylogenetic analysis. A multiple amino acid sequence alignment between each group and the CKRs was then constructed. The difference in the amino acid composition between the group and the CKRs was evaluated as the Kullback-Leibler (KL information value at each alignment site. The KL information value is considered to reflect the difference in the functional constraints at the site. The sites with the top 5% of KL information values were selected and mapped on the structure of a CKR. The comparisons with decoy receptor groups revealed that the detected sites were biased on the intracellular side. In contrast, the sites detected from the comparisons with viral receptor groups were found on both the extracellular and intracellular sides. More sites were found in the ligand-binding pocket in the analyses of the viral receptor groups, as compared to the decoy receptor groups. Some of the detected sites were located in the GPCR motifs. For example, the DRY motif of the decoy receptors was often degraded, although the motif of the viral receptors was basically conserved. The observations for the viral receptor groups suggested that the constraints in the pocket region are loose and that the sites on the intracellular side are different from those for the decoy receptors, which may be related to the constitutive signaling activity of the viral receptors.

  1. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  2. Pattern recognition receptors: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Nadege; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2006-07-01

    The vertebrate immune system consists of two inter-related components, the innate and adaptive responses, which are required for the resolution of infection. The innate immune response is critical for the immediate protection from infection and for marshalling the B- and T-cell responses of the adaptive response. A key component of the innate immune response is germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors that detect pathogens. Several families of these pattern recognition receptors have now been described. Microbial recognition by these receptors triggers appropriate immune responses, including the direct uptake and killing of pathogens and/or initiation of intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in the activation of immune responsive transcriptional programs. Pattern recognition receptors include soluble receptors in serum (collectins), transmembrane receptors on cell surfaces or vacuolar membranes (C-type lectins and Toll-like receptors) or cytoplasmic sensors (NACHT-LRR proteins and RNA helicases). Roles for these pattern recognition receptor families are emerging in the susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and in acute and chronic conditions, such as sepsis, autoimmune disease and atherosclerosis. These findings suggest that the selective targeting of pattern recognition receptors and the pathways they trigger may be useful clinically. Progress towards therapeutics designed to target Toll-like receptor signaling is already well underway. This review will describe our current understanding of innate immune sensors and the mechanisms regulating their activity.

  3. Inhibitory effects of tramadol on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adrenal chromaffin cells and in Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Munehiro; Minami, Kouichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shigematsu, Akio; Shibuya, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Tramadol has been used clinically as an analgesic; however, the mechanism of its analgesic effects is still unknown.We used bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to investigate effects of tramadol on catecholamine secretion, nicotine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) increases and membrane current changes. We also investigated effects of tramadol on α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes.Tramadol concentration-dependently suppressed carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion to 60% and 27% of the control at the concentration of 10 and 100 μM, respectively, whereas it had little effect on veratridine- or high K+-induced catecholamine secretion.Tramadol also suppressed nicotine-induced ([Ca2+]i) increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Tramadol inhibited nicotine-induced inward currents, and the inhibition was unaffected by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone.Tramadol inhibited nicotinic currents carried by α7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.Tramadol inhibited both α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic currents in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.In conclusion, tramadol inhibits catecholamine secretion partly by inhibiting nicotinic AChR functions in a naloxone-insensitive manner and α7 receptors are one of those inhibited by tramadol. PMID:12010769

  4. Inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid receptors 1 and 3 attenuates atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kritikou, E.; Puijvelde, van G.H.M.; Heijden, van der T.; Santbrink, van P.J.; Swart, M.; Schaftenaar, F.H.; Kroner, M.J.; Kuiper, J.; Bot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural lysophospholipid present at high concentrations within lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques. Upon local accumulation in the damaged vessels, LPA can act as a potent activator for various types of immune cells through its specific membrane receptors LPA1/3. LPA

  5. Receptor mediated agglutination of human spermatozoa by spermagglutinating factor isolated from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Siftjit; Prabha, Vijay; Sarwal, Abha

    2010-12-01

    We examined spermagglutinating factor isolated from Staphylococcus aureus for evidence of receptor mediated agglutination of human spermatozoa. Binding to spermatozoa by spermagglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus with a high degree of specificity indicates receptor-ligand interaction. To examine this interaction we isolated and purified the ligand and the receptor. To assess receptor mediated agglutination of spermatozoa further we blocked spermagglutination induced by spermagglutinating factor in the presence of receptor. Spermagglutinating factor induced spermagglutination was competitively inhibited by adding purified receptor, indicating that sperm agglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus attaches to specific receptors on human spermatozoa. The spermagglutinating factor receptor was a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 57 kDa. Spermagglutinating factor induced spermagglutination and at higher concentrations had a spermicidal effect, which was inhibited by introducing the receptor. As observed on scanning electron microscopy studies, incubating spermatozoa with spermagglutinating factor showed profound morphological alterations. However, spermatozoa with normal morphology were noted when incubated with spermagglutinating factor in the presence of receptor, indicating that morphological alterations may account for spermatozoa agglutination by spermagglutinating factor. Results suggest that spermagglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus may bind specifically to sperm surface receptor sites before causing spermagglutination. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Concentrating Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Lee A.; Loomis, James; Bhatia, Bikram; Bierman, David M.; Wang, Evelyn N.; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-09

    Solar energy is a bountiful renewable energy resource: the energy in the sunlight that reaches Earth in an hour exceeds the energy consumed by all of humanity in a year.(1) While the phrase “solar energy conversion” probably brings photovoltaic (PV) cells to mind first, PV is not the only option for generating electricity from sunlight. Another promising technology for solar energy conversion is solar–thermal conversion, commonly referred to as concentrating solar power (CSP).(2) The first utility-scale CSP plants were constructed in the 1980s, but in the two decades that followed, CSP saw little expansion.(3, 4) More recent years, however, have seen a CSP renaissance due to unprecedented growth in the adoption of CSP.(3, 5) Photographs of two operating CSP plants, a parabolic trough collector plant and a central receiver (or “power tower”), are shown here.

  7. Concentrating Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehos, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has the potential to contribute significantly to the generation of electricity by renewable energy resources in the U.S.. Thermal storage can extend the duty cycle of CSP beyond daytime hours to early evening where the value of electricity is often the highest. The potential solar resource for the southwest U.S. is identified, along with the need to add power lines to bring the power to consumers. CSP plants in the U.S. and abroad are described. The CSP cost of electricity at the busbar is discussed. With current incentives, CSP is approaching competiveness with conventional gas-fired systems during peak-demand hours when the price of electricity is the highest. It is projected that a mature CSP industry of over 4 GWe will be able to reduce the energy cost by about 50%, and that U.S. capacity could be 120 GW by 2050.

  8. Stress concentration at notches

    CERN Document Server

    Savruk, Mykhaylo P

    2017-01-01

    This book compiles solutions of linear theory of elasticity problems for isotropic and anisotropic bodies with sharp and rounded notches. It contains an overview of established and recent achievements, and presents the authors’ original solutions in the field considered with extensive discussion. The volume demonstrates through numerous, useful examples the effectiveness of singular integral equations for obtaining exact solutions of boundary problems of the theory of elasticity for bodies with cracks and notches. Incorporating analytical and numerical solutions of the problems of stress concentrations in solid bodies with crack-like defects, this volume is ideal for scientists and PhD students dealing with the problems of theory of elasticity and fracture mechanics. Stands as a modern and extensive compendium of solutions to the problems of linear theory of elasticity of isotropic and anisotropic bodies with sharp and rounded notches; Adopts a highly reader-friendly layout of tables, charts, approximation ...

  9. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept.

  10. Molecular identification of a myosuppressin receptor from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöller, Susanne; Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    The insect myosuppressins (X1DVX2HX3FLRFamide) are neuropeptides that generally block insect muscle activities. We have used the genomic sequence information from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Genome Project to clone a G protein-coupled receptor that was closely related to the two...... previously cloned and characterized myosuppressin receptors from Drosophila [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 100 (2003) 9808]. The mosquito receptor cDNA was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and was found to be activated by low concentrations of Anopheles myosuppressin (TDVDHVFLRFamide; EC50, 1.6 x 10...... identification of a mosquito neuropeptide receptor....

  11. NCS-1 associates with adenosine A2A receptors and modulates receptor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma eNavarro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signalling by local changes in intracellular calcium concentration is an established function of Calmodulin which is known to interact with many GPCRs. Less is known about the functional role of the closely related neuronal EF-hand Ca2+-sensor proteins that frequently associate with calmodulin targets with different functional outcome. In the present study we aimed to investigate if a target of calmodulin – the A2A adenosine receptor, is able to associate with two other neuronal calcium binding proteins, namely NCS-1 and caldendrin. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments we show the existence of A2A - NCS-1 complexes in living cells whereas caldendrin did not associate with A2A receptors under the conditions tested. Interestingly, NCS-1 binding modulated downstream A2A receptor intracellular signalling in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Taken together this study provides further evidence that neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins play an important role in modulation of GPCR signalling.

  12. Selective localization of oxytocin receptors and vasopressin 1a receptors in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sara M; Smith, Aaron L; Goodman, Mark M; Bales, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    Intranasal oxytocin (OT) affects a suite of human social behaviors, including trust, eye contact, and emotion recognition. However, it is unclear where oxytocin receptors (OXTR) and the structurally related vasopressin 1a receptors (AVPR1a) are expressed in the human brain. We have previously described a reliable, pharmacologically informed receptor autoradiography protocol for visualizing these receptors in postmortem primate brain tissue. We used this technique in human brainstem tissue to identify the neural targets of OT and vasopressin. To determine binding selectivity of the OXTR radioligand and AVPR1a radioligand, sections were incubated in four conditions: radioligand alone, radioligand with the selective AVPR1a competitor SR49059, and radioligand with a low or high concentration of the selective OXTR competitor ALS-II-69. We found selective OXTR binding in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, a conserved region of OXTR expression in all primate species investigated to date. We found selective AVPR1a binding in the nucleus prepositus, an area implicated in eye gaze stabilization. The tissue's postmortem interval (PMI) was not correlated with either the specific or nonspecific binding of either radioligand, indicating that it will not likely be a factor in similar postmortem studies. This study provides critical data for future studies of OXTR and AVPR1a in human brain tissue.

  13. [GABAC receptors: structure and functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfilova, V N; Tiurenkov, I N

    2011-01-01

    Data on the structure, localization, physiology and pharmacology of GABA(C) receptors are reviewed. Thece receptors belong to cys-loop receptors and consist of rho1-3 subunits representing pentamers with five subunits that form a chloride channel. They are found in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. The pentamer can be homomeric, consisting of five similar protomers (e.g., p1), or heteromeric (pseudo-homomeric), consisting of rho1 and rho2 subunits. Chloride channel function also depends on the GABA(C) receptor subunit composition. The activation of GABAc receptors is accompanied by a change in the permeability of plasmatic membranes for C1 ions, which is followed by depolarization (presynaptic inhibition) or hyperpolarization (postsynaptic inhibition). There are a great number of the allosteric modulators, agonists and antagonists of GABA(C) receptors.

  14. Alcohol- and alcohol antagonist-sensitive human GABAA receptors: tracking δ subunit incorporation into functional receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2010-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn(2+) block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABA(A)Rs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs.

  15. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...... polyamine toxins antagonize the AMPA receptor ion channel and provide the basis for rational development of uncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors....

  16. Pharmacological assessment of adrenergic receptors in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V M; Rud, K S; Gloviczki, P

    2000-06-01

    Experiments were to characterize pharmacologically adrenergic receptors in human varicose veins to the natural transmitter norepinephrine and to an extract of Ruscus. Greater saphenous veins and varicose tributaries from patients undergoing elective surgery for primary varicose disease and portions of greater saphenous veins from patients undergoing peripheral arterial reconstruction (control) were suspended for the measurement of isometric force in organ chambers. Concentration response curves were obtained to norepinephrine or the extract of Ruscus aculeatus in the absence and presence of selective antagonists of alpha, and alpha2 adrenergic receptors. Norepinephrine and Ruscus extract caused concentration-dependent contractions in all veins. Contractions to norepinephrine were greater in control veins than in varicose tributaries. Contractions to the extract were greater in varicose tributaries than in greater saphenous veins from varicose patients. Contractions to norepinephrine were reduced similarly by alpha and alpha2-adrenergic agonists in control and varicose veins but to a greater extent by alpha2-blockade in greater saphenous veins from varicose patients. Contractions to Ruscus extract were not reduced by alpha-adrenergic blockade in control veins but were reduced by alpha2-adrenergic blockade in varicose veins. These results suggest a differential distribution of alpha adrenergic receptors on greater saphenous veins from non-varicose patients compared to those with primary varicose disease. Venotropic agents from plant extract probably exert effects by way of multiple receptor and non-receptor mediated events.

  17. DISC1 regulates primary cilia that display specific dopamine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Marley

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the DISC1 gene are strongly associated with major psychiatric syndromes such as schizophrenia. DISC1 encodes a cytoplasmic protein with many potential interaction partners, but its cellular functions remain poorly understood. We identified a role of DISC1 in the cell biology of primary cilia that display disease-relevant dopamine receptors.A GFP-tagged DISC1 construct expressed in NIH3T3 cells and rat striatal neurons localized near the base of primary cilia. RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous DISC1 resulted in a marked reduction in the number of cells expressing a primary cilium. FLAG-tagged versions of the cloned human D1, D2 and D5 dopamine receptors concentrated highly on the ciliary surface, and this reflects a specific targeting mechanism specific because D3 and D4 receptors localized to the plasma membrane but were not concentrated on cilia.These results identify a role of DISC1 in regulating the formation and/or maintenance of primary cilia, and establish subtype-specific targeting of dopamine receptors to the ciliary surface. Our findings provide new insight to receptor cell biology and suggest a relationship between DISC1 and neural dopamine signaling.

  18. Stabilization of the bioactivity of tumor necrosis factor by its soluble receptors

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) exist in cell-associated as well as soluble forms, both binding specifically to TNF. Since the soluble forms of TNF receptors (sTNF-Rs) can compete with the cell- associated TNF receptors for TNF, it was suggested that they function as inhibitors of TNF activity; at high concentrations, the sTNF-Rs indeed inhibit TNF effects. However, we report here that in the presence of low concentrations of the sTNF-Rs, effects of TNF whose induction depend on...

  19. Functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at the 5-HT3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, B; Wetzel, C H; Pestel, E; Zieglgänsberger, W; Holsboer, F; Rupprecht, R

    1996-08-23

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine is thought to exert its psychopharmacological actions through a variety of neurotransmitter receptors. It binds preferentially to D4 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, little is known on it's interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor. Using a cell line stably expressing the 5-HT3 receptor, whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis revealed functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at low nanomolar concentrations in view of a binding affinity in the upper nanomolar range. Because the concentration of clozapine required for an interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor can be achieved with therapeutical doses, functional antagonistic properties at this ligand-gated ion channel may contribute to its unique psychopharmacological profile.

  20. Roles of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in differentiation of mouse sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudwa, A E; Michopoulos, V; Gatewood, J D; Rissman, E F

    2006-01-01

    Sex differences in brain and behavior are ubiquitous in sexually reproducing species. Developmental differences in circulating concentrations of gonadal steroids underlie many sexual dimorphisms. During the late embryonic and early perinatal periods, the testes produce androgens, thus, male brains are exposed to testosterone, and in situ testosterone is aromatized to estradiol. In contrast, females are not exposed to high concentrations of testosterone or estradiol until puberty. In many species, neural sex differences and sexually dimorphic behaviors in adults are initiated primarily by estradiol exposure during early development. In brain, estradiol activates two independent processes: masculinization of neural circuits and networks that are essential for expression of male-typical adult behaviors, and defeminization, the loss of the ability to display adult female-typical behaviors. Here, data for the roles of each of the known estrogen receptors (estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta) in these two processes are reviewed. Based on work done primarily in knockout mouse models, separate roles for the two estrogen receptors are suggested. Estrogen receptor alpha is primarily involved in masculinization, while estrogen receptor beta has a major role in defeminization of sexual behaviors. In sum, estradiol can have selective effects on distinct behavioral processes via selective interactions with its two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta.

  1. Workplace Concentration of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik; García-Pérez, Mónica; Haltiwanger, John; McCue, Kristin; Sanders, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Casual observation suggests that in most U.S. urban labor markets, immigrants have more immigrant coworkers than native-born workers do. While seeming obvious, this excess tendency to work together has not been precisely measured, nor have its sources been quantified. Using matched employer–employee data from the U.S. Census Bureau Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) database on a set of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with substantial immigrant populations, we find that, on average, 37% of an immigrant’s coworkers are themselves immigrants; in contrast, only 14% of a native-born worker’s coworkers are immigrants. We decompose this difference into the probability of working with compatriots versus with immigrants from other source countries. Using human capital, employer, and location characteristics, we narrow the mechanisms that might explain immigrant concentration. We find that industry, language, and residential segregation collectively explain almost all the excess tendency to work with immigrants from other source countries, but they have limited power to explain work with compatriots. This large unexplained compatriot component suggests an important role for unmeasured country-specific factors, such as social networks. PMID:25425452

  2. Dimerization of nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Pierre; Bourguet, William

    2013-01-01

    Multicellular organisms require specific intercellular communication to properly organize the complex body plan during embryogenesis and maintain its properties and functions during the entire life. While growth factors, neurotransmitters, and peptide hormones bind to membrane receptors, thereby inducing the activity of intracellular kinase cascades or the JAK-STAT signaling pathways, other small signaling compounds such as steroid hormones, certain vitamins, and metabolic intermediates enter, or are generated, within the target cells and bind to members of a large family of nuclear receptors (NRs). NRs are ligand-inducible transcription factors that control a plethora of biological phenomena, thus orchestrating complex events like development, organ homeostasis, immune function, and reproduction. NR-NR interactions are of major importance in these regulatory processes, as NRs regulate their target genes by binding to cognate DNA response elements essentially as homo- or heterodimers. A number of structural and functional studies have provided significant insights as to how combinatorial NRs rely on protein-protein contacts that discriminate geometric features of their DNA response elements, thereby allowing both binding site diversity and physiological specificity. Here, we will review our current understanding of NR-NR interactions and provide protocols for a number of experimental approaches that are useful for their study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  4. CRF1 receptor-deficiency increases cocaine reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contarino, Angelo; Kitchener, Pierre; Vallée, Monique; Papaleo, Francesco; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    Stimulant drugs produce reward but also activate stress-responsive systems. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-responsive systems are activated by stimulant drugs. However, their role in stimulant drug-induced reward remains poorly understood. Herein, we report that CRF1 receptor-deficient (CRF1-/-), but not wild-type, mice show conditioned place preference (CPP) responses to a relatively low cocaine dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Conversely, wild-type, but not CRF1-/-, mice display CPP responses to a relatively high cocaine dose (20 mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that CRF1 receptor-deficiency alters the rewarding effects of cocaine. Acute pharmacological antagonism of the CRF1 receptor by antalarmin also eliminates cocaine reward. Nevertheless, CRF1-/- mice display higher stereotypy responses to cocaine than wild-type mice. Despite the very low plasma corticosterone concentration, CRF1-/- mice show higher nuclear glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels in the brain region of the hippocampus than wild-type mice. Full rescue of wild-type-like corticosterone and GR circadian rhythm and level in CRF1-/- mice by exogenous corticosterone does not affect CRF1 receptor-dependent cocaine reward but induces stereotypy responses to cocaine. These results indicate a critical role for the CRF1 receptor in cocaine reward, independently of the closely related HPA axis activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  6. Local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glykys, J; Dzhala, V; Egawa, K

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal intracellular chloride concentration [Cl(-)](i) is an important determinant of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated inhibition and cytoplasmic volume regulation. Equilibrative cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) move Cl(-) across the membrane, but accumulat...... anions determine the homeostatic set point for [Cl(-)], and hence, neuronal volume and the polarity of local GABA(A)R signaling....

  7. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Mireille; Lagarde, Stéphanie; Laflamme, Cynthia; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Marois, Louis; Naccache, Paul H.; Pouliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    We shed new light on the expression and function of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family, associated with inflammation and hyperalgesia, in human granulocytes. Resting cells expressed constitutive levels of PAR-2 and PAR-3 mRNA but not PAR-1 or PAR-4. Based on flow cytometry, stimulation with opsonized bacteria (Bop) specifically up-regulated cell surface expression of PAR-2 in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner, independent of transcription or de novo protein synthesis. Primary granules were identified as a source of preformed PAR-2 that can readily be mobilized at the surface on fusion with the plasma membrane. Cellular response to PAR-2 activation, measured as changes in intracellular calcium concentration, was enhanced in PAR-2 up-regulated cells. Increase of cell-surface PAR-2 and of cell responsiveness were dependent specifically on the engagement of immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding receptors. Together, our results reveal that mobilization of intracellular granules, in response to Ig-receptor activation, up-regulates PAR-2 surface expression and makes neutrophils more responsive to proteinase activity. This enhanced response to PAR-2 activation indicates that molecular communication between pain and inflammation may be more important than previously believed.—St-Onge, M., Lagarde, S., Laflamme, C., Rollet-Labelle, E., Marois, L., Naccache, P. H., Pouliot, M. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils. PMID:20154268

  8. Characterisation of recombinant serotonin 5-HT1A receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells: the agonist [3H]lisuride labels free receptor and receptor coupled to G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, H; Turner, J D; Strange, P G

    1995-11-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptors expressed stably in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells have been studied using radioligand binding with the radiolabelled agonist [3H]lisuride. Competition studies with a range of antagonists versus [3H]lisuride confirmed that all of the specific [3H]lisuride binding was to 5-HT1A receptors on the cells. Competition studies with the antagonist spiperone and several agonists gave data that fitted best to two-binding-site models. The affinities of these competing ligands at the two classes of sites were generally in agreement with their corresponding affinities determined in previous work with either 8-[3H]hydroxydipropylaminotetralin ([3H]8-OH-DPAT; labels receptor coupled to G protein) or [3H]spiperone (labels free receptor). Saturation analyses with [3H]lisuride showed that this radioligand labels a single class of binding sites, but the level of radioligand binding was approximately twice that seen when either [3H]8-OH-DPAT or [3H]spiperone was used. [3H]Lisuride binding was partially inhibited by addition of guanine nucleotides, and the extent of inhibition decreased as the [3H]lisuride concentration was increased. This inhibition was due to the effect of guanine nucleotide to decrease slightly the affinity of [3H]lisuride for binding to the 5-HT1A receptors on the cells. It is concluded that [3H]lisuride can label both the free receptor and the receptor coupled to G proteins but with slightly different affinities and that these two states of the receptor exist in roughly equal amounts in the cells. Agonists generally have a higher affinity for the receptor coupled to G protein, whereas antagonists, with the exception of spiperone (which has a higher affinity for the free receptor), have roughly equal affinities for the free receptor and the receptor coupled to G proteins.

  9. The innovative concept of three-dimensional hybrid receptor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić, A.; Stanišić Stojić, S.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the current understanding of air pollution transport processes at regional and long-range scale. For this purpose, three-dimensional (3D) potential source contribution function and concentration weighted trajectory models, as well as new hybrid receptor model, concentration weighted boundary layer (CWBL), which uses a two-dimensional grid and a planetary boundary layer height as a frame of reference, are presented. The refined approach to hybrid receptor modeling has two advantages. At first, it considers whether each trajectory endpoint meets the inclusion criteria based on planetary boundary layer height, which is expected to provide a more realistic representation of the spatial distribution of emission sources and pollutant transport pathways. Secondly, it includes pollutant time series preprocessing to make hybrid receptor models more applicable for suburban and urban locations. The 3D hybrid receptor models presented herein are designed to identify altitude distribution of potential sources, whereas CWBL can be used for analyzing the vertical distribution of pollutant concentrations along the transport pathway.

  10. Concentration fluctuations and averaging time in vapor clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, David J

    2010-01-01

    This book contributes to more reliable and realistic predictions by focusing on sampling times from a few seconds to a few hours. Its objectives include developing clear definitions of statistical terms, such as plume sampling time, concentration averaging time, receptor exposure time, and other terms often confused with each other or incorrectly specified in hazard assessments; identifying and quantifying situations for which there is no adequate knowledge to predict concentration fluctuations in the near-field, close to sources, and far downwind where dispersion is dominated by atmospheric t

  11. LRP4 serves as a co-receptor of agrin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bin; Luo, Shiwen; Wang, Qiang; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Formation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) requires agrin, a factor released from motoneurons, and MuSK, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that is activated by agrin. However, how signal is transduced from agrin to MuSK remains unclear. Here we report that low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 4 (LRP4) functions as a co-receptor of agrin. LRP4 is specifically expressed in myotubes and is concentrated at the NMJ. The extracellular domain of LRP4 interacts with neuronal...

  12. Influence of phasic and tonic dopamine release on receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kristoffer Kisbye; Herrik, Kjartan F; Berg, Rune W

    2010-01-01

    Tonic and phasic dopamine release is implicated in learning, motivation, and motor functions. However, the relationship between spike patterns in dopaminergic neurons, the extracellular concentration of dopamine, and activation of dopamine receptors remains unresolved. In the present study, we...... develop a computational model of dopamine signaling that give insight into the relationship between the dynamics of release and occupancy of D(1) and D(2) receptors. The model is derived from first principles using experimental data. It has no free parameters and offers unbiased estimation...

  13. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive...

  14. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  15. Step tracking program for concentrator solar collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, D.; Jaliu, C.

    2016-08-01

    The increasing living standards in developed countries lead to increased energy consumption. The fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas effect that accompany the energy production can be reduced by using renewable energy. For instance, the solar thermal systems can be used in temperate climates to provide heating during the transient period or cooling during the warmer months. Most used solar thermal systems contain flat plate solar collectors. In order to provide the necessary energy for the house cooling system, the cooling machine uses a working fluid with a high temperature, which can be supplied by dish concentrator collectors. These collectors are continuously rotated towards sun by biaxial tracking systems, process that increases the consumed power. An algorithm for a step tracking program to be used in the orientation of parabolic dish concentrator collectors is proposed in the paper to reduce the consumed power due to actuation. The algorithm is exemplified on a case study: a dish concentrator collector to be implemented in Brasov, Romania, a location with the turbidity factor TR equal to 3. The size of the system is imposed by the environment, the diameter of the dish reflector being of 3 meters. By applying the proposed algorithm, 60 sub-programs are obtained for the step orientation of the parabolic dish collector over the year. Based on the results of the numerical simulations for the step orientation, the efficiency of the direct solar radiation capture on the receptor is up to 99%, while the energy consumption is reduced by almost 80% compared to the continuous actuation of the concentrator solar collector.

  16. Antagonism of recombinant and native GluK3-containing kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Pinheiro, Paulo S; Jane, David E; Mulle, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    A number of kainate receptor antagonists have shown selectivity for receptors containing the GluK1 subunit. Here, we analyze the effects of these GluK1 antagonists on currents mediated by recombinant homomeric GluK3 and heteromeric GluK2/3 receptors expressed in HEK 293 cells and activated by fast application of glutamate. We show that, amongst these compounds, UBP302, UBP310 and UBP316 effectively block recombinant homomeric GluK3 receptors. However, these antagonists are ineffective in blocking homomeric GluK2 or heteromeric GluK2/3 receptors. In addition, these antagonists do not affect presynaptic kainate receptors at mouse hippocampal mossy fibre synapses, which are thought to be composed of GluK2 and GluK3 subunits. Moreover, the AMPA receptor-selective non-competitive antagonist GYKI 53655 blocks, at high concentrations, GluK3-containing receptors and decreases short-term plasticity at mossy fibre synapses. These results expand the range of targets of kainate receptor antagonists and provide pharmacological tools to study the elusive mechanisms of neurotransmitter control by presynaptic kainate receptors.

  17. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G. Eric

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. PMID:25814663

  18. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-05-08

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Substance P Receptor Binding Sites are Expressed by Glia in vivo after Neuronal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyh, Patrick W.; Johnson, Donald J.; Boehmer, Christian G.; Catton, Mark D.; Vinters, Harry V.; Maggio, John E.; Too, Heng-Phon; Vigna, Steven R.

    1989-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system.

  20. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-05

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New horizons for lipoprotein receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav M.; Dagil, Robert; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor (LR) family constitutes a large group of structurally closely related receptors with broad ligand-binding specificity. Traditionally, ligand binding to LRs has been anticipated to involve merely the complement type repeat (CR)-domains omnipresent in the family. Recently...

  2. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  3. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  4. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  5. Membrane distillation for milk concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moejes, S.N.; Romero Guzman, Maria; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Barrera, K.H.; Feenstra, L.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an emerging technology to concentrate liquid products while producing high quality water as permeate. Application for desalination has been studied extensively the past years, but membrane distillation has also potential to produce concentrated food products like

  6. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  7. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptors...

  8. Variable aromatase inhibitor plasma concentrations do not correlate with circulating estrogen concentrations in post-menopausal breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Daniel L; Speth, Kelly A; Kidwell, Kelley M; Gersch, Christina L; Desta, Zeruesenay; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Stearns, Vered; Skaar, Todd C; Hayes, Daniel F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M

    2017-10-01

    The aromatase inhibitors (AI) exemestane (EXE), letrozole (LET), and anastrozole suppress estrogen biosynthesis, and are effective treatments for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Prior work suggests that anastrozole blood concentrations are associated with the magnitude of estrogen suppression. The objective of this study was to determine whether the magnitude of estrogen suppression, as determined by plasma estradiol (E2) concentrations, in EXE or LET treated patients is associated with plasma AI concentrations. Five hundred post-menopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer were enrolled in the prospective Exemestane and Letrozole Pharmacogenetic (ELPh) Study conducted by the COnsortium on BReast cancer phArmacogomics (COBRA) and randomly assigned to either drug. Estrogen concentrations were measured at baseline and after 3 months of AI treatment and drug concentrations were measured after 1 or 3 months. EXE or LET concentrations were compared with 3-month E2 concentration or the change from baseline to 3 months using several complementary statistical procedures. Four-hundred patients with on-treatment E2 and AI concentrations were evaluable (EXE n = 200, LET n = 200). Thirty (7.6%) patients (EXE n = 13, LET n = 17) had 3-month E2 concentrations above the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) (median: 4.75; range: 1.42-63.8 pg/mL). EXE and LET concentrations were not associated with on-treatment E2 concentrations or changes in E2 concentrations from baseline (all p > 0.05). Steady-state plasma AI concentrations do not explain variability in E2 suppression in post-menopausal women receiving EXE or LET therapy, in contrast with prior evidence in anastrozole treated patients.

  9. The Relationship of Brimonidine Concentration in Vitreous Body to the Free Concentration in Retina/Choroid Following Topical Administration in Pigmented Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinno, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Kazuya; Kozai, Seiko; Kawamura, Akio; Inada, Katsuhiro; Tokushige, Hideki

    2017-05-01

    Several studies showed that repeated topical administration of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution reached the human vitreous concentration above 2 nM, which is the concentration necessary to activate the α2-adrenergic receptor. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship of the brimonidine concentration in the vitreous body to the free concentration in the retina/choroid which is the target site of brimonidine on neuroprotective effect after topical administration. Brimonidine concentrations in the eye tissues of pigmented rabbits were determined following single ocular administration of 0.1% brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution at pH 7.3. Binding affinity of brimonidine to melanin and melanin content in the retina/choroid of pigmented rabbits was also examined. The concentration of free brimonidine which did not bind to melanin in the retina/choroid was calculated using the binding parameters to melanin. Topically applied brimonidine rapidly distributed to intraocular tissues. The elimination rate from melanin-containing tissues such as the iris/ciliary body and retina/choroid was slower than the aqueous humor and vitreous body in pigmented rabbits. In both the anterior and posterior retina/choroid, the free brimonidine concentrations were over 100-fold lower than the total concentrations. The concentrations in the vitreous body closely matched to the free concentrations in the posterior retina/choroid. Simulated free concentrations in the posterior retina/choroid were gradually increased when 0.1% solution was instilled twice daily. The present data indicated that the brimonidine concentration in the vitreous body was comparable to the free concentration in the posterior retina/choroid. This suggests that the vitreous concentration can be a surrogate indicator of the free brimonidine concentration in the posterior retina/choroid. From the present findings, it is expected that multiple instillation of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic

  10. Heterotypic interactions between transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, TM; Blackwell, AD; Giannetti, AM; Bjorkman, PJ; Enns, CA

    2003-01-01

    Cellular iron uptake in most tissues occurs via endocytosis of diferric transferrin (Tf) bound to the transferrin receptor (TfR). Recently, a second transferrin receptor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2), has been identified and shown to play a critical role in iron metabolism. TfR2 is capable of Tf-mediated iron uptake and mutations in this gene result in a rare form of hereditary hemochromatosis unrelated to the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE. Unlike TfR, TfR2 expression is not contro...

  11. Microfluidic Techniques for Analytes Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunlu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics has been undergoing fast development in the past two decades due to its promising applications in biotechnology, medicine, and chemistry. Towards these applications, enhancing concentration sensitivity and detection resolution are indispensable to meet the detection limits because of the dilute sample concentrations, ultra-small sample volumes and short detection lengths in microfluidic devices. A variety of microfluidic techniques for concentrating analytes have been developed. This article presents an overview of analyte concentration techniques in microfluidics. We focus on discussing the physical mechanism of each concentration technique with its representative advancements and applications. Finally, the article is concluded by highlighting and discussing advantages and disadvantages of the reviewed techniques.

  12. High-efficiency solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, F. L.; Dorman, J.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of solar concentrator is presented using liquid lenses and simple translational tracking mechanism. The concentrator achieves a 100:1 nominal concentration ratio and is compared in performance with a flat-plate collector having two sheets of glazing and non-selective coating. The results of the thermal analysis show that higher temperatures can be obtained with the concentrator than is possible with the non-concentrator flat-plate type. Furthermore, the thermal efficiency far exceeds that of the comparative flat-plate type for all operating conditions.

  13. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  14. Ionotropic ATP receptors in neuronal-glial communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Pankratov, Yuri

    2011-04-01

    In the central nervous system ATP is released from both neurones and astroglial cells acting as a homo- and heterocellular neurotransmitter. Glial cells express numerous purinoceptors of both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) varieties. Astroglial P2X receptors can be activated by ongoing synaptic transmission and can mediate fast local signalling through elevation in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and Na(+) concentrations. These ionic signals can be translated into various physiological messages by numerous pathways, including release of gliotransmitters, metabolic support of neurones and regulation of activity of postsynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors. Ionotropic purinoceptors represent a novel pathway of glia-driven modulation of synaptic signalling that involves the release of ATP from neurones and astrocytes followed by activation of P2X receptors which can regulate synaptic activity by variety of mechanisms expressed in both neuronal and glial compartments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin induces upregulation of vascular AT1 receptor gene expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickenig, G; Röling, J; Strehlow, K; Schnabel, P; Böhm, M

    1998-12-01

    An interaction of insulin with angiotensin II effects could be pathophysiologically important for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. We examined the effect of insulin on AT1 receptor gene expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). A 24-hour incubation with insulin (100 nmol/L) produced a 2-fold increase in AT1 receptor density on VSMCs, as assessed by radioligand binding assays. This enhanced AT1 receptor expression was caused by a time- and concentration-dependent upregulation of the AT1 receptor mRNA levels, as assessed by Northern analysis. The maximal effect was detected after a 24-hour incubation of cells with 100 nmol/L insulin (270+/-20%). AT1 receptor upregulation was caused by a stabilization of the AT1 receptor mRNA, because the AT1 receptor mRNA half-life was prolonged from 5 hours under basal conditions to 10 hours after insulin stimulation. In contrast, insulin had no influence on AT1 receptor gene transcription, as assessed by nuclear run-on assays. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was followed by an increased functional response, because angiotensin II evoked a significantly elevated intracellular release of calcium in cells that were preincubated with 100 nmol/L insulin for 24 hours. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was dependent on tyrosine kinases, as assessed by experiments with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Furthermore, experiments using the intracellular calcium chelator bis(2-amino-5-methylphenoxy)ethane-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester suggest that intracellular calcium release may be involved in AT1 receptor regulation. Insulin-induced upregulation of the AT1 receptor by posttranscriptional mechanisms may explain the association of hyperinsulinemia with hypertension and arteriosclerosis, because activation of the AT1 receptor plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis.

  16. Synthesis and Pharmacological Characterization of a Novel Sigma Receptor Ligand with Improved Metabolic Stability and Antagonistic Effects Against Methamphetamine

    OpenAIRE

    Seminerio, Michael J.; Robson, Matthew J.; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Jamalapuram, Seshulatha; Avery, Bonnie A.; Christopher R. McCurdy; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine interacts with sigma receptors at physiologically relevant concentrations suggesting a potential site for pharmacologic intervention. In the present study, a previous sigma receptor ligand, CM156, was optimized for metabolic stability, and the lead analog was evaluated against the behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Radioligand binding studies demonstrated that the lead analog, AZ66, displayed high nanomolar affinity for both sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors (2.4 ± 0.63 and 0....

  17. Stargazin Modulation of AMPA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana A. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast excitatory synaptic signaling in the mammalian brain is mediated by AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In neurons, AMPA receptors co-assemble with auxiliary proteins, such as stargazin, which can markedly alter receptor trafficking and gating. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to map distances between the full-length, functional AMPA receptor and stargazin expressed in HEK293 cells and to determine the ensemble structural changes in the receptor due to stargazin. In addition, we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the structural and conformational distribution of the receptor and how this distribution is affected by stargazin. Our nanopositioning data place stargazin below the AMPA receptor ligand-binding domain, where it is well poised to act as a scaffold to facilitate the long-range conformational selection observations seen in single-molecule experiments. These data support a model of stargazin acting to stabilize or select conformational states that favor activation.

  18. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. (/sup 3/H)-(Thr4,Gly7)OT: a highly selective ligand for central and peripheral OT receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elands, J.; Barberis, C.; Jard, S.

    1988-01-01

    Oxytocin receptors in rat hippocampal synaptic plasma membranes were compared with mammary gland and uterine oxytocin receptors. For this purpose, a highly specific oxytocic agonist (Thr4,Gly7)oxytocin was tritiated. We demonstrated that this ligand labels oxytocin receptors selectively. Scatchard analyses revealed a high affinity for all the oxytocin receptors investigated, with equilibrium dissociation constants between 1.0 and 2.0 nM. Binding appeared to take place at a single population of receptor sites. Competition experiments confirmed the high affinity of arginine vasopressin for hippocampal oxytocin receptors but also revealed that mammary gland and uterine oxytocin receptors do not discriminate more efficiently between oxytocin and arginine vasopressin. This lack in specificity is not affected by applying different concentrations of Mg ions.

  20. Nuclear receptors outside the nucleus: extranuclear signalling by steroid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ellis R.; Hammes, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors mediate numerous crucial biological processes and are classically thought to function as transcriptional regulators in the nucleus. However, it has been known for more than 50 years that steroids evoke rapid responses in many organs that cannot be explained by gene regulation. Mounting evidence indicates that most steroid receptors in fact exist in extranuclear cellular pools, including at the plasma membrane. This latter pool, when engaged by a steroid ligand, rapidly activates signals that affect various aspects of cellular biology. Research into the mechanisms of signalling instigated by extranuclear steroid receptor pools and how this extranuclear signalling is integrated with responses elicited by nuclear receptor pools provides novel understanding of steroid hormone signalling and its roles in health and disease. PMID:27729652

  1. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations available for cannabinoid receptors.

  2. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nirupa; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-09-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine-5'-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein-coupled receptors, mGluR4 and mGluR1, and the taste bud-expressed heterodimer T1R1+T1R3. Each of these receptors is expressed in small numbers of cells in anterior and posterior taste buds. The mGluRs are activated by glutamate and certain analogs but are not reported to be sensitive to nucleotides. In contrast, T1R1+T1R3 is activated by a broad range of amino acids and displays a strongly potentiated response in the presence of nucleotides. Mice in which the Grm4 gene is knocked out show a greatly enhanced preference for umami tastants. Loss of the Tas1r1 or Tas1R3 genes is reported to depress but not eliminate neural and behavioral responses to umami. When intact mammalian taste buds are apically stimulated with umami tastants, their functional responses to umami tastants do not fully resemble the responses of a single proposed umami receptor. Furthermore, the responses to umami tastants persist in the taste cells of T1R3-knockout mice. Thus, umami taste detection may involve multiple receptors expressed in different subsets of taste cells. This receptor diversity may underlie the complex perception of umami, with different mixtures of amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides yielding subtly distinct taste qualities.

  3. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine-5′-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein–coupled receptors, mGluR4 and mGluR1, and the taste bud–expressed heterodimer T1R1+T1R3. Each of these receptors is expressed in small numbers of cells in anterior and posterior taste buds. The mGluRs are activated by glutamate and certain analogs but are not reported to be sensitive to nucleotides. In contrast, T1R1+T1R3 is activated by a broad range of amino acids and displays a strongly potentiated response in the presence of nucleotides. Mice in which the Grm4 gene is knocked out show a greatly enhanced preference for umami tastants. Loss of the Tas1r1 or Tas1R3 genes is reported to depress but not eliminate neural and behavioral responses to umami. When intact mammalian taste buds are apically stimulated with umami tastants, their functional responses to umami tastants do not fully resemble the responses of a single proposed umami receptor. Furthermore, the responses to umami tastants persist in the taste cells of T1R3-knockout mice. Thus, umami taste detection may involve multiple receptors expressed in different subsets of taste cells. This receptor diversity may underlie the complex perception of umami, with different mixtures of amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides yielding subtly distinct taste qualities. PMID:19571230

  4. Affinity of Iresine herbstii and Brugmansia arborea extracts on different cerebral receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Cristina; Cavallo, Federica; Bruni, Giancarlo; Capasso, Anna; De Feo, Vincenzo; De Martino, Laura; Giorgi, Giorgio; Micheli, Lucia

    2006-05-24

    Iresine herbstii Hook. (Amaranthaceae) and Brugmansia arborea (L.) Lagerheim (Solanaceae) are used in the northern Peruvian Andes for magic-therapeutical purposes. The traditional healers use Iresine herbstii with the ritual aim to expel bad spirits from the body. Furthermore, Iresine herbstii was used in association with other plants, such as Trichocereus pachanoi Britt. et Rose, for divination, to diagnose diseases, and to take possession of another identity. Also, species of Brugmansia have been reported to be used during ritual practices for magical and curative purposes. Given the above evidence, the aim of the present study is to evaluate if the central effects of Iresine herbstii and Brugmansia arborea could be associated with interaction with SNC receptors. Two Iresine herbstii extracts (methanolic and aqueous) and one Brugmansia arborea aqueous extract were tested for in vitro affinity on 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C), D1, D2, alpha(1), and alpha(2) receptors by radioligand binding assays. The biological materials for binding assay (cerebral cortex) were taken from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The extracts affinity for receptors is definite as inhibition percentage of radioligand/receptor binding and measured as the radioactivity of remaining complex radioligand/receptor. The data obtained for Iresine extracts have shown a low affinity for the 5-HT(1A) receptor and no affinity for 5-HT(2A) receptor. Otherwise the methanolic extract showed affinity for 5-HT(2C) receptor (IC(50): 34.78 microg/ml) and for D1 receptor (IC(50): 19.63 microg/ml), instead the Iresine aqueous extract displayed a lower affinity for D1 (48.3% at the maximum concentration tested) and a higher value of affinity for D2 receptors (IC(50): 32.08 microg/ml). The Brugmansia aqueous extract displayed affinity for D1 receptors (IC(50): 17.68 microg/ml), D2 receptors (IC(50): 15.95 microg/ml) and weak affinity for the serotoninergic receptors. None of the three extracts showed relevant affinity

  5. Modulating activity of M1 receptor to the reaction of ileal smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Glaza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:The subject of the study was determination of the effect of drugs on ileal smooth muscle contraction induced by activation of M1 type muscarinic receptors. Drugs that have an effect on muscarinic receptors are divided to agonists, with close ties to the receptor and high internal activity and antagonists, with no internal activity. Conducted experiments tested interactions between a broad-spectrum agonist of muscarinic receptors, carbachol and a selective muscarinic receptor antagonist of M1 type, pirenzepine.Material/Methods:Testing was conducted on tissues isolated from rat’s intestine. Male Wistar rats with weight between 220 g and 360 g were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of urethane (120 mg/kg. Concentration-effect curves were determined with the use of cumulated concentration method, in accordance with the van Rossum method (1963 in Kenakin modification (2006.Results:The purpose of the study was determination of concentration-effect curves for carbachol. This curve was compared with the curve of receptor occupation depending on concentration of this drug. Based on concentration-effect curves, the average value of EC50 was calculated for carbachol, amounting to 2.44×10–6 [M/l].Conclusions:The results confirmed that atropine is effective in stopping contractions caused by carbachol, meeting the conditions of competitive antagonists. Atropine caused the shift of curves for carbachol to the right. Pirenzepine, selectively blocking muscarinic receptors of M1 type gave similar results. It was proved that in the preparation of gastric fundus smooth muscle, M1 type receptors occur not only presynaptically, but also postsynaptically.

  6. Role of M1 receptor in regulation of gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gajdus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:The subject of this study is determination of the influence of drugs on gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction induced by activation of muscarinic receptors M1. Experiments tested interactions between a receptor agonist, carbachol and muscarinic receptor antagonists, atropine and pirenzepine.Material/Methods:Testing was conducted on tissues isolated from rat’s stomach. Male Wistar rats with weight between 220 g and 360 g were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of urethane (120 mg/kg. The stomach was dissected, and later the gastric fundus was isolated. Tissue was placed in a dish for insulated organs with 20 ml in capacity, filled with Krebs fluid. Results contained in the study are average values ± SE. In order to determine statistical significance, the principles of receptor theory were used (Kenakin modification.Results:According to tests, carbachol, in concentrations ranging between 10–8 M to 10–4 M, in a dosage-dependent way induces gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction. Presented results indicate that carbachol meets the conditions posed to full agonists. On the other hand, atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, causes a concentration-dependent shift of concentration-effect curve (for carbachol to the right, maintaining maximum reaction. According to analysis of the curve determined, we can deduce that atropine meets the conditions posed to competitive antagonists. The use of pirenzepine, a competitive receptor agonist M1, causes shift of concentration-effect curve (for carbachol to the right, maintaining maximum reaction.Conclusions:From the testing conducted on the preparation of the gastric fundus we can deduce that atropine causes shift of concentration-effect curves for carbachol to the right. A similar effect is released by pirenzepine, selectively blocking muscarinic receptors of M1 type. The results indicate that in the preparation of the gastric fundus smooth muscle, M1 type

  7. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Steroid receptors in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, T; Sato, B; Matsumoto, K; Ono, K

    1980-05-01

    Using the whole-cell incubation system at 37 degrees C, the specific bindings for 3H-dexamethasone, 3H-estradiol-17 beta, 3H-dihydrotestosterone and 3H-R5020 were measured in the purified, putative osteoblasts isolated from fetal rat calvaria by collagenase digestion. More than 90% of the purified cells contained intense alkaline phosphatase activity. The specific binding for 3H-dexamethasone with high affinity and low capacity was demonstrated in the isolated osteoblasts. Most of the binding was found in the nuclear fraction, indicating nucler binding of the 3H-dexamethasone-receptor complex. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for 3H-dexamethasone was estimated to be 3.3 x 10(-9)M and the number of binding sites was calculated to be 65 fmol/ml (4 x 10(6) cells) or 9,750 binding sites per cell. High salt: sucrose gradient analysis of nuclear extracts revealed a radioactive 4.0 S peak. These results indicate that the purified osteoblasts are among the target cells for glucocorticoids. On the other hand, the specific bindings for 3H-estradiol-17 beta and 3H-dihydrotestosterone were not detectable in the isolated osteoblasts, which suggests that estrogens and androgens act on osteoblasts only indirectly.

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor regulation of adult forebrain neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Batt, Myra K; Cronier, Brigitte A; Jackson, Michele C; Bruno Garza, Jennifer L; Trinh, Dennis S; Mason, Carter O; Spearry, Rachel P; Bhattacharya, Shayon; Robitz, Rachel; Nakafuku, Masato; MacLennan, A John

    2013-01-16

    Appropriately targeted manipulation of endogenous neural stem progenitor (NSP) cells may contribute to therapies for trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. A prerequisite to such therapies is a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult NSP cells in vivo. Indirect data suggest that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling may inhibit neuronal differentiation of NSP cells. We challenged subventricular zone (SVZ) cells in vivo with low concentrations of CNTF to anatomically characterize cells containing functional CNTF receptors. We found that type B "stem" cells are highly responsive, whereas type C "transit-amplifying" cells and type A neuroblasts are remarkably unresponsive, as are GFAP(+) astrocytes found outside the SVZ. CNTF was identified in a subset of type B cells that label with acute BrdU administration. Disruption of in vivo CNTF receptor signaling in SVZ NSP cells, with a "floxed" CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) mouse line and a gene construct driving Cre recombinase (Cre) expression in NSP cells, led to increases in SVZ-associated neuroblasts and new olfactory bulb neurons, as well as a neuron subtype-specific, adult-onset increase in olfactory bulb neuron populations. Adult-onset receptor disruption in SVZ NSP cells with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV-Cre) also led to increased neurogenesis. However, the maintenance of type B cell populations was apparently unaffected by the receptor disruption. Together, the data suggest that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling in type B stem cells inhibits adult neurogenesis, and further suggest that the regulation may occur in a neuron subtype-specific manner.

  10. Wellcome Prize Lecture. Cell surface, ion-sensing receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Daniela

    2002-07-01

    Changes in extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) concentration ([Ca2+]o) affect kidney function both under basal and hormone-stimulated conditions. The molecular identification of an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) has confirmed a direct role of Ca(2+)o on parathyroid and kidney function (i.e. independent of calciotropic hormones) as a modulator of Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, evidence accumulated over the last 10 years has shown that CaR is also expressed in regions outside the calcium homeostatic system where its role is largely undefined but seems to be linked to regulation of local ionic homeostasis. The parathyroid and kidney CaRs are 1081 and 1079 amino acids long, respectively, and belong to the type III family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which includes other CaRs, metabotropic glutamate receptors and putative vomeronasal organ receptors. For the CaR, its low (millimolar) affinity for Ca2+, its positive cooperativity and its large ion-sensing extracellular domain, indicate that the receptor is more sensitive to changes in net cationic charge rather than to a specific ligand. Mg2+, trivalent cations of the lanthanide series and polyvalent cations such as spermine and aminoglycoside antibiotics can all activate the receptor in vitro with EC50 values in the micromolar range for trivalent and polyvalent cations or in the millimolar range for Ca2+ and Mg2+. In addition to true CaR agonists, CaR sensitivity to Ca(2+)o is also susceptible to allosteric modulation by ionic strength, L-amino acids and by pharmacological agents. This review will address endogenous and exogenous CaR agonists, the role of the receptor in the calcium homeostatic system and some speculation on possible role(s) of the CaR in regions not involved in mineral ion homeostasis.

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junction: GABA receptors and ivermectin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermina Hernando

    Full Text Available The prevalence of human and animal helminth infections remains staggeringly high, thus urging the need for concerted efforts towards this area of research. GABA receptors, encoded by the unc-49 gene, mediate body muscle inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes and are targets of anthelmintic drugs. Thus, the characterization of nematode GABA receptors provides a foundation for rational anti-parasitic drug design. We therefore explored UNC-49 channels from C. elegans muscle cultured cells of the first larval stage at the electrophysiological and behavioral levels. Whole-cell recordings reveal that GABA, muscimol and the anthelmintic piperazine elicit macroscopic currents from UNC-49 receptors that decay in their sustained presence, indicating full desensitization. Single-channel recordings show that all drugs elicit openings of ∼2.5 pA (+100 mV, which appear either as brief isolated events or in short bursts. The comparison of the lowest concentration required for detectable channel opening, the frequency of openings and the amplitude of macroscopic currents suggest that piperazine is the least efficacious of the three drugs. Macroscopic and single-channel GABA-activated currents are profoundly and apparently irreversibly inhibited by ivermectin. To gain further insight into ivermectin action at C. elegans muscle, we analyzed its effect on single-channel activity of the levamisol-sensitive nicotinic receptor (L-AChR, the excitatory receptor involved in neuromuscular transmission. Ivermectin produces a profound inhibition of the frequency of channel opening without significant changes in channel properties. By revealing that ivermectin inhibits C. elegans muscle GABA and L-AChR receptors, our study adds two receptors to the already known ivermectin targets, thus contributing to the elucidation of its pleiotropic effects. Behavioral assays in worms show that ivermectin potentiates piperazine-induced paralysis, thus suggesting

  12. TRA-418, a novel compound having both thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonistic and prostaglandin I(2) receptor agonistic activities: its antiplatelet effects in human and animal platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N; Miyamoto, M; Isogaya, M; Suzuki, M; Ikezawa, S; Ohno, M; Otake, A; Umemura, K

    2003-08-01

    TRA-418 is a novel compound that has been found in our screening for compounds having both thromboxane A2 (TP) receptor antagonistic and prostaglandin I2 (IP) receptor agonistic activities. In the binding assays, TRA-418 showed a 10-fold higher affinity to TP-receptors than IP-receptors. TRA-418 inhibited platelet aggregation induced by the TP-receptor agonist, U-46619 and by arachidonic acid at concentrations lower than those required for inhibition of ADP-induced aggregations. Furthermore, TRA-418 inhibited not only platelet aggregation induced by ADP alone, but also that induced by ADP in the presence of the TP-receptor antagonist, SQ-29548. When the IC50 values of TRA-418 for platelet aggregation were estimated in platelet preparations from monkeys, dogs, cats, and rats using ADP and arachidonic acid as the platelet stimulating agents, it was found that the values estimated in monkey platelets were quite similar to those estimated in human platelets. In ex vivo platelet aggregation in monkeys, TRA-418 exhibited significant inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced aggregation in platelet preparations from monkeys treated at 3 micro g kg min-1 or higher doses, where neither a significant decrease in blood pressure nor a significant increase in heart rate was observed. These results are consistent with the fact that TRA-418 has a relatively potent TP-receptor antagonistic activity together with a relatively weak IP-receptor agonistic activity.

  13. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  14. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Kallenberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  15. Mu Opioids and Their Receptors: Evolution of a Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are among the oldest medications available to manage a number of medical problems. Although pain is the current focus, early use initially focused upon the treatment of dysentery. Opium contains high concentrations of both morphine and codeine, along with thebaine, which is used in the synthesis of a number of semisynthetic opioid analgesics. Thus, it is not surprising that new agents were initially based upon the morphine scaffold. The concept of multiple opioid receptors was first suggested almost 50 years ago (Martin, 1967), opening the possibility of new classes of drugs, but the morphine-like agents have remained the mainstay in the medical management of pain. Termed mu, our understanding of these morphine-like agents and their receptors has undergone an evolution in thinking over the past 35 years. Early pharmacological studies identified three major classes of receptors, helped by the discovery of endogenous opioid peptides and receptor subtypes—primarily through the synthesis of novel agents. These chemical biologic approaches were then eclipsed by the molecular biology revolution, which now reveals a complexity of the morphine-like agents and their receptors that had not been previously appreciated. PMID:24076545

  16. Effect of galantamine on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and spontaneous cholinergic synaptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texidó, Laura; Ros, Esteve; Martín-Satué, Mireia; López, Susana; Aleu, Jordi; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2005-01-01

    Various types of anticholinesterasic agents have been used to improve the daily activities of Alzheimer's disease patients. It was recently demonstrated that Galantamine, described as a molecule with anticholinesterasic properties, is also an allosteric enhancer of human α4β2 neuronal nicotinic receptor activity. We explored its effect on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Galantamine, at a concentration of 0.1 μM, increased the amplitude of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion currents in the human α7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, but caused inhibition at higher concentrations. The maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 22% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, was observed at a concentration of 250 μM Ach. The same enhancing effect was obtained in oocytes transplanted with Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) isolated from the electric organ, but in this case the optimal concentration of galantamine was 1 μM. In this case, the maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 35% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, occurred at a concentration of 50 μM ACh. Galantamine affects not only the activity of post-synaptic receptors but also the activity of nerve terminals. At a concentration of 1 μM, quantal spontaneous events, recorded in a cholinergic synapse, increased their amplitude, an effect which was independent of the anticholinesterasic activity associated with this compound. The anticholinesterasic effect was recorded in preparations treated with a galantamine concentration of 10 μM. In conclusion, our results show that galantamine enhances human α7 neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor activity. It also enhances muscular AChRs and the size of spontaneous cholinergic synaptic events. However, only a very narrow range of galantamine concentrations can be used for enhancing effects. PMID:15834443

  17. Atypical functional properties of GluK3-containing kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Coussen, Françoise; Mulle, Christophe

    2009-12-09

    The properties of synaptic receptors determine their mode of action at presynaptic and postsynaptic loci. Here, we investigated the atypical biophysical properties of GluK3-containing kainate receptors, which contribute to presynaptic facilitation at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. We show, using fast glutamate applications on outside-out patches and kinetic modeling, that the low sensitivity of GluK3 receptors for glutamate is attributable to fast desensitization of partially bound receptors. Consequently, these receptors can only be activated by fast transients of high glutamate concentration. In addition, GluK3 receptors are very sensitive to voltage-dependent block by intracellular spermine that precludes activation of substantial currents at potentials positive to -50 mV. Two specific residues within the channel pore define this high-affinity site. Finally, GluK3 are calcium permeable in the same way as unedited GluK2 receptors. These receptors present unique properties among AMPA/kainate receptors that could reflect a specialized presynaptic function.

  18. Role of Histamine and Its Receptor Subtypes in Stimulation of Conjunctival Goblet Cell Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Densen; Li, Dayu; Hayashi, Chisato; Shatos, Marie; Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of histamine and its receptors on goblet cell secretion. Methods. Cultured rat and human goblet cells were grown in RPMI 1640. Goblet cell secretion of high molecular weight glycoconjugate was measured by an enzyme-linked lectin assay. Cultured rat goblet cells were homogenized and either RNA was isolated for RT-PCR or proteins were isolated for Western blot analysis for presence of histamine receptors subtypes H1 through H4. The localization of these receptors was determined in rat and human goblet cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results. Histamine stimulated goblet cell secretion in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. All four histamine receptors were present in cultured rat and human goblet cells. Use of agonists specific to individual histamine receptor subtypes indicated that the rank order of agonist stimulation was H1 = H3 > H4 > H2. Using antagonists specific to individual histamine receptor subtypes determined that H2 and H3, but not the H1 and H4, antagonists, inhibited histamine-stimulated conjunctival goblet cell secretion. Conclusions. Rat and human conjunctival goblet cells are a direct target of histamine, which induces secretion. All four histamine receptors are present in rat and human conjunctiva and are active in rat conjunctival goblet cells. These findings suggest that all four histamine receptor subtypes are important for conjunctival goblet cell secretion. Blockage of histamine receptor subtypes could prevent the excess mucus production associated with ocular allergy. PMID:22467574

  19. Increased serum chemerin concentration in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrych, Krystian; Stojek, Magdalena; Smoczynski, Marian; Sledzinski, Tomasz; Sylwia, Szrok-Wojtkiewicz; Swierczynski, Julian

    2012-05-01

    Chemerin is a potent chemoattractant for chemokine-like receptor 1 expressing cells and is involved in inflammatory and immune processes that play an important role in chronic pancreatitis. To test the hypothesis that serum chemerin concentration may be affected in chronic pancreatitis patients and that chemerin can influence the course of chronic pancreatitis by increasing profibrotic cytokine production. Serum concentrations of chemerin and the major cytokines involved in pancreatic fibrosis such as platelet-derived growth factor BB and transforming growth factor β-1 were determined by ELISA in samples from 40 nondiabetic and 28 diabetic male patients with chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic origin and 40 age-matched healthy controls. Serum concentrations of chemerin were increased both in nondiabetic and diabetic chronic pancreatitis patients compared to controls. Moreover, in chronic pancreatitis patients a positive correlation was found between serum chemerin and platelet-derived growth factor BB as well as transforming growth factor β-1 concentrations. The results indicate for the first time that: (a) chronic pancreatitis in humans is associated with an increased serum chemerin concentration and (b) serum chemerin concentration correlates with serum concentrations of the major profibrotic cytokines. Elevated level of chemerin, by stimulating macrophage infiltration of the pancreas, might lead to overproduction of platelet-derived growth factor BB and transforming growth factor β-1 and, consequently, to pancreatic fibrosis. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sialic Acid Receptors of Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Herrler, Georg; Klenk, Hans Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acid linked to glycoproteins and gangliosides is used by many viruses as a receptor for cell entry. These viruses include important human and animal pathogens, such as influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, corona, noro, rota, and DNA tumor viruses. Attachment to sialic acid is mediated by receptor binding proteins that are constituents of viral envelopes or exposed at the surface of non-enveloped viruses. Some of these viruses are also equipped with a neuraminidase or a sialyl-O-acetyl-esterase. These receptor-destroying enzymes promote virus release from infected cells and neutralize sialic acid-containing soluble proteins interfering with cell surface binding of the virus. Variations in the receptor specificity are important determinants for host range, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses.

  1. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  2. Insulin receptor signaling in cones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajala, Ammaji; Dighe, Radhika; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rajala, Raju V S

    2013-01-01

    .... To date there are no studies on the insulin receptor signaling in cones; however, mRNA levels of IR signaling proteins are significantly higher in cone-dominant neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl...

  3. Optimal concentrations in transport systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Wonjung; Bush, John W. M.; Jensen, Kaare H.; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impeda...

  4. Utility-scale photovoltaic concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The photovoltaics concentrators section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  5. Concentrating solar collector - final design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Final report of program to improve commercially available concentrating solar collector describes final hardware, discusses problems encountered, and presents certification statements, photographs, and recommendations for modification.

  6. On Shaft Fillet Stress Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2017-01-01

    A shaft is typically loaded by three different load types; torsional, bending and normal load separately or more generally in combinations. In most cases the size of the shaft is controlled by the constraints on the maximum allowable deflection and/orrotation at e.g. the position of bearings or g...... or gears. But if care is not taken to limit the stress concentrations these will control the durability of the shaft. With the use of fillets we have stress concentration described by the stress concentration factor Kt (theoretic stress concentration factor)....

  7. Effects of PhD examination stress on allopregnanolone and cortisol plasma levels and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Broekhoven, F. van; Span, P.N.; Backstrom, T.; Zitman, F.G.; Verkes, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) density in blood platelets and plasma allopregnanolone concentration in humans were determined following acute stress as represented by PhD examination. Fifteen healthy PhD students participated. Heart rate, blood pressure, plasma allopregnanolone, plasma

  8. History of retinoic acid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbrook, Doris M; Chambon, Pierre; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Asson-Batres, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of retinoic acid receptors arose from research into how vitamins are essential for life. Early studies indicated that Vitamin A was metabolized into an active factor, retinoic acid (RA), which regulates RNA and protein expression in cells. Each step forward in our understanding of retinoic acid in human health was accomplished by the development and application of new technologies. Development cDNA cloning techniques and discovery of nuclear receptors for steroid hormones provided the basis for identification of two classes of retinoic acid receptors, RARs and RXRs, each of which has three isoforms, α, β and ɣ. DNA manipulation and crystallographic studies revealed that the receptors contain discrete functional domains responsible for binding to DNA, ligands and cofactors. Ligand binding was shown to induce conformational changes in the receptors that cause release of corepressors and recruitment of coactivators to create functional complexes that are bound to consensus promoter DNA sequences called retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) and that cause opening of chromatin and transcription of adjacent genes. Homologous recombination technology allowed the development of mice lacking expression of retinoic acid receptors, individually or in various combinations, which demonstrated that the receptors exhibit vital, but redundant, functions in fetal development and in vision, reproduction, and other functions required for maintenance of adult life. More recent advancements in sequencing and proteomic technologies reveal the complexity of retinoic acid receptor involvement in cellular function through regulation of gene expression and kinase activity. Future directions will require systems biology approaches to decipher how these integrated networks affect human stem cells, health, and disease.

  9. Changes in GABA(A) receptor gene expression associated with selective alterations in receptor function and pharmacology after ethanol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Enrico; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Busonero, Fabio; Talani, Giuseppe; Tranquilli, Stefania; Mameli, Manuel; Spiga, Saturnino; Follesa, Paolo; Biggio, Giovanni

    2003-12-17

    Changes in the expression of subunits of the GABA type A (GABA(A)) receptor are implicated in the development of ethanol tolerance and dependence as well as in the central hyperexcitability associated with ethanol withdrawal. The impact of such changes on GABA(A) receptor function and pharmacological sensitivity was investigated with cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to ethanol for 5 d and then subjected to ethanol withdrawal. Both ethanol treatment and withdrawal were associated with a marked decrease in the maximal density of GABA-evoked Cl- currents, whereas the potency of GABA was unaffected. Ethanol exposure also reduced the modulatory efficacy of the benzodiazepine receptor agonists lorazepam, zolpidem, and zaleplon as well as that of the inverse agonists Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, effects that were associated with a reduced abundance of mRNAs encoding the receptor subunits alpha1, alpha3, gamma2L, and gamma2S. Ethanol withdrawal restored the efficacy of lorazepam, but not that of low concentrations of zolpidem or zaleplon, to control values. Flumazenil, which was ineffective in control neurons, and Ro 15-4513 each potentiated the GABA response after ethanol withdrawal. These effects of withdrawal were accompanied by upregulation of the alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 subunit mRNAs as well as of the alpha4 protein. Diazepam or gamma-hydroxybutyrate, but not baclofen, prevented the changes in both GABA(A) receptor pharmacology and subunit mRNA levels induced by ethanol withdrawal. Changes in GABA(A) receptor gene expression induced by prolonged exposure to and withdrawal of ethanol are thus associated with altered GABA(A) receptor function and pharmacological sensitivity.

  10. IGF-I, IGF-II, and Insulin Stimulate Different Gene Expression Responses through Binding to the IGF-I Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteyhe, Soetkin; Klaproth, Birgit; Borup, Rehannah

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and the insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II are closely related peptides important for regulation of metabolism, growth, differentiation, and development. The IGFs exert their main effects through the IGF-I receptor. Although the insulin receptor is the main physiological receptor...... for insulin, this peptide hormone can also bind at higher concentrations to the IGF-I receptor and exert effects through it. We used microarray gene expression profiling to investigate the gene expression regulated by IGF-I, IGF-II, and insulin after stimulation of the IGF-I receptor. Fibroblasts from mice......, knockout for IGF-II and the IGF-II/cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and expressing functional IGF-I but no insulin receptors, were stimulated for 4 h with equipotent saturating concentrations of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II. Each ligand specifically regulated a group of transcripts...

  11. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  12. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-03-22

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy.

  13. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-06

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 30 YEARS OF THE MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR: The brain mineralocorticoid receptor: a saga in three episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joëls, Marian; de Kloet, E Ronald

    2017-07-01

    In 1968, Bruce McEwen discovered that 3H-corticosterone administered to adrenalectomised rats is retained in neurons of hippocampus rather than those of hypothalamus. This discovery signalled the expansion of endocrinology into the science of higher brain regions. With this in mind, our contribution highlights the saga of the brain mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in three episodes. First, the precloning era dominated by the conundrum of two types of corticosterone-binding receptors in the brain, which led to the identification of the high-affinity corticosterone receptor as the 'promiscuous' MR cloned in 1987 by Jeff Arriza and Ron Evans in addition to the classical glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Then, the post-cloning period aimed to disentangle the function of the brain MR from that of the closely related GR on different levels of biological complexity. Finally, the synthesis section that highlights the two faces of brain MR: Salt and Stress. 'Salt' refers to the regulation of salt appetite, and reciprocal arousal, motivation and reward, by a network of aldosterone-selective MR-expressing neurons projecting from nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and circumventricular organs. 'Stress' is about the limbic-forebrain nuclear and membrane MRs, which act as a switch in the selection of the best response to cope with a stressor. For this purpose, activation of the limbic MR promotes selective attention, memory retrieval and the appraisal process, while driving emotional expressions of fear and aggression. Subsequently, rising glucocorticoid concentrations activate GRs in limbic-forebrain circuitry underlying executive functions and memory storage, which contribute in balance with MR-mediated actions to homeostasis, excitability and behavioural adaptation. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...... to CD163 demonstrated that optimal ligand binding requires physiological plasma calcium concentrations, and an immediate ligand release occurs at the low calcium concentrations measured in acidifying endosomes. In conclusion, SRCR domain 3 of CD163 is an exposed domain and a critical determinant...

  16. Involvement of cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the menthol-induced gastric relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Antonella; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that menthol reduces murine gastric tone in part through a neural mechanism, involving adrenergic pathways and reduction of ongoing release of acetylcholine from enteric nerves. In the present study we aimed to verify whether the gastric relaxation to menthol may be triggered by interaction with neural receptors or ionic channels proteins, such as transient receptor potential (TRP)-melastatin8 (TRPM8), TRP-ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), 5-hydroxytriptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor or cholinergic nicotinic receptors. Spontaneous mechanical activity was detected in vitro as changes in intraluminal pressure from isolated mouse stomach. Menthol (0.3-30 mM) induced gastric relaxation which was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine, a TRPM8 receptor antagonist, HC030031, a TRPA1 channel blocker. In addition, allylisothiocyanate, a TRPA1 agonist, but not (2S,5R)-2-Isopropyl-N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methylcyclohexanecarboximide, a selective TRPM8 agonist, induced gastric relaxation. Genic expression of TRPA1, but not of TRPM8, was revealed in mouse stomach. Indeed, menthol-induced gastric relaxation was significantly reduced by hexamethonium, cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist. Menthol, at concentrations that failed to affect gastric tone, reduced the contraction induced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium, nicotinic receptor agonist. The joint application of hexamethonium and atropine, muscarinc receptor antagonist, or hexamethonium and phentholamine, α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, did not produce any additive reduction of the relaxant response to menthol. Lastly, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was ineffective. In conclusion, our study suggests that nicotinic receptors, but not TRP and 5-HT3 receptors, are molecular targets for menthol inducing murine gastric relaxation, ultimately due to the reduction of acetylcholine release from enteric nerves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation by cell density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, C.D.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptors in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were characterized and their regulation by cell density examined. In hepatocytes cultured at 5 X 10(5) cells per 3.8 cm2 plate (/sup 125/I)IGF-II bound to specific, high affinity receptors (Ka = 4.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(9) l/mol). Less than 1% cross-reactivity by IGF-I and no cross-reactivity by insulin were observed. IGF-II binding increased when cells were permeabilized with 0.01% digitonin, suggesting the presence of an intracellular receptor pool. Determined by Scatchard analysis and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity labeling, the higher binding was due solely to an increase in binding sites present on 220 kDa type II IGF receptors. In hepatocytes cultured at low densities, the number of cell surface receptors increased markedly, from 10-20,000 receptors per cell at a culture density of 6 X 10(5) cells/well to 70-80,000 receptors per cell at 0.38 X 10(5) cells/well. The increase was not due simply to the exposure of receptors from the intracellular pool, as a density-related increase in receptors was also seen in cells permeabilized with digitonin. There was no evidence that IGF binding proteins, either secreted by hepatocytes or present in fetal calf serum, had any effect on the measurement of receptor concentration or affinity. We conclude that rat hepatocytes in primary culture contain specific IGF-II receptors and that both cell surface and intracellular receptors are regulated by cell density.

  18. Nuclear receptors and endocrine disruptors in fetal and neonatal testes: a gapped landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eRouiller-Fabre

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, many studies reported that male reproductive disorders are increasing among humans. It is currently acknowledged that these abnormalities can result from fetal exposure to environmental chemicals that are progressively becoming more concentrated and widespread in our environment. Among the chemicals present in the environment (air, water, food and many consumer products, several can act as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs, thus interfering with the endocrine system. Phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA and diethylstilbestrol (DES have been largely incriminated, particularly during the fetal and neonatal period, due to their estrogenic and/or anti-androgenic properties. Indeed, many epidemiological and experimental studies have highlighted their deleterious impact on fetal and neonatal testis development. As EDCs can affect many different genomic and non-genomic pathways, the mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of EDC exposure are difficult to elucidate. Using literature data and results from our laboratory, in the present review we discuss the role of classical nuclear receptors (genomic pathway in the fetal and neonatal testis response to EDC exposure, particularly to phthalates, BPA and DES. Among the nuclear receptors we focused on some of the most likely candidates, such as peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR, androgen receptor (AR, estrogen receptors (ERα and β, liver X receptors (LXR and small heterodimer partner (SHP. First, we describe the expression and potential functions (based on data from studies using receptor agonists and mouse knockout models of these nuclear receptors in the developing testis. Then, for each EDC studied, we summarize the main evidences indicating that the reprotoxic effect of each EDC under study is mediated through a specific nuclear receptor(s. We also point-out the involvement of other receptors and nuclear receptor-independent pathways.

  19. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear Receptors, RXR & the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D and thyroid hormone, and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors, and in particular of the retinoid X receptor (RXR), positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the “Big Bang” of molecular endocrinology. This review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multi-cellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  1. Oxytocin receptor blockade: a new principle in the treatment of preterm labor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L F; Lyndrup, J; Akerlund, M

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of myometrial and decidual oxytocin receptors increases dramatically in normal women in late pregnancy, causing enhanced uterine sensitivity to physiologic levels of oxytocin. Similar increase in myometrial oxytocin receptors has been found in women in preterm labor, indicating...... a role for oxytocin also in idiopathic preterm labor. A newly synthesized oxytocin analogue, 1-deamino-2-D-Tyr-(OEt)-4-Thr-8-Orn-oxytocin, has been found to be a competitive inhibitor of oxytocin. The present study was conducted to test its efficacy in suppressing uterine contractions during preterm...... of the patients. These preliminary findings support the concept that an increased concentration of uterine oxytocin receptors is an important etiologic factor in uncomplicated preterm labor and therefore oxytocin receptor blockade may be a therapeutic alternative for this condition....

  2. The Drosophila gene CG9918 codes for a pyrokinin-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Torp, Malene; Hauser, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The database from the Drosophila Genome Project contains a gene, CG9918, annotated to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned the cDNA of this gene and functionally expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested a library of about 25 Drosophila and other insect neuropeptides......, and seven insect biogenic amines on the expressed receptor and found that it was activated by low concentrations of the Drosophila neuropeptide, pyrokinin-1 (TGPSASSGLWFGPRLamide; EC50, 5 x 10(-8) M). The receptor was also activated by other Drosophila neuropeptides, terminating with the sequence PRLamide...... (Hug-gamma, ecdysis-triggering-hormone-1, pyrokinin-2), but in these cases about six to eight times higher concentrations were needed. The receptor was not activated by Drosophila neuropeptides, containing a C-terminal PRIamide sequence (such as ecdysis-triggering-hormone-2), or PRVamide (such as capa...

  3. Ethanol inhibits epileptiform activity and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in rat amygdaloid slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gean, P.W. (Cheng-Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan))

    1992-02-26

    The effect of ethanol on the epileptiform activity induced by Mg{sup ++}-free solution was studied in rat amygdalar slices using intracellular recording techniques. The spontaneous and evoked epileptiform discharges consisting of an initial burst followed by afterdischarges were observed 20-30 min after switching to Mg{sup ++}-free medium. Superfusion with ethanol reversibly reduced the duration of spontaneous and evoked bursting discharges in a concentration-dependent manner. Synaptic response mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation was isolated by application of a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and either in Mg{sup ++}-free solution or in the presence of 50 {mu}M bicuculline. Application of ethanol reversibly suppressed the duration of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response. These results suggest that intoxicating concentrations of ethanol possess anticonvulsant activity through blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic excitation.

  4. Circulating Endocannabinoid Concentrations and Sexual Arousal in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Carolin; Hill, Matthew N.; Chang, Sabrina C.H.; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Gorzalka, Boris B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several lines of evidence point to the potential role of the endocannabinoid system in female sexual functioning. These include results from studies describing the subjective effects of exogenous cannabinoids on sexual functioning in humans and the observable effects of exogenous cannabinoids on sexual functioning in other species, as well as results from studies investigating the location of cannabinoid receptors in the brain and periphery, and the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation on neurotransmitters implicated in sexual functioning. While these lines of research suggest a role for the endocannabinoid system in female sexual functioning, no studies investigating the relationship between concentrations of endogenous cannabinoids (i.e., arachidonoylethanolamide [AEA] and 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and sexual functioning have been conducted in any species. Aim To measure circulating endocannabinoid concentrations in relation to subjective and physiological indices of sexual arousal in women (n = 21). Methods Serum endocannabinoid (AEA and 2-AG) concentrations were measured immediately prior to, and immediately following, viewing of neutral (control) and erotic (experimental) film stimuli in a repeated measures design. Physiological sexual arousal was measured via vaginal photoplethysmography. Subjective sexual arousal was measured both continuously and non-continuously. Pearson’s correlations were used to investigate the relationships between endocannabinoid concentrations and sexual arousal. Main Outcome Measures Changes in AEA and 2-AG concentrations from pre- to post-film and in relation to physiological and subjective indices of sexual arousal. Results Results revealed a significant relationship between endocannabinoid concentrations and female sexual arousal, whereby increases in both physiological and subjective indices of sexual arousal were significantly associated with decreases in AEA, and increases in subjective indices of

  5. GABA_A receptor function is regulated by lipid bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Werge, Thomas; Berthelsen, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid ( DHA) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs) promote GABA(A) receptor [ (3)H]-muscimol binding, and DHA increases the rate of GABAA receptor desensitization. Triton X-100, a structurally unrelated amphiphile, similarly promotes [ (3)H]-muscimol binding. The mechanism......( s) underlying these effects are poorly understood. DHA and Triton X-100, at concentrations that affect GABAA receptor function, increase the elasticity of lipid bilayers measured as decreased bilayer stiffness using gramicidin channels as molecular force transducers. We have previously shown......-beta-glucoside, capsaicin, and DHA) on GABAA receptor function in mammalian cells. All the compounds promoted GABAA receptor [ (3)H]-muscimol binding by increasing the binding capacity of high- affinity binding without affecting the associated equilibrium binding constant. A semiquantitative analysis found a similar...

  6. Enhanced expression of contractile endothelin ET(B) receptors in rat coronary artery after organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, E.; Maddahi, A.; Wackenfors, A.

    2008-01-01

    Endothelin-1 is a potent vasoconstrictor mediating its effects via two receptor subtypes, the endothelin type A (ET(A)) preferentially situated on smooth muscle cells, mediating vasoconstriction and endothelin type B (ET(B)) mainly located on endothelial cells, mediating vasodilatation....... In cardiovascular disease and in organ culture in vitro, endothelin ET(B) receptors are up-regulated on smooth muscle cells. The objectives of the present study were to characterise the endothelin receptor-induced vasoconstriction and quantify the endothelin receptor mRNA levels and immunoreactivity in fresh...... and cultured rat coronary arteries. We demonstrate that endothelin-1 induces strong and equal concentration-dependent contractions in fresh and cultured segments from the left anterior descending coronary artery. Sarafotoxin 6c, an endothelin ET(B) receptor agonist, had negligible effect in fresh arteries...

  7. Mapping the Dynamics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor within the Nuclear Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Martin; Presman, Diego M; Bruno, Luciana; Annibale, Paolo; Dansey, Maria V; Burton, Gerardo; Gratton, Enrico; Pecci, Adali; Levi, Valeria

    2017-07-24

    The distribution of the transcription machinery among different sub-nuclear domains raises the question on how the architecture of the nucleus modulates the transcriptional response. Here, we used fluorescence fluctuation analyses to quantitatively explore the organization of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the interphase nucleus of living cells. We found that this ligand-activated transcription factor diffuses within the nucleus and dynamically interacts with bodies enriched in the coregulator NCoA-2, DNA-dependent foci and chromatin targets. The distribution of the receptor among the nuclear compartments depends on NCoA-2 and the conformation of the receptor as assessed with synthetic ligands and GR mutants with impaired transcriptional abilities. Our results suggest that the partition of the receptor in different nuclear reservoirs ultimately regulates the concentration of receptor available for the interaction with specific targets, and thus has an impact on transcription regulation.

  8. Estrogen receptor expression in melasma: results from facial skin of affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Robert; Moy, Lawrence

    2008-05-01

    Melasma is a commonly acquired hypermelanosis of the skin due to various etiological factors, including pregnancy and oral contraceptives. Estrogen receptor expression in affected skin has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare estrogen receptor expression in hyperpigmented and normal facial skin of patients with melasma. Biopsies of 3 mm were taken from affected and unaffected forehead skin of 2 female patients with melasma. Frozen sections of the tissues were obtained and mouse monoclonal antibody against human estrogen receptors was tested at various dilutions to determine the optimum concentrations required for reproducible immunostaining with minimal background staining. Fluorescence was evaluated and compared qualitatively. The immunohistochemical staining of tissue from both patients reflected a qualitative increase in estrogen receptor expression in melasma-affected skin compared to unaffected skin. This study demonstrates the increased expression of estrogen receptors in melasma-affected skin and may establish the basis for exploring topical anti-estrogen therapies in melasma.

  9. Prognostic Value of Estrogen Receptor alpha and Progesterone Receptor Conversion in Distant Breast Cancer Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, Laurien D. C.; Moelans, Cathy B.; Meijer, S. L.; van Slooten, Henk-Jan; Wesseling, Pieter; Wesseling, Jelle; Westenend, Pieter J.; Bart, Joost; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Oudejans, Joost; van der Valk, Paul; van Gils, Carla H.; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in the receptor profile of primary breast cancers to their metastases (receptor conversion) have been described for the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) and progesterone receptor (PR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of receptor conversion for ER alpha and

  10. School concentration and school travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the research as described in this Doctor’s thesis is twofold. Firstly it is to define in how far Dutch facilities for primary and secondary education were subjected to spatial concentration during recent decades. Secondly it is intended to assess what this concentration implied for

  11. Concentrations of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    ABSTRACT: Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were examined as a function of depth in killer whale (Orcinus orca) blubber samples. Lipid-normalized concentrations of PCBs, PCDD/Fs, and ...

  12. P2X4: A fast and sensitive purinergic receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaanus Suurväli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular nucleotides have been recognized as important mediators of activation, triggering multiple responses via plasma membrane receptors known as P2 receptors. P2 receptors comprise P2X ionotropic receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are expressed in many tissues, where they are involved in a number of functions including synaptic transmission, muscle contraction, platelet aggregation, inflammation, macrophage activation, differentiation and proliferation, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. P2X4 is one of the most sensitive purinergic receptors (at nanomolar ATP concentrations, about one thousand times more than the archetypal P2X7. P2X4 is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons, in microglia, and also found in various epithelial tissues and endothelial cells. It localizes on the plasma membrane, but also in intracellular compartments. P2X4 is preferentially localized in lysosomes, where it is protected from proteolysis by its glycosylation. High ATP concentration in the lysosomes does not activate P2X4 at low pH; P2X4 gets activated by intra-lysosomal ATP only in its fully dissociated tetra-anionic form, when the pH increases to 7.4. Thus, P2X4 is functioning as a Ca2+-channel after the fusion of late endosomes and lysosomes. P2X4 modulates major neurotransmitter systems and regulates alcohol-induced responses in microglia. P2X4 is one of the key receptors mediating neuropathic pain. However, injury-induced upregulation of P2X4 expression is gender dependent and plays a key role in pain difference between males and females. P2X4 is also involved in inflammation. Extracellular ATP being a pro-inflammatory molecule, P2X4 can trigger inflammation in response to high ATP release. It is therefore involved in multiple pathologies, like post-ischemic inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, airways inflammation in asthma, neurodegenerative diseases and even metabolic syndrome. Although P2X4 remains poorly

  13. Hyperglycemia of Diabetic Rats Decreased by a Glucagon Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David G.; Ulichny Goebel, Camy; Hruby, Victor J.; Bregman, Marvin D.; Trivedi, Dev

    1982-02-01

    The glucagon analog [l-Nα-trinitrophenylhistidine, 12-homoarginine]-glucagon (THG) was examined for its ability to lower blood glucose concentrations in rats made diabetic with streptozotocin. In vitro, THG is a potent antagonist of glucagon activation of the hepatic adenylate cyclase assay system. Intravenous bolus injections of THG caused rapid decreases (20 to 35 percent) of short duration in blood glucose. Continuous infusion of low concentrations of the inhibitor led to larger sustained decreases in blood glucose (30 to 65 percent). These studies demonstrate that a glucagon receptor antagonist can substantially reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic animals without addition of exogenous insulin.

  14. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine...... receptor is, to our knowledge, the first cloned insect G protein-coupled receptor that appears to be fully specific for tyramine....

  15. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  16. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. Copyright © 2016 by U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  17. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  18. Crambescidin 816 induces calcium influx though glutamate receptors in primary cultures of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Martín Vázquez

    2014-06-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the cytotoxic effect of 10 μM Cramb816 in cortical neurons may be related to an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration elicited by the toxin, which is shown to be mediated by glutamate receptor activation. Further studies analyzing the effect of glutamate receptor blockers on the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  19. Potential Involvement of P2 Receptors in the Pathological Processes of Hyperthyroidism: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wu; Li, Guodong; Nie, Yijun; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liang, Shangdong

    2016-05-01

    Symptoms of hyperthyroidism manifest mainly as changes in the nervous and metabolic systems. Whether P2X receptors (ionotropic ATP purinergic receptors, including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) are involved in the alterations of these disorders still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the association of hyperthyroidism with the expression of P2X3 and P2X7 receptors and the concentrations of ATP in blood leukocytes and catecholamine. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve patients diagnosed with hyperthyroidism were recruited. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels had been detected by chemiluminescence method. Meanwhile, the catecholamine levels (including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine) in plasma, ATP level and P2X receptors (including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) in peripheral blood had been detected by high performance liquid chromatography, bioluminescence method, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were significantly higher in the hyperthyroidism group compared with the control group. The concentration of ATP in the hyperthyroidism group was significantly higher than its in the control group. The expression of P2X3 mRNA and P2X7 mRNA in hyperthyroidism group were significantly increased compared with those in control group. In a conclusion, there is a relationship between the elevated expression of P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood leukocytes and high serum epinephrine and norepinephrine levels in hyperthyroidism patients. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  20. A novel way to monitor urine concentration: fluorescent concentration matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubayova, Katarina; Luckova, Iveta; Sabo, Jan; Karabinos, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The amount of water found in urine is important diagnostic information; nevertheless it is not yet directly determined. Indirectly, the water content in urine is expressed by its density (specific gravity). However, without the diuresis value it is not possible to determine whether the increase in density of urine is due to a decrease in water secretion or an increase in the concentration of secreted substances. This problem can be solved by the use of fluorescent concentration 3D-matrices which characterise urine concentration through the pφ (or -logφ) value of the first fluorescence centre. The urine fluorescent concentration 3D-matrix was created by the alignment of the synchronous spectra of the dilution series of urine starting from undiluted (pφ = 0) to 1000-fold diluted urine (pφ = 3). Using the fluorescence concentration 3D-matrix analysis of the urine samples from healthy individuals, a reference range was established for the value pφ, determining the normal, concentrated or diluted type of urine. The diagnostic potential of this approach was tested on urine samples from two patients with a chronic glomerulonephritis. The pφ value of the urine fluorescence concentration 3D-matrix analysis determines whether the urine sample falls within the normal, concentrated or diluted type of urine. This parameter can be directly utilised in sportsmen's hydration state monitoring, as well as in the diagnosis and treatment of serious diseases. An important advantage of this novel diagnostic approach is that a 12/24 h urine collection is not required, which predetermines it for use especially within paediatrics.

  1. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Saigal, Neil

    2010-06-08

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably 18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with 18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  2. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Saigal, Neil; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably 18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with 18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  3. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar [Irvine, CA; Saigal, Neil [Fresno, CA; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh (Fresno, CA)

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably .sup.18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with .sup.18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  4. Influence of the adenosine A1 receptor on blood pressure regulation and renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Russell D.; Thorén, Peter; Steege, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine A1 receptors in regulating blood pressure in conscious mice. Adenosine A1-receptor knockout (A1R-/-) mice and their wild-type (A1R+/+) littermates were placed on standardized normal-salt (NS), high-salt (HS), or salt-deficient (SD....... The elevated plasma renin concentrations found in the A1R-/- mice could also result in increased blood pressure. Our results confirm that adenosine, acting through the adenosine A1 receptor, plays an important role in regulating blood pressure, renin release, and sodium excretion....

  5. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  6. Signal Transduction of Immunoglobulin E Receptor Crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy Aidan

    In the work presented in this thesis we explore several important aspects of the mechanisms involved in the signal transduction of the crosslinking of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-receptor complexes on the surface of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells. In order to understand what interactions may be important in determining the lateral diffusibility of this cell surface protein, quantitative fluorescence measurements were made of the distribution of fluorescence labelled IgE as well as a variety of other membrane proteins under externally applied electrical potential gradients. These measurements reveal that strong steric interactions are manifest at the typical protein concentrations on cell surfaces, and that these interactions are well accounted for in these experiments by an excluded volume model which can be expressed as a Fermi distribution. The relationship between the lateral diffusion coefficient determined from fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) experiments and those determined by analyzing the relaxation of the concentration gradients induced by externally applied electrical gradients are discussed. The cell surface interactions associated with IgE-receptor crosslinking are known to lead to dramatic changes in free ionized Ca^{2+} activity (Ca^{2+}] _{i} within the cells. Methods were developed which allowed us to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of (Ca^{2+}] _{i} during the crosslinking events using quantitative low light level imaging of the fluorescent Ca^{2+} indicator fura -2 loaded into RBL cells. These studies indicate that the cell surface crosslinking events lead to large complex oscillations of (Ca^{2+}] _{i} within the cell, which appear to be controlled by some as yet unidentified messenger molecule. Comparisons of the kinetics of the changes in (Ca^{2+}]_{i } induced within the cells with that of the crosslinking induced by a simple bivalent antigen suggest that the relevant stimulus needed to generate a (Ca ^{2+}]_{i} response is not

  7. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knasel, Don; Ehresman, Derik

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  8. Ethanol and trichloroethanol alter gating of 5-HT3 receptor-channels in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, D M; Sung, K W; Zhou, Q

    2000-02-14

    Alcohol potentiation of 5-HT3 receptors was examined in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques. Activation of the receptor with the weak partial agonist dopamine (DA) was used to examine alcohol effects under conditions of full agonist occupancy, but low probability of channel opening. Dopamine activation of the receptor increased in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50=0.28 mM), and on average maximal responses to DA were 8.0+/-0.8% of the maximal response to 5-HT. Ethanol (EtOH) and trichloroethanol (TCEt) potentiated DA-activated ion current mediated by 5-HT3 receptors. Potentiation of responses to a maximally effective dopamine concentration averaged 52.0+/-8.0% for EtOH and 567+/-43% for TCEt, which was comparable to the potentiation observed when receptors were activated by a low concentration of 5-HT. The alcohols increased both the potency and efficacy with which dopamine activated the receptor. The observation that alcohols increase the maximal efficacy of dopamine activation of the receptor indicates that one action of alcohols on the 5-HT3 receptor is to increase the probability of channel opening independent of any effect on agonist affinity.

  9. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  10. The expression level of CB1 and CB2 receptors determines their efficacy at inducing apoptosis in astrocytomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiron Cudaback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids represent unique compounds for treating tumors, including astrocytomas. Whether CB(1 and CB(2 receptors mediate this therapeutic effect is unclear.We generated astrocytoma subclones that express set levels of CB(1 and CB(2, and found that cannabinoids induce apoptosis only in cells expressing low levels of receptors that couple to ERK1/2. In contrast, cannabinoids do not induce apoptosis in cells expressing high levels of receptors because these now also couple to the prosurvival signal AKT. Remarkably, cannabinoids applied at high concentration induce apoptosis in all subclones independently of CB(1, CB(2 and AKT, but still through a mechanism involving ERK1/2.The high expression level of CB(1 and CB(2 receptors commonly found in malignant astrocytomas precludes the use of cannabinoids as therapeutics, unless AKT is concomitantly inhibited, or cannabinoids are applied at concentrations that bypass CB(1 and CB(2 receptors, yet still activate ERK1/2.

  11. Effects of dexamethasone on purinergic signaling in murine mast cells: Selective suppression of P2X7 receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Ito, Masaaki; Hoshino, Yui; Matsuoka, Isao

    2017-12-02

    Mast cells express many different purinergic receptors, including ionotropic P2X4 and P2X7, which recognize the accumulation of extracellular ATP released from activated and/or damaged cells. This results in the stimulation of mast cell functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid widely used for the treatment of allergic disease, on purinergic receptor expression in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Treatment of BMMCs with Dex decreased P2X7 receptor mRNA levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner without affecting the expression of other purinergic receptor subtypes. Accordingly, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that Dex treatment also decreased P2X7 receptor protein levels. This effect was mimicked by prednisolone, another anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, and was inhibited by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Functionally, treatment of BMMCs with Dex impaired the P2X7-mediated rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, degranulation, and ethidium uptake, a response relevant to receptor-pore formation. Finally, oral administration of Dex to C57BL/6 mice in vivo resulted in a significant decrease in P2X7 receptor expression in peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that reduction of P2X7 receptor expression in mast cells might be one of the anti-allergic mechanisms of Dex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation versus modulation in GnRH receptor function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolman, J.C.; Theodoropoulos, T.J.

    1985-03-01

    Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration after exposure to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) indicates that an instantaneous increase occurs in the rate of release of LH directly from the anterior pituitary, as measured dynamically during superfusion in vitro. On the other hand, estradiol-17 beta (E2) alone shows no such instantaneous effect on LH release rate (at least for the first four hours), in either physiologic or pharmacologic concentrations. At the same time, brief (ten to 30 minute) exposure of isolated anterior pituitary plasma membranes to physiologic concentrations of E2 significantly alters the binding of a fully biologically active /sup 125/I-GnRH to its plasma membrane receptor protein. In order to characterize the effect of E2 on GnRH binding further, dispersed bovine anterior pituitary cells were preincubated for six hours in the presence or absence of physiologic concentrations of E2 (10(-10)M). Following preincubation in the presence of E2, the cell suspension was incubated for 30 minutes with physiologic concentrations (5 x 10(-11) - 5 x 10(-10)M) of a fully biologically active /sup 125/I-GnRH. The treatment, at least, doubled the number of biologically important high affinity GnRH binding sites (Kd's . 7.5 x -10(-11) - 4.5 x 10(-10)M), and changed the binding capacity of some of the binding sites up to three fold, which altered the cooperativity of GnRH-receptor interaction. Thus, the interaction of E2 with GnRH at the level of GnRH receptor is mandatory for the short-term pituitary effect of E2 on LH release in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Potentiation of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth by fluvoxamine: role of sigma-1 receptors, IP3 receptors and cellular signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been widely used and are a major therapeutic advance in psychopharmacology. However, their pharmacology is quite heterogeneous. The SSRI fluvoxamine, with sigma-1 receptor agonism, is shown to potentiate nerve-growth factor (NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC 12 cells. However, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying potentiation by fluvoxamine are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the roles of cellular signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by fluvoxamine and sigma-1 receptor agonists. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The effects of three SSRIs (fluvoxamine, sertraline, paroxetine and three sigma-1 receptor agonists (SA4503, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl piperidine (PPBP, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA-sulfate on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were examined. Also examined were the effects of the sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3 receptor antagonist, and specific inhibitors of signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by selective sigma-1 receptor agonist SA4503. Fluvoxamine (but not sertraline or paroxetine and the sigma-1 receptor agonists SA4503, PPBP, and DHEA-sulfate significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The potentiation by fluvoxamine and the three sigma-1 receptor agonists was blocked by co-administration of the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, suggesting that sigma-1 receptors play a role in blocking the enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, the potentiation by SA4503 was blocked by co-administration of the IP(3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C. In addition, the specific inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC-gamma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, p38MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK

  14. Steroid receptors in benign breast disease, gross cystic disease and fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardelli, G B; Lamaina, V; Siliotti, F

    1987-01-01

    The benign breast pathology embraces a wide variety of anatomo-clinical-pathological conditions producing confusion in nomenclature. The Authors collected three different types of BBP and investigated the hormonal receptor status for each. The following concentrations of ERc were found: 1-6 fmol/mg in BBD; less than 2 fmol/mg in GCD; 12-18 fmol/mg in the cytoplasm and 29-37.5 fmol/mg in the nucleus in FA. In FA, PgR was found in concentrations of 43.5-50 fmol/mg in the cytoplasm and 0.2-10 fmol/mg in the nucleus. Even if we consider these three histo-pathological entities (BBD, GCD, FA) separately, no correlation can be seen between the presence of receptors and benign breast disease. The only observation we can make is that the fibroadenomas contain more easily identifiable receptor concentrations than BBD and GCD.

  15. Mitragynine concentrations in two fatalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Olwen; Roider, Gabriele; Stöver, Andreas; Graw, Matthias; Musshoff, Frank; Sachs, Hans; Bicker, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of fatalities are reported of which the recreational use of Mitragyna speciosa ("kratom") could be confirmed. One of these cases presents with one of the highest postmortem mitragynine concentrations published to date. Our results show that even extremely high mitragynine blood concentrations following the consumption of kratom do not necessarily have to be the direct cause of death in such fatalities as a result of an acute overdose. The two cases are compared with regard to the differences in mitragynine concentrations detected and the role of mitragynine in the death of the subjects. Irrespective of the big differences in mitragynine concentrations in the postmortem blood samples, mitragynine was not the primary cause of death in either of the two cases reported here. Additionally, by rough estimation, a significant difference in ratio of mitragynine to its diastereomers in the blood and urine samples between the two cases could be seen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  17. Freeze concentration of dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarnath, K.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Systems and Materials Dept.; Swinkels, W. [Holland Energy Technology BV (Netherlands)

    1992-12-31

    Freeze concentration as a separation process was discussed. It separates mixed liquids by converting one or more of them to a solid. The process is more energy efficient in many applications than either evaporation or distillation, the most common industrial separation methods today. An EPRI report has shown that annual heat energy consumption would decrease an estimated 1.4 quads if industry replaced evaporation and distillation in every feasible case where freezing can be used. The freeze concentration process was employed to replace thermal evaporation in the dairy industry. The goals of the project were to save energy by converting concentration processes to an efficient electrically powered refrigeration system, and to create higher quality dairy products. Tests showed equal or superior quality from freeze concentrates. 2 tabs.

  18. Role of neurokinin 1 receptors in dextran sulfate-induced colitis: studies with gene-deleted mice and the selective receptor antagonist netupitant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szitter, István; Pintér, Erika; Perkecz, Anikó; Kemény, Agnes; Kun, József; Kereskai, László; Pietra, Claudio; Quinn, John P; Zimmer, Andreas; Berger, Alexandra; Paige, Christopher J; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2014-05-01

    The function of the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor was investigated in the DSS-induced mouse colitis model using NK1 receptor-deficient mice and the selective antagonist netupitant. Colitis was induced by oral administration of 20 mg/ml DSS solution for 7 days in C57BL/6 and Tacr1 KO animals (n = 5-7). During the induction, one-half of the C57BL/6 and Tacr1 KO group received one daily dose of 6 mg/kg netupitant, administered intraperitoneally, the other half of the group received saline, respectively. Disease activity index (DAI), on the basis of stool consistency, blood and weight loss, was determined over 7 days. Histological evaluation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) measurement, cytokine concentrations and receptor expression analysis were performed on the colon samples. NK1 receptors are up-regulated in the colon in response to DSS treatment. DSS increased DAI, histopathological scores, BLC, sICAM-1, IFN-γ, IL-16 and JE in wildtype mice, which were significantly reduced in NK1 receptor-deficient ones. NK1 receptor antagonism with netupitant significantly diminished DAI, inflammatory histopathological alterations, BLC, IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-16 in wildtype mice, but not in the NK1-deficient ones. MPO was similarly elevated and netupitant significantly decreased its activity in both groups. NK1 receptor antagonism could be beneficial for colitis via inhibiting different inflammatory mechanisms.

  19. Extension of platelet concentrate storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T L; Nelson, E J; Carmen, R; Murphy, S

    1983-01-01

    Extension of the storage time of platelet concentrates in a satellite bag which is part of a new blood bag system was studied by reinfusing autologous 51Cr-labeled platelets into normal volunteers, and measuring postinfusion platelet counts and bleeding times in patients requiring platelet transfusions. This satellite bag, made of polyvinylchloride plasticized with a new agent, was found to protect platelet concentrates against fall of pH better than other containers studied. This protection was felt to be due to the greater gas permeability of the new plastic. Mean in vivo recovery and half-life (greater than 31% and 3.3 days, respectively) of autologous reinfused platelets were satisfactory following 5 days of storage. Following 7 days of storage, mean recovery was 41 percent and half-life was 2.8 days. Peripheral platelet count increments in patients following platelet transfusions with concentrates stored 4 to 7 days in the new plastic were comparable to increments following transfusion of platelets stored 2 to 3 days in the other plastics studied. Bleeding times shortened in three of four patients receiving platelet concentrates stored from 4 to 6 days in the new plastic. Platelet concentrates stored in the new bag at 20 to 24 degrees C with flat-bed or elliptical agitation could be transfused for up to 5 days following phlebotomy with acceptable clinical results. The new plastic container is promising for storage of platelet concentrates for up to 7 days. Due to the higher pH of 50-ml platelet concentrates stored in bags made with the new plastic, the concentrates were superior at any storage interval to those stored in bags made of the other plastics studied.

  20. Desensitization of the human 5-HT4 receptor in isolated atria of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, Ulrich; Fritsche, Julia; Fabian, Stephanie; Christ, Josepha; Neumann, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    In the human cardiovascular system, serotonin (5-HT) exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects mediated by 5-HT4 receptors. Moreover, 5-HT4 receptor stimulation can cause arrhythmias in the human heart. Response to 5-HT can fade due to desensitization of the receptor system and/or activation of phosphodiesterases. In this study, we investigated a potential desensitization of the human 5-HT4(a) receptor expressed in the mouse heart. Therefore, we have used atrial preparations of transgenic (TG) mice with cardiac myocyte-specific overexpression of the human 5-HT4(a) receptor and their non-transgenic littermates (WT). Homologous (by 5-HT) and potentially heterologous (by isoprenaline) desensitization of the 5-HT4 receptor was investigated in atria of TG mice. 5-HT increased force of contraction in isolated electrically paced left atria and beating rate in spontaneously beating right atria only in preparations from TG but not from WT. Pre-treatment of isolated atria with high concentrations (10-600 μM) of 5-HT for 60 min attenuated the positive inotropic effects and the positive chronotropic effects of 5-HT in TG atria. Several inhibitors of desensitization including Zn2+, sucrose, and paroxetine were tested. Whereas sucrose was without any effect and Zn2+ only was partially effective, paroxetine was able to inhibit desensitization favoring at least in part a G-protein receptor-coupled kinase-mediated mechanism of 5-HT4 receptor desensitization in the TG mouse heart. In addition, desensitization of ventricular 5-HT4 receptors was noted in isolated perfused hearts (Langendorff preparations) from TG mice. In summary, we show homologous desensitization of the 5-HT4 receptor in the heart of a transgenic mouse model possibly dependent on active G-protein receptor-coupled kinase. The exact mechanism and a potentially heterologous desensitization have to be elucidated by further investigations.

  1. The Effects of Histamine H3 Receptors on Contractile Responses on Rat Gastric Fundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aşkın Hekimoğlu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the effects of histamine receptors on the gastrointestinal system smooth muscle contractions and the role of histamine H3 receptors on these effects. İsolated rat gastric fundus preparations were hanged on isolated organ bath and histamine receptor agonist and anthagonists were added to the bath solution and the electrical field stimulation-induced contractile responses were evaluated. In our study groups after blocking one of the histamine receptors H1, H2,H3; contractile responses were observed. Then, other two receptors were blocked one by one or combination of them to observe the changes on the contractile responses given to the electrical stimulation .To blocke histamine receptors pyrilamine (10-6м as H1 receptor blocker, famotidine (10-6м as H2 receptor blocker and thioperamide (10-5м as H3 receptor blocker and various combination of them were used. All groups were treated with H3 receptor anthagonist thioperamide (10-5м and agonist (R-α-methylhistamine (RMHA on 10-8, 10-7, 10-6 ve 10-5 molar concentrations cumulatively to observe its mediator effects on contractile responses. We suggested that (R-α-methylhistamine mediates the inhibition on the contractile effects of rat gastric fundus. This conclusion was supported by these findings: a the selective agonists (RMHA caused a dumping of the contractile effect of acetylcholine; b the effect of (RMHA was prevented by the selective H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide.

  2. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole quinuclidine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Lirit N; Ford, Benjamin M; Madadi, Nikhil R; Penthala, Narsimha R; Crooks, Peter A; Prather, Paul L

    2014-08-15

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogs bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analog exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogs acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogs demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole Quinuclidine analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Prather, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogues bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analogue exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogues acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogues demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. PMID:24858620

  4. Dopamine D/sub 2/ and D/sub 1/ receptors: biochemical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niznik, H.B.

    1986-01-01

    In order to label dopamine D/sub 2/ receptors reversibly and selectively the potent substituted benzamide neuroleptic, YM-09151-2, was tritium labeled and its binding characteristics to striatal homogenates investigated. (/sup 3/H) YM-09151-2 bound to D/sub 2/ receptors with high affinity in a specific, saturable, reversible and sodium dependent fashion, displaying an appropriate pharmacological D/sub 2/ receptor profile. (/sup 3/H) YM-09151-2 appears to be the ligand of choice for labeling D/sub 2/ receptors since it displays approximately 20-fold lower affinity for serotonergic S/sub 2/ receptors than does (/sup 3/H) spiperone. As an initial step towards the molecular identification of the ligand binding subunit of the striatal D/sub 2/ receptor, photolabile analogues of the substituted benzamide clebopride were synthesized and their reversible and irreversible binding interactions to D/sub 2/ receptors characterized. D/sub 2/ receptor photoinactivation was prevented in a concentration and stereoselective manner by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists. In vivo biodistribution studies with (/sup 125/I) iodoazidoclebopride confirmed the ligand's ability to bind to D/sub 2/ receptor-rich regions and as such, may become a useful tool for the molecular characterization of D/sub 2/ receptor proteins. Digitonin solubilized striatal dopamine D/sub 2/ and D/sub 1/ receptors can be completely separated with full retention of biological activity by steric exclusion High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with corresponding Stokes radii of 7.1 and 5.6 nm.

  5. Expression of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the reproductive system of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Marcin; Chruścicka, Barbara; Lech, Tomasz; Burnat, Grzegorz; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Although the presence of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors in the central nervous system is well documented, they have recently been found in peripheral and non-neuronal tissues. In the present study we investigated the expression of group III mGlu receptors in the reproductive system of male mice. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the presence of mGlu6, mGlu7 and mGlu8 (but not mGlu4) receptor transcripts in testes and epididymides from adult mice. In addition, expression of mGlu6 (Grm6) and mGlu8 receptor (Grm8) mRNA was detected in spermatozoa isolated from the vas deferens. The vas deferens was found to contain only mGlu7 receptor (Grm7) mRNA, which was particularly intense in 21-day-old male mice. In penile homogenates, only the mGlu7 receptor signal was detected. Genetic ablation of the mGlu7 receptor in males led to fertility disorders manifested by decreased insemination capability as well as deterioration of sperm parameters, particularly sperm motility, vitality, sperm membrane integrity and morphology, with a simultaneous increase in sperm concentration. These results indicate that constitutively expressed mGlu receptors in the male reproductive system may play an important role in ejaculation and/or erection processes, as well as in the formation and maturation of spermatozoa.

  6. Progesterone receptor structure and protease activity in primary human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, P D; Clarke, C L; Satyaswaroop, P G

    1988-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to investigate progesterone receptor structure (isoforms) in 33 primary human endometrial tumors. The monoclonal antibodies recognized on protein blots two progesterone receptor proteins with molecular weights of 116,000 and 81,000. The Mr 116,000 protein appeared as a triplet, while a single band was found for the Mr 81,000 protein. The triplet/singlet structure was found in all progesterone receptor-positive tumors, regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation. Protease activity, which gave rise to a false-negative pattern on protein blots, was found in approximately one-half of the tumors in which it was investigated. Inclusion of a cocktail of protease inhibitors during sample preparation resulted in the maintenance of the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure. Mixing experiments using a progesterone receptor-rich human endometrial carcinoma (EnCa 101), which lacks protease activity, and protease-containing primary tumor homogenates indicated that the protease was leupeptin sensitive. Interestingly, while the proteolytic activity reduced or eliminated the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure seen on protein blot analysis, it did not affect progesterone receptor concentration measured by Scatchard analysis. Sample preparation in the presence of protease inhibitors is therefore a requisite for structural analysis of the progesterone receptor in endometrial tumors.

  7. Modulatory Effects of Dopamine D2 Receptors on Spreading Depression in Rat Somatosensory Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Haarmann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spreading depression (SD is a propagating wave of depolarization followed by depression of the neuroglial activities and can modulate extracellular dopamine concentrations in the neocortex. It has been shown that the dopaminergic system plays a role in migraine. SD has been suggested as a critical phenomenon in the pathophysiology of migraine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dopamine D2 receptors on the characteristic features of SD in rat neocortical tissues. Methods: The effect of dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole and D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride was tested on different characteristic features (amplitude, duration and velocity of KCl-induced SD in somatosensory neocortical slices of adult rats. The effect of above-mentioned substances on production of long-term potentiation (LTP in the neocortex was also evaluated. Results: The present data revealed a dose-dependent suppression of the amplitude and duration of SD in the presence of the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride in the neocortex. D2 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole dose-dependently enhanced the amplitude and duration of the neocortical SD. Furthermore, application of D2 receptor antagonist significantly suppressed induction of LTP. Discussion: These results indicate that D2 receptors modulate the initiation of SD in the neocortex. This finding refers to the potential role of D2 receptor antagonist in treatment of migraine pain.

  8. Intracellular ATP concentration contributes to the cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects of adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujue Li

    Full Text Available Extracellular adenosine (ADE interacts with cells by two pathways: by activating cell surface receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations; and by interfering with the homeostasis of the intracellular nucleotide pool at millimolar concentrations. Ade shows both cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of adenosine-mediated ATP on cell viability were investigated. Adenosine treatment was found to be cytoprotective in the low intracellular ATP state, but cytotoxic under the normal ATP state. Adenosine-mediated cytotoxicity and cytoprotection rely on adenosine-derived ATP formation, but not via the adenosine receptor pathway. Ade enhanced proteasome inhibition-induced cell death mediated by ATP generation. These data provide a new pathway by which adenosine exerts dual biological effects on cell viability, suggesting an important role for adenosine as an ATP precursor besides the adenosine receptor pathway.

  9. Triton X-100 inhibits agonist-induced currents and suppresses benzodiazepine modulation of GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Ebert, Bjarke; Klaerke, Dan

    2009-01-01

    effects on gramicidin channel A appearance rate and lifetime in artificial lipid bilayers. In the present study, the pharmacological action of Triton-X 100 on GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes was examined. Triton-X 100 inhibited GABA(A) alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2S) receptor currents...... by flunitrazepam at alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2S) receptors. All effects were independent of the presence of a gamma(2S) subunit in the GABA(A) receptor complex. The present study suggests that Triton X-100 may stabilize open and desensitized states of the GABA(A) receptor through changes in lipid bilayer elasticity....... in a noncompetitive, time- and voltage-dependent manner and increased the apparent rate and extent of desensitization at 10 muM, which is 30 fold below the critical micelle concentration. In addition, Triton X-100 induced picrotoxin-sensitive GABA(A) receptor currents and suppressed allosteric modulation...

  10. Arabidopsis ETR1 and ERS1 Differentially Repress the Ethylene Response in Combination with Other Ethylene Receptor Genes1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The ethylene response is negatively regulated by a family of five ethylene receptor genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The five members of the ethylene receptor family can physically interact and form complexes, which implies that cooperativity for signaling may exist among the receptors. The ethylene receptor gene mutations etr1-1(C65Y)(for ethylene response1-1), ers1-1(I62P) (for ethylene response sensor1-1), and ers1C65Y are dominant, and each confers ethylene insensitivity. In this study, the repression of the ethylene response by these dominant mutant receptor genes was examined in receptor-defective mutants to investigate the functional significance of receptor cooperativity in ethylene signaling. We showed that etr1-1(C65Y), but not ers1-1(I62P), substantially repressed various ethylene responses independent of other receptor genes. In contrast, wild-type receptor genes differentially supported the repression of ethylene responses by ers1-1(I62P); ETR1 and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE4 (EIN4) supported ers1-1(I62P) functions to a greater extent than did ERS2, ETR2, and ERS1. The lack of both ETR1 and EIN4 almost abolished the repression of ethylene responses by ers1C65Y, which implied that ETR1 and EIN4 have synergistic effects on ers1C65Y functions. Our data indicated that a dominant ethylene-insensitive receptor differentially repressed ethylene responses when coupled with a wild-type ethylene receptor, which supported the hypothesis that the formation of a variety of receptor complexes may facilitate differential receptor signal output, by which ethylene responses can be repressed to different extents. We hypothesize that plants can respond to a broad ethylene concentration range and exhibit tissue-specific ethylene responsiveness with differential cooperation of the multiple ethylene receptors. PMID:22227969

  11. Odontoblasts as sensory receptors: transient receptor potential channels, pannexin-1, and ionotropic ATP receptors mediate intercellular odontoblast-neuron signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Sobhan, Ubaidus; Shimada, Miyuki; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Aya; Soya, Manabu; Kuroda, Hidetaka; Katakura, Akira; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Tazaki, Masakazu

    2015-04-01

    Various stimuli induce pain when applied to the surface of exposed dentin. However, the mechanisms underlying dentinal pain remain unclear. We investigated intercellular signal transduction between odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons following direct mechanical stimulation of odontoblasts. Mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) by activating the mechanosensitive-transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, and TRPA1, but not TRPM8 channels. In cocultures of odontoblasts and TG neurons, increases in [Ca(2+)]i were observed not only in mechanically stimulated odontoblasts, but also in neighboring odontoblasts and TG neurons. These increases in [Ca(2+)]i were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and in the presence of mechanosensitive TRP channel antagonists. A pannexin-1 (ATP-permeable channel) inhibitor and ATP-degrading enzyme abolished the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in neighboring odontoblasts and TG neurons, but not in the stimulated odontoblasts. G-protein-coupled P2Y nucleotide receptor antagonists also inhibited the increases in [Ca(2+)]i. An ionotropic ATP (P2X3) receptor antagonist inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)]i in neighboring TG neurons, but not in stimulated or neighboring odontoblasts. During mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts, a connexin-43 blocker did not have any effects on the [Ca(2+)]i responses observed in any of the cells. These results indicate that ATP, released from mechanically stimulated odontoblasts via pannexin-1 in response to TRP channel activation, transmits a signal to P2X3 receptors on TG neurons. We suggest that odontoblasts are sensory receptor cells and that ATP released from odontoblasts functions as a neurotransmitter in the sensory transduction sequence for dentinal pain.

  12. The antibiotic azithromycin is a motilin receptor agonist in human stomach: comparison with erythromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, John; Sanger, Gareth J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The antibiotic azithromycin is a suggested alternative to erythromycin for treating patients with delayed gastric emptying. However, although hypothesized to activate motilin receptors, supportive evidence is unavailable. This was investigated using recombinant and naturally expressed motilin receptors in human stomach, comparing azithromycin with erythromycin. Experimental Approach [125I]-motilin binding and calcium flux experiments were conducted using human recombinant motilin receptors in CHO cells. Neuromuscular activities were studied using circular muscle of human gastric antrum, after electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic nerves. Key Results Azithromycin (1–100 μM) and erythromycin (3–30 μM) concentration-dependently displaced [125I]-motilin binding to the motilin receptor (52 ± 7 and 58 ± 18% displacement at 100 and 30 μM respectively). Azithromycin, erythromycin and motilin concentration-dependently caused short-lived increases in intracellular [Ca2+] in cells expressing the motilin receptor. EC50 values were, respectively, 2.9, 0.92 and 0.036 μM (n = 3 each); and maximal activities were similar. In human stomach, EFS evoked cholinergically mediated contractions, attenuated by simultaneous nitrergic activation. Azithromycin and erythromycin lactobionate (30–300 μM each) facilitated these contractions (apparent Emax values of 2007 ± 396 and 1924 ± 1375%, n = 3–4 each concentration, respectively). These actions were slow in onset and faded slowly. The higher concentrations also evoked short-lived muscle contraction. Contractions to a submaximally effective concentration of carbachol were unaffected by either drug. Conclusions and Implications Azithromcyin activates human recombinant motilin receptors in therapeutically relevant concentrations, similar to erythromycin. In humans, gastric antrum azithromycin caused long-lasting facilitation of cholinergic activity. These actions explain the gastric prokinetic

  13. Identification of insulin in the tear film and insulin receptor and IGF-1 receptor on the human ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cunha, Daniel A; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2002-04-01

    Insulin produces pleiotropic effects on sensitive tissues, including the ocular surface, through the tyrosine kinase insulin receptor. Cerebrospinal fluid and secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva, have been reported to contain insulin. In the present study, the presence of insulin was examined in tear film, and the expression of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor was examined in the human cornea and conjunctiva. Stimulated tear samples collected from 33 volunteers (17 men, 16 women), aged 23 to 51 years, who were fed or fasted for 12 hours, were assayed for total protein and insulin content by the biuret dye test and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Frozen sections of human cornea (n = 4) and conjunctiva (n = 3) were incubated with anti-insulin receptor and anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and developed with a secondary antibody-peroxidase conjugate. Insulin was detected in all tear samples analyzed, the mean concentration being 0.404 +/- 0.129 ng/mL. There were no gender-related differences. In fed subjects, tears tended toward a higher insulin content than those in fasted individuals. There was no linear correlation between insulin and total protein content (mean, 4.61 +/- 0.79 mg/mL) in the tear film. Insulin and IGF-1 receptors were detected in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first demonstration of insulin in human tear film and the presence of insulin and IGF-1 receptor on the human ocular surface. These results suggest that the pancreatic hormone may play a metabolic and/or mitogenic role on the ocular surface.

  14. Evaluation of exposure concentrations used in assessing manufactured nanomaterial environmental hazards: are they relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Patricia A; Klaessig, Frederick; Turco, Ronald F; Priester, John H; Rico, Cyren M; Avila-Arias, Helena; Mortimer, Monika; Pacpaco, Kathleen; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-09-16

    Manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) are increasingly produced and used in consumer goods, yet our knowledge regarding their environmental risks is limited. Environmental risks are assessed by characterizing exposure levels and biological receptor effects. As MNMs have rarely been quantified in environmental samples, our understanding of exposure level is limited. Absent direct measurements, environmental MNM concentrations are estimated from exposure modeling. Hazard, the potential for effects on biological receptors, is measured in the laboratory using a range of administered MNM concentrations. Yet concerns have been raised regarding the "relevancy" of hazard assessments, particularly when the administered MNM concentrations exceed those predicted to occur in the environment. What MNM concentrations are administered in hazard assessments and which are "environmentally relevant"? This review regards MNM concentrations in hazard assessments, from over 600 peer-reviewed articles published between 2008 and 2013. Some administered MNM concentrations overlap with, but many diverge from, predicted environmental concentrations. Other uncertainties influence the environmental relevance of current hazard assessments and exposure models, including test conditions, bioavailable concentrations, mode of action, MNM production volumes, and model validation. Therefore, it may be premature for MNM risk research to sanction information on the basis of concentration "environmental relevance".

  15. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  16. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ashoor

    Full Text Available Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+-dependent Cl(- channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  17. Modulatory Effects of Eschscholzia californica Alkaloids on Recombinant GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Fedurco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The California poppy (Eschscholzia californica Cham. contains a variety of natural compounds including several alkaloids found exclusively in this plant. Because of the sedative, anxiolytic, and analgesic effects, this herb is currently sold in pharmacies in many countries. However, our understanding of these biological effects at the molecular level is still lacking. Alkaloids detected in E. californica could be hypothesized to act at GABAA receptors, which are widely expressed in the brain mainly at the inhibitory interneurons. Electrophysiological studies on a recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor showed no effect of N-methyllaurotetanine at concentrations lower than 30 μM. However, (S-reticuline behaved as positive allosteric modulator at the α3, α5, and α6 isoforms of GABAA receptors. The depressant properties of aerial parts of E. californica are assigned to chloride-current modulation by (S-reticuline at the α3β2γ2 and α5β2γ2 GABAA receptors. Interestingly, α1, α3, and α5 were not significantly affected by (R-reticuline, 1,2-tetrahydroreticuline, codeine, and morphine—suspected (S-reticuline metabolites in the rodent brain.

  18. Clinical correlations of steroid receptors and male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, R B; Lippman, M E; Thompson, E B; McGuire, W L; Wittliff, J L; De Sombre, E R; Jensen, E V; Singhakowinta, A; Brooks, S C; Neifeld, J P

    1980-04-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) were present in tumor specimens from 29 of 34 cases of male breast cancer. There was a significant negative correlation of ER concentration with age. The quantity of ER tended to correlate directly with progesterone receptor levels, disease-free interval, and response duration among responders, but not to a statistically significant extent. In 13 patients for whom response data were available, no significant correlation was observed between ER levels and either frequency or duration of orchiectomy response. Among the six patients with tumor ER levels of less than 30 fmol per mg of protein, however, only two brief responses to orchiectomy occurred that were of little clinical benefit, while three of seven patients with higher ER responded more favorably. Thus, although this suggests that a relationship between low ER and unfavorable orchiectomy response may emerge as more patients are studied, currently available data do not justify basing therapeutic intervention on ER status of a biopsy in a manner analogous to that used for female breast cancer. Nine of 14 male breast cancer patients had positive progesterone receptor assays and several had androgen or glucocorticoid receptors. Tissue from only three of ten men with gynecomastia had measurable ER, and these were limited to the 4S component on sucrose gradients.

  19. The TRPM8 Protein Is a Testosterone Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Elustondo, Pia A.; Krishnan, Vivek; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V.; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a key steroid hormone in the development of male reproductive tissues and the regulation of the central nervous system. The rapid signaling mechanism induced by testosterone affects numerous behavioral traits, including sexual drive, aggressiveness, and fear conditioning. However, the currently identified testosterone receptor(s) is not believed to underlie the fast signaling, suggesting an orphan pathway. Here we report that an ion channel from the transient receptor potential family, TRPM8, commonly known as the cold and menthol receptor is the major component of testosterone-induced rapid actions. Using cultured and primary cell lines along with the purified TRPM8 protein, we demonstrate that testosterone directly activates TRPM8 channel at low picomolar range. Specifically, testosterone induced TRPM8 responses in primary human prostate cells, PC3 prostate cancer cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and hippocampal neurons. Picomolar concentrations of testosterone resulted in full openings of the purified TRPM8 channel in planar lipid bilayers. Furthermore, acute applications of testosterone on human skin elicited a cooling sensation. Our data conclusively demonstrate that testosterone is an endogenous and highly potent agonist of TRPM8, suggesting a role of TRPM8 channels well beyond their well established function in somatosensory neurons. This discovery may further imply TRPM8 channel function in testosterone-dependent behavioral traits. PMID:25480785

  20. Hyaluronic acid induces activation of the κ-opioid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zavan

    Full Text Available Nociceptive pain is one of the most common types of pain that originates from an injury involving nociceptors. Approximately 60% of the knee joint innervations are classified as nociceptive. The specific biological mechanism underlying the regulation of nociceptors is relevant for the treatment of symptoms affecting the knee joint. Intra-articular administration of exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA appears to be particularly effective in reducing pain and improving patient function.We performed an in vitro study conducted in CHO cells that expressed a panel of opioid receptors and in primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons to determine if HA induces the activation of opioid peptide receptors (OPr using both aequorin and the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM.Selective agonists and antagonists for each OPr expressed on CHO cells were used to test the efficacy of our in vitro model followed by stimulation with HA. The results showed that HA induces stimulatory effects on the κ receptor (KOP. These effects of HA were also confirmed in rat DRG neurons, which express endogenously the OPr.HA activates the KOP receptor in a concentration dependent manner, with a pEC(50 value of 7.57.

  1. A circuit supporting concentration-invariant odor perception in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asahina Kenta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most odors are perceived to have the same quality over a large concentration range, but the neural mechanisms that permit concentration-invariant olfactory perception are unknown. In larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, odors are sensed by an array of 25 odorant receptors expressed in 21 olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. We investigated how subsets of larval OSNs with overlapping but distinct response properties cooperate to mediate perception of a given odorant across a range of concentrations. Results Using calcium imaging, we found that ethyl butyrate, an ester perceived by humans as fruity, activated three OSNs with response thresholds that varied across three orders of magnitude. Whereas wild-type larvae were strongly attracted by this odor across a 500-fold range of concentration, individuals with only a single functional OSN showed attraction across a narrower concentration range corresponding to the sensitivity of each ethyl butyrate-tuned OSN. To clarify how the information carried by different OSNs is integrated by the olfactory system, we characterized the response properties of local inhibitory interneurons and projection neurons in the antennal lobe. Local interneurons only responded to high ethyl butyrate concentrations upon summed activation of at least two OSNs. Projection neurons showed a reduced response to odors when summed input from two OSNs impinged on the circuit compared to when there was only a single functional OSN. Conclusions Our results show that increasing odor concentrations induce progressive activation of concentration-tuned olfactory sensory neurons and concomitant recruitment of inhibitory local interneurons. We propose that the interplay of combinatorial OSN input and local interneuron activation allows animals to remain sensitive to odors across a large range of stimulus intensities.

  2. Degradation of tissue-type plasminogen activator by human monocyte- derived macrophages is mediated by the mannose receptor and by the low- density lipoprotein receptor-related protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, F.; Braat, E.A.M.; Rijken, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The balance of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) production and degradation determines its concentration in blood and tissues. Disturbance of this balance may result in either increased or decreased proteolysis. In the present study, we identified the receptor systems involved in the

  3. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  4. Multiple serotonin receptors: regional distribution and effect of raphe lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackshear, M.A.; Sanders-Bush, E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA). School of Medicine); Steranka, L.R. (Indiana University, Northwest Center for Medical Education, Gary, IN, USA)

    1981-12-17

    These studies confirm and extend the recent work suggesting that (/sup 3/H)lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) labels two distinct binding sites in rat brain resembling serotonin (5HT) receptors. Although Scatchard analyses of (/sup 3/H)LSD binding to membranes prepared from cortex/hippocampus were linear, the heterogeneity of the (/sup 3/H)LSD binding sites was clearly demonstrated in displacement studies. The displacement curves for both 5HT and spiperone were bisigmoidal with the concentration required to saturate the high affinity components nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations necessary to saturate the low affinity components. Additivity studies suggested that the sites with high affinity for 5HT and spiperone are different, independent sites. These sites are referred to as 5HT/sub 1/ and 5HT/sub 2/ respectively. Regional analyses showed, that in the frontal cortex, the density of the 5HT/sub 2/ site was slightly greater than the 5HT/sub 1/ site whereas the 5HT/sub 1/ site was predominant in all other brain areas, including the spinal cord. The pharmacological properties of the two sites have features in common with 5HT receptors; however, electrolytic lesions of the midbrain raphe nuclei did not change the densities or binding constants of the two apparent 5HT receptor subtypes, even though the number of high affinity 5HT uptake sites was markedly reduced.

  5. Emerging GLP-1 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have become available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These agents exploit the physiological effects of GLP-1, which is able to address several of the pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1R agonists...

  6. Osteopontin interaction with integrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kläning, Eva

    Osteopontin is a negatively charged and unstructured protein that is found in many types of tissue in humans. Osteopontin can interact with many different types of cells via interaction with integrins, which are a particular class of receptors expressed on the cellular surface. Via contact...... with integrins, osteopontin can affect cellular behaviour in both normal and disease-related contexts....

  7. Chemokine receptors in allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castan, L; Magnan, A; Bouchaud, G

    2017-05-01

    Under homeostatic conditions, as well as in various diseases, leukocyte migration is a crucial issue for the immune system that is mainly organized through the activation of bone marrow-derived cells in various tissues. Immune cell trafficking is orchestrated by a family of small proteins called chemokines. Leukocytes express cell-surface receptors that bind to chemokines and trigger transendothelial migration. Most allergic diseases, such as asthma, rhinitis, food allergies, and atopic dermatitis, are generally classified by the tissue rather than the type of inflammation, making the chemokine/chemokine receptor system a key point of the immune response. Moreover, because small antagonists can easily block such receptors, various molecules have been developed to suppress the recruitment of immune cells during allergic reactions, representing potential new drugs for allergies. We review the chemokines and chemokine receptors that are important in asthma, food allergies, and atopic dermatitis and their respectively developed antagonists. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  9. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  10. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Any living organism interacts with and responds specifically to environmental molecules by expressing specific olfactory receptors. This specificity will be first examined in causal terms with particular emphasis on the mechanisms controlling olfactory gene expression, cell-to-cell interactions a...

  11. TRA-418, a thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist and prostacyclin receptor agonist, inhibits platelet-leukocyte interaction in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Ohno, Michihiro; Yamada, Naohiro; Ohtake, Atsushi; Matsushita, Teruo

    2010-10-01

    TRA-418, a compound with both thromboxane A2 receptor (TP receptor) antagonistic and prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonistic activities, was synthesised in our laboratory as a new antithrombotic agent. In this study, we examined the effects of TRA-418 on platelet-leukocyte interactions in human whole blood. Platelet-leukocyte interactions were induced by U-46619 in the presence of epinephrine (U-46619 + epinephrine) or with thrombin receptor agonist peptide 1-6 (TRAP). Platelet-leukocyte interactions were assessed by flow cytometry, with examination of both platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte complexes. In a control experiment, the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29548 significantly inhibited the induction of platelet-leukocyte complexes by the combination of U-46619 and epinephrine, but not TRAP-induced formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes. Conversely, the IP receptor agonist beraprost sodium inhibited platelet-leukocyte complex formation induced by both methods, although the IC50 values of beraprost sodium for U-46619 + epinephrine were at least 10-fold greater than for TRAP. Under such conditions, TRA-418 inhibited both U-46619 + epinephrine-induced and TRAP-induced platelet-leukocyte complex formation in a concentration-dependent manner, in a similar range. These results suggest that TRA-418 exerts its inhibitory effects on platelet-leukocyte interactions by acting as a TP receptor antagonist as well as an IP receptor agonist in an additive or synergistic manner. These inhibitory effects of TRA-418 on formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes suggest the compound is beneficial effects as an antithrombotic agent.

  12. Evolution of neurotransmitter receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, J C; di Porzio, U; Robinson, D A; Shreeve, S M; Lai, J; Kerlavage, A R; Fracek, S P; Lentes, K U; Fraser, C M

    1988-01-01

    The presence of hormones, neurotransmitters, their receptors and biosynthetic and degradative enzymes is clearly not only associated with the present and the recent past but with the past several hundred million years. Evidence is mounting which indicates substantial conservation of protein structure and function of these receptors and enzymes over these tremendous periods of time. These findings indicate that the evolution and development of the nervous system was not dependent upon the formation of new or better transmitter substances, receptor proteins, transducers and effector proteins but involved better utilization of these highly developed elements in creating advanced and refined circuitry. This is not a new concept; it is one that is now substantiated by increasingly sophisticated studies. In a 1953 article discussing chemical aspects of evolution (Danielli, 1953) Danielli quotes Medawar, "... endocrine evolution is not an evolution of hormones but an evolution of the uses to which they are put; an evolution not, to put it crudely, of chemical formulae but of reactivities, reaction patterns and tissue competences." To also quote Danielli, "In terms of comparative biochemistry, one must ask to what extent the evolution of these reactivities, reaction patterns and competences is conditional upon the evolution of methods of synthesis of new proteins, etc., and to what extent the proteins, etc., are always within the synthetic competence of an organism. In the latter case evolution is the history of changing uses of molecules, and not of changing synthetic abilities." (Danielli, 1953). Figure 4 outlines a phylogenetic tree together with an indication of where evidence exists for both the enzymes that determine the biosynthesis and metabolism of the cholinergic and adrenergic transmitters and their specific cholinergic and adrenergic receptors. This figure illustrates a number of important points. For example, the evidence appears to show that the transmitters

  13. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  14. Roles of xenobiotic receptors in vascular pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Zihui; Luo, Xiaoqin

    2014-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), 2 closely related and liver-enriched members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a nonnuclear receptor transcription factor (TF), are major receptors/TFs regulating the expression of genes for the clearance and detoxification of xenobiotics. They are hence defined as "xenobiotic receptors". Recent studies have demonstrated that PXR, CAR and AhR also regulate the expression of key proteins involved in endobiotic responses such as the metabolic homeostasis of lipids, glucose, and bile acid, and inflammatory processes. It is suggested that the functions of PXR, CAR and AhR may be closely implicated in the pathogeneses of metabolic vascular diseases, such as hyperlipidemia, atherogenesis, and hypertension. Therefore, manipulation of the activities of these receptors may provide novel strategies for the treatment of vascular diseases. Here, we review the pathophysiological roles of PXR, CAR and AhR in the vascular system.

  15. Stavudine plasma concentrations and lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Hofstede, Hadewych J M; Koopmans, Peter P; Burger, David M

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between plasma stavudine concentrations and lipoatrophy (LA), one of the major adverse events in patients on stavudine and one of the major reasons to discontinue stavudine. Plasma drug concentrations were retrospectively analysed in patients who were on a stavudine-containing regimen for at least 12 months. We defined two groups of patients: 21 patients with LA and 15 patients without LA or other stavudine-related side effects (i.e. neuropathy). We analysed stavudine concentrations in 212 plasma samples: 87 in the control group and 125 in the LA group, with a mean of four plasma samples per person (at least two a year). Demographics were comparable in LA patients and controls, except the duration of stavudine use, which was longer in the LA group: 55 versus 42 months in the control group. Overall, LA patients had higher drug exposure to stavudine when compared with the controls, and this was seen in the geometric concentration ratios (CRs), which were 0.978 and 0.741, respectively (P = 0.04), and also a higher percentage of CR values >1.0, representing a drug concentration above the normal population curve (46% versus 23%, P = 0.02). In addition, the duration of stavudine therapy was independently associated with LA (P = 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, both duration of stavudine (P = 0.05) and CR > 1.0 (P = 0.02) were independently correlated with LA. Monitoring of plasma stavudine concentrations can be useful to prevent stavudine-related LA.

  16. Calcium is the switch in the moonlighting dual function of the ligand-activated receptor kinase phytosulfokine receptor 1

    KAUST Repository

    Muleya, Victor

    2014-09-23

    Background: A number of receptor kinases contain guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic centres encapsulated in the cytosolic kinase domain. A prototypical example is the phytosulfokine receptor 1 (PSKR1) that is involved in regulating growth responses in plants. PSKR1 contains both kinase and GC activities however the underlying mechanisms regulating the dual functions have remained elusive. Findings: Here, we confirm the dual activity of the cytoplasmic domain of the PSKR1 receptor. We show that mutations within the guanylate cyclase centre modulate the GC activity while not affecting the kinase catalytic activity. Using physiologically relevant Ca2+ levels, we demonstrate that its GC activity is enhanced over two-fold by Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, increasing Ca2+ levels inhibits kinase activity up to 500-fold at 100 nM Ca2+. Conclusions: Changes in calcium at physiological levels can regulate the kinase and GC activities of PSKR1. We therefore propose a functional model of how calcium acts as a bimodal switch between kinase and GC activity in PSKR1 that could be relevant to other members of this novel class of ligand-activated receptor kinases.

  17. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  18. The role of EP and TP receptors in the response to prostaglandin E2 in the aorta of WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Eva Hc; Jensen, Boye; Skøtt, Ole

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The present study examined the hypothesis that prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) through activation of prostaglandin E (EP) receptor contributes to endothelium-dependent contractions. Methods and Results Western blotting revealed that the protein expression of EP1 receptor was significantly down......-regulated in the aorta of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), but there was no significant difference in the expression of EP2, EP4 and total EP3 receptors between preparations of Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and SHR. Isometric tension studies showed that low concentrations of PGE(2) caused endothelium......-dependent relaxations in WKY but not in aortas of the SHR. High concentrations of PGE(2) evoked contractions predominately through the activation of thromboxane-prostanoid (TP) receptors in the WKY, but involves the dual activation EP and TP receptors in the SHR. SQ29,548, BAYu3405 and Terutroban (TP receptor...

  19. TGF-β1 serum concentrations and receptor expressions in the lens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue fibrosis as complication of diabetes mellitus is known in humans. Because TGF-β1induces fibrosis and is elevated in humans suffering from diabetes mellitus we measured this growth factor in serum of dogs with diabetes mellitus and compared it with healthy dogs and those with fibrotic diseases. Further we ...

  20. Vitamin C deficiency reduces muscarinic receptor coronary artery vasoconstriction and plasma tetrahydrobiopterin concentration in guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsted, Gry Freja; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lindblad, Maiken Marie

    2017-01-01

    exposed to vasoconstrictor/-dilator agents. Dunkin Hartley female guinea pigs (n = 32) were randomized to high (1500 mg/kg diet) or low (0 to 50 mg/kg diet) vitC for 10-12 weeks. At euthanasia, coronary artery segments were dissected and mounted in a wire-myograph. Vasomotor responses to potassium...

  1. 2-Heteroaryl Benzimidazole Derivatives as Melanin Concentrating Hormone Receptor 1 (MCH-R1) Antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chae Jo; Kim, Jeong Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Kwangseok; Yi, Kyu Yang [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    A novel series of 2-heteroaryl substituted benzimidazole derivatives, containing the piperidinylphenyl acetamide group at the 1-position, were synthesized and evaluated as MCH-R1 antagonists. Extensive SAR investigation probing the effects of C-2 heteroaryl group led to the identification of 2-[2-(pyridin-3-yl)ethyl] analog 3o, which exhibits highly potent MCH-R1 binding activity with an IC{sub 50} value of 1 nM. This substance 3o also has low hERG binding activity, good metabolic stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties.

  2. 4-Acylamino-and 4-ureidobenzamides as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Receveur, Jean-Marie; Bjurling, Emelie; Ulven, Trond

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis, in vitro biological evaluation and structure-activity relationships of 4-acylamino-and 4-ureidobenzamides as novel hMCH1R-antagonists are disclosed. The nature of the amine side chains could be varied considerably in contrast to the central benzamide scaffold and aromatic substituents....

  3. Physician Education: The Erythropoietin Receptor and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura; Arai

    1996-01-01

    ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO): Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone that promotes the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells and regulates the number of erythrocytes in peripheral blood. EPO is produced mainly by the kidneys, and transcription of the EPO gene is promoted by a reduction in the oxygen concentration in the blood. The existence of EPO was suggested near the end of the 19th century by the discovery that hypoxia increases the production of red blood cells. EPO was identified as a serum factor in the 1950s, and in 1970 Miyake and coworkers succeeded in purifying it by using the urine of patients with aplastic anemia as a starting material. The human EPO gene was cloned in 1985 using a partial amino acid sequence from this purified EPO, and it is well known that recombinant EPO is currently used as a drug to treat anemia associated with chronic renal failure and other illnesses. ACTION OF EPO: When human bone marrow cells are cultured in a semisolid medium containing EPO, they form small erythroblast colonies in five to seven days, and by day 10 large erythroblast colonies appear that resemble fireworks ("burst" colonies). The original cells in the former colonies are called colony forming units-erythroid (CFU-E) or late-stage erythroblast progenitor cells and in the latter colonies they are called burst forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) or early-stage erythroblast progenitor cells. As shown in Figure 1, red blood cells are produced through differentiation from stem cells to BFU-E, CFU-E, and erythroblasts. Although EPO acts on both BFU-E and CFU-E cells, CFU-E cells show greater sensitivity to EPO, and other factors such as stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-4, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) must be present together with EPO for BFU-E cell proliferation. In erythroblasts beyond the CFU-E stage, sensitivity to EPO decreases as the cells mature. THE EPO RECEPTOR AND THE CYTOKINE RECEPTOR FAMILY: The EPO

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  5. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene by Cannabis Use Interaction on CB1 Receptor Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcherside, Ariel; Noble, Lindsey J; McIntyre, Christa K; Filbey, Francesca M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Because delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, binds to cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, levels of CB1 protein could serve as a potential biomarker for response to THC. To date, available techniques to characterize CB1 expression and function in vivo are limited. In this study, we developed an assay to quantify CB1 in lymphocytes to determine how it relates to cannabis use in 58 daily cannabis users compared with 47 nonusers. Furthermore, we tested whether CB1 levels are associated with mutations in a single nucleotide polymorphism known to regulate CB1 functioning (i.e., rs2023239). Methods: Total protein concentration was analyzed through the Pierce BCA Protein assay kit. CB1 protein was quantified through CNR1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit from MyBioSource. CB1 concentration and total protein concentration were quantified and used to calculate a ratio of CB1 to total protein. Results: Inherent levels of peripheral lymphocyte CB1 were sufficient for quantification through ELISA without protein amplification. We found a group×genotype interaction such that users with the G allele had greater CB1 concentration than users with the A/A genotype, and a trend-level difference between genotypes in nonusers. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a minimally invasive technique of CB1 quantification that holds promise for the use of CB1 protein concentration, along with rs2023239 genotype, as a potential biomarker for susceptibility to cannabis use. These results suggest a gene (rs2023239 G)×environment (cannabis use) effect on CB1 density.

  6. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to optimize the potential benefits of neural stem cell (NSC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, it is necessary to understand their biological characteristics. Although neurotrophin transduction strategies are promising, alternative approaches such as the modulation of intrinsic neurotrophin expression by NSCs, could also be beneficial. Therefore, utilizing the C17.2 neural stem cell line, we have examined the expression of selected neurotrophic factors under different in vitro conditions. In view of recent evidence suggesting a role for the pineal hormone melatonin in vertebrate development, it was also of interest to determine whether its G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in NSCs. Results RT-PCR analysis revealed robust expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in undifferentiated cells maintained for two days in culture. After one week, differentiating cells continued to exhibit high expression of BDNF and NGF, but GDNF expression was lower or absent, depending on the culture conditions utilized. Melatonin MT1 receptor mRNA was detected in NSCs maintained for two days in culture, but the MT2 receptor was not seen. An immature MT1 receptor of about 30 kDa was detected by western blotting in NSCs cultured for two days, whereas a mature receptor of about 40 – 45 kDa was present in cells maintained for longer periods. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that the MT1 receptor is expressed in both neural (β-tubulin III positive and glial (GFAP positive progenitor cells. An examination of the effects of melatonin on neurotrophin expression revealed that low physiological concentrations of this hormone caused a significant induction of GDNF mRNA expression in NSCs following treatment for 24 hours. Conclusions The phenotypic characteristics of C17.2 cells suggest that they are

  7. Characterization of a novel nonpeptide vasopressin V2-agonist, OPC-51803, in cells transfected human vasopressin receptor subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeki; Yamamura, Yoshitaka; Itoh, Shuji; Hirano, Takahiro; Tsujimae, Kenji; Aoyama, Masashi; Kondo, Kazumi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shinohara, Tomoichi; Kan, Keizo; Tanada, Yoshihisa; Teramoto, Shuji; Sumida, Takumi; Nakayama, Sunao; Sekiguchi, Kazuo; Kambe, Toshimi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Mori, Toyoki; Tominaga, Michiaki

    2000-01-01

    We discovered the first nonpeptide arginine-vasopressin (AVP) V2-receptor agonist, OPC-51803. Pharmacological properties of OPC-51803 were elucidated using HeLa cells expressing human AVP receptor subtypes (V2, V1a and V1b) and compared with those of 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP), a peptide V2-receptor agonist.OPC-51803 and dDAVP displaced [3H]-AVP binding to human V2- and V1a-receptors with Ki values of 91.9±10.8 nM (n=6) and 3.12±0.38 nM (n=6) for V2-receptors, and 819±39 nM (n=6) and 41.5±9.9 nM (n=6) for V1a-receptors, indicating that OPC-51803 was about nine times more selective for V2-receptors, similar to the selectivity of dDAVP. OPC-51803 scarcely displaced [3H]-AVP binding to human V1b-receptors even at 10−4 M, while dDAVP showed potent affinity to human V1b-receptors with the Ki value of 13.7±3.2 nM (n=4).OPC-51803 concentration-dependently increased cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in HeLa cells expressing human V2-receptors with an EC50 value of 189±14 nM (n=6). The concentration-response curve for cyclic AMP production induced by OPC-51803 was shifted to the right in the presence of a V2-antagonist, OPC-31260.At 10−5 M, OPC-51803 did not increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HeLa cells expressing human V1a-receptors. On the other hand, dDAVP increased [Ca2+]i in HeLa cells expressing human V1a- and V1b-receptors in a concentration-dependent fashion.From these results, OPC-51803 has been confirmed to be the first nonpeptide agonist for human AVP V2-receptors without agonistic activities for V1a- and V1b-receptors. OPC-51803 may be useful for the treatment of AVP-deficient pathophysiological states and as a tool for AVP researches. PMID:10780976

  8. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, ...

  9. Angiotensin receptors in the cardiovascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, L.J.; Voors, AA; Buikema, H; van Gilst, WH

    2002-01-01

    The angiotensin II receptors mediate the effects of the renin-angiotensin system, which has an important role in cardiovascular (patho)physiology. Four types of angiotensin receptors are known, of which the type 1 (AT,) and the type 2 (AT(2)) receptors are the most important. Stimulation of the AT,

  10. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has

  11. Muscarinic receptors and drugs in cardiovascular medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Doods, H. N.

    1995-01-01

    The parasympathetic system and its associated muscarinic receptors have been the subject of a renaissance of interest for the following two main reasons: (1) the association of endothelial muscarinic receptors and the nitric oxide (NO) pathway; (2) the discovery of several muscarinic receptor

  12. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Glycoprotein hormone receptor; gonadotropin receptor; Labeo rohita; luteinizing hormone receptor; mariner transposon; PCR cloning. Abstract. A search for the presence of mariner-like elements in the Labeo rohita genome by polymerase chain reaction led to the amplification of a partial DNA sequence coding ...

  13. COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN OF RECEPTOR SELECTIVE TRAIL VARIANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sloot, Almer M.; Szegezdi, Eva; Reis, Carlos R.; Tur, Vicente; Quax, Wim J.; Samali, Afshin; Serrano, Luis; Wallach, D; Kovalenko, A; Feldman, M

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potential anticancer drug that selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells by interacting with death receptors DR4 and DR5. TRAIL can also bind to decoy receptors (DcR1, DcR2, and osteoprotegerin receptor) that

  14. Sensing intracellular pathogens-NOD-like receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietdijk, Svend T.; Burwell, Timothy; Bertin, John; Coyle, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system uses different molecules that sense pathogen associated molecular patterns. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-1-like receptors (RLRs) and the NOD-like receptors (NLRs). The NLRs, consisting of more than 20 related family members, are present in the cytosol and

  15. Receptor conversion in distant breast cancer metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, L.D.C.

    2013-01-01

    The routine pathological work-up of breast cancer includes the evaluation of the estrogen receptor (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) which reveals biological information about the tumour as well as provides predictive biomarkers regarding hormonal

  16. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    , more research has to be done in this field. Chemokine receptors are interesting tools in this matter. First, the chemokine system has a high degree of promiscuity that allows several chemokines to target one receptor in different ways, as well as a single chemokine ligand to target several receptors...

  17. Viscoelasticity of Concentrated Proteoglycan Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meechai, Nispa; Jamieson, Alex; Blackwell, John; Carrino, David

    2001-03-01

    Proteoglycan Aggregate (PGA) is the principal macromolecular component of the energy-absorbing matrix of cartilage and tendon. Its brush-like supramolecular structure consists of highly-ionic subunits, non-covalently bound to a hyaluronate chain. We report viscoelastic behavior of concentrated solutions of PGA, purified by column fractionation to remove free subunits. At physiological ionic strength, these preparations exhibit a sol-to-gel transition when the concentration is increased above molecular overlap. The strain dependence of concentrated solutions shows a pronounced non-linearity above a critical strain, at which the storage modulus decreases suddenly, and the loss modulus exhibits a maximum. This response is similar to that observed for close-packed dispersions of soft spheres, when the applied strain is sufficient to move a sphere past its neighbors. At low and high ionic strength, the elasticity of solutions near the overlap concentration decreases. The former is interpreted as due to a decrease in intramolecular and intermolecular electrostatic repulsions, because of strong trapping of counterions within the PGA brush, the latter to salt-induced brush collapse.

  18. Concentrating on the right measures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0. EDITORIAL. Concentrating on the right measures. Richard von Rahdena,b. , Zane Farinaa,b* and Michael Jamesc. aDiscipline of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Nelson Mandela School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban,.

  19. Gravimetric determination of phospholipid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera-Garcia, Roberto; Connell, Lisa; Shaw, Walter A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2012-09-01

    Accurate determination of lipid concentrations is an obligatory routine in a research laboratory engaged in studies using this class of biomaterials. For phospholipids, this is frequently accomplished using the phosphate assay (Bartlett, G.R. Phosphorus Assay in Column Chromatography. J. Biol. Chem. 234, 466-468, 1959). Given the purity of the currently commercially available synthetic and isolated natural lipids, we have observed that determination of the dry weight of lipid stock solutions provides the fastest, most accurate, and generic method to assay their concentrations. The protocol described here takes advantage of the high resolution and accuracy obtained by modern weighing technology. We assayed by this technique the concentrations of a number of phosphatidylcholine samples, with different degrees of acyl chain saturation and length, and in different organic solvents. The results were compared with those from Bartlett assay, (31)P NMR, and Langmuir compression isotherms. The data obtained show that the gravimetric assay yields lipid concentrations with a resolution similar or better than obtained by the other techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Benign concentric annular macular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Salles de Moura Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the authors is to show clinical findings of a patient with benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, which is an unusual condition, and part of the "bull’s eye" maculopathy differential diagnosis. An ophthalmologic examination with color perception, fluorescein angiography, and ocular electrophysiology was performed.

  1. Lactoferrin concentration in buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Giacinti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to quantify lactoferrin (Lfe in buffalo milk and to examine the factors affecting milk Lfe, such as the lactation stage, daily milk yield, parity, and milk somatic cells count (SCC. Milk Lfe concentration was detected by the SDS-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The overall mean of Lfe concentration was 0.332±0.165 g/L and ranged from 0.030 to 0.813 g/L. Milk Lfe concentrations increased (P<0.01 with the increase of days in milk, but it was not affected by parity. It was estimated an increase of 0.0015 g/L daily of Lfe in milk during lactation. Milk Lfe concentration was significantly affected by SCC. The differences became significant when the levels of SCC increased up to 200.000/mL. This is the first investigation on the levels of Lfe in buffalo milk in reference to daily milk production, lactation stage, parity and SCC. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Lfe and SCC in buffalo milk.

  2. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic def...... deficiencies in several countries, but evidence is lacking regarding indications, dosing, efficacy and safety....

  3. m2-toxin: A selective ligand for M2 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsi, J M; Valentine, H H; Potter, L T

    1999-11-01

    Selective ligands are needed for distinguishing the functional roles of M2 receptors in tissues containing several muscarinic receptor subtypes. Because the venom of the green mamba Dendroaspis angusticeps contains the most specific antagonists known for M1 and M4 receptors (m1-toxin and m4-toxin), it was screened for toxins that inhibit the binding of [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine ([(3)H]NMS) to cloned M2 receptors. Desalted venom had as much anti-M2 as anti-M4 activity. The most active anti-M2 toxin in the venom was isolated by gel filtration, cation-exchange chromatography, and reversed-phase HPLC, and called m2-toxin. Spectrometry yielded a mass of 7095 Da, and N-terminal sequencing of 53 amino acids showed RICHSQMSSQPPTTTFCRVNSCYRRTLRDPHDPRGT-IIVRGCGCPRMKPGTKL. This sequence is more homologous to antinicotinic than antimuscarinic toxins, but it lacks three almost invariant residues of antinicotinic toxins required for their activity. m2-Toxin fully blocked the binding of [(3)H]NMS and [(3)H]oxotremorine-M to M2 receptors with Hill coefficients near 1, and blocked 77% of the binding sites for 0.1 nM [(3)H]NMS in the rat brainstem (K(i) = 11 nM). Concentrations that fully blocked cloned M2 receptors had no effect on M4 receptors, but slightly increased [(3)H]NMS binding to M1 receptors, an allosteric effect. In accord with these results, light microscopic autoradiography of the rat brain showed that m2-toxin decreased [(3)H]NMS binding in regions rich in M2 receptors and increased binding in regions rich in M1 receptors. Thus m2-toxin is a novel M2-selective, short-chain neurotoxin that may prove useful for binding and functional studies.

  4. Antagonism of the 5-HT6 receptor - Preclinical rationale for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Inge E M; Mørk, Arne

    2017-10-01

    Antagonism of the 5-HT6 receptor is a promising approach for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is compelling preclinical evidence for the procognitive potential of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists and several compounds are in clinical development, as adjunct therapy to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). This manuscript summarizes the scientific rationale for the use of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists as AD treatment, with some focus on the selective and high-affinity 5-HT6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine (Lu AE58054). The 5-HT6 receptor is enriched in brain regions that mediate cognition, where expression predominates on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and subsets of GABAergic interneurons. It is proposed that 5-HT6 receptor antagonism modulates the balance between neuronal excitation (glutamate) and inhibition (GABA), which may have widespread implications for neurotransmission and neuronal activity. This is supported by preclinical studies showing that 5-HT6 receptor antagonists increase concentrations of multiple neurotransmitters, and strengthened by recent evidence that idalopirdine facilitates neuronal oscillations and contributes to the recruitment of several neuronal networks relevant in cognition. Some of these effects are observed with idalopirdine monotherapy, whereas others require concomitant treatment with an AChEI. Several hypotheses for the mechanism underlying the synergistic actions between 5-HT6 receptor antagonists and AChEIs are discussed. Collectively, the current evidence suggests that 5-HT6 receptor antagonism adds a unique, complementary mechanism of action to that of AChEIs. The facilitation of multiple neurotransmitters and neuronal activity in brain regions that mediate cognition, and the synergy with AChEIs, are proposed to mediate the procognitive effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists in AD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoinactivation of the stargazin-AMPA receptor complex: subunit-dependency and independence from physical dissociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Semenov

    Full Text Available Agonist responses and channel kinetics of native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors are modulated by transmembrane accessory proteins. Stargazin, the prototypical accessory protein, decreases desensitization and increases agonist potency at AMPA receptors. Furthermore, in the presence of stargazin, the steady-state responses of AMPA receptors show a gradual decline at higher glutamate concentrations. This "autoinactivation" has been assigned to physical dissociation of the stargazin-AMPA receptor complex and suggested to serve as a protective mechanism against overactivation. Here, we analyzed autoinactivation of GluA1-A4 AMPA receptors (all flip isoform expressed in the presence of stargazin. Homomeric GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4 channels showed pronounced autoinactivation indicated by the bell-shaped steady-state dose response curves for glutamate. In contrast, homomeric GluA2i channels did not show significant autoinactivation. The resistance of GluA2 to autoinactivation showed striking dependence on the splice form as GluA2-flop receptors displayed clear autoinactivation. Interestingly, the resistance of GluA2-flip containing receptors to autoinactivation was transferred onto heteromeric receptors in a dominant fashion. To examine the relationship of autoinactivation to physical separation of stargazin from the AMPA receptor, we analyzed a GluA4-stargazin fusion protein. Notably, the covalently linked complex and separately expressed proteins expressed a similar level of autoinactivation. We conclude that autoinactivation is a subunit and splice form dependent property of AMPA receptor-stargazin complexes, which involves structural rearrangements within the complex rather than any physical dissociation.

  6. Menthol enhances phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in midbrain periaqueductal grey neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Benjamin K; Karim, Shafinaz; Goodchild, Ann K; Vaughan, Christopher W; Drew, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Menthol, a naturally occurring compound in the essential oil of mint leaves, is used for its medicinal, sensory and fragrant properties. Menthol acts via transient receptor potential (TRPM8 and TRPA1) channels and as a positive allosteric modulator of recombinant GABAA receptors. Here, we examined the actions of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated currents in intact midbrain slices. Experimental Approach Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons in midbrain slices from rats to determine the effects of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated phasic IPSCs and tonic currents. Key Results Menthol (150–750 μM) produced a concentration-dependent prolongation of spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, but not non-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs throughout the PAG. Menthol actions were unaffected by TRPM8 and TRPA1 antagonists, tetrodotoxin and the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil. Menthol also enhanced a tonic current, which was sensitive to the GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin (100 μM), bicuculline (30 μM) and Zn2+ (100 μM), but unaffected by gabazine (10 μM) and a GABAC receptor antagonist, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid hydrate (TPMPA; 50 μM). In addition, menthol potentiated currents induced by the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonist THIP/gaboxadol (10 μM). Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that menthol positively modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic populations of GABAA receptors in native PAG neurons. The development of agents that potentiate GABAA-mediated tonic currents and phasic IPSCs in a manner similar to menthol could provide a basis for novel GABAA-related pharmacotherapies. PMID:24460753

  7. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  8. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  9. Systematic biochemical characterization of the SAM domains in Eph receptor family from Mus Musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Li, Qingxia; Zheng, Yunhua; Li, Gang; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-13

    The Eph receptor family is the largest subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases and well-known for their pivotal roles in axon guidance, synaptogenesis, artery/venous differentiation and tumorigenesis, etc. Activation of the Eph receptor needs multimerization of the receptors. The intracellular C-terminal SAM domain of Eph receptor was reported to mediate self-association of Eph receptors via the homo SAM-SAM interaction. In this study, we systematically expressed and purified the SAM domain proteins of all fourteen Eph receptors of Mus musculus in Escherichia coli. The FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) results showed the recombinant SAM domains were highly homogeneous. Using CD (circular dichroism) spectrometry, we found that the secondary structure of all the SAM domains was typically alpha helical folded and remarkably similar. The thermo-stability tests showed that they were quite stable in solution. SEC-MALS (size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiple angle light scattering) results illustrated 200 μM Eph SAM domains behaved as good monomers in the size-exclusion chromatography. More importantly, DLS (dynamic light scattering) results revealed the overwhelming majority of SAM domains was not multimerized in solution either at 200 μM or 2000 μM protein concentration, which indicating the SAM domain alone was not sufficient to mediate the polymerization of Eph receptor. In summary, our studies provided the systematic biochemical characterizations of the Eph receptor SAM domains and implied their roles in Eph receptor mediated signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Nguyen

    Full Text Available Dextromethorphan is an antitussive with a high margin of safety that has been hypothesized to display rapid-acting antidepressant activity based on pharmacodynamic similarities to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In addition to binding to NMDA receptors, dextromethorphan binds to sigma-1 (σ1 receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dextromethorphan elicits antidepressant-like effects and the involvement of σ1 receptors in mediating its antidepressant-like actions. The antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan were assessed in male, Swiss Webster mice using the forced swim test. Next, σ1 receptor antagonists (BD1063 and BD1047 were evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to determine the involvement of σ receptors in its antidepressant-like effects. Quinidine, a cytochrome P450 (CYP 2D6 inhibitor, was also evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to increase the bioavailability of dextromethorphan and reduce exposure to additional metabolites. Finally, saturation binding assays were performed to assess the manner in which dextromethorphan interacts at the σ1 receptor. Our results revealed dextromethorphan displays antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test that can be attenuated by pretreatment with σ1 receptor antagonists, with BD1063 causing a shift to the right in the dextromethorphan dose response curve. Concomitant administration of quinidine potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan. Saturation binding assays revealed that a Ki concentration of dextromethorphan reduces both the Kd and the Bmax of [(3H](+-pentazocine binding to σ1 receptors. Taken together, these data suggest that dextromethorphan exerts some of its antidepressant actions through σ1 receptors.

  11. Interaction proteomics reveals brain region-specific AMPA receptor complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, N.; Pandya, N.J.; Koopmans, F.T.W.; Castelo-Szekelv, V.; van der Schors, R.C.; Smit, A.B.; Li, K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain is mediated by glutamate acting on postsynaptic AMPA receptors. Recent studies have revealed a substantial number of AMPA receptor auxiliary proteins, which potentially contribute to the regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking, subcellular receptor

  12. Spectrofluorimetric method for determination of some angiotensin II receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa R. El-Shaboury

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, accurate and highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for determination of some angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AIIRA's, namely Losartan potassium (Los-K, Irbesartan (Irb, Valsartan (Val and Candesartan cilexetil (Cand in pure forms as well as in their pharmaceutical dosage forms. All the variables affecting the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (0.9982–0.9991 were obtained over the concentration range from 0.006 μg/mL to 1.7 μg/mL. Good accuracy and precision were successfully obtained for the analysis of tablets containing each drug alone or combined with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ without interferences from the co-formulated HCTZ or the additives commonly present in tablets. Keywords: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, Spectrofluorimetry, Determination

  13. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (Cgrp, Adrenomedullin (Am, Amylin, And Calcitonin (Ct Receptors And Overlapping Biological Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Fischer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CGRP, AM, amylin, and CT have in common N-terminal 6-7 amino acid ring structures linked by disulfide bridges and amidated C-termini required for biological activity. For the related bioactive peptides, receptor-binding sites linked to cAMP stimulation and to a lesser extent to the phospholipase C signaling pathway have been identified in tissue specific manner. The highest density of CGRP receptors has been recognized in the cerebellum and the spinal cord. There photoaffinity-labeled N-glycosylated 60,000 and 54,000 Mr proteins are converted to 46,000 and 41,000 Mr components following endoglycosidase F/N-glycosidase F treatment. The same proteins were specifically labeled with [125I]-hCGRP-I(1-37 and -(8-37. Some cross-reaction between the CGRP receptor and AM was evident whereas amylin and CT were only recognized at over 10-7 M. A different AM receptor localized predominantly in the lung recognized CGRP at low, and amylin and calcitonin at equally high concentrations. CT receptor binding sites have been identified in osteoclasts and in the periventricular region of the brain. They cross-reacted