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Sample records for vervet monkeys electronic

  1. The influence of diet and dimethylhydrazine on the large intestine of vervet monkeys: scanning and transmission electron microscope studies.

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    Jaskiewicz, K.; Kritchevsky, D.; Venter, F. S.; van Wyk, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    The study was designed to identify diet and carcinogen-dependent ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of macroscopically normal colonic mucosa in primates. Seventy adult female vervet monkeys were divided into seven equal treatment groups. Four received a Western high-fat low fibre diet (WD), two a prudent low-fat higher fibre diet (PD) and one a control low-fat high fibre diet (CD). Three groups (2 WD, 1 PD) received dimethylhydrazine intramuscularly at 14 day intervals. After 18 months, monkeys of two groups on the WD were transferred to the PD (WD----PD) and 30 months later all were killed. Mucosae of caecum, colon transversum and rectum were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and showed close similarity to that of humans. Rectal mucosae showed increased surface goblet cell secretory activity, mucin production and microvillar changes related to WD and WD----PD. The enhancing effect of a carcinogen on ultrastructural changes such as cellular pleomorphism, cytoplasmic interbridging, nuclear and nucleolar irregularities and appearance of argentaffin cells in the free surface epithelium were noted predominantly in high-fat treated animals. Such changes observed in the upper part of crypt, orifice and free surface epithelium can be characteristic for precancerous change and could be utilised practically in the detection of precursor lesions of the colon. Images Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Figs. 11 & 12 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Figs. 13 & 14 PMID:3620336

  2. Toxicokinetics of ochratoxin A in vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops).

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    Stander, M A; Nieuwoudt, T W; Steyn, P S; Shephard, G S; Creppy, E E; Sewram, V

    2001-07-01

    The toxicokinetics of ochratoxin A were investigated in vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops). Three female monkeys were treated intravenously with ochratoxin A at doses, respectively, of 0.8, 1.5 and 2 mg/ kg body weight (BW). Blood and urine samples were collected over a period of 21 days. Plasma and urine extracts were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with either fluorescence or negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection. The clearance of ochratoxin A from plasma followed a two-compartment model. The elimination half-life of ochratoxin A in the monkeys was determined to be 19-21 days and the average total body clearance was 0.22 +/- 0.07 ml/h per kg and the average apparent distribution volume of the central compartment was 59 +/- 9 ml/kg and the peripheral compartment was 59 +/- 20 ml/kg. No evidence was found for any metabolic conversion of ochratoxin A.

  3. OBSERVATIONS ON THE BEHAVIOUR OF VERVET MONKEYS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If on the other hand, the predator advances on the monkeys and comes so close as to be a serious source of danger, the whispered call changes rapidly into the loud and harsh high intensity version. The mouth position is the same, with pronounced lip-retraction, but the eyes are opened wider and the body hair bristles.

  4. Molecular detection of Yaba monkey tumour virus from a vervet monkey

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    Helene Brettschneider

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Yaba monkey tumour virus (YMTV was first diagnosed in a colony of captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta in Yaba, Nigeria. It has been implicated as the cause of cutaneous nodules in wild baboons (Papio species, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis. This article reports a case of cutaneous pox lesions caused by YMTV in a  free-ranging  adult  female  vervet  monkey  (Chlorocebus  pygerythrus  from  the  Umkomaas coastal area in South Africa. The virus was identified by molecular sequencing from fragments of the insulin metalloprotease-like protein and intracellular mature virion membrane protein as well as the DNA polymerase genes. Phylogenetic analyses of these gene regions revealed a 99% similarity of the sample to YMTV. Although human disease caused by YMTV is normally mild,  it  is  recommended  that  persons  in  contact  with  non-human  primates  in  the  area  of Umkomaas who develop cutaneous lesions should inform their doctors of the possibility of this infection. The extent and significance of the virus to human and non-human primates in South Africa are not known. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first diagnosis of YMTV in South Africa and in vervet monkeys.

  5. Locomotor Anatomy and Behavior of Patas Monkeys (Erythrocebus patas with Comparison to Vervet Monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops

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    Adrienne L. Zihlman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas living in African savanna woodlands and grassland habitats have a locomotor system that allows them to run fast, presumably to avoid predators. Long fore- and hindlimbs, long foot bones, short toes, and a digitigrade foot posture were proposed as anatomical correlates with speed. In addition to skeletal proportions, soft tissue and whole body proportions are important components of the locomotor system. To further distinguish patas anatomy from other Old World monkeys, a comparative study based on dissection of skin, muscle, and bone from complete individuals of patas and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops was undertaken. Analysis reveals that small adjustments in patas skeletal proportions, relative mass of limbs and tail, and specific muscle groups promote efficient sagittal limb motion. The ability to run fast is based on a locomotor system adapted for long distance walking. The patas’ larger home range and longer daily range than those of vervets give them access to highly dispersed, nutritious foods, water, and sleeping trees. Furthermore, patas monkeys have physiological adaptations that enable them to tolerate and dissipate heat. These features all contribute to the distinct adaptation that is the patas monkeys’ basis for survival in grassland and savanna woodland areas.

  6. Vervet monkeys use paths consistent with context-specific spatial movement heuristics.

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    Teichroeb, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Animal foraging routes are analogous to the computationally demanding "traveling salesman problem" (TSP), where individuals must find the shortest path among several locations before returning to the start. Humans approximate solutions to TSPs using simple heuristics or "rules of thumb," but our knowledge of how other animals solve multidestination routing problems is incomplete. Most nonhuman primate species have shown limited ability to route plan. However, captive vervets were shown to solve a TSP for six sites. These results were consistent with either planning three steps ahead or a risk-avoidance strategy. I investigated how wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) solved a path problem with six, equally rewarding food sites; where site arrangement allowed assessment of whether vervets found the shortest route and/or used paths consistent with one of three simple heuristics to navigate. Single vervets took the shortest possible path in fewer than half of the trials, usually in ways consistent with the most efficient heuristic (the convex hull). When in competition, vervets' paths were consistent with different, more efficient heuristics dependent on their dominance rank (a cluster strategy for dominants and the nearest neighbor rule for subordinates). These results suggest that, like humans, vervets may solve multidestination routing problems by applying simple, adaptive, context-specific "rules of thumb." The heuristics that were consistent with vervet paths in this study are the same as some of those asserted to be used by humans. These spatial movement strategies may have common evolutionary roots and be part of a universal mental navigational toolkit. Alternatively, they may have emerged through convergent evolution as the optimal way to solve multidestination routing problems.

  7. Development of a safer laboratory vervet monkey model for the study of human African trypanosomiasis

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    Maxwell Waema

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are three subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei: T. b. gambiense, T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. brucei. The first two are infectious to humans, whilst T. b. brucei is not. Identifying an animal model of T. b. brucei that mimics human African trypanosomiasis (HAT would enable researchers to study HAT without subjecting themselves to undue risks such as accidental infection. Objectives: This study assessed the sequential clinical, parasitological and haematological changes in vervet monkeys infected with T. b. brucei.Methods: Three vervet monkeys were infected with a 104 inoculum of T. b. brucei (isolate GUTat 1. Late-stage disease was induced by subcurative treatment with diminazene aceturate 28 days post-infection. The animals were treated curatively with melarsoprol upon relapse. Parasitaemia and clinical signs were monitored daily and, at weekly intervals, the monkeys’ blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were sampled for haematology and parasitosis assessments, respectively.Results: The first-peak parasitaemia was observed between seven and nine days post-infection. Clinical signs associated with the disease included fever, dullness, pallor of mucous membranes, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and oedema. Late-stage signs included stiffness of joints and lethargy. The monkeys developed a disease associated with microcytic hypochromic anaemia. There was an initial decline, followed by an increase, in total white blood cell counts from early- to late-stage disease. Trypanosomes were detected in the CSF and there was a significant increase in white cell counts in the CSF during late-stage disease. Infected vervet monkeys displayed classical clinical symptoms, parasitological and haematological trends that were similar to monkeys infected withT.b. rhodesiense.Conclusion: The T. b. brucei vervet monkey model can be used for studying HAT without putting laboratory technicians and researchers at high risk of accidental infection.

  8. A Deficit in Face-Voice Integration in Developing Vervet Monkeys Exposed to Ethanol during Gestation

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    Zangenehpour, Shahin; Javadi, Pasha; Ervin, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    monkey model of fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) provides an unparalleled opportunity to study the neurobehavioral outcomes of prenatal ethanol exposure in a controlled experimental setting. Recent work has revealed a significant reduction of the neuronal population in the frontal lobes of these monkeys. We...... used an intersensory matching procedure to investigate audiovisual perception of socially relevant stimuli in young FAE vervet monkeys. Here we show a domain-specific deficit in audiovisual integration of socially relevant stimuli. When FAE monkeys were shown a pair of side-by-side videos of a monkey....... However, a group of normally developing monkeys exhibited a significant preference for the non-matching video. This inability to integrate and thereby discriminate audiovisual stimuli was confined to the integration of faces and voices as revealed by the monkeys' ability to match a dynamic face...

  9. Phytosociology and plant community utilisation by vervet monkeys of the Blydeberg Conservancy, Limpopo Province

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    A.S. Barret

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant communities of the Blydeberg Conservancy were investigated as part of a research project on the foraging ecology of vervet monkeys Cercopithecus aethiops pygerythrus (senso lato in mixed lowveld bushveld and sour lowveld bushveld areas. To date there are no formal management plans for vervet monkeys. This is attributed to the limited knowledge of vervets and their utilisation of and impacts on ecosystems. From a TWINSPAN classification refined by Braun-Blanquet procedures, ten plant communities that can be placed into four major groups were identified. A classification and description of these communities, including a vegetation map are presented. Diagnostic species as well as prominent and less conspicuous species of tree, shrub, herb and grass strata are outlined. Of the ten available plant communities, the vervets utilised only six during the study period. There was an abundant supply of various food sources throughout the year, with movement patterns mostly coinciding with the fruiting times of several tree and other plant species.

  10. Heterochrony and cross-species intersensory matching by infant vervet monkeys.

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    Shahin Zangenehpour

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary origins of a phenotype requires understanding the relationship between ontogenetic and phylogenetic processes. Human infants have been shown to undergo a process of perceptual narrowing during their first year of life, whereby their intersensory ability to match the faces and voices of another species declines as they get older. We investigated the evolutionary origins of this behavioral phenotype by examining whether or not this developmental process occurs in non-human primates as well.We tested the ability of infant vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops, ranging in age from 23 to 65 weeks, to match the faces and voices of another non-human primate species (the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. Even though the vervets had no prior exposure to rhesus monkey faces and vocalizations, our findings show that infant vervets can, in fact, recognize the correspondence between rhesus monkey faces and voices (but indicate that they do so by looking at the non-matching face for a greater proportion of overall looking time, and can do so well beyond the age of perceptual narrowing in human infants. Our results further suggest that the pattern of matching by vervet monkeys is influenced by the emotional saliency of the Face+Voice combination. That is, although they looked at the non-matching screen for Face+Voice combinations, they switched to looking at the matching screen when the Voice was replaced with a complex tone of equal duration. Furthermore, an analysis of pupillary responses revealed that their pupils showed greater dilation when looking at the matching natural face/voice combination versus the face/tone combination.Because the infant vervets in the current study exhibited cross-species intersensory matching far later in development than do human infants, our findings suggest either that intersensory perceptual narrowing does not occur in Old World monkeys or that it occurs later in development. We argue that these

  11. Immunospecific immunoglobulins and IL-10 as markers for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense late stage disease in experimentally infected vervet monkeys

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    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, J.M.; Jensen, Henrik Michael Elvang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of IL-10 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) as biomarkers for staging HAT in vervet monkeys, a useful pathogenesis model for humans. METHODS: Vervet monkeys were infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently given sub-curative and curative treatment 28...

  12. Third-party ranks knowledge in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus.

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    Christèle Borgeaud

    Full Text Available The Machiavellian/Social Intelligence Hypothesis proposes that a complex social environment selected for advanced cognitive abilities in vertebrates. In primates it has been proposed that sophisticated social strategies like obtaining suitable coalition partners are an important component of social intelligence. Knowing the rank relationships between group members is a basic requirement for the efficient use of coalitions and the anticipation of counter-coalitions. Experimental evidence for such knowledge currently exists in only few species. Here, we conducted rank reversal playback experiments on adult females belonging to three different groups of free-ranging vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus to test their knowledge of the female hierarchy. Playbacks simulating rank reversals (subordinate aggressing a dominant induced longer looking times than playbacks simulating a dominant aggressing a subordinate. Vervet monkey females therefore seem to compute the rank relationships between other females. Our results suggest that detailed social knowledge about rank relationships may be widespread in primates and potentially also in other species living in stable groups.

  13. Third-party ranks knowledge in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus).

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    Borgeaud, Christèle; van de Waal, Erica; Bshary, Redouan

    2013-01-01

    The Machiavellian/Social Intelligence Hypothesis proposes that a complex social environment selected for advanced cognitive abilities in vertebrates. In primates it has been proposed that sophisticated social strategies like obtaining suitable coalition partners are an important component of social intelligence. Knowing the rank relationships between group members is a basic requirement for the efficient use of coalitions and the anticipation of counter-coalitions. Experimental evidence for such knowledge currently exists in only few species. Here, we conducted rank reversal playback experiments on adult females belonging to three different groups of free-ranging vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus) to test their knowledge of the female hierarchy. Playbacks simulating rank reversals (subordinate aggressing a dominant) induced longer looking times than playbacks simulating a dominant aggressing a subordinate. Vervet monkey females therefore seem to compute the rank relationships between other females. Our results suggest that detailed social knowledge about rank relationships may be widespread in primates and potentially also in other species living in stable groups.

  14. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

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    Joseph Bouskila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells. However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp. in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function.

  15. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

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    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha; Beierschmitt, Amy; Palmour, Roberta; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells) and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells). However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp.) in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function. PMID:27069692

  16. Scales drive detection, attention, and memory of snakes in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus).

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    Isbell, Lynne A; Etting, Stephanie F

    2017-01-01

    Predatory snakes are argued to have been largely responsible for the origin of primates via selection favoring expansion of the primate visual system, and even today snakes can be deadly to primates. Neurobiological research is now beginning to reveal the mechanisms underlying the ability of primates (including humans) to detect snakes more rapidly than other stimuli. However, the visual cues allowing rapid detection of snakes, and the cognitive and ecological conditions contributing to faster detection, are unclear. Since snakes are often partially obscured by vegetation, the more salient cues are predicted to occur in small units. Here we tested for the salience of snake scales as the smallest of potential visual cues by presenting four groups of wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pytherythrus) with a gopher snake (Pituophis catenifer) skin occluded except for no more than 2.7 cm, in natural form and flat, the latter to control for even small curvilinear cues from their unusual body shape. Each of these treatments was preceded by a treatment without the snakeskin, the first to provide a baseline, and the second, to test for vigilance and memory recall after exposure to the snakeskin. We found that (1) vervets needed only a small portion of snakeskin for detection, (2) snake scales alone were sufficient for detection, (3) latency to detect the snakeskin was longer with more extensive and complex ground cover, and (4) vervets that were exposed to the snakeskin remembered where they last saw "snakes", as indicated by increased wariness near the occluding landmarks in the absence of the snakeskin and more rapid detection of the next presented snakeskin. Unexpectedly, adult males did not detect the snakeskin as well as adult females and juveniles. These findings extend our knowledge of the complex ecological and evolutionary relationships between snakes and primates.

  17. The static allometry of sexual and non-sexual traits in vervet monkeys.

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    Rodríguez, Rafael L; Cramer, Jennifer Danzy; Schmitt, Christopher A; Gaetano, Tegan J; Grobler, J Paul; Freimer, Nelson B; Turner, Trudy R

    2015-03-01

    Sexual traits vary tremendously in static allometry. This variation may be explained in part by body size-related differences in the strength of selection. We tested this hypothesis with in two populations of vervet monkeys, using estimates of the level of condition dependence for different morphological traits as a proxy for body size-related variation in the strength of selection. In support of the hypothesis, we found that the steepness of allometric slopes increased with the level of condition dependence. One trait of particular interest, the penis, had shallow allometric slopes and low levels of condition dependence, in agreement with one of the most consistent patterns yet detected in the study of allometry, that of genitalia exhibitting shallow allometries.

  18. Prenatal alcohol exposure affects progenitor cell numbers in olfactory bulbs and dentate gyrus of vervet monkeys

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    Burke, Mark W; Inyatkin, Alexey; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) alters hippocampal cell numbers in rodents and primates, and this may be due, in part, to a reduction in the number or migration of neuronal progenitor cells. The olfactory bulb exhibits substantial postnatal cellular proliferation and a rapid turnover of newly formed...... cells in the rostral migratory pathway, while production and migration of postnatal neurons into the dentate gyrus may be more complex. The relatively small size of the olfactory bulb, compared to the hippocampus, potentially makes this structure ideal for a rapid analysis. This study used the St. Kitts...... vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus) to (1) investigate the normal developmental sequence of post-natal proliferation in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus and (2) determine the effects of naturalistic prenatal ethanol exposure on proliferation at three different ages (neonate, five months and two years...

  19. Similarity in food cleaning techniques within matrilines in wild vervet monkeys.

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    Erica van de Waal

    Full Text Available Social learning and the formation of traditions rely on the ability and willingness to copy one another. A central question is under which conditions individuals adapt behaviour to social influences. Here, we demonstrate that similarities in food processing techniques emerge on the level of matrilines (mother-offspring but not on the group level in an experiment on six groups of wild vervet monkeys that involved grapes covered with sand. Monkeys regularly ate unclean grapes but also used four cleaning techniques more similarly within matrilines: rubbing in hands, rubbing on substrate, open with mouth, and open with hands. Individual cleaning techniques evolved over time as they converged within matrilines, stabilised at the end and remained stable in a follow-up session more than one year later. The similarity within matrilines persisted when we analyzed only foraging events of individuals in the absence of other matriline members and matriline members used more similar methods than adult full sisters. Thus, momentary conversion or purely genetic causation are unlikely explanations, favouring social learning as mechanism for within matriline similarities. The restriction of traditions to matriline membership rather than to the group level may restrict the development of culture in monkeys relative to apes or humans.

  20. Acoustic classification of alarm calls by vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) and humans (Homo sapiens): I. Natural calls.

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    Owren, M J

    1990-03-01

    A 2-choice, operant-conditioning-based classification procedure was developed in which vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) categorized species-typical snake and eagle alarm calls recorded from individually identified free-ranging animals. After preliminary training with a pair of calls from a single animal, 2 vervets were tested with novel exemplars produced by a variety of callers. Experiment 1 combined testing with continued training in routine classification of 14 new calls. In Experiment 2, the subjects were tested with 48 novel calls in rapid succession. Human (Homo sapiens) control subjects participated in the first study without extended preliminary training. Monkey and human subjects both showed immediate transfer to classification of unfamiliar alarm calls, despite variations both in voice characteristics and reproduction quality.

  1. Effects of heated hydrotherapy on muscle HSP70 and glucose metabolism in old and young vervet monkeys.

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    Kavanagh, Kylie; Davis, Ashely T; Jenkins, Kurt A; Flynn, D Mickey

    2016-07-01

    Increasing heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in aged and/or insulin-resistant animal models confers benefits to healthspan and lifespan. Heat application to increase core temperature induces HSPs in metabolically important tissues, and preliminary human and animal data suggest that heated hydrotherapy is an effective method to achieve increased HSPs. However, safety concerns exist, particularly in geriatric medicine where organ and cardiovascular disease commonly will preexist. We evaluated young vervet monkeys compared to old, insulin-resistant vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) in their core temperatures, glucose tolerance, muscle HSP70 level, and selected safety biomarkers after 10 sessions of hot water immersions administered twice weekly. Hot water immersion robustly induced the heat shock response in muscles. We observed that heat-treated old and young monkeys have significantly higher muscle HSP70 than control monkeys and treatment was without significant adverse effects on organ or cardiovascular health. Heat therapy improved pancreatic responses to glucose challenge and tended to normalize glucose excursions. A trend for worsened blood pressure and glucose values in the control monkeys and improved values in heat-treated monkeys were seen to support further investigation into the safety and efficacy of this intervention for metabolic syndrome or diabetes in young or old persons unable to exercise.

  2. Arithmetic-Like Reasoning in Wild Vervet Monkeys: A Demonstration of Cost-Benefit Calculation in Foraging

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    Sayaka Tsutsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arithmetic-like reasoning has been demonstrated in various animals in captive and seminatural environments, but it is unclear whether such competence is practiced in the wild. Using a hypothetical foraging paradigm, we demonstrate that wild vervet monkeys spontaneously adjust their “foraging behavior” deploying arithmetic-like reasoning. Presented with arithmetic-like problems in artificially controlled feeding conditions, all the monkeys tested attempted to retrieve “artificial prey” according to the quantity of the remainder when the task involved one subtraction only (i.e., “2−1”, while one monkey out of four did so when it was sequentially subtracted twice (i.e., “2−1−1”. This monkey also adjusted his “foraging behavior” according to the quantity of the reminder for a task requiring stepwise mental manipulation (i.e., “(2−1−1”, though the results became less evident. This suggests that vervet monkeys are capable of spontaneously deploying mental manipulations of numerosity for cost-benefit calculation of foraging but that the extent of such capacity varies among individuals. Different foraging strategies might be deployed according to different levels of mental manipulation capacity in each individual in a given population. In addition to providing empirical data, the current study provides an easily adaptable field technique that would allow comparison across taxa and habitat using a uniform method.

  3. High-fiber diet promotes weight loss and affects maternal behavior in vervet monkeys.

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    Fairbanks, Lynn A; Blau, Karin; Jorgensen, Matthew J

    2010-03-01

    The dramatic increase in obesity in western societies has shifted the emphasis in nutrition research from the problems of undernutrition to the adverse consequences of being overweight. As with humans, Old World monkeys are at increased risk for type II diabetes and other chronic diseases when they gain excessive weight. To prevent overweight and obesity, promote animal health, and provide a more natural level of fiber in the diet, the standard commercial monkey chow diet at a vervet monkey breeding colony was changed to a higher fiber formulation in 2004. The new diet was also higher in protein and lower in carbohydrate and energy density than the standard diet. Because maternal behavior is known to be sensitive to differences in resource availability, data on weight and mother-infant interactions for 147 mothers with 279 infants born from 2000 through 2006 were assessed for effects of the diet change. The results showed that, even though food was provided ad libitum, the mean body weight of breeding females was 10% lower after the transition to the high-fiber diet. Behaviorally, mothers on the high-fiber diet were significantly more rejecting to their infants, and their infants had to play a greater role in maintaining ventral contact in the first few months of their lives. The effects of the diet change on maternal rejection were significantly related to the mother's body weight, with lower-weight mothers scoring higher in maternal rejection. These results demonstrate that maternal behavior is responsive to changes in maternal condition, and that beneficial changes in the diet may have unintended consequences on behavior. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Using the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus to examine questions in ethnoprimatology.

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    James E Loudon

    Full Text Available This study seeks to understand how humans impact the dietary patterns of eight free-ranging vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus groups in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. Vervets are omnivores that exploit a wide range of habitats including those that have been anthropogenically-disturbed. As humans encroach upon nonhuman primate landscapes, human-nonhuman primate interconnections become increasingly common, which has led to the rise of the field of ethnoprimatology. To date, many ethnoprimatological studies have examined human-nonhuman primate associations largely in qualitative terms. By using stable carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N isotope analysis, we use quantitative data to understand the degree to which humans impact vervet monkey dietary patterns. Based on initial behavioral observations we placed the eight groups into three categories of anthropogenic disturbance (low, mid, and high. Using δ13C and δ15N values we estimated the degree to which each group and each anthropogenically-disturbed category was consuming C4 plants (primarily sugar cane, corn, or processed foods incorporating these crops. δ13C values were significantly different between groups and categories of anthropogenic-disturbance. δ15N values were significantly different at the group level. The two vervet groups with the highest consumption of C4 plants inhabited small nature reserves, appeared to interact with humans only sporadically, and were initially placed in the mid level of anthropogenic-disturbance. However, further behavioral observations revealed that the high δ13C values exhibited by these groups were linked to previously unseen raiding of C4 crops. By revealing these cryptic feeding patterns, this study illustrates the utility of stable isotopes analysis for some ethnoprimatological questions.

  5. Vervet monkeys solve a multiplayer "forbidden circle game" by queuing to learn restraint.

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    Fruteau, Cécile; van Damme, Eric; Noë, Ronald

    2013-04-22

    In social dilemmas, the ability of individuals to coordinate their actions is crucial to reach group optima. Unless exacted by power or force, coordination in humans relies on a common understanding of the problem, which is greatly facilitated by communication. The lack of means of consultation about the nature of the problem and how to solve it may explain why multiagent coordination in nonhuman vertebrates has commonly been observed only when multiple individuals react instantaneously to a single stimulus, either natural or experimentally simulated, for example a predator, a prey, or a neighboring group. Here we report how vervet monkeys solved an experimentally induced coordination problem. In each of three groups, we trained a low-ranking female, the "provider," to open a container holding a large amount of food, which the providers only opened when all individuals dominant to them ("dominants") stayed outside an imaginary "forbidden circle" around it. Without any human guidance, the dominants learned restraint one by one, in hierarchical order from high to low. Once all dominants showed restraint immediately at the start of the trial, the providers opened the container almost instantly, saving all individuals opportunity costs due to lost foraging time. Solving this game required trial-and-error learning based on individual feedback from the provider to each dominant, and all dominants being patient enough to wait outside the circle while others learned restraint. Communication, social learning, and policing by high-ranking animals played no perceptible role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Social Behaviours and Networks of Vervet Monkeys Are Influenced by Gastrointestinal Parasites.

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    Colin A Chapman

    Full Text Available Substantial research has shown that while some parasite infections can be fatal to hosts, most infections are sub-clinical and non-lethal. Such sub-clinical infections can nonetheless have negative consequences for the long-term fitness of the host such as reducing juvenile growth and the host's ability to compete for food and mates. With such effects, infected individuals are expected to exhibit behavioural changes. Here we use a parasite removal experiment to quantify how gastrointestinal parasite infections affect the behaviour of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops at Lake Nabugabo, Uganda. Behavioural profiles and the structure of nearest neighbour relationships varied significantly. As predicted, after deworming the duration of the resting events decreased, which is consistent with the idea that parasite infections are energetically costly. In contrast to what was predicted, we could not reject the null hypothesis and we observed no change in either the frequency or duration of grooming, but we found that the duration of travel events increased. A network analysis revealed that after deworming, individuals tended to have more nearest neighbours and hence probably more frequent interactions, with this effect being particularly marked for juveniles. The heightened response by juveniles may indicate that they are avoiding infected individuals more than other age classes because it is too costly to move energy away from growth. We consider that populations with high parasite burden may have difficulties developing social networks and behaviours that could have cascading effects that impact the population in general.

  7. Selective attention to philopatric models causes directed social learning in wild vervet monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waal, Erica; Renevey, Nathalie; Favre, Camille Monique; Bshary, Redouan

    2010-01-01

    Human behaviour is often based on social learning, a mechanism that has been documented also in a variety of other vertebrates. However, social learning as a means of problem-solving may be optimal only under specific conditions, and both theoretical work and laboratory experiments highlight the importance of a potential model's identity. Here we present the results from a social learning experiment on six wild vervet monkey groups, where models were either a dominant female or a dominant male. We presented ‘artificial fruit’ boxes that had doors on opposite, differently coloured ends for access to food. One option was blocked during the demonstration phase, creating consistent demonstrations of one possible solution. Following demonstrations we found a significantly higher participation rate and same-door manipulation in groups with female models compared to groups with male models. These differences appeared to be owing to selective attention of bystanders to female model behaviour rather than owing to female tolerance. Our results demonstrate the favoured role of dominant females as a source for ‘directed’ social learning in a species with female philopatry. Our findings imply that migration does not necessarily lead to an exchange of socially acquired information within populations, potentially causing highly localized traditions. PMID:20236972

  8. Hippocampal neuron populations are reduced in vervet monkeys with fetal alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R; Palmour, Roberta M

    2015-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to beverage alcohol is a major cause of mild mental retardation and developmental delay. In nonendangered alcohol-preferring vervet monkeys, we modeled the most common nondysmorphic form of fetal alcohol syndrome disorder with voluntary drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally and persist through infancy (5 months) and juvenile (2 years) stages. Although the volumes of hippocampal subdivisions in FAE animals are not atypical at birth, by age 2, they are only 65-70% of those estimated in age-matched controls. These data suggest that moderate, naturalistic alcohol consumption during late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume. © 2015 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Induced cooperation to access a shareable reward increases the hierarchical segregation of wild vervet monkeys.

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    Riccardo Pansini

    Full Text Available Until now cooperation experiments in primates have paid little attention to how cooperation can emerge and what effects are produced on the structure of a social group in nature. I performed field experiments with three groups of wild vervet monkeys in South Africa. I induced individuals to repeatedly approach and operate food containers. At least two individuals needed to operate the containers in order to get the reward. The recurrent partner associations observed before the experiment only partly predicted the forming of cooperative partnerships during the experiment. While most of the tested subjects cooperated with other partners, they preferred to do so with specific combinations of individuals and they tended not to mix with other group members outside these preferred partnerships. Cooperation therefore caused the relatively homogeneous networks I observed before the experiment to differentiate. Similar to a matching market, the food sharing partners selected each other limiting their choice. Interestingly neither sex nor age classes explained the specific partner matching. Kinship could not explain it either. Rather, higher ranking individuals cooperated with other higher ranking individuals, and lower ranking also matched among the same rank. This study reveals the key role dominance rank plays when food resources are patchy and can only be accessed through sharing with other individuals.

  10. Supply and demand determine the market value of food providers in wild vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruteau, Cécile; Voelkl, Bernhard; van Damme, Eric; Noë, Ronald

    2009-07-21

    Animals neither negotiate verbally nor conclude binding contracts, but nevertheless regularly exchange goods and services without overt coercion and manage to arrive at agreements over exchange rates. Biological market theory predicts that such exchange rates fluctuate according to the law of supply and demand. Previous studies showed that primates pay more when commodities become scarcer: subordinates groomed dominants longer before being tolerated at food sites in periods of shortage; females groomed mothers longer before obtaining permission to handle their infants when there were fewer newborns and males groomed fertile females longer before obtaining their compliance when fewer such females were present. We further substantiated these results by conducting a 2-step experiment in 2 groups of free-ranging vervet monkeys in the Loskop Dam Nature Reserve, South Africa. We first allowed a single low-ranking female to repeatedly provide food to her entire group by triggering the opening of a container and measured grooming bouts involving this female in the hour after she made the reward available. We then measured the shifts in grooming patterns after we added a second food container that could be opened by another low-ranking female, the second provider. All 4 providers received more grooming, relative to the amount of grooming they provided themselves. As biological market theory predicts, the initial gain of first providers was partially lost again after the introduction of a second provider in both groups. We conclude that grooming was fine-tuned to changes in the value of these females as social partners.

  11. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Affects Progenitor Cell Numbers in Olfactory Bulbs and Dentate Gyrus of Vervet Monkeys

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    Mark W. Burke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE alters hippocampal cell numbers in rodents and primates, and this may be due, in part, to a reduction in the number or migration of neuronal progenitor cells. The olfactory bulb exhibits substantial postnatal cellular proliferation and a rapid turnover of newly formed cells in the rostral migratory pathway, while production and migration of postnatal neurons into the dentate gyrus may be more complex. The relatively small size of the olfactory bulb, compared to the hippocampus, potentially makes this structure ideal for a rapid analysis. This study used the St. Kitts vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus to (1 investigate the normal developmental sequence of post-natal proliferation in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus and (2 determine the effects of naturalistic prenatal ethanol exposure on proliferation at three different ages (neonate, five months and two years. Using design-based stereology, we found an age-related decrease of actively proliferating cells in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus for both control and FAE groups. Furthermore, at the neonatal time point, the FAE group had fewer actively proliferating cells as compared to the control group. These data are unique with respect to fetal ethanol effects on progenitor proliferation in the primate brain and suggest that the olfactory bulb may be a useful structure for studies of cellular proliferation.

  12. Experimental infections of baboons (Papio spp. and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops with Trichinella zimbabwensis and successful treatment with ivermectin

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    S. Mukaratirwa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Trichinella zimbabwensis infections were established in three baboons (Papios p.and four vervet monkeys (Cercopithecuase thiops and the clinical-pathological manifestations assessed. The infected animals showed clinical signs ranging from fever, diarrhoea, periorbitaol edema and muscular pain in varying degrees. One baboon became blind due to the infection. Levels of creatinine phosphokinase and lactated ehydrogenase increased to reach a peak on Day 42 post-infection(pifor both baboons and monkeys. Blood parameters such as packed cell volume, levels of red blood cells and white blood cells did not change significantly from the normal ranges except for the levels of eosinophils which peaked above the normal ranges at Day 28 and 56 pi in baboons and at Day 56 pi in monkeys.

  13. Population ecology of vervet monkeys in a high latitude, semi-arid riparian woodland

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    Graham Pasternak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Narrow riparian woodlands along non-perennial streams have made it possible for vervet monkeys to penetrate the semi-arid karoo ecosystem of South Africa, whilst artificial water points have more recently allowed these populations to colonize much more marginal habitat away from natural water sources. In order to better understand the sequelae of life in these narrow, linear woodlands for historically ‘natural’ populations and to test the prediction that they are ecologically stressed, we determined the size of troops in relation to their reliance on natural and artificial water sources and collected detailed data from two river-centred troops on activity, diet and ranging behaviour over an annual cycle. In comparison to other populations, our data indicate that river-centred troops in the karoo were distinctive primarily both for their large group sizes and, consequently, their large adult cohorts, and in the extent of home range overlap in what is regarded as a territorial species. Whilst large group size carried the corollary of increased day journey length and longer estimated interbirth intervals, there was little other indication of the effects of ecological stress on factors such as body weight and foraging effort. We argue that this was a consequence of the high density of Acacia karroo, which accounted for a third of annual foraging effort in what was a relatively depauperate floristic habitat. We ascribed the large group size and home range overlap to constraints on group fission.Conservation implications: The distribution of group sizes, sampled appropriately across habitats within a conservation area, will be of more relevance to management than average values, which may be nothing more than a statistical artefact, especially when troop sizes are bimodally distributed.

  14. Specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the sensory-motor cortex of the Chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) with comparative notes on macaque and vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; Manger, Paul R; Defelipe, Javier

    2005-09-01

    The systematic study of pyramidal cell structure has revealed new insights into specialization of the phenotype in the primate cerebral cortex. Regional specialization in the neuronal phenotype may influence patterns of connectivity and the computational abilities of the circuits they compose. The comparative study of pyramidal cells in homologous cortical areas is beginning to yield data on the evolution and development of such specialized circuitry in the primate cerebral cortex. Recently, we have focused our efforts on sensory-motor cortex. Based on our intracellular injection methodology, we have demonstrated a progressive increase in the size of, the branching structure in, and the spine density of the basal dendritic trees of pyramidal cells through somatosensory areas 3b, 1, 2, 5, and 7 in the macaque and vervet monkeys. In addition, we have shown that pyramidal cells in premotor area 6 are larger, more branched, and more spinous than those in the primary motor cortex (MI or area 4) in the macaque monkey, vervet monkey, and baboon. Here we expand the basis for comparison by studying the basal dendritic trees of layer III pyramidal cells in these same sensory-motor areas in the chacma baboon. The baboon was selected because it has a larger cerebral cortex than either the macaque or vervet monkeys; motor cortex has expanded disproportionately in these three species; and motor cortex in the baboon reportedly has differentiated to include a new cortical area not present in either the macaque or vervet monkeys. We found, as in monkeys, a progressive increase in the morphological complexity of pyramidal cells through areas 3b, 5, and 7, as well as from area 4 to area 6, suggesting that areal specialization in microcircuitry was likely to be present in a common ancestor of primates. In addition, we found subtle differences in the extent of the interareal differences in pyramidal cell structure between homologous cortical areas in the three species. Copyright 2005

  15. Specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the sensory-motor cortex of the vervet monkey (Cercopethicus pygerythrus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, G N; Benavides-Piccione, R; Elston, A; Defelipe, J; Manger, P R

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed systematic differences in the pyramidal cell structure between functionally related cortical areas of primates. Trends for a parallel in pyramidal cell structure and functional complexity have been reported in visual, somatosensory, motor, cingulate and prefrontal cortex in the macaque monkey cortex. These specializations in structure have been interpreted as being fundamental in determining cellular and systems function, endowing circuits in these different cortical areas with different computational power. In the present study we extend our initial finding of systematic specialization of pyramidal cell structure in sensory-motor cortex in the macaque monkey [Cereb Cortex 12 (2002) 1071] to the vervet monkey. More specifically, we investigated pyramidal cell structure in somatosensory and motor areas 1/2, 5, 7, 4 and 6. Neurones in fixed, flat-mounted, cortical slices were injected intracellularly with Lucifer Yellow and processed for a light-stable 3,3'-diaminobenzidine reaction product. The size of, number of branches in, and spine density of the basal dendritic arbors varied systematically such that there was a trend for increasing complexity in arbor structure with progression through 1/2, 5 and 7. In addition, cells in area 6 were larger, more branched, and more spinous than those in area 4.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense transmitted by a single tsetse fly bite in vervet monkeys as a model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available We have investigated the pathogenicity of tsetse (Glossina pallidipes-transmitted cloned strains of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in vervet monkeys. Tsetse flies were confirmed to have mature trypanosome infections by xenodiagnosis, after which nine monkeys were infected via the bite of a single infected fly. Chancres developed in five of the nine (55.6% monkeys within 4 to 8 days post infection (dpi. All nine individuals were successfully infected, with a median pre-patent period of 4 (range = 4-10 days, indicating that trypanosomes migrated from the site of fly bite to the systemic circulation rapidly and independently of the development of the chancre. The time lag to detection of parasites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was a median 16 (range = 8-40 days, marking the onset of central nervous system (CNS, late stage disease. Subsequently, CSF white cell numbers increased above the pre-infection median count of 2 (range = 0-9 cells/microl, with a positive linear association between their numbers and that of CSF trypanosomes. Haematological changes showed that the monkeys experienced an early microcytic-hypochromic anaemia and severe progressive thrombocytopaenia. Despite a 3-fold increase in granulocyte numbers by 4 dpi, leucopaenia occurred early (8 dpi in the monkey infection, determined mainly by reductions in lymphocyte numbers. Terminally, leucocytosis was observed in three of nine (33% individuals. The duration of infection was a median of 68 (range = 22-120 days. Strain and individual differences were observed in the severity of the clinical and clinical pathology findings, with two strains (KETRI 3741 and 3801 producing a more acute disease than the other two (KETRI 3804 and 3928. The study shows that the fly-transmitted model accurately mimics the human disease and is therefore a suitable gateway to understanding human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness.

  17. Regional specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the limbic cortex of the vervet monkey (Cercopithecus pygerythrus): an intracellular injection study of the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; Manger, Paul; Defelipe, Javier

    2005-12-01

    The pyramidal cell phenotype varies quite dramatically in structure among different cortical areas in the primate brain. Comparative studies in visual cortex, in particular, but also in sensorimotor and prefrontal cortex, reveal systematic trends for pyramidal cell specialization in functionally related cortical areas. Moreover, there are systematic differences in the extent of these trends between different primate species. Recently we demonstrated differences in pyramidal cell structure in the cingulate cortex of the macaque monkey; however, in the absence of other comparative data it remains unknown as to whether the neuronal phenotype differs in cingulate cortex between species. Here we extend the basis for comparison by studying the structure of the basal dendritic trees of layer III pyramidal cells in the posterior and anterior cingulate gyrus of the vervet monkey (Brodmann's areas 23 and 24, respectively). Cells were injected with Lucifer Yellow in flat-mounted cortical slices, and processed for a light-stable DAB reaction product. Size, branching pattern, and spine density of basal dendritic arbors were determined, and somal areas measured. As in the macaque monkey, we found that pyramidal cells in anterior cingulate gyrus (area 24) were more branched and more spinous than those in posterior cingulate gyrus (area 23). In addition, the extent of the difference in pyramidal cell structure between these two cortical regions was less in the vervet monkey than in the macaque monkey.

  18. Long-term methamphetamine administration in the vervet monkey models aspects of a human exposure: brain neurotoxicity and behavioral profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melega, William P; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Laćan, Goran; Way, Baldwin M; Pham, Jamie; Morton, Grenvill; Cho, Arthur K; Fairbanks, Lynn A

    2008-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-associated alterations in the human striatal dopamine (DA) system have been identified with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and post-mortem studies but have not been well correlated with behavioral changes or cumulative METH intake. Animal studies that model some aspects of human long-term METH abuse can establish dose-dependency profiles of both behavioral changes and potential brain neurotoxicities for identifying consequences of particular cumulative exposures. Based on parameters from human and our monkey pharmacokinetic studies, we modeled a prevalent human METH exposure of daily multiple doses in socially housed vervet monkeys. METH doses were escalated over 33 weeks, with final dosages resulting in estimated peak plasma METH concentrations of 1-3 microM, a range measured in human abusers. With larger METH doses, progressive increases in abnormal behavior and decreases in social behavior were observed on 'injection' days. Anxiety increased on 'no injection' days while aggression decreased throughout the study. Thereafter, during 3 weeks abstinence, differences in baseline vs post-METH behaviors were not observed. Post-mortem analysis of METH brains showed 20% lower striatal DA content while autoradiography studies of precommissural striatum showed 35% lower [3H]WIN35428 binding to the DA transporter. No statistically significant changes were detected for [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to the vesicular monoamine transporter (METH-lower by 10%) or for [3H]SCH 23390 and [3H]raclopride binding to DA D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Collectively, this long-term, escalating dose METH exposure modeling a human abuse pattern, not associated with high-dose binges, resulted in dose-dependent behavioral effects and caused persistent changes in presynaptic striatal DA system integrity.

  19. Rod photoreceptors express GPR55 in the adult vervet monkey retina.

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    Joseph Bouskila

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R. In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells. The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated.

  20. Müller cells express the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    dissimilarities. Double labeling of CB2R and glutamine synthetase shows that CB2R is restricted to Müller cell processes, extending from the internal limiting membrane, with very low staining, to the external limiting membrane, with heavy labeling. We conclude that CB2R is indeed present in the retina...... but exclusively in the retinal glia, whereas CB1R is expressed only in the neuroretina. These results extend our knowledge on the expression and distribution of cannabinoid receptors in the monkey retina, although further experiments are still needed to clarify their role in retinal functions....

  1. Rod photoreceptors express GPR55 in the adult vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol...... components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin......, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55...

  2. Inhibition of adaptive immune responses leads to a fatal clinical outcome in SIV-infected pigtailed macaques but not vervet African green monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn E Schmitz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available African green monkeys (AGM and other natural hosts for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV do not develop an AIDS-like disease following SIV infection. To evaluate differences in the role of SIV-specific adaptive immune responses between natural and nonnatural hosts, we used SIV(agmVer90 to infect vervet AGM and pigtailed macaques (PTM. This infection results in robust viral replication in both vervet AGM and pigtailed macaques (PTM but only induces AIDS in the latter species. We delayed the development of adaptive immune responses through combined administration of anti-CD8 and anti-CD20 lymphocyte-depleting antibodies during primary infection of PTM (n = 4 and AGM (n = 4, and compared these animals to historical controls infected with the same virus. Lymphocyte depletion resulted in a 1-log increase in primary viremia and a 4-log increase in post-acute viremia in PTM. Three of the four PTM had to be euthanized within 6 weeks of inoculation due to massive CMV reactivation and disease. In contrast, all four lymphocyte-depleted AGM remained healthy. The lymphocyte-depleted AGM showed only a trend toward a prolongation in peak viremia but the groups were indistinguishable during chronic infection. These data show that adaptive immune responses are critical for controlling disease progression in pathogenic SIV infection in PTM. However, the maintenance of a disease-free course of SIV infection in AGM likely depends on a number of mechanisms including non-adaptive immune mechanisms.

  3. Specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the cingulate cortex of the Chacma baboon (Papio ursinus): an intracellular injection study of the posterior and anterior cingulate gyrus with comparative notes on the macaque and vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; DeFelipe, Javier; Manger, Paul

    2005-10-28

    This study forms part of an ongoing investigation of pyramidal cell structure in the cingulate cortex of primates. Recently we have demonstrated that layer III pyramidal cells in the anterior cingulate gyrus are considerably larger, more branched and more spinous than those in the posterior cingulate gyrus (areas 24 and 23, respectively) in the macaque and vervet monkeys. Moreover, the extent of the interareal difference in specialization in pyramidal cell structure differed between the two species. These data suggest that pyramidal cell circuitry may have evolved differently in these closely related species. Presently there are too few data to speculate on what is selecting for this specialization in structure. Here we extend the basis for comparison by studying pyramidal cell structure in cingulate gyrus of the Chacma baboon (Papio ursinus). Methodology used here is the same as that for our previous studies: intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow in flat-mounted cortical slices. We found that pyramidal cells in anterior cingulate gyrus (area 24) were more branched and more spinous than those in posterior cingulate gyrus (area 23). Moreover, the complexity in pyramidal cell structure in both the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus of the baboon differed to that in the corresponding regions in either the macaque or vervet monkeys.

  4. The genome of the vervet (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Wesley C.; Jasinska, Anna J.; García-Pérez, Raquel; Svardal, Hannes; Tomlinson, Chad; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Capozzi, Oronzo; Minx, Patrick; Montague, Michael J.; Kyung, Kim; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Kremitzki, Milinn; Graves, Tina; Chiang, Colby; Hughes, Jennifer; Tran, Nam; Huang, Yu; Ramensky, Vasily; Choi, Oi-wa; Jung, Yoon J.; Schmitt, Christopher A.; Juretic, Nikoleta; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Turner, Trudy R.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Karl, Julie A.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Zahn, Roland; O'Connor, David H.; Redmond, Eugene; Nisbett, Alex; Jacquelin, Béatrice; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Dione, Michel; Antonio, Martin; Schroth, Gary P.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Thomas, Gregg W.C.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Raney, Brian J.; Aken, Bronwen; Nag, Rishi; Schmitz, Juergen; Churakov, Gennady; Noll, Angela; Stanyon, Roscoe; Webb, David; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Nordborg, Magnus; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Dewar, Ken; Weinstock, George M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a genome reference of the African green monkey or vervet (Chlorocebus aethiops). This member of the Old World monkey (OWM) superfamily is uniquely valuable for genetic investigations of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), for which it is the most abundant natural host species, and of a wide range of health-related phenotypes assessed in Caribbean vervets (C. a. sabaeus), whose numbers have expanded dramatically since Europeans introduced small numbers of their ancestors from West Africa during the colonial era. We use the reference to characterize the genomic relationship between vervets and other primates, the intra-generic phylogeny of vervet subspecies, and genome-wide structural variations of a pedigreed C. a. sabaeus population. Through comparative analyses with human and rhesus macaque, we characterize at high resolution the unique chromosomal fission events that differentiate the vervets and their close relatives from most other catarrhine primates, in whom karyotype is highly conserved. We also provide a summary of transposable elements and contrast these with the rhesus macaque and human. Analysis of sequenced genomes representing each of the main vervet subspecies supports previously hypothesized relationships between these populations, which range across most of sub-Saharan Africa, while uncovering high levels of genetic diversity within each. Sequence-based analyses of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms reveal extremely low diversity in Caribbean C. a. sabaeus vervets, compared to vervets from putatively ancestral West African regions. In the C. a. sabaeus research population, we discover the first structural variations that are, in some cases, predicted to have a deleterious effect; future studies will determine the phenotypic impact of these variations. PMID:26377836

  5. A counter-current heat exchange system in the tail of the vervet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lightly anaesthetized vervet monkeys can maintain their body core-temperature by skin vasoconstriction and shivering when the environmental temperature is moderately lowered. Under such conditions the arterial blood supplying the tail skin is several degrees cooler than the core temperature and thus heat loss from the ...

  6. Electrons at the monkey saddle: A multicritical Lifshitz point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtyk, A.; Goldstein, G.; Chamon, C.

    2017-01-01

    We consider two-dimensional interacting electrons at a monkey saddle with dispersion ∝px3-3 pxpy2 . Such a dispersion naturally arises at the multicritical Lifshitz point when three Van Hove saddles merge in an elliptical umbilic elementary catastrophe, which we show can be realized in biased bilayer graphene. A multicritical Lifshitz point of this kind can be identified by its signature Landau level behavior Em∝(Bm ) 3 /2 and related oscillations in thermodynamic and transport properties, such as de Haas-Van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, whose period triples as the system crosses the singularity. We show, in the case of a single monkey saddle, that the noninteracting electron fixed point is unstable to interactions under the renormalization-group flow, developing either a superconducting instability or non-Fermi-liquid features. Biased bilayer graphene, where there are two non-nested monkey saddles at the K and K' points, exhibits an interplay of competing many-body instabilities, namely, s -wave superconductivity, ferromagnetism, and spin- and charge-density waves.

  7. GPS-identified, low-level nocturnal activity of vervets (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) and olive baboons (Papio anubis) in Laikipia, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Lynne A; Bidner, Laura R; Crofoot, Margaret C; Matsumoto-Oda, Akiko; Farine, Damien R

    2017-09-01

    Except for owl monkeys (Aotus spp.), all anthropoid primates are considered strictly diurnal. Recent studies leveraging new technologies have shown, however, that some diurnal anthropoids also engage in nocturnal activity. Here we examine the extent to which vervets (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) and olive baboons (Papio anubis) are active at night. We deployed GPS collars with tri-axial accelerometer data loggers on 18 free-ranging adult females: 12 vervets spread among 5 social groups, and 6 olive baboons spread among 4 groups. Their locations were recorded every 15 min, and their activity levels, for 3 s/min over 7.5 months. We also used camera traps that were triggered by heat and movement at seven sleeping sites. Travel was detected on 0.4% of 2,029 vervet-nights involving 3 vervets and 1.1% of 1,109 baboon-nights involving 5 baboons. Travel was mainly arboreal for vervets but mainly terrestrial for baboons. During the night, vervets and baboons were active 13% and 15% of the time, respectively. Activity varied little throughout the night and appeared unaffected by moon phase. Our results confirm the low nocturnality of vervets and olive baboons, which we suggest is related to living near the equator with consistent 12-hr days, in contrast to other anthropoids that are more active at night. Since anthropoid primates are thought to have evolved in northern latitudes, with later dispersal to tropical latitudes, our results may have implications for understanding the evolution of anthropoid diurnality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Relation between phylogeny of African green monkey CD4 genes and their respective simian immunodeficiency virus genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Diop, Ousmane

    1997-01-01

    mangabeys, rhesus and pig-tail macaques, chimpanzees, and humans. Chimpanzees and humans consistently clustered together. Monkeys within the Cercopithecus genus formed a separate cluster which included pata monkeys, supporting its grouping as a member of Cercopithecus. Surprisingly, sooty mangabeys were......, tantalus, vervets, grivets, and sabaeus formed separate subgroups with BGM grouping closely with vervets. The branching order of the AGM species was related to that of their respective SIVagm env sequences. The study suggests a strong correlation between CD4 phylogeny and the susceptibility of the host...

  9. Resilience of experimentally seeded dietary traditions in wild vervets: Evidence from group fissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waal, Erica; van Schaik, Carel P; Whiten, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Controlled laboratory experiments have delivered extensive and compelling evidence for the diffusion and maintenance of socially learned behavior in primates and other animals. Such evidence is rarer in the wild, but we show that a behavior seeded in a majority of individuals within vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythus) groups may be sustained across several years. Here, we report results of two natural fission events in such groups that offer novel evidence of the resilience of socially transmitted group norms of behavior. Before fission, high ranked females exhibited an almost exclusive adherence to a group preference among two food options, originally introduced through a distasteful additive in one option, but no longer present in repeated later tests. Because of rank-dependent competition, low-ranked females ate more of the formerly distasteful food and so discovered it was now as palatable as the alternative. Despite this experience, low ranked females who formed the splinter groups then expressed a 100% bias for the preferred option of their original parent group, revealing these preferences to be resilient. We interpret this effect as conformity to either the preferences of high rankers or of a majority in the parent group, or both. However, given fissioned individuals' familiarity with their habitat and experimental options, we question the adequacy of the informational function usually ascribed to conformity and discuss alternatives under a concept of "social conformity". © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Vervet monkey solve a multi-player 'forbidden-circle' game by queuing to learn restraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fruteau, C.; van Damme, E.E.C.; Noe, R.

    2013-01-01

    In social dilemmas, the ability of individuals to coordinate their actions is crucial to reach group optima. Unless exacted by power or force, coordination in humans relies on a common understanding of the problem, which is greatly facilitated by communication. The lack of means of consultation

  11. The endocannabinoid system within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the vervet monkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, P.; Bouskila, J.; Bouchard, J. -F.

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system mainly consists of cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R), their endogenous ligands termed endocannabinoids (eCBs), and the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of eCBs. These cannabinoid receptors have been well characterized in rodent a...

  12. Hippocampal neuron populations are reduced in vervet monkeys with fetal alcohol exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally...... late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume....

  13. Observations on the anatomy of the tail in the vervet monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A long tail is characteristic of the Family Cercopithecidae but apart from a limited contribution to postural adjustment no other function seems obvious. The tail has a large proportion of skin which contributes significantly to the total body surface area. Because it has a widely adjustable blood flow rate and appears specially ...

  14. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha

    2016-01-01

    2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp.) in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves....... In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function....

  15. Scotopic vision in the monkey is modulated by the G protein-coupled receptor 55

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha

    2016-01-01

    -adapted conditions. Thirteen vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus) were used in this study: four controls (injected with the vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO), four injected with LPG and five with CID. We analyzed amplitudes and latencies of the a-wave (photoreceptor responses) and the b-wave (rod and cone system...... responses) of the ERG. Our results showed that after injection of LPG, the amplitude of the scotopic b-wave was significantly higher, whereas after the injection of CID, it was significantly decreased, compared to the vehicle (DMSO). On the other hand, the a-wave amplitude, and the a-wave and b-wave...

  16. Arteriviruses, Pegiviruses, and Lentiviruses Are Common among Wild African Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Adam L; Lauck, Michael; Ghai, Ria R; Nelson, Chase W; Heimbruch, Katelyn; Hughes, Austin L; Goldberg, Tony L; Kuhn, Jens H; Jasinska, Anna J; Freimer, Nelson B; Apetrei, Cristian; O'Connor, David H

    2016-08-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are a historically important source of zoonotic viruses and are a gold-standard model for research on many human pathogens. However, with the exception of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (family Retroviridae), the blood-borne viruses harbored by these animals in the wild remain incompletely characterized. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of two novel simian pegiviruses (family Flaviviridae) and two novel simian arteriviruses (family Arteriviridae) in wild African green monkeys from Zambia (malbroucks [Chlorocebus cynosuros]) and South Africa (vervet monkeys [Chlorocebus pygerythrus]). We examine several aspects of infection, including viral load, genetic diversity, evolution, and geographic distribution, as well as host factors such as age, sex, and plasma cytokines. In combination with previous efforts to characterize blood-borne RNA viruses in wild primates across sub-Saharan Africa, these discoveries demonstrate that in addition to SIV, simian pegiviruses and simian arteriviruses are widespread and prevalent among many African cercopithecoid (i.e., Old World) monkeys. Primates are an important source of viruses that infect humans and serve as an important laboratory model of human virus infection. Here, we discover two new viruses in African green monkeys from Zambia and South Africa. In combination with previous virus discovery efforts, this finding suggests that these virus types are widespread among African monkeys. Our analysis suggests that one of these virus types, the simian arteriviruses, may have the potential to jump between different primate species and cause disease. In contrast, the other virus type, the pegiviruses, are thought to reduce the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans. However, we did not observe a similar protective effect in SIV-infected African monkeys coinfected with pegiviruses, possibly because SIV causes little to no disease in these hosts. Copyright © 2016

  17. Monkey Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Christine Horvatis

    2012-01-01

    A ballerina, a gladiator, a camper, a baseball player, a surfer, and a shopper; these are just a few of the amazing monkeys that the author's seventh graders created from papier-mache. This project provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through the creation of sculptural characters based on their own interests, hobbies, and…

  18. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Nyawira Maranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P<0.05 elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness.

  19. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawira Maranga, Dawn; Kagira, John Maina; Kinyanjui, Christopher Kariuki; Muturi Karanja, Simon; Wangari Maina, Naomi; Ngotho, Maina

    2013-01-01

    The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi) to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P < 0.05) elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. PMID:24194772

  20. Consul, the Educated Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpas, Sidney J.; Massion, Gary R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a toy, the Educated Monkey, developed to help students learn multiplication tables and associated division, factoring, and addition tables and associated subtraction. Explains why the monkey works and reviews geometric, algebraic, and arithmetic concepts. (KHR)

  1. Distribution of collateral fibers in the monkey cervical spinal cord detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ptito, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    techniques. We calculate the diffusion tensor and the persistent angular structure (PAS), a multi-fiber reconstruction technique, from high quality post mortem data of a perfusion-fixed vervet monkey cervical spinal cord sample and simulated crossing fiber data. Our results show that (i) cylindrical geometry......Diffusion anisotropy monitored with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) is a sensitive marker to monitor developmental or pathological microstructural changes in spinal cord. The white matter is often treated as a unidirectional axonal bundle but collateral fibers branching off...... in the white matter of the spinal cord is an invalid assumption due to collateral fibers. We also demonstrate that (ii) collateral fibers can be resolved as distinct peaks in the water diffusion propagator in white matter using multi-fiber models. Finally, we show that (iii) crossing fibers are mainly located...

  2. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN MONKEY DENTIN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN Cebus apella DENTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Humberto Antoniazzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.

  3. Rhesus monkey platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  4. Chemotherapy of second stage human African trypanosomiasis: comparison between the parenteral diamidine DB829 and its oral prodrug DB868 in vervet monkeys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thuita, John K; Wolf, Kristina K; Murilla, Grace A; Bridges, Arlene S; Boykin, David W; Mutuku, James N; Liu, Qiang; Jones, Susan K; Gem, Charles O; Ching, Shelley; Tidwell, Richard R; Wang, Michael Z; Paine, Mary F; Brun, Reto

    2015-01-01

    ... (central nervous system [CNS]) of infection. In response to this largely unmet need for new treatments, the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development developed novel parenteral diamidines and corresponding oral prodrugs that have shown cure...

  5. Scanning electron microscopy study of the choroid plexus in the monkey (Cebus apella apella Estudo do plexo coróide no macaco (Cebus apella apella ao microscópio eletrônico de varredura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OISENYL JOSÉ TAMEGA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles of the monkey Cebus apella apella were examined through scanning electron microscopy at contributing to the description of such structures in primates. The animals were anesthetized previously with 3% hypnol intraperitoneally and after perfusion with 2.5% glutaraldehyde, samples of the choroid plexus were collected after exhibition of the central portion and inferior horn of the lateral ventricles. The ventricular surface of those cells presents globose form as well as fine interlaced protrusions named microvilli. Among those, it is observed the presence of some cilia. Resting on the choroid epithelial cells there is a variable number of free cells, with fine prolongations which extend from them. They are probably macrophages and have been compared to Kolmer cells or epiplexus cells, located on choroid epithelium. The choroid plexus of the encephalic lateral ventricles of the monkey Cebus apella apella at scanning electron microscopy is similar to that of other primates, as well as to that of other species of mammals mainly cats and rats, and also humans.As células do plexo coróide dos ventrículos laterais do macaco-prego (Cebus apella apella foram examinadas ao microscópio eletrônico de varredura com o objetivo de melhor descrever e comparar este órgão ao de outras espécies de mamíferos, principalmente o homem. Inicialmente, os animais foram previamente anestesiados com hipnol a 3% intraperitonealmente e após perfusão com glutaraldeído 2,5%, amostras dos plexos coróides foram coletadas após exibição da porção central e corno inferior dos ventrículos laterais. A superfície ventricular dessas células apresenta forma globosa e a presença de finas protrusões entrelaçadas denominadas microvilosidades. Entre estas, observam-se alguns cílios. Repousando sobre as células epiteliais coróides está presente um número variável de células livres com finos prolongamentos

  6. Monkeys Match and Tally Quantities across Senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kerry E.; MacLean, Evan L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    We report here that monkeys can actively match the number of sounds they hear to the number of shapes they see and present the first evidence that monkeys sum over sounds and sights. In Experiment 1, two monkeys were trained to choose a simultaneous array of 1-9 squares that numerically matched a sample sequence of shapes or sounds. Monkeys…

  7. Formal monkey linguistics : The debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlenker, Philippe; Chemla, Emmanuel; Schel, Anne M.; Fuller, James; Gautier, Jean Pierre; Kuhn, Jeremy; Veselinović, Dunja; Arnold, Kate; Cäsar, Cristiane; Keenan, Sumir; Lemasson, Alban; Ouattara, Karim; Ryder, Robin; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We explain why general techniques from formal linguistics can and should be applied to the analysis of monkey communication - in the areas of syntax and especially semantics. An informed look at our recent proposals shows that such techniques needn't rely excessively on categories of human language:

  8. Immunization with a recombinant fowlpox virus expressing a hepatitis C virus core-E1 polyprotein variant, protects mice and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) against challenge with a surrogate vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lajonchere, Liz; Amador-Cañizares, Yalena; Frías, Roberto; Milian, Yoamel; Musacchio, Alexis; Guerra, Ivis; Acosta-Rivero, Nelson; Martínez, Gillian; Castro, Jorge; Puentes, Pedro; Cosme, Karelia; Dueñas-Carrera, Santiago

    2008-10-01

    HCV (hepatitis C virus) is a worldwide health problem nowadays. No preventive vaccine is available against this pathogen, and therapeutic treatments currently in use have important drawbacks, including limited efficacy. In the present work a recombinant fowlpox virus, FPCoE1, expressing a truncated HCV core-E1 polyprotein, was generated. FPCoE1 virus generally failed to elicit a humoral immune response against HCV antigens in BALB/c mice. By contrast, mice inoculated with FPCoE1 elicited a positive interferon-gamma secretion response against HCV core in ex-vivo ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunospot) assays. Remarkably, mice inoculated with FPCoE1 significantly controlled viraemia in a surrogate challenge model with vvRE, a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HCV structural antigens. In fact, 40% of the mice had no detectable levels of vvRE in their ovaries. Administration of FPCoE1 in vervet monkeys [Chlorocebus (formerly Cercophitecus) aethiops sabaeus] induced lymphoproliferative response against HCV core and E1 proteins in 50% of immunized animals. Monkeys immunized with FPCoE1 had no detectable levels of vvRE in their blood, whereas monkeys inoculated with FP9, the negative control virus, had detectable levels of vvRE in blood up to 7 days after challenge. In conclusion, recombinant fowlpox virus FPCoE1 is able to induce an anti-HCV immune response in mice and monkeys. This ability could be rationally employed to develop effective strategies against HCV infection by using FPCoE1 in combination with other vaccine candidates or antiviral treatments.

  9. Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Measures During and After Pregnancy and Age- and Sex-Specific Reference Intervals in African Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, Lee; Gee, Melaney K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R

    2015-07-01

    Clinical decisions and experimental analyses often involve the assessment of hematology and clinical chemistry. Using clinical pathology to assess the health status of NHP in breeding colonies or data from studies than involve pregnancy can often be complicated by pregnancy status. This study had 2 objectives regarding the hematology and clinical chemistry of African green monkeys (AGM, Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus): 1) to compare pregnant or recently postpartum animals with nonpregnant, nonlactating animals and 2) to create age- and sex-specific reference intervals. Subjects in this study were 491 AGM from the Vervet Research Colony of the Wake Forest University Primate Center. Results indicated that changes in BUN, serum total protein, albumin, ALP, GGT, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, total CO2, globulins, lipase, amylase, WBC, neutrophils, lymphocytes, platelets, RBC, Hgb, and Hct occur during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Age- and sex-specific reference intervals consistent with guidelines from the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology were established and further expand the understanding of how to define health in AGM on the basis of clinical pathology. The combination of understanding the changes that occur in pregnancy and postpartum and expansive reference intervals will help guide clinical and experimental decisions.

  10. Metacognition in monkeys during an oculomotor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, Paul G; Sommer, Marc A

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated whether rhesus monkeys show evidence of metacognition in a reduced, visual oculomotor task that is particularly suitable for use in fMRI and electrophysiology. The 2-stage task involved punctate visual stimulation and saccadic eye movement responses. In each trial, monkeys made a decision and then made a bet. To earn maximum reward, they had to monitor their decision and use that information to bet advantageously. Two monkeys learned to base their bets on their decisions within a few weeks. We implemented an operational definition of metacognitive behavior that relied on trial-by-trial analyses and signal detection theory. Both monkeys exhibited metacognition according to these quantitative criteria. Neither external visual cues nor potential reaction time cues explained the betting behavior; the animals seemed to rely exclusively on internal traces of their decisions. We documented the learning process of one monkey. During a 10-session transition phase, betting switched from random to a decision-based strategy. The results reinforce previous findings of metacognitive ability in monkeys and may facilitate the neurophysiological investigation of metacognitive functions. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Delay of gratification in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    In two separate series of experiments four capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and four squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were given demonstration trials in which a human transferred six pieces of food, one by one, from out of each monkey's reach to within reach. On test trials the monkey could reach for the transferred food at any time, an action that ended the trial. Therefore, it was in the monkey's interest to allow food items to accumulate before reaching for food. No capuchin monkey showed delay of gratification in the first phase of testing. An attempt to facilitate performance by presenting a single free food item immediately before the transfer failed (Phase 2). In Phase 3, when the transferred food items increased progressively in size, two capuchins maintained delays, and frequently waited for all 6 items to accumulate. One squirrel monkey started to delay gratification in Phase 1, and another did so in Phase 3. A return to single-sized food items did not impair the monkeys' ability to delay. Short (1 s) interitem delays were generally easier to maintain than longer delays (3 or 5 s). In both species the delaying individuals bridged the delays idiosyncratically. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. An Infectious Clone of Woolly Monkey Hepatitis B Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lanford, Robert E.; Chavez, Deborah; Barrera, Azeneth; Brasky, Kathleen M.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the Hepadnaviridae family have been isolated from birds, rodents, and primates. A new hepadnavirus isolated from the woolly monkey, a New World primate, is phylogenetically distinct from other primate isolates. An animal model has been established for woolly monkey hepatitis B virus (WMHBV) by using spider monkeys, since woolly monkeys are endangered. In this study, a greater-than-genome length construct was prepared without amplification by using covalently closed circular DNA ext...

  13. Monkey Bites among US Military Members, Afghanistan, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Katheryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Bites from Macaca mulatta monkeys, native to Afghanistan, can cause serious infections. To determine risk for US military members in Afghanistan, we reviewed records for September–December 2011. Among 126 animal bites and exposures, 10 were monkey bites. Command emphasis is vital for preventing monkey bites; provider training and bite reporting promote postexposure treatment. PMID:23017939

  14. Experimental infection of squirrel monkeys with nipah virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianneau, Philippe; Guillaume, Vanessa; Wong, Thong; Badmanathan, Munisamy; Looi, Ren Yih; Murri, Severine; Loth, Philippe; Tordo, Noel; Wild, Fabian; Horvat, Branka; Contamin, Hugues

    2010-03-01

    We infected squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) with Nipah virus to determine the monkeys' suitability for use as primate models in preclinical testing of preventive and therapeutic treatments. Infection of squirrel monkeys through intravenous injection was followed by high death rates associated with acute neurologic and respiratory illness and viral RNA and antigen production.

  15. Basic math in monkeys and college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Jessica F; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2007-12-01

    Adult humans possess a sophisticated repertoire of mathematical faculties. Many of these capacities are rooted in symbolic language and are therefore unlikely to be shared with nonhuman animals. However, a subset of these skills is shared with other animals, and this set is considered a cognitive vestige of our common evolutionary history. Current evidence indicates that humans and nonhuman animals share a core set of abilities for representing and comparing approximate numerosities nonverbally; however, it remains unclear whether nonhuman animals can perform approximate mental arithmetic. Here we show that monkeys can mentally add the numerical values of two sets of objects and choose a visual array that roughly corresponds to the arithmetic sum of these two sets. Furthermore, monkeys' performance during these calculations adheres to the same pattern as humans tested on the same nonverbal addition task. Our data demonstrate that nonverbal arithmetic is not unique to humans but is instead part of an evolutionarily primitive system for mathematical thinking shared by monkeys.

  16. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p <0.05) directly with the +G level reaching a maximum (3G) within a seconds compare to controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  17. Nutrition of flexor tendons in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, P R; Bridwell, K; Whiteside, L A; Lesker, P A

    1978-10-01

    The hydrogen washout technique was used to investigate the role of synovial diffusion versus vascular perfusion in the nutrition of monkey flexor tendons within the digital sheath. There was no significant difference in the uptake and washout of hydrogen tracer by tendons in contact with synovium but detached from the surrounding vasculature, compared to control tendons. However, there was insignificant uptake of tracer by tendons with intact vasculature, but separated from synovium. Synovial diffusion is a primary nutrient pathway of monkey flexor tendons within the digital sheath.

  18. Analysis of prostate-specific antigen transcripts in chimpanzees, cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N Mubiru

    Full Text Available The function of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is to liquefy the semen coagulum so that the released sperm can fuse with the ovum. Fifteen spliced variants of the PSA gene have been reported in humans, but little is known about alternative splicing in nonhuman primates. Positive selection has been reported in sex- and reproductive-related genes from sea urchins to Drosophila to humans; however, there are few studies of adaptive evolution of the PSA gene. Here, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR product cloning and sequencing, we study PSA transcript variant heterogeneity in the prostates of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis, and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops. Six PSA variants were identified in the chimpanzee prostate, but only two variants were found in cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys. In the chimpanzee the full-length transcript is expressed at the same magnitude as the transcripts that retain intron 3. We have found previously unidentified splice variants of the PSA gene, some of which might be linked to disease conditions. Selection on the PSA gene was studied in 11 primate species by computational methods using the sequences reported here for African green monkey, cynomolgus monkey, baboon, and chimpanzee and other sequences available in public databases. A codon-based analysis (dN/dS of the PSA gene identified potential adaptive evolution at five residue sites (Arg45, Lys70, Gln144, Pro189, and Thr203.

  19. Relative density and distribution of Tantalus monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis of data was conducted using the software package DISTANCE 6.0 to determine population density estimate. Kwada, Yuwe, Jeltere and Balda are the four ranges within the reserve. Considering the number of species sighted, Tantalus monkey is widespread throughout the reserve where it was sighted in all the ...

  20. Accommodative lens refilling in rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; Terwee, T; Glasser, A; Wendt, M; Vilipuru, AS; van Kooten, TG; Norrby, S; Haitjema, HJ; Kooijman, AC

    PURPOSE. Accommodation can be restored to presbyopic human eyes by refilling the capsular bag with a soft polymer. This study was conducted to test whether accommodation, measurable as changes in optical refraction, can be restored with a newly developed refilling polymer in a rhesus monkey model. A

  1. Nutritional and health status of woolly monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Timmer, S.; Jansen, W.L.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha and L. flavicauda) are threatened species in the wild and in captivity. Numerous zoological institutions have historically kept Lagothrix lagotricha spp., but only a few of them have succeeded in breeding populations. Therefore the majority of institutions that

  2. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observations on the anatomy of the tail in the vervet monkey, cercopithecus, which bear on thermoregulatory function in the organ (Primata: Cercopithecidae) Abstract PDF · Vol 12, No 2 (1977) - Articles A counter-current heat exchange system in the tail of the vervet monkey, Cercopithecus pygerythrus (Primata ...

  3. Agonism and dominance in female blue monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Keren; Cords, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Agonistic behavior features prominently in hypotheses that explain how social variation relates to ecological factors and phylogenetic constraints. Dominance systems vary along axes of despotism, tolerance, and nepotism, and comparative studies examine cross-species patterns in these classifications. To contribute to such studies, we present a comprehensive picture of agonistic behavior and dominance relationships in wild female blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis), an arboreal guenon, with data from 9 groups spanning 18 years. We assessed where blue monkeys fall along despotic, tolerant, and nepotistic spectra, how their dominance system compares to other primates, primarily cercopithecines, and whether their agonistic behavior matches socioecological model predictions. Blue monkeys showed low rates of mainly low-intensity agonism and little counter-aggression. Rates increased with rank and group size. Dominance asymmetry varied at different organizational levels, being more pronounced at the level of interactions than dyad or group. Hierarchies were quite stable, had moderate-to-high linearity and directional consistency and moderate steepness. There was clear maternal rank inheritance, but inconsistent adherence to Kawamura's rules. There was little between-group variation, although hierarchy metrics showed considerable variation across group-years. Overall, blue monkeys have moderately despotic, moderately tolerant, and nepotistic dominance hierarchies. They resemble other cercopithecines in having significantly linear and steep hierarchies with a generally stable, matriline-based structure, suggesting a phylogenetic basis to this aspect of their social system. Blue monkeys most closely match Sterck et al.'s [1997] Resident-Nepotistic-Tolerant dominance category, although they do not fully conform to predictions of any one socioecological model. Our results suggest that socioecological models might better predict variation within than across clades, thereby

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Health System Strengthening: Iceida’s Development Collaboration in Monkey Bay, Malawi, in 2000-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jónína Einarsdóttir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Icelandic International Development Agency (Iceida supported the health services in the Monkey Bay area in Mangochi district in Malawi in southern Africa in the period 2000-2011. It included construction of physical structures, logistic, training of health staff, and community health activities. One additional feature included support for the national electronic Health Monitoring Information System (HMIS in place, with extraction and analysis of data generated by the health services in the area. In this paper, the development of the services will be analysed and discussed. Further, difficulties to find appropriate indicators to monitor health services, in Monkey Bay and elsewhere, will be presented and elaborated upon.

  5. Head Rotation Detection in Marmoset Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhadri, Sravanthi

    Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and closing of the chamber door. All of these conditions were tested with either house light on or off. Infra-red camera with a frame rate of 90 Hz was used to capture of the head movement of monkeys. To assist the signal detection, two circular markers were attached to the top of monkey head. The data analysis used an image-based marker detection scheme. Images were processed using the Computation Vision Toolbox in Matlab. The markers and their positions were detected using blob detection techniques. Based on the frame-by-frame information of marker positions, the angular position, velocity and acceleration were extracted in horizontal and vertical planes. Adaptive Otsu Thresholding, Kalman filtering and bound setting for marker properties were used to overcome a number of challenges encountered during this analysis, such as finding image segmentation threshold, continuously tracking markers during large head movement, and false alarm detection. The results show that the blob detection method together with Kalman filtering yielded better performances than other image based techniques like optical flow and SURF features .The median of the maximal head turn in the horizontal plane was in the range of 20 to 70 degrees and the median of the maximal velocity in horizontal plane was in the range of a few hundreds of degrees per

  6. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  7. A freely-moving monkey treadmill model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Justin D.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Freifeld, Oren; Gao, Hua; Walker, Ross; Ryu, Stephen I.; Meng, Teresa H.; Murmann, Boris; Black, Michael J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Motor neuroscience and brain-machine interface (BMI) design is based on examining how the brain controls voluntary movement, typically by recording neural activity and behavior from animal models. Recording technologies used with these animal models have traditionally limited the range of behaviors that can be studied, and thus the generality of science and engineering research. We aim to design a freely-moving animal model using neural and behavioral recording technologies that do not constrain movement. Approach. We have established a freely-moving rhesus monkey model employing technology that transmits neural activity from an intracortical array using a head-mounted device and records behavior through computer vision using markerless motion capture. We demonstrate the flexibility and utility of this new monkey model, including the first recordings from motor cortex while rhesus monkeys walk quadrupedally on a treadmill. Main results. Using this monkey model, we show that multi-unit threshold-crossing neural activity encodes the phase of walking and that the average firing rate of the threshold crossings covaries with the speed of individual steps. On a population level, we find that neural state-space trajectories of walking at different speeds have similar rotational dynamics in some dimensions that evolve at the step rate of walking, yet robustly separate by speed in other state-space dimensions. Significance. Freely-moving animal models may allow neuroscientists to examine a wider range of behaviors and can provide a flexible experimental paradigm for examining the neural mechanisms that underlie movement generation across behaviors and environments. For BMIs, freely-moving animal models have the potential to aid prosthetic design by examining how neural encoding changes with posture, environment and other real-world context changes. Understanding this new realm of behavior in more naturalistic settings is essential for overall progress of basic

  8. Competitive control of cognition in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowaguchi, Mayuka; Patel, Nirali P; Bunnell, Megan E; Kralik, Jerald D

    2016-12-01

    The brain has evolved different approaches to solve problems, but the mechanisms that determine which approach to take remain unclear. One possibility is that control progresses from simpler processes, such as associative learning, to more complex ones, such as relational reasoning, when the simpler ones prove inadequate. Alternatively, control could be based on competition between the processes. To test between these possibilities, we posed the support problem to rhesus monkeys using a tool-use paradigm, in which subjects could pull an object (the tool) toward themselves to obtain an otherwise out-of-reach goal item. We initially provided one problem exemplar as a choice: for the correct option, a food item placed on the support tool; for the incorrect option, the food item placed off the tool. Perceptual cues were also correlated with outcome: e.g., red, triangular tool correct, blue, rectangular tool incorrect. Although the monkeys simply needed to touch the tool to register a response, they immediately pulled it, reflecting a relational reasoning process between themselves and another object (Rself-other), rather than an associative one between the arbitrary touch response and reward (Aresp-reward). Probe testing then showed that all four monkeys used a conjunction of perceptual features to select the correct option, reflecting an associative process between stimuli and reward (Astim-reward). We then added a second problem exemplar and subsequent testing revealed that the monkeys switched to using the on/off relationship, reflecting a relational reasoning process between two objects (Rother-other). Because behavior appeared to reflect Rself-other rather than Aresp-reward, and Astim-reward prior to Rother-other, our results suggest that cognitive processes are selected via competitive control dynamics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Trial Outcome and Associative Learning Signals in the Monkey Hippocampus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wirth, Sylvia; Avsar, Emin; Chiu, Cindy C; Sharma, Varun; Smith, Anne C; Brown, Emery; Suzuki, Wendy A

    2009-01-01

    .... To study how hippocampal neurons convey information about reward and trial outcome during new associative learning, we recorded hippocampal neurons as monkeys learned novel object-place associations...

  10. Monkeying around: Use of Survey Monkey as a Tool for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massat, Carol Rippey; McKay, Cassandra; Moses, Helene

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an online survey tool called Survey Monkey, which can be used by school social workers and school social work educators for evaluation of practice, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Examples of questions are given. Principles of writing good survey questions are described. (Contains 2 tables and 1…

  11. Clustering of PCOS-like traits in naturally hyperandrogenic female rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D H; Rayome, B H; Dumesic, D A; Lewis, K C; Edwards, A K; Wallen, K; Wilson, M E; Appt, S E; Levine, J E

    2017-04-01

    Do naturally occurring, hyperandrogenic (≥1 SD of population mean testosterone, T) female rhesus monkeys exhibit traits typical of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Hyperandrogenic female monkeys exhibited significantly increased serum levels of androstenedione (A4), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), estradiol (E2), LH, antimullerian hormone (AMH), cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol and corticosterone, as well as increased uterine endometrial thickness and evidence of reduced fertility, all traits associated with PCOS. Progress in treating women with PCOS is limited by incomplete knowledge of its pathogenesis and the absence of naturally occurring PCOS in animal models. A female macaque monkey, however, with naturally occurring hyperandrogenism, anovulation and polyfollicular ovaries, accompanied by insulin resistance, increased adiposity and endometrial hyperplasia, suggests naturally occurring origins for PCOS in nonhuman primates. As part of a larger study, circulating serum concentrations of selected pituitary, ovarian and adrenal hormones, together with fasted insulin and glucose levels, were determined in a single, morning blood sample obtained from 120 apparently healthy, ovary-intact, adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) while not pregnant or nursing. The monkeys were then sedated for somatometric and ultrasonographic measurements. Female monkeys were of prime reproductive age (7.2 ± 0.1 years, mean ± SEM) and represented a typical spectrum of adult body weight (7.4 ± 0.2 kg; maximum 12.5, minimum 4.6 kg). Females were defined as having normal (n = 99) or high T levels (n = 21; ≥1 SD above the overall mean, 0.31 ng/ml). Electronic health records provided menstrual and fecundity histories. Steroid hormones were determined by tandem LC-MS-MS; AMH was measured by enzymeimmunoassay; LH, FSH and insulin were determined by radioimmunoassay; and glucose was read by glucose meter. Most analyses were limited to 80 females (60 normal T, 20 high T) in

  12. Evaluation of diabetes determinants in woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Burns, R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jansen, W.L.; Ferket, P.R.; Heugten, E.

    2007-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha) are a threatened specie in the wild with limited successful management in captivity due to diagnosed hypertension and suspected diabetic conditions. Six woolly monkeys with known hypertension problems were tested to determine if diabetes mellitus and current

  13. Serum Chemistry concentrations of captive Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix Lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Ferket, P.; Stoskopf, M.; Heugten, van E.

    2008-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix sp.) are threatened species and numerous zoos have failed to sustain successful populations. The most common causes of death in captive woolly monkeys are related to pregnancy and hypertension. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate serum concentrations

  14. Sequential responding and planning in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E

    2012-11-01

    Previous experiments have assessed planning during sequential responding to computer generated stimuli by Old World nonhuman primates including chimpanzees and rhesus macaques. However, no such assessment has been made with a New World primate species. Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) are an interesting test case for assessing the distribution of cognitive processes in the Order Primates because they sometimes show proficiency in tasks also mastered by apes and Old World monkeys, but in other cases fail to match the proficiency of those other species. In two experiments, eight capuchin monkeys selected five arbitrary stimuli in distinct locations on a computer monitor in a learned sequence. In Experiment 1, shift trials occurred in which the second and third stimuli were transposed when the first stimulus was selected by the animal. In Experiment 2, mask trials occurred in which all remaining stimuli were masked after the monkey selected the first stimulus. Monkeys made more mistakes on trials in which the locations of the second and third stimuli were interchanged than on trials in which locations were not interchanged, suggesting they had already planned to select a location that no longer contained the correct stimulus. When mask trials occurred, monkeys performed at levels significantly better than chance, but their performance exceeded chance levels only for the first and the second selections on a trial. These data indicate that capuchin monkeys performed very similarly to chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys and appeared to plan their selection sequences during the computerized task, but only to a limited degree.

  15. Perceptual Learning: 12-Month-Olds' Discrimination of Monkey Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Joseph; Flom, Ross; Jones, Jacob; Martin, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Six-month-olds reliably discriminate different monkey and human faces whereas 9-month-olds only discriminate different human faces. It is often falsely assumed that perceptual narrowing reflects a permanent change in perceptual abilities. In 3 experiments, ninety-six 12-month-olds' discrimination of unfamiliar monkey faces was examined. Following…

  16. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Obinutuzumab in Cynomolgus Monkeys and Relevance to Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, Elisabeth; Solonets, Maria; Kuhlmann, Olaf; Schick, Eginhard; Piper-Lepoutre, Hanna; Singer, Thomas; Tyagi, Gaurav

    2017-07-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101, Gazyva™, Gazyvaro®, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel, Switzerland) is a humanized, glycoengineered type II antibody targeted against CD20. The preclinical safety evaluation required to support clinical development and marketing authorization of obinutuzumab included repeat-dose toxicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys for up to 6-month dosing with a 9-month recovery period. Results from those studies showed decreases in circulating B cells and corresponding B-cell depletion in lymphoid tissues, consistent with the desired pharmacology of obinutuzumab. Hypersensitivity reactions were noted at all doses in the 6-month study and were attributed to the foreign recognition of the drug construct in cynomolgus monkeys. Findings in monkeys were classified as acute hypersensitivity reactions that were evident immediately after dosing, such as excessive salivation, erythema, pruritus, irregular respiration, or ataxia, or chronic hypersensitivity reactions characterized by glomerulonephritis, arteritis/periarteritis, and inflammation in several tissues including serosal/adventitial inflammation. Immune complex deposits were demonstrated in tissues by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. Some of, but not all, the animals that developed these reactions had detectable antidrug antibodies or circulating immune complexes accompanied by loss of drug exposure and pharmacodynamic effect. On the basis of clinical evidence to date, hypersensitivity reactions following obinutuzumab are rare, further supporting the general view that incidence and manifestation of immunogenicity in nonclinical species are generally not predictive for humans.

  17. Inequity responses of monkeys modified by effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolkenten, Megan; Brosnan, Sarah F.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2007-01-01

    Without joint benefits, joint actions could never have evolved. Cooperative animals need to monitor closely how large a share they receive relative to their investment toward collective goals. This work documents the sensitivity to reward division in brown, or tufted, capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). In addition to confirming previous results with a larger subject pool, this work rules out several alternative explanations and adds data on effort sensitivity. Thirteen adult monkeys exchanged tokens for rewards, showing negative reactions to receiving a less-favored reward than their partner. Because their negative reaction could not be attributed to the mere visibility of better rewards (greed hypothesis) nor to having received such rewards in the immediate past (frustration hypothesis), it must have been caused by seeing their partner obtain the better reward. Effort had a major effect in that by far the lowest level of performance in the entire study occurred in subjects required to expend a large effort while at the same time seeing their partner receive a better reward. It is unclear whether this effort–effect was based on comparisons with the partner, but it added significantly to the intensity of the inequity response. These effects are as expected if the inequity response evolved in the context of cooperative survival strategies. PMID:18000045

  18. Nuclear DNA variation in spider monkeys (Ateles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A C; Dubach, J M

    2001-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationships based on DNA sequence variation for the aldolase A intron V nuclear genomic region were evaluated and compared to phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequence variation among spider monkeys (Ateles). Samples of Ateles ranging from Central America throughout the Amazon Basin were sequenced to determine phylogenetic relationships among geographically widely distributed populations. Analysis of nuclear DNA sequences using parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and genetic distance analyses produced similar phylogenies. Four previously proposed monophyletic species of spider monkeys were: (1) Ateles paniscus, composed of haplotypes from the northeastern Amazon Basin; (2) A. belzebuth, found in the western and southern Amazon Basin; (3) A. hybridus, located primarily along the Magdalena River valley of Colombia; and (4) A. geoffroyi, including all haplotypes found in the Choco region of South America and throughout Central America. The nuclear phylograms were analyzed based on associated bootstrap support and confidence probabilities. Support from the nuclear DNA genome was less robust than support from the mitochondrial DNA data, most likely due to a level of sequence variation, which was 90% less than that of the mitochondrial DNA genome. Nuclear DNA congruencies with mitochondrial DNA-based phylogenies, as supported by the incongruence length difference and winning sites tests, provide further support for the suggested revisions in Ateles taxonomy that are contradictory to long-held taxonomies based on pelage variation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Can Rhesus Monkey Learn Executive Attention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bramlett-Parker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of data indicates that, compared to humans, rhesus monkeys perform poorly on tasks that assess executive attention, or voluntary control over selection for processing, particularly under circumstances in which attention is attracted elsewhere by competing stimulus control. In the human-cognition literature, there are hotly active debates about whether various competencies such as executive attention, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence can be improved through training. In the current study, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta completed an attention-training intervention including several inhibitory-control tasks (a Simon task, numerical Stroop task, global/local interference task, and a continuous performance task to determine whether generalized improvements would be observed on a version of the Attention Network Test (ANT of controlled attention, which was administered before and after the training intervention. Although the animals demonstrated inhibition of prepotent responses and improved in executive attention with practice, this improvement did not generalize to the ANT at levels consistently better than were observed for control animals. Although these findings fail to encourage the possibility that species differences in cognitive competencies can be ameliorated through training, they do advance our understanding of the competition between stimulus-control and cognitive-control in performance by nonhuman and human primates.

  20. Scleral Biomechanics in the Aging Monkey Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Michaël J. A.; Suh, J-K. Francis; Bottlang, Michael; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the age-related differences in the inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nonlinear biomechanical properties of posterior sclera from old (22.9 ± 5.3 years) and young (1.5 ± 0.7 years) rhesus monkeys. Methods The posterior scleral shell of each eye was mounted on a custom-built pressurization apparatus, then intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated from 5 to 45 mmHg while the 3D displacements of the scleral surface were measured using speckle interferometry. Each scleral shell geometry was digitally reconstructed from data generated by a 3D digitizer (topography) and 20 MHz ultrasounds (thickness). An inverse finite element (FE) method incorporating a fiber-reinforced constitutive model was used to extract a unique set of biomechanical properties for each eye. Displacements, thickness, stress, strain, tangent modulus, structural stiffness, and preferred collagen fiber orientation were mapped for each posterior sclera. Results The model yielded 3-D deformations of posterior sclera that matched well with those observed experimentally. The posterior sclera exhibited inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nonlinear mechanical behavior. The sclera was significantly thinner (p = 0.038), and tangent modulus and structural stiffness were significantly higher in old monkeys (p biomechanics, and potentially contribute to age-related susceptibility to glaucomatous vision loss. PMID:19494203

  1. Experimental thromboembolic stroke in cynomolgus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, G; Nishimura, A; Susumu, T; Nagata, R; Kuge, Y; Yokota, C; Minematsu, K

    2001-01-30

    To develop an experimental model of thromboembolic stroke without intracranial surgery, an autologous blood clot was delivered to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) via the internal carotid artery in cynomolgus monkeys. Male cynomolgus monkeys, in which a chronic catheter had been earlier implanted in the left internal carotid artery, were used. The clot was flushed into the internal carotid artery under sevofluorane anesthesia. A neurologic deficit score was assigned after MCA embolization. After 24 h, cerebral infarct size and location were determined by the TTC staining method. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured prior to and after MCA embolization, using positron emission tomography (PET). After embolization, long-lasting and profound extensor hypotonia of the contralateral upper and lower limbs, and mild to severe incoordination were observed. Contralateral hemiplegia was observed over the following 24 h. In gross morphologic observation of the brain, the lesions involved mostly the caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and insular cortex. CBF was maximally reduced in the left MCA territory, but not in the right MCA territory. This model is relevant to thromboembolic stroke in human in neurologic dysfunction and histopathologic brain damage.

  2. Explicit information reduces discounting behavior in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePearson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals are notoriously impulsive in common laboratory experiments, preferring smaller, sooner rewards to larger, delayed rewards even when this reduces average reward rates. By contrast, the same animals often engage in natural behaviors that require extreme patience, such as food caching, stalking prey, and traveling long distances to high quality food sites. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that standard laboratory delay discounting tasks artificially inflate impulsivity by subverting animals’ common learning strategies. To test this idea, we examined choices made by rhesus macaques in two variants of a standard delay discounting task. In the conventional variant, post-reward delays were uncued and adjusted to render total trial length constant; in the second, all delays were cued explicitly. We found that measured discounting was significantly reduced in the cued task, with discount rates well below those reported in studies using the standard uncued design. When monkeys had complete information, their decisions were more consistent with a strategy of reward rate maximization. These results indicate that monkeys, and perhaps other animals, are more patient than is normally assumed, and that laboratory measures of delay discounting may overstate impulsivity.

  3. Short poly-glutamine repeat in the androgen receptor in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Paukner, Annika; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo; Suomi, Stephen J; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2017-12-01

    The androgen receptor mediates various physiological and developmental functions and is highly conserved in mammals. Although great intraspecific length polymorphisms in poly glutamine (poly-Q) and poly glycine (poly-G) regions of the androgen receptor in humans, apes and several Old World monkeys have been reported, little is known about the characteristics of these regions in New World monkeys. In this study, we surveyed 17 species of New World monkeys and found length polymorphisms in these regions in three species (common squirrel monkeys, tufted capuchin monkeys and owl monkeys). We found that the poly-Q region in New World monkeys is relatively shorter than that in catarrhines (humans, apes and Old World monkeys). In addition, we observed that codon usage for poly-G region in New World monkeys is unique among primates. These results suggest that the length of polymorphic regions in androgen receptor genes have evolved uniquely in New World monkeys.

  4. Dissecting the mechanisms of squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Lm; Holmes, An; Williams, LE; Brosnan, Sf

    2013-01-01

    Although the social learning abilities of monkeys have been well documented, this research has only focused on a few species. Furthermore, of those that also incorporated dissections of social learning mechanisms, the majority studied either capuchins (Cebus apella) or marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). To gain a broader understanding of how monkeys gain new skills, we tested squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) which have never been studied in tests of social learning mechanisms. To determine whether S. boliviensis can socially learn, we ran "open diffusion" tests with monkeys housed in two social groups (N = 23). Over the course of 10 20-min sessions, the monkeys in each group observed a trained group member retrieving a mealworm from a bidirectional task (the "Slide-box"). Two thirds (67%) of these monkeys both learned how to operate the Slide-box and they also moved the door significantly more times in the direction modeled by the trained demonstrator than the alternative direction. To tease apart the underlying social learning mechanisms we ran a series of three control conditions with 35 squirrel monkeys that had no previous experience with the Slide-box. The first replicated the experimental open diffusion sessions but without the inclusion of a trained model, the second was a no-information control with dyads of monkeys, and the third was a 'ghost' display shown to individual monkeys. The first two controls tested for the importance of social support (mere presence effect) and the ghost display showed the affordances of the task to the monkeys. The monkeys showed a certain level of success in the group control (54% of subjects solved the task on one or more occasions) and paired controls (28% were successful) but none were successful in the ghost control. We propose that the squirrel monkeys' learning, observed in the experimental open diffusion tests, can be best described by a combination of social learning mechanisms in concert; in this case, those

  5. Loss of metabolites from monkey striatum during PET with FDOPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, P; Munk, O L; Doudet, D

    2001-01-01

    constants using data recorded during 240 min of FDOPA circulation in normal monkeys and in monkeys with unilateral 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) lesions. Use of the extended models increased the magnitudes of K(D)(i) and k(D)(3) in striatum; in the case of k(D)(3), variance...... of the estimate was substantially improved upon correction for metabolite loss. The rate constants for metabolite loss were higher in MPTP-lesioned monkey striatum than in normal striatum. The high correlation between individual estimates of k(Lin)(cl) and k(DA)(9) suggests that both rate constants reveal loss...

  6. A mechanism of bone tissue loss in monkeys (BION - 11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, N. V.; Oganov, V. S.

    The elucidation of mechanisms of bone tissue loss under the spaceflight conditions remains an actual problem until now It was established that primary reactions to a mechanical stress evolve at the cellular level therefore the main attention of the researchers was aimed at studying bone tissue cells and their interactions With the use of electron microscopy we studied osteoblasts osteocytes osteoclasts and stromal cells in bioptats of the iliac bone crest from monkeys flown on board the satellite guillemotleft BION - 11 guillemotright during 2 weeks The flight samples were compared with the vivarium and simulation controls The functional state of cells was evaluated by the degree of development of organelles for specific biosyntheses rough endoplasmic reticulum Golgy complex nucleus state interrelation with a mineralized matrix The analysis of the obtained results and data of other authors Klein -- Nulend et al 2003 etc permits to suppose that the following sequence of cell interactions underlies the bone tissue loss during mechanical stress microgravity reaction of mechano-sensitive osteocytes to a mechanical stimulus consisting in enhancement of osteolytic processes in cells which results in a partial bone tissue loss along the local unloading Simultaneously the modulating signals are transmitted through a system of canals and processes towards active osteoblasts surface osteocytes and bone marrow stromal cells as well As a reply to a mechanical stimulus there occurs a reduction slowing down of proliferation

  7. Transplantation of adult monkey neural stem cells into a contusion spinal cord injury model in rhesus macaque monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemati, Shiva Nemati; Jabbari, Reza; Hajinasrollah, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    , therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model...... on Tarlov's scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. CONCLUSION: Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation....

  8. Looming biases in monkey auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Joost X; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2007-04-11

    Looming signals (signals that indicate the rapid approach of objects) are behaviorally relevant signals for all animals. Accordingly, studies in primates (including humans) reveal attentional biases for detecting and responding to looming versus receding signals in both the auditory and visual domains. We investigated the neural representation of these dynamic signals in the lateral belt auditory cortex of rhesus monkeys. By recording local field potential and multiunit spiking activity while the subjects were presented with auditory looming and receding signals, we show here that auditory cortical activity was biased in magnitude toward looming versus receding stimuli. This directional preference was not attributable to the absolute intensity of the sounds nor can it be attributed to simple adaptation, because white noise stimuli with identical amplitude envelopes did not elicit the same pattern of responses. This asymmetrical representation of looming versus receding sounds in the lateral belt auditory cortex suggests that it is an important node in the neural network correlate of looming perception.

  9. Keep children away from macaque monkeys!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréhin, Camille; Debuisson, Cécile; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; Niphuis, Henk; Buitendijk, Hester; Mengelle, Catherine; Grouteau, Erick; Claudet, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    To warn physicians and parents about the risk of macaque bites, we present two pediatric cases (a 4-year-old boy and a 10-year-old girl) of bites sustained while on holiday. The young boy developed febrile dermohypodermitis and was hospitalized for IV antibiotic treatment. He received an initial antirabies vaccine while still in the holiday destination. Except for local wound disinfection and antibiotic ointment, the girl did not receive any specific treatment while abroad. Both were negative for simian herpes PCR. When travelling in countries or cities with endemic simian herpes virus, parents should keep children away from monkeys. Travel agencies, pediatricians and family physicians should better inform families about the zoonotic risk. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Population Density of the White-Throated Monkey ( Cercopithecus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population Density of the White-Throated Monkey ( Cercopithecus Erythrogaster ) in ... Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences ... in Okomu National Park, Edo State, Nigeria was conducted to estimate the population density.

  11. Chemical recognition of fruit ripeness in spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Omer; Orts Garri, Rosa; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Schulz, Stefan; Heymann, Eckhard W; Ayasse, Manfred; Laska, Matthias

    2015-10-06

    Primates are now known to possess well-developed olfactory sensitivity and discrimination capacities that can play a substantial role in many aspects of their interaction with conspecifics and the environment. Several studies have demonstrated that olfactory cues may be useful in fruit selection. Here, using a conditioning paradigm, we show that captive spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) display high olfactory discrimination performance between synthetic odor mixtures mimicking ripe and unripe fruits of two wild, primate-consumed, Neotropical plant species. Further, we show that spider monkeys are able to discriminate the odor of ripe fruits from odors that simulate unripe fruits that become increasingly similar to that of ripe ones. These results suggest that the ability of spider monkeys to identify ripe fruits may not depend on the presence of any individual compound that mark fruit ripeness. Further, the results demonstrate that spider monkeys are able to identify ripe fruits even when the odor signal is accompanied by a substantial degree of noise.

  12. jMonkeyEngine 3.0 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Edén, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    If you are a jMonkey developer or a Java developer who is interested to delve further into the game making process to expand your skillset and create more technical games, then this book is perfect for you.

  13. Estrogen Restores Multisynaptic Boutons in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex while Promoting Working Memory in Aged Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yuko; Yuk, Frank; Puri, Rishi; Janssen, William G M; Rapp, Peter R; Morrison, John H

    2016-01-20

    Humans and nonhuman primates are vulnerable to age- and menopause- related decline in working memory, a cognitive function reliant on area 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). We showed previously that presynaptic mitochondrial number and morphology in monkey dlPFC neurons correlate with working memory performance. The current study tested the hypothesis that the types of synaptic connections these boutons form are altered with aging and menopause in rhesus monkeys and that these metrics may be coupled with mitochondrial measures and working memory. Using serial section electron microscopy, we examined the frequencies and characteristics of nonsynaptic, single-synaptic, and multisynaptic boutons (MSBs) in the dlPFC. In contrast to our previous observations in the monkey hippocampal dentate gyrus, where MSBs comprised ∼40% of boutons, the vast majority of dlPFC boutons were single-synaptic, whereas MSBs constituted a mere 10%. The frequency of MSBs was not altered by normal aging, but decreased by over 50% with surgical menopause induced by ovariectomy in aged monkeys. Cyclic estradiol treatment in aged ovariectomized animals restored MSB frequencies to levels comparable to young and aged premenopausal monkeys. Notably, the frequency of MSBs positively correlated with working memory scores, as measured by the average accuracy on the delayed response (DR) test. Furthermore, MSB incidence positively correlated with the number of healthy straight mitochondria in dlPFC boutons and inversely correlated with the number of pathological donut-shaped mitochondria. Together, our data suggest that MSBs are coupled to cognitive function and mitochondrial health and are sensitive to estrogen. Significance statement: Many aged menopausal individuals experience deficits in working memory, an executive function reliant on recurrent firing of prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons. However, little is known about the organization of presynaptic inputs to these neurons and how

  14. Dissecting the mechanisms of squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis social learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Hopper

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the social learning abilities of monkeys have been well documented, this research has only focused on a few species. Furthermore, of those that also incorporated dissections of social learning mechanisms, the majority studied either capuchins (Cebus apella or marmosets (Callithrix jacchus. To gain a broader understanding of how monkeys gain new skills, we tested squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis which have never been studied in tests of social learning mechanisms. To determine whether S. boliviensis can socially learn, we ran “open diffusion” tests with monkeys housed in two social groups (N = 23. Over the course of 10 20-min sessions, the monkeys in each group observed a trained group member retrieving a mealworm from a bidirectional task (the “Slide-box”. Two thirds (67% of these monkeys both learned how to operate the Slide-box and they also moved the door significantly more times in the direction modeled by the trained demonstrator than the alternative direction. To tease apart the underlying social learning mechanisms we ran a series of three control conditions with 35 squirrel monkeys that had no previous experience with the Slide-box. The first replicated the experimental open diffusion sessions but without the inclusion of a trained model, the second was a no-information control with dyads of monkeys, and the third was a ‘ghost’ display shown to individual monkeys. The first two controls tested for the importance of social support (mere presence effect and the ghost display showed the affordances of the task to the monkeys. The monkeys showed a certain level of success in the group control (54% of subjects solved the task on one or more occasions and paired controls (28% were successful but none were successful in the ghost control. We propose that the squirrel monkeys’ learning, observed in the experimental open diffusion tests, can be best described by a combination of social learning mechanisms in concert

  15. Longitudinal Analysis of Early Stage Sarcopenia in Aging Rhesus Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    McKiernan, Susan H.; Colman, Ricki; Lopez, Marisol; Beasley, T. Mark; Weindruch, Richard; Aiken, Judd M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a longitudinal study using the rhesus monkey to determine biochemical and histological changes in vastus lateralis (VL) muscle fibers and whether these changes correlate with muscle mass loss. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine body weight, body fat and to estimate upper leg muscle mass in twelve adult male rhesus monkeys over 12 years. Muscle mass (MM) was evaluated at years six, nine and twelve of the study. Concurrently, VL muscle biopsy samples were co...

  16. Preference transitivity and symbolic representation in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Addessi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Can non-human animals comprehend and employ symbols? The most convincing empirical evidence comes from language-trained apes, but little is known about this ability in monkeys. Tokens can be regarded as symbols since they are inherently non-valuable objects that acquire an arbitrarily assigned value upon exchange with an experimenter. Recent evidence suggested that capuchin monkeys, which diverged from the human lineage 35 million years ago, can estimate, represent and combine token quantities. A fundamental and open question is whether monkeys can reason about symbols in ways similar to how they reason about real objects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examined this broad question in the context of economic choice behavior. Specifically, we assessed whether, in a symbolic context, capuchins' preferences satisfy transitivity--a fundamental trait of rational decision-making. Given three options A, B and C, transitivity holds true if A > or = B, B > or = C and A > or = C (where > or = indicates preference. In this study, we trained monkeys to exchange three types of tokens for three different foods. We then compared choices monkeys made between different types of tokens with choices monkeys made between the foods. Qualitatively, capuchins' preferences revealed by the way of tokens were similar to those measured with the actual foods. In particular, when choosing between tokens, monkeys displayed strict economic preferences and their choices satisfied transitivity. Quantitatively, however, values measured by the way of tokens differed systematically from those measured with the actual foods. In particular, for any pair of foods, the relative value of the preferred food increased when monkeys chose between the corresponding tokens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that indeed capuchins are capable of treating tokens as symbols. However, as they do so, capuchins experience the cognitive burdens imposed by symbolic

  17. Auditory artificial grammar learning in macaque and marmoset monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Slater, Heather; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2013-11-27

    Artificial grammars (AG) are designed to emulate aspects of the structure of language, and AG learning (AGL) paradigms can be used to study the extent of nonhuman animals' structure-learning capabilities. However, different AG structures have been used with nonhuman animals and are difficult to compare across studies and species. We developed a simple quantitative parameter space, which we used to summarize previous nonhuman animal AGL results. This was used to highlight an under-studied AG with a forward-branching structure, designed to model certain aspects of the nondeterministic nature of word transitions in natural language and animal song. We tested whether two monkey species could learn aspects of this auditory AG. After habituating the monkeys to the AG, analysis of video recordings showed that common marmosets (New World monkeys) differentiated between well formed, correct testing sequences and those violating the AG structure based primarily on simple learning strategies. By comparison, Rhesus macaques (Old World monkeys) showed evidence for deeper levels of AGL. A novel eye-tracking approach confirmed this result in the macaques and demonstrated evidence for more complex AGL. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown level of AGL complexity in Old World monkeys that seems less evident in New World monkeys, which are more distant evolutionary relatives to humans. The findings allow for the development of both marmosets and macaques as neurobiological model systems to study different aspects of AGL at the neuronal level.

  18. Functional variations in the ultrastructure of the thyroid gland in malnourished infant monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, B S; Enwonwu, C O

    1975-01-01

    Healthy male pigtail monkeys (Macaca nemestrina) were procured at the age of 6-9 months, and fed either a 20 percent casein diet or a diet containing 2 percent casein as the sole source of protein. After 3-5 months, the malnourished monkeys developed many features usually associated with the clinical syndrome of marasmic kwashiorkor as seen in socioeconomically underpriviledged societies. Ultrastructural evaluation of thyroid gland revealed that dietary protein-calorie deficiency produced marked reduction in follicular cell height, conspicuous decrease in the number of apical filamentous microvilli, and a relative scarcity of the apical microvesicles as well as other pale staining colloid vesicles compared to findings on control glands. The electron-dense lysosomelike granules did not appear particularly affected, although in some sections they seemed to have increased in number and were located mainly in the basal portion of the cells, These electron-dense granules often displayed marked lack of homogeneity in regard to their structure in the malnourished glands. Most of these morphologic alterations have been noted frequently in thyroid glands of hypophysectomized animals, or in glands suppressed by the administration of thyroxine, and are therefore highly indicative of thyroid hypofuction in this animal prototype of human protein-calorie malnutrition.

  19. Secretion of phytohemagglutinin by monkey COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, T A; Florkiewicz, R Z; Chrispeels, M J

    1986-12-01

    The entire coding region of a gene, which encodes a polypeptide of phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L), obtained from a library of genomic DNA of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Greensleeves, was introduced into the SV40 expression vector pJC119. Monkey COS1 cells were transfected with the recombinant clone and the synthesis, glycosylation, and transport of PHA-L studied and compared with the normal processes in bean cotyledons. In the bean, phytohemagglutinin is synthesized on the rough endoplasmic reticulum and transported via the Golgi complex to protein bodies, vacuole-like organelles. Phytohemagglutinin was synthesized and glycosylated at the ER and processed in the Golgi apparatus of the transfected COS1 cells. After passing the Golgi apparatus, PHA-L was slowly secreted into the culture medium (half-time of 3-6 h), a result indicating that the signals for targeting proteins beyond the Golgi apparatus in plant cells are different from those in animal cells. PHA, which is stored in protein bodies in the plant cells, is secreted by animal cells. Tunicamycin inhibited both glycosylation and secretion of PHA by the COS1 cells, a finding indicating an essential role of the oligosaccharides for transport of PHA in these cells in contrast to the situation found in bean cotyledons. PHA, secreted into the culture medium, was partially sensitive to endo H, a result indicating the presence of one high-mannose and one complex oligosaccharide chain, a situation identical to that in beans.

  20. Prefrontal neurons represent winning and losing during competitive video shooting games between monkeys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosokawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    ...) showed response sensitivity related to a competitive game. In this study, monkeys played a video shooting game, either competing with another monkey or the computer, or playing alone without a rival...

  1. Phylogeny of African monkeys based upon mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, A. C.; Kuiken, C. L.; Dekker, J. T.; Goudsmit, J.

    1995-01-01

    The suborder Anthropoidea of the primates has traditionally been divided in three superfamilies: the Hominoidea (apes and humans) and the Cercopithecoidea (Old World monkeys), together comprising the infraorder Catarrhini, and the Ceboidea (New World monkeys) belonging to the infraorder Platyrrhini.

  2. Fetal malformations and early embryonic gene expression response in cynomolgus monkeys maternally exposed to thalidomide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was performed to determine experimental conditions for thalidomide induction of fetal malformations and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying thalidomide teratogenicity in cynomolgus monkeys. Cynomolgus monkeys were orally administered (±)-thalidomid...

  3. Observational learning in capuchin monkeys: a video deficit effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2017-07-01

    Young human children have been shown to learn less effectively from video or televised images than from real-life demonstrations. Although nonhuman primates respond to and can learn from video images, there is a lack of direct comparisons of task acquisition from video and live demonstrations. To address this gap in knowledge, we presented capuchin monkeys with video clips of a human demonstrator explicitly hiding food under one of two containers. The clips were presented at normal, faster than normal, or slower than normal speed, and then the monkeys were allowed to choose between the real containers. Even after 55 sessions and hundreds of video demonstration trials the monkeys' performances indicated no mastery of the task, and there was no effect of video speed. When given live demonstrations of the hiding act, the monkeys' performances were vastly improved. Upon subsequent return to video demonstrations, performances declined to pre-live-demonstration levels, but this time with evidence for an advantage of fast video demonstrations. Demonstration action speed may be one aspect of images that influence nonhuman primates' ability to learn from video images, an ability that in monkeys, as in young children, appears limited compared to learning from live models.

  4. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  5. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing. Copyright © 2015 Stauffer et al.

  6. Neural Monkey: An Open-source Tool for Sequence Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helcl Jindřich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we announce the development of Neural Monkey – an open-source neural machine translation (NMT and general sequence-to-sequence learning system built over the TensorFlow machine learning library. The system provides a high-level API tailored for fast prototyping of complex architectures with multiple sequence encoders and decoders. Models’ overall architecture is specified in easy-to-read configuration files. The long-term goal of the Neural Monkey project is to create and maintain a growing collection of implementations of recently proposed components or methods, and therefore it is designed to be easily extensible. Trained models can be deployed either for batch data processing or as a web service. In the presented paper, we describe the design of the system and introduce the reader to running experiments using Neural Monkey.

  7. ‘‘What's wrong with my monkey?''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I. Anna S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The birth of the first transgenic primate to have inherited a transgene from its parents opens the possibility to set up transgenic marmoset colonies, as these monkeys are small and relatively easy to keep and breed in research facilities. The prospect of transgenic marmoset models of human disease......, readily available in the way that transgenic laboratory mice are currently, prompts excitement in the scientific community; but the idea of monkeys being bred to carry diseases is also contentious. We structure an ethical analysis of the transgenic marmoset case around three questions: whether...... it is acceptable to use animals as models of human disease; whether it is acceptable to genetically modify animals; and whether these animals' being monkeys makes a difference. The analysis considers the prospect of transgenic marmoset studies coming to replace transgenic mouse studies and lesion studies...

  8. Comparative Overview of Visuospatial Working Memory in Monkeys and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Oyama, Kei; Nakamura, Shinya; Iijima, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of working memory, particularly its visuospatial aspect, have long been studied in non-human primates. On the other hand, rodents are becoming more important in systems neuroscience, as many of the innovative research methods have become available for them. There has been a question on whether primates and rodents have similar neural backgrounds for working memory. In this article, we carried out a comparative overview of the neural mechanisms of visuospatial working memory in monkeys and rats. In monkeys, a number of lesion studies indicate that the brain region most responsible for visuospatial working memory is the ventral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (vDLPFC), as the performance in the standard tests for visuospatial working memory, such as delayed response and delayed alternation tasks, are impaired by lesions in this region. Single-unit studies revealed a characteristic firing pattern in neurons in this area, a sustained delay activity. Further studies indicated that the information maintained in the working memory, such as cue location and response direction in a delayed response, is coded in the sustained delay activity. In rats, an area comparable to the monkey vDLPFC was found to be the dorsal part of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as the delayed alternation in a T-maze is impaired by its lesion. Recently, the sustained delay activity similar to that found in monkeys has been found in the dorsal mPFC of rats performing the delayed response task. Furthermore, anatomical studies indicate that the vDLPFC in monkeys and the dorsal mPFC in rats have much in common, such as that they are both the major targets of parieto-frontal projections. Thus lines of evidence indicate that in both monkeys and rodents, the PFC plays a critical role in working memory.

  9. Morphology and Accommodative Function of the Vitreous Zonule in Human and Monkey Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütjen-Drecoll, Elke; Kaufman, Paul L.; Wasielewski, Rainer; Ting-Li, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the attachments of the posterior zonule and vitreous in relation to accommodation and presbyopia in monkeys and humans. Methods. Novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) techniques were used to visualize the anterior, intermediate, and posterior vitreous zonule and their connections to the ciliary body, vitreous membrane, lens capsule, and ora serrata, and to characterize their age-related changes and correlate them with loss of accommodative forward movement of the ciliary body. α-Chymotrypsin was used focally to lyse the vitreous zonule and determine the effect on movement of the accommodative apparatus in monkeys. Results. The vitreous attached to the peripheral lens capsule and the ora serrata directly. The pars plana zonule and the posterior tines of the anterior zonule were separated from the vitreous membrane except for strategically placed attachments, collectively termed the vitreous zonule, that may modulate and smooth the forward and backward movements of the entire system. Age-dependent changes in these relationships correlated significantly with loss of accommodative amplitude. Lysis of the intermediate vitreous zonule partially restored accommodative movement. Conclusions. The vitreous zonule system may help to smoothly translate to the lens the driving forces of accommodation and disaccommodation generated by the ciliary muscle, while maintaining visual focus and protecting the lens capsule and ora serrata from acute tractional forces. Stiffening of the vitreous zonular system may contribute to age-related loss of accommodation and offer a therapeutic target for presbyopia. PMID:19815737

  10. Autophagy in retinal ganglion cells in a rhesus monkey chronic hypertensive glaucoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuifeng Deng

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by physiological intraocular hypertension that causes damage to the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. In the past, RGC damage in POAG was suggested to have been attributed to RGC apoptosis. However, in the present study, we applied a model closer to human POAG through the use of a chronic hypertensive glaucoma model in rhesus monkeys to investigate whether another mode of progressive cell death, autophagy, was activated in the glaucomatous retinas. First, in the glaucomatous retinas, the levels of LC3B-II, LC3B-II/LC3B-I and Beclin 1 increased as demonstrated by Western blot analyses, whereas early or initial autophagic vacuoles (AVi and late or degraded autophagic vacuoles (AVd accumulated in the ganglion cell layer (GCL and in the inner plexiform layer (IPL as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. Second, lysosome activity and autophagosome-lysosomal fusion increased in the RGCs of the glaucomatous retinas, as demonstrated by Western blotting against lysosome associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP1 and double labeling against LC3B and LAMP1. Third, apoptosis was activated in the glaucomatous eyes with increased levels of caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 and an increased number of TUNEL-positive RGCs. Our results suggested that autophagy was activated in RGCs in the chronic hypertensive glaucoma model of rhesus monkeys and that autophagy may have potential as a new target for intervention in glaucoma treatment.

  11. Transplantation of cultured rhesus monkey vascular endothelial cells to allogeneic cornea concomitant with stripping of Descemet's membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In cases of damaged corneal endothelium cells (CECs of the eye, transplantation of cultured vascular endothelial cells (VECs may be a viable method to restore transparency. Aims: To evaluate the viability of replacing damaged primate CECs with cultured allogeneic VECs. Subjects and Methods: Rhesus monkey VECs (RMVECs were cultured and proliferating cells were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in vitro. RMs of the experimental group (n = 6 underwent manual Descemettt membrane stripping with transplantation of RMVECs labeled with BrdU; those in the control group received manual Descemetnt membrane stripping without transplantation. Postoperative evaluations included the transparency and appearance of the corneal graft; distribution and ultrastructural changes of RMVECs on the inner surface of the cornea using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistological identification of BrdU. Results: At 90 days postsurgery, the corneal grafts of the monkeys in the experimental group retained better transparency than those of the controls, without corneal neovascularization or bullous keratopathy. A layer of cells with positive BrdU staining was found on the posterior surface of the treated corneas in the experimental group, while there was no VEC structure in corneal grafts from the monkeys of the control group. Conclusions: RMVECs can grow on the posterior surface of the cornea without Descemet's membrane. Cultured and transplanted RMVECs appeared similar in ultrastructure. VECs can provide a barrier to maintain corneal dehydration and transparency to some extent.

  12. Transplantation of cultured rhesus monkey vascular endothelial cells to allogeneic cornea concomitant with stripping of Descemet's membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qin; Wu, Min; Sun, Xiaomei; Zhang, Wenjia; Hu, Zhulin; Liu, Hai

    2015-08-01

    In cases of damaged corneal endothelium cells (CECs) of the eye, transplantation of cultured vascular endothelial cells (VECs) may be a viable method to restore transparency. To evaluate the viability of replacing damaged primate CECs with cultured allogeneic VECs. Rhesus monkey VECs (RMVECs) were cultured and proliferating cells were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in vitro. RMs of the experimental group (n = 6) underwent manual Descemettt membrane stripping with transplantation of RMVECs labeled with BrdU; those in the control group received manual Descemetnt membrane stripping without transplantation. Postoperative evaluations included the transparency and appearance of the corneal graft; distribution and ultrastructural changes of RMVECs on the inner surface of the cornea using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistological identification of BrdU. At 90 days postsurgery, the corneal grafts of the monkeys in the experimental group retained better transparency than those of the controls, without corneal neovascularization or bullous keratopathy. A layer of cells with positive BrdU staining was found on the posterior surface of the treated corneas in the experimental group, while there was no VEC structure in corneal grafts from the monkeys of the control group. RMVECs can grow on the posterior surface of the cornea without Descemet's membrane. Cultured and transplanted RMVECs appeared similar in ultrastructure. VECs can provide a barrier to maintain corneal dehydration and transparency to some extent.

  13. Pulpal Response to Intraligamentary Injection in the Cynomologus Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurach, James C.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if intraligamentary injection causes qualitative histopathologic changes in the dental pulp of a Cynomologus monkey. In as much as the pulp and periapical tissues of the monkey are similar to that of humans, nonresolving damage to the pulp would contraindicate periodontal ligament injection in procedures where the tooth would not be extracted or the pulp extirpated. Periodontal ligament injection in this study did not produce any histopathological pulpal changes when compared to the pulps of uninjected teeth. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:3859234

  14. Isolation of M. pneumoniae from monkeys (Presbitus cristata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipkovits, L; Marantidi, A N; Dzikidze, E K; Krylova, R I; Vulvovich, J V

    1989-03-01

    Monkeys of the species Presbitus cristata died of severe interstitial pneumonia 20-60 days after their transportation. The carcases were examined for the presence of mycoplasmas. Thirty-six out of 65 samples obtained from the liver, spleen, kidney, lung, lymph nodes, pharynx, bronchi and blood of 13 monkeys contained mycoplasmas biochemically and serologically identical with M. pneumoniae. The isolated strains were able to elicit a rise in body temperature and an elevation in the number of leucocytes in blood as well as development of interstitial pneumonia, colonization of the inner organs by the mycoplasmas and a serological response in the experimentally infected guinea-pigs.

  15. The monkey in the mirror: Hardly a stranger

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Frans B. M.; Dindo, Marietta; Freeman, Cassiopeia A.; Hall, Marisa J.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely assumed that monkeys see a stranger in the mirror, whereas apes and humans recognize themselves. In this study, we question the former assumption by using a detailed comparison of how monkeys respond to mirrors versus live individuals. Eight adult female and six adult male brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) were exposed twice to three conditions: (i) a familiar same-sex partner, (ii) an unfamiliar same-sex partner, and (iii) a mirror. Females showed more eye contact and friendly behavior and fewer signs of anxiety in front of a mirror than they did when exposed to an unfamiliar partner. Males showed greater ambiguity, but they too reacted differently to mirrors and strangers. Discrimination between conditions was immediate, and blind coders were able to tell the difference between monkeys under the three conditions. Capuchins thus seem to recognize their reflection in the mirror as special, and they may not confuse it with an actual conspecific. Possibly, they reach a level of self–other distinction intermediate between seeing their mirror image as other and recognizing it as self. PMID:16055557

  16. Vegetarian diet in Guenon and Mangabey monkeys of Moukalaba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    php/ijbcs http://indexmedicus.afro.who.int. Vegetarian diet in Guenon and Mangabey monkeys of Moukalaba-Doudou. National Park, Gabon: Similarities and Differences. Lilian Brice MANGAMA-KOUMBA1,2*, Ghislain Wilfried EBANG ELLA1,2,.

  17. Distribution And Conservation Of The Patas Monkey Erythrocebus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From December 2003 through May 2004, a survey was conducted on patas monkeys Erythrocebus patas in Kenya to determine the historic distribution, current distribution, conservation status, and threats. Patas were found in Laikipia District, Busia, West-Pokot, Turkana, Makueni and Taita Taveta Districts. Historically ...

  18. Survey of De Brazza's monkey ( Cercopithecus neglectus Schlegel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Censuses of De Brazza's monkey Cercopithecus neglectus were conducted in the Tororo District of eastern Uganda and in Trans-Nzoia and West Pokot Districts of Western Kenya to determine the status of this species and its habitat. The species had not been reported in eastern Uganda since 1958, and a previous census ...

  19. Long-term persistence of de Brazza's Monkey ( Cercopithecus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report on population trends of de Brazza's monkey (Cercopithecus neglectus) over 20 years in Kenya's Kisere Forest, a biologically-rich moist forest remnant under intense anthropogenic pressure. We found that although abundance of this shy primate did not change across four censuses, group composition ...

  20. Phylogenetic tests of a Cercopithecus monkey hybrid reveal X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A captive Cercopithecus nictitans × C. cephus male was examined at loci on the X- and Y-chromosomes as a test of previously described phylogenetic methods for identifying hybrid Cercopithecus monkeys. The results confirm the reliability of such assays, indicating that they can be of immediate utility for studies of wild ...

  1. Toxoplasmosis in a colony of New World monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, H.H.; Henriksen, P.; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1997-01-01

    In a colony of New World monkeys five tamarins (Saguinus oedipus, Saguinus labiatus and Leontopithecus rosal. rosal.), three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix pygmaea) and one saki (Pithecia pithecia) died suddenly. The colony comprised 16 marmosets, 10 tamarins and three sakis. The ma...

  2. Polioencephalomalacia secondary to hypernatremia in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macri, S M Cummings; Masek-Hammerman, K; Crowell, A M; Fenn, M S; Knight, H L; Westmoreland, S V; Miller, A D

    2014-05-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp) are one of the most consistently used New World primates in biomedical research and are increasingly being used in neuroscience research, including models of drug abuse and addiction. Spontaneous neurologic disease in the squirrel monkey is uncommonly reported but includes various infectious diseases as well as cerebral amyloidosis. Hypernatremia is an extremely serious condition of hyperosmolarity that occurs as a result of water loss, adipsia, or excess sodium intake. Neurologic effects of hypernatremia reflect the cellular dehydration produced by the shift of water from the intracellular fluid space into the hypertonic extracellular fluid space. Severe hypernatremia may result in cerebrocortical laminar necrosis (polioencephalomalacia) in human patients as well as in a number of domestic species, including pigs, poultry, and ruminants. We report the clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings of polioencephalomalacia in 13 squirrel monkeys. Polioencephalomalacia in these animals was associated with hypernatremia that was confirmed by serum levels of sodium greater than 180 mmol/L (reference range, 134.0-154.0 mmol/L [mEq/L]). All animals had concurrent diseases or experimental manipulation that predisposed to adipsia. Immunohistochemical investigation using antibodies to neuronal nuclei (NeuN), CNPase, Iba-1, and CD31 revealed necrosis of predominantly cerebral cortical layers 3, 4, and 5 characterized by neuronal degeneration and loss, oligodendrocytic loss, microglial proliferation, and vascular reactivity. The squirrel monkey is exquisitely sensitive to hyperosmolar metabolic disruption and it is associated with laminar cortical necrosis.

  3. Paratuberculosis (Johne’s Disease) in the Monkey (Macaca Mulatta),

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis is caused by the acid-fast organism Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and is known to affect cattle, sheep and goats...IT HAS A PROLONGED COURSE CHARACTERIZED BY DIARRHEA, EMACIATION, AND EVENTUALLY DEATH. The recognition of paratuberculosis in the monkey provides

  4. Food and Feeding Habits of Mona Monkey Cercopithecus Mona in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The feeding habits of mona monkey Cercopithecus mona in Ayede/Isan forest reserve, Ayede, Ekiti State, Nigeria were studied for six months. Direct observation was used in the data collection. The study area was visited two days per week between 0600-1100hours and 1600-1800hours for the six months in the forest ...

  5. Servants, Managers and Monkeys: New Perspectives on Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskey, Frederick C.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author questions whether the understanding of teaching and leading is the same today as it was last year? The chances are that the concept of what it means to be a teacher and a leader has changed. After describing three leadership types: servants, managers, and monkeys, Buskey suggest several things that are needed to improve…

  6. Evaluating the habitat of the critically endangered Kipunji monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most primates are threatened by tropical forest loss. One population of the critically endangered kipunji monkey Rungwecebus kipunji occurs in a restricted part of one forest in southern Tanzania. This restricted range is something of an enigma. We collated woody vegetation data to assess habitat quality in and around the ...

  7. Concurent fatal helminthosis and balantidosis in red monkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fresh fecal specimen from a moribund red monkey (Erythrocebus patas) from the zoological garden, University of Ibadan with a history of dysentery was examined. Ova of Trichuris spp., Enterobius spp, Ancylostoma spp. and Strongyloides spp., as well as Balantidium spp oocysts were found. Post mortem, findings revealed ...

  8. GLP-1 receptor localization in monkey and human tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pyke, Charles; Heller, R Scott; Kirk, Rikke Kaae

    2014-01-01

    and increase heart rate. Using a new monoclonal antibody for immunohistochemistry, we detected GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in important target organs in humans and monkeys. In the pancreas, GLP-1R was predominantly localized in β-cells with a markedly weaker expression in acinar cells. Pancreatic ductal epithelial...

  9. 54 relative density and distribution of tantalus monkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tersor

    In Jeltere ecological habitat for the species survival is under threats. ... range of forest habitats with different levels of human activity, which is ideal for investigating anthropogenic influence on primate abundance and distribution. METHODS .... Table 3: Populations structure of Tantalus monkey in Sambisa game reserve.

  10. The distribution of Mona monkeys ( Cercopithecus mona , schreber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively, high occurrences were observed at the sites behind the Church and Mosque, and the Faculty of Environmental Sciences between 09:01 12:00 h. Mona populations were significantly different (P<0.05) between the study sites. Mona monkey habitat restoration, proper forest management and law enforcement ...

  11. 54 relative density and distribution of tantalus monkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tersor

    Tantalus monkey (Cercopithecus tantalus) was reported as widely abundant primate species in Sambisa Game. Reserve. In order to provide information ... density and he found a negative relationship with minimum density. By contrast, Eeley and .... A comprehensive computer software package Microsoft excel (Ms excel) ...

  12. The Monkey Kid: A Personal Glimpse into the Cultural Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M. Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wang, Xiao-Yen (Director/Writer, 'The Monkey Kid '(1995. San Francisco, Calif.: Beijing–San Francisco Film Group. Also released in France by Les Films du Parodoxe under the title, 'La Mome Singe '(1997. 95 minutes. Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles.

  13. New insights into samango monkey speciation in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiré L Dalton

    Full Text Available The samango monkey is South Africa's only exclusively forest dwelling primate and represents the southernmost extent of the range of arboreal guenons in Africa. The main threats to South Africa's forests and thus to the samango are linked to increasing land-use pressure and increasing demands for forest resources, resulting in deforestation, degradation and further fragmentation of irreplaceable habitats. The species belongs to the highly polytypic Cercopithecus nictitans group which is sometimes divided into two species C. mitis and C. albogularis. The number of subspecies of C. albogularis is also under debate and is based only on differences in pelage colouration and thus far no genetic research has been undertaken on South African samango monkey populations. In this study we aim to further clarify the number of samango monkey subspecies, as well as their respective distributions in South Africa by combining molecular, morphometric and pelage data. Overall, our study provides the most comprehensive view to date into the taxonomic description of samango monkeys in South Africa. Our data supports the identification of three distinct genetic entities namely; C. a. labiatus, C. a. erythrarchus and C. a. schwarzi and argues for separate conservation management of the distinct genetic entities defined by this study.

  14. Vegetarian diet in Guenon and Mangabey monkeys of Moukalaba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    habitats and his characteristics in primatology. Today it is considered as a sanctuary of western lowland gorillas, with an abundance and high density of apes (Takenoshita and. Yamagiwa, 2008; Nakashima et al., 2013b). Also, there are two main groups of. Cercopithecines monkeys (Mangabeys and. Guenons) and a lack ...

  15. Call Combinations in Monkeys: Compositional or Idiomatic Expressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kate; Zuberbuhler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Syntax is widely considered the feature that most decisively sets human language apart from other natural communication systems. Animal vocalisations are generally considered to be holistic with few examples of utterances meaning something other than the sum of their parts. Previously, we have shown that male putty-nosed monkeys produce call…

  16. Normal thoracic radiographic appearance of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis has been increasingly used as a non-human primate model in biomedical research. As establishing baseline thoracic radiography for the cynomolgus monkey is essential, we tested the hypothesis that age and sex may affect the thoracic radiography parameters of this species. METHODS: Here, 697 healthy cynomolgus monkeys were segregated by sex and age (three age groups: 25-36 months, 37-48 months, 49-60 months. The lung length (LL, maximal interior thoracic depth (TD, maximal interior thoracic breadth (TBr, cardiac silhouette breadth (CBr, cardiothoracic ratio (CR, right and left costophrenic angles (RCA and LCA, and right hilar height ratio (R-HHR were assessed by chest film. Statistical analysis was applied to examine the effect of age, sex, and age × sex interactions. RESULTS: Significant effects by age were shown for LL, TD, TBr, CBr, and CR. Significant effects by sex were found for TD, TBr, CBr, CR, and R-HHR. Significant effects by age × sex were observed for TD, TBr, CBr, and CR. Both TD and TBr increased with age in both sexes, and both were significantly higher in males than in females in the group aged 49-60 months. CBr increased with age and was significantly higher in males than in females across all age groups. CR declined with age and was significantly higher in males than females across all age groups, and CR was similar or slightly higher relative to those previously found in other non-human primate species. As to the other parameters with no significant sex nor age-related differences, the R-HHR was greater than 1.00, and the angulation of bilateral costophrenic angles were sharp. CONCLUSIONS: The thoracic radiographic parameters for the healthy cynomolgus monkey presented here should prove useful in veterinary practice, research involving non-human primate models of respiratory or cardiovascular disorders, and morphological studies on cynomolgus monkeys.

  17. Modeling depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Stephanie L; Shively, Carol A

    2012-06-01

    Depressive disorders are prevalent, costly, and poorly understood. Male rodents in stress paradigms are most commonly used as animal models, despite the two-fold increased prevalence of depression in women and sex differences in response to stress. Although these models have provided valuable insights, new models are needed to move the field forward. Social stress-associated behavioral depression in adult female cynomolgus macaques closely resembles human depression in physiological, neurobiological, and behavioral characteristics, including reduced body mass, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis perturbations, autonomic dysfunction, increased cardiovascular disease risk, reduced hippocampal volume, altered serotonergic function, decreased activity levels, and increased mortality. In addition, behaviorally depressed monkeys also have low ovarian steroid concentrations, even though they continue to have menstrual cycles. Although this type of ovarian dysfunction has not been reported in depressed women and is difficult to identify, it may be the key to understanding the high prevalence of depression in women. Depressive behavior in female cynomolgus monkeys is naturally occurring and not induced by experimental manipulation. Different social environmental challenges, including isolation vs. subordination, may elicit the depression-like response in some animals and not others. Similarly, social subordination is stressful and depressive behavior is more common in socially subordinate monkeys. Yet, not all subordinates exhibit behavioral depression, suggesting individual differences in sensitivity to specific environmental stressors and enhanced risk of behavioral depression in some individuals. The behavior and neurobiology of subordinates is distinctly different than that of behaviorally depressed monkeys, which affords the opportunity to differentiate between stressed and depressed states. Thus, behaviorally depressed monkeys exhibit numerous physiological

  18. Chloroform extract of Carica papaya seeds induces long-term reversible azoospermia in langur monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, N K; Manivannan, B; Mishra, P K; Pathak, N; Sriram, S; Bhande, S S; Panneerdoss, S

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate the antifertility activity of the chloroform extract of Carica papaya seeds by oral administration in langur monkey, Presbytis entellus entellus. The chloroform extract of Carica papaya seeds, 50 mg/kg/day, was administered orally for 360 days to adult male langur monkeys. The sperm characteristics by light and electron microscopy, the sperm functional tests, the semen biochemistry, the serum testosterone level, the Leydig cell function, and the histology and ultrastructure of testis were determined to evaluate the antifertility activity and the blood biochemistry and hematology, to evaluate the toxicology. The extract gradually decreased the sperm concentration since days 30-60 of treatment with a total inhibition of sperm motility, a decrease in sperm viability and increase in sperm abnormality. Azoospermia was observed after day 90 of treatment and continued during the whole treatment period. Treatment withdrawal resulted in a gradual recovery in these parameters and 150 days later they reverted to nearly the pretreatment values. Morphological observation of the ejaculated sperm by light and scanning electron microscopy showed deleterious changes, particularly on the mid-piece. Sperm functional tests, viz., sperm mitochondrial activity index, acrosome intactness test and hypo-osmotic swelling test scored in the infertile range during treatment and returned to the fertile values 150 days after drug withdrawal. Histology of the testis revealed shrunken tubules, germ cell atrophy and normal Leydig cells. Ultrastructure of the testis showed vacuolization in the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells and germ cells. Loss of cytoplasmic organelles were evident in the spermatocytes and spermatids. Round spermatids showed loss of Golgi bodies, peripheral mitochondria and vacuolated cytoplasm, indicating maturational arrest. Leydig cell functional test indicated a mild inhibition of steroidogenic function. Haematology and serum biochemistry study disclosed no significant

  19. Rhesus monkeys see who they hear: spontaneous cross-modal memory for familiar conspecifics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuma Adachi

    Full Text Available Rhesus monkeys gather much of their knowledge of the social world through visual input and may preferentially represent this knowledge in the visual modality. Recognition of familiar faces is clearly advantageous, and the flexibility and utility of primate social memory would be greatly enhanced if visual memories could be accessed cross-modally either by visual or auditory stimulation. Such cross-modal access to visual memory would facilitate flexible retrieval of the knowledge necessary for adaptive social behavior. We tested whether rhesus monkeys have cross-modal access to visual memory for familiar conspecifics using a delayed matching-to-sample procedure. Monkeys learned visual matching of video clips of familiar individuals to photographs of those individuals, and generalized performance to novel videos. In crossmodal probe trials, coo-calls were played during the memory interval. The calls were either from the monkey just seen in the sample video clip or from a different familiar monkey. Even though the monkeys were trained exclusively in visual matching, the calls influenced choice by causing an increase in the proportion of errors to the picture of the monkey whose voice was heard on incongruent trials. This result demonstrates spontaneous cross-modal recognition. It also shows that viewing videos of familiar monkeys activates naturally formed memories of real monkeys, validating the use of video stimuli in studies of social cognition in monkeys.

  20. Non-random walks in monkeys and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Denis; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Walsh, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Principles of self-organization play an increasingly central role in models of human activity. Notably, individual human displacements exhibit strongly recurrent patterns that are characterized by scaling laws and can be mechanistically modelled as self-attracting walks. Recurrence is not, however, unique to human displacements. Here we report that the mobility patterns of wild capuchin monkeys are not random walks, and they exhibit recurrence properties similar to those of cell phone users, suggesting spatial cognition mechanisms shared with humans. We also show that the highly uneven visitation patterns within monkey home ranges are not entirely self-generated but are forced by spatio-temporal habitat heterogeneities. If models of human mobility are to become useful tools for predictive purposes, they will need to consider the interaction between memory and environmental heterogeneities. PMID:22031731

  1. Monkeying with the Goodness-of-Fit Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsaglia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The familiar Σ(OBS - EXP 2/EXP goodness-of-fit measure is commonly used to test whether an observed sequence came from the realization of n independent identically distributed (iid discrete random variables. It can be quite effective for testing for identical distribution, but is not suited for assessing independence, as it pays no attention to the order in which output values are received. This note reviews a way to adjust or tamper, that is, monkey-with the classical test to make it test for independence as well as identical distribution--in short, to test for both the i's in iid, using monkey tests similar to those in the Diehard Battery of Tests of Randomness (Marsaglia 1995.

  2. Present and potential distribution of Snub-nosed Monkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüchel, Jonas; Bøcher, Peder Klith; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    are the Snub-nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus), a temperate-subtropical East Asian genus. We use species distribution modeling to assess the following question of key relevancy for conservation management of Rhinopithecus; 1. Which climatic factors determine the present distribution of Rhinopithecus within...... Southeast Asia? 2. By also considering historical records on now extirpated populations, we then assess the extent to which Rhinopithecus today live in an anthropogenically truncated niche space. 3. To form a basis for selecting areas for reintroduction, based on (1)-(2) we then estimate the potential...... distribution of Rhinopithecus within the region, considering climate, habitat availability and the locations of nature reserves. Keywords: biodiversity, biogeography, conservation, China, snub-nosed monkey, rhinopithecus, primates, species distribution modeling...

  3. Spontaneous epithelioid hemangiosarcoma in a rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Takayuki; Gray, Tasha L; Gatto, Nicholas T; Forest, Thomas; Machotka, Sam V; Troth, Sean P; Prahalada, Srinivasa

    2014-08-01

    Epithelioid hemangiosarcoma is a rare malignant endothelial neoplasia with a unique, predominantly epithelioid morphology. A 4-y-old rhesus monkey from our laboratory had multiple neoplastic nodules in a digit, limb skin, hindlimb muscle, and visceral organs including lung, heart, and brain. The nodules were composed of pleomorphic, polygonal, epithelioid, neoplastic cells that were arranged in sheets, nests, and cords and supported by variably dense fibrovascular connective tissue. The morphologic features of this tumor were predominantly epithelioid. However, some regions contained cystic spaces, clefts, and channel-like structures, all of which were lined with morphologically distinct neoplastic endothelial cells. These neoplastic cells, with or without epithelioid morphology, were positive immunohistochemically for CD31, factor VIII-related antigen, and vimentin. The presence of multiple metastatic nodules, high mitotic rate, and extensive Ki67-positive staining were consistent with malignancy. This report is the first description of epithelioid hemangiosarcoma in a rhesus monkey.

  4. Differential Cellular Tropism of Lentivirus and Adeno-Associated Virus in the Brain of Cynomolgus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    An, Heeyoung; Cho, Doo-Wan; Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Young-Su; Han, Su-Cheol; Lee, C. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers are using viruses to deliver genes of interest into the brains of laboratory animals. However, certain target brain cells are not easily infected by viruses. Moreover, the differential tropism of different viruses in monkey brain is not well established. We investigated the cellular tropism of lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) toward neuron and glia in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascularis). Lentivirus and AAV were injected into putamen of the monkey br...

  5. Photochemical injury to the foveomacula of the monkey eye following argon blue-green panretinal photocoagulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Parver, L M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Visual loss following panretinal photocoagulation was found in the Diabetic Retinopathy and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Studies. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that light scattered in the monkey eye during a procedure designed to mimic a clinical panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) can produce a photochemical injury to the foveomacula. METHODS: Ten eyes of 5 adult cynomologous monkeys underwent a PRP using an argon blue-green laser. Three eyes in 2 monkeys ...

  6. Musculoplasty for mastoid cavity obliteration in the capucine monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, P J

    1975-01-01

    In a series of musculoplasty in 12 ears in the capucine monkey the mastoid cavity was successfully obliterated in the early follow-up months, but showed no obliteration at one year. A control using a bovine collagen preparation showed similar results. Musculoplasty appears to carry the dual risk of burying residual cholesteatomatous disease by virtue of atrophy and shrinkage of the muscle flap, and reformation of the mastoid cavity.

  7. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad eMortazavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In humans and non-human primates (NHP, white matter neurons (WMNs persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR, temporal (TE, and parietal (Par association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30μm thickness, and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of

  8. Biological Rhythms and Temperature Regulation in Rhesus Monkeys During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This program examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2229 were exposed to 11 2/3 days of microgravity. The circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity were monitored constantly. This experiment has extended previous observations from COSMOS 1514 and 2044, as well as provided insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  9. Discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; France, C P

    1996-02-01

    Three rhesus monkeys discriminated between 0.178 mg/kg of nalbuphine and saline while responding under a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of stimulus-shock termination. Nalbuphine produced dose-related increases in drug-lever responding with > or = 90% of responses occurring on the drug lever at doses larger than 0.1 mg/kg. The duration of action of the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine was less than 5.25 hr. Rank order potency of compounds that substituted for the nalbuphine discriminative stimulus (i.e., > or = 90% responding on the nalbuphine lever) in all three subjects was fentanyl > butorphanol > methadone > morphine. Compounds that did not substitute completely in all monkeys included the kappa agonists ethylketocyclazocine, enadoline, spiradoline and U-50,488 and the nonopioids cocaine, d-amphetamine, clonidine, ketamine and phencyclidine. Naltrexone antagonized the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine, shifting the nalbuphine dose-effect curve in a manner that was consistent with mu receptor mediation. Results from the current study demonstrate that, in rhesus monkeys, the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are mediated by mu opioid receptors. Although there is evidence suggesting that nalbuphine has kappa agonist effects (e.g., subjective effects in humans), results from several studies, including the current study, strongly suggest that in rhesus monkeys nalbuphine does not exert agonist actions at kappa receptors. Moreover, these data indicate that differences in behavioral effects between nalbuphine and prototypic mu opioids (e.g., morphine) probably result from differences in activity (e.g., efficacy) at mu receptors rather than any kappa agonist actions of nalbuphine.

  10. Behavioral effects of 6-methylene naltrexone (nalmefene) in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, C P; Gerak, L R

    1994-09-01

    Nalmefene [17-N-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-beta-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6- methylenemorphinan hydrochloride (also NIH 10365)], a 6-methylene derivative of naltrexone, was compared to naltrexone for its behavioral effects in rhesus monkeys. Nalmefene had opioid antagonist actions under all conditions, having a potency similar to that of naltrexone. In morphine-treated monkeys, discriminating between 0.01 mg/kg of naltrexone and saline, nalmefene substituted completely for naltrexone at doses larger than 0.001 mg/kg. The onset of discriminative stimulus effects was similar for nalmefene and naltrexone. A dose of 0.032 mg/kg of either antagonist occasioned > or = 90% naltrexone-level responding beginning 6 to 8 min after s.c. administration; the effects of this dose of either antagonist persisted for more than 1 hr. Like the parent compound naltrexone, nalmefene also antagonized the discriminative stimulus effects of opioid agonists. Nalmefene prevented the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in monkeys acutely deprived of morphine and antagonized the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine in a separate group of monkeys discriminating between nalbuphine and saline. At the dose of naltrexone and nalmefene that produced an equivalent antagonism of morphine when the antagonist was administered 0.25 hr before morphine (0.01 mg/kg), the duration of antagonist action was 6 hr, respectively. Nalmefene also attenuated the antinociceptive effects of the mu agonist alfentanil and the kappa agonist CI-977 [5R-(5,7,8-beta)-N-methyl- N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)1-oxaspiro[4,5]dec-8-yl]-4-benzofuranaceta mide], being 55 times more potent in attenuating the antinociceptive effects of alfentanil as compared to Cl-977.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Changes in Somatosensory Responsiveness in Behaving Monkeys and Human Sub

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-30

    MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUOf1BE(S) Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology University of Tennessee, Memphis Sa. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b...and monkeys make ballistic movements more quickly (50-100 msec) in response to vibratory as compared to visual signals. Human subjects also make...quickly (50-100 msec) in response to vibratory as compared to visual signals. Subjects also make movements more quickly to a visual target if, in addition

  12. Individual differences in rhesus monkeys' demand for drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Hall, Amy; Winger, Gail

    2012-09-01

    A relatively small percentage of humans who are exposed to drugs of abuse eventually become addicted to or dependent on those drugs. These individual differences in likelihood of developing drug addiction may reflect behavioral, neurobiological or genetic correlates of drug addiction and are therefore important to model. Behavioral economic measures of demand establish functions whose overall elasticity (rate of decrease in consumption as price increases) reflects the reinforcing effectiveness of various stimuli, including drugs. Using these demand functions, we determined the reinforcing effectiveness of five drugs of abuse (cocaine, remifentanil, ketamine, methohexital and ethanol) in 10 rhesus monkeys with histories of intravenous drug-taking. There was a continuum of reinforcing effectiveness across the five drugs, with cocaine and remifentanil showing the most reinforcing effectiveness. There was also a continuum of sensitivity of the monkeys; two of the 10 animals, in particular, showed greater demand for the drugs than did the remaining eight monkeys. In addition, monkeys that demonstrated greater demand for one drug tended to show greater demand for all drugs but did not show a similar relatively greater demand for sucrose pellets. These findings suggest that the tendency to find drugs to be reinforcing is a general one, not restricted to particular drugs and also, that a minority of animals show a substantially enhanced sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of drugs. The possibility that differences in responsiveness to the reinforcing effects of drugs may form the basis of individual differences in drug-taking in humans should be considered. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. The visual motion detectors underlying ocular following responses in monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kenichiro; Matsuura, Kiyoto; Taki, Masakatsu; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Inaba, Naoko; Kawano, Kenji; Miles, Frederick A.

    2008-01-01

    Psychophysical evidence indicates that visual motion can be sensed by low-level (energy-based) and high-level (feature-based) mechanisms. The present experiments were undertaken to determine which of these mechanisms mediates the initial ocular following response (OFR) that can be elicited at ultra-short latencies by sudden motion of large-field images. We used the methodology of Sheliga, Chen, FitzGibbon and Miles (Initial ocular following in humans: a response to first-order motion energy. Vision Research, In press), who studied the initial OFRs of humans, to study the initial OFRs of monkeys. Accordingly, we applied horizontal motion to 1) vertical square-wave gratings lacking the fundamental (“missing fundamental stimulus”), and 2) vertical grating patterns consisting of the sum of two sinusoids of frequency 3f and 4f, which created a repeating pattern with beat frequency, f. Both visual stimuli share a critical property: when subject to ¼-wavelength steps, their overall pattern (feature) shifts in the direction of the steps, whereas their major Fourier component shifts in the reverse direction (because of spatial aliasing). We found that the initial OFRs of monkeys to these stimuli, like those of humans, were always in the opposite direction to the ¼-wavelength shifts, i.e., in the direction of the major Fourier component, consistent with detection by (low-level) oriented spatio-temporal filters as in the well-known energy model of motion analysis. Our data indicate that the motion detectors mediating the initial OFR have quantitatively similar properties in monkeys and humans, suggesting that monkeys provide a good animal model for the human OFR. PMID:16356529

  14. Phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine in human and rhesus monkey lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, H M; Zigler, J S

    1989-11-01

    Phosphorylcholine (P-choline) and phosphorylethanolamine (P-ethanolamine) are important precursors of phospholipids. The metabolism and concentration of P-choline has been shown to change in animal models of cataract, especially in oxidatively or osmotically stressed rat lenses. The concentrations of P-choline and P-ethanolamine were determined in monkey lenses and in normal and cataractous human lenses, and the rate of synthesis of P-choline was determined in human and monkey lenses. The concentration of P-choline in 53 clear human lenses was 0.94 mM (+/- 0.31 S.D.) and was relatively unaffected by age, eye bank storage, or freezing. There was a 70% decrease in P-choline in brown cataracts but no significant change from normal in non-brown cataracts. The concentration of P-ethanolamine in human lenses was 0.45 mM (+/- 0.26 S.D.), and it appeared to decrease during frozen storage of lenses and in cataracts. The concentrations of P-choline and P-ethanolamine in 12 rhesus monkey lenses were 1.51 mM (+/- 0.27 S.D.) and 0.75 mM (+/- 0.14 S.D.), respectively. The rate of synthesis of P-choline in monkey lenses incubated with [3H]choline was 8 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight in 1 mM choline. Adult human lenses incubated in 1 mM choline synthesized P-choline at a rate of 23 nmol hr-1 g-1 (+/- 6 S.D.). This limited capacity for P-choline synthesis in primate lenses may contribute to the lower P-choline concentration relative to rat lenses, which contain 11 mM P-choline and can synthesize P-choline at an apparent maximum rate of 130 nmol hr-1 g-1.

  15. Do rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceive illusory motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Gori, Simone; Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, visual illusions have been used repeatedly to understand similarities and differences of visual perception of human and non-human animals. However, nearly all studies have focused only on illusions not related to motion perception and, to date, it is unknown whether non-human primates perceive any kind of motion illusion. In the present study we investigated whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceived one of the most popular motion illusions in humans, the Rotating Snake illusion (RSI). To this purpose, we set up four experiments. In Experiment 1 subjects initially were trained to discriminate static vs. dynamic arrays. Once reaching the learning criterion, they underwent probe trials in which we presented the RSI and a control stimulus identical in overall configuration with the exception that the order of the luminance sequence was changed in a way that no apparent motion is perceived by humans. The overall performance of monkeys indicated that they spontaneously classified RSI as a dynamic array. Subsequently, we tested adult humans in the same task with the aim of directly comparing the performance of human and non-human primates (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3 we found that monkeys can be successfully trained to discriminate between the RSI and a control stimulus. Experiment 4 showed that a simple change in luminance sequence in the two arrays could not explain the performance reported in Exp. 3. These results suggest that some rhesus monkeys display a human-like perception of this motion illusion, raising the possibility that the neurocognitive systems underlying motion perception may be similar between human and non-human primates. PMID:25812828

  16. Identification of Phylogenetic Position in the Chlamydiaceae Family for Chlamydia Strains Released from Monkeys and Humans with Chlamydial Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Karaulov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of the comparative analysis concerning relatedness and evolutional difference of the 16S–23S nucleotide sequences of the middle ribosomal cluster and 23S rRNA I domain, and based on identification of phylogenetic position for Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydia trichomatis strains released from monkeys, relatedness of the above stated isolates with similar strains released from humans and with strains having nucleotide sequences presented in the GenBank electronic database has been detected for the first time ever. Position of these isolates in the Chlamydiaceae family phylogenetic tree has been identified. The evolutional position of the investigated original Chlamydia and Chlamydophila strains close to analogous strains from the Gen-Bank electronic database has been demonstrated. Differences in the 16S–23S nucleotide sequence of the middle ribosomal cluster and 23S rRNA I domain of plasmid and nonplasmid Chlamydia trachomatis strains released from humans and monkeys relative to different genotype groups (group B-B, Ba, D, Da, E, L1, L2, L2a; intermediate group-F, G, Ga have been revealed for the first time ever. Abnormality in incA chromosomal gene expression resulting in Chlamydia life development cycle disorder, and decrease of Chlamydia virulence can be related to probable changes in the nucleotide sequence of the gene under consideration

  17. Discriminative stimulus and antinociceptive effects of dihydroetorphine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R; Gauthier, Cheryl R A; France, Charles R A P

    2003-04-01

    Although dihydroetorphine has micro opioid agonist activity there is evidence to suggest that it is not identical to that of morphine. This study compared dihydroetorphine to other opioids under behavioral conditions that are sensitive to micro opioid agonism. The acute effects of dihydroetorphine, etorphine and morphine were evaluated using two procedures. In one procedure, monkeys received 3.2 mg/kg per day of morphine and discriminated naltrexone from saline while responding under a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of stimulus shock termination. In addition, a warm-water, tail-withdrawal procedure was used in untreated monkeys. When acutely deprived of morphine, monkeys responded on the naltrexone lever, and this effect was reversed by dihydroetorphine, etorphine and morphine. Each agonist produced the maximum (20-s latency) antinociceptive effect in 50 degrees C water. Naltrexone antagonized the discriminative stimulus and antinociceptive effects of dihydroetorphine and etorphine, although Schild analyses yielded large variability in slopes and pA(2) values. Naltrexone reversed established effects of dihydroetorphine and morphine in both procedures and pretreatment with dihydroetorphine (2, 6 or 24 h) did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine. Taken together, these data support the notion that dihydroetorphine is a micro agonist with a short duration of action; however, variability in antagonism of dihydroetorphine and morphine might be a manifestation of differences that have been reported for these drugs at the cellular level.

  18. Antinociceptive and respiratory effects of nalbuphine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; Butelman, E R; Woods, J H; France, C P

    1994-11-01

    Antinociceptive and respiratory effects of nalbuphine and other opioids were studied in rhesus monkeys. In a thermal, tail withdrawal assay, the kappa agonist enadoline and the mu agonists alfentanil and fentanyl produced maximum antinociceptive effects in all subjects and over a wide range of temperatures, whereas nalbuphine produced antinociceptive effects in only some subjects and only when the water temperature was < or = 50 degrees C. Naltrexone antagonized the antinociceptive effects of nalbuphine, alfentanil and enadoline; however, the magnitude of antagonism was not equal among agonists. In subjects that did not show an antinociceptive response to nalbuphine, nalbuphine (3.2-10.0 mg/kg) antagonized the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl but not enadoline. The irreversible opioid antagonist clocinnamox produced a parallel shift to the right in the nalbuphine dose-effect curve 1 hr after administration and decreased the maximum effect produced by nalbuphine 24 and 48 hr after administration. Nalbuphine had modest respiratory-depressant effects in monkeys breathing air and attenuated hyperventilation produced by 5% CO2. In contrast, alfentanil had marked respiratory-depressant effects in monkeys breathing air or 5% CO2 in air and these effects were antagonized by nalbuphine. Taken together, these results suggest nalbuphine has low efficacy at mu opioid receptors; however, quantitative differences between alfentanil and nalbuphine indicate a second (non-enadoline sensitive) receptor might also be important for the antinociceptive effects of nalbuphine.

  19. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) hear rising frequency sounds as looming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfar, Asif A; Maier, Joost X

    2009-08-01

    Rising sound intensity provides an important cue for the detection of looming objects. Studies with humans indirectly suggest that rising pitch can also signal a looming object. This link between rising intensity and rising frequency is puzzling because no physical rise in frequency occurs when a sound source approaches. Putative explanations include (a) the idea that the loudness of sound depends on its frequency, (b) the frequent co-occurrence of rising intensity with rising frequency in vocalizations generates an association between the 2 features, and (c) auditory neurons process amplitude- and frequency-modulated sounds similarly. If these hypotheses are valid, then rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)--which share some homologies in the vocal production apparatus and auditory system--should also associate rising frequency with rising intensity, and thus should perceive rising frequency as a looming sound source. A head-turning assay and a preferential-looking paradigm revealed that monkeys show an attentional bias toward rising versus falling frequency sounds and link the former to visual looming signals. This suggests that monkeys hear a rising frequency sound as a looming sound source even though, in the real world, no such link exists. 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Capuchin monkeys do not show human-like pricing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Rhia; Buttrick, Nicholas; Widness, Jane; Goldstein, Robin; Santos, Laurie R

    2014-01-01

    Recent work in judgment and decision-making has shown that a good's price can have irrational effects on people's preferences. People tend to prefer goods that cost more money and assume that such expensive goods will be more effective, even in cases where the price of the good is itself arbitrary. Although much work has documented the existence of these pricing effects, unfortunately little work has addressed where these price effects come from in the first place. Here we use a comparative approach to distinguish between different accounts of this bias and to explore the origins of these effects. Specifically, we test whether brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) are also susceptible to pricing effects within the context of an experimentally trained token economy. Using a capuchin population previously trained in a token market, we explored whether monkeys used price as an indicator of value across four experiments. Although monkeys demonstrated an understanding of which goods had which prices (consistently shifting preferences to cheaper goods when prices were increased), we observed no evidence that such price information affected their valuation of different kinds of goods. These results suggest that human pricing effects may involve more sophisticated human-unique cognitive capacities, such as an understanding of market forces and signaling.

  1. Capuchin monkeys do not show human-like pricing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Rhia; Buttrick, Nicholas; Widness, Jane; Goldstein, Robin; Santos, Laurie R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work in judgment and decision-making has shown that a good's price can have irrational effects on people's preferences. People tend to prefer goods that cost more money and assume that such expensive goods will be more effective, even in cases where the price of the good is itself arbitrary. Although much work has documented the existence of these pricing effects, unfortunately little work has addressed where these price effects come from in the first place. Here we use a comparative approach to distinguish between different accounts of this bias and to explore the origins of these effects. Specifically, we test whether brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) are also susceptible to pricing effects within the context of an experimentally trained token economy. Using a capuchin population previously trained in a token market, we explored whether monkeys used price as an indicator of value across four experiments. Although monkeys demonstrated an understanding of which goods had which prices (consistently shifting preferences to cheaper goods when prices were increased), we observed no evidence that such price information affected their valuation of different kinds of goods. These results suggest that human pricing effects may involve more sophisticated human-unique cognitive capacities, such as an understanding of market forces and signaling. PMID:25520677

  2. Cognitive performance of juvenile monkeys after chronic fluoxetine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari S. Golub

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Potential long term effects on brain development are a concern when drugs are used to treat depression and anxiety in childhood. In this study, male juvenile rhesus monkeys (three-four years of age were dosed with fluoxetine or vehicle (N = 16/group for two years. Histomorphometric examination of cortical dendritic spines conducted after euthanasia at one year postdosing (N = 8/group suggested a trend toward greater dendritic spine synapse density in prefrontal cortex of the fluoxetine-treated monkeys. During dosing, subjects were trained for automated cognitive testing, and evaluated with a test of sustained attention. After dosing was discontinued, sustained attention, recognition memory and cognitive flexibility were evaluated. Sustained attention was affected by fluoxetine, both during and after dosing, as indexed by omission errors. Response accuracy was not affected by fluoxetine in post-dosing recognition memory and cognitive flexibility tests, but formerly fluoxetine-treated monkeys compared to vehicle controls had more missed trial initiations and choices during testing. Drug treatment also interacted with genetic and environmental variables: MAOA genotype (high- and low transcription rate polymorphisms and testing location (upper or lower tier of cages. Altered development of top-down cortical regulation of effortful attention may be relevant to this pattern of cognitive test performance after juvenile fluoxetine treatment.

  3. Epigenetic changes with dietary soy in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Howard

    Full Text Available Nutritional interventions are important alternatives for reducing the prevalence of many chronic diseases. Soy is a good source of protein that contains isoflavones, including genistein and daidzein, and may alter the risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive cancers. We have shown previously in nonhuman primates that soy protein containing isoflavones leads to improved body weight, insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and atherosclerosis compared to protein without soy isoflavones (casein, and does not increase the risk of cancer. Since genistein has been shown to alter DNA methylation, we compared the methylation profiles of cynomolgus monkeys, from multiple tissues, eating two high-fat, typical American diets (TAD with similar macronutrient contents, with or without soy protein. DNA methylation status was successfully determined for 80.6% of the probes in at least one tissue using Illumina's HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. Overall methylation increased in liver and muscle tissue when monkeys switched from the TAD-soy to the TAD-casein diets. Genes involved in epigenetic processes, specifically homeobox genes (HOXA5, HOXA11, and HOXB1, and ABCG5 were among those that changed between diets. These data support the use of the HumanMethylation27 BeadChip in cynomolgus monkeys and identify epigenetic changes associated with dietary interventions with soy protein that may potentially affect the etiology of complex diseases.

  4. Epigenetic changes with dietary soy in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Timothy D; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jing; Cui, Wei; Slager, Rebecca; Gray, Stanton; Hawkins, Gregory A; Medvedovic, Mario; Wagner, Janice D

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional interventions are important alternatives for reducing the prevalence of many chronic diseases. Soy is a good source of protein that contains isoflavones, including genistein and daidzein, and may alter the risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive cancers. We have shown previously in nonhuman primates that soy protein containing isoflavones leads to improved body weight, insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and atherosclerosis compared to protein without soy isoflavones (casein), and does not increase the risk of cancer. Since genistein has been shown to alter DNA methylation, we compared the methylation profiles of cynomolgus monkeys, from multiple tissues, eating two high-fat, typical American diets (TAD) with similar macronutrient contents, with or without soy protein. DNA methylation status was successfully determined for 80.6% of the probes in at least one tissue using Illumina's HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. Overall methylation increased in liver and muscle tissue when monkeys switched from the TAD-soy to the TAD-casein diets. Genes involved in epigenetic processes, specifically homeobox genes (HOXA5, HOXA11, and HOXB1), and ABCG5 were among those that changed between diets. These data support the use of the HumanMethylation27 BeadChip in cynomolgus monkeys and identify epigenetic changes associated with dietary interventions with soy protein that may potentially affect the etiology of complex diseases.

  5. Encoding of reward expectation by monkey anterior insular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhiki, Takashi; Richmond, Barry J; Shidara, Munetaka

    2012-06-01

    The insula, a cortical brain region that is known to encode information about autonomic, visceral, and olfactory functions, has recently been shown to encode information during reward-seeking tasks in both single neuronal recording and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. To examine the reward-related activation, we recorded from 170 single neurons in anterior insula of 2 monkeys during a multitrial reward schedule task, where the monkeys had to complete a schedule of 1, 2, 3, or 4 trials to earn a reward. In one block of trials a visual cue indicated whether a reward would or would not be delivered in the current trial after the monkey successfully detected that a red spot turned green, and in other blocks the visual cue was random with respect to reward delivery. Over one-quarter of 131 responsive neurons were activated when the current trial would (certain or uncertain) be rewarded if performed correctly. These same neurons failed to respond in trials that were certain, as indicated by the cue, to be unrewarded. Another group of neurons responded when the reward was delivered, similar to results reported previously. The dynamics of population activity in anterior insula also showed strong signals related to knowing when a reward is coming. The most parsimonious explanation is that this activity codes for a type of expected outcome, where the expectation encompasses both certain and uncertain rewards.

  6. Capuchin monkeys do not show human-like pricing effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhia eCatapano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent work in judgment and decision-making has shown that a good’s price can have irrational effects on people’s preferences. People tend to prefer goods that cost more money and assume that such expensive goods will be more effective, even in cases where the price of the good is itself arbitrary. Although much work has documented the existence of these pricing effects, unfortunately little work has addressed where these price effects come from in the first place. Here we use a comparative approach to distinguish between different accounts of this bias and to explore the origins of these effects. Specifically, we test whether brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella are also susceptible to pricing effects within the context of an experimentally trained token economy. Using a capuchin population previously trained in a token market, we explored whether monkeys used price as an indicator of value across four experiments. Although monkeys demonstrated an understanding of which goods had which prices (consistently shifting preferences to cheaper goods when prices were increased, we observed no evidence that such price information affected their valuation of different kinds of goods. These results suggest that human price effects may involve more sophisticated human-unique cognitive capacities, such as an understanding of market forces and signaling.

  7. Real-time dopamine measurement in awake monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik W Schluter

    Full Text Available Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV is often used to measure real-time dopamine (DA concentrations in awake, behaving rodents. Extending this technique to work in monkeys would provide a platform for advanced behavioral studies and a primate model for preclinical research. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of DA recordings in two awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta using a mixture of techniques adapted from rodent, primate and brain slice work. We developed a long carbon fiber electrode to operate in the larger primate brain. This electrode was lowered into the striatum each day using a recording chamber and a detachable micromanipulator system. A manipulator also moved one or more tungsten stimulating electrodes into either the nearby striatum or the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNc. We developed an electrical stimulation controller to reduce artifacts during electrical stimulation. We also introduce a stimulation-based methodology for estimating distances between electrodes in the brain. Dopamine responses within the striatum were evoked by either stimulation of the striatum near the FSCV electrode, or stimulation within the VTA/SNc. Unexpected juice rewards also evoked dopamine responses in the ventral striatum. Thus, we demonstrate that robust dopamine responses can be recorded from awake, behaving primates with FSCV. In addition, we describe how a stimulation technique borrowed from the neuroprosthetics field can activate the distributed monkey midbrain dopamine system in a way that mimics rodent VTA stimulation.

  8. Sex and Status Sell to Monkeys: Social Advertising Creates Brand Preferences in Rhesus Macaques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M Yavuz Acikalin; Karli Watson; Gavan Fitzsimons; Michael Platt

    2015-01-01

      Innate evolutionary mechanisms may influence consumer response to advertising. We demonstrate that exposure to sex- and status-based advertising campaigns elicit brand preferences in rhesus monkeys...

  9. Selection of river crossing location and sleeping site by proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ikki; Tuuga, Augustine; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Higashi, Seigo

    2008-11-01

    From May 2005-2006, selections of river crossing locations and sleeping sites used by a one-male group (BE-Group) of proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) were investigated along the Menanggul River, tributary of the Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Malaysia. The frequency of river crossings for focal monkeys in the BE-Group was significantly higher at locations with narrow branch-to-bank distances. Branch-to-bank distances were defined as the distances between the longest tree branches extending over the river and the bank of river on each side. This was measured in areas crossed by the monkeys. The focal monkeys used locations with a higher probability of successful river crossings that did not require jumping into the water and swimming across than those that did. The frequency of sleeping site usage by the BE-Group was positively correlated with the frequency of using river crossing locations by the focal monkeys. Previous reports on predation of proboscis monkeys indicate that clouded leopards (Neofelis diardi) and crocodilians (Tomistoma schlegeli and Crocodylus porosus) may be the major terrestrial and aquatic predators of these monkeys. The selection of river crossing locations by proboscis monkeys may be influenced both by the threat of these predators and the location of suitable and protected sleeping sites. Finally, sleeping sites locations that offer arboreal escape routes may protect proboscis monkeys from leopard attack. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Plasmodium simium/Plasmodium vivax infections in southern brown howler monkeys from the Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Camargos Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Blood infection by the simian parasite, Plasmodium simium, was identified in captive (n = 45, 4.4% and in wild Alouatta clamitans monkeys (n = 20, 35% from the Atlantic Forest of southern Brazil. A single malaria infection was symptomatic and the monkey presented clinical and haematological alterations. A high frequency of Plasmodium vivax-specific antibodies was detected among these monkeys, with 87% of the monkeys testing positive against P. vivax antigens. These findings highlight the possibility of malaria as a zoonosis in the remaining Atlantic Forest and its impact on the epidemiology of the disease.

  11. Do you see what I see? A comparative investigation of the Delboeuf illusion in humans (Homo sapiens), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Audrey E; Brosnan, Sarah F; Beran, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Studying visual illusions is critical to understanding typical visual perception. We investigated whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) perceived the Delboeuf illusion in a similar manner as human adults (Homo sapiens). To test this, in Experiment 1, we presented monkeys and humans with a relative discrimination task that required subjects to choose the larger of 2 central dots that were sometimes encircled by concentric rings. As predicted, humans demonstrated evidence of the Delboeuf illusion, overestimating central dots when small rings surrounded them and underestimating the size of central dots when large rings surrounded them. However, monkeys did not show evidence of the illusion. To rule out an alternate explanation, in Experiment 2, we presented all species with an absolute classification task that required them to classify a central dot as "small" or "large." We presented a range of ring sizes to determine whether the Delboeuf illusion would occur for any dot-to-ring ratios. Here, we found evidence of the Delboeuf illusion in all 3 species. Humans and monkeys underestimated central dot size to a progressively greater degree with progressively larger rings. The Delboeuf illusion now has been extended to include capuchin monkeys and rhesus monkeys, and through such comparative investigations we can better evaluate hypotheses regarding illusion perception among nonhuman animals. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. The monkey puzzle: a systematic review of studies of stress, social hierarchies, and heart disease in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petticrew, Mark; Davey Smith, George

    2012-01-01

    It is often suggested that psychosocial factors, such as stress, or one's social position, may play an important role in producing social gradients in human disease. Evidence in favour of this model of health inequalities has relied, in part, on studies of the health effects of the natural social hierarchies found among non-human primates. This study aimed to assess the strength of this evidence. A systematic review was carried out to identify all studies of psychosocial factors and coronary artery disease (CAD) in non-human primates. We searched databases (MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and Primatelit from inception to November 2010) to identify experimental and observational studies of the impact of social reorganisation, social instability, and disruption of dominance hierarchies on primate CAD outcomes. We also handsearched bibliographies and examined the citations to those studies in public health articles. Fourteen studies were found which presented evidence on CAD and social status and/or psychosocial stress. These suggested that the association between social status and disease may be sex-specific: in female monkeys dominant status may be protective, with subordinate females having a greater extent of atherosclerosis. In male monkeys the reverse may be the case. Overall, non-human primate studies present only limited evidence for an association between social status and CAD, Despite this, there is selective citation of individual non-human primate studies in reviews and commentaries relating to human disease aetiology. Such generalisation of data from monkey studies to human societies does not appear warranted.

  13. Alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotection and visual signal transduction in the retina of Parkinsonian, MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Campello

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is mainly characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, including the retina. Different interrelated molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease-associated neuronal death have been put forward in the brain, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Systemic injection of the proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP to monkeys elicits the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome, including morphological and functional impairments in the retina. However, the intracellular events leading to derangement of dopaminergic and other retinal neurons in MPTP-treated animal models have not been so far investigated. Here we have used a comparative proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in the retina of MPTP-treated monkeys. Proteins were solubilized from the neural retinas of control and MPTP-treated animals, labelled separately with two different cyanine fluorophores and run pairwise on 2D DIGE gels. Out of >700 protein spots resolved and quantified, 36 were found to exhibit statistically significant differences in their expression levels, of at least ± 1.4-fold, in the parkinsonian monkey retina compared with controls. Most of these spots were excised from preparative 2D gels, trypsinized and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. Data obtained were used for protein sequence database interrogation, and 15 different proteins were successfully identified, of which 13 were underexpressed and 2 overexpressed. These proteins were involved in key cellular functional pathways such as glycolysis and mitochondrial electron transport, neuronal protection against stress and survival, and phototransduction processes. These functional categories underscore that alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotective mechanisms and signal transduction are involved in MPTP-induced neuronal degeneration in the retina, in similarity to

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and eradication regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tetsufumi; Aoki, Wataru; Mizuno, Takashi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Ohno, Junki; Nakai, Tsunehiro; Nomiya, Takao; Fujii, Miki; Fusegawa, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Kazuya; Hamada, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoshinori

    2017-02-01

    Campylobacter spp. are zoonotic pathogens, however, knowledge about their presence and antimicrobial resistance in nonhuman primates is limited. Our animal facility purchased cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from various Asian countries: China, Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Colonization by Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 238 of the monkeys from 2009 to 2012 and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out for these isolates. Furthermore, we eradicated these pathogens from these monkeys. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 47 monkeys from three specific countries: China, Cambodia, and Indonesia, with respective isolation rates of 15%, 36%, and 67%. Two monkeys, which were each infected with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, showed clinical symptoms of diarrhea and bloody feces. In total, 41 isolates of C. coli and 17 isolates of C. jejuni were detected. Antimicrobial susceptibility varied: in the monkeys from China, erythromycin (ERY)-, tetracycline (TET)-, and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli, in the monkeys from Cambodia, amoxicillin-intermediate, TET- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli and amoxicillin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni, and in the monkeys from Indonesia, ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli and TET- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni were common (>75%). Multiresistant isolates of C. coli were found in monkeys from all countries and multiresistant isolates of C. jejuni were found in monkeys from Indonesia. The eradication rate with azithromycin was comparable to that with gentamicin (GEN) by oral administration, and was higher than those with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) and chloramphenicol (CHL). From the perspective of zoonosis, we should acknowledge multiresistant Campylobacter spp. isolated from the monkeys as a serious warning. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The effect of environmental enrichment on the behavior of captive tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Mikkelsen, L F; Hau, J

    2010-01-01

    The authors provided different forms of environmental enrichment to six old laboratory male tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and studied the behavior of the monkeys during a baseline period and during three enrichment periods. Each observation period lasted 5 d, with an interval of 6 d betw...

  16. Nutritional analysis and intervention in the captive woolly monkey (Lagothric lagotricha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.

    2008-01-01

    Woolly monkeys (Lagothrix ssp.) are a threatened species in the wild and are extremely difficult to breed and successfully maintain in captivity. The majority of health complications in woolly monkeys (WM) may be of nutritional origin. The objectives of this thesis were to: 1) determine the current

  17. Hemopoietic stem cells in rhesus monkeys : surface antigens, radiosensitivity, and responses to GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Wielenga (Jenne)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractRhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were bred at the Primate Center TNO, Rijswijk, The Netherlands!. Both male and female animals were used for the experiments. The monkeys weighed 2.5-4 kg and were 2-4 years old at the time of the experiment. They were all typed for RhLA-A, -B and -DR

  18. No effects of dioxin singly on limb malformations in macaque monkeys through epidemiological and treated studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaoka, Kazuo; Iida, Hiroko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Primate Research Insitute, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry; Watanabe, Kunio [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Primate Research Institute, Field Research Center; Goda, Hiroshi [Towa Kagaku Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ihara, Toshio; Nagata, Ryoichi [Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories, Ltd. (Japan). Safety Research Facility; Yasuda, Mineo [Hiroshima International Univ. (Japan). Fac. of Health Sciences, Dept. of Clinical Engineering; Kubata, Shunichiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Life Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    2004-09-15

    Human populations exposed with highly dioxin were suspected to be caused immunological dysfunctions, carcinogenesis, and developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. Because of species resemblances, the dioxin effects have been investigating using monkeys as a model for assessment of dioxin exposure on human health. Since 1957 the limb malformations of monkeys in Japan have been reported. The higher frequency of them was found in provisional groups of monkeys who were given the same kind of food for human. The chromosomal abnormalities are excluded from the factor for the congenital limb malformations that are still producing in Japan. In this study, the relations between dioxin and the limb malformations of macaque monkeys were estimated by the epidemiological and administered researches. The dioxin levels in monkeys were measured at two districts that one has the provisional groups including monkeys with limb malformations and the other has breeding groups never seeing the malformations for a long time. TEQ was calculated by the levels of dioxin isomers in the monkeys and the values show no difference between the two places and between the individuals with and without the limb malformations. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was administered via subcutaneous to pregnant rhesus monkeys from the day 20 of gestation to the day 90 after birth. The exposed babies, including the offspring and died in neonatal, had observed normal limbs in the range of 30-300 ng TCDD /kg of body weight.

  19. Fecal and Salivary Cortisol Concentrations in Woolly (Lagothrix ssp. and Spider Monkeys (Ateles spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D. Ange-van Heugten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detrimental physiological effects due to stressors can contribute to the low captive success of primates. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential impact of diet composition on cortisol concentrations in feces and saliva in woolly (n=27 and spider monkeys (n=61. The research was conducted in three studies: the first investigated spider monkeys in the United States, the second investigated spider monkeys within Europe, and the third investigated woolly monkeys within Europe. Fecal cortisol in spider monkeys in US zoos varied (P=.07 from 30 to 66 ng/g. The zoo with the highest fecal cortisol also had the highest salivary cortisol (P≤.05. For European zoos, fecal cortisol differed between zoos for both spider and woolly monkeys (P≤.05. Spider monkeys had higher fecal cortisol than woolly monkeys (P≤.05. Zoos with the highest dietary carbohydrates, sugars, glucose, and fruit had the highest cortisol. Cortisol was highest for zoos that did not meet crude protein requirements and fed the lowest percentage of complete feeds and crude fiber. Differences among zoos in housing and diets may increase animal stress. The lifespan and reproductive success of captive primates could improve if stressors are reduced and dietary nutrients optimized.

  20. Adequate mothering by partially isolated rhesus monkeys after observation of maternal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dienske, H.; Vreeswijk, W. van; Koning, H.

    1980-01-01

    13 laboratory-born female monkeys were allowed to remain with their mothers for about 4 mo and were subsequently singly caged in rooms where they were able to see other monkeys. Ss that did not see mothers caring for their infants neglected their own firstborn. In contrast, Ss that were allowed to

  1. Assessing significant (> 30%) alopecia as a possible biomarker for stress in captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Melinda A.; Menard, Mark T.; El-Mallah, Saif N.; Rosenberg, Kendra; Lutz, Corrine K.; Worlein, Julie; Coleman, Kris; Meyer, Jerrold S.

    2016-01-01

    Hair loss is common in macaque colonies. Very little is known about the relationship between psychological stress and hair loss. We initially examined alopecia and hair cortisol concentrations in 198 (89 male) rhesus macaques from three primate centers and demonstrated replicability of our previous finding that extensive alopecia (> 30% hair loss) is associated with increased chronic cortisol concentrations and significantly affected by facility. A subset of these monkeys (142 of which 67 were males) were sampled twice approximately 8 months apart allowing us to examine the hypotheses that gaining hair should be associated with decreases in cortisol concentrations and vice versa. Hair loss was digitally scored using ImageJ software for the first sample. Then visual assessment was used to examine the second sample, resulting in 3 categories of coat condition: 1) monkeys that remained fully haired, 2) monkeys that remained alopecic (with more than 30% hair loss), or 3) monkeys that showed more than a 15% increase in hair. The sample size for the group that lost hair was too small to be analyzed. Consistent with our hypothesis, monkeys that gained hair showed a significant reduction in hair cortisol concentrations but this effect only held for females. Coat condition changed little across sampling periods with only 25 (11 male) monkeys showing a greater than 15% gain of hair. Twenty (7 male) monkeys remained alopecic, whereas 97 (49 males) remained fully haired. Hair cortisol was highly correlated across samples for the monkeys that retained their status (remained alopecic or retained their hair). PMID:27008590

  2. Aging, dominance history, and social behavior in Java-monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Veenema, H.C.; Spruijt, B.M.; Vanhooff, J.A.R.A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the dominance history of socially housed Java-monkeys on the aging process. In monkeys, social subordinance is generally associated with elevated levels of cortisol, which, in turn, have been suggested to influence cognitive decline. As

  3. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Physiology and Cognitive Control of Behavior in Stress Inoculated Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Lindley, Steven E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to stress inoculation protocols early in life subsequently exhibit diminished neurobiological responses to moderate psychological stressors and enhanced cognitive control of behavior during juvenile development compared to non-inoculated monkeys. The present experiments extended these findings and revealed that stress inoculated…

  4. Fixational Saccades and Their Relation to Fixation Instability in Strabismic Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Suraj; Pullela, Mythri; Ramachandran, Santoshi; Adade, Samuel; Joshi, Anand C; Das, Vallabh E

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the contribution of fixational saccades toward fixation instability in strabismic monkeys. Binocular eye movements were measured as six experimental monkeys (five strabismic monkeys and one monkey with downbeat nystagmus) and one normal monkey fixated targets of two shapes (Optotype, Disk) and two sizes (0.5°, 2°) during monocular and binocular viewing. Fixational saccades were detected using an unsupervised clustering algorithm. When compared with the normal monkey, amplitude and frequency of fixational saccades in both the viewing and nonviewing eye were greater in 3 of 5 strabismic monkeys (1-way ANOVA on ranks P saccades was largely due to quick phases of ongoing nystagmus. Fixational saccade amplitude was increased significantly (3-way ANOVA; P saccade amplitude and the Bivariate Contour Ellipse Area (BCEA) was nonlinear, showing saturation of saccade amplitude. Fixation instability in depth was significantly greater in strabismic monkeys (vergence BCEA: 0.63 deg2-2.15 deg2) compared with the normal animal (vergence BCEA: 0.15 deg2; P saccades. Target parameter effects on fixational saccades are similar to previous findings of target effects on BCEA.

  5. Recognizing Facial Cues: Individual Discrimination by Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Lisa A.; Winslow, James T.; Hopkins, William D.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2007-01-01

    Faces are one of the most salient classes of stimuli involved in social communication. Three experiments compared face-recognition abilities in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). In the face-matching task, the chimpanzees matched identical photographs of conspecifics' faces on Trial 1, and the rhesus monkeys did the same after 4 generalization trials. In the individual-recognition task, the chimpanzees matched 2 different photographs of the same individual after 2 trials, and the rhesus monkeys generalized in fewer than 6 trials. The feature-masking task showed that the eyes were the most important cue for individual recognition. Thus, chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys are able to use facial cues to discriminate unfamiliar conspecifics. Although the rhesus monkeys required many trials to learn the tasks, this is not evidence that faces are not as important social stimuli for them as for the chimpanzees. PMID:10739311

  6. Memory of ordinal number categories in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Tanya; Amit, Daniel J; Yakovlev, Volodya; Zohary, Ehud; Hochstein, Shaul

    2006-03-01

    What mechanism underlies serial order memory? Studying preverbal serial memory shows that macaque monkeys reproducing a sequence of items can acquire knowledge of item ordinal position. In our previous experiment, macaques were repeatedly presented with image lists (first shown sequentially and then simultaneously on a touch screen together with a distractor chosen randomly from other lists). The task was to touch list images in the correct order. The monkeys' natural tendency was to categorize images by their ordinal position or number because their most common error was touching the distractor when it had the same ordinal number (in its own list) as the correct image. Item-to-item associations were used to complete the categorization strategy. Proposing a dynamic image-salience hypothesis for serial recall (based on category-to-image influence and a salience computation for identifying touch targets), we now study the category label characteristics in the context of this hypothesis. We found that these category labels are absolute, ordinal-number-based categories (first, second, etc.), not relative memorized as relative distance from the beginning and the end of the list, and not based on fixed ranking of reward contingency/image familiarity. Even isolated from item-item associations, the categories demonstrate category tuning (as well as the corresponding overlap of adjacent ordinal number codes). Moreover, monkeys choose images by proximity of their category to the current touch number, irrespective of the accuracy of the preceding choice. Category tuning itself is symmetric relative to correct ordinal position, but is skewed by other factors (reward, etc.). Tuning width increases with list length, with a concurrent increased use of item-to-item associations for determining touch order.

  7. Intranasal oxytocin enhances socially-reinforced learning in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Parr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no drugs approved for the treatment of social deficits associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. One hypothesis for these deficits is that individuals with ASD lack the motivation to attend to social cues because those cues are not implicitly rewarding. Therefore, any drug that could enhance the rewarding quality of social stimuli could have a profound impact on the treatment of ASD, and other social disorders. Oxytocin (OT is a neuropeptide that has been effective in enhancing social cognition and social reward in humans. The present study examined the ability of OT to selectively enhance learning after social compared to nonsocial reward in rhesus monkeys, an important species for modeling the neurobiology of social behavior in humans. Monkeys were required to learn an implicit visual matching task after receiving either intranasal (IN OT or Placebo (saline. Correct trials were rewarded with the presentation of positive and negative social (play faces/threat faces or nonsocial (banana/cage locks stimuli, plus food. Incorrect trials were not rewarded. Results demonstrated a strong effect of socially-reinforced learning, monkeys’ performed significantly better when reinforced with social versus nonsocial stimuli. Additionally, socially-reinforced learning was significantly better and occurred faster after IN-OT compared to placebo treatment. Performance in the IN-OT, but not Placebo, condition was also significantly better when the reinforcement stimuli were emotionally positive compared to negative facial expressions. These data support the hypothesis that OT may function to enhance prosocial behavior in primates by increasing the rewarding quality of emotionally positive, social compared to emotionally negative or nonsocial images. These data also support the use of the rhesus monkey as a model for exploring the neurobiological basis of social behavior and its impairment.

  8. Delay discounting of food and remifentanil in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, David R; Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2013-09-01

    Drug abuse can be conceptualized as choice between drug and nondrug reinforcers in which drug choice is excessive; factors impacting drug taking can be examined using procedures in which subjects choose between drug and an alternative reinforcer. This experiment examined the effects of delayed reinforcement on choice between food and the mu-opioid receptor agonist remifentanil. Rhesus monkeys responded under a concurrent fixed-ratio 5, fixed-ratio 5 schedule in which responding on one lever delivered one food pellet and responding on another lever delivered an i.v. infusion. With no delay, monkeys responded predominantly for food rather than saline or small doses of remifentanil; as the dose of remifentanil increased (0.1-1.0 μg/kg/infusion), monkeys responded more for drug. Delaying delivery (30-240 s) of 0.32 and not 1.0 μg/kg/infusion of remifentanil (food delivered immediately) decreased responding for drug and increased responding for food, resulting in a rightward shift in the remifentanil dose-effect curve. Delaying delivery of food (60-240 s) when doses of remifentanil smaller than 0.32 μg/kg/infusion (but not saline) were available decreased responding for food and increased responding for drug, resulting in a leftward shift in the remifentanil dose-effect curve. These results provide evidence that delaying the delivery of a mu-opioid receptor agonist reduces its potency as a positive reinforcer; more importantly, delaying the delivery of an alternative nondrug reinforcer (e.g., food) enhances the reinforcing potency of the agonist. Thus, understanding the factors that control substance abuse requires examination of contingencies for both drug and nondrug reinforcers.

  9. Functional imaging reveals numerous fields in the monkey auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher I Petkov

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical studies propose that the primate auditory cortex contains more fields than have actually been functionally confirmed or described. Spatially resolved functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI with carefully designed acoustical stimulation could be ideally suited to extend our understanding of the processing within these fields. However, after numerous experiments in humans, many auditory fields remain poorly characterized. Imaging the macaque monkey is of particular interest as these species have a richer set of anatomical and neurophysiological data to clarify the source of the imaged activity. We functionally mapped the auditory cortex of behaving and of anesthetized macaque monkeys with high resolution fMRI. By optimizing our imaging and stimulation procedures, we obtained robust activity throughout auditory cortex using tonal and band-passed noise sounds. Then, by varying the frequency content of the sounds, spatially specific activity patterns were observed over this region. As a result, the activity patterns could be assigned to many auditory cortical fields, including those whose functional properties were previously undescribed. The results provide an extensive functional tessellation of the macaque auditory cortex and suggest that 11 fields contain neurons tuned for the frequency of sounds. This study provides functional support for a model where three fields in primary auditory cortex are surrounded by eight neighboring "belt" fields in non-primary auditory cortex. The findings can now guide neurophysiological recordings in the monkey to expand our understanding of the processing within these fields. Additionally, this work will improve fMRI investigations of the human auditory cortex.

  10. Traditions in Spider Monkeys Are Biased towards the Social Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorelli, Claire J.; Schaffner, Colleen M.; Campbell, Christina J.; Notman, Hugh; Pavelka, Mary S.; Weghorst, Jennifer A.; Aureli, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Cross-site comparison studies of behavioral variation can provide evidence for traditions in wild species once ecological and genetic factors are excluded as causes for cross-site differences. These studies ensure behavior variants are considered within the context of a species' ecology and evolutionary adaptations. We examined wide-scale geographic variation in the behavior of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) across five long-term field sites in Central America using a well established ethnographic cross-site survey method. Spider monkeys possess a relatively rare social system with a high degree of fission-fusion dynamics, also typical of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and humans (Homo sapiens). From the initial 62 behaviors surveyed 65% failed to meet the necessary criteria for traditions. The remaining 22 behaviors showed cross-site variation in occurrence ranging from absent through to customary, representing to our knowledge, the first documented cases of traditions in this taxon and only the second case of multiple traditions in a New World monkey species. Of the 22 behavioral variants recorded across all sites, on average 57% occurred in the social domain, 19% in food-related domains and 24% in other domains. This social bias contrasts with the food-related bias reported in great ape cross-site comparison studies and has implications for the evolution of human culture. No pattern of geographical radiation was found in relation to distance across sites. Our findings promote A. geoffroyi as a model species to investigate traditions with field and captive based experiments and emphasize the importance of the social domain for the study of animal traditions. PMID:21373196

  11. Functional organization of monkey brain for abstract operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Ryohei; Suhara, Tetsuya; Nagai, Yuji; Iriki, Atsushi; Maeda, Jun

    2007-04-01

    When humans manipulate a control device under operational rules, with the goal of indirectly controlling a remote tool to achieve a desired outcome, they may rely on the power of internal representation to organize individual moves of the controller and tool into a set of sequences by mapping the motor space among hand, controller and tool. We recently used functional brain imaging (PET) to investigate activations in monkey brain associated with joystick-controlled remote operation of a shovel to obtain food. Activated areas included the prefrontal cortex, posterior parietal cortex and cerebellum, regardless of the rules relating movements of the joystick to those of the shovel (Obayashi et al., 2004). If those areas are engaged in the mental manipulation of internal representation, then we should expect brain activity in the same regions during any similar remote operation, even with different controllers and/or operational rules. To address the above hypothesis in the current study, we used PET to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of two monkeys during a task in which they were required to control a shovel remotely (to fetch a food pellet) by manipulating dual dials. Compared to unplanned movement of the dials, the active dual-dial operation was associated with robust activation of the prefrontal cortex, higher-order motor cortex, posterior parietal cortex and cerebellum, quite similar to that observed during remote operation with a joystick. The present study suggests that monkeys might be able to organize abstract sequential operations according to learned rules, and perhaps indeed to have insight into the nature of the causal relationships, implying the existence of a relatively sophisticated system of internal representation in the absence of language. The fact that the present results are consistent with our previous PET studies strengthens the view that the underlying mechanism for implicit manipulation of internal representations may involve a

  12. Short parietal lobe connections of the human and monkey brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catani, Marco; Robertsson, Naianna; Beyh, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    The parietal lobe has a unique place in the human brain. Anatomically, it is at the crossroad between the frontal, occipital, and temporal lobes, thus providing a middle ground for multimodal sensory integration. Functionally, it supports higher cognitive functions that are characteristic...... in the medial and lateral aspects of the parietal lobe were identified in both species. A tract connecting the medial parietal cortex to the lateral inferior parietal cortex was observed in the monkey brain only. Our findings suggest a consistent pattern of intralobar parietal connections between humans...

  13. Coding of Border Ownership in Monkey Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Hong; Friedman, Howard S.; von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    2000-01-01

    Areas V1 and V2 of the visual cortex have traditionally been conceived as stages of local feature representations. We investigated whether neural responses carry information about how local features belong to objects. Single-cell activity was recorded in areas V1, V2, and V4 of awake behaving monkeys. Displays were used in which the same local feature (contrast edge or line) could be presented as part of different figures. For example, the same light–dark edge could be the left side of a dark...

  14. [Heart functions in monkeys during a 2-week antiorthostatic hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotov, V. P.; Convertino, V.; Korol'kov, V. I.; Latham, R.; Trambovetskii, E. V.; Fanton, J.; Crisman, R.; Truzhennikov, A. N.; Evert, D.; Nosovskii, A. M.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of the left heart ventricular muscle contractility and compliance was studied in 4 monkeys in the head down position (antiorthostatic hypokinesia) with the body angle 10 during 2 weeks. Functional tests on a tilt table and under two conditions of centrifuge rotation were performed prior to and after the antiorthostatic hypokinesia. No changes in the left heart ventricular muscle contractility was found. However, the sensitivity level of the baroreflex control decreased. Compliance of the left heart myocardial fibre increased in the first hours and days of the antiorthostatic hypokinesia.

  15. Latanoprost-Eluting Contact Lenses in Glaucomatous Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolino, Joseph B; Ross, Amy E; Tulsan, Rehka; Watts, Amy C; Wang, Rong-Fang; Zurakowski, David; Serle, Janet B; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-10-01

    To assess the ability of latanoprost-eluting contact lenses to lower the intraocular pressure (IOP) of glaucomatous eyes of cynomolgus monkeys. Preclinical efficacy study of 3 treatment arms in a crossover design. Female cynomolgus monkeys with glaucoma induced in 1 eye by repeated argon laser trabeculoplasty. Latanoprost-eluting low-dose contact lenses (CLLO) and high-dose contact lenses (CLHI) were produced by encapsulating a thin latanoprost-polymer film within the periphery of a methafilcon hydrogel, which was lathed into a contact lens. We assessed the IOP-lowering effect of CLLO, CLHI, or daily latanoprost ophthalmic solution in the same monkeys. Each monkey consecutively received 1 week of continuous-wear CLLO, 3 weeks without treatment, 5 days of latanoprost drops, 3 weeks without treatment, and 1 week of continuous-wear CLHI. On 2 consecutive days before initiation of each study arm, the IOP was measured hourly over 7 consecutive hours to establish the baseline IOP. Two-tailed Student t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis. Intraocular pressure. Latanoprost ophthalmic solution resulted in IOP reduction of 5.4±1.0 mmHg on day 3 and peak IOP reduction of 6.6±1.3 mmHg on day 5. The CLLO reduced IOP by 6.3±1.0, 6.7±0.3, and 6.7±0.3 mmHg on days 3, 5, and 8, respectively. The CLHI lowered IOP by 10.5±1.4, 11.1±4.0, and 10.0±2.5 mmHg on days 3, 5, and 8, respectively. For the CLLO and CLHI, the IOP was statistically significantly reduced compared with the untreated baseline at most time points measured. The CLHI demonstrated greater IOP reduction than latanoprost ophthalmic solution on day 3 (P = 0.001) and day 5 (P = 0.015), and at several time points on day 8 (P contact lenses is at least as effective as delivery with daily latanoprost ophthalmic solution. More research is needed to determine the optimal continuous-release dose that would be well tolerated and maximally effective. Contact lens drug

  16. Viral vector-based reversible neuronal inactivation and behavioral manipulation in the macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristina J; Callaway, Edward M; Krauzlis, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Viral vectors are promising tools for the dissection of neural circuits. In principle, they can manipulate neurons at a level of specificity not otherwise achievable. While many studies have used viral vector-based approaches in the rodent brain, only a few have employed this technique in the non-human primate, despite the importance of this animal model for neuroscience research. Here, we report evidence that a viral vector-based approach can be used to manipulate a monkey's behavior in a task. For this purpose, we used the allatostatin receptor/allatostatin (AlstR/AL) system, which has previously been shown to allow inactivation of neurons in vivo. The AlstR was expressed in neurons in monkey V1 by injection of an adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1) vector. Two monkeys were trained in a detection task, in which they had to make a saccade to a faint peripheral target. Injection of AL caused a retinotopic deficit in the detection task in one monkey. Specifically, the monkey showed marked impairment for detection targets placed at the visual field location represented at the virus injection site, but not for targets shown elsewhere. We confirmed that these deficits indeed were due to the interaction of AlstR and AL by injecting saline, or AL at a V1 location without AlstR expression. Post-mortem histology confirmed AlstR expression in this monkey. We failed to replicate the behavioral results in a second monkey, as AL injection did not impair the second monkey's performance in the detection task. However, post-mortem histology revealed a very low level of AlstR expression in this monkey. Our results demonstrate that viral vector-based approaches can produce effects strong enough to influence a monkey's performance in a behavioral task, supporting the further development of this approach for studying how neuronal circuits control complex behaviors in non-human primates.

  17. Behavioral Determinants of Cannabinoid Self-Administration in Old World Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, William S; Martin, Thomas J; Nader, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Reinforcing effects of Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary active ingredient in marijuana, as assessed with self-administration (SA), has only been established in New World primates (squirrel monkeys). The objective of this study was to investigate some experimental factors that may enhance intravenous SA of THC and the cannabinoid receptor (CBR) agonist CP 55 940 in Old World monkeys (rhesus and cynomolgus), a species that has been used extensively in biomedical research. In one experiment, male rhesus monkeys (N=9) were trained to respond under a fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food presentation. The effects of CP 55 940 (1.0-10 μg/kg, i.v.) and THC (3.0-300 μg/kg, i.v.) on food-maintained responding and body temperature were determined in these subjects prior to giving them access to self-administer each drug. Both drugs dose-dependently decreased food-maintained responding. CP 55 940 (0.001-3.0 μg/kg) functioned as a reinforcer in three monkeys, whereas THC (0.01-10 μg/kg) did not have reinforcing effects in any subject. CP 55 940 was least potent to decrease food-maintained responding in the monkeys in which CP 55 940 functioned as a reinforcer. Next, THC was administered daily to monkeys until tolerance developed to rate-decreasing effects. When THC SA was reexamined, it functioned as a reinforcer in three monkeys. In a group of cocaine-experienced male cynomolgus monkeys (N=4), THC SA was examined under a second-order schedule of reinforcement; THC functioned as reinforcer in two monkeys. These data suggest that SA of CBR agonists may be relatively independent of their rate-decreasing effects in Old World monkeys. Understanding individual differences in vulnerability to THC SA may lead to novel treatment strategies for marijuana abuse.

  18. Looking ahead? Computerized maze task performance by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella), and human children (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E; Futch, Sara E; Evans, Theodore A; Perdue, Bonnie M

    2015-05-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and-at least to an extent-anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future-oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques), a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys), and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to "plan ahead" to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future-oriented cognition in primates. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Differential habitat utilization by patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and tantalus monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops tantalus) living sympatrically in northern Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, N

    1999-11-01

    In order to obtain reliable evidence for differences in habitat preferences between two closely related savanna-dwelling primate species, namely, patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and tantalus monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops tantalus), I collected data on vegetation and patterns of range use concurrently at a single study site, Kala Maloue, Cameroon, in a similar manner for a group of each species. Kala Maloue consisted of 64% grassland mostly dominated by Gramineae spp. and the rest was woodland. Tantalus monkeys showed preference for woodland, especially gallery forest, much more than did the patas irrespective of the season. Moreover, patas preferentially established their home range in grassland in the wet season. Interspecific and seasonal differences in habitat preferences could be interpreted on the basis of interspecific and seasonal differences in preferences for main food. In dry season, tantalus utilized water-containing areas at a frequency closely in proportion to the availability of such areas while the patas utilized water-containing areas more frequently than expected. This is because tantalus established a smaller home range along the river where water was never completely depleted throughout the dry season. Both the patas and the tantalus preferred woodland to grassland as sleeping sites possibly owing to predation avoidance. Both the daily travel distance per group weight and the home range size per group weight were greater for patas than for tantalus partly because of higher preference for grassland with low habitat quality in the case of patas. It is suggested, however, that high locomotive ability enabled patas to effectively utilize small and widely dispersed items of food such as grasshoppers and to explore areas with high availability of food and water and with preferable sleeping sites.

  20. Monkey Viperin Restricts Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replication.

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    Jianyu Fang

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an important pathogen which causes huge economic damage globally in the swine industry. Current vaccination strategies provide only limited protection against PRRSV infection. Viperin is an interferon (IFN stimulated protein that inhibits some virus infections via IFN-dependent or IFN-independent pathways. However, the role of viperin in PRRSV infection is not well understood. In this study, we cloned the full-length monkey viperin (mViperin complementary DNA (cDNA from IFN-α-treated African green monkey Marc-145 cells. It was found that the mViperin is up-regulated following PRRSV infection in Marc-145 cells along with elevated IRF-1 gene levels. IFN-α induced mViperin expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and strongly inhibits PRRSV replication in Marc-145 cells. Overexpression of mViperin suppresses PRRSV replication by blocking the early steps of PRRSV entry and genome replication and translation but not inhibiting assembly and release. And mViperin co-localized with PRRSV GP5 and N protein, but only interacted with N protein in distinct cytoplasmic loci. Furthermore, it was found that the 13-16 amino acids of mViperin were essential for inhibiting PRRSV replication, by disrupting the distribution of mViperin protein from the granular distribution to a homogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. These results could be helpful in the future development of novel antiviral therapies against PRRSV infection.

  1. Prediction suppression and surprise enhancement in monkey inferotemporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Suchitra; Meyer, Travis; Olson, Carl R

    2017-07-01

    Exposing monkeys, over the course of days and weeks, to pairs of images presented in fixed sequence, so that each leading image becomes a predictor for the corresponding trailing image, affects neuronal visual responsiveness in area TE. At the end of the training period, neurons respond relatively weakly to a trailing image when it appears in a trained sequence and, thus, confirms prediction, whereas they respond relatively strongly to the same image when it appears in an untrained sequence and, thus, violates prediction. This effect could arise from prediction suppression (reduced firing in response to the occurrence of a probable event) or surprise enhancement (elevated firing in response to the omission of a probable event). To identify its cause, we compared firing under the prediction-confirming and prediction-violating conditions to firing under a prediction-neutral condition. The results provide strong evidence for prediction suppression and limited evidence for surprise enhancement.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In predictive coding models of the visual system, neurons carry signed prediction error signals. We show here that monkey inferotemporal neurons exhibit prediction-modulated firing, as posited by these models, but that the signal is unsigned. The response to a prediction-confirming image is suppressed, and the response to a prediction-violating image may be enhanced. These results are better explained by a model in which the visual system emphasizes unpredicted events than by a predictive coding model. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Color discrimination in the tufted capuchin monkey, Sapajus spp.

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    Paulo Roney Kilpp Goulart

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the efficacy of an adapted version of the Mollon-Reffin test for the behavioral investigation of color vision in capuchin monkeys. Ten tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp., formerly referred to as Cebus apella had their DNA analyzed and were characterized as the following: one trichromat female, seven deuteranope dichromats (six males and one female, and two protanope males, one of which was identified as an "ML protanope." For their behavioral characterization, all of the subjects were tested at three regions of the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE 1976 u'v' diagram, with each test consisting of 20 chromatic variation vectors that were radially distributed around the chromaticity point set as the test background. The phenotypes inferred from the behavioral data were in complete agreement with those predicted from the genetic analysis, with the threshold distribution clearly differentiating between trichromats and dichromats and the estimated confusion lines characteristically converging for deuteranopes and the "classic" protanope. The discrimination pattern of the ML protanope was intermediate between protan and deutan, with confusion lines horizontally oriented and parallel to each other. The observed phenotypic differentiation confirmed the efficacy of the Mollon-Reffin test paradigm as a useful tool for evaluating color discrimination in nonhuman primates. Especially noteworthy was the demonstration of behavioral segregation between the "classic" and "ML" protanopes, suggesting identifiable behavioral consequences of even slight variations in the spectral sensitivity of M/L photopigments in dichromats.

  3. Color Discrimination in the Tufted Capuchin Monkey, Sapajus spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Paulo Roney Kilpp; Bonci, Daniela Maria Oliveira; Galvão, Olavo de Faria; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of an adapted version of the Mollon-Reffin test for the behavioral investigation of color vision in capuchin monkeys. Ten tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp., formerly referred to as Cebus apella) had their DNA analyzed and were characterized as the following: one trichromat female, seven deuteranope dichromats (six males and one female), and two protanope males, one of which was identified as an “ML protanope.” For their behavioral characterization, all of the subjects were tested at three regions of the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) 1976 u′v′ diagram, with each test consisting of 20 chromatic variation vectors that were radially distributed around the chromaticity point set as the test background. The phenotypes inferred from the behavioral data were in complete agreement with those predicted from the genetic analysis, with the threshold distribution clearly differentiating between trichromats and dichromats and the estimated confusion lines characteristically converging for deuteranopes and the “classic” protanope. The discrimination pattern of the ML protanope was intermediate between protan and deutan, with confusion lines horizontally oriented and parallel to each other. The observed phenotypic differentiation confirmed the efficacy of the Mollon-Reffin test paradigm as a useful tool for evaluating color discrimination in nonhuman primates. Especially noteworthy was the demonstration of behavioral segregation between the “classic” and “ML” protanopes, suggesting identifiable behavioral consequences of even slight variations in the spectral sensitivity of M/L photopigments in dichromats. PMID:23620819

  4. Meaningful gesture in monkeys? Investigating whether mandrills create social culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Laidre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human societies exhibit a rich array of gestures with cultural origins. Often these gestures are found exclusively in local populations, where their meaning has been crafted by a community into a shared convention. In nonhuman primates like African monkeys, little evidence exists for such culturally-conventionalized gestures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here I report a striking gesture unique to a single community of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx among nineteen studied across North America, Africa, and Europe. The gesture was found within a community of 23 mandrills where individuals old and young, female and male covered their eyes with their hands for periods which could exceed 30 min, often while simultaneously raising their elbow prominently into the air. This 'Eye covering' gesture has been performed within the community for a decade, enduring deaths, removals, and births, and it persists into the present. Differential responses to Eye covering versus controls suggested that the gesture might have a locally-respected meaning, potentially functioning over a distance to inhibit interruptions as a 'do not disturb' sign operates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The creation of this gesture by monkeys suggests that the ability to cultivate shared meanings using novel manual acts may be distributed more broadly beyond the human species. Although logistically difficult with primates, the translocation of gesturers between communities remains critical to experimentally establishing the possible cultural origin and transmission of nonhuman gestures.

  5. Fluoxetine Administration in Juvenile Monkeys: Implications for Pharmacotherapy in Children

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    Mari S. Golub

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine therapy has been approved for children with major depressive disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder for over 14 years and has expanded to other childhood behavior disorders. As use increases, more detail on fluoxetine effects during juvenile brain development can help maintain safe and effective use of this therapy. Here, a narrative review is provided of previously published findings from a large nonhuman primate project. Fluoxetine was administered to juvenile male rhesus monkeys for an extended period (2 years prior to puberty. Compared to controls, treated monkeys showed sleep disruption, facilitated social interaction, greater impulsivity, and impaired sustained attention during treatment. No effects on growth were seen. Metabolomics assays characterized a distinctive response to fluoxetine and demonstrated individual differences that were related to the impulsivity measure. Fluoxetine interactions with monoamine oxidase A polymorphisms that influenced behavior and metabolomics markers were an important, previously unrecognized finding of our studies. After treatment was discontinued, some behavioral effects persisted, but short-term memory and cognitive flexibility testing did not show drug effects. This detailed experimental work can contribute to clinical research and continued safe and effective fluoxetine pharmacotherapy in children.

  6. LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT. The developmental dynamics of marmoset monkey vocal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, D Y; Fenley, A R; Teramoto, Y; Narayanan, D Z; Borjon, J I; Holmes, P; Ghazanfar, A A

    2015-08-14

    Human vocal development occurs through two parallel interactive processes that transform infant cries into more mature vocalizations, such as cooing sounds and babbling. First, natural categories of sounds change as the vocal apparatus matures. Second, parental vocal feedback sensitizes infants to certain features of those sounds, and the sounds are modified accordingly. Paradoxically, our closest living ancestors, nonhuman primates, are thought to undergo few or no production-related acoustic changes during development, and any such changes are thought to be impervious to social feedback. Using early and dense sampling, quantitative tracking of acoustic changes, and biomechanical modeling, we showed that vocalizations in infant marmoset monkeys undergo dramatic changes that cannot be solely attributed to simple consequences of growth. Using parental interaction experiments, we found that contingent parental feedback influences the rate of vocal development. These findings overturn decades-old ideas about primate vocalizations and show that marmoset monkeys are a compelling model system for early vocal development in humans. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Are monkeys able to plan for future exchange?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjade, Marie; Thierry, Bernard; Call, Josep; Dufour, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    Whether or not non-human animals can plan for the future is a hotly debated issue. We investigate this question further and use a planning-to-exchange task to study future planning in the cooperative domain in two species of monkeys: the brown capuchin (Cebus apella) and the Tonkean macaque (Macaca tonkeana). The rationale required subjects to plan for a future opportunity to exchange tokens for food by collecting tokens several minutes in advance. Subjects who successfully planned for the exchange task were expected to select suitable tokens during a collection period (5/10 min), save them for a fixed period of time (20/30 min), then take them into an adjacent compartment and exchange them for food with an experimenter. Monkeys mostly failed to transport tokens when entering the testing compartment; hence, they do not seem able to plan for a future exchange with a human partner. Three subjects did however manage to solve the task several times, albeit at very low rates. They brought the correct version of three possible token types, but rarely transported more than one suitable token at a time. Given that the frequency of token manipulation predicted transport, success might have occurred by chance. This was not the case, however, since in most cases subjects were not already holding the token in their hands before they entered the testing compartment. Instead, these results may reflect subjects' strengths and weaknesses in their time-related comprehension of the task.

  8. Contextual factors explain risk-seeking preferences in rhesus monkeys

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    Sarah eHeilbronner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to humans and most other animals, rhesus macaques strongly prefer risky rewards to safe ones with similar expected value. Why macaques prefer risk while other animals typically avoid it remains puzzling and challenges the idea that monkeys provide a model for human economic behavior. Here we argue that monkeys’ risk-seeking preferences are neither mysterious nor unique. Risk-seeking in macaques is possibly induced by specific elements of the tasks that have been used to measure their risk preferences. The most important of these elements are (1 very small stakes, (2 serially repeated gambles with short delays between trials, and (3 task parameters that are learned through experience, not described verbally. Together, we hypothesize that these features will readily induce risk-seeking in monkeys, humans, and rats. Thus, elements of task design that are often ignored when comparing studies of risk attitudes can easily overwhelm basal risk preferences. More broadly, these results highlight the fundamental importance of understanding the psychological basis of economic decisions in interpreting preference data and corresponding neural measures.

  9. Aeromonas simiae sp. nov., isolated from monkey faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf-Monteil, Colette; Flèche, Anne Le; Riegel, Philippe; Prévost, Gilles; Bermond, Delphine; Grimont, Patrick A D; Monteil, Henri

    2004-03-01

    Two Aeromonas strains, IBS S6874(T) and IBS S6652, were isolated from the faeces of two healthy monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from Mauritius that were kept in quarantine in the Centre for Primatology, Strasbourg, France. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the two isolates formed an unknown genetic lineage within the genus Aeromonas. The two isolates had nearly identical sequences (0.1 % nucleotide substitution) that were related closely to those of recognized Aeromonas species (1.7-3.5 % nucleotide substitution). DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strains IBS S6874(T) and IBS S6652 had high DNA-DNA similarity (89 %) to each other and a low level of DNA-DNA similarity to closely related taxa (18 % relatedness to Aeromonas trota and 16 % relatedness to Aeromonas schubertii). Phenotypically, the two monkey isolates differed from most previously described mesophilic Aeromonas species by their lack of haemolysis on sheep-blood agar and inability to produce indole, gas from glucose or acid from mannitol. They differed from the most closely related species, A. schubertii, by their ability to produce acid from D-cellobiose and D-sucrose and by their pyrazinamidase activity. The name Aeromonas simiae sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates; strain IBS S6874(T) (=CIP 107798(T)=CCUG 47378(T)) is the type strain.

  10. Development of sensitivity to visual texture modulation in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Movshon, J Anthony; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2010-09-10

    In human and non-human primates, higher form vision matures substantially later than spatial acuity and contrast sensitivity, as revealed by performance on such tasks as figure-ground segregation and contour integration. Our goal was to understand whether delayed maturation on these tasks was intrinsically form-dependent or, rather, related to the nature of spatial integration necessary for extracting task-relevant cues. We used an intermediate-level form task that did not call for extensive spatial integration. We trained monkeys (6-201 weeks) to discriminate the orientation of pattern modulation in a two-alternative forced choice paradigm. We presented two families of form patterns, defined by texture or contrast variations, and luminance-defined patterns for comparison. Infant monkeys could discriminate texture- and contrast-defined form as early as 6 weeks; sensitivity improved up to 40 weeks. Surprisingly, sensitivity for texture- and contrast-defined form matured earlier than for luminance-defined form. These results suggest that intermediate-level form vision develops in concert with basic spatial vision rather than following sequentially. Comparison with earlier results reveals that different aspects of form vision develop over different time courses, with processes that depend on comparing local image content maturing earlier than those requiring "global" linking of multiple visual elements across a larger spatial extent.

  11. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  12. A yellow fever epizootic in Zika Forest, Uganda, during 1972: Part 2: Monkey serology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirya, B G; Okia, N O

    1977-01-01

    During the 1972 yellow fever epizootic in Zika Forest, Uganda, sera from 21 monkeys shot in a number of forests around the Entebbe area were tested for the presence of a number of arbovirus antibodies. All sera were tested for antibodies against Chikungunya (CHIK), O'nyong-nyong (ONN), Zika, yellow fever (YF) West Nile (WN) and Wesselsbron (WESS) by the haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test. Because of the crossreaction within the flaviviruses (group B arboviruses) mouse protection test (PT) was also carried out on the sera against YF, WESS and Zika viruses. Serological studies carried out on monkey sera from different parts of Uganda, including the Entebbe area, during 1968 gave results which reflected a surprisingly low rate of YF immune monkeys (3%) throughout the country compared with the rate of over 40% immune monkeys obtained by Haddow et al. in 1951. 40% of the monkey sera collected during 1972 were immune to YF by the PT. Since no YF virus had been isolated between 1968 and 1972 the results indicate strongly that the monkeys in the Entebbe area were involved in the epizootic of 1972. No sick or dead monkeys were found in all the forests checked around Entebbe area during the epizootic. This indicates that the animal-to-animal cycle of the equatorial African forests involved the mild endemic infection characteristic of a virus in its natural habitat and infecting its natural host.

  13. Sporadic premature aging in a Japanese monkey: a primate model for progeria.

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    Takao Oishi

    Full Text Available In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes.

  14. Lactobacillus and Pediococcus species richness and relative abundance in the vagina of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, Michael G; Jin, Ling; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Tao, Lin

    2012-06-01

    The rhesus monkey is an important animal model to study human vaginal health to which lactic acid bacteria play a significant role. However, the vaginal lactic acid bacterial species richness and relative abundance in rhesus monkeys is largely unknown. Vaginal swab samples were aseptically obtained from 200 reproductive-aged female rhesus monkeys. Following Rogosa agar plating, single bacterial colonies representing different morphotypes were isolated and analyzed for whole-cell protein profile, species-specific polymerase chain reaction, and 16S rRNA gene sequence.   A total of 510 Lactobacillus strains of 17 species and one Pediococcus acidilactici were identified. The most abundant species was Lactobacillus reuteri, which colonized the vaginas of 86% monkeys. Lactobacillus johnsonii was the second most abundant species, which colonized 36% of monkeys. The majority of monkeys were colonized by multiple Lactobacillus species. The vaginas of rhesus monkeys are frequently colonized by multiple Lactobacillus species, dominated by L. reuteri. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jinghua (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)); Eng, J.; Yalow, R.S. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States) City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1990-12-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled park insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report the authors describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. They demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in their immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species.

  16. Reproduction and sera embryotoxicity after immunization of monkeys with the laminin peptides YIGSR, RGD, and IKVAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, B J; Klein, N W; Conrad, S H; Ruppenthal, G C; Sackett, G P; Weeks, B S; Kleinman, H K

    1995-01-01

    Monkeys with excellent reproductive histories were immunized with the laminin peptides YIGSR, RGD, IKVAV, and YD, a control sequence with no known biological function. Sera from the YIGSR-immunized monkey became toxic, causing neural tube defects in whole rat embryo cultures, and this monkey experienced fetal loss after immunization. Sera from the RGD-immunized monkey also became embryotoxic in culture after immunization, but this monkey appeared to become infertile as she failed to initiate a pregnancy for at least 2 years after immunization. In contrast, embryos cultured on sera from the IKVAV- or YD-immunized monkeys were predominantly normal and both monkeys completed successful pregnancies. Antibody levels to the respective peptides or to laminin were not predictive of embryotoxicity, but antibody binding to homogenized yolk sacs as well as to yolk sacs of cultured embryos was associated with sera embryotoxicity and reproductive outcomes in vivo. These observations suggested that the laminin sequences YIGSR and RGD may play a role in immune-mediated reproductive failure by reacting directly with embryonic tissue and could provide a basis for identifying individuals at risk for both spontaneous abortion and infertility. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624326

  17. Sex differences in rhesus monkey toy preferences parallel those of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Janice M; Siebert, Erin R; Wallen, Kim

    2008-08-01

    Sex differences in toy preferences in children are marked, with boys expressing stronger and more rigid toy preferences than girls, whose preferences are more flexible. Socialization processes, parents, or peers encouraging play with gender-specific toys are thought to be the primary force shaping sex differences in toy preference. A contrast in view is that toy preferences reflect biologically-determined preferences for specific activities facilitated by specific toys. Sex differences in juvenile activities, such as rough-and-tumble play, peer preferences, and infant interest, share similarities in humans and monkeys. Thus if activity preferences shape toy preferences, male and female monkeys may show toy preferences similar to those seen in boys and girls. We compared the interactions of 34 rhesus monkeys, living within a 135 monkey troop, with human wheeled toys and plush toys. Male monkeys, like boys, showed consistent and strong preferences for wheeled toys, while female monkeys, like girls, showed greater variability in preferences. Thus, the magnitude of preference for wheeled over plush toys differed significantly between males and females. The similarities to human findings demonstrate that such preferences can develop without explicit gendered socialization. We offer the hypothesis that toy preferences reflect hormonally influenced behavioral and cognitive biases which are sculpted by social processes into the sex differences seen in monkeys and humans.

  18. Lack of prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys: convergent evidence from two different food distribution tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, Federica; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Call, Josep

    2014-10-22

    Prosociality can be defined as any behaviour performed to alleviate the needs of others or to improve their welfare. Prosociality has probably played an essential role in the evolution of cooperative behaviour and several studies have already investigated it in primates to understand the evolutionary origins of human prosociality. Two main tasks have been used to test prosociality in a food context. In the Platforms task, subjects can prosocially provide food to a partner by selecting a prosocial platform over a selfish one. In the Tokens task, subjects can prosocially provide food to a partner by selecting a prosocial token over a selfish one. As these tasks have provided mixed results, we used both tasks to test prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys. Our results provided no compelling evidence of prosociality in a food context in any of the species tested. Additionally, our study revealed serious limitations of the Tokens task as it has been previously used. These results highlight the importance of controlling for confounding variables and of using multiple tasks to address inconsistencies present in the literature. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Social Status in Monkeys: Effects of Social Confrontation on Brain Function and Cocaine Self-Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert W; Czoty, Paul W; Porrino, Linda J; Nader, Michael A

    2017-04-01

    Individual differences in response to social stress and environmental enrichment may contribute to variability in response to behavioral and pharmacological treatments for drug addiction. In monkeys, social status influences the reinforcing effects of cocaine and the effects of some drugs on cocaine self-administration. In this study, we used male cynomolgus macaques (n=15) living in established social groups to examine the effects of social confrontation on the reinforcing effects of cocaine using a food-drug choice procedure. On the test day, a dominant or subordinate monkey was removed from his homecage and placed into another social pen; 30 min later he was studied in a cocaine-food choice paradigm. For the group, following social confrontation, sensitivity to cocaine reinforcement was significantly greater in subordinate monkeys compared with dominant animals. Examining individual-subject data revealed that for the majority of monkeys (9/15), serving as an intruder in another social group affected cocaine self-administration and these effects were dependent on the social rank of the monkey. For subordinate monkeys, sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine increased while sensitivity decreased in dominant monkeys. To investigate potential mechanisms mediating these effects, brain glucose metabolism was studied in a subset of monkeys (n=8) using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) with positron emission tomography. Dominant and subordinate monkeys displayed distinctly different patterns of brain glucose metabolism in their homecage, including areas associated with vigilance and stress/anxiety, respectively, and during social confrontation. These data demonstrate that, depending on an individual's social status, the same social experience can have divergent effects on brain function and cocaine self-administration. These phenotypic differences in response to social conditions support a personalized treatment approach to cocaine addiction.

  20. Interactions between Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys: discrimination and antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Xu; McMahon, Lance R; Gerak, Lisa R; Becker, Ginger L; France, Charles P

    2008-08-01

    Opioid receptor agonists can enhance some effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists, and cannabinoid receptor agonists can enhance some effects of opioid receptor agonists; however, the generality of these interactions is not established. This study examined interactions between the discriminative stimulus and antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rhesus monkeys. Neither heroin nor morphine (intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.)) altered the discriminative stimulus effects of THC in monkeys (n = 5) discriminating 0.1 mg/kg THC i.v. In contrast, THC (s.c.) markedly attenuated the discriminative stimulus effect of morphine and heroin in nondependent monkeys (n = 4) discriminating 1.78 mg/kg morphine s.c. Doses of THC that attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in nondependent monkeys failed to modify the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in morphine-dependent (5.6 mg/kg/12 h) monkeys (n = 4) discriminating 0.0178 mg/kg naltrexone s.c. THC also failed to modify the discriminative stimulus effects of naltrexone in morphine-dependent monkeys or the effects of midazolam in monkeys (n = 4) discriminating 0.32 mg/kg midazolam s.c. Doses of THC (s.c.) that attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in nondependent monkeys enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine (s.c.) in nondependent monkeys. While mu receptor agonists did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of THC, THC altered the effects of mu receptor agonists in a context-dependent manner. That the same doses of THC enhance, attenuate, or do not affect morphine, depending on the condition, suggests that attenuation of morphine by THC can result from perceptual masking rather than common pharmacodynamic mechanisms or pharmacokinetic interactions.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of the cephalosporin SM-1652 in mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, H; Yano, K; Okuda, T

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of SM-1652 were studied in mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys. The plasma half-lives of SM-1652, administered intravenously at a dose of 20 mg/kg, were 11.0 min in mice, 26.0 min in rats, 65.8 min in rabbits, 72.6 min in dogs, and 150.9 min in monkeys. The 24-h urinary excretion of SM-1652 was 30 to 35% of the dose in mice and rats, 70 to 75% in rabbits and dogs, and 45% in monkeys. Biliary excretion of the antibiotic over a 24-h period was 60 and 19% in rats a...

  2. Drusenoid maculopathy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): Effects of age and gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivert, Lena; Landauer, Noelle; Mattison, Julie A; Ingram, Donald K; Neuringer, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare drusenoid maculopathy in monkeys with human age-related macular degeneration and evaluate the influence of age, gender and caloric restriction. Methods Examination by indirect ophthalmoscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy and fundus photography, including in some cases fluorescein angiography, was performed on 61 male and 60 female rhesus macaques of ages 10-39 years. Fifty-four of the monkeys were maintained on a calorically restricted diet (approximately 30% lower than control levels) and 67 on an approximately ad libitum diet for 2-19 years, with all other environmental factors held constant. Maculopathies were graded on a 5-point scale and the effects of age, sex, and diet on prevalence and severity were examined. The retinas of 6 monkeys with macular drusen, 19-28 years old, were examined histologically. Results Rhesus monkeys showed a high prevalence (61 %) of drusenoid maculopathy. The prevalence and severity of the maculopathy increased with age (p =0.012). Fully half of all monkeys aged 10-12 years had some detectable degree of drusen. This high prevalence in young adulthood indicates that drusen develop much earlier in rhesus monkeys than in humans, who develop early maculopathy most rapidly at 50-60 years of age, even when correcting for the 3-fold difference in lifespan. No neovascularization or geographic atrophy was found. Females had a higher prevalence and severity than males (p=0.019). Calorically restricted monkeys had a slightly lower prevalence and severity at 10-12 years than controls, but the difference was not statistically significant. This is an on-going project and differences between the caloric restricted and ad-lib groups may emerge as the animals age. Some monkeys developed severe maculopathy in their 20s with others unaffected in their 30s. The histology of drusen resembled those in human retina. Conclusion Drusenoid maculopathy is common in rhesus monkeys even in young adult life. Half of the rhesus monkeys examined have

  3. Photoacoustic detection of functional responses in the motor cortex of awake behaving monkey during forelimb movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul D.; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging was applied to detect the neuronal activity in the motor cortex of an awake, behaving monkey during forelimb movement. An adult macaque monkey was trained to perform a reach-to-grasp task while PA images were acquired through a 30-mm diameter implanted cranial chamber. Increased PA signal amplitude results from an increase in regional blood volume and is interpreted as increased neuronal activity. Additionally, depth-resolved PA signals enabled the study of functional responses in deep cortical areas. The results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing PA imaging for studies of functional activation of cerebral cortex in awake monkeys performing behavioral tasks.

  4. [Epizootic hepatitis A among African green monkeys kept in a vivarium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andzhaparidze, A G; Karetnyĭ, Iu V; Korzaia, L I; Balaian, M S; Titova, I P

    1989-01-01

    The results of observations on the pattern of spread of hepatitis A virus and immune response to it in African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) kept in the animal house are presented. The infection in the monkeys was found to be characterized by all virological, serological, and biochemical parameters inherent in hepatitis A virus. The results indicated that hepatitis A in monkeys may run both asymptomatic and clinically manifest course, and the spread of infection in the animal house sequentially involves most seronegative animals into the epidemic process.

  5. Autoradiographic location of sensory nerve endings in dentin of monkey teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, M.R.; Dong, W.K.

    1983-04-01

    We have used the autoradiographic method to locate trigeminal nerve endings in monkey teeth. The nerve endings were labeled in two adult female Macaca fascicularis by 20 hours of axonal transport of radioactive protein (/sup 3/H-L-proline). We found a few labeled axons in contralateral mandibular central incisors and one mandibular canine. In ipsilateral teeth, numerous myelinated and unmyelinated axons were labeled; they formed a few terminal branches in the roots but primarily branched in the crown to form the peripheral plexus of Raschkow and to terminate as free endings in the odontoblast layer, predentin, and as far as 120 micrometers into dentinal tubules. Electron microscopic autoradiography showed that the radioactive axonally transported protein was confined to sensory axons and endings; odontoblasts and dentin matrix were not significantly labeled. Labeled free nerve endings were closely apposed to odontoblasts in dentin but did not form distinctive junctions with them. Nerve endings were most numerous in the regular tubular dentin of the crown adjacent to the tip of the pulp horn, occurring in at least half of the dentinal tubules there. Our results show tha dentinal sensory nerve endings in primate teeth can be profuse, sparse, or absent depending on the location and structure of dentin and its adjacent pulp. When dentin was innervated, the tubules were straight and contained odontoblast processes, the predentin was wide, the odontoblast cell bodies were relatively columnar, and there was an adjacent cell-free zone and pulpal nerve plexus.

  6. A Micro-Silicon Chip for in Vivo Cerebral Imprint in Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Access to cerebral tissue is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we present, for the first time, a new tool designed to obtain molecular and cellular cerebral imprints in the striatum of anesthetized monkeys. The imprint is obtained during a spatially controlled interaction of a chemically modified micro-silicon chip with the brain tissue. Scanning electron and immunofluorescence microscopies showed homogeneous capture of cerebral tissue. Nano-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) analysis of proteins harvested on the chip allowed the identification of 1158 different species of proteins. The gene expression profiles of mRNA extracted from the imprint tool showed great similarity to those obtained via the gold standard approach, which is based on post-mortem sections of the same nucleus. Functional analysis of the harvested molecules confirmed the spatially controlled capture of striatal proteins implicated in dopaminergic regulation. Finally, the behavioral monitoring and histological results establish the safety of obtaining repeated cerebral imprints in striatal regions. These results demonstrate the ability of our imprint tool to explore the molecular content of deep brain regions in vivo. They open the way to the molecular exploration of brain in animal models of neurological diseases and will provide complementary information to current data mainly restricted to post-mortem samples. PMID:23509975

  7. Cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pengfei; Song, Haibo; Yang, Pingliang; Xie, Huiqi; Kang, Y James

    2011-06-01

    Chloral hydrate has been long used as a safe sedative and hypnotic drug in humans. However, reports on its cardiovascular adverse effects have been published from time to time. The present study was undertaken to use Rhesus monkeys as a model to define the dose regiment of chloral hydrate at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced and the consequences of the cardiac events. Male Rhesus monkeys of 2-3 years old were intravenously infused with chloral hydrate starting at 50 mg/kg with an increasing increment of 25 mg/kg until the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a traditional up-and-down dosing procedure was applied to define a single dose level at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced. The data obtained showed that when the sequentially escaladed dose reached 125 mg/kg, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in all monkeys tested. The single effective dose to cause cardiac arrhythmias calculated from the crossover analysis was 143 ± 4 mg/kg. This value would be equivalent to 68.6 ± 1.9 mg/kg for children and 46.4 ± 1.3 mg/kg for adults in humans. Under either multiple or single dose condition, cardiac arrhythmias did not occur before 40 min after the onset of anesthesia induced by chloral hydrate. Cardiac arrhythmias were recovered without help at the end of the anesthesia in most cases, but also continued after the regain of consciousness in some cases. The cardiac arrhythmias were accompanied with compromised cardiac function including suppressed fractional shortening and ejection fraction. This study thus suggests that cautions need to be taken when chloral hydrate is used above certain levels and beyond a certain period of anesthesia, and cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate need to be closely monitored because compromised cardiac function may occur simultaneously. In addition, patients with cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate should be monitored even after they are recovered from the anesthesia.

  8. Peripapillary Scleral Thickness in Perfusion-Fixed Normal Monkey Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, J. Crawford; Blidner, Richard A.; Bellezza, Anthony J.; Thompson, Hilary W.; Hart, Richard T.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the thickness of the peripapillary sclera in perfusion-fixed normal monkey eyes so as to build accurate computational models of intraocular pressure (IOP)-related stress and strain within these tissues. Methods Nine rhesus monkeys were perfusion fixed, each with one normal eye set to an IOP of 10 mm Hg by manometer. A 6-mm-diameter specimen containing the optic nerve head and peripapillary sclera was trephined from each scleral shell and cut into 4-μm serial sagittal sections across the scleral canal opening, either horizontally (four eyes) or vertically (five eyes). The thickness of the peripapillary sclera was measured on every 24th section at 100-μm intervals from the posterior scleral canal opening (PSCO) to the peripheral edge of the specimen. The data were pooled by quadrant (superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal), regions within each quadrant, and distance from the PSCO, overall and for individual eyes, and subjected to analysis of variance. Results In terms of distance from the PSCO, the peripapillary sclera was thinnest nearest the PSCO (201 μm, nasal; 201 μm, temporal; 240 μm, inferior; 249 μm, superior), thickened progressively to a maximum in the midperiphery approximately 600 to 1000 μm from the PSCO (326 μm, nasal; 415 μm, superior; 420 μm, temporal; 422 μm, inferior), and thinned again peripherally in all quadrants. The peripapillary sclera was thinner in the nasal quadrant when compared with the other quadrants superiorly, inferiorly, and temporally (central region means of 291 μm, nasal; 369 μm, superior; 372 μm, inferior; and 369 μm, temporal; P < 0.0001). Conclusions In the normal monkey eye, peripapillary scleral thickness varies significantly with distance from the posterior scleral canal opening and is thinner in the nasal quadrant than in the other quadrants. These differences are substantial and are likely to affect the magnitude of IOP-related stress and strain within these tissues for a given level

  9. Haematology of experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological aberrations associated with human infective trypanosomes were investigated in the vervet monkey model of the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Four monkeys were infected intravenously with 104 Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and monitored for changes in the blood profile using a haematological ...

  10. Statistical learning of visual transitions in monkey inferotemporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Travis; Olson, Carl R

    2011-11-29

    One of the most fundamental functions of the brain is to predict upcoming events on the basis of the recent past. A closely related function is to signal when a prediction has been violated. The identity of the brain regions that mediate these functions is not known. We set out to determine whether they are implemented at the level of single neurons in the visual system. We gave monkeys prolonged exposure to pairs of images presented in fixed sequence so that each leading image became a strong predictor for the corresponding trailing image. We then monitored the responses of neurons in the inferotemporal cortex to image sequences that obeyed or violated the transitional rules imposed during training. Inferotemporal neurons exhibited a transitional surprise effect, responding much more strongly to unpredicted transitions than to predicted transitions. Thus, neurons even in the visual system make experience-based predictions and react when they fail.

  11. Dyscoria associated with herpesvirus infection in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozalo, Alfonso S.; Montoya, Enrique J.; Weller, Richard E.

    2008-08-16

    Abstract Dyscoria was observed in a female owl monkey and her two offspring. A third offspring was found dead with necrohemorrhagic encephalitis. Two males paired with the female died, one of which showed oral ulcers at necropsy. Histologic examination of the oral ulcers revealed syncytia and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in epithelial cells. Ocular examination revealed posterior synechia associated with the dyscoria in all three animals. Serum samples from the female and her offspring were positive for Herpesvirus simplex antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The clinical history, gross and microscopic lesions, and serology results suggests a herpesviral etiology, possibly, H. simplex or H. saimiri-1. This report underscores the risks associated with introducing animals into breeding or research colonies that were previously kept as pets or those from unknown origin that could carry asymptomatic pathogenic Herpesvirus infections. In addition, herpesviral infection should be considered among the differential diagnoses if dyscoria is observed in nonhuman primates.

  12. Temporal discounting and inter-temporal choice in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Hwang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans and animals are more likely to take an action leading to an immediate reward than actions with delayed rewards of similar magnitudes. Although such devaluation of delayed rewards has been almost universally described by hyperbolic discount functions, the rate of this temporal discounting varies substantially among different animal species. This might be in part due to the differences in how the information about reward is presented to decision makers. In previous animal studies, reward delays or magnitudes were gradually adjusted across trials, so the animals learned the properties of future rewards from the rewards they waited for and consumed previously. In contrast, verbal cues have been used commonly in human studies. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were trained in a novel inter-temporal choice task in which the magnitude and delay of reward were indicated symbolically using visual cues and varied randomly across trials. We found that monkeys could extract the information about reward delays from visual symbols regardless of the number of symbols used to indicate the delay. The rate of temporal discounting observed in the present study was comparable to the previous estimates in other mammals, and the animal’s choice behavior was largely consistent with hyperbolic discounting. Our results also suggest that the rate of temporal discounting might be influenced by contextual factors, such as the novelty of the task. The flexibility furnished by this new inter-temporal choice task might be useful for future neurobiological investigations on inter-temporal choice in non-human primates.

  13. Video-task acquisition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): a comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, W. D.; Washburn, D. A.; Hyatt, C. W.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This study describes video-task acquisition in two nonhuman primate species. The subjects were seven rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and seven chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). All subjects were trained to manipulate a joystick which controlled a cursor displayed on a computer monitor. Two criterion levels were used: one based on conceptual knowledge of the task and one based on motor performance. Chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys attained criterion in a comparable number of trials using a conceptually based criterion. However, using a criterion based on motor performance, chimpanzees reached criterion significantly faster than rhesus monkeys. Analysis of error patterns and latency indicated that the rhesus monkeys had a larger asymmetry in response bias and were significantly slower in responding than the chimpanzees. The results are discussed in terms of the relation between object manipulation skills and video-task acquisition.

  14. Prevalence of Balantidium coli Infection in Bred Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta in Guangxi, southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Long Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Balantidium coli infects humans, primates and pigs, causing serious diarrhea and dysentery. Little information on the prevalence of B. coli in primates is available in China. This investigation was conducted to determine the prevalence of B. coli infection in bred rhesus monkeys in Guangxi Zhuang Nationality Autonomous Region (GZNAR, southern China.A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from rhesus monkeys bred in cages in GZNAR and B. coli cysts and/or trophozoites were examined microscopically after sedimentation with water in May 2013.(64.2% samples were tested positive. The prevalence was 65% (39/60 and 63.3% (38/60 in female and male monkeys, respectively. 80% (48/60 cages in this nonhuman primate center were positive for B. coli.The present survey revealed high circulation of B. coli in bred rhesus monkeys in GZNAR, which poses potential threats to animal and human health.

  15. Prevalence of Balantidium coli Infection in Bred Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in Guangxi, southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai Long; Li, Qian; Dong, Ling; Li, Juan; Zou, Feng Cai; Zhang, Li

    2014-03-01

    Balantidium coli infects humans, primates and pigs, causing serious diarrhea and dysentery. Little information on the prevalence of B. coli in primates is available in China. This investigation was conducted to determine the prevalence of B. coli infection in bred rhesus monkeys in Guangxi Zhuang Nationality Autonomous Region (GZNAR), southern China. A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from rhesus monkeys bred in cages in GZNAR and B. coli cysts and/or trophozoites were examined microscopically after sedimentation with water in May 2013. (64.2%) samples were tested positive. The prevalence was 65% (39/60) and 63.3% (38/60) in female and male monkeys, respectively. 80% (48/60) cages in this nonhuman primate center were positive for B. coli. The present survey revealed high circulation of B. coli in bred rhesus monkeys in GZNAR, which poses potential threats to animal and human health.

  16. Effects of a novel fentanyl derivative on drug discrimination and learning in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; Moerschbaecher, J M; Bagley, J R; Brockunier, L L; France, C P

    1999-10-01

    Three monkeys discriminated 1.78 mg/kg of mirfentanil while responding under a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of stimulus-shock termination. Two mirfentanil derivatives, OHM3295 and OHM10579, substituted for mirfentanil in all subjects. However, other drugs produced variable effects among monkeys; for example, mu and kappa opioid agonists and clonidine substituted for mirfentanil on some occasions in two monkeys. Cocaine, amphetamine, and ketamine did not substitute in any subject. Opioid antagonists did not attenuate the effects of mirfentanil. In monkeys responding under a repeated acquisition and performance procedure, errors increased only during the acquisition phase at doses of mirfentanil that decreased response rates. Thus, unlike fentanyl, the discriminative stimulus effects of mirfentanil do not appear to be mediated exclusively through opioid receptors. Finally, mirfentanil does not appear to disrupt complex behavioral processes.

  17. Effects of Head-down Tilt on Nerve Conduction in Rhesus Monkeys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bo Sun Xiao-Yun Zhang Li-Zhi Liu Zhao-Hui Chen Zhong-Quan Dai Xu-Sheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    ...) comprises an experimental model used to simulate the space flight environment. This study investigated nerve conduction characteristics of rhesus monkeys before and alter prolonged exposure to H DT. Methods...

  18. Genetic diversity and distinctiveness of the proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) of the Klias Peninsula, Sabah, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Munshi-South, Jason; Bernard, Henry

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced a partial segment of the mitochondrial control region from 21 proboscis monkeys of the Klias peninsula, the last large population remaining on the west coast of Sabah, Malaysia...

  19. Reduction on OFF-responses of Electroretinogram in Monkeys with Long-term High Intraocular Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Gao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Reduced OFF-responses are recorded in monkeys with high IOP when dysfunction of photoreceptor is involved. The reduced OFF-responses to long-flash stimulus show evidence of anomalous retinal circuitry in glaucomatous retinopathy.

  20. Protective efficacy of multiple vaccine platforms against Zika virus challenge in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Bricault, Christine A; Moseley, Edward T; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng'ang'a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Borducchi, Erica N; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys also conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector vaccine, both expressing ZIKV premembrane and envelope, also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Limited Susceptibility of Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to Leprosy after Experimental Administration of Mycobacterium leprae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gerald P.; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C.; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Fajardo, Tranquilino T.; Villahermosa, Laarni G.; Cellona, Roland V.; Balagon, Maria V.; White, Valerie A.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Walsh, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis—importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1–19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration. PMID:22855766

  2. Evaluating self-generated decisions in frontal pole cortex of monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Genovesio, Aldo; Wise, Steven P

    2010-01-01

    The frontal pole cortex (FPC) expanded markedly during human evolution, but its function remains uncertain in both monkeys and humans. Accordingly, we examined single-cell activity in this area. On every trial, monkeys decided between two response targets on the basis of a 'stay' or 'shift' cue. Feedback followed at a fixed delay. FPC cells did not encode the monkeys' decisions when they were made, but did so later on, as feedback approached. This finding indicates that the FPC is involved in monitoring or evaluating decisions. Using a control task and delayed feedback, we found that decision coding lasted until feedback only when the monkeys combined working memory with sensory cues to 'self-generate' decisions, as opposed to when they simply followed trial-by-trial instructions. A role in monitoring or evaluating self-generated decisions could account for FPC's expansion during human evolution.

  3. Discriminative stimulus effects of flumazenil in untreated and in diazepam-treated rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; France, C P

    1999-10-01

    Long-term use of benzodiazepine agonists can have adverse effects (e.g., development of dependence), thereby limiting their clinical usefulness. The goal of the current study was to examine the discriminative stimulus effects of flumazenil in untreated and diazepam-treated monkeys to determine whether this type of procedure could be used to examine benzodiazepine dependence. Flumazenil (0.32 mg/kg s.c.) was established as a discriminative stimulus in eight monkeys receiving 5.6 mg/kg/day of diazepam (p.o.); four responded under a fixed ratio (FR)5 schedule of stimulus-shock termination (SST) and four responded under a FR5 schedule of food presentation. For comparison, 1.0 mg/kg flumazenil (s.c.) was established as a discriminative stimulus in four untreated monkeys responding under a FR5 schedule of SST. Flumazenil dose-dependently increased responding on the flumazenil-appropriate lever in all monkeys. In diazepam-treated monkeys, Ro 15-4513, ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate and bretazenil substituted for flumazenil with pentylenetetrazole substituting in some monkeys; other drugs failed to substitute for flumazenil. Acute administration of 10.0 mg/kg diazepam (s.c.) shifted the flumazenil dose-effect curve threefold to the right of the control dose-effect curve. Temporary suspension of diazepam treatment produced a time-related increase in flumazenil-lever responding that was reversed by diazepam. In untreated monkeys, midazolam substituted for flumazenil, with other drugs, including those with primary mechanisms of action at non-gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors, substituting in some monkeys. Ro 15-4513 did not substitute in any untreated monkey. The flumazenil discriminative stimulus appears to be pharmacologically selective in treated monkeys with only negative and low efficacy positive modulators substituting for flumazenil; in contrast, a variety of drugs substitute for flumazenil in untreated monkeys. This apparent difference in selectivity suggests

  4. Nástroje pro náhodné testování (Monkey testing)

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Victor

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis focuses on explaining the term Monkey testing and its usage in a field of software development. The first chapter presents principal ideas about testing and we get familiar with testing in general. In the next part we familiarize with particular types of testing and with the role of testing during software development. Following part of this thesis introduces test automation its advantages and risks. Next chapter is about monkey testing which may be considered as a subgro...

  5. The effects of fur rubbing on the social behavior of tufted capuchin monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Fur rubbing has often been attributed a social as well as a medicinal function in capuchin monkeys, yet to date there have been no studies investigating the effects of fur rubbing on subsequent group dynamics. Here we report for the first time how social group cohesion is affected by fur rubbing in tufted capuchin monkeys. Fifteen captive capuchins were each observed 6 times for 45 minutes, three times following the provision of materials typically used for fur rubbing (onion) and three times...

  6. Foraging density for squirrel monkey Saimiri sciureus in two forests in Puerto Lopez - Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Astwood R, Jorge; Rodríguez P, José; Rodríguez-C, Karen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective. Forest remnants were analyzed to determine the density of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and the degree of alteration of the forest, by selecting areas for the conservation and maintenance of the species in natural environments. Materials and methods. Linear transects were conducted on two wooden fragments, “La Reforma” and “Campo Hermoso” farms (Puerto Lopez, Meta, Colombia), recording sightings of squirrel monkeys and identifying the tree species used by the primates...

  7. Chlorpheniramine as a Prophylaxis to Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement in the Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of the antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate in preventing the early performance decrement in monkeys following a supralethal dose... chlorpheniramine and were performance tested 24 hours prior to irradiation. These five animals and 10 additional animals were then injected with 10 mg of... chlorpheniramine at 60 minutes and at 30 minutes before irradiation. The monkeys were tested and their performance was recorded for 2 hours following a 4000

  8. Investigation of anti-motion sickness drugs in the squirrel monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, B. S.; Money, K. E.; Kohl, R. L.; Kinter, L. B.

    1992-01-01

    Early attempts to develop an animal model for anti-motion sickness drugs, using dogs and cats; were unsuccessful. Dogs did not show a beneficial effect of scopolamine (probably the best single anti-motion sickness drug for humans thus far) and the findings in cats were not definitive. The authors have developed an animal model using the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) of the Bolivian phenotype. Unrestrained monkeys in a small lucite cage were tested in an apparatus that induces motion sickness by combining vertical oscillation and horizontal rotation in a visually unrestricted laboratory environment. Signs of motion sickness were scored using a rating scale. Ten susceptible monkeys (weighing 800-1000 g) were given a total of five tests each, to establish the baseline susceptibility level. Based on the anticholinergic activity of scopolamine, the sensitivity of squirrel monkey to scopolamine was investigated, and the appropriate dose of scopolamine for this species was determined. Then various anti-motion sickness preparations were administered in subsequent tests: 100 ug scopolamine per monkey; 140 ug dexedrine; 50 ug scopolamine plus 70 ug dexedrine; 100 ug scopolamine plus 140 ug dexedrine; 3 mg promethazine; 3 mg promethazine plus 3 mg ephedrine. All these preparations were significantly effective in preventing motion sickness in the monkeys. Ephedrine, by itself, which is marginally effective in humans, was ineffective in the monkeys at the doses tried (0.3-6.0 mg). The squirrel monkey appears to be a good animal model for antimotion sickness drugs. Peripherally acting antihistamines such as astemizole and terfenadine were found to be ineffective, whereas flunarizine, and an arginine vasopressin V1 antagonist, showed significant activity in preventing motion sickness.

  9. What do Diana monkeys know about the focus of attention of a conspecific?

    OpenAIRE

    Scerif, Gaia; Gómez, Juan Carlos; Byrne, RW

    2004-01-01

    Converging experimental and observational evidence suggests that some non-human primates are able to co-orient with shifts in visual attention, both of conspecifics and humans. However, the underlying cognitive mechanisms involved are unclear. To investigate attention-following in Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana diana), we used photographs of familiar conspecifics orienting towards one of two locations. A subject monkey was shown a photograph, and shortly afterwards a toy appeared at one l...

  10. Induction of arthritis in monkeys by immunization with type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of two cynomolugus and three rhesus monkeys with purified type II collagen resulted in the development of polyarthritis. Arthritis first became clinically apparent 7 wk after primary immunization and persisted for 16 mo. Radiologic examination of the limbs demonstrated soft tissue swelling with severe joint destruction including loss of cartilage and bone. Involved joints eventually became ankylosed with permanent loss of some motion. All of the monkeys developed a response to th...

  11. Sleep patterns in male juvenile monkeys influenced by gestational iron deprivation and MAOA genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in sleep patterns of children may have developmental origins. Here, two factors known to influence behavioral development, monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype and prenatal iron deficiency, were examined for their influences on sleep in juvenile rhesus monkeys. Sleep was assessed based on a threshold for inactivity as recorded by activity monitors. Pregnant monkeys were fed diets containing either 100 ppm Fe (iron sufficient) or 10 ppm Fe (iron deficient). At 3-4 months ...

  12. Clinical biochemical aspects of glutaminase toxicity in rabbits and Rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.; Baskerville, A.; Harris-Smith, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment with a chemically modified glutaminase was lethal to rabbits and Rhesus monkeys at all but the lowest doses. Changes in the serum levels of triglycerides, glucose, creatinine, urea, cholesterol and protein and in the activities of some serum enzymes were the probable result of the development of lesions in liver, kidney and intestine observed at necropsy. Treatment with unmodified glutaminase induced similar changes in rabbits but not in Rhesus monkeys.

  13. Synchronized practice helps bearded capuchin monkeys learn to extend attention while learning a tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragaszy, Dorothy M; Eshchar, Yonat; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Resende, Briseida; Laity, Kellie; Izar, Patrícia

    2017-07-24

    Culture extends biology in that the setting of development shapes the traditions that individuals learn, and over time, traditions evolve as occasional variations are learned by others. In humans, interactions with others impact the development of cognitive processes, such as sustained attention, that shape how individuals learn as well as what they learn. Thus, learning itself is impacted by culture. Here, we explore how social partners might shape the development of psychological processes impacting learning a tradition. We studied bearded capuchin monkeys learning a traditional tool-using skill, cracking nuts using stone hammers. Young monkeys practice components of cracking nuts with stones for years before achieving proficiency. We examined the time course of young monkeys' activity with nuts before, during, and following others' cracking nuts. Results demonstrate that the onset of others' cracking nuts immediately prompts young monkeys to start handling and percussing nuts, and they continue these activities while others are cracking. When others stop cracking nuts, young monkeys sustain the uncommon actions of percussing and striking nuts for shorter periods than the more common actions of handling nuts. We conclude that nut-cracking by adults can promote the development of sustained attention for the critical but less common actions that young monkeys must practice to learn this traditional skill. This work suggests that in nonhuman species, as in humans, socially specified settings of development impact learning processes as well as learning outcomes. Nonhumans, like humans, may be culturally variable learners.

  14. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from cynomolgus monkeys (M. fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Sonia Q; Kimbason, Tara; Reindel, James; Dubois, Andre

    2005-06-15

    We recently reported the occurrence of natural infection with H. pylori in a group of cynomolgus monkeys with chronic active gastritis and gastric erosions. The goal of the present study was to characterize and to compare strains isolated from animals originating from two different geographical areas. Gross and microscopic pathology determined at the time of necropsy was similar in all animals. H. pylori were isolated from specimens harvested in five monkeys (four from Vietnam and one from the Philippines) with gastritis. Isolates from monkeys bred in Vietnam had a similar DNA fingerprint pattern, which was distinct from that of isolates from a monkey bred in the Philippines. All strains were of the s1a vacA subtype, but all the 'Vietnamese' strains were cagA+ and all but one were iceA1 whereas the 'Philippino' strains were cagA- and iceA2. The sequences of the 16S rRNA of the Vietnamese and Philippino strains shared 98% homology and both clustered with H. pylori sequences present in the NCBI database. In conclusion, cynomolgus monkeys can be naturally colonized by H. pylori, and the strains isolated from these animals appear to vary according to the geographical origin, thus indicating probable infection prior to importation. Since some of the cynomolgus monkeys developed antral erosions during natural infection, we propose that this animal model may be used to investigate the role of H. pylori in ulcerogenesis.

  15. Strategies for the production of genetically identical monkeys by embryo splitting

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    Paprocki AM

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetically identical rhesus monkeys would have tremendous utility as models for the study of human disease and would be particularly valuable for vaccine trials and tissue transplantation studies where immune function is important. While advances in nuclear transfer technology may someday enable monkeys to be cloned with some efficiency, embryo splitting may be a more realistic approach to creating pairs of genetically identical monkeys. Although several different approaches to embryo splitting, including blastocyst bisection and blastomere separation, have been used successfully in rodents and domestic species for production of pairs and sets of identical offspring, efforts to create monozygotic twins in rhesus monkeys using these approaches have not met with similar success. Aggregation of split embryos with other types of blastomeres, such as tetraploid and developmentally asynchronous blastomeres, that could potentially increase their cell numbers and developmental competence without contributing to term development has been investigated as an alternative approach to creating monozygotic twin monkeys. The major challenges encountered with respect to the efficient production of monozygotic twins in rhesus monkeys and potential strategies to overcome these challenges are discussed.

  16. Behavioral efficacy of diazepam against nerve agent exposure in rhesus monkeys. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, C.A.; Larsen, T.; Finger, A.V.; Solana, R.P.; McMaster, S.B.

    1991-12-31

    The possibility that nerve agents will be used on the battlefield is real. The traditional therapy against nerve agent exposure consists of pyridostigmine pretreatment and atropine-pralidoxime chloride therapy administered after nerve agent exposure. This therapy regimen is extremely effective in preventing mortality in laboratory animals exposed to multilethal concentrations of nerve agent, yet these animals often display convulsions, brain damage, and behavioral incapacitation. We report here that the addition of diazepam to the traditional therapy for nerve agent (soman) exposure not only decreases the incidence of convulsions, but also attenuates the cognitive impairments of rhesus monkeys trained on a Serial Probe Recognition (SPR) task. Monkeys which received diazepam treatment required only 6 days before their performance on the SPR task returned to presoman exposure levels, compared to nondiazepamtreated monkeys which required 15 days. Moreover, only 1 out of the 5 monkeys which received diazepain treatment suffered tonic-clonic convulsions; in contrast all 5 monkeys which did not receive diazepam treatment experienced severe convulsive episodes. These results suggest that diazepam would be an excellent adjunct to traditional nerve agent therapy to facilitate behavioral recovery from nerve agent intoxication that might be encountered by US military personnel on the battlefield or accidental organophosphate poisoning encountered in industrial or agricultural accidents. Serial probe recognition task, diazepam, nerve agents, soman convulsions, rhesus monkeys, cognition, organophosphate.

  17. Establishment of reference values for complete blood count and blood gases in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shunya; Koie, Hiroshi; Kanayama, Kiichi; Katakai, Yuko; Ito-Fujishiro, Yasuyo; Sankai, Tadashi; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ageyama, Naohide

    2017-05-18

    Cynomolgus monkeys are closely related to humans phylogenetically, and this has resulted in their widespread use as a preclinical model. Hematological data with regard to these monkeys are thus important. Although reference values for blood components and sex hormones have been established for cynomolgus monkeys, those for arterial blood gases have not. The arterial blood gases quickly reflect respiratory and circulatory dynamics, and are thus useful for animal management and safe general anesthesia and surgical operations. Furthermore, since O2 is transported by RBC, CBC and blood gases are closely related. The present study aimed to establish reference values for arterial blood gases and CBC in cynomolgus monkeys over a wide age range. Blood gases and CBC of arterial blood, collected from 41 female and 21 male anesthetized monkeys, were measured. Age correlated with RBC, HGB and HCT in the CBC. Values differed significantly between males and females in pCO2, CO2 concentration, MCV and MCH. The pH of blood was equivalent to that of humans and pCO2 was more stable, whereas MCV and MCH were lower than those in humans. Erythrocytes were smaller and less pigmented than in other Macaca species. Several relationships between gender and age, and blood gases and CBC were identified in cynomolgus monkeys. In conclusion, these reference values will be useful as markers for veterinary applications and in the care and maintenance of these animals.

  18. Videos of conspecifics elicit interactive looking patterns and facial expressions in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Clayton P; Zimmerman, Prisca E; Gothard, Katalin M

    2011-08-01

    A broader understanding of the neural basis of social behavior in primates requires the use of species-specific stimuli that elicit spontaneous, but reproducible and tractable behaviors. In this context of natural behaviors, individual variation can further inform about the factors that influence social interactions. To approximate natural social interactions similar to those documented by field studies, we used unedited video footage to induce in viewer monkeys spontaneous facial expressions and looking patterns in the laboratory setting. Three adult male monkeys (Macaca mulatta), previously behaviorally and genetically (5-HTTLPR) characterized, were monitored while they watched 10 s video segments depicting unfamiliar monkeys (movie monkeys) displaying affiliative, neutral, and aggressive behaviors. The gaze and head orientation of the movie monkeys alternated between "averted" and "directed" at the viewer. The viewers were not reinforced for watching the movies, thus their looking patterns indicated their interest and social engagement with the stimuli. The behavior of the movie monkey accounted for differences in the looking patterns and facial expressions displayed by the viewers. We also found multiple significant differences in the behavior of the viewers that correlated with their interest in these stimuli. These socially relevant dynamic stimuli elicited spontaneous social behaviors, such as eye-contact induced reciprocation of facial expression, gaze aversion, and gaze following, that were previously not observed in response to static images. This approach opens a unique opportunity to understanding the mechanisms that trigger spontaneous social behaviors in humans and nonhuman primates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. PENGARUH PERSEPSI EKOWISATA TERHADAP TINGKAT KEPUASAN WISATAWAN DI MONKEY FOREST UBUD, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Via Reza Efrida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate (1 the ecotourism perception of tourists visiting Monkey Forest Ubud; (2 the visitor satisfaction level on Monkey Forest Ubud attraction; and (3 the influence of ecotourism perception on visitor satisfaction level at Monkey Forest Ubud. The result of this research carried out descriptive statistic by using an importance-performance analysis (IPA and inferential statistic by using a simple linear regression analysis. The technique of determining sample size is incidental sampling technique by distributing questionnaires to 170 tourists visiting Monkey Forest Ubud. The result showed that tourists which visit Monkey Forest Ubud strongly agree on the implementation of ecotourism concept. On the other hand, the calculation results of concordance rate showed 89.59% which means that the overall tourist is satisfied with the Monkey Forest Ubud attraction. Moreover, based on the hypothesis testing by using t-test statistical significance showed that there is a significant influence of independent variable (perception of ecotourism on the dependent variable (tourist satisfaction.

  20. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  1. Naturally transmitted herpesvirus papio-2 infection in a black and white colobus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troan, Brigid V; Perelygina, Ludmila; Patrusheva, Irina; Wettere, Arnaud J van; Hilliard, Julia K; Loomis, Michael R; Voe, Ryan S De

    2007-12-15

    A 6.5-year-old female eastern black and white colobus monkey (Colobus guereza) was evaluated after acute onset of ataxia and inappetence. The monkey was ataxic and lethargic, but no other abnormalities were detected via physical examination, radiography, or clinicopathologic analyses. During the next 2 days, the monkey's clinical condition deteriorated, and its WBC count decreased dramatically. Cytologic examination of a CSF sample revealed marked lymphohistiocytic inflammation. Despite supportive care, the monkey became apneic; after 20 hours of mechanical ventilation, fatal cardiac arrest occurred. At necropsy, numerous petechiae were detected within the white matter tracts of the brain; microscopic lesions of multifocal necrosis and hemorrhage with intranuclear inclusions identified in the brain and adrenal glands were consistent with an acute herpesvirus infection. A specific diagnosis of herpesvirus papio-2 (HVP-2) infection was made on the basis of results of serologic testing; PCR assay of tissue specimens; live virus isolation from the lungs; and immunohistochemical identification of the virus within brain, spinal cord, and adrenal gland lesions. Via phylogenetic tree analysis, the colobus HVP-2 isolate was grouped with neuroinvasive strains of the virus. The virus was most likely transmitted to the colobus monkey through toys shared with a nearby colony of baboons (the natural host of HVP-2). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of natural transmission of HVP-2 to a nonhost species. Infection with HVP-2 should be a differential diagnosis for acute encephalopathy in primate monkeys and humans, particularly following exposure to baboons.

  2. Easy rider: monkeys learn to drive a wheelchair to navigate through a complex maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Stephanie; Guthrie, Martin; Goillandeau, Michel; Nguyen, Tho Hai; Orignac, Hugues; Gross, Christian; Boraud, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The neurological bases of spatial navigation are mainly investigated in rodents and seldom in primates. The few studies led on spatial navigation in both human and non-human primates are performed in virtual, not in real environments. This is mostly because of methodological difficulties inherent in conducting research on freely-moving monkeys in real world environments. There is some incertitude, however, regarding the extrapolation of rodent spatial navigation strategies to primates. Here we present an entirely new platform for investigating real spatial navigation in rhesus monkeys. We showed that monkeys can learn a pathway by using different strategies. In these experiments three monkeys learned to drive the wheelchair and to follow a specified route through a real maze. After learning the route, probe tests revealed that animals successively use three distinct navigation strategies based on i) the place of the reward, ii) the direction taken to obtain reward or iii) a cue indicating reward location. The strategy used depended of the options proposed and the duration of learning. This study reveals that monkeys, like rodents and humans, switch between different spatial navigation strategies with extended practice, implying well-conserved brain learning systems across different species. This new task with freely driving monkeys provides a good support for the electrophysiological and pharmacological investigation of spatial navigation in the real world by making possible electrophysiological and pharmacological investigations.

  3. Easy rider: monkeys learn to drive a wheelchair to navigate through a complex maze.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Etienne

    Full Text Available The neurological bases of spatial navigation are mainly investigated in rodents and seldom in primates. The few studies led on spatial navigation in both human and non-human primates are performed in virtual, not in real environments. This is mostly because of methodological difficulties inherent in conducting research on freely-moving monkeys in real world environments. There is some incertitude, however, regarding the extrapolation of rodent spatial navigation strategies to primates. Here we present an entirely new platform for investigating real spatial navigation in rhesus monkeys. We showed that monkeys can learn a pathway by using different strategies. In these experiments three monkeys learned to drive the wheelchair and to follow a specified route through a real maze. After learning the route, probe tests revealed that animals successively use three distinct navigation strategies based on i the place of the reward, ii the direction taken to obtain reward or iii a cue indicating reward location. The strategy used depended of the options proposed and the duration of learning. This study reveals that monkeys, like rodents and humans, switch between different spatial navigation strategies with extended practice, implying well-conserved brain learning systems across different species. This new task with freely driving monkeys provides a good support for the electrophysiological and pharmacological investigation of spatial navigation in the real world by making possible electrophysiological and pharmacological investigations.

  4. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor regulation by stress inoculation in squirrel monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent mildly stressful situations provide opportunities to learn, practice, and improve coping in a process called stress inoculation. Stress inoculation also enhances cognitive control and response inhibition of impulsive motivated behavior. Cognitive control and motivation have been linked to striatal dopamine D2 and/or D3 receptors (DRD2/3 in rodents, monkeys, and humans. Here, we study squirrel monkeys randomized early in life to stress inoculation with or without maternal companionship and a no-stress control treatment condition. Striatal DRD2/3 availability in adulthood was measured in vivo by [11C]raclopride binding using positron emission tomography (PET. DRD2/3 availability was greater in caudate and putamen compared to ventral striatum as reported in PET studies of humans and other non-human primates. DRD2/3 availability in ventral striatum was also consistently greater in stress inoculated squirrel monkeys compared to no-stress controls. Squirrel monkeys exposed to stress inoculation in the presence of their mother did not differ from squirrel monkeys exposed to stress inoculation without maternal companionship. Similar effects in different social contexts extend the generality of our findings and together suggest that stress inoculation increases striatal DRD2/3 availability as a correlate of cognitive control in squirrel monkeys.

  5. Comparative anatomy of the arm muscles of the Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata) with some comments on locomotor mechanics and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre; Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A G M F; Bretas, Rafael Vieira; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-08-01

    The anatomical literature on the genus Macaca has focused mainly on the rhesus monkey. However, some aspects in the positional behaviors of the Japanese monkey may be different from those in rhesus monkey, suggesting that the anatomical details of these species are divergent. Four thoracic limbs of Macaca fuscata adults were dissected. The arm muscles in Japanese macaques are more similar to rhesus monkeys and Papio; these characteristics are closer to those of bearded capuchins than apes, indicating more proximity of this genus to New World primates. The anatomical features observed favor quadrupedal locomotor behaviors on the ground and in arboreal environments. Japanese monkeys, rhesus monkeys, and bearded capuchins, which share more primitive characteristics in their arm muscles, present features that favor both arboreal and quadrupedal locomotor behaviors, whereas apes, mainly Pan and Gorilla, which spend more time on the ground, present more quadrupedal specializations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeffrey.fisher@fda.hhs.gov; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  7. Sixteen-year review of the population trends and mortality causes for catipve Woolly monkey Lagothrix spp

    OpenAIRE

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Woolly monkeys Lagothrix spp are difficult to maintain and breed successfully. These species are threatened in the wild and conservationists need to be aware of their plight in captivity if attempts to sustain the species are ultimately required. Written survey reports, International Species Information System record analysis and Woolly monkey studbook record analysis were completed to gather data on the survivability of the Woolly monkey population in captivity from 1990 to 2005. The Woolly ...

  8. Systematic identification and evolutionary features of rhesus monkey small nucleolar RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Runsheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated that non-protein-coding RNAs (npcRNAs/ncRNAs play important roles during eukaryotic development, species evolution, and in the etiology of disease. Rhesus macaques are the most widely used primate model in both biomedical research and primate evolutionary studies. However, most reports on these animals focus on the functional roles of protein-coding sequences, whereas very little is known about macaque ncRNAs. Results In the present study, we performed the first systematic profiling of intermediate-size ncRNAs (50 to 500 nt from the rhesus monkey by constructing a cDNA library. We identified 117 rhesus monkey ncRNAs, including 80 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs, 29 other types of known RNAs (snRNAs, Y RNA, and others, and eight unclassified ncRNAs. Comparative genomic analysis and northern blot hybridizations demonstrated that some snoRNAs were lineage- or species-specific. Paralogous sequences were found for most rhesus monkey snoRNAs, the expression of which might be attributable to extensive duplication within the rhesus monkey genome. Further investigation of snoRNA flanking sequences showed that some rhesus monkey snoRNAs are retrogenes derived from L1-mediated integration. Finally, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that birds and primates share some snoRNAs and host genes thereof, suggesting that both the relevant host genes and the snoRNAs contained therein may be inherited from a common ancestor. However, some rhesus monkey snoRNAs hosted by non-ribosome-related genes appeared after the evolutionary divergence between birds and mammals. Conclusions We provide the first experimentally-derived catalog of rhesus monkey ncRNAs and uncover some interesting genomic and evolutionary features. These findings provide important information for future functional characterization of snoRNAs during primate evolution.

  9. Learning to cope with stress modulates anterior cingulate cortex stargazin expression in monkeys and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex G; Capanzana, Roxanne; Brockhurst, Jacqueline; Cheng, Michelle Y; Buckmaster, Christine L; Absher, Devin; Schatzberg, Alan F; Lyons, David M

    2016-05-01

    Intermittent mildly stressful situations provide opportunities to learn, practice, and improve coping with gains in subsequent emotion regulation. Here we investigate the effects of learning to cope with stress on anterior cingulate cortex gene expression in monkeys and mice. Anterior cingulate cortex is involved in learning, memory, cognitive control, and emotion regulation. Monkeys and mice were randomized to either stress coping or no-stress treatment conditions. Profiles of gene expression were acquired with HumanHT-12v4.0 Expression BeadChip arrays adapted for monkeys. Three genes identified in monkeys by arrays were then assessed in mice by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of a key gene (PEMT) involved in acetylcholine biosynthesis was increased in monkeys by coping but this result was not verified in mice. Another gene (SPRY2) that encodes a negative regulator of neurotrophic factor signaling was decreased in monkeys by coping but this result was only partly verified in mice. The CACNG2 gene that encodes stargazin (also called TARP gamma-2) was increased by coping in monkeys as well as mice randomized to coping with or without subsequent behavioral tests of emotionality. As evidence of coping effects distinct from repeated stress exposures per se, increased stargazin expression induced by coping correlated with diminished emotionality in mice. Stargazin modulates glutamate receptor signaling and plays a role in synaptic plasticity. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity that mediate learning and memory in the context of coping with stress may provide novel targets for new treatments of disorders in human mental health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Viral vector-based reversible neuronal inactivation and behavioral manipulation in the macaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Juliane Nielsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are promising tools for the dissection of neural circuits. In principle, they can manipulate neurons at a level of specificity not otherwise achievable. While many studies have used viral vector-based approaches in the rodent brain, only a few have employed this technique in the non-human primate, despite the importance of this animal model for neuroscience research. Here, we report for the first time that a viral vector-based approach can be used to manipulate a monkey’s behavior in a task. For this purpose, we used the allatostatin receptor/allatostatin (AlstR/AL system, which has previously been shown to allow inactivation of neurons in vivo. The AlstR was expressed in neurons in monkey V1 by injection of an AAV1 vector. Two monkeys were trained in a detection task, in which they had to make a saccade to a faint peripheral target. Injection of AL caused a retinotopic deficit in the detection task in one monkey. Specifically, the monkey showed marked impairment for detection targets placed at the visual field location represented at the virus injection site, but not for targets shown elsewhere. We confirmed that these deficits indeed were due to the interaction of AlstR and AL by injecting saline, or AL at a V1 location without AlstR expression. Post-mortem histology confirmed AlstR expression in this monkey. We failed to replicate the behavioral results in a second monkey, as AL injection did not impair the second monkey’s performance in the detection task. However, post-mortem histology revealed a very low level of AlstR expression in this monkey. Our results demonstrate that viral vector-based approaches can produce effects strong enough to influence a monkey’s performance in a behavioral task, supporting the further development of this approach for studying how neuronal circuits control complex behaviors in non-human primates.

  11. Do primates see the solitaire illusion differently? A comparative assessment of humans (Homo sapiens), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Parrish, Audrey E; Beran, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    An important question in comparative psychology is whether human and nonhuman animals share similar principles of perceptual organization. Despite much empirical research, no firm conclusion has been drawn. The Solitaire illusion is a numerosity illusion in humans that occurs when one misperceives the relative number of 2 types of items presented in intermingled sets. To date, no study has investigated whether nonhuman animals perceive the Solitaire illusion as humans do. Here, we compared the perception of the Solitaire illusion in human and nonhuman primates in 3 experiments. We first observed (Experiment 1) the spontaneous behavior of chimpanzees when presented with 2 arrays composed of a different number of preferred and nonpreferred food items. In probe trials, preferred items were presented in the Solitaire pattern in 2 different spatial arrangements (either clustered centrally or distributed on the perimeter). Chimpanzees did not show any misperception of quantity in the Solitaire pattern. Next, humans, chimpanzees, rhesus monkeys, and capuchin monkeys underwent the same testing of relative quantity judgments in a computerized task that also presented the Solitaire illusion (Experiments 2 and 3). Unlike humans, chimpanzees did not appear to perceive the illusion, in agreement with Experiment 1. The performance of rhesus monkeys and capuchin monkeys was also different from that of humans, but was slightly more indicative of a potential Solitaire illusion. On the whole, our results suggest a potential discontinuity in the visual mechanisms underlying the Solitaire illusion between human and nonhuman primates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  13. Handling newborn monkeys alters later exploratory, cognitive, and social behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Elizabeth A; Sclafani, Valentina; Paukner, Annika; Kaburu, Stefano S K; Suomi, Stephen J; Ferrari, Pier F

    2017-08-18

    Touch is one of the first senses to develop and one of the earliest modalities for infant-caregiver communication. While studies have explored the benefits of infant touch in terms of physical health and growth, the effects of social touch on infant behavior are relatively unexplored. Here, we investigated the influence of neonatal handling on a variety of domains, including memory, novelty seeking, and social interest, in infant monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n=48) from 2 to 12 weeks of age. Neonates were randomly assigned to receive extra holding, with or without accompanying face-to-face interactions. Extra-handled infants, compared to standard-reared infants, exhibited less stress-related behavior and more locomotion around a novel environment, faster approach of novel objects, better working memory, and less fear towards a novel social partner. In sum, infants who received more tactile stimulation in the neonatal period subsequently demonstrated more advanced motor, social, and cognitive skills-particularly in contexts involving exploration of novelty-in the first three months of life. These data suggest that social touch may support behavioral development, offering promising possibilities for designing future early interventions, particularly for infants who are at heightened risk for social disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Adaptive Neuroplastic Responses in Early and Late Hemispherectomized Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Burke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioural recovery in children who undergo medically required hemispherectomy showcase the remarkable ability of the cerebral cortex to adapt and reorganize following insult early in life. Case study data suggest that lesions sustained early in childhood lead to better recovery compared to those that occur later in life. In these children, it is possible that neural reorganization had begun prior to surgery but was masked by the dysfunctional hemisphere. The degree of neural reorganization has been difficult to study systematically in human infants. Here we present a 20-year culmination of data on our nonhuman primate model (Chlorocebus sabeus of early-life hemispherectomy in which behavioral recovery is interpreted in light of plastic processes that lead to the anatomical reorganization of the early-damaged brain. The model presented here suggests that significant functional recovery occurs after the removal of one hemisphere in monkeys with no preexisting neurological dysfunctions. Human and primate studies suggest a critical role for subcortical and brainstem structures as well as corticospinal tracts in the neuroanatomical reorganization which result in the remarkable behavioral recovery following hemispherectomy. The non-human primate model presented here offers a unique opportunity for studying the behavioral and functional neuroanatomical reorganization that underlies developmental plasticity.

  15. Modular architectonic organization of the insula in the macaque monkey.

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    Evrard, Henry C; Logothetis, Nikos K; Craig, A D Bud

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide a framework for ongoing analyses of the neuronal connections of the insular cortex of the macaque monkey using modern high-resolution methods, we examined its anatomical organization in serial coronal sections stained alternately with Nissl and Gallyas (myelin) techniques. We observed the same 15 distinct architectonic areas in 10 brains. Within the granular, dysgranular, and agranular regions described in prior studies, we identified 4, 4, and 7 distinct areas, respectively. Across brains, these areas have consistent architectonic characteristics, and in flat map reconstructions they display a consistent topological or neighborhood arrangement, despite variations in the size of individual areas between cases. The borders between areas are generally rather sharply defined. Some areas, in particular the dysgranular areas, appear to consistently contain subtle transitions that suggest possible subareas or modules within the well-delimited areas. The presence of a distinct granular area that straddles the fundus of the superior limiting sulcus over its entire posterior-to-anterior extent is consistent with the available evidence on interoceptive thalamocortical projections, and also with the tensile anchor theory of species-specific cortical gyrification. These observations are consonant with the model of homeostatic afferent processing in the primate insula, and they suggest that discrete modules within insular cortex provide the basis for its polymodal integration of all salient activity relevant to ongoing emotional behavior. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Disparity selectivity of neurons in monkey inferior temporal cortex.

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    Uka, T; Tanaka, H; Yoshiyama, K; Kato, M; Fujita, I

    2000-07-01

    The inferior temporal cortex (IT) of the monkey, a final stage in the ventral visual pathway, has been known to process information on two-dimensional (2-D) shape, color, and texture. On the other hand, the dorsal visual pathway leading to the posterior parietal cortex has been known to process information on location in space. Likewise, neurons selective for binocular disparity, which convey information on depth, have been found mainly in areas along the dorsal visual pathway. Here, we report that many neurons in the IT are also selective for binocular disparity. We recorded extracellular activity from IT neurons and found that more than half of the neurons changed their response depending on the disparity added. The change was not attributed to monocular responses or eye movements. Most neurons selective for disparity were "near" or "far" cells; they preferred either crossed or uncrossed disparity, and only a small population was tuned to zero disparity. Disparity-selective neurons were also selective for shape. Most preferred the same type of disparity irrespective of the shape presented. Disparity preference was also invariant for the fronto-parallel translation of the stimuli in most of the neurons. Finally, nearby neurons exhibited similar disparity selectivity, suggesting the existence of a functional module for processing of binocular disparity in the IT. From the above and our recent findings, we suggest that the IT integrates shape and binocular disparity information, and plays an important role in the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3-D) surfaces.

  17. Somatostatinergic nerves in the cervical spinal cord of the monkey.

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    Burnweit, C; Forssmann, W G

    1979-08-03

    Somatostatinergic nerves in the spinal cord of the monkey were investigated utilizing immunohistochemistry with various antibodies against synthetic somatostatin. In contrast to earlier investigations, it is shown that somatostatinergic nerve endings occur in most of the areas of the grey matter of the spinal cord. The somatostatinergic axons are, however, characteristically distributed in three main regions: (1) Densely-packed endings are seen in lamina II of the substantia gelatinosa, forming a crescent-shaped pattern in the columna dorsalis. Somatostatin immunoreactivity is also seen in lamina I and in the Lissauer tract. (2) A fine network of fibers is observed around the central canal; the endings are concentrated on special cell bodies. Some single perikarya are also stained in this region. (3) A loose network of single fibers is found ending on perikarya of the columna lateralis or ventralis. The perikarya of the nerve axons, with the exception of those terminating in the columna dorsalis, have as yet not been identified. In order to better understand the somatostatinergic system of the spinal cord, these newly-detected somatostatinergic nerves must be studied and their exact pathways analyzed.

  18. Insightful problem solving and emulation in brown capuchin monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Elizabeth; Abramo, Allison M; Karen Hambright, M; Phillips, Kimberley A

    2017-05-01

    We investigated problem solving abilities of capuchin monkeys via the "floating object problem," a task in which the subject must use creative problem solving to retrieve a favored food item from the bottom of a clear tube. Some great apes have solved this problem by adding water to raise the object to a level at which it can be easily grabbed. We presented seven capuchins with the task over eight trials (four "dry" and four "wet"). None of the subjects solved the task, indicating that no capuchin demonstrated insightful problem solving under these experimental conditions. We then investigated whether capuchins would emulate a solution to the task. Seven subjects observed a human model solve the problem by pouring water from a cup into the tube, which brought the object to the top of the tube, allowing the subject to retrieve it. Subjects were then allowed to interact freely with an unfilled tube containing the object in the presence of water and objects that could be used to solve the task. While most subjects were unable to solve the task after viewing a demonstrator solve it, one subject did so, but in a unique way. Our results are consistent with some previous results in great ape species and indicate that capuchins do not spontaneously solve the floating object problem via insight.

  19. Discriminative stimulus properties of lysergic acid diethylamide in the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, E B

    1985-07-01

    Four monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) were trained to discriminate 0.06 mg/kg of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) from saline in a two-key task in which correct responding was reinforced with food under a fixed ratio 32 schedule. The ED50 of LSD was 0.011 mg/kg. The nonhallucinogenic ergot, lisuride, and the hallucinogen, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, substituted completely for LSD (ED50 values were 0.0098 and 0.45 mg/kg, respectively). Mescaline (1-40 mg/kg), d-amphetamine (0.1-0.625 mg/kg) and apomorphine (0.1-0.5 mg/kg) did not substitute for LSD. In antagonism testing with ketanserin (1-10 mg/kg) or pirenperone (0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg), only the highest dose of pirenperone attenuated the LSD stimulus effect (to 55%). A 0.1-mg/kg dose of pirenperone produced nonresponding in three of four animals. The LSD cue was unaffected by clozapine (1 and 2 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg) and pizotifen (0.6-1.8 mg/kg). The fact that lisuride does not readily cause hallucinations in humans, but yet substituted for LSD in primates, indicates that the LSD cue may not reflect the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. It is suggested that the LSD stimulus effect may depend on receptors (e.g., serotonergic) that, at the moment, are only poorly characterized.

  20. Visual selectivity for heading in monkey area MST.

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    Bremmer, Frank; Kubischik, Michael; Pekel, Martin; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Lappe, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The control of self-motion is supported by visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive signals. Recent research has shown how these signals interact in the monkey medio-superior temporal area (area MST) to enhance and disambiguate the perception of heading during self-motion. Area MST is a central stage for self-motion processing from optic flow, and integrates flow Weld information with vestibular self-motion and extraretinal eye movement information. Such multimodal cue integration is clearly important to solidify perception. However to understand the information processing capabilities of the brain, one must also ask how much information can be deduced from a single cue alone. This is particularly pertinent for optic flow, where controversies over its usefulness for self-motion control have existed ever since Gibson proposed his direct approach to ecological perception. In our study, we therefore, tested macaque MST neurons for their heading selectivity in highly complex flow Welds based on the purely visual mechanisms. We recorded responses of MST neurons to simple radial flow Welds and to distorted flow Welds that simulated a self-motion plus an eye movement. About half of the cells compensated for such distortion and kept the same heading selectivity in both cases. Our results strongly support the notion of an involvement of area MST in the computation of heading.

  1. Cardiovascular depressant effects of neomycin and gentamicin in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H R

    1975-08-01

    1. The acute cardiovascular effects of neomycin and gentamicin, representative aminoglycoside antibiotics, were examined in surgically-prepared anaesthetized rhesus monkeys. 2. Intravenous administration of 14, 28, and 56 mg/kg of neomycin consistently induced a dose-dependent depression of systemic blood pressure, cardiac output, left ventricular contractile force, maximum dF/dt of left ventricular contraction, and heart rate. Neomycin produced similar cardiovascular depressant effects when heart rate was maintained constant by electrical pacing. 3. Maximum depression of haemodynamic values usually occurred within 2 to 5 min after injection of neomycin; values then gradually returned to control levels within 20 to 30 (14 mg/kg) or 60 to 80 (56 mg/kg) minutes. 4. Injection of CaCl2 (1.35 mEq Ca2+/kg, i.v.) during the peak depressant effect of neomycin produced a rapid and maintained restoration of cardiovascular function to control levels; conversely, noradrenaline (2 mug, i.v.) of isoprenaline (0.5 mug, i.v.) produced only transient reversal of the neomycin effects. 5. Similar evidence of cardiovascular dysfunction was observed with gentamicin. 6. These findings demonstrate the direct cardiovascular depressant effects of aminoglycoside natibiotics in a higher primate species, and suggest that this adverse response is related to an alteration of calcium ion function.

  2. Exposure to sunlight reduces the risk of myopia in rhesus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to sunlight has recently been postulated as responsible for the effect that more time spent outdoors protects children from myopia, while early life exposure to natural light was reported to be possibly related to onset of myopia during childhood. In this study, we had two aims: to determine whether increasing natural light exposure has a protective effect on hyperopic defocus-induced myopia, and to observe whether early postnatal exposure to natural light causes increased risk of refractive error in adolescence. Eight rhesus monkeys (aged 20-30 days were treated monocularly with hyperopic-defocus (-3.0D lens and divided randomly into two groups: AL group (n=4, reared under Artificial (indoor Lighting (08:00-20:00; and NL group (n=4, exposed to Natural (outdoor Light for 3 hours per day (11:00-14:00, and to indoor lighting for the rest of the light phase. After being reared with lenses for ca. 190 days, all monkeys were returned to unrestricted vision until the age of 3 years. Another eight age-matched monkeys, reared with unrestricted vision under artificial lighting since birth, were employed as controls. The ocular refraction, corneal curvature and axial dimensions were measured before lens-wearing (at 23±3 days of age, monthly during the light phase, and at the age of puberty (at 1185+3 days of age. During the lens-wearing treatment, infant monkeys in the NL group were more hyperopic than those in the AL group (F=5.726, P=0.032. Furthermore, the two eyes of most NL monkeys remained isometropic, whereas 3 of 4 AL monkeys developed myopic anisometropia more than -2.0D. At adolescence, eyes of AL monkeys showed significant myopic anisometropia compared with eyes of NL monkeys (AL vs NL: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.22±0.44D; P=0.002 and controls (AL vs Control: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.05±0.85D; P<0.0001. All differences in refraction were associated with parallel changes in axial dimensions. Our results suggest that exposure to natural outdoor

  3. Use of a Recombinant Gamma-2 Herpesvirus Vaccine Vector against Dengue Virus in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Georg F; Magnani, Diogo M; Ricciardi, Michael; Shin, Young C; Domingues, Aline; Bailey, Varian K; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Rakasz, Eva G; Watkins, David I; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2017-08-15

    Research on vaccine approaches that can provide long-term protection against dengue virus infection is needed. Here we describe the construction, immunogenicity, and preliminary information on the protective capacity of recombinant, replication-competent rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a persisting herpesvirus. One RRV construct expressed nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), while a second recombinant expressed a soluble variant of the E protein (E85) of dengue virus 2 (DENV2). Four rhesus macaques received a single vaccination with a mixture of both recombinant RRVs and were subsequently challenged 19 weeks later with 1 × 10 5 PFU of DENV2. During the vaccine phase, plasma of all vaccinated monkeys showed neutralizing activity against DENV2. Cellular immune responses against NS5 were also elicited, as evidenced by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) tetramer staining in the one vaccinated monkey that was Mamu-A*01 positive. Unlike two of two unvaccinated controls, two of the four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA sequences in plasma after challenge. One of these two monkeys also showed no anamnestic increases in antibody levels following challenge and thus appeared to be protected against the acquisition of DENV2 following high-dose challenge. Continued study will be needed to evaluate the performance of herpesviral and other persisting vectors for achieving long-term protection against dengue virus infection. IMPORTANCE Continuing studies of vaccine approaches against dengue virus (DENV) infection are warranted, particularly ones that may provide long-term immunity against all four serotypes. Here we investigated whether recombinant rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) could be used as a vaccine against DENV2 infection in rhesus monkeys. Upon vaccination, all animals generated antibodies capable of neutralizing DENV2. Two of four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA after subsequent high-dose DENV2 challenge at 19 weeks

  4. Mental transformations of spatial stimuli in humans and in monkeys: rotation vs. translocation.

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    Nekovarova, Tereza; Nedvidek, Jan; Klement, Daniel; Rokyta, Richard; Bures, Jan

    2013-03-01

    We studied the ability of monkeys and humans to orient in one spatial frame ("response frame") according to abstract spatial stimuli presented in another spatial frame ("stimulus frame"). The stimuli were designed as simple maps of the "response space". We studied how the transformations of these stimuli affected the performance. The subjects were trained to choose a particular position in the response frame - either on a touch screen (monkeys) or on a keyboard (humans) - according to schematic spatial stimuli presented on the stimulus screen. The monkeys responded by touching one of four circles shown in corners of a rectangle displayed on the touch screen. The correct position was signaled by the stimulus ("map") presented on the stimulus screen. The map was a complementary rectangle, but only with one circle shown ("pointer"). The position of this circle indicated the correct position in the response frame. In the first experiment we only manipulated stimuli presented on the computer screen. The "map" was originally shown in the same position and orientation as the "response pattern" but later the position and the rotation of the map on the screen were changing. Such transformations of the stimuli allow us to study the mental operations that the animals performed and how particular mental transformations mutually differed. In the second experiment we tested whether the monkeys relied more on stimuli presented on the screen or on the surrounding stable environment and objects. We compared the performance of animals in tasks with rotated virtual maps in a stable surrounding environment with the performance in tasks where we rotated the surrounding frame (computer monitor), whereas the stimuli on the screen remained stable. In the third experiment we tested human subjects in analogous tests to compare the ability and cognitive strategies of monkeys and humans in this task. We showed that the mental strategies that monkeys used for orientation in one spatial frame

  5. The Effects of Simultaneous Dual Focus Lenses on Refractive Development in Infant Monkeys

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    Arumugam, Baskar; Hung, Li-Fang; To, Chi-ho; Holden, Brien; Smith, Earl L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the effects of two simultaneously imposed, competing focal planes on refractive development in monkeys. Methods. Starting at 3 weeks of age and continuing until 150 ± 4 days of age, rhesus monkeys were reared with binocular dual-focus spectacle lenses. The treatment lenses had central 2-mm zones of zero power and concentric annular zones with alternating powers of +3.0 diopter [D] and plano (pL or 0 D) (n = 7; +3D/pL) or −3.0 D and plano (n = 7; −3D/pL). Retinoscopy, keratometry, and A-scan ultrasonography were performed every 2 weeks throughout the treatment period. For comparison purposes data were obtained from monkeys reared with full field (FF) +3.0 (n = 4) or −3.0 D (n = 5) lenses over both eyes and 33 control animals reared with unrestricted vision. Results. The +3 D/pL lenses slowed eye growth resulting in hyperopic refractive errors that were similar to those produced by FF+3 D lenses (+3 D/pL = +5.25 D, FF +3 D = +4.63 D; P = 0.32), but significantly more hyperopic than those observed in control monkeys (+2.50 D, P = 0.0001). One −3 D/pL monkey developed compensating axial myopia; however, in the other −3 D/pL monkeys refractive development was dominated by the zero-powered portions of the treatment lenses. The refractive errors for the −3 D/pL monkeys were more hyperopic than those in the FF −3 D monkeys (−3 D/pL = +3.13 D, FF −3D = −1.69 D; P = 0.01), but similar to those in control animals (P = 0.15). Conclusions. In the monkeys treated with dual-focus lenses, refractive development was dominated by the more anterior (i.e., relatively myopic) image plane. The results indicate that imposing relative myopic defocus over a large proportion of the retina is an effective means for slowing ocular growth. PMID:25324283

  6. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

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    Chenggu Cai

    Full Text Available Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2 and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3. Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  7. Monkeys Wait to Begin a Computer Task when Waiting Makes Their Responses More Effective

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    Theodore A. Evans

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella performed a computerized inhibitory control task modeled after an “escalating interest task” from a recent human study (Young, Webb, & Jacobs, 2011. In the original study, which utilized a first-person shooter game, human participants learned to inhibit firing their simulated weapon long enough for the weapon‟s damage potential to grow in effectiveness (up to 10 seconds in duration. In the present study, monkeys earned food pellets for eliminating arrays of target objects using a digital eraser. We assessed whether monkeys could suppress trial-initiating joystick movements long enough for the eraser to grow in size and speed, thereby making their eventual responses more effective. Monkeys of both species learned to inhibit moving the eraser for as long as 10 seconds, and they allowed the eraser to grow larger for successively larger target arrays. This study demonstrates an interesting parallel in behavioral inhibition between human and nonhuman participants and provides a method for future comparative testing of human and nonhuman test groups.

  8. Age-dependent decreases of calcium, phosphorus, sulfur, and zinc in the cardiac valves of monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menetti, Federico; Tohno, Setsuko; Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Azuma, Cho; Moriwake, Yumi; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Minami, Takeshi; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Oishi, Takao; Hayashi, Motoharu

    2005-09-01

    To elucidate compositional changes of the cardiac valves in monkey with aging, the authors investigated age-related changes of elements in the four cardiac valves of rhesus and Japanese monkeys and the relationships among elements by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The four cardiac valves of the aortic, pulmonary, mitral, and tricuspid valves were resected from 19 rhesus and 11 Japanese monkeys, ranging in age from 10 d to 33 yr. The element contents were determined by ICP-AES. It was found that the Ca, P, S, and Zn contents were high in the four cardiac valves of the monkeys below 1 yr and thereafter decreased significantly with aging, except for Ca in the mitral valve, for which no significant correlation was found between age and Ca content. The Ca and P contents did not increase in the four cardiac valves at old age. This result revealed that calcification scarcely occurred in the four cardiac valves at old age. With regard to the relationships among elements, it was found that there were significant direct correlations among the Ca, P, S, and Zn contents in all of the four cardiac valves of the monkeys, with two exceptions between P and Zn contents in both the aortic and pulmonary valves. Therefore, as Ca decreased in the four cardiac valves, P, S, and Zn decreased simultaneously in the same cardiac valves.

  9. Ventilatory effects of negative GABA(A) modulators in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; Estupinan, L E; France, C P

    1998-12-01

    This study examined changes in ventilation produced by negative gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) modulators in rhesus monkeys. The effects of Ro 15-4513, beta-CCE and beta-CCM were examined in four rhesus monkeys breathing air or 5% CO2 in air. When monkeys breathed CO2, minute volume (VE) and frequency (f) increased, on average, to 158 and 140% of control (air), respectively. Ro 15-4513 did not modify ventilation in monkeys breathing either gas mixture; however, beta-CCE and beta-CCM increased VE and f in monkeys breathing air to between 123 and 141% of control and had no effect on ventilation of 5% CO2. Increased ventilation produced by the negative GABA(A) modulators appeared to be maximal, because ventilation was not further enhanced when the dose was increased three-fold. Each of the three negative GABA(A) modulators reversed the decreases in ventilation produced by diazepam, suggesting that these drugs are acting at benzodiazepine receptors; however, the increased ventilation produced by beta-CCE and beta-CCM might suggest that they have more negative efficacy than Ro 15-4513. These data extend previous findings by showing that some negative GABA(A) modulators (Ro 15-4513) do not alter ventilation and further indicate that changes in ventilation can be used to evaluate efficacy differences among GABA(A) modulators.

  10. Discriminative-stimulus effects of triazolam and midazolam in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelas, S; Gerak, L R; France, C P

    1999-02-01

    The present study characterized the discriminative-stimulus effects of triazolam and midazolam in rhesus monkeys. Six monkeys discriminated 0.1 mg/kg of triazolam from vehicle under a fixed-ratio 5 (FR 5) schedule of stimulus-shock termination (SST). Four monkeys subsequently discriminated 0.56 mg/kg of midazolam from vehicle under the same schedule of reinforcement. Benzodiazepine (BDZ) agonists midazolam and diazepam, and the barbiturate pentobarbital, substituted for triazolam, and the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine did not. Triazolam, diazepam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, as well as the barbiturates amobarbital and pentobarbital, substituted for midazolam, and ketamine did not. The BDZ antagonist flumazenil antagonized both the triazolam and midazolam discriminative stimuli. Bretazenil, a low-efficacy BDZ agonist, did not substitute for the midazolam discriminative stimulus in three of the monkeys and shifted the midazolam dose-effect curve to the right; in a fourth monkey, bretazenil substituted for midazolam and shifted the midazolam dose-effect curve to the left. Schild analyses with flumazenil or bretazenil, in combination with midazolam, yielded slopes that deviated significantly from unity. While clearly supporting the notion that BDZ agonists produce stimulus effects by acting at the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABA(A)) receptor complex, these data also suggest that the discriminative-stimulus effects of midazolam might be mediated by more than one BDZ receptor subtype.

  11. Functional disruption of the dystrophin gene in rhesus monkey using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongchang; Zheng, Yinghui; Kang, Yu; Yang, Weili; Niu, Yuyu; Guo, Xiangyu; Tu, Zhuchi; Si, Chenyang; Wang, Hong; Xing, Ruxiao; Pu, Xiuqiong; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Li, Shihua; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been used to genetically modify genomes in a variety of species, including non-human primates. Unfortunately, this new technology does cause mosaic mutations, and we do not yet know whether such mutations can functionally disrupt the targeted gene or cause the pathology seen in human disease. Addressing these issues is necessary if we are to generate large animal models of human diseases using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to target the monkey dystrophin gene to create mutations that lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy. Examination of the relative targeting rate revealed that Crispr/Cas9 targeting could lead to mosaic mutations in up to 87% of the dystrophin alleles in monkey muscle. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9 induced mutations in both male and female monkeys, with the markedly depleted dystrophin and muscle degeneration seen in early DMD. Our findings indicate that CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently generate monkey models of human diseases, regardless of inheritance patterns. The presence of degenerated muscle cells in newborn Cas9-targeted monkeys suggests that therapeutic interventions at the early disease stage may be effective at alleviating the myopathy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Rhesus monkeys show human-like changes in gaze following across the lifespan.

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    Rosati, Alexandra G; Arre, Alyssa M; Platt, Michael L; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-05-11

    Gaze following, or co-orienting with others, is a foundational skill for human social behaviour. The emergence of this capacity scaffolds critical human-specific abilities such as theory of mind and language. Non-human primates also follow others' gaze, but less is known about how the cognitive mechanisms supporting this behaviour develop over the lifespan. Here we experimentally tested gaze following in 481 semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) ranging from infancy to old age. We found that monkeys began to follow gaze in infancy and this response peaked in the juvenile period-suggesting that younger monkeys were especially attuned to gaze information, like humans. After sexual maturity, monkeys exhibited human-like sex differences in gaze following, with adult females showing more gaze following than males. Finally, older monkeys showed reduced propensity to follow gaze, just as older humans do. In a second study (n = 80), we confirmed that macaques exhibit similar baseline rates of looking upwards in a control condition, regardless of age. Our findings indicate that-despite important differences in human and non-human primate life-history characteristics and typical social experiences-monkeys undergo robust ontogenetic shifts in gaze following across early development, adulthood and ageing that are strikingly similar to those of humans. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Physical Features of Visual Images Affect Macaque Monkey's Preference for These Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    Animals exhibit different degrees of preference toward various visual stimuli. In addition, it has been shown that strongly preferred stimuli can often act as a reward. The aim of the present study was to determine what features determine the strength of the preference for visual stimuli in order to examine neural mechanisms of preference judgment. We used 50 color photographs obtained from the Flickr Material Database (FMD) as original stimuli. Four macaque monkeys performed a simple choice task, in which two stimuli selected randomly from among the 50 stimuli were simultaneously presented on a monitor and monkeys were required to choose either stimulus by eye movements. We considered that the monkeys preferred the chosen stimulus if it continued to look at the stimulus for an additional 6 s and calculated a choice ratio for each stimulus. Each monkey exhibited a different choice ratio for each of the original 50 stimuli. They tended to select clear, colorful and in-focus stimuli. Complexity and clarity were stronger determinants of preference than colorfulness. Images that included greater amounts of spatial frequency components were selected more frequently. These results indicate that particular physical features of the stimulus can affect the strength of a monkey's preference and that the complexity, clarity and colorfulness of the stimulus are important determinants of this preference. Neurophysiological studies would be needed to examine whether these features of visual stimuli produce more activation in neurons that participate in this preference judgment.

  14. Comparative analysis of field-isolate and monkey-adapted Plasmodium vivax genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest R Chan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant insights into the biology of Plasmodium vivax have been gained from the ability to successfully adapt human infections to non-human primates. P. vivax strains grown in monkeys serve as a renewable source of parasites for in vitro and ex vivo experimental studies and functional assays, or for studying in vivo the relapse characteristics, mosquito species compatibilities, drug susceptibility profiles or immune responses towards potential vaccine candidates. Despite the importance of these studies, little is known as to how adaptation to a different host species may influence the genome of P. vivax. In addition, it is unclear whether these monkey-adapted strains consist of a single clonal population of parasites or if they retain the multiclonal complexity commonly observed in field isolates. Here we compare the genome sequences of seven P. vivax strains adapted to New World monkeys with those of six human clinical isolates collected directly in the field. We show that the adaptation of P. vivax parasites to monkey hosts, and their subsequent propagation, did not result in significant modifications of their genome sequence and that these monkey-adapted strains recapitulate the genomic diversity of field isolates. Our analyses also reveal that these strains are not always genetically homogeneous and should be analyzed cautiously. Overall, our study provides a framework to better leverage this important research material and fully utilize this resource for improving our understanding of P. vivax biology.

  15. Learning by observation in the macaque monkey under high experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbaine, Faiçal; Demolliens, Marie; Belmalih, Abdelouahed; Brovelli, Andrea; Boussaoud, Driss

    2015-08-01

    While neuroscience research has tremendously advanced our knowledge about the neural mechanisms of individual learning, i.e. through trial-and-error, it is only recently that neuroscientists have begun to study observational learning, and thus little is known about its neural mechanisms. One limitation is that observational learning has been addressed under unconstrained experimental conditions, not compatible with neuronal recordings. This study examined observational learning in macaque monkeys under the constraining conditions of behavioral neurophysiology. Two animals sat in primate chairs facing each other, with their head fixed. A touch screen was placed face up between the chairs at arm's reach, and the monkeys were trained on an abstract visuomotor associative task. In one experiment, the monkeys alternated the roles of "actor" and "observer". The actor learned to associate visual cues with reaching targets, while the observer "watched" freely. Then, the observer was given the same cue-target associations just performed by the actor, or had to learn new, not previously observed ones. The results show that learning performance is better after observation. In experiment 2, one monkey learned from a human actor who performed the task with errors only, or with successes only in separate blocks. The monkey's gain in performance was higher after observation of errors than after successes. The findings suggest that observational learning can occur even under highly constraining conditions, and open the way for investigating the neuronal correlates of social learning using the methods of behavioral neurophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) show robust evidence for memory awareness across multiple generalization tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, Victoria L; Hampton, Robert R

    2012-05-01

    The possibility that memory awareness occurs in nonhuman animals has been evaluated by providing opportunity to decline memory tests. Current evidence suggests that rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) selectively decline tests when memory is weak (Hampton in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98:5359-5362, 2001; Smith et al. in Behav Brain Sci 26:317-374, 2003). However, much of the existing research in nonhuman metacognition is subject to the criticism that, after considerable training on one test type, subjects learn to decline difficult trials based on associative learning of external test-specific contingencies rather than by evaluating the private status of memory or other cognitive states. We evaluated whether such test-specific associations could account for performance by presenting monkeys with a series of generalization tests across which no single association with external stimuli was likely to adaptively control use of the decline response. Six monkeys performed a four alternative delayed matching to location task and were significantly more accurate on trials with a decline option available than on trials without it, indicating that subjects selectively declined tests when memory was weak. Monkeys transferred appropriate use of the decline response under three conditions that assessed generalization: two tests that weakened memory and one test that enhanced memory in a novel way. Bidirectional generalization indicates that use of the decline response by monkeys is not controlled by specific external stimuli but is rather a flexible behavior based on a private assessment of memory.

  17. Capuchin Monkeys Alternate Play and Reward in a Dual Computerized Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. Parrish

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many animals cooperate with one another to achieve outcomes that they could not obtain on their own. One form of cooperation that has received much attention but little empirical support from experimental studies is reciprocity, leaving open the question of whether animals will work to provide benefits to others. Although there is some evidence of reciprocal behavior in animals, early work in macaque monkeys showed that while they would initially work to pay another individual (who could then return the favor, they ceased doing so over time. Here, we extended this investigation of reciprocity to capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella, a species known for cooperating and providing each other with rewards in other contexts. We investigated whether capuchin monkeys would engage in a dual computer task that required alternating work by two animals, such that food rewards earned by one individual were delivered to the partner. Unlike previous research, capuchin monkeys sustained work on the task when their actions benefited only another monkey, even with progressively longer delays between the subject’s actions that rewarded the partner and the partner’s subsequent actions that rewarded the subject. A separate question was the degree to which subjects understood their actions as social. We assessed whether subjects’ behaviors were influenced by the presence or absence of a partner. Subjects behaved differently in the two conditions, indicating that future research investigating what subjects understand about their partners is warranted.

  18. Testicular Fibrous Hypoplasia in Cynomolgus Monkeys ( Macaca fascicularis): An Incidental, Congenital Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Bacares, Marcia E; Vemireddi, Vimala; Creasy, Dianne

    2017-06-01

    Testicular fibrous hypoplasia is an incidental lesion characterized by replacement of the testicular parenchyma by mature collagen. A retrospective survey of hematoxylin and eosin-stained testicular sections from 722 purpose-bred Asian and 90 Mauritian cynomolgus monkeys from 56 safety assessment studies conducted between 1999 and 2011 was performed. The incidence of the lesion increased markedly over time. No cases occurred between 1999 and 2004. Between 2005 and 2009, the incidence ranged between 8.1% and 11.0% of the monkeys examined and then rose to 26.1% in 2010 and 30.9% in 2011. Overall, the lesion was identified in 10.94% of Asian monkeys with the highest incidence in animals originating from China and Vietnam; severity ranged from minimal to severe and it occurred unilaterally (38.5%) and bilaterally (61.5%). In Mauritian monkeys, the lesion was predominantly minimal in severity, bilateral in distribution, and affected 6.6% of the animals examined. The lesion occurred regardless of sexual maturation status but when present in mature monkeys was often associated with cystic tubular atrophy of the seminiferous epithelium. Based on the morphological characteristics of the lesion and the unilateral/bilateral distribution, the lesion is considered to be a congenital or developmental abnormality.

  19. Owl monkey CCR5 reveals synergism between CD4 and CCR5 in HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahabedian, John; Sharma, Amit; Kaczmarek, Maryska E; Wilkerson, Greg K; Sawyer, Sara L; Overbaugh, Julie

    2017-12-01

    Studying HIV-1 replication in the presence of functionally related proteins from different species has helped define host determinants of HIV-1 infection. Humans and owl monkeys, but not macaques, encode a CD4 receptor that permits entry of transmissible HIV-1 variants due to a single residue difference. However, little is known about whether divergent CCR5 receptor proteins act as determinants of host-range. Here we show that both owl monkey (Aotus vociferans) CD4 and CCR5 receptors are functional for the entry of transmitted HIV-1 when paired with human versions of the other receptor. By contrast, the owl monkey CD4/CCR5 pair is generally a suboptimal receptor combination, although there is virus-specific variation in infection with owl monkey receptors. Introduction of the human residues 15Y and 16T within a sulfation motif into owl monkey CCR5 resulted in a gain of function. These findings suggest there is cross-talk between CD4 and CCR5 involving the sulfation motif. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Subsecond timing in primates: comparison of interval production between human subjects and rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco, Wilbert; Merchant, Hugo; Prado, Luis; Mendez, Juan Carlos

    2009-12-01

    This study describes the psychometric similarities and differences in motor timing performance between 20 human subjects and three rhesus monkeys during two timing production tasks. These tasks involved tapping on a push-button to produce the same set of intervals (range of 450 to 1,000 ms), but they differed in the number of intervals produced (single vs. multiple) and the modality of the stimuli (auditory vs. visual) used to define the time intervals. The data showed that for both primate species, variability increased as a function of the length of the produced target interval across tasks, a result in accordance with the scalar property. Interestingly, the temporal performance of rhesus monkeys was equivalent to that of human subjects during both the production of single intervals and the tapping synchronization to a metronome. Overall, however, human subjects were more accurate than monkeys and showed less timing variability. This was especially true during the self-pacing phase of the multiple interval production task, a behavior that may be related to complex temporal cognition, such as speech and music execution. In addition, the well-known human bias toward auditory as opposed to visual cues for the accurate execution of time intervals was not evident in rhesus monkeys. These findings validate the rhesus monkey as an appropriate model for the study of the neural basis of time production, but also suggest that the exquisite temporal abilities of humans, which peak in speech and music performance, are not all shared with macaques.

  1. Prefrontal neurons represent winning and losing during competitive video shooting games between monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Masataka

    2012-05-30

    Humans and animals must work to support their survival and reproductive needs. Because resources are limited in the natural environment, competition is inevitable, and competing successfully is vitally important. However, the neuronal mechanisms of competitive behavior are poorly studied. We examined whether neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) showed response sensitivity related to a competitive game. In this study, monkeys played a video shooting game, either competing with another monkey or the computer, or playing alone without a rival. Monkeys performed more quickly and more accurately in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games, indicating that they were more motivated in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games. LPFC neurons showed differential activity between the competitive and noncompetitive games showing winning- and losing-related activity. Furthermore, activities of prefrontal neurons differed depending on whether the competition was between monkeys or between the monkey and the computer. These results indicate that LPFC neurons may play an important role in monitoring the outcome of competition and enabling animals to adapt their behavior to increase their chances of obtaining a reward in a socially interactive environment.

  2. Rimonabant-Induced Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Withdrawal in Rhesus Monkeys: Discriminative Stimulus Effects and Other Withdrawal Signs

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; McMahon, Lance R.

    2010-01-01

    Marijuana-dependent individuals report using marijuana to alleviate withdrawal, suggesting that pharmacotherapy of marijuana withdrawal could promote abstinence. To identify potential pharmacotherapies for marijuana withdrawal, this study first characterized rimonabant-induced Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) withdrawal in rhesus monkeys by using drug discrimination and directly observable signs. Second, drugs were examined for their capacity to modify cannabinoid withdrawal. Monkeys receivin...

  3. Induced Neurocysticercosis in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta Produces Clinical Signs and Lesions Similar to Natural Disease in Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a serious endemic zoonosis resulting in increased cases of seizure and epilepsy in humans. The genesis of clinical manifestations of the disease through experimental animal models is poorly exploited. The monkeys may prove useful for the purpose due to their behavior and cognitive responses mimicking man. In this study, neurocysticercosis was induced in two rhesus monkeys each with 12,000 and 6,000 eggs, whereas three monkeys were given placebo. The monkeys given higher dose developed hyperexcitability, epileptic seizures, muscular tremors, digital cramps at 10 DPI, and finally paralysis of limbs, followed by death on 67 DPI, whereas the monkeys given lower dose showed delayed and milder clinical signs. On necropsy, all the infected monkeys showed numerous cysticerci in the brain. Histopathologically, heavily infected monkeys revealed liquefactive necrosis and formation of irregular cystic cavities lined by atrophied parenchymal septa with remnants of neuropil of the cerebrum. In contrast, the monkeys infected with lower dose showed formation of typical foreign body granulomas characterized by central liquefaction surrounded by chronic inflammatory response. It was concluded that the inflammatory and immune response exerted by the host against cysticerci, in turn, led to histopathological lesions and the resultant clinical signs thereof.

  4. Habitat preferences, diet, feeding strategy and social organization of the black spider monkey (Ateles paniscus paniscus Linnaeus 1758) in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosmalen, van M.G.M.

    1980-01-01

    This study describes habitat choice of the Surinam black spider monkey ( Atelespaniscuspaniscus ) and clarifies complex temporal and spatial effects of food sources on the behaviour of a group of spider monkeys in a 350 ha study area in

  5. Prevention of capsule opacification after accommodating lens refilling : Pilot study of strategies evaluated in a monkey model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Steven A.; Terwee, Thom; Hanssen, Alex; Martin, Heiner; Langner, Soenke; Stachs, Oliver; van Kooten, Theo G.

    PURPOSE: To test 2 strategies to prevent capsule opacification after accommodating lens refilling in a rhesus monkey model. SETTING: Animal laboratory and laboratory of European university medical centers. DESIGN: Experimental study. METHODS: Six rhesus monkeys had refilling of the lens capsular

  6. Empty Sets as Part of the Numerical Continuum: Conceptual Precursors to the Zero Concept in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Dustin J.; Rugani, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current research was to explore whether monkeys possess conceptual precursors necessary for understanding zero. We trained rhesus monkeys on a nonsymbolic numerical matching-to-sample task, and on a numerical ordering task. We then introduced nondifferentially reinforced trials that contained empty sets to determine whether monkeys…

  7. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  8. Anatomical and radiographic appearance of the capuchin monkey thoracic cavity (Cebus apella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio R. Alves

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The capuchin monkey is widespread both north and south of the Legal Amazon and in the Brazilian cerrado. Ten clinically healthy capuchin monkeys were submitted to an anatomical and radiographic study of their thoracic cavities. The radiographic evaluation allowed the description of biometric values associated with the cardiac silhouette and thoracic structures. Application of the VHS (vertebral heart size method showed positive correlation (P<0.05 with depth of the thoracic cavity, as well as between the body length of vertebrae T3, T4, T5 and T6 and the cardiac length and width. The lung fields showed a diffuse interstitial pattern, more visible in the caudal lung lobes and a bronchial pattern in the middle and cranial lung lobes. The radiographic examination allowed preliminary inferences to be made concerning the syntopy of the thoracic structures and modification of the pulmonary patterns and cardiac anatomy for the capuchin monkey.

  9. The monkey selfie: copyright lessons for originality in photographs and internet jurisdiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Guadamuz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, a macaque monkey used a camera belonging to British photographer David Slater in Indonesia to take a self-portrait. The selfie picture became famous worldwide after it was published in the British media. In 2014 Slater sent a removal request to Wikimedia Commons, which indicated that the picture was in the public domain because it had been taken by the monkey and animals cannot own copyright works. While most of the legal analysis so far has been centred around US law, this article takes a completely different approach. Re-assessing jurisdictional issues, I examine the case from a UK and European perspective. The monkey selfie is of importance to internet policy: it has a lot to teach us about online jurisdiction. Under current originality rules, David Slater has a good copyright claim for ownership of the picture.

  10. The Signature of Maternal Social Rank in Placenta Deoxyribonucleic Acid Methylation Profiles in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Renaud; Suderman, Matthew J; Nemoda, Zsofia; Sutti, Sheila; Ruggiero, Angela M; Dettmer, Amanda M; Suomi, Stephen J; Szyf, Moshe

    2017-05-01

    The effects of social status on human health can be modeled in captive cohorts of nonhuman primates. This study shows that maternal social rank is associated with broad changes in DNA methylation in placentae of rhesus monkeys (N = 10). Differentially methylated genes between social ranks are enriched in signaling pathways playing major roles in placenta physiology. Moreover, the authors found significant overlaps with genes whose expression was previously associated with social rank in adult rhesus monkeys (Tung et al., 2012) and whose methylation was associated with perinatal stress in newborn humans and rhesus monkeys (Nieratschker et al., 2014). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that system-wide epigenetic changes in multiple tissues are involved in long-term adaptations to the social environment. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P endocrine system were similar to the effects of chairing on the ground, but were more pronounced. Reduced intestinal calcium absorption, losses in body weight, increases in cortisol, and higher postflight blood urea nitrogen were the changes in flight monkeys that distinguished them from the flight simulation study animals.

  12. Viscoelastic Characterization of Peripapillary Sclera: Material Properties by Quadrant in Rabbit and Monkey Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, J. Crawford; Suh, J-K. Francis; Thomas, Kevin A.; Bellezza, Anthony J.; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Hart, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    In this report we characterize the viscoelastic material properties of peripapillary sclera from the four quadrants surrounding the optic nerve head in both rabbit and monkey eyes. Scleral tensile specimens harvested from each quadrant were subjected to uniaxial stress relaxation and tensile ramp to failure tests. Linear viscoelastic theory, coupled with a spectral reduced relaxation function, was employed to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the tissues. We detected no differences in the stress-strain curves of specimens from the four quadrants surrounding the optic nerve head (ONH) below a strain of 4 percent in either the rabbit or monkey. While the peripapillary sclera from monkey eyes is significantly stiffer (both instantaneously and in equilibrium) and relaxes more slowly than that from rabbits, we detected no differences in the viscoelastic material properties (tested at strains of 0–1 percent) of sclera from the four quadrants surrounding the ONH within either species group. PMID:12661206

  13. Protective Efficacy of Adenovirus/Protein Vaccines Against SIV Challenges in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Brown, Eric P.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Smith, Kaitlin M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Liu, Jinyan; Shields, Jennifer; Parenteau, Lily; Whitney, James B.; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Lavine, Christy L.; Perry, James R.; Li, Wenjun; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Lewis, Mark G.; Chen, Bing; Wenschuh, Holger; Reimer, Ulf; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Handley, Scott A.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Lorin, Clarisse; Voss, Gerald; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies of viral vector-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates have previously shown partial protection against stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vector priming followed by boosting with a purified envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Rhesus monkeys primed with Ad26 vectors expressing SIVsmE543 Env/Gag/Pol antigens and boosted with AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H Env gp140 demonstrated complete protection in 50% of vaccinated animals against a series of repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SIVmac251 challenges that infected all controls. Protective efficacy correlated with the functionality of Env-specific antibody responses. Comparable protection was also observed with a similar Ad/Env vaccine against repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. These data demonstrate robust protection by Ad/Env vaccines against acquisition of stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. PMID:26138104

  14. Polymorphic New World monkeys with more than three M/L cone types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H.; Deegan, Jess F.

    2005-10-01

    Most New World (platyrrhine) monkeys have M/L cone photopigment polymorphisms that map directly into individual variations in visual sensitivity and color vision. We used electroretinogram flicker photometry to examine M/L cone photopigments in the New World monkey Callicebus moloch (the dusky Titi). Like other New World monkeys, this species has an M/L cone photopigment polymorphism that reflects the presence of X-chromosome opsin gene alleles. However, unlike other platyrrhines in which three M/L photopigments are typical, Callicebus has a total of five M/L cone photopigments. The peak sensitivity values for these pigments extend across the range from 530 to 562 nm. The result is an enhanced array of potential color vision phenotypes in this species.

  15. Third-party social evaluations of humans by monkeys and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R; Bucher, Benoit; Chijiiwa, Hitomi; Kuroshima, Hika; Takimoto, Ayaka; Fujita, Kazuo

    2017-11-01

    Developmental psychologists are increasingly interested in young children's evaluations of individuals based on third-party interactions. Studies have shown that infants react negatively to agents who display harmful intentions toward others, and to those who behave unfairly. We describe experimental studies of capuchin monkeys' and pet dogs' differential reactions to people who are helpful or unhelpful in third-party contexts, and monkeys' responses to people who behave unfairly in exchanges of objects with a third party. We also present evidence that capuchin monkeys monitor the context of failures to help and violations of reciprocity, and that intentionality is one factor underlying their social evaluations of individuals whom they see interacting with others. We conclude by proposing some questions for studies of nonhuman species' third party-based social evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. STUDIES ON ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS PRODUCED EXPERIMENTALLY IN RHESUS MONKEYS. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Elvin A.; Wolf, Abner; Bezer, Ada E.

    1948-01-01

    The factor in brain tissue which induces acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, when injected into rhesus monkeys as an emulsion with adjuvants, has been found in human, monkey, rabbit, and chicken brain but is absent from frog and fish brain. It is unaffected by fixation of the brain in formalin, by boiling, and by treatment with ultrasound. It is present in the spinal cord of 3 day old rabbits but does not appear in the rabbit cerebrum until about the 12th day of life; in this respect it parallels the laying down of myelin. Attempts to produce the encephalomyelitis passively with large quantities of serum or of cell exudates, and suspensions of cells from spleen and lymph node from monkeys with encephalomyelitis, were unsuccessful. PMID:18884901

  17. Retropositional events consolidate the branching order among New World monkey genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterholz, Martin; Walter, Lutz; Roos, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Due to contradicting relationships obtained from various morphological and genetic studies, phylogenetic relationships among New World monkey genera are highly disputed. In the present study, we analyzed the presence/absence pattern of 128 SINE integrations in all New World monkey genera. Among them, 70 were specific for only a single genus, whereas another 18 were present in all New World monkey genera. The 40 remaining insertions were informative to elucidate phylogenetic relationships among genera. Several of them confirmed the monophyly of the three families Cebidae, Atelidae and Pitheciidae as well as of the subfamily Callithrichinae. Further markers provided evidence for a sister grouping of Cebidae and Atelidae to the exclusion of Pitheciidae as well as for relationships among genera belonging to Callithrichinae and Atelidae. Although a close affiliation of Saimiri, Aotus and Cebus to Callithrichinae was shown, the relationships among the three genera remained unresolved due to three contradicting insertions.

  18. Nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA: evidence for hybridization in colobine monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziegler Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colobine monkeys constitute a diverse group of primates with major radiations in Africa and Asia. However, phylogenetic relationships among genera are under debate, and recent molecular studies with incomplete taxon-sampling revealed discordant gene trees. To solve the evolutionary history of colobine genera and to determine causes for possible gene tree incongruences, we combined presence/absence analysis of mobile elements with autosomal, X chromosomal, Y chromosomal and mitochondrial sequence data from all recognized colobine genera. Results Gene tree topologies and divergence age estimates derived from different markers were similar, but differed in placing Piliocolobus/Procolobus and langur genera among colobines. Although insufficient data, homoplasy and incomplete lineage sorting might all have contributed to the discordance among gene trees, hybridization is favored as the main cause of the observed discordance. We propose that African colobines are paraphyletic, but might later have experienced female introgression from Piliocolobus/Procolobus into Colobus. In the late Miocene, colobines invaded Eurasia and diversified into several lineages. Among Asian colobines, Semnopithecus diverged first, indicating langur paraphyly. However, unidirectional gene flow from Semnopithecus into Trachypithecus via male introgression followed by nuclear swamping might have occurred until the earliest Pleistocene. Conclusions Overall, our study provides the most comprehensive view on colobine evolution to date and emphasizes that analyses of various molecular markers, such as mobile elements and sequence data from multiple loci, are crucial to better understand evolutionary relationships and to trace hybridization events. Our results also suggest that sex-specific dispersal patterns, promoted by a respective social organization of the species involved, can result in different hybridization scenarios.

  19. Monkeys benefit from reciprocity without the cognitive burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchak, Malini; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2012-01-01

    The debate about the origins of human prosociality has focused on the presence or absence of similar tendencies in other species, and, recently, attention has turned to the underlying mechanisms. We investigated whether direct reciprocity could promote prosocial behavior in brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). Twelve capuchins tested in pairs could choose between two tokens, with one being “prosocial” in that it rewarded both individuals (i.e., 1/1), and the other being “selfish” in that it rewarded the chooser only (i.e., 1/0). Each monkey’s choices with a familiar partner from their own group was compared with choices when paired with a partner from a different group. Capuchins were spontaneously prosocial, selecting the prosocial option at the same rate regardless of whether they were paired with an in-group or out-group partner. This indicates that interaction outside of the experimental setting played no role. When the paradigm was changed, such that both partners alternated making choices, prosocial preference significantly increased, leading to mutualistic payoffs. As no contingency could be detected between an individual’s choice and their partner’s previous choice, and choices occurred in rapid succession, reciprocity seemed of a relatively vague nature akin to mutualism. Having the partner receive a better reward than the chooser (i.e., 1/2) during the alternating condition increased the payoffs of mutual prosociality, and prosocial choice increased accordingly. The outcome of several controls made it hard to explain these results on the basis of reward distribution or learned preferences, and rather suggested that joint action promotes prosociality, resulting in so-called attitudinal reciprocity. PMID:22949668

  20. Metatarsal torsion in monkeys, apes, humans and australopiths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Michelle S M; Harmon, Elizabeth H

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of metatarsal torsion in apes, cercopithecoids and humans, compares australopiths with these species, and discusses their inferred foot morphology and function relative to prehensility, arboreality and the presence or absence of a longitudinal arch. Our results show that locomotor modes are reflected in metatarsal torsion values. Apes, which climb vertically with their foot inverted, have hallucal metatarsal heads that are turned toward the other toes and lateral toes that are inverted. Cercopithecoids, which tend to orient their feet in an axis more parallel to the line of motion, present signs of prehensility by having inverted 2nd metatarsals that oppose the hallux, while their two lateral-most metatarsals are strongly everted. Humans, with their rigid feet and longitudinal arches, have all toes that present their plantar surface toward the ground, resulting in hallucal and 2nd metatarsals that are relatively untwisted and the others that are strongly everted. Humans are different from all taxa only for the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal. It is hypothesized that the untwisted 2nd metatarsal reflects the lack of digit opposability of the medial foot and the strongly everted 3rd metatarsal reflects the longitudinal arch. Australopithecus afarensis was characterized by an everted lateral foot, the prerequisite for the development, but not necessarily an indicator, of a longitudinal arch. In Australopithecus africanus, torsion of fragmentary and complete 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th metatarsals suggest that the species did not have a foot with monkey- or ape-like prehensile capabilities and did not have a human-like longitudinal arch. In the Swartkrans remains, torsion is consistent with an unprehensile foot. The morphology of the fossils indicates that there was strong selection to orient the plantar surface of the toes facing the ground at the expense of a grasping foot and inversion ability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Discriminative stimulus effects of pregnanolone in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroactive steroids and benzodiazepines can positively modulate GABA by acting at distinct binding sites on synaptic GABA(A) receptors. Although these receptors are thought to mediate the behavioral effects of both benzodiazepines and neuroactive steroids, other receptors (e.g., extrasynaptic GABA(A), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), σ₁, or 5-HT₃ receptors) might contribute to the effects of neuroactive steroids, accounting for differences among positive modulators. The current study established the neuroactive steroid pregnanolone as a discriminative stimulus to determine whether actions in addition to positive modulation of synaptic GABA(A) receptors might contribute to its discriminative stimulus effects. Four rhesus monkeys discriminated 5.6 mg/kg pregnanolone while responding under a fixed-ratio 10 schedule of stimulus-shock termination. Positive modulators acting at benzodiazepine, barbiturate, or neuroactive steroid sites produced ≥80 % pregnanolone-lever responding, whereas drugs acting primarily at receptors other than synaptic GABA(A) receptors, such as extrasynaptic GABA(A), NMDA, σ₁, and 5-HT₃ receptors, produced vehicle-lever responding. Flumazenil antagonized the benzodiazepines midazolam and flunitrazepam, with Schild analyses yielding slopes that did not deviate from unity and pA₂ values of 7.39 and 7.32, respectively. Flumazenil did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of pregnanolone. While these results do not exclude the possibility that pregnanolone acts at receptors other than synaptic GABA(A) receptors, they indicate a primary and possibly exclusive role of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in its discriminative stimulus effects. Reported differences in the effects of benzodiazepines and neuroactive steroids are not due to differences in their actions at synaptic GABA(A) receptors.

  2. MRI Overestimates Excitotoxic Amygdala Lesion Damage in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Basile

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective, fiber-sparing excitotoxic lesions are a state-of-the-art tool for determining the causal contributions of different brain areas to behavior. For nonhuman primates especially, it is advantageous to keep subjects with high-quality lesions alive and contributing to science for many years. However, this requires the ability to estimate lesion extent accurately. Previous research has shown that in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI accurately estimates damage following selective ibotenic acid lesions of the hippocampus. Here, we show that the same does not apply to lesions of the amygdala. Across 19 hemispheres from 13 rhesus monkeys, MRI assessment consistently overestimated amygdala damage as assessed by microscopic examination of Nissl-stained histological material. Two outliers suggested a linear relation for lower damage levels, and values of unintended amygdala damage from a previous study fell directly on that regression line, demonstrating that T2 hypersignal accurately predicts damage levels below 50%. For unintended damage, MRI estimates correlated with histological assessment for entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex and hippocampus, though MRI significantly overestimated the extent of that damage in all structures. Nevertheless, ibotenic acid injections routinely produced extensive intentional amygdala damage with minimal unintended damage to surrounding structures, validating the general success of the technique. The field will benefit from more research into in vivo lesion assessment techniques, and additional evaluation of the accuracy of MRI assessment in different brain areas. For now, in vivo MRI assessment of ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala can be used to confirm successful injections, but MRI estimates of lesion extent should be interpreted with caution.

  3. Levofloxacin Cures Experimental Pneumonic Plague in African Green Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jacob D.; Brasel, Trevor L.; Barr, Edward B.; Gigliotti, Andrew P.; Koster, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Background Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is considered a potential bioweapon due to rapid lethality when delivered as an aerosol. Levofloxacin was tested for primary pneumonic plague treatment in a nonhuman primate model mimicking human disease. Methods and Results Twenty-four African Green monkeys (AGMs, Chlorocebus aethiops) were challenged via head-only aerosol inhalation with 3–145 (mean = 65) 50% lethal (LD50) doses of Y. pestis strain CO92. Telemetered body temperature >39°C initiated intravenous infusions to seven 5% dextrose controls or 17 levofloxacin treated animals. Levofloxacin was administered as a “humanized” dose regimen of alternating 8 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg 30-min infusions every 24-h, continuing until animal death or 20 total infusions, followed by 14 days of observation. Fever appeared at 53–165 h and radiographs found multilobar pneumonia in all exposed animals. All control animals died of severe pneumonic plague within five days of aerosol exposure. All 16 animals infused with levofloxacin for 10 days survived. Levofloxacin treatment abolished bacteremia within 24 h in animals with confirmed pre-infusion bacteremia, and reduced tachypnea and leukocytosis but not fever during the first 2 days of infusions. Conclusion Levofloxacin cures established pneumonic plague when treatment is initiated after the onset of fever in the lethal aerosol-challenged AGM nonhuman primate model, and can be considered for treatment of other forms of plague. Levofloxacin may also be considered for primary presumptive-use, multi-agent antibiotic in bioterrorism events prior to identification of the pathogen. PMID:21347450

  4. Cranial shape variation in adult howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Luca; Bruner, Emiliano

    2017-12-05

    Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) display a distinctive cranial architecture characterized by airorhynchy (or retroflexion of the facial skeleton on the cranial base), a small braincase, and a posteriorly oriented foramen magnum. This configuration has been associated with distinct factors including a high folivory diet, locomotion, and the presence of a specialized vocal tract characterized by large hyoid bone. However, the morphological relationships between the facial and neurocranial blocks in Alouatta have been scarcely investigated. In this study we quantitatively analyzed the cranial shape variation in Alouatta seniculus, to evaluate possible influences and constraints in face and braincase associated with airorhynchy. We also considered the structural role of the pteric area within the cranial functional matrix. We applied landmark-based analysis and multivariate statistics to 31 adult crania, computing shape analyses based on 3D coordinates registration as well as the analysis of the Euclidean distance matrix to investigate patterns of intraspecific morphological variability. Our results suggest that allometry is the main source of variation involved in shaping cranial morphology in howlers, influencing the degree of facial proportions and braincase flattening, and generating the main sexual differences. Larger individuals are characterized by a higher degree of airorhynchy, neurocranial flattening, and expansion of the zygomatic arch. Allometric variations influence the skull as a whole, without distinct patterns for face and braincase, which behave as an integrated morphological unit. A preliminary survey on the pteric pattern suggests that the morphology of this area may be the result of variations in the vertical growth rates between face and braincase. Future studies should be dedicated to the ontogenetic series and focus on airorhynchy in terms of differential growth among distinct cranial districts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Levofloxacin cures experimental pneumonic plague in African green monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colby Layton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is considered a potential bioweapon due to rapid lethality when delivered as an aerosol. Levofloxacin was tested for primary pneumonic plague treatment in a nonhuman primate model mimicking human disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-four African Green monkeys (AGMs, Chlorocebus aethiops were challenged via head-only aerosol inhalation with 3-145 (mean = 65 50% lethal (LD(50 doses of Y. pestis strain CO92. Telemetered body temperature >39 °C initiated intravenous infusions to seven 5% dextrose controls or 17 levofloxacin treated animals. Levofloxacin was administered as a "humanized" dose regimen of alternating 8 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg 30-min infusions every 24-h, continuing until animal death or 20 total infusions, followed by 14 days of observation. Fever appeared at 53-165 h and radiographs found multilobar pneumonia in all exposed animals. All control animals died of severe pneumonic plague within five days of aerosol exposure. All 16 animals infused with levofloxacin for 10 days survived. Levofloxacin treatment abolished bacteremia within 24 h in animals with confirmed pre-infusion bacteremia, and reduced tachypnea and leukocytosis but not fever during the first 2 days of infusions. CONCLUSION: Levofloxacin cures established pneumonic plague when treatment is initiated after the onset of fever in the lethal aerosol-challenged AGM nonhuman primate model, and can be considered for treatment of other forms of plague. Levofloxacin may also be considered for primary presumptive-use, multi-agent antibiotic in bioterrorism events prior to identification of the pathogen.

  6. [Monkey malaria (Plasmodium knowlesi infection) after travelling to Thailand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroidl, Inge; Seilmaier, Michael; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Bretzel, Gisela; Wendtner, Clemens; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    A case of malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi is described in a 52-year-old female German traveler after returning from Thailand. P. knowlesi is a parasite of macaques in Southeast Asia and has been recognized in recent years as an important and probably increasing cause of human malaria in some areas. At least 16 cases in international travelers have been published so far. This includes four cases imported to Germany. All German patients visited forested areas in Southern Thailand inhabited by the natural monkey host prior to their illness. Most cases diagnosed in endemic areas present as mild disease. However in some patients P. knowlesi may take a severe and life-threatening course. Diagnosis is usually is based on microscopy whereas rapid tests are not reliable. However, microscopic differentiation of P. knowlesi from other plasmodium species (eg, P. malariae, P. falciparum) is difficult, especially when parasitemia is low. Thus PCR methods are required for definite species determination. Changing endemicity as well as changing tourism patterns such as the trend towards eco-tourism might increase the risk of infection for travelers even in areas which are considered as low endemic for malaria. Malaria has to be considered in all febrile patients returning from endemic areas. In Southeast Asia this has to include Plasmodium knowlesi infection. Especially if microscopy suggests P. falciparum/P. malariae double infection, or when results indicate P. malariae but the clinical presentation differs from that of quartan malaria (eg, daily fever), diagnostic procedures for P. knowlesi should be initiated. Currently available rapid diagnostic tests are not reliable for the detection of P. knowlesi. The definite diagnosis of P. knowlesi infection usually requires PCR techniques Changing tourism patterns such as the trend towards eco-tourism might increase the risk of infection for travelers even in low prevalence areas. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Memory T Cells Are Significantly Increased in Rejecting Liver Allografts of Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajung; Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Jin, Xue-Li; Kim, Tae Jin; Park, Chanho; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Hyo-Sin; Hong, Suk Kyun; Yoon, Kyung Chul; Ahn, Sung Woo; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Yang, Jaeseok; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2017-11-18

    The Rhesus monkey (RM) is an excellent preclinical model in kidney, heart and islet transplantation that has provided the basis for new immunosuppressive protocols for clinical studies. However, there remain relatively few liver transplantation (LT) models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we analyzed the immune cell populations of PBMCs and secondary lymphoid organs along with livers of normal rhesus monkeys and compared them to those of rejecting liver transplanted recipient's following withdrawal of immunosuppression. We undertook five allogeneic ABO compatible orthotopic LT in monkeys using five normal donor monkey livers. We collected tissues including lymph nodes, spleens, blood, recipient livers and performed flow cytometric analysis using isolated immune cells. We found that CD4 or CD8 naïve T cells were normally seen at low levels and memory T cells were seen at high levels in the liver rather than lymphoid organs or PBMC. However, regulatory cells such as CD4+FoxP-3(+)T cells and CD8+CD28- cells remained in high numbers in the liver, but not in lymph node or PBMC. The comparison of CD4/8 T sub-populations in normal and rejected livers and the various tissues showed that naïve cells were dramatically decreased in spleen, lymph node and PBMC of rejected liver transplanted monkeys, but rather memory CD4/8 T cells were increased in all tissues and PBMC. The normal liver has large numbers of CD4 Tregs, CD8+CD28- and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are known immunosuppressive cells occurring at much higher levels than those seen in lymph node or peripheral blood. Memory T cells are dramatically increased in rejecting liver allografts of rhesus monkeys compared to those seen in normal RM tissues. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. The effects of fur rubbing on the social behavior of tufted capuchin monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J

    2008-11-01

    Fur rubbing has often been attributed as a social as well as a medicinal function in capuchin monkeys, yet to date there have been no studies investigating the effects of fur rubbing on subsequent group dynamics. Here, we report for the first time how social group cohesion is affected by fur rubbing in tufted capuchin monkeys. Fifteen captive capuchins were each observed six times for 45 min, three times following the provision of materials typically used for fur rubbing (onion) and three times following control food items (apple). When compared with the apple condition, monkeys significantly increased proximity to one another in the first 15 min of the onion condition, which is when most fur rubbing took place. Moreover, monkeys were more likely to spend time in groups when fur rubbing but less likely to spend time in groups when manipulating the onion in other ways. In subsequent periods monkeys were less likely to be in proximity to one another in the onion condition compared with the apple condition. Aggression between group members was elevated whereas affiliation was decreased throughout the onion condition. In short, capuchins spent more time further apart and engaged in more aggressive acts and shorter affiliative acts following fur-rubbing bouts. It is possible that these differences in behavior could be owing to differences in how the monkeys competed for and interacted with the items presented in each condition rather than due to fur rubbing as such. Alternatively, fur rubbing with pungent materials might interfere with olfactory cues used to regulate social interactions within a group and thereby cause increased levels of aggression. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Ranking Cognitive Flexibility in a Group Setting of Rhesus Monkeys with a Set-Shifting Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnitko, Tatiana A; Allen, Daicia C; Gonzales, Steven W; Walter, Nicole A R; Grant, Kathleen A

    2017-01-01

    Attentional set-shifting ability is an executive function underling cognitive flexibility in humans and animals. In humans, this function is typically observed during a single experimental session where dimensions of playing cards are used to measure flexibility in the face of changing rules for reinforcement (i.e., the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST)). In laboratory animals, particularly non-human primates, variants of the WCST involve extensive training and testing on a series of dimensional discriminations, usually in social isolation. In the present study, a novel experimental approach was used to assess attentional set-shifting simultaneously in 12 rhesus monkeys. Specifically, monkeys living in individual cages but in the same room were trained at the same time each day in a set-shifting task in the same housing environment. As opposed to the previous studies, each daily session began with a simple single-dimension discrimination regardless of the animal's performance on the previous session. A total of eight increasingly difficult, discriminations (sets) were possible in each daily 45 min session. Correct responses were reinforced under a second-order schedule of flavored food pellet delivery, and criteria for completing a set was 12 correct trials out of a running total of 15 trials. Monkeys progressed through the sets at their own pace and abilities. The results demonstrate that all 12 monkeys acquired the simple discrimination (the first set), but individual differences in the ability to progress through all eight sets were apparent. A performance index (PI) that encompassed progression through the sets, errors and session duration was calculated and used to rank each monkey's performance in relation to each other. Overall, this version of a set-shifting task results in an efficient assessment of reliable differences in cognitive flexibility in a group of monkeys.

  10. Negative Lens–Induced Myopia in Infant Monkeys: Effects of High Ambient Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Earl L.; Hung, Li-Fang; Arumugam, Baskar; Huang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether high light levels, which have a protective effect against form-deprivation myopia, also retard the development of lens-induced myopia in primates. Methods. Hyperopic defocus was imposed on 27 monkeys by securing −3 diopter (D) lenses in front of one eye. The lens-rearing procedures were initiated at 24 days of age and continued for periods ranging from 50 to 123 days. Fifteen of the treated monkeys were exposed to normal laboratory light levels (∼350 lux). For the other 12 lens-reared monkeys, auxiliary lighting increased the illuminance to 25,000 lux for 6 hours during the middle of the daily 12 hour light cycle. Refractive development, corneal power, and axial dimensions were assessed by retinoscopy, keratometry, and ultrasonography, respectively. Data were also obtained from 37 control monkeys, four of which were exposed to high ambient lighting. Results. In normal- and high-light-reared monkeys, hyperopic defocus accelerated vitreous chamber elongation and produced myopic shifts in refractive error. The high light regimen did not alter the degree of myopia (high light: −1.69 ± 0.84 D versus normal light: −2.08 ± 1.12 D; P = 0.40) or the rate at which the treated eyes compensated for the imposed defocus. Following lens removal, the high light monkeys recovered from the induced myopia. The recovery process was not affected by the high lighting regimen. Conclusions. In contrast to the protective effects that high ambient lighting has against form-deprivation myopia, high artificial lighting did not alter the course of compensation to imposed defocus. These results indicate that the mechanisms responsible for form-deprivation myopia and lens-induced myopia are not identical. PMID:23557736

  11. Negative lens-induced myopia in infant monkeys: effects of high ambient lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Earl L; Hung, Li-Fang; Arumugam, Baskar; Huang, Juan

    2013-04-26

    To determine whether high light levels, which have a protective effect against form-deprivation myopia, also retard the development of lens-induced myopia in primates. Hyperopic defocus was imposed on 27 monkeys by securing -3 diopter (D) lenses in front of one eye. The lens-rearing procedures were initiated at 24 days of age and continued for periods ranging from 50 to 123 days. Fifteen of the treated monkeys were exposed to normal laboratory light levels (∼350 lux). For the other 12 lens-reared monkeys, auxiliary lighting increased the illuminance to 25,000 lux for 6 hours during the middle of the daily 12 hour light cycle. Refractive development, corneal power, and axial dimensions were assessed by retinoscopy, keratometry, and ultrasonography, respectively. Data were also obtained from 37 control monkeys, four of which were exposed to high ambient lighting. in normal- and high-light-reared monkeys, hyperopic defocus accelerated vitreous chamber elongation and produced myopic shifts in refractive error. the high light regimen did not alter the degree of myopia (high light: -1.69 ± 0.84 D versus normal light: -2.08 ± 1.12 D; P = 0.40) or the rate at which the treated eyes compensated for the imposed defocus. Following lens removal, the high light monkeys recovered from the induced myopia. The recovery process was not affected by the high lighting regimen. In contrast to the protective effects that high ambient lighting has against form-deprivation myopia, high artificial lighting did not alter the course of compensation to imposed defocus. These results indicate that the mechanisms responsible for form-deprivation myopia and lens-induced myopia are not identical.

  12. Differential Cellular Tropism of Lentivirus and Adeno-Associated Virus in the Brain of Cynomolgus Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Heeyoung; Cho, Doo-Wan; Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Young-Su; Han, Su-Cheol; Lee, C Justin

    2016-02-01

    Many researchers are using viruses to deliver genes of interest into the brains of laboratory animals. However, certain target brain cells are not easily infected by viruses. Moreover, the differential tropism of different viruses in monkey brain is not well established. We investigated the cellular tropism of lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) toward neuron and glia in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascularis). Lentivirus and AAV were injected into putamen of the monkey brain. One month after injection, monkeys were sacrificed, and then the presence of viral infection by expression of reporter fluorescence proteins was examined. Tissues were sectioned and stained with NeuN and GFAP antibodies for identifying neuronal cells or astrocytes, respectively, and viral reporter GFP-expressing cells were counted. We found that while lentivirus infected mostly astrocytes, AAV infected neurons at a higher rate than astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytes showed reactiveness when cells were infected by virus, likely due to virus-mediated neuroinflammation. The Sholl analysis was done to compare the hypertrophy of infected and uninfected astrocytes by virus. The lentivirus infected astrocytes showed negligible hypertrophy whereas AAV infected astrocytes showed significant changes in morphology, compared to uninfected astrocytes. In the brain of cynomolgus monkey, lentivirus shows tropism for astrocytes over neurons without much reactivity in astrocytes, whereas AAV shows tropism for neurons over glial cells with a significant reactivity in astrocytes. We conclude that AAV is best-suited for gene delivery to neurons, whereas lentivirus is the best choice for gene delivery to astrocytes in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys.

  13. Self-control assessments of capuchin monkeys with the rotating tray task and the accumulation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Perdue, Bonnie M; Rossettie, Mattea S; James, Brielle T; Whitham, Will; Walker, Bradlyn; Futch, Sara E; Parrish, Audrey E

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of delay of gratification in capuchin monkeys using a rotating tray (RT) task have shown improved self-control performance in these animals in comparison to the accumulation (AC) task. In this study, we investigated whether this improvement resulted from the difference in methods between the rotating tray task and previous tests, or whether it was the result of greater overall experience with delay of gratification tasks. Experiment 1 produced similar performance levels by capuchins monkeys in the RT and AC tasks when identical reward and temporal parameters were used. Experiment 2 demonstrated a similar result using reward amounts that were more similar to previous AC experiments with these monkeys. In Experiment 3, monkeys performed multiple versions of the AC task with varied reward and temporal parameters. Their self-control behavior was found to be dependent on the overall delay to reward consumption, rather than the overall reward amount ultimately consumed. These findings indicate that these capuchin monkeys' self-control capacities were more likely to have improved across studies because of the greater experience they had with delay of gratification tasks. Experiment 4 and Experiment 5 tested new, task-naïve monkeys on both tasks, finding more limited evidence of self-control, and no evidence that one task was more beneficial than the other in promoting self-control. The results of this study suggest that future testing of this kind should focus on temporal parameters and reward magnitude parameters to establish accurate measures of delay of gratification capacity and development in this species and perhaps others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory mechanics: comparison of Beagle dogs, Göttingen minipigs and Cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchetti, Geoffrey; Troncy, Eric; Robichaud, Annette; Gold, Leslie; Schuessler, Thomas; Maghezzi, Said; Bassett, Leanne; Authier, Simon

    2014-01-01

    When the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) is determined by respiratory safety pharmacology, follow-up studies are warranted and may include airway resistance and compliance. Respiratory mechanics in commonly used large animal species (Beagle dogs, Cynomolgus monkeys, and Göttingen minipigs) were compared. Eighteen animals were used (3/sex/species) in an anesthetized model (propofol infusion) with pancuronium as a neuromuscular blocker. Parameters of respiratory mechanics were evaluated at baseline and at peak drug effect. Resistance (Rrs) and elastance (Ers) were measured by applying a single frequency forced oscillation (0.5 Hz) to the subject's airway opening and fitting the flow, volume and pressure data to the single compartment model of the lung. Increasing doses of intravenous (IV) methacholine were administered in all three species, as well as doubling aerosolized concentrations of the same bronchoconstrictor agent before and after inhaled albuterol. The slope of the IV methacholine dose-response curve for Rrs was similar in dogs and monkeys and both species differed from minipigs, which showed greater reactivity. At the highest IV dose tested, minipigs also reached higher levels of bronchoconstriction than the other two species. They were followed, in decreasing order, by dogs and monkeys. Albuterol induced a significant decrease in the slope of the dose-response curve only in dogs and monkeys. Scientific literature is available on respiratory mechanics in monkeys and dogs but not in minipigs. Our results suggest that minipigs were more reactive than dogs and monkeys to IV methacholine while less sensitive to inhaled albuterol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ecology and removal of introduced rhesus monkeys: Desecheo Island National Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M A

    1989-04-01

    A field project was conducted to remove an introduced population of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) from Desecheo Island National Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico. A group of 57 monkeys from Cayo Santiago was released on Desecheo Island in 1966 to study processes of adaptation. Observations in 1969 and 1970 implicated the monkeys in a drastic decline of the nesting populations of brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) and red-footed boobies (Sula sula). Previous efforts at trapping and removal had been conducted in 1977, 1979, and 1981. The present removal project began in 1985 and continued through 1987. During this period, field investigations were conducted regarding ecology and behavior, simultaneous with the removal of 66 monkeys from the island. Estimates of the monkey population size have been inaccurate. The total number present on the island has been extremely difficult to determine due to the rugged terrain and the furtiveness of the monkeys. The population did increase since introduction and was composed of apparently healthy individuals, generally in excellent physical condition. The population was well adapted to the harsh environment of Desecheo Island. No permanent sources of fresh water exist on the island and feeding adaptations focused on consumption of the wood pulp of the almacigo tree (Bursera simaruba) as a result. Huge amounts of this wood pulp were consumed daily for both nutrition and as a source of moisture. Cactus and other plant species were utilized as secondary sources of moisture and nutrition, including lesser amounts of almacigo fruit and leaves. Circumstantial evidence indicates the monkeys are egg predators. Social adaptations involved dispersal into small groups to optimize foraging conditions.

  16. Reference values of hematology, biochemistry, and blood type in cynomolgus monkeys from cambodia origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kangmoo; Chang, Jaejin; Lee, Min-Jae; Wang, Seungsu; In, Kimhong; Galano-Tan, Wilhelm C; Jun, Sanghun; Cho, Kahee; Hwang, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Ju; Park, Wanje

    2016-03-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys as nonhuman primates are valuable animal models because they have a high level of human gene homology. There are many reference values for hematology and biochemistry of Cynomolgus monkeys that are needed for proper clinical diagnosis and biomedical research conduct. The body weight information and blood type are also key success factors in allogeneic or xenogeneic models. Moreover, the biological parameters could be different according to the origin of the Cynomolgus monkey. However, there are limited references provided, especially of Cambodia origin. In this study, we measured average body weight of 2,518 Cynomolgus monkeys and analyzed hematology and serum biochemistry using 119 males, and determined blood types in 642 monkeys with Cambodia origin. The average body weight of male Cynomolgus monkeys were 2.56±0.345 kg and female group was 2.43±0.330 kg at the age from 2 to 3 years. The male group showed relatively sharp increased average body weight from the 3 to 4 age period compared to the female group. In hematology and biochemistry, it was found that most of the data was similar when compared to other references even though some results showed differences. The ABO blood type result showed that type A, B, AB, and O was approximately 15.6, 33.3, 44.2, and 6.9%, respectively. The main blood type in this facility was B and AB. These biological background references of Cambodia origin could be used to provide important information to researchers who are using them in their biomedical research.

  17. Monkeys head-gaze following is fast, precise and not fully suppressible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Karolina; Dicke, Peter W.; Thier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human eye-gaze is a powerful stimulus, drawing the observer's attention to places and objects of interest to someone else (‘eye-gaze following’). The largely homogeneous eyes of monkeys, compromising the assessment of eye-gaze by conspecifics from larger distances, explain the absence of comparable eye-gaze following in these animals. Yet, monkeys are able to use peer head orientation to shift attention (‘head-gaze following’). How similar are monkeys' head-gaze and human eye-gaze following? To address this question, we trained rhesus monkeys to make saccades to targets, either identified by the head-gaze of demonstrator monkeys or, alternatively, identified by learned associations between the demonstrators' facial identities and the targets (gaze versus identity following). In a variant of this task that occurred at random, the instruction to follow head-gaze or identity was replaced in the course of a trial by the new rule to detect a change of luminance of one of the saccade targets. Although this change-of-rule rendered the demonstrator portraits irrelevant, they nevertheless influenced performance, reflecting a precise redistribution of spatial attention. The specific features depended on whether the initial rule was head-gaze or identity following: head-gaze caused an insuppressible shift of attention to the target gazed at by the demonstrator, whereas identity matching prompted much later shifts of attention, however, only if the initial rule had been identity following. Furthermore, shifts of attention prompted by head-gaze were spatially precise. Automaticity and swiftness, spatial precision and limited executive control characterizing monkeys' head-gaze following are key features of human eye-gaze following. This similarity supports the notion that both may rely on the same conserved neural circuitry. PMID:26446808

  18. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jiang

    Full Text Available Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA, alphavirus replicons (VRP, attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad, or attenuated poxvirus (Pox. These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  19. The Monkey game: A computerized verbal working memory task for self-reliant administration in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Weijer-Bergsma, Eva; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Jolani, Shahab; Van Luit, Johannes E H

    2016-06-01

    In two studies, the psychometric properties of an online self-reliant verbal working memory task (the Monkey game) for primary school children (6-12 years of age) were examined. In Study 1, children (n = 5,203) from 31 primary schools participated. The participants completed computerized verbal and visual-spatial working memory tasks (i.e., the Monkey game and the Lion game) and a paper-and-pencil version of Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices. Reading comprehension and math achievement test scores were obtained from the schools. First, the internal consistency of the Monkey game was examined. Second, multilevel modeling was used to examine the effects of classroom membership. Multilevel multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the Monkey game's concurrent relationship with the Lion game and its predictive relationships with reading comprehension and math achievement. Also, age-related differences in performance were examined. In Study 2, the concurrent relationships between the Monkey game and two tester-led computerized working memory tasks were further examined (n = 140). Also, the 1- and 2-year stability of the Monkey game was investigated. The Monkey game showed excellent internal consistency, good concurrent relationships with the other working memory measures, and significant age differences in performance. Performance on the Monkey game was also predictive of subsequent reading comprehension and mathematics performance, even after controlling for individual differences in intelligence. Performance on the Monkey game was influenced by classroom membership. The Monkey game is a reliable and suitable instrument for the online computerized and self-reliant assessment of verbal working memory in primary school children.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well...... of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina...

  1. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P animals.

  2. Isolation of a phylogenetically distinct rabies virus from a tufted capuchin monkey (Cebus apella) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Sugimoto, Kahori; Mochizuki, Nobuyuki; Segawa, Takao; Itou, Takuya; Carvalho, Adolorata A B; Nociti, Darci P; Mello, Rosane M; Santos, Anna K R A; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2013-12-26

    A rabies virus isolate (BRmk1358 strain) was discovered from a rabid tufted capuchin monkey in Brazil. The present study determined the nucleotide sequence of the BRmk1358 strain and compared with the rabies viruses isolated from marmosets and other animals in the Americas. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the BRmk1358 strain formed a lineage distant from that of marmoset rabies virus within the Chiroptera-related rabies virus cluster. This result suggests that the source of rabies infection in the tufted capuchin monkey may have been bat, and that they have a risk to act as rabies reservoir in Brazil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P parathyroid hormone did not reach significance. Calcitonin showed modest decreases postflight (P animals.

  4. Recovery of Dengue Viruses from Tissues of Experimentally Infected Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchette, Nyven J.; Halstead, Scott B.; Nash, Donald R.; Stenhouse, Andrew C.

    1972-01-01

    A tissue explant culture technique for the recovery of dengue virus from experimentally infected monkey tissue is described and compared with tissue culture assay of tissue triturates and co-cultivation of trypsinized cells in cell cultures. The most efficient technique was one in which minced tissue was explanted in co-culture with dengue virus-susceptible LLC-MK2 monkey kidney cells. This technique shows promise of being useful for detection of virus in autopsy material from fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever cases. PMID:4627963

  5. Auditory Association Cortex Lesions Impair Auditory Short-Term Memory in Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michael; D'Amato, Michael R.; Rodman, Hillary R.; Gross, Charles G.

    1990-01-01

    Monkeys that were trained to perform auditory and visual short-term memory tasks (delayed matching-to-sample) received lesions of the auditory association cortex in the superior temporal gyrus. Although visual memory was completely unaffected by the lesions, auditory memory was severely impaired. Despite this impairment, all monkeys could discriminate sounds closer in frequency than those used in the auditory memory task. This result suggests that the superior temporal cortex plays a role in auditory processing and retention similar to the role the inferior temporal cortex plays in visual processing and retention.

  6. Tvorba 3D her pomocí jMonkeyEngine 3.0

    OpenAIRE

    Skála, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The topic of this bachelor thesis is game development of three dimensional PC games using Java programming language and game engine jMonkeyEngine witch is built on Java. The goal is to present capabilities of this tool and also to determine whether the developers of the engine actually proved that Java is usable for making PC games. The first part is focused on jMonkeyEngine itself with its history and basic characteristics. Next part is the principles of working in a 3D environment a then sp...

  7. Standardized Full-Field Electroretinography in the Green Monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Palmour, Roberta M

    2014-01-01

    Full-field electroretinography is an objective measure of retinal function, serving as an important diagnostic clinical tool in ophthalmology for evaluating the integrity of the retina. Given the similarity between the anatomy and physiology of the human and Green Monkey eyes, this species has......). Photopic and scotopic ERG recordings were obtained by full-field stimulation over a range of 6 log units of intensity in dark-adapted or light-adapted eyes of adult Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus). Intensity, duration, and interval of light stimuli were varied separately. Reproducible values...

  8. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  9. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  10. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) rapidly learn to select dominant individuals in videos of artificial social interactions between unfamiliar conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Regina; Basile, Benjamin M; Adachi, Ikuma; Suzuki, Wendy A; Wilson, Mark E; Hampton, Robert R

    2010-11-01

    Social animals, such as primates, must behave appropriately in complex social situations such as dominance interactions. Learning dominance information through trial and error would be dangerous; therefore, cognitive mechanisms for rapid learning of dominance information by observation would be adaptive. We used a set of digitally edited artificial social interactions to examine whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) can learn dominance relationships between unfamiliar conspecifics through observation. Our method allowed random assignment of stimulus monkeys to ranks in an artificial hierarchy, controlling for nonbehavioral cues that could indicate dominance. Subject monkeys watched videos depicting 1 stimulus monkey behaving dominantly toward another and were rewarded for selecting the dominant individual. Monkeys rapidly learned this discrimination across 5 behavior types in Experiment 1 and transferred performance to novel videos of new individuals in Experiment 2. In addition, subjects selected the dominant individual more often than expected by chance in probe videos containing no behavioral dominance information, indicating some retention of the relative dominance status of stimulus monkeys from training. Together, our results suggest that monkeys can learn dominance hierarchies through observation of third-party social interactions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Pharmacokinetics of the selective prostacyclin receptor agonist selexipag in rats, dogs and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Yamada, Tetsuhiro; Treiber, Alexander; Gnerre, Carmela; Nonaka, Kiyoko

    2018-02-01

    1. This study examined the pharmacokinetics, distribution, metabolism and excretion of the selective prostacyclin receptor agonist selexipag (NS-304; ACT-293987) and its active metabolite MRE-269 (ACT-33679). The compounds were investigated following oral and/or intravenous administration to intact rats, dogs and monkeys, and bile-duct-cannulated rats and dogs. 2. After oral administration of [14C]selexipag, selexipag was well absorbed in rats and dogs with total recoveries of over 90% of the dose, mainly in the faeces. Biliary excretion was the major elimination pathway for [14C]MRE-269 as well as [14C]selexipag, while renal elimination was of little importance. [14C]Selexipag-related radioactivity was secreted into the milk in lactating rats. 3. Plasma was analysed for total radioactivity, selexipag and MRE-269 in rats and monkeys. Selexipag was negligible in rat plasma due to extensive metabolism, and MRE-269 was present in rat and monkey plasma. A species difference was clearly evident when selexipag was incubated in rat, dog and monkey plasma. 4. Total radioactivity was rapidly distributed to tissues. The highest concentrations were found in the bile duct and liver without significant accumulation or persistence, while there was limited melanin-associated binding, penetration of the blood-brain barrier and placental transfer of drug-related materials.

  12. A retrograde double fluorescent tracing study of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle in the cynomolgus monkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderWerf, F.; Aramideh, M.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Baljet, B.; Speelman, J. D.; Otto, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the cynomolgus monkey, motoneurons innervating the levator palpebrae superioris muscle form a nucleus within the oculomotor nuclei called the central caudal nucleus. After double fluorescent neuronal retrograde tracing experiments, using fast blue and diamidino yellow as tracers in the levator

  13. [Data on intestinal parasites of lower monkeys in the Adler apery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, T P

    2010-01-01

    Under captive conditions, a parasite fauna connected with the changes in ecological conditions, feeding, and mode of life is usually formed in monkeys. Species composition of the intestinal parasites has been investigated in six species of the monkeys (Macaca mulatta, M. fascicularis, M. nemestrina, Ceropithecus aethiops, Papio hamadryas, and P. anubis), which were born in the Adler apery and live there for a long time. A comparison with similar investigations carried out in the Sukhumi apery, where the climatic and keeping conditions are practically identical with those in the Adler apery, was conducted. Parasite fauna of monkeys in the Adler apery was found to include three species of Nematoda (Ascaris sp., Trichocephalus sp., and Strongyloides sp.) and two species of Protozoa (Balantidium coli and Lamblia intestinalis). In our material, Trichocephalus sp. is the dominant parasite species among helminthes, and Balantidium coli is the most frequent species of Protozoa. The commonness in the transmission of these parasites and similarity in their life cycles contribute to the forming of polyinvasions in monkeys.

  14. Metacognitive Monkeys or Associative Animals? Simple Reinforcement Learning Explains Uncertainty in Nonhuman Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pelley, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys will selectively and adaptively learn to avoid the most difficult trials of a perceptual discrimination learning task. Couchman, Coutinho, Beran, and Smith (2010) have recently demonstrated that this pattern of responding does not depend on animals receiving trial-by-trial feedback for their responses; it also obtains if experience of the…

  15. In-group conformity sustains different foraging traditions in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Dindo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Decades of research have revealed rich cultural repertoires encompassing multiple traditions in wild great apes, a picture crucially complemented by experimental simulations with captive apes. Studies with wild capuchin monkeys, the most encephalized simian species, have indicated a New World convergence on these cultural phenomena, involving multiple traditions and tool use. However, experimental studies to date are in conflict with such findings in concluding that capuchins, like other monkeys, show minimal capacities for social learning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a new experimental approach in which the alpha male of each of two groups of capuchins was trained to open an artificial foraging device in a quite different way, using either a slide or lift action, then reunited with his group. In each group a majority of monkeys, 8 of 11 and 13 of 14, subsequently mastered the task. Seventeen of the successful 21 monkeys discovered the alternative action to that seeded in the group, performing it a median of 4 times. Nevertheless, all 21 primarily adopted the technique seeded by their group's alpha male. Median proportions of slide versus lift were 0.96 for the group seeded with slide versus 0. 01 for the group seeded with lift. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest a striking effect of social conformity in learned behavioral techniques, consistent with field reports of capuchin traditions and convergent on the only other species in which such cultural phenomena have been reported, chimpanzees and humans.

  16. A novel method for capturing and monitoring a small neotropical primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri collinsi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Anita I; Castro, Paulo H G; Monteiro, Frederico O B; Ruivo, Luana P; de Sousa e Silva Júnior, José

    2015-03-01

    Squirrel monkeys (genus Saimiri) are agile, arboreal primates that are seldom captured in the wild due to their small body size (forest. Captures occurred in November and December 2013. We habituated animals to feed on a large platform located in a 123.5 m(2) area enclosed by a green net (3 m high). Multiple individuals could freely enter and exit the area via four ropes affixed from surrounding trees to the platform. Once individuals were feeding inside the netted area on selected trapping days, the ropes were dropped remotely, eliminating their escape routes. We successfully trapped 21 different individuals of the social group (14 adults and 7 immatures) with this method. We conclude that this is a conceptually simple, effective method for trapping squirrel monkeys in most habitats, and possibly other small arboreal primates that live in large social groups. The present method was more effective than previous methods utilized to capture squirrel monkeys in the field, and has the advantages of: allowing for safe capture of several individuals simultaneously; enabling re-captures; releasing of animals as a group at the site of capture; use of soft netting which facilitates safe capture of the monkeys. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Monkeys Rely on Recency of Stimulus Repetition When Solving Short-Term Memory Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, John H., Jr.; Richmond, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Seven monkeys performed variants of two short-term memory tasks that others have used to differentiate between selective and nonselective memory mechanisms. The first task was to view a list of sequentially presented images and identify whether a test matched any image from the list, but not a distractor from a preceding list. Performance was best…

  18. Minor contributions of the maxillary sinus to the air-conditioning performance in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Teruo; Nishimura, Takeshi D

    2015-08-01

    The nasal passages mainly adjust the temperature and humidity of inhaled air to reach the alveolar condition required in the lungs. By contrast to most other non-human primates, macaque monkeys are distributed widely among tropical, temperate and subarctic regions, and thus some species need to condition the inhaled air in cool and dry ambient atmospheric areas. The internal nasal anatomy is believed to have undergone adaptive modifications to improve the air-conditioning performance. Furthermore, the maxillary sinus (MS), an accessory hollow communicating with the nasal cavity, is found in macaques, whereas it is absent in most other extant Old World monkeys, including savanna monkeys. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics simulations to simulate the airflow and heat and water exchange over the mucosal surface in the nasal passage. Using the topology models of the nasal cavity with and without the MS, we demonstrated that the MS makes little contribution to the airflow pattern and the air-conditioning performance within the nasal cavity in macaques. Instead, the inhaled air is conditioned well in the anterior portion of the nasal cavity before reaching the MS in both macaques and savanna monkeys. These findings suggest that the evolutionary modifications and coetaneous variations in the nasal anatomy are rather independent of transitions and variations in the climate and atmospheric environment found in the habitats of macaques. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolverton, W L; Rowlett, J K; Winger, G; Woods, J H; Gerak, L R; France, C P

    1999-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of GABA that is present in the CNS and fulfils at least some of the criteria for a neurotransmitter. Its effects are generally similar to those of CNS depressants and include ataxia, sleep and anesthesia. It has also been suggested that GHB is a drug of abuse. The present experiment was designed to evaluate GHB in procedures predictive of abuse and dependence potential in rhesus monkeys. Three monkeys were surgically prepared with indwelling silicone venous catheters and allowed to self-administer methohexital or saline in twice-daily experimental sessions. Other groups of monkeys were trained in drug discrimination paradigms to discriminate D-amphetamine (AMPH; n = 4), pentobarbital (PB; n = 3) or triazolam (n = 3) from saline. Another group was maintained on diazepam daily and trained to discriminate flumazenil from saline (n = 2). GHB (0.01-10 mg/kg per injection) maintained self-administration marginally above saline levels at one dose (3.2 or 10 mg/kg) in two of the three monkeys tested. GHB (1.0-178 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.) or intragastrically (i.g.)) did not reliably substitute as a discriminative stimulus for any of the training conditions. Taken together with previous results, the present experiment suggests that GHB has, at most, low potential for abuse.

  20. Pharmacological profile of a deuterium-substituted mirfentanil derivative, OHM10579, in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelas, S; Gerak, L R; Landers, L K; Brandt, M R; Bagley, J R; Brockunier, L L; France, C P

    1998-07-01

    The discriminative-stimulus, respiratory, and antinociceptive effects of OHM10579, an isotopic isomer of mirfentanil, were characterized in rhesus monkeys. In monkeys discriminating nalbuphine, 0.32 mg/kg of OHM10579 partially substituted for nalbuphine. In monkeys treated daily with 3.2 mg/kg of morphine and discriminating 0.01 mg/kg of naltrexone, 0.32 mg/kg of OHM10579 substituted for naltrexone. In morphine-abstinent monkeys, morphine reversed naltrexone-lever responding, an effect attenuated by OHM10579. The shift to the right in the morphine dose-effect curve was greater 2 h after 0.32 mg/kg of OHM10579 compared to 0.32 mg/kg of mirfentanil, indicating that OHM10579 has a longer duration of action than mirfentanil. In a warm-water tail-withdrawal procedure, 10 and 17.8 mg/kg of OHM10579 had antinociceptive effects that were not antagonized by naltrexone. Morphine decreased breathing in air to 48%, whereas the maximal decrease with OHM10579 was to 75% of control. OHM10579 attenuated hyperventilation induced by 5% CO2 and partially antagonized the respiratory-depressant effects of morphine. OHM10579 can be classified as a low-efficacy mu-opioid agonist with some nonopioid actions. These results indicate that the pharmacology of the mirfentanil isotope OHM10579 is similar to that of mirfentanil, but that OHM10579 might have a longer duration of action.

  1. Elucidation of the metabolic pathway of S-equol in rat, monkey and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwen, Richard J; Nguyen, Linh; Jackson, Richard L

    2012-06-01

    S-equol is a selective estrogen receptor β (ERβ) agonist which is produced in certain individuals after ingestion of its precursor daidzein, an isoflavone present in soy. S-equol is thought to provide certain health benefits, including reduced menopausal symptoms. The metabolic profile of S-equol was determined in vivo in Sprague-Dawley rats and cynomolgus monkeys, and in vitro using hepatocytes from rat, monkey, and human. High resolution MS fragmentation patterns indicated that the major metabolite of S-equol in rat plasma and urine was the 4'-glucuronide conjugate, with lesser amounts of unconjugated S-equol, the 7-sulfate conjugate, and the 4'-glucuronide-7-sulfate diconjugate. Monkeys also showed extensive metabolism, with the major species in plasma being the 4'-glucuronide and the 7-sulfate-4'-glucuronide diconjugate; urine contained primarily the 4'-glucuronide, as seen in the rat. In vitro metabolism by hepatocytes was extensive and similar in all species, with fragmentation patterns also indicating that the 4'-glucuronide was the major metabolite. No oxidative metabolites of [(14)C] S-equol were detected in either in vivo or in vitro studies. These findings show that glucuronidation is the primary pathway for the metabolism of S-equol in rat, monkey and man, and that all metabolic routes of S-equol observed in vitro were also observed in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Colour-related oscillations in the striate cortex of awake monkeys: "reverse" observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, V.A.F.; Bondar, I.; Kruger, J.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma oscillations of 30-70 Hz in local electroencephalograms (EEGs) were observed in primary visual cortex (V1) of monkeys when they viewed coloured stimuli under conditions which were not part of a training paradigm. No oscillatory modulations were detected in simultaneously recorded spike trains,

  3. Histological and histomorphometrical evaluation of tissue reactions adjacent to endosteal implants in monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Rostrup, E; Hjörting-Hansen, E

    1992-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative histological study of the initial healing response adjacent to 24 submerged and non-submerged implants placed in the lower jaws of 6 monkeys is presented. The histomorphometric analysis showed no significant differences in mineralized bone-implant contact length...

  4. Testing the Glucose Hypothesis among Capuchin Monkeys: Does Glucose Boost Self-Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Audrey E; Emerson, Ishara D; Rossettie, Mattea S; Beran, Michael J

    2016-08-03

    The ego-depletion hypothesis states that self-control diminishes over time and with exertion. Accordingly, the glucose hypothesis attributes this depletion of self-control resources to decreases in blood glucose levels. Research has led to mixed findings among humans and nonhuman animals, with limited evidence for such a link between glucose and self-control among closely-related nonhuman primate species, but some evidence from more distantly related species (e.g., honeybees and dogs). We tested this hypothesis in capuchin monkeys by manipulating the sugar content of a calorie-matched breakfast meal following a nocturnal fast, and then presenting each monkey with the accumulation self-control task. Monkeys were presented with food items one-by-one until the subject retrieved and ate the accumulating items, which required continual inhibition of food retrieval in the face of an increasingly desirable reward. Results indicated no relationship between self-control performance on the accumulation task and glucose ingestion levels following a fast. These results do not provide support for the glucose hypothesis of self-control among capuchin monkeys within the presented paradigm. Further research assessing self-control and its physiological correlates among closely- and distantly-related species is warranted to shed light on the mechanisms underlying self-control behavior.

  5. Social Behavior in Interacting Squirrel Monkeys with Differential Nutritional and Environmental Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Patricia F.

    This paper reports an observational study of the effects of handling on the social behavior of squirrel monkeys who received a protein deficient diet. After birth, experimental animals received a low-protein diet for a 6-week period. A subgroup of these animals were handled between 3 and 12 weeks of age. All of the animals interacted (in four…

  6. Dissociation of Active Working Memory and Passive Recognition in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Active cognitive control of working memory is central in most human memory models, but behavioral evidence for such control in nonhuman primates is absent and neurophysiological evidence, while suggestive, is indirect. We present behavioral evidence that monkey memory for familiar images is under active cognitive control. Concurrent cognitive…

  7. Roll tilt psychophysics in rhesus monkeys during vestibular and visual stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F; Haburcakova, Csilla; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2008-07-01

    How does the brain calculate the spatial orientation of the head relative to gravity? Psychophysical measurements are critical to investigate this question, but such measurements have been limited to humans. In non-human primates, behavioral measures have focused on vestibular-mediated eye movements, which do not reflect percepts of head orientation. We have therefore developed a method to measure tilt perception in monkeys, derived from the subjective visual vertical (SVV) task. Two rhesus monkeys were trained to align a light bar parallel to gravity and performed this task during roll tilts, centrifugation, and roll optokinetic stimulation. The monkeys accurately aligned the light bar with gravity during static roll tilts but also demonstrated small orientation-dependent misperceptions of the tilt angle analogous to those measured in humans. When the gravito-inertial force (GIF) rotated dynamically in the roll plane, SVV responses remained closely aligned with the GIF during roll tilt of the head (coplanar canal rotational cues present), lagged slightly behind the GIF during variable-radius centrifugation (no canal cues present), and shifted gradually during fixed-radius centrifugation (orthogonal yaw canal cues present). SVV responses also deviated away from the earth-vertical during roll optokinetic stimulation. These results demonstrate that rotational cues derived from the semicircular canals and visual system have prominent effects on psychophysical measurements of roll tilt in rhesus monkeys and therefore suggest that a central synthesis of graviceptive and rotational cues contributes to percepts of head orientation relative to gravity in non-human primates.

  8. Case Study: What Makes a Good Case, Revisited: The Survey Monkey Tells All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herried, Clyde Freeman; Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie; Schiller, Nancy A.; Herreid, Ky F.; Wright, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. In this month's issue the authors provide a more definitive answer to the "What Makes a Good Case?" question based on a just-completed Survey Monkey survey given to NCCSTS teachers.

  9. The Role of the Antiviral APOBEC3 Gene Family in Protecting Chimpanzees against Lentiviruses from Monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Etienne

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-species transmissions of viruses from animals to humans are at the origin of major human pathogenic viruses. While the role of ecological and epidemiological factors in the emergence of new pathogens is well documented, the importance of host factors is often unknown. Chimpanzees are the closest relatives of humans and the animal reservoir at the origin of the human AIDS pandemic. However, despite being regularly exposed to monkey lentiviruses through hunting, chimpanzees are naturally infected by only a single simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVcpz. Here, we asked why chimpanzees appear to be protected against the successful emergence of other SIVs. In particular, we investigated the role of the chimpanzee APOBEC3 genes in providing a barrier to infection by most monkey lentiviruses. We found that most SIV Vifs, including Vif from SIVwrc infecting western-red colobus, the chimpanzee's main monkey prey in West Africa, could not antagonize chimpanzee APOBEC3G. Moreover, chimpanzee APOBEC3D, as well as APOBEC3F and APOBEC3H, provided additional protection against SIV Vif antagonism. Consequently, lentiviral replication in primary chimpanzee CD4(+ T cells was dependent on the presence of a lentiviral vif gene that could antagonize chimpanzee APOBEC3s. Finally, by identifying and functionally characterizing several APOBEC3 gene polymorphisms in both common chimpanzees and bonobos, we found that these ape populations encode APOBEC3 proteins that are uniformly resistant to antagonism by monkey lentiviruses.

  10. Two-item discrimination and Hamilton search learning in infant pigtailed macaque monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ha, J.C.; Mandell, D.J.; Gray, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how infant pigtailed macaque monkeys performed on two separate learning assessments, two-object discrimination/reversal and Hamilton search learning. Although the learning tasks have been tested on several species, including non-human primates, there have been no normative

  11. Fecal and Salivary Cortisol Concentrations in Woolly (Lagothrix ssp.) and Spider Monkeys (Ateles spp.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ange-van Heugten, K.D.; Heugten, van E.; Timmer, S.; Bosch, G.; Elias, A.; Whisnant, S.; Swarts, H.J.M.; Ferket, P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Detrimental physiological effects due to stressors can contribute to the low captive success of primates. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential impact of diet composition on cortisol concentrations in feces and saliva in woolly (n=27) and spider monkeys (n=61). The research

  12. Simian Homologues of Human Gamma-2 and Betaherpesviruses in Mandrill and Drill Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Vincent; Mauclere, Philippe; Dubreuil, Guy; Lewis, John; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Rigoulet, Jacques; Petit, Thierry; Gessain, Antoine

    2000-01-01

    Recent serological and molecular surveys of different primate species allowed the characterization of several Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) homologues in macaques, African green monkeys, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Identification of these new primate rhadinoviruses revealed the existence of two distinct genogroups, called RV1 and RV2. Using a degenerate consensus primer PCR method for the herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene, the presence of KSHV homologues has been investigated in two semi-free-ranging colonies of eight drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus), five mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx), and two hybrid (Mandrillus leucophaeus-Mandrillus sphinx) monkeys, living in Cameroon and Gabon, Central Africa. This search revealed the existence of not only two distinct KSHV homologues, each one belonging to one of the two rhadinovirus genogroups, but also of two new betaherpesvirus sequences, one being close to cytomegaloviruses and the other being related to human herpesviruses 6 and 7 (HHV-6 and -7). The latter viruses are the first simian HHV-6 and -7 homologues identified to date. These data show that mandrill and drill monkeys are the hosts of at least four novel distinct herpesviruses. Moreover, mandrills, like macaques and African green monkeys, harbor also two distinct gamma-2 herpesviruses, thus strongly suggesting that a second gamma-2 herpesvirus, belonging to the RV2 genogroup, may exist in humans. PMID:11090203

  13. Normal Anatomy, Histology, and Spontaneous Pathology of the Nasal Cavity of the Cynomolgus Monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanza, Ronnie; Taylor, Ian; Gregori, Michela; Hill, Colin; Swan, Mark; Goodchild, Joel; Goodchild, Kane; Schofield, Jane; Aldous, Mark; Mowat, Vasanthi

    2016-07-01

    The evaluation of inhalation studies in monkeys is often hampered by the scarcity of published information on the relevant nasal anatomy and pathology. We examined nasal cavities of 114 control cynomolgus monkeys from 11 inhalation studies evaluated 2008 to 2013, in order to characterize and document the anatomic features and spontaneous pathology. Compared to other laboratory animals, the cynomolgus monkey has a relatively simple nose with 2 unbranched, dorsoventrally stacked turbinates, large maxillary sinuses, and a nasal septum that continues into the nasopharynx. The vomeronasal organ is absent, but nasopalatine ducts are present. Microscopically, the nasal epithelium is thicker than that in rodents, and the respiratory (RE) and transitional epithelium (TE) rest on a thick basal lamina. Generally, squamous epithelia and TE line the vestibule, RE, the main chamber and nasopharynx, olfactory epithelium, a small caudodorsal region, while TE is observed intermittently along the passages. Relatively high incidences of spontaneous pathology findings, some resembling induced lesions, were observed and included inflammation, luminal exudate, scabs, squamous and respiratory metaplasia or hyperplasia, mucous cell hyperplasia/metaplasia, and olfactory degeneration. Regions of epithelial transition were the most affected. This information is considered helpful in the histopathology evaluation and interpretation of inhalation studies in monkeys. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The Incidence of Lymphoplasmacytic Gastritis in the Fundus and Antrum of Cynomolgus Monkey ( Macaca fascicularis ) Stomachs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeag, Sean; McInnes, Elizabeth F

    2012-12-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic gastritis is a concern for toxicological pathologists reading preclinical, non-human primate toxicity studies because subtle gastric changes which could be treatment-related may be masked and gastritis lesions may be confused with treatment-related effects and thus a gastric finding may be incorrectly assigned as a treatment-related lesion. This paper discusses the incidence of lymphoplasmacytic gastritis in cynomolgus monkeys at a contract research organization. The incidence of lymphoplasmacytic gastritis in the fundus and antrum of control cynomolgus monkeys on 18 non-gastric compound studies, was scored. The average fundus score ranged from 0.3 to 1.5 and the average antral score ranged from 0.9 to 3.5 in the cynomolgus monkey stomachs examined. The number of affected control animals in a study ranged from 0 to 5 control animals. No correlation between the route of vehicle administration and the severity or incidence of the lesions was noted. The percentage incidence of affected animals ranged from 0 to 100%. An increased incidence lymphoplasmatic gastritis from 2000 to 2004 was noted. The implications of lymphoplasmacytic gastritis in cynomolgus monkeys used for acute toxicity studies are discussed.

  15. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE VITREOUS BODY IN RHESUS-MONKEYS AND MAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WORST, JGF; LOS, LI

    1992-01-01

    In the isolated unfixed vitreous body a structural organization can be visualized by slitlamp microscopy or by an ink-injection technique. We discuss the observations on human and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) vitreous bodies using the ink-injection technique. Advantages and disadvantages of this

  16. Reproducibility and Variation of Diffusion Measures in the Squirrel Monkey Brain, In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Kurt; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Choe, Ann S; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Animal models are needed to better understand the relationship between diffusion MRI (dMRI) and the underlying tissue microstructure. One promising model for validation studies is the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus. This study aims to determine (1) the reproducibility of in vivo diffusion measures both within and between subjects; (2) the agreement between in vivo and ex vivo data acquired from the same specimen and (3) normal diffusion values and their variation across brain regions. Methods Data were acquired from three healthy squirrel monkeys, each imaged twice in vivo and once ex vivo. Reproducibility of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and principal eigenvector (PEV) was assessed, and normal values were determined both in vivo and ex vivo. Results The calculated coefficients of variation (CVs) for both intra-subject and inter-subject MD were below 10% (low variability) while FA had a wider range of CVs, 2–14% intra-subject (moderate variability), and 3–31% inter-subject (high variability). MD in ex vivo tissue was lower than in vivo (30%–50% decrease), while FA values increased in all regions (30–39% increase). The mode of angular differences between in vivo and ex vivo PEVs was 12 degrees. Conclusion This study characterizes the diffusion properties of the squirrel monkey brain and serves as the groundwork for using the squirrel monkey, both in vivo and ex vivo, as a model for diffusion MRI studies. PMID:27587226

  17. Medial temporal lesions in monkeys impair memory on a variety of tasks sensitive to human amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola-Morgan, S; Squire, L R

    1985-02-01

    Monkeys with conjoint bilateral lesions of the hippocampus and amygdala were impaired on four different tests of memory (delayed retention of object discriminations, concurrent discrimination, delayed response, and delayed nonmatching to sample). Because tests involving delays and distractions are known to be especially sensitive to human amnesia, in three of the tasks relatively long delay intervals between training and test trials were used, and in two tasks distraction was introduced during the delay intervals. The severity of the impairment increased with the length of the delay, and distraction markedly increased the memory impairment. For one task given on two occasions (delayed nonmatching to sample), the severity of the impairment was unchanged over a period of 1.5 years. Taken together with previous findings that skill learning is unimpaired in the same operated monkeys, the results of the present study strengthen the conclusion that monkeys with medial temporal lesions constitute an animal model of human amnesia. In addition, the four tasks used here appear to constitute a sensitive and appropriate battery that could be used in other studies of the neuroanatomy of memory functions in the monkey.

  18. Chronic lead exposure effects in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, W G; Singh, A; McMahon, A; Rice, D C

    1998-01-01

    Although reproductive consequences of high circulating blood lead levels (> or = 60 micrograms/dL) have been reported, potential adverse effects of chronic lead exposure in males that result in low to moderate blood lead levels (10-25 and 26-60 micrograms/dL, respectively) are unknown. Effects of chronic lead exposure to testis ultrastructure were determined in the cynomolgus monkey after oral administration of lead acetate (1500 micrograms/kg BW/day) in a vehicle in the following groups: from birth to 10 years (lifetime), postnatal day 300 to 10 years (postinfancy), and postnatal day 0-400 (infancy); monkeys in the control group received only the vehicle (95% glycerol and 5% distilled water). At age 10 years, circulating lead concentrations in lifetime and postinfancy-dosed monkeys were approximately 35 micrograms/dL, and in control and infancy animals the concentrations were exposure to lead that results in moderate blood lead concentrations induced persistent ultrastructural alterations in the cynomolgus monkey testis. Results of this study on the primate, following extrapolation to humans, could influence further refining of the impact of environmental lead contamination concentrations vis-à-vis the health of children, adults, and aged human beings.

  19. Human – monkey interaction on a University campus in Nigeria: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2017-03-28

    Mar 28, 2017 ... frequent hunting/poaching, trade in bush meat and exotic pet ownership puts Nigeria in similar, though less precarious situations, when compared with countries in south and south east Asia and in the south Pacific Islands where monkey temples abound with more frequent and closer interactions between.

  20. How rhesus monkey infants budget their time between mothers and peers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, G.D.; Dienske, H.; Luxemburg, E.A.V.; Ribbens, L.

    1981-01-01

    Social play between two rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) infants takes place mainly when they are both not in body contact with their mothers. This suggests that social play and mother-infant body contact are potential competitors in the infants' time budgets. We investigated whether the presence of a

  1. Proteome profiling of the sperm maturation milieu in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Shao-Hua; Liu, Xue-Xia; Wang, Wen-Juan; Liu, Fu-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The mammalian spermatozoon acquires its fertilising potential during transit through the epididymis, where it interacts with epididymal luminal fluid proteins (the sperm maturation milieu). In order to highlight the epididymal-specific function of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) in sperm maturation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of epididymal luminal fluid proteins was followed by identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) or MALDI-TOF/TOF and revealed over five hundred spots, comprising 198 non-redundant proteins. Some mass spectrometric data were confirmed by western blotting identification. Some common epididymal fluid proteins were identified, such as clusterin, α-1-antitrypsin, malate dehydrogenase, L-lactate dehydrogenase B, α-1-acid glycoprotein 1 and α-mannosidase. More than 7% of all proteins were anti-oxidative, which might control oxidative stress within the male tract. When compared with bull and human epididymal luminal fluid proteins, those in the rhesus monkey had more overlap with the human, which provides evidence of a close evolutionary relationship between the rhesus monkey and man. This study provides new proteomic information on possible rhesus monkey epididymal functions and novel potential biomarkers for the noninvasive assessment of male fertility.

  2. High seroprevalence of enterovirus infections in apes and old world monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvala, Heli; McIntyre, Chloe L; Imai, Natsuko; Clasper, Lucy; Djoko, Cyrille F; LeBreton, Matthew; Vermeulen, Marion; Saville, Andrew; Mutapi, Francisca; Tamoufé, Ubald; Kiyang, John; Biblia, Tafon G; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Pépin, Jacques; Njouom, Richard; Njoum, Richard; Smura, Teemu; Fair, Joseph N; Wolfe, Nathan D; Roivainen, Merja; Simmonds, Peter

    2012-02-01

    To estimate population exposure of apes and Old World monkeys in Africa to enteroviruses (EVs), we conducted a seroepidemiologic study of serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies against 3 EV types. Detection of species A, B, and D EVs infecting wild chimpanzees demonstrates their potential widespread circulation in primates.

  3. Evaluation of cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Wook; Park, Yong Sung; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Doo Wan; Lee, Hong Soo; Han, Su Cheol [Jeonbuk Department of Inhalation Research, Korea Institute of toxicology, KRICT, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    These absorbed dose can calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle transport code). Internal radiotherapy absorbed dose was calculated using conventional software, such as OLINDA/EXM or Monte Carlo simulation. However, the OLINDA/EXM does not calculate individual absorbed dose and non-standard organ, such as tumor. While the Monte Carlo simulation can calculated non-standard organ and specific absorbed dose using individual CT image. External radiotherapy, absorbed dose can calculated by specific absorbed energy in specific organs using Monte Carlo simulation. The specific absorbed energy in each organ was difference between species or even if the same species. Since they have difference organ sizes, position, and density of organs. The aim of this study was to individually evaluated cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation. We evaluation of cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed energy in each organ compared with mouse heart was 54.6 fold higher than monkey absorbed energy in heart. Likewise lung was 88.4, liver was 16.0, urinary bladder was 29.4 fold higher than monkey. It means that the distance of each organs and organ mass was effects of the absorbed energy. This result may help to can calculated absorbed dose and more accuracy plan for external radiation beam therapy and internal radiotherapy.

  4. Human – monkey interaction on a University campus in Nigeria: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human – monkey interaction on a University campus in Nigeria: An avenue for zoonotic disease transmission at the human wildlife interface? ... The low level of awareness about zoonotic disease among the respondents could be ameliorated through public health awareness campaigns by health workers and ...

  5. Low levels of sarin affect the EEG in marmoset monkeys: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helden, H.H.P.M. van; Vanwersch, R.A.P.; Kuijpers, W.C.; Trap, H.C.; Philippens, I.H.C.; Benschop, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this pilot study was to estimate the lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL) for the electroencephalogram (EEG) upon long-term, low-level exposure of vehicle-pretreated and pyridostigmine-pretreated marmoset monkeys to sarin vapour. This is the C·t value (t = 5 h) of

  6. Mother-Infant Interaction in Rhesus Monkeys Treated Chronically with Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Mari S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Drug-exposed mother-infant rhesus monkey pairs were similar to nontreated controls in the amount and types of activity displayed at the infant's tenth and ninetieth day of age. At about 3 months of age drug-exposed pairs increased in interaction, signaling mother-infant independence. This finding suggests that mother-infant attachment may be…

  7. Structural differences among serum IgA proteins of chimpanzee, rhesus monkey and rat origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, T.; Radl, J.; Mestecky, J.

    1997-01-01

    Asparagine-linked sugar chains were quantitatively released from chimpanzee, Rhesus monkey and rat IgA proteins as oligosaccharides by hydrazinolysis, converted to radioactive oligosaccharides by reduction with NaB3H4, and separated into neutral and two acidic fractions by paper electrophoresis. The

  8. Gambling primates: reactions to a modified Iowa Gambling Task in humans, chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rebecca A.; Latzman, Robert D.; de Waal, Frans B. M.; Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2014-01-01

    Humans will, at times, act against their own economic self-interest, for example, in gambling situations. To explore the evolutionary roots of this behavior, we modified a traditional human gambling task, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), for use with chimpanzees, capuchin monkeys and humans. We expanded the traditional task to include two additional payoff structures to fully elucidate the ways in which these primate species respond to differing reward distributions versus overall quantities of rewards, a component often missing in the existing literature. We found that while all three species respond as typical humans do in the standard IGT payoff structure, species and individual differences emerge in our new payoff structures. Specifically, when variance avoidance and reward maximization conflicted, roughly equivalent numbers of apes maximized their rewards and avoided variance, indicating that the traditional payoff structure of the IGT is insufficient to disentangle these competing strategies. Capuchin monkeys showed little consistency in their choices. To determine whether this was a true species difference or an effect of task presentation, we replicated the experiment but increased the intertrial interval. In this case, several capuchin monkeys followed a reward maximization strategy, while chimpanzees retained the same strategy they had used previously. This suggests that individual differences in strategies for interacting with variance and reward maximization are present in apes, but not in capuchin monkeys. The primate gambling task presented here is a useful methodology for disentangling strategies of variance avoidance and reward maximization. PMID:24504555

  9. Contextual Congruency Effect in Natural Scene Categorization: Different Strategies in Humans and Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Anne-Claire; Fize, Denis; VanRullen, Rufin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid visual categorization is a crucial ability for survival of many animal species, including monkeys and humans. In real conditions, objects (either animate or inanimate) are never isolated but embedded in a complex background made of multiple elements. It has been shown in humans and monkeys that the contextual background can either enhance or impair object categorization, depending on context/object congruency (for example, an animal in a natural vs. man-made environment). Moreover, a scene is not only a collection of objects; it also has global physical features (i.e phase and amplitude of Fourier spatial frequencies) which help define its gist. In our experiment, we aimed to explore and compare the contribution of the amplitude spectrum of scenes in the context-object congruency effect in monkeys and humans. We designed a rapid visual categorization task, Animal versus Non-Animal, using as contexts both real scenes photographs and noisy backgrounds built from the amplitude spectrum of real scenes but with randomized phase spectrum. We showed that even if the contextual congruency effect was comparable in both species when the context was a real scene, it differed when the foreground object was surrounded by a noisy background: in monkeys we found a similar congruency effect in both conditions, but in humans the congruency effect was absent (or even reversed) when the context was a noisy background. PMID:26207915

  10. Daily feeding rhythm in proboscis monkeys: a preliminary comparison with other non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ikki; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Tuuga, Augustine; Bernard, Henry; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    In non-human primates, the daily feeding rhythm, i.e., temporal fluctuation in feeding activity across the day, has been described but has rarely received much analytical interpretation, though it may play a crucial part in understanding the adaptive significance of primate foraging strategies. This study is the first to describe the detailed daily feeding rhythm in proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) based on data collected from both riverbank and inland habitats. From May 2005 to May 2006, data on feeding behavior in a group of proboscis monkeys consisting of an alpha-male, six adult females and immatures was collected via continuous focal animal sampling technique in a forest along the Menanggul River, Sabah, Malaysia. In both the male and females, the highest peak of feeding activity was in the late afternoon at 15:00-17:00, i.e., shortly before sleeping. The differences in the feeding rhythm among the seasons appeared to reflect the time spent eating fruit and/or the availability of fruit; clearer feeding peaks were detected when the monkeys spent a relevant amount of time eating fruit, but no clear peak was detected when fruit eating was less frequent. The daily feeding rhythm was not strongly influenced by daily temperature fluctuations. When comparing the daily feeding rhythm of proboscis monkeys to that of other primates, one of the most common temporal patterns detected across primates was a feeding peak in the late afternoon, although it was impossible to demonstrate this statistically because of methodological differences among studies.

  11. Capillary changes in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas of the aging rhesus monkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuker, JIH; Luiten, PGM; Fuchs, E

    2000-01-01

    The rhesus monkey is considered a useful animal model for studying human aging, because non-human primates show many of the neurobiological alterations that have been reported in aging humans. Cognitive impairment that accompanies normal aging may, at least partially, originate from capillary

  12. Anti-CD45RB monoclonal antibody prolongs renal allograft survival in cynomolgus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.; Luke, P. P. W.; Yang, H.; Visser, L.; Sun, H.; Garcia, B.; Qian, H.; Xiang, Y.; Huang, X.; Liu, W.; Senaldi, G.; Schneider, A.; Poppema, S.; Wang, H.; Jevnikar, A. M.; Zhong, R.

    Previously, an anti-CD45RB monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been shown to induce murine allograft tolerance. The present study was performed to assess the ability of an anti-human CD45RB mAb to prevent rejection in a monkey MHC-mismatched kidney transplant model. The recipients were allocated into the

  13. Pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in monkeys after oral and intramuscular administration : relation to efficacy in kidney allografting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, HJ; Slingerland, W; Mennninger, K; Ossevoort, M; Hengy, JC; Dorobek, B; Vouderscher, J; Ringers, J; Odeh, M; Jonker, Margreet

    In cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys, the dose-normalized exposure of cyclosporine administered orally as microemulsion preconcentrate (Neoral) was lower than that upon intramuscular administration. For oral administration, mean values (+/- SD) of C-max, 24-h area-under-the curve (AUC) and 24-h trough

  14. Canine distemper virus isolated from a monkey efficiently replicates on Vero cells expressing non-human primate SLAM receptors but not human SLAM receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Na; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Jianzhong; Xu, Weiwei; Li, Tiansong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Lei; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Gao, Yuwei; Hu, Guixue; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-08-02

    In 2008, an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in monkeys was reported in China. We isolated CDV strain (subsequently named Monkey-BJ01-DV) from lung tissue obtained from a rhesus monkey that died in this outbreak. We evaluated the ability of this virus on Vero cells expressing SLAM receptors from dog, monkey and human origin, and analyzed the H gene of Monkey-BJ01-DV with other strains. The Monkey-BJ01-DV isolate replicated to the highest titer on Vero cells expressing dog-origin SLAM (10(5.2±0.2) TCID50/ml) and monkey-origin SLAM (10(5.4±0.1) TCID50/ml), but achieved markedly lower titers on human-origin SLAM cells (10(3.3±0.3) TCID50/ml). Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length H gene showed that Monkey-BJ01-DV was highly related to other CDV strains obtained during recent CDV epidemics among species of the Canidae family in China, and these Monkey strains CDV (Monkey-BJ01-DV, CYN07-dV, Monkey-KM-01) possessed a number of amino acid specific substitutions (E276V, Q392R, D435Y and I542F) compared to the H protein of CDV epidemic in other animals at the same period. Our results suggested that the monkey origin-CDV-H protein could possess specific substitutions to adapt to the new host. Monkey-BJ01-DV can efficiently use monkey- and dog-origin SLAM to infect and replicate in host cells, but further adaptation may be required for efficient replication in host cells expressing the human SLAM receptor.

  15. Preference for an Opioid/Benzodiazepine Mixture over an Opioid Alone Using a Concurrent Choice Procedure in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Peter F; France, Charles P; Gerak, Lisa R

    2017-07-01

    Increased abuse of opioids is contributing to an escalation in overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines are frequently abused with opioids, possibly because they increase the potency and/or effectiveness of opioids to produce reinforcing effects. This study used a concurrent-choice procedure to determine whether monkeys would choose to self-administer a mixture of the opioid remifentanil and the benzodiazepine midazolam over remifentanil alone. Initially, three monkeys could respond on one lever for saline and on a second lever for either remifentanil alone or midazolam alone. Thereafter, monkeys chose between a dose of remifentanil (0.32 µ g/kg/infusion) that did not change and a dose of remifentanil that varied across sessions; for some sessions, midazolam was combined with varying doses of remifentanil. All monkeys received more infusions of remifentanil (0.0032-0.32 µ g/kg/infusion) than saline, whereas only two monkeys responded more for midazolam than for saline. When 0.32 µ g/kg/infusion remifentanil was available on one lever and a dose of remifentanil that varied across sessions (0.1-1 µ g/kg/infusion) was available on the other lever, monkeys chose the larger dose. Combining 3.2 µ g/kg/infusion midazolam with 0.32 µ g/kg/infusion remifentanil increased responding for the mixture over 0.32 µ g/kg/infusion remifentanil alone, although monkeys chose remifentanil alone over mixtures containing smaller doses of remifentanil. When 10 µ g/kg/infusion midazolam was combined with 0.1 µ g/kg/infusion remifentanil, monkeys chose the mixture over 0.32 µ g/kg/infusion remifentanil alone. Thus, monkeys prefer some opioid/benzodiazepine mixtures to larger doses of the opioid alone, suggesting that opioid/benzodiazepine coabuse might be due to increased potency (and possibly effectiveness) of opioids to produce reinforcing effects. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Capture techniques and morphological measurements of the mona monkey (Cercopithecus mona) on the island of Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, M E; Bensen, K J

    1998-04-01

    Morphological measurements were collected from 12 wild and 12 captive mona monkeys (Cercopithecus mona) on the Caribbean island of Grenada. Mona monkeys were introduced to Grenada from Africa approximately 200 to 300 years ago during the slave trade era. Wild monkeys were captured using either 1) a baited treadle-door trap and anesthetic-filled darts fired from a blowpipe, or 2) rifle-fired anesthetic-filled darts. All wild monkeys were released back into the forest after capture and were seen with their original groups within 24 hours of release. Captive monkeys were anesthetized using blowpipe-fired darts. A Ketaset/Rompun mixture was the most effective anesthetic for wild monkeys while Ketaset alone was suitable for captive monkeys. Responses to and recovery times from both drugs varied among individuals. Data on eight linear body measurements, canine length, testicle size, and weight were collected from all monkeys. Adult monkeys were significantly sexually dimorphic across all measurements. Mean adult male weight (mean = 4.7, SD = 0.9, n = 13) was almost twice that of adult females (mean = 2.8, SD = 0.8, n = 7). No significant differences in weight or measurements were found between adult wild and captive males. Preliminary comparisons with morphometrics for African C. mona from the literature showed the upper limit of Grenada mona body length and weight to be smaller than that of African monas for both sexes. These differences may be due to genetic divergence, ecological adaptation, inter-African geographic variation, and/or small sample sizes.

  17. Development of the interpeduncular nucleus in the midbrain of Rhesus monkey and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenn, N J; Halfon, N; Rakic, P

    1978-02-20

    The development of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) in primates was studied in rhesus monkey with 3H-thymidine autoradiographic, Nissl and Golgi methods and in humans in histological preparations from embryos and fetuses of different ages. Autoradiographic analysis demonstrated that the neurons of the monkey IPN underwent their final cell division between postconception day 36 (E36) and E42, which corresponds to Stages 17 through 21 of Hendrickx and Sawyer. Autoradiograms of monkeys sacrificed at various short intervals following exposure to a pulse of 3H-thymidine showed that IPN neurons were generated in the proximity of the ventricular surface near the confluence of the 3rd ventricle and cerebral aqueduct, migrated ventrally along the midline and then spread laterally after reaching the ventral midbrain, where IPN was first recognized at E45 (Stage 23). The distribution of successively generated neurons in autoradiograms revealed caudal to rostal and lateral to medial spatiotemporal gradients. Differentiation of IPN neuronal size and development of Nissl substance began in rhesus monkey only after postmitotic cells had reached their destination and seemed to be pronounced mainly through E104. However, growth of the dendrites and elaboration of their side branches as seen in Golgi impregnations progressed gradually from E81 to birth (E165) and perhaps even later. Analysis of histological preparations of a series of human embryos and fetuses was used to derive similar information indirectly, since the autoradiographic method cannot be applied to man. It was found that IPN neurons in human probably underwent their final division between Carnegie Stage 17 and 21. Similarly, as in monkey, postmitotic cells in human IPN displayed an inverted fountain pattern of cellular migration. IPN could first be delineated at Stage 23. There was evidence for both caudal to rostral and lateral to medial spatiotemporal gradients in the human, as in the monkey. Thus, in monkey and

  18. Comparison between carbachol iontophoresis and intravenous pilocarpine stimulated accommodation in anesthetized rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mark; He, Lin; Glasser, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    Rhesus monkeys are an animal model for human accommodation and presbyopia and consistent and repeatable methods are needed to stimulate and measure accommodation in anesthetized rhesus monkeys. Accommodation has typically been pharmacologically stimulated with topical pilocarpine or carbachol iontophoresis. Intravenous (i.v.) pilocarpine has recently been shown to produce more natural, rapid and reproducible accommodative responses compared to topical pilocarpine. Here, i.v. pilocarpine was compared to carbachol iontophoresis stimulated accommodation. Experiments were performed under anaesthesia on five previously iridectomized monkeys aged 10-16 years. In three monkeys, accommodation was stimulated with carbachol iontophoresis in five successive experiments and refraction measured with a Hartinger coincidence refractometer. In separate experiments, accommodation was stimulated using a 5 mg/kg bolus of i.v. pilocarpine given over 30 s followed by a continuous infusion of 20 mg/kg/hr for 5.5 min in three successive experiments with the same monkeys as well as in single experiments with two additional monkeys. Refraction was measured continuously using photorefraction with baseline and accommodated refraction also measured with the Hartinger. In subsequent i.v. pilocarpine experiments with each monkey, accommodative changes in lens equatorial diameter were measured in real-time with video-image analysis. Maximum accommodation of three monkeys with carbachol iontophoresis (five repeats) was (mean ± SD; range) 14.0 ± 3.5; 9.9-20.3 D and with i.v. pilocarpine stimulation (three repeats) was 11.1 ± 1.1; 9.9-13.0 D. The average of the standard deviations of maximum accommodation from each monkey was 0.8 ± 0.3 D from carbachol iontophoresis and 0.3 ± 0.2 from i.v. pilocarpine. The average latency to the start of the response after carbachol iontophoresis was 2.5 ± 3.9; 0.0-12.0 min with a time constant of 12.7 ± 9.5; 2.3-29.2 min. The average

  19. A. Femoralis in the small Green Monkey(Cercopithecus aethiops sabeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The small Green Monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops sabeus in large groups inhabits the African savannah. The animals delivered to us were from East Africa, that is from Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. The length of the animal is 110 cm, and the tail itself is 50 cm long. They can often be seen in Zoos. According to data, mostly by zoo gardens, these monkeys live for about 15 to 17 years, exceptionally for 20 years. The objective of our work was to investigate a part of their cardiovascular system so in that way to contribute to a better knowledge of this animal body structure and accordingly to comparative anatomy in general. The investigation included 6 Small Green Monkeys, of both gender, 3-4 years old, body weight 2000-3000 grams, obtained from The Institute for Virusology, vaccines and serums from Belgrade. For obtaining the hindlimb arterial vascularization, after exsanguination of the animal, contrast mass of gelatin coloured with tempera was injected into the abdominal aorta. After injecting, the blood vessels were prepared and photographed. In the Small Green Monkey, femoral artery (A. femoralis is an continuation of the external iliac artery (A. iliaca externa. The branches of the femoral artery are: A. profunda femoris, A. saphena, A. genus descendens and A. caudalis femoralis. A. profunda femoris separates to A. circumflexa femoris lateralis, Ramus muscularis and A. circumflexa femoris medialis. In humans A. femoralis branches into: A. epigastrica superficialis, A. circumflexa ilium superficialis, Aa. pudendae externae, A. profunda femoris and A. genus descendens (A. descendens genus. A. profunda femoris branches into: A. circumflexa femoris lateralis, A. circumflexa femoris medialis and Aa. perforantes. In domestic animals, mammals, the branches of the femoral artery (A. femoralis are: A. circumflexa femoris lateralis, A. saphena, A. genus descendens and Aa. caudales femoris In the Small Green Monkey, humans and domestic mammals A. femoralis

  20. Processing of pro-opiomelanocortin-derived amidated joining peptide and glycine-extended precursor in monkey pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M

    1991-01-01

    The molecular forms of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derived amidated and C-terminal glycine-extended joining peptide from monkey (Macaca mulatta) pituitary were determined. The predominant forms of joining peptide found were the low molecular peptides POMC(76-105) and POMC(76-106), respectively. Si...... sequence of monkey and human POMC extremely conserved, but also the processing patterns are similar. The monkey therefore serves as a suitable model for studying regulation of the processing of POMC and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in man....

  1. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  2. Sleeping site selection by proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilen, Katie L; Marshall, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Primates spend at least half their lives sleeping; hence, sleeping site selection can have important effects on behavior and fitness. As proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) often sleep along rivers and form bands (aggregations of one male groups) at their sleeping sites, understanding sleeping site selection may shed light on two unusual aspects of this species' socioecology: their close association with rivers and their multilevel social organization. We studied sleeping site selection by proboscis monkeys for twelve months at Sungai Tolak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia to test two main hypotheses regarding the drivers of sleeping site selection: reduction of molestation by mosquitoes and anti-predator behavior. We identified to genus and collected data on the physical structure (diameter at breast height, relative height, branch structure, and leaf coverage) of sleeping trees and available trees in three forest types. We used resource selection function models to test specific predictions derived from our two hypotheses. The monkeys preferred to sleep in large trees with few canopy connections located along rivers. The selection of large emergent trees was consistent with both of our main hypotheses: decreased molestation by mosquitoes and reduced potential entry routes for terrestrial predators. Although we are only beginning to understand how sleeping sites might influence behavior, grouping, and potential survival of this species, our study has shown that proboscis monkeys (at Sungai Tolak) have a very strong preference for large trees located near the river. As these trees are often the first to be logged by local villagers, this may exacerbate the problems of forest loss for these endangered monkeys. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Discriminative stimulus effects of flumazenil in rhesus monkeys treated chronically with chlordiazepoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, C P; Gerak, L R

    1997-03-01

    Discriminative stimulus effects of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil were studied in two rhesus monkeys receiving 3.2 mg/kg/12 h of chlordiazepoxide while discriminating between vehicle and 0.056 mg/kg of flumazenil. In a drug discrimination component responding was maintained under a FR 10 schedule of stimulus-shock termination; in a non-discrimination component responding was maintained under a FR 10 schedule of food presentation. Flumazenil and Ro 15-4513 occasioned >80% flumazenil-lever responding at doses larger than 0.032 and 0.056 mg/kg, respectively. Pentylenetetrazole, ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (betaCCE), ketamine and spiradoline failed to substitute for flumazenil although >80% drug-lever responding was observed for two of the compounds in one monkey. Flumazenil, Ro 15-4513, pentylenetetrazole, betaCCE but not ketamine or spiradoline decreased rates of responding in the food component at doses that had little effect on rates in the stimulus-shock termination component. When chlordiazepoxide injections were discontinued and saline was administered before the session, monkeys did not respond on the flumazenil lever; when flumazenil was administered under the same conditions, monkeys responded on the flumazenil lever despite not having received chlordiazepoxide for nine days. Drug stimulus control was established with flumazenil in monkeys receiving chlordiazepoxide and substitution studies suggest that this effect of flumazenil might result from antagonist actions at benzodiazepine receptors: however, lack of withdrawal-related effects after termination of chlordiazepoxide treatment precludes validation of this procedure for studying benzodiazepine dependence.

  4. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta detect rhythmic groups in music, but not the beat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henkjan Honing

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that rhythmic entrainment, long considered a human-specific mechanism, can be demonstrated in a selected group of bird species, and, somewhat surprisingly, not in more closely related species such as nonhuman primates. This observation supports the vocal learning hypothesis that suggests rhythmic entrainment to be a by-product of the vocal learning mechanisms that are shared by several bird and mammal species, including humans, but that are only weakly developed, or missing entirely, in nonhuman primates. To test this hypothesis we measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, probing a well-documented component in humans, the mismatch negativity (MMN to study rhythmic expectation. We demonstrate for the first time in rhesus monkeys that, in response to infrequent deviants in pitch that were presented in a continuous sound stream using an oddball paradigm, a comparable ERP component can be detected with negative deflections in early latencies (Experiment 1. Subsequently we tested whether rhesus monkeys can detect gaps (omissions at random positions in the sound stream; Experiment 2 and, using more complex stimuli, also the beat (omissions at the first position of a musical unit, i.e. the 'downbeat'; Experiment 3. In contrast to what has been shown in human adults and newborns (using identical stimuli and experimental paradigm, the results suggest that rhesus monkeys are not able to detect the beat in music. These findings are in support of the hypothesis that beat induction (the cognitive mechanism that supports the perception of a regular pulse from a varying rhythm is species-specific and absent in nonhuman primates. In addition, the findings support the auditory timing dissociation hypothesis, with rhesus monkeys being sensitive to rhythmic grouping (detecting the start of a rhythmic group, but not to the induced beat (detecting a regularity from a varying rhythm.

  5. Tail function during arboreal quadrupedalism in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) and tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jesse W; Russo, Gabrielle A; Fellmann, Connie D; Thatikunta, Meena A; Chadwell, Brad A

    2015-10-01

    The need to maintain stability on narrow branches is often presented as a major selective force shaping primate morphology, with adaptations to facilitate grasping receiving particular attention. The functional importance of a long and mobile tail for maintaining arboreal stability has been comparatively understudied. Tails can facilitate arboreal balance by acting as either static counterbalances or dynamic inertial appendages able to modulate whole-body angular momentum. We investigate associations between tail use and inferred grasping ability in two closely related cebid platyrrhines-cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) and black-capped squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis). Using high-speed videography of captive monkeys moving on 3.2 cm diameter poles, we specifically test the hypothesis that squirrel monkeys (characterized by grasping extremities with long digits) will be less dependent on the tail for balance than tamarins (characterized by claw-like nails, short digits, and a reduced hallux). Tamarins have relatively longer tails than squirrel monkeys, move their tails through greater angular amplitudes, at higher angular velocities, and with greater angular accelerations, suggesting dynamic use of tail to regulate whole-body angular momentum. By contrast, squirrel monkeys generally hold their tails in a comparatively stationary posture and at more depressed angles, suggesting a static counterbalancing mechanism. This study, the first empirical test of functional tradeoffs between grasping ability and tail use in arboreal primates, suggests a critical role for the tail in maintaining stability during arboreal quadrupedalism. Our findings have the potential to inform our functional understanding of tail loss during primate evolution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ecological factors predictive of wild spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth) foraging decisions in Yasuní, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    Because fruiting trees are uncommon in tropical forests, frugivorous primates experience selective pressure to incorporate knowledge of where to find feeding trees, what to expect when they arrive there, and when they can return after depleting a tree. I investigated these abilities in wild spider monkeys (Ateles belzebuth) in Yasuní, Ecuador, by analyzing the characteristics of feeding trees that drive foraging decisions. Foraging data were derived from four 2-week follows of focal adult females, conducted between May and December 1999, during which I measured and mapped all trees in which the focal subject fed, feeding bout duration, and the number of conspecifics feeding simultaneously with the focal. Taking into account the order in which feeding trees were visited across each follow, I analyzed each foraging decision from the second week of a follow, treating all previously visited trees as options for visits. I scored each option tree in terms of nine ecological variables, including the distance from the decision to each location tree, DBH, recent feeding time and mean feeding times for the focal and other monkeys present, and the interval in hours between the foraging decision and the most recent visit to each option tree. I then examined the predictive strength of the model using logistic regression analysis, comparing characteristics of selected trees to those not selected. The overall model successfully predicted trees selected by focal monkeys (r(2)  = 0.27). Monkeys preferentially moved to nearby, large canopy trees, in which previous feeding success was high, and which were visited after an interval of 3.5 days. Interval mattered most for medium and large trees, but did not predict selection for trees trees, Yasuní spider monkeys appeared to integrate spatial, value, and temporal information when deciding where to feed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Why are there apes? Evidence for the co-evolution of ape and monkey ecomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Apes, members of the superfamily Hominoidea, possess a distinctive suite of anatomical and behavioral characters which appear to have evolved relatively late and relatively independently. The timing of paleontological events, extant cercopithecine and hominoid ecomorphology and other evidence suggests that many distinctive ape features evolved to facilitate harvesting ripe fruits among compliant terminal branches in tree edges. Precarious, unpredictably oriented, compliant supports in the canopy periphery require apes to maneuver using suspensory and non-sterotypical postures (i.e. postures with eccentric limb orientations or extreme joint excursions). Diet differences among extant species, extant species numbers and evidence of cercopithecoid diversification and expansion, in concert with a reciprocal decrease in hominoid species, suggest intense competition between monkeys and apes over the last 20 Ma. It may be that larger body masses allow great apes to succeed in contest competitions for highly desired food items, while the ability of monkeys to digest antifeedant-rich unripe fruits allows them to win scramble competitions. Evolutionary trends in morphology and inferred ecology suggest that as monkeys evolved to harvest fruit ever earlier in the fruiting cycle they broadened their niche to encompass first more fibrous, tannin- and toxin-rich unripe fruits and later, for some lineages, mature leaves. Early depletion of unripe fruit in the central core of the tree canopy by monkeys leaves a hollow sphere of ripening fruits, displacing antifeedant-intolerant, later-arriving apes to small-diameter, compliant terminal branches. Hylobatids, orangutans, Pan species, gorillas and the New World atelines may have each evolved suspensory behavior independently in response to local competition from an expanding population of monkeys. Genetic evidence of rapid evolution among chimpanzees suggests that adaptations to suspensory behavior, vertical climbing, knuckle

  8. Genetic consequences of seed dispersal to sleeping trees by white-bellied spider monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karubian, Jordan; Ottewell, Kym; Link, Andres; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Frugivorous animals frequently generate clumped distributions of seeds away from source trees via 'destination-based' dispersal processes. For example, use of traditional sleeping trees by white-bellied spider monkeys Ateles belzebuth generates high densities of seeds of a preferred food source, the palm Oenocarpus bataua, at these sites. Little is known about the maternal seed source diversity and population genetic metrics of seed pools encountered at these sites. Given the repeated use of sleeping trees over time, and the fluid social organization and wide ranging movements exhibited by spider monkeys, we predicted that O. bataua seed pools beneath sleeping trees would be characterized by relatively high values of maternal seed source diversity and standard metrics of genetic diversity. Contrary to these expectations, we found relatively low average maternal seed source diversity beneath each of 6 sleeping trees we studied (weighted mean α = 3.74), but considerable variation in diversity of maternal seed sources between sleeping trees (range = 1.75-10.1) and high heterogeneity in standard genetic diversity measures between sleeping trees. There was no evidence for overlap in maternal seed sources between sleeping tree sites (δ = 1.0), resulting in significant genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.055-0.319) between these sites. Observed variation between sleeping trees could not be explained by the number of individual spider monkeys whose core home ranges included a given tree, nor by distance to a central mineral lick, a focal point of spider monkey activity. These findings suggest that spider monkey seed dispersal to sleeping trees is spatially restricted, perhaps because the animals visit sleeping trees at the end of the day and therefore only disperse O. bataua fruits that they ingest late in the day. These results add to our growing appreciation of the ways frugivore behavior mechanistically shapes seed dispersal outcomes.

  9. Telemetric assessment of social and single housing: Evaluation of electrocardiographic intervals in jacketed cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Robert A; Tichenor, Stephen D; Regalia, Douglas E; York, Kristina; Holzgrefe, Henry H

    2015-01-01

    Proactive efforts to socially house laboratory animals are a contemporary, important focus for enhancing animal welfare. Jacketing cynomolgus monkeys has been traditionally considered an exclusionary criterion for social housing based on unsubstantiated concerns that study conduct or telemetry equipment might be compromised. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of jacketing naïve, adolescent cynomolgus monkeys in different single and social housing types based on parallel comparisons of heart rate. Eight naive cynomolgus monkeys were randomized into pairs and ECG data were collected for 24h from each animal in each housing condition using a crossover design. Caging paradigms consisted of standard individual, standard pair, quaternary pair (4 linked cages), and European-style pair housing in non-sequential order varied by pair to control for possible time bias. Dosing and blood collection procedures were performed to characterize any effects of housing on ECG data during study conduct. There was no increase in the incidence of equipment damage in pair vs. individually housed animals. Further, animals in all 4 housing paradigms showed similar acclimation assessed as heart rate (mean 139-154 beats per minute), and maintained similar diurnal rhythms, with an expected slowing of the heart rate at night (aggregate lights out HR 110±4bpm compared to daytime 146±7bpm). This study demonstrates the effects of different social access and housing types on the study-naïve cynomolgus monkeys during jacketed cardiovascular telemetry data collection in a repeat-dose toxicology study design. There were no discernible effects of social housing on baseline ECG parameters collected via jacketed telemetry, and all animals maintained expected diurnal rhythms in all housing settings tested. These data demonstrate that cynomolgus monkeys can be socially housed during data collection as a standard practice, consistent with global efforts to improve study animal welfare. Copyright

  10. Two distinct gamma-2 herpesviruses in African green monkeys: a second gamma-2 herpesvirus lineage among old world primates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greensill, J.; Sheldon, J. A.; Renwick, N. M.; Beer, B. E.; Norley, S.; Goudsmit, J.; Schulz, T. F.

    2000-01-01

    Primate gamma-2 herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses) have so far been found in humans (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV], also called human herpesvirus 8), macaques (Macaca spp.) (rhesus rhadinovirus [RRV] and retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus [RFHV]), squirrel monkeys (Saimiri

  11. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    . To this end, we investigated the effects of xanomeline on the behavior induced by D-amphetamine and (-)-apomorphine in drug-naive Cebus apella monkeys. Antipsychotic compounds antagonize amphetamine-induced motor unrest and stereotypies in this species. Xanomeline inhibited D-amphetamine-induced motor unrest...... xanomeline was tested in EPS-sensitized Cebus apella monkeys, EPS were not observed at the dose range of xanomeline used in the D-amphetamine-apomorphine combination study (0.5-3 mg/kg). However, when xanomeline was tested at 4 mg/kg, moderate dystonia was seen in two out of three monkeys. It is concluded...... that xanomeline inhibits D-amphetamine- and (-)-apomorphine-induced behavior in Cebus apella monkeys at doses that do not cause EPS. These data further substantiate that muscarinic receptor agonists may be useful in the pharmacological treatment of psychosis....

  12. Evaluation of σ-1 receptor radioligand 18F-FTC-146 in rats and squirrel monkeys using PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, Michelle L; Shen, Bin; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2014-01-01

    -FTC-146 was observed in rat plasma. Preliminary monkey PET/MRI studies demonstrated specific accumulation of (18)F-FTC-146 in the brain (mainly in cortical structures, cerebellum, and vermis) that could be attenuated by pretreatment with haloperidol. HPLC of monkey plasma suggested radioligand metabolism...... chromatography (HPLC). Preliminary PET/MRI of squirrel monkey brain was conducted along with HPLC assessment of (18)F-FTC-146 stability in monkey plasma and human serum. RESULTS: Biodistribution studies showed that (18)F-FTC-146 accumulated in S1R-rich rat organs, including the lungs, pancreas, spleen, and brain....... Pretreatment with known S1R compounds, haloperidol, or BD1047, before radioligand administration, significantly attenuated (18)F-FTC-146 accumulation in all rat brain regions by approximately 85% (P

  13. Primacy and recency effects in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a serial probe recognition task. III. A developmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, S M; Castro, C A

    1998-04-01

    In children, the recency effect emerges prior to the primacy effect. To determine whether this dissociation is also seen in nonhuman primates, we evaluated the development of the primacy and recency effect in 3 young adult (35 months) and 4 adolescent (21 months) male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a six-item serial probe recognition (SPR) task. As predicted, the young adult monkeys displayed both effects, while the adolescent monkeys only displayed the recency effect. Not until after 26 months of training on the SPR task did the adolescent monkeys exhibit both the primacy and recency effect. Interference and strategy differences are discussed in terms of the results along with an interpretation of Rudy's (1992) configural association theory of cognitive development. Additional possible explanations for this developmental dissociation include the delayed maturation of the neocortical, hippocampal, and/or cholinergic systems, the latter two having been shown to be important in the expression of the primacy but not the recency effect.

  14. IOP-Lowering Effect of ONO-9054, A Novel Dual Agonist of Prostanoid EP3 and FP Receptors, in Monkeys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamane, Shinsaku; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Satoshi; Nagai, Kazufumi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Neki, Shinichi; Suto, Fumitaka; Kambe, Tohru; Hirota, Yasushi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a better IOP reduction can be observed in conscious, normotensive monkeys treated with ONO-9054, a novel dual EP3 and FP receptor agonist, compared...

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Inhaled Nano- and Micro-Particle Deposition in the Rhesus Monkey Nasal Passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Simulations of Inhaled Nano - and Micro- Particle Deposition in the Rhesus Monkey Nasal Passages Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...old, 11.9 kg) rhesus monkey were used to predict deposition of inhaled nano - and micro- particles . Steady-state, inspiratory airflow simulations were...on the simulation data for nano - and micro- particle deposition to allow for simplified calculations of age-based nasal deposition in the rhesus

  16. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  17. Cyto-, myelo- and chemoarchitecture of the prefrontal cortex of the Cebus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Rizzolo, Roelf J; De Lima, Miguel A X; Ervolino, Edilson; de Oliveira, José A; Casatti, Claudio A

    2011-01-13

    According to several lines of evidence, the great expansion observed in the primate prefrontal cortex (PfC) was accompanied by the emergence of new cortical areas during phylogenetic development. As a consequence, the structural heterogeneity noted in this region of the primate frontal lobe has been associated with diverse behavioral and cognitive functions described in human and non-human primates. A substantial part of this evidence was obtained using Old World monkeys as experimental model; while the PfC of New World monkeys has been poorly studied. In this study, the architecture of the PfC in five capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) was analyzed based on four different architectonic tools, Nissl and myelin staining, histochemistry using the lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin and immunohistochemistry using SMI-32 antibody. Twenty-two architectonic areas in the Cebus PfC were distinguished: areas 8v, 8d, 9d, 12l, 45, 46v, 46d, 46vr and 46dr in the lateral PfC; areas 11l, 11m, 12o, 13l, 13m, 13i, 14r and 14c in the orbitofrontal cortex, with areas 14r and 14c occupying the ventromedial corner; areas 32r, 32c, 25 and 9m in the medial PfC, and area 10 in the frontal pole. This number is significantly higher than the four cytoarchitectonic areas previously recognized in the same species. However, the number and distribution of these areas in Cebus were to a large extent similar to those described in Old World monkeys PfC in more recent studies. The present parcellation of the Cebus PfC considerably modifies the scheme initially proposed for this species but is in line with previous studies on Old World monkeys. Thus, it was observed that the remarkable anatomical similarity between the brains of genera Macaca and Cebus may extend to architectonic aspects. Since monkeys of both genera evolved independently over a long period of time facing different environmental pressures, the similarities in the architectonic maps of PfC in both genera are issues of interest

  18. Cyto-, myelo- and chemoarchitecture of the prefrontal cortex of the Cebus monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casatti Claudio A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to several lines of evidence, the great expansion observed in the primate prefrontal cortex (PfC was accompanied by the emergence of new cortical areas during phylogenetic development. As a consequence, the structural heterogeneity noted in this region of the primate frontal lobe has been associated with diverse behavioral and cognitive functions described in human and non-human primates. A substantial part of this evidence was obtained using Old World monkeys as experimental model; while the PfC of New World monkeys has been poorly studied. In this study, the architecture of the PfC in five capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella was analyzed based on four different architectonic tools, Nissl and myelin staining, histochemistry using the lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin and immunohistochemistry using SMI-32 antibody. Results Twenty-two architectonic areas in the Cebus PfC were distinguished: areas 8v, 8d, 9d, 12l, 45, 46v, 46d, 46vr and 46dr in the lateral PfC; areas 11l, 11m, 12o, 13l, 13m, 13i, 14r and 14c in the orbitofrontal cortex, with areas 14r and 14c occupying the ventromedial corner; areas 32r, 32c, 25 and 9m in the medial PfC, and area 10 in the frontal pole. This number is significantly higher than the four cytoarchitectonic areas previously recognized in the same species. However, the number and distribution of these areas in Cebus were to a large extent similar to those described in Old World monkeys PfC in more recent studies. Conclusions The present parcellation of the Cebus PfC considerably modifies the scheme initially proposed for this species but is in line with previous studies on Old World monkeys. Thus, it was observed that the remarkable anatomical similarity between the brains of genera Macaca and Cebus may extend to architectonic aspects. Since monkeys of both genera evolved independently over a long period of time facing different environmental pressures, the similarities in the architectonic

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of awake monkeys: some approaches for improving imaging quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Feng; Dillenburger, Barbara C.; Friedman, Robert M.; Chen, Li M.; Gore, John C.; Avison, Malcolm J.; Roe, Anna W.

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), at high magnetic field strength can suffer from serious degradation of image quality because of motion and physiological noise, as well as spatial distortions and signal losses due to susceptibility effects. Overcoming such limitations is essential for sensitive detection and reliable interpretation of fMRI data. These issues are particularly problematic in studies of awake animals. As part of our initial efforts to study functional brain activations in awake, behaving monkeys using fMRI at 4.7T, we have developed acquisition and analysis procedures to improve image quality with encouraging results. We evaluated the influence of two main variables on image quality. First, we show how important the level of behavioral training is for obtaining good data stability and high temporal signal-to-noise ratios. In initial sessions, our typical scan session lasted 1.5 hours, partitioned into short (movements resulting in considerable image misregistrations. After a few months of extensive behavioral training, we were able to increase the length of individual runs and the total length of each session. The monkey learned to wait until the end of a block for fluid reward, resulting in longer periods of continuous acquisition. Each additional 60 training sessions extended the duration of each session by 60 minutes, culminating, after about 140 training sessions, in sessions that last about four hours. As a result, the average translational movement decreased from over 500 μm to less than 80 μm, a displacement close to that observed in anesthetized monkeys scanned in a 7 T horizontal scanner. Another major source of distortion at high fields arises from susceptibility variations. To reduce such artifacts, we used segmented gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences. Increasing the number of segments significantly decreased susceptibility artifacts and image distortion. Comparisons of images from functional runs using four

  20. Mining noise affects loud call structures and emission patterns of wild black-fronted titi monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, M H L; Kaizer, M C; Young, R J; Rodrigues, M; Sousa-Lima, R S

    2017-09-11

    Anthropogenic noise pollution is increasing and can constrain acoustic communication in animals. Our aim was to investigate if the acoustic parameters of loud calls and their diurnal pattern in the black-fronted titi monkey (Callicebus nigrifrons) are affected by noise produced by mining activity in a fragment of Atlantic Forest in Brazil. We installed two passive acoustic monitoring devices to record sound 24 h/day, 7 days every 2 months, for a year; one unit was close to an opencast mine and the other 2.5 km away from it. Both sites presented similar habitat structures and were inhabited by groups of black-fronted titi monkeys. We quantified the noise at both sites by measuring the equivalent continuous sound level every 2 months for 1 year and quantified the emission of loud calls by titi monkeys through visual inspection of the recordings. The close site presented higher ambient noise levels than the far site. The quantitative comparison of loud calls of black-fronted titi monkeys between the two sites showed less calling activity in the site close to the mine than in the site further away. Approximately 20 % of the calls detected at the site close to the mine were masked by noise from truck traffic. Loud calls were longer at the site far from the mine and the diurnal patterns of vocal activity differed in the amount of calling as well as in the timing of peak calling activity between the two sites. Our results indicate that mining noise may constrain titi monkeys' long-distance vocal communication. Loud calls occupy a similar frequency band to mining noise, and an increase in ambient noise may be triggering black-fronted titi monkeys to adjust their long-distance communication patterns to avoid masking of their calls. Given that vocalizations are an important means of social interaction in this species, there are concerns about the impact of mining noise on populations exposed to this human activity.

  1. Adaptive changes in vergence eye movements induced by vergence-vestibular interaction training in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumie; Akao, Teppei; Kurkin, Sergei; Fukushima, Junko; Fukushima, Kikuro

    2004-05-01

    Clear vision of objects moving in three-dimensional space near an observer is attained by a combination of smooth-pursuit and vergence eye movements. The two systems must interact with the vestibular system to maintain the image of the object on the fovea. Previous studies showed that training with smooth-pursuit vestibular interactions resulted in adaptive changes in the smooth-pursuit response. Although vergence and smooth-pursuit systems are thought to have separate neural substrates, recent studies indicate that the caudal parts of the frontal eye fields that receive vestibular inputs contain neurons that discharge in response to combinations of smooth-pursuit and vergence. This combination of discharge sensitivities suggests the possibility that adaptive changes may be induced in the vergence system by vestibular inputs during vergence-pursuit training. To explore this possibility, we examined the effects of training with conflicting vestibular and vergence tracking in four head-stabilized monkeys. Animals were rewarded for tracking a laser spot that moved towards or away from them at 1 Hz in phase with sinusoidal whole-body rotation (+/- 5 degrees) in the pitch plane; the spot moved closer when the monkey's nose moved downward. From the monkey's point of view, the spot moved sinusoidally 10-66 cm in front of them along the mid-sagittal plane, requiring symmetrical vergence eye movements of 4.8 degrees for each eye. Eye movements induced by equivalent spot motion at 0.3-1.0 Hz with or without chair rotation were examined before and after training for each session (0.5-1.0 h). Before training, pitch rotation alone in complete darkness did not induce vergence eye movements in any of the monkeys tested. Vergence tracking without chair rotation showed decreased gain and increased phase lag (re vergence target velocity) at frequencies above 0.5 Hz. After training, the vergence response during chair rotation with the spot showed significantly higher gains and

  2. Validation of an auditory sensory reinforcement paradigm: Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli) do not prefer consonant over dissonant sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Hiroki; Basile, Muriel; Olivier, Marion; Remeuf, Kevin; Nagumo, Sumiharu; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Lemasson, Alban

    2013-08-01

    The central position and universality of music in human societies raises the question of its phylogenetic origin. One of the most important properties of music involves harmonic musical intervals, in response to which humans show a spontaneous preference for consonant over dissonant sounds starting from early human infancy. Comparative studies conducted with organisms at different levels of the primate lineage are needed to understand the evolutionary scenario under which this phenomenon emerged. Although previous research found no preference for consonance in a New World monkey species, the question remained opened for Old World monkeys. We used an experimental paradigm based on a sensory reinforcement procedure to test auditory preferences for consonant sounds in Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli campbelli), an Old World monkey species. Although a systematic preference for soft (70 dB) over loud (90 dB) control white noise was found, Campbell's monkeys showed no preference for either consonant or dissonant sounds. The preference for soft white noise validates our noninvasive experimental paradigm, which can be easily reused in any captive facility to test for auditory preferences. This would suggest that human preference for consonant sounds is not systematically shared with New and Old World monkeys. The sensitivity for harmonic musical intervals emerged probably very late in the primate lineage.

  3. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  4. Single subcutaneous dosing of cefovecin in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, J.; Thuesen, Line Risager; Braskamp, G.

    2011-01-01

    Cefovecin is a third-generation cephalosporin approved for antibacterial treatment with a 14-day dosing interval in dogs and cats. This antibiotic may also be useful for zoo and wildlife veterinary medicine, because of its broad spectrum and long duration of activity. The aim of the study...... wounds were determined. After administration, blood, urine, and feces were collected, and concentrations of cefovecin were determined. Further, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for bacteria isolated from fresh skin wounds of monkeys during a health control program were determined. The mean...... maximum plasma concentration (C(max) ) of cefovecin was 78 µg/mL and was achieved after 57 min. The mean apparent long elimination half-life (t½) was 6.6 h and excretion occurred mainly via urine. The MIC for the majority of the bacteria examined was >100 µg/mL. The PK of cefovecin in rhesus monkeys...

  5. Experience-dependent changes in the development of face preferences in infant rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Lisa A; Murphy, Lauren; Feczko, Eric; Brooks, Jenna; Collantes, Marie; Heitz, Thomas R

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that early experience shapes the development of visual perception for faces in humans. However, the effect of experience on the development of social attention in non-human primates is unknown. In two studies, we examined the effect of cumulative social experience on developmental changes in attention to the faces of unfamiliar conspecifics or heterospecifics, and mom versus an unfamiliar female. From birth, infant rhesus monkeys preferred to look at conspecific compared to heterospecific faces, but this pattern reversed over time. In contrast, no consistent differences were found for attention to mom's face compared to an unfamiliar female. These results suggest differential roles of social experience in shaping the development of face preferences in infant monkeys. Results have important implications for establishing normative trajectories for the development of face preferences in an animal model of human social behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Radiographic incidence of spinal osteopathologies in captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Godínez, Braulio; Ibáñez-Contreras, Alejandra; Perdigón-Castañeda, Gerardo; Galván-Montaño, Alfonso; García-Montes de Oca, Guadalupe; Zapata-Valdez, Carinthia; Tena-Betancourt, Eduardo

    2010-10-01

    Degenerative spinal disease is a leading cause of chronic disability both in humans and animals. Although widely seen as a normal occurrence of aging, degenerative spinal disease can be caused by various genetic, iatrogenic, inflammatory, and congenital factors. The objective of this study was to characterize the degenerative spine-related diseases and the age at onset in a random subpopulation of 20 captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; male, 13; female, 7; age: range, 4 to 27 y; median, 18.5 y). Spinal radiographic evaluation (left lateral, right lateral, and ventrodorsal views) of the spinal column (C1 to S1) was performed, and spinal degenerative disease was scored. The incidence of osteopathology was higher in the 14- to 18-y-old group, but incidence did not differ according to sex. In the studied population, degenerative changes were present in monkeys as young as 9 y of age.

  7. Septicemic invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) with severe diffused suppurative meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, Kazufumi; Takayama, Kou; Bito, Makiko; Shimokubo, Natsumi; Kawashima, Ryosuke; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2017-07-07

    A 2-year-old male cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) showed neurological symptoms during quarantine for importation into Japan, and was euthanized due to poor prognosis. Gross anatomical examination revealed a hemorrhagic lesion around the lateral ventricle in the cerebrum. Histologically, severe diffused suppurative meningitis and ventriculitis were detected with numerous Gram-negative bacilli in the cerebrum. Immunohistochemically, the bacilli were positively stained with an antibody against Klebsiella pneumoniae. The bacterium was isolated from the liver, and it was confirmed to be K. pneumoniae by 16S rDNA sequencing. The isolate displayed a hypermucoviscosity phenotype, was positive for the rmpA and k2A genes, and demonstrated multidrug resistance. These results suggest that invasive K. pneumoniae can cause septicemic infection, characterized by severe diffused suppurative meningoencephalitis in monkeys.

  8. Quantitative genetics of costly neonatal sexual size dimorphism in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    BLOMQUIST, G. E.; WILLIAMS, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    Offspring size is often an intimate link between the fitness of parents and offspring. Among mammals, neonate mass is also related to adult levels of dimorphism and intrasexual competitive mating. We describe the sex-specific genetic architecture of neonate mass in captive squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis), a small Neotropical primate. Best fitting quantitative genetic models show strong maternal genetic effects with little difference between sexes offering limited opportunity for neonatal dimorphism to respond to observed or hypothetical selection. Heritabilities that are approximately zero also imply it is unlikely that neonatal dimorphism can evolve as a correlated response to selection on adult size. However, male mass is also more dependent on maternal condition (age and parity) making dimorphism plastic. Finally, we hypothesize that large maternal genetic effects reflect income breeding and tightly synchronized seasonal reproduction in squirrel monkeys, both of which require strong maternal control of offspring growth and timing of birth. PMID:23437981

  9. Pedicled Instep Flap and Tibial Nerve Reconstruction in a Cynomolgus Monkey [Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Weiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male cynomolgus monkey experienced extensive soft tissue trauma to the right caudal calf area. Some weeks after complete healing of the original wounds, the monkey developed a chronic pressure sore on plantar surface of the heel of its right foot. A loss of sensitivity in the sole of the foot was hypothesized. The skin defect was closed by a medial sensate pedicled instep flap followed by counter transplantation of a full thickness graft from the interdigital webspace. The integrity of the tibial nerve was revised and reconstructed by means of the turnover flap technique. Both procedures were successful. This is an uncommon case in an exotic veterinary patient as it demonstrates a reconstructive skin flap procedure for the treatment of a chronic, denervated wound in combination with the successful reconstruction of 2.5 cm gap in the tibial nerve.

  10. Radiographic Incidence of Spinal Osteopathologies in Captive Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Godínez, Braulio; Ibáñez-Contreras, Alejandra; Perdigón-Castañeda, Gerardo; Galván-Montaño, Alfonso; de Oca, Guadalupe García-Montes; Zapata-Valdez, Carinthia; Tena-Betancourt, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative spinal disease is a leading cause of chronic disability both in humans and animals. Although widely seen as a normal occurrence of aging, degenerative spinal disease can be caused by various genetic, iatrogenic, inflammatory, and congenital factors. The objective of this study was to characterize the degenerative spine-related diseases and the age at onset in a random subpopulation of 20 captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; male, 13; female, 7; age: range, 4 to 27 y; median, 18.5 y). Spinal radiographic evaluation (left lateral, right lateral, and ventrodorsal views) of the spinal column (C1 to S1) was performed, and spinal degenerative disease was scored. The incidence of osteopathology was higher in the 14- to 18-y-old group, but incidence did not differ according to sex. In the studied population, degenerative changes were present in monkeys as young as 9 y of age. PMID:21262126

  11. Electronic Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-01-01

    Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks...

  12. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  13. Vacuum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Eichmeier, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen experts from the electronics industry, research institutes and universities have joined forces to prepare this book. ""Vacuum Electronics"" covers the electrophysical fundamentals, the present state of the art and applications, as well as the future prospects of microwave tubes and systems, optoelectronics vacuum devices, electron and ion beam devices, light and X-ray emitters, particle accelerators and vacuum interrupters. These topics are supplemented by useful information about the materials and technologies of vacuum electronics and vacuum technology.

  14. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  15. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically associated with other data and which is intended by the user to serve as a signature;. The suggested new definition for an electronic signature reads as follows: 'electronic signature' means a sound, symbol or process that is (i) uniquely linked to the ...

  16. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    (a) facilitate ecommerce;2. (b) remove and prevent barriers to electronic communications in South Africa;3. (c) ensure that electronic transactions in the Republic conform to the highest international standards;4. (d) promote the development of electronic transactions services which are responsive to the needs of users and ...

  17. The physiological effect of human grooming on the heart rate and the heart rate variability of laboratory non-human primates: a pilot study in male rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Clara Grandi; Hiroaki eIshida

    2015-01-01

    Grooming is a widespread, essential and complex behavior with social and affiliative valence in the non-human primate world. Its impact at the autonomous nervous system level has been studied during allogrooming among monkeys living in a semi-naturalistic environment. For the first time, we investigated the effect of human grooming to monkey in a typical experimental situation inside laboratory. We analyzed the autonomic response of male monkeys groomed by a familiar human (experimenter), in ...

  18. Effects of social reorganization on dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability and cocaine self-administration in male cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czoty, P W; Gould, R W; Gage, H D; Nader, M A

    2017-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated that brain dopamine D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) and the reinforcing effects of cocaine can be influenced by a monkey's position in the social dominance hierarchy. In this study, we manipulated the social ranks of monkeys by reorganizing social groups and assessed effects on D2/D3R availability and cocaine self-administration. Male cynomolgus monkeys (N = 12) had been trained to self-administer cocaine under a concurrent cocaine-food reinforcement schedule. Previously, PET measures of D2/D3R availability in the caudate nucleus and putamen had been obtained with [ 18 F]fluoroclebopride during cocaine abstinence, while monkeys lived in stable social groups of four monkeys/pen. For this study, monkeys were reorganized into groups that consisted of (1) four previously dominant, (2) four previously subordinate, and (3) a mix of previously dominant and subordinate monkeys. After 3 months, D2/D3R availability was redetermined and cocaine self-administration was reexamined. D2/D3R availability significantly increased after reorganization in monkeys who were formerly subordinate, with the greatest increases observed in those that became dominant. No consistent changes in D2/D3R availability were observed in formerly dominant monkeys. Cocaine self-administration did not vary according to rank after reorganization of social groups. However, when compared to their previous cocaine self-administration data, the potency of cocaine as a reinforcer decreased in 9 of 11 monkeys. These results indicate that changing the social conditions can alter D2/D3R availability in subordinate monkeys in a manner suggestive of environmental enrichment. In most monkeys, social reorganization shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the right, also consistent with environmental enrichment.

  19. Effects of Atropine and Azaprophen on Matching and Detection in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    substantially more potent than atropine for inhibiting termining whether atropine and azaprophen could be differ- carbachol-induced c,- amylase release (6. 7, 13...investigated the behavioral effects of azap- tion of daily fruit and vitamin supplements, was presented rophen and atropine in rhesus monkeys using...thank Jeffrey Witkin for helpful comments on the with results from carbachol-induced a- amylase release (6, 7, manuscript and Donald Conrad and Lisa King

  20. Conservation of the Proboscis Monkey and the Orangutan in Borneo: Comparative Issues and Economic Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Swarna Nantha, Hemanath

    2007-01-01

    Concentrating on their presence in Borneo, the ecology and conservation of two large Southeast Asian primates, the orangutan Pongo pymaeus and the proboscis monkey Nasalis larvatus are reviewed. The former species occurs only in Borneo and Sumatra and the latter only in Borneo. The comparative threats facing these two endangered primates and their approximate numbers in the wild are put into perspective. The long-term survival of both species is adversely affected by the degradation and conve...

  1. The pharmacokinetics of lisuride hydrogen maleate in rat, rabbit and rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpel, M; Toda, T; Oshino, N; Pommerenke, G

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of lisuride hydrogen maleate (LHM) were investigated in rat, rabbit and rhesus monkey. Experiments were designed to meet not only the requirements of drug registration but also to serve other preclinical disciplines (toxicology, pharmacology). LHM is absorbed almost completely at a dose level of 100-250 micrograms/kg. During absorption and first liver passage (FPE) LHM is metabolized. The FPE was highest in the rhesus monkey and lowest in the rat. Calculated on bioavailability during chronic tolerance studies, in the highest dose group rats were burdened with 180-fold and rhesus monkeys with 70-fold the highest human dose (parkinsonism). Total clearance values indicated the presence of extrahepatic metabolism in all animal species. Terminal half-lives of unchanged drug in plasma were in the range of a few hours. Therefore, no accumulation of unchanged drug was expected to occur following daily repeated administration in the animal species investigated. Elimination of 14C-radioactivity proceeded mainly via the liver in rat and rabbit. The rhesus monkey excreted most of the dose administered in the urine. Enterohepatic circulation of 14C-material was demonstrated in the rat. In the rat but not in the other two species a small part of the dose (about 2%) accumulated in blood cells in the form of metabolites. Unchanged lisuride is able to cross membranes very rapidly, this was shown in distribution studies (whole-body autoradiography of rat, direct measurements in rat and rabbit). Transfer of lisuride into fetuses and brain is governed by its concentration in plasma. Drug level decrease in fetuses and brain was shown to somewhat slower than in plasma. Detailed evaluation of the distribution pattern in the brain of rat and rabbit showed a high affinity of lisuride for its preferential target tissue, the pituitary.

  2. Spatial memory and the monkey hippocampus: not all space is created equal.

    OpenAIRE

    Banta Lavenex Pamela; Lavenex Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory however few have reliably produced inconsistent results. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory has been clearly established in rodents studies in nonhuman primates have made a variety of claims that range from the involvement of the hippocampus in spatial memory only at relatively longer memory delays to no role for the hippocampus in spatial memory at all. In contrast we have shown that ...

  3. Spatial memory and the monkey hippocampus: not all space is created equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta Lavenex, Pamela; Lavenex, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory, however few, have reliably produced inconsistent results. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory has been clearly established in rodents, studies in nonhuman primates have made a variety of claims that range from the involvement of the hippocampus in spatial memory only at relatively longer memory delays, to no role for the hippocampus in spatial memory at all. In contrast, we have shown that selective damage restricted to the hippocampus (CA regions) prevents the learning or use of allocentric, spatial relational representations of the environment in freely behaving adult monkeys tested in an open-field arena. In this commentary, we discuss a unifying framework that explains these apparently discrepant results regarding the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory. We describe clear and strict criteria to interpret the findings from previous studies and guide future investigations of spatial memory in monkeys. Specifically, we affirm that, as in the rodent, the primate hippocampus is critical for spatial relational learning and memory, and in a time-independent manner. We describe how claims to the contrary are the result of experimental designs that fail to recognize, and control for, egocentric (hippocampus-independent) and allocentric (hippocampus-dependent) spatial frames of reference. Finally, we conclude that the available data demonstrate unequivocally that the central role of the hippocampus in allocentric, spatial relational learning and memory is conserved among vertebrates, including nonhuman primates. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Spatial memory and the monkey hippocampus: not all space is created equal

    OpenAIRE

    Lavenex, Pamela Banta; LAVENEX, PIERRE

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory, however few, have reliably produced inconsistent results. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory has been clearly established in rodents, studies in nonhuman primates have made a variety of claims that range from the involvement of the hippocampus in spatial memory only at relatively longer memory delays, to no role for the hippocampus in spatial memory at all. In contrast, we have shown ...

  5. Proximal and Distal Predictors of the Spider Monkey's Stress Levels in Fragmented Landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José D Ordóñez-Gómez

    Full Text Available The rapid loss, fragmentation and degradation of tropical forests threaten the survival of many animal species. However, the way in which these phenomena affect animal health has been poorly explored, thus limiting the design of appropriate conservation strategies. To address this, here we identified using linear mixed models the effect of proximal (diet, activity pattern, hunting and logging and distal (sum of the basal areas of fruiting-tree species [SBAFS], landscape forest cover and degree of forest fragmentation variables over fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM levels-hormones associated with animal health and fitness-of six groups of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi inhabiting six landscapes with different spatial structures in Mexico. Proximal variables showed a stronger predictive power over fGCMs than distal. In this sense, increases in travel time, the occurrence of hunting, and reductions in rest time and fruit consumption resulted in higher fGCM levels. Regarding distal variables, increases in SBAFS were negatively related to fGCM levels, thus suggesting that food scarcity increases stress hormone levels. Nevertheless, contrary to theoretical expectations, spider monkeys living in smaller tracts of forest spent less time travelling, but the same time feeding on fruit as those in more forested areas. The lower net energy return associated with this combination of factors would explain why, contrary to theoretical expectations, increased forest cover was associated with increased levels of fGCMs in these groups. Our study shows that, at least in the short term, spider monkeys in fragmented landscapes do not always present higher levels of stress hormones compared to those inhabiting continuous forest, and the importance of preserving fruit sources and controlling hunting for reducing the levels of stress hormones in free ranging spider monkeys.

  6. Radiographic Incidence of Spinal Osteopathologies in Captive Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Godínez, Braulio; Ibáñez-Contreras, Alejandra; Perdigón-Castañeda, Gerardo; Galván-Montaño, Alfonso; de Oca, Guadalupe García-Montes; Zapata-Valdez, Carinthia; Tena-Betancourt, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative spinal disease is a leading cause of chronic disability both in humans and animals. Although widely seen as a normal occurrence of aging, degenerative spinal disease can be caused by various genetic, iatrogenic, inflammatory, and congenital factors. The objective of this study was to characterize the degenerative spine-related diseases and the age at onset in a random subpopulation of 20 captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; male, 13; female, 7; age: range, 4 to 27 y; median, 1...

  7. Dissociation of active working memory and passive recognition in rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Active cognitive control of working memory is central in most human memory models, but behavioral evidence for such control in nonhuman primates is absent and neurophysiological evidence, while suggestive, is indirect. We present behavioral evidence that monkey memory for familiar images is under active cognitive control. Concurrent cognitive demands during the memory delay impaired matching-to-sample performance for familiar images in a demand-dependent manner, indicating that maintaining th...

  8. Self administration of heroin and cocaine in morphine-dependent and morphine-withdrawn rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R; Galici, Ruggero; France, Charles P

    2009-06-01

    Dependence can develop during chronic opioid use, and the emergence of withdrawal might promote drug taking. This study examined how chronic morphine administration or withdrawal modified self administration of heroin or cocaine. Four monkeys responded under a fixed ratio 10 schedule to receive i.v. infusions of heroin (0.56-560 microg/kg/infusion) or cocaine (1-100 microg/kg/infusion). Monkeys received morphine twice daily; the final dose was 10 mg/kg/12 h. Dose-effect curves for heroin or cocaine were determined in 150-min sessions throughout morphine administration and during temporary suspension when withdrawal signs were also monitored. Heroin dose-effect curves and withdrawal signs were determined daily following termination of morphine administration. Before monkeys received morphine, heroin, and cocaine maintained responding with unit doses of 1.78 microg/kg of heroin and 10 microg/kg/injection of cocaine resulting in, on average, 13.4 and 20.8 infusions, respectively. When monkeys received morphine daily, self administration of heroin and cocaine decreased to, on average, 3.1 and 11.3 infusions, respectively. Responding for heroin or cocaine recovered following temporary (17-53 h) suspension of morphine administration. The number of heroin infusions and total withdrawal signs increased when morphine administration was terminated. Withdrawal signs peaked 3-4 days after morphine; however, the number of infusions remained elevated for 8 weeks. Changes in self administration responding did not precisely covary with signs of withdrawal and responding for small doses of heroin persisted long after discontinuation of morphine, suggesting that non-pharmacologic (e.g., conditioned reinforcing) effects might contribute to the maintenance of lever pressing under these conditions.

  9. Lorcaserin Reduces the Discriminative Stimulus and Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gregory T; Gerak, Lisa R; Javors, Martin A; France, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and obesity are serious public health problems, and studies suggest that both dopamine and serotonin systems are involved in regulating the consumption of drugs and food. Lorcaserin has serotonin (5-HT)2C receptor agonist actions, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and might be effective for treating cocaine abuse. These studies characterized the pharmacokinetic and behavioral profiles of lorcaserin (intragastric administration) and determined the effectiveness of lorcaserin to alter discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects of cocaine (intravenous administration) in rhesus monkeys. Administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently increased the occurrence of yawning while decreasing spontaneous activity and operant responding for food. These effects appeared within 30-60 minutes of administration and began to dissipate by 240 minutes, a time course closely matching plasma concentrations of lorcaserin. In monkeys discriminating cocaine from saline, lorcaserin alone did not occasion cocaine-appropriate responding but shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the right and down in two of three monkeys. When administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreased the rate at which monkeys responded for infusions of cocaine. When administered chronically, 3.2 mg/kg lorcaserin reduced the rate of cocaine-maintained responding by 50% for the duration of a 14-day treatment period. Together, these results show that lorcaserin attenuates the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine after acute administration and the reinforcing effects of cocaine after acute and repeated administration, consistent with the view that it might have utility in treating cocaine abuse. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Effect of daily morphine administration and its discontinuation on delay discounting of food in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, David R; Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Opioid abusers discount delayed reinforcers more rapidly than nonusers; however, it is unclear whether chronic drug administration or its discontinuation impacts discounting. This study examined the impact of daily morphine administration and its discontinuation on delay discounting of food in rhesus monkeys. Responding on one lever delivered one food pellet immediately; responding on another lever delivered two food pellets either immediately or after a delay (30-120 s) that increased within the session. Monkeys (n=3) responded for the large reinforcer when both reinforcers were delivered immediately and more for the smaller, immediately available reinforcer as the delay to delivery of the large reinforcer increased. When administered acutely, morphine (0.032-5.6 mg/kg) increased trial omissions and had variable effects on choice, with small doses decreasing and large doses increasing choice of the large delayed reinforcer. Chronic morphine administration (0.1 mg/kg/day to 3.2 mg/kg twice daily) reduced choice of the large delayed reinforcer in two monkeys, while increasing choice in a third monkey. Despite the development of tolerance to some effects (i.e. rightward shifts in dose-effect curves for the number of trials omitted) and evidence of mild opioid dependence (e.g. decrease in the number of trials completed, as well as body weight), discontinuation of treatment did not appear to systematically impact discounting. Overall, these results suggest that repeated opioid administration causes persistent effects on choice under a delay discounting procedure; however, differences in the direction of effect among individuals suggest that factors other than, or in addition to, changes in discounting might play a role.

  11. Carpal kinematics in quadrupedal monkeys: towards a better understanding of wrist morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daver, Guillaume; Berillon, Gilles; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide new data on carpal kinematics in primates in order to deepen our understanding of the relationships between wrist morphology and function. To that end, we provide preliminary data on carpal kinematics in seven species of quadrupedal monkeys that have not been previously investigated in this regard (cercopithecoids, n = 4; ceboids, n = 3). We radiographed wrists from cadavers at their maximum radial and ulnar deviations, as well as at maximum flexion and extension. We took angular measurements to quantify the contribution of the mobility of the two main wrist joints (antebrachiocarpal and midcarpal) with respect to total wrist mobility. We also recorded qualitative observations. Our quantitative results show few clear differences among quadrupedal monkeys for radioulnar deviation and flexion-extension: all the primates studied exhibit a greater midcarpal mobility (approximately 54-83% of the total range of motion) than antebrachiocarpal mobility; however, we identified two patterns of carpal kinematics that show the functional impact of previously recognised morphological variations in quadrupedal monkeys. Firstly, qualitative results show that the partition that divides the proximal joint of the wrist in ceboids results in less mobility and more stability of the ulnar part of the wrist than is seen in cercopithecoids. Secondly, we show that the olive baboon specimen (Papio anubis) is characterised by limited antebrachiocarpal mobility for extension; this effect is likely the result of a radial process that projects on the scaphoid notch, as well as an intraarticular meniscus. Because of these close relationships between carpal kinematics and morphology in quadrupedal monkeys, we hypothesise that, to some extent, these functional tendencies are related to their locomotor hand postures. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Infection of Aotus vociferans (karyotype V) monkeys with different strains of Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W E; Skinner, J C; Pappaioanou, M; Ma, N S; Broderson, J R; Sutton, B B; Stanfill, P S

    1987-06-01

    Twenty splenectomized Aotus vociferans (karyotype V) monkeys were infected with strains of Plasmodium vivax from New Guinea, North Korea, Indonesia, El Salvador, and Honduras. Peak parasite densities ranged from 4,840 to 75,500 per mm3. Gametocytes infective to different species of mosquitoes were produced with all strains of P. vivax studied. Two transmissions of the Chesson strain of P. vivax were made by the intravenous inoculation of dissected sporozoites from An. dirus mosquitoes. Prepatent periods were 16 days.

  13. Handedness influences intermanual transfer in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) but not rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeving, Emily R; Lacreuse, Agnès; Hopkins, William D; Phillips, Kimberley A; Novak, Melinda A; Nelson, Eliza L

    2015-03-01

    Intermanual transfer refers to an effect, whereby training one hand to perform a motor task improves performance in the opposite untrained hand. We tested the hypothesis that handedness facilitates intermanual transfer in two nonhuman primate species: rhesus monkeys (N = 13) and chimpanzees (N = 52). Subjects were grouped into one of four conditions: (1) left-handers trained with the left (dominant) hand; (2) left-handers trained with the right (nondominant) hand; (3) right-handers trained with the left (nondominant) hand; and (4) right-handers trained with the right (dominant) hand. Intermanual transfer was measured using a task where subjects removed a Life Savers(®) candy (monkeys) or a washer (chimpanzees) from metal shapes. Transfer was measured with latency by comparing the average time taken to solve the task in the first session with the trained hand compared to the first session with the untrained hand. Hypotheses and predictions were derived from three models of transfer: access: benefit training with nondominant hand; proficiency: benefit training with dominant hand; and cross-activation: benefit irrespective of trained hand. Intermanual transfer (i.e., shorter latency in untrained hand) occurred regardless of whether monkeys trained with the dominant hand or nondominant hand, supporting the cross-activation model. However, transfer was only observed in chimpanzees that trained with the dominant hand. When handedness groups were examined separately, the transfer effect was only significant for right-handed chimpanzees, partially supporting the proficiency model. Findings may be related to neurophysiological differences in motor control as well as differences in handedness patterning between rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees.

  14. Functional near infrared spectroscopy for awake monkey to accelerate neurorehabilitation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Higo, Noriyuki; Kato, Junpei; Matsuda, Keiji; Yamada, Toru

    2017-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is suitable for measuring brain functions during neurorehabilitation because of its portability and less motion restriction. However, it is not known whether neural reconstruction can be observed through changes in cerebral hemodynamics. In this study, we modified an fNIRS system for measuring the motor function of awake monkeys to study cerebral hemodynamics during neurorehabilitation. Computer simulation was performed to determine the optimal fNIRS source-detector interval for monkey motor cortex. Accurate digital phantoms were constructed based on anatomical magnetic resonance images. Light propagation based on the diffusion equation was numerically calculated using the finite element method. The source-detector pair was placed on the scalp above the primary motor cortex. Four different interval values (10, 15, 20, 25 mm) were examined. The results showed that the detected intensity decreased and the partial optical path length in gray matter increased with an increase in the source-detector interval. We found that 15 mm is the optimal interval for the fNIRS measurement of monkey motor cortex. The preliminary measurement was performed on a healthy female macaque monkey using fNIRS equipment and custom-made optodes and optode holder. The optodes were attached above bilateral primary motor cortices. Under the awaking condition, 10 to 20 trials of alternated single-sided hand movements for several seconds with intervals of 10 to 30 s were performed. Increases and decreases in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration were observed in a localized area in the hemisphere contralateral to the moved forelimb.

  15. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Dax1 knockout in the monkey recapitulates human AHC-HH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Zheng, Bo; Shen, Bin; Chen, Yongchang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianying; Niu, Yuyu; Cui, Yiqiang; Zhou, Jiankui; Wang, Hong; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Bian; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao; Ji, Weizhi; Huang, Xingxu

    2015-12-20

    Mutations in the DAX1 locus cause X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), which manifest with primary adrenal insufficiency and incomplete or absent sexual maturation, respectively. The associated defects in spermatogenesis can range from spermatogenic arrest to Sertoli cell only syndrome. Conclusions from Dax1 knockout mouse models provide only limited insight into AHC/HH disease mechanisms, because mouse models exhibit more extensive abnormalities in testicular development, including disorganized and incompletely formed testis cords with decreased number of peritubular myoid cells and male-to-female sex reversal. We previously reported successful clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome targeting in cynomolgus monkeys. Here, we describe a male fetal monkey in which targeted genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 produced Dax1-null mutations in most somatic tissues and in the gonads. This DAX1-deficient monkey displayed defects in adrenal gland development and abnormal testis architecture with small cords, expanded blood vessels and extensive fibrosis. Sertoli cell formation was not affected. This phenotype strongly resembles findings in human patients with AHC-HH caused by mutations in DAX1. We further detected upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin-VEGF signaling in the fetal Dax1-deficient testis, suggesting abnormal activation of signaling pathways in the absence of DAX1 as one mechanism of AHC-HH. Our study reveals novel insight into the role of DAX1 in HH and provides proof-of-principle for the generation of monkey models of human disease via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. No evidence for neo-oogenesis may link to ovarian senescence in adult monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jihong; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Mengyuan; Mao, Jian; Yin, Yu; Ye, Xiaoying; Liu, Na; Han, Jihong; Gao, Yingdai; Cheng, Tao; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2013-11-01

    Female germline or oogonial stem cells transiently residing in fetal ovaries are analogous to the spermatogonial stem cells or germline stem cells (GSCs) in adult testes where GSCs and meiosis continuously renew. Oocytes can be generated in vitro from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, but the existence of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in adult mammalian ovaries is less clear. Preliminary findings of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in mice and humans have not been consistently reproducible. Monkeys provide the most relevant model of human ovarian biology. We searched for GSCs and neo-meiosis in ovaries of adult monkeys at various ages, and compared them with GSCs from adult monkey testis, which are characterized by cytoplasmic staining for the germ cell marker DAZL and nuclear expression of the proliferative markers PCNA and KI67, and pluripotency-associated genes LIN28 and SOX2, and lack of nuclear LAMIN A, a marker for cell differentiation. Early meiocytes undergo homologous pairing at prophase I distinguished by synaptonemal complex lateral filaments with telomere perinuclear distribution. By exhaustive searching using comprehensive experimental approaches, we show that proliferative GSCs and neo-meiocytes by these specific criteria were undetectable in adult mouse and monkey ovaries. However, we found proliferative nongermline somatic stem cells that do not express LAMIN A and germ cell markers in the adult ovaries, notably in the cortex and granulosa cells of growing follicles. These data support the paradigm that adult ovaries do not undergo germ cell renewal, which may contribute significantly to ovarian senescence that occurs with age. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Relationship of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor and Cholecystokinin Immunoreactivity in Monkey Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Eggan, Stephen M.; Melchitzky, Darlene S.; Sesack, Susan R.; Fish, Kenneth N.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cannabis impairs cognitive functions reliant on the circuitry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and increases the risk of schizophrenia. The actions of cannabis are mediated via the brain cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), which in rodents is heavily localized to the axon terminals of cortical GABA basket neurons that contain cholecystokinin (CCK). Differences in the laminar distribution of CB1R-immunoreactive (IR) axons have been reported between rodent and monkey neocort...

  18. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Tucker A. [Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Twaddle, Nathan C. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Roegge, Cindy S. [Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Callicott, Ralph J. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Priority One Services Corp, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 μg/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 μg/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures to BPA from food contact, medical devices, and other environmental sources. - Highlights: ► Maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism attenuate fetal exposure to BPA. ► Serum AUC for aglycone BPA in fetal monkeys is less than half of that in the dam. ► BPA profiles in monkey fetus rule out selective deconjugation and accumulation. ► BPA levels in monkey placenta are similar to other metabolically active tissues. ► Some published human cord blood data for BPA are inconsistent with these measurements.

  19. Effects of the Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine, SEL-068, on Nicotine Discrimination in Squirrel Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rajeev I; Bergman, Jack

    2015-08-01

    A key feature of addiction to nicotine likely resides in its ability to produce subjective effects that, in turn, may be reflected in its discriminative-stimulus properties. Vaccination against such effects of nicotine offers an intriguing therapeutic approach for smoking cessation, but a reliably effective and immunologically safe vaccine remains to be identified. Here we report on the ability of SEL-068, a nanoparticle-based vaccine that targets nicotine, to modify the discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotine in a primate species. Results indicate that squirrel monkeys vaccinated with SEL-068 failed to acquire 0.1 mg/kg nicotine discrimination but readily learned to discriminate 0.001 mg/kg of the nicotinic full agonist (+)-epibatidine ((+)-EPI). After (+)-EPI training, doses of nicotine ⩾ 0.32 mg/kg, which produced behaviorally adverse actions, still failed to substitute for the (+)-EPI training stimulus in immunized monkeys, whereas (+)-EPI and the partial agonist varenicline engendered, respectively, complete and partial substitution in all monkeys with potency comparable to their potency in non-immunized subjects. In other subjects, nicotine was trained as a discriminative-stimulus and then replaced by (+)-EPI. Subsequent vaccination with SEL-068 led to a threefold and long-lasting (>30 weeks) decrease in the potency of nicotine but not (+)-EPI or varenicline. Collectively, our results show that SEL-068 can block the development of nicotine discrimination and attenuate nicotine's effects in nicotine-experienced monkeys without altering the discriminative-stimulus properties of other nicotinic drugs. The difference in the vaccine's effects in naive and nicotine-experienced subjects provides important insight into the conditions under which immunotherapy may be effective in combating nicotine addiction.

  20. Sex differences in rhesus monkey toy preferences parallel those of children

    OpenAIRE

    Hassett, Janice M.; Siebert, Erin R.; Wallen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Socialization processes, parents, or peers encouraging play with gender specific toys are thought to be the primary force shaping sex differences in toy preference. A contrast in view is that toy preferences reflect biologically determined preferences for specific activities facilitated by specific toys. Sex differences in juvenile activities, such as rough and tumble play, peer preferences, and infant interest, share similarities in humans and monkeys. Thus if activity preferences shape toy ...

  1. Impact of caloric restriction on health and survival in rhesus monkeys from the NIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Julie A; Roth, George S; Beasley, T Mark; Tilmont, Edward M; Handy, April M; Herbert, Richard L; Longo, Dan L; Allison, David B; Young, Jennifer E; Bryant, Mark; Barnard, Dennis; Ward, Walter F; Qi, Wenbo; Ingram, Donald K; de Cabo, Rafael

    2012-09-13

    Calorie restriction (CR), a reduction of 10–40% in intake of a nutritious diet, is often reported as the most robust non-genetic mechanism to extend lifespan and healthspan. CR is frequently used as a tool to understand mechanisms behind ageing and age-associated diseases. In addition to and independently of increasing lifespan, CR has been reported to delay or prevent the occurrence of many chronic diseases in a variety of animals. Beneficial effects of CR on outcomes such as immune function, motor coordination and resistance to sarcopenia in rhesus monkeys have recently been reported. We report here that a CR regimen implemented in young and older age rhesus monkeys at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) has not improved survival outcomes. Our findings contrast with an ongoing study at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center (WNPRC), which reported improved survival associated with 30% CR initiated in adult rhesus monkeys (7–14 years) and a preliminary report with a small number of CR monkeys. Over the years, both NIA and WNPRC have extensively documented beneficial health effects of CR in these two apparently parallel studies. The implications of the WNPRC findings were important as they extended CR findings beyond the laboratory rodent and to a long-lived primate. Our study suggests a separation between health effects, morbidity and mortality, and similar to what has been shown in rodents, study design, husbandry and diet composition may strongly affect the life-prolonging effect of CR in a long-lived nonhuman primate.

  2. A Novel Touch-Sensitive Apparatus for Behavioral Studies in Unrestrained Squirrel Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Kangas, Brian D.; Bergman, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing sophistication and affordability of touch-sensitive technology, its use in the behavioral sciences has been limited. The present paper describes the design and empirical validation of a novel touch-sensitive operant conditioning chamber for use with unrestrained squirrel monkeys. In addition, results from a variant of a commonly employed animal model of learning, the repeated acquisition task, demonstrated the effectiveness of this chamber in programming an assay of com...

  3. ASPM and the evolution of cerebral cortical size in a community of New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanea, Fernando A; Perry, George H; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-01-01

    The ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) gene has been proposed as a major determinant of cerebral cortical size among primates, including humans. Yet the specific functions of ASPM and its connection to human intelligence remain controversial. This debate is limited in part by a taxonomic focus on Old World monkeys and apes. Here we expand the comparative context of ASPM sequence analyses with a study of New World monkeys, a radiation of primates in which enlarged brain size has evolved in parallel in spider monkeys (genus Ateles) and capuchins (genus Cebus). The primate community of Costa Rica is perhaps a model system because it allows for independent pairwise comparisons of smaller- and larger-brained species within two taxonomic families. Accordingly, we analyzed the complete sequence of exon 18 of ASPM in Ateles geoffroyi, Alouatta palliata, Cebus capucinus, and Saimiri oerstedii. As the analysis of multiple species in a genus improves phylogenetic reconstruction, we also analyzed eleven published sequences from other New World monkeys. Our exon-wide, lineage-specific analysis of eleven genera and the ratio of rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (d(N)/d(S)) on ASPM revealed no detectable evidence for positive selection in the lineages leading to Ateles or Cebus, as indicated by d(N)/d(S) ratios of <1.0 (0.6502 and 0.4268, respectively). Our results suggest that a multitude of interacting genes have driven the evolution of larger brains among primates, with different genes involved in this process in different encephalized lineages, or at least with evidence for positive selection not readily apparent for the same genes in all lineages. The primate community of Costa Rica may serve as a model system for future studies that aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive capacity and cortical size.

  4. ASPM and the evolution of cerebral cortical size in a community of New World monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Villanea

    Full Text Available The ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated gene has been proposed as a major determinant of cerebral cortical size among primates, including humans. Yet the specific functions of ASPM and its connection to human intelligence remain controversial. This debate is limited in part by a taxonomic focus on Old World monkeys and apes. Here we expand the comparative context of ASPM sequence analyses with a study of New World monkeys, a radiation of primates in which enlarged brain size has evolved in parallel in spider monkeys (genus Ateles and capuchins (genus Cebus. The primate community of Costa Rica is perhaps a model system because it allows for independent pairwise comparisons of smaller- and larger-brained species within two taxonomic families. Accordingly, we analyzed the complete sequence of exon 18 of ASPM in Ateles geoffroyi, Alouatta palliata, Cebus capucinus, and Saimiri oerstedii. As the analysis of multiple species in a genus improves phylogenetic reconstruction, we also analyzed eleven published sequences from other New World monkeys. Our exon-wide, lineage-specific analysis of eleven genera and the ratio of rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (d(N/d(S on ASPM revealed no detectable evidence for positive selection in the lineages leading to Ateles or Cebus, as indicated by d(N/d(S ratios of <1.0 (0.6502 and 0.4268, respectively. Our results suggest that a multitude of interacting genes have driven the evolution of larger brains among primates, with different genes involved in this process in different encephalized lineages, or at least with evidence for positive selection not readily apparent for the same genes in all lineages. The primate community of Costa Rica may serve as a model system for future studies that aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive capacity and cortical size.

  5. Play behavior of red colobus monkeys in Kibale National Park, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Eric A

    2010-01-01

    Play is a conspicuous behavior in primates, yet there are few detailed species-specific accounts of primate play. This article presents the results of a 1-year study of play in red colobus monkeys (Procolobus rufomitratus). Descriptions of play frequencies and types of play are provided from infancy through adulthood. Age and sex comparisons are discussed in light of other research and hypotheses that may explain these observations. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Social development and behavioural reciprocity in young rhesus monkeys with their siblings and non-siblings

    OpenAIRE

    Janus, Magdalena Ciesielska

    1989-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of relationships with partners close in age on the development of social competence in immature monkeys. Social relationships between 28 sibling and non-sibling immature captive rhesus macaques, (Macaca mulatta), 4 to 40 months old, living in four social groups, were investigated. First, the characteristics of affiliative and agonistic aspects of those relationships were described. Then, the degree to which social behaviours were reciprocated in dyads ...

  7. Population coding of forelimb joint kinematics by peripheral afferents in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Umeda

    Full Text Available Various peripheral receptors provide information concerning position and movement to the central nervous system to achieve complex and dexterous movements of forelimbs in primates. The response properties of single afferent receptors to movements at a single joint have been examined in detail, but the population coding of peripheral afferents remains poorly defined. In this study, we obtained multichannel recordings from dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons in cervical segments of monkeys. We applied the sparse linear regression (SLiR algorithm to the recordings, which selects useful input signals to reconstruct movement kinematics. Multichannel recordings of peripheral afferents were performed by inserting multi-electrode arrays into the DRGs of lower cervical segments in two anesthetized monkeys. A total of 112 and 92 units were responsive to the passive joint movements or the skin stimulation with a painting brush in Monkey 1 and Monkey 2, respectively. Using the SLiR algorithm, we reconstructed the temporal changes of joint angle, angular velocity, and acceleration at the elbow, wrist, and finger joints from temporal firing patterns of the DRG neurons. By automatically selecting a subset of recorded units, the SLiR achieved superior generalization performance compared with a regularized linear regression algorithm. The SLiR selected not only putative muscle units that were responsive to only the passive movements, but also a number of putative cutaneous units responsive to the skin stimulation. These results suggested that an ensemble of peripheral primary afferents that contains both putative muscle and cutaneous units encode forelimb joint kinematics of non-human primates.

  8. Effects of chronic cocaine self-administration on cognition and cerebral glucose utilization in Rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert W; Gage, H Donald; Nader, Michael A

    2012-11-15

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with neurobiological and cognitive deficits that persist into abstinence, hindering success of behavioral treatment strategies and perhaps increasing likelihood of relapse. The effects of current cocaine use and abstinence on neurobiology and cognition are not well characterized. Adult male rhesus monkeys with an extensive cocaine self-administration history (∼ 5 years) and age-matched control animals (n = 4/group) performed cognitive tasks in morning sessions and self-administered cocaine or food in afternoon sessions. Positron emission tomography and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose were employed to assess cerebral metabolic rates of glucose utilization during cognitive testing. Cocaine-experienced monkeys required significantly more trials and committed more errors on reversal learning and multidimensional discriminations, compared with control animals. Cocaine-naive, but not cocaine-experienced, monkeys showed greater metabolic rates of glucose utilization during a multidimensional discrimination task in the caudate nucleus, hippocampus, anterior and posterior cingulate, and regions associated with attention, error detection, memory, and reward. Using a delayed match-to-sample task, there were no differences in baseline working memory performance between groups. High-dose cocaine self-administration disrupted delayed match-to-sample performance but tolerance developed. Acute abstinence from cocaine did not affect performance, but by day 30 of abstinence, accuracy increased significantly, while performance of cocaine-naive monkeys was unchanged. These data document direct effects of cocaine self-administration on cognition and neurobiological sequelae underlying cognitive deficits. Improvements in working memory can occur in abstinence, albeit across an extended period critical for treatment seekers, suggesting pharmacotherapies designed to enhance cognition may improve success of current behavioral modification strategies

  9. Results of crown-height reduction and partial coronal pulpectomy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, M J; Verstraete, F J

    2001-02-01

    In research facilities using non-human primates, crown-height reduction with partial coronal pulpectomy ("vital pulpotomy") is routinely performed on canine teeth of adult male monkeys to reduce self-trauma and the potential for injury to staff or cage-mates. Success of pulpotomy techniques in humans is reportedly 40 to 60%. Failure leads to chronic inflammation and pulp necrosis, which introduces variability in research animals, and may affect research results. The purpose of the study reported here was to determine failure rate of this procedure by evaluating clinical and radiographic findings at 3, 9, and 24 months after crown amputation and partial coronal pulpectomy of maxillary canines in adult male rhesus monkeys. Forty-seven maxillary canine teeth from 24 adult male rhesus monkeys were treated by use of crown amputation and partial coronal pulpectomy, using standard dental technique. Follow-up clinical and radiographic examination was performed 3, 9, and 24 months after surgery. At three months after surgery, there was no clinical evidence of failure at any of the teeth. On the basis of radiographic findings, 2 of 47 teeth had failed and one was suspicious for early failure. At nine months, clinical evidence of failure was not apparent; radiographically, 5 of 44 teeth appeared to have failed and 3 others were suspect. Two years post-operatively, failure was clinically evident at two teeth, with radiographic evidence of failure in five teeth, and suspicion of early failure in an additional six of 41 teeth [corrected]. The failure rate of crown amputation and partial coronal pulpectomy of canine teeth in adult male rhesus monkeys is high, and the chronic inflammation associated with this is cause for concern.

  10. Histopathologic ocular examination after lensectomy in a Macacus rhesus monkey, an unexpected event of secondary glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, F D; van der Heijde, G L

    2001-01-01

    In a Macacus rhesus monkey an unilateral lensectomy was performed on the 15th day of life to study the emmetropization proces. During a period of 20.5 months refractional state, axial length, corneal dioptric power and intraocular pressure were measured in the aphakic and fellow eye. Results showed that axial elongation of the aphakic eye was larger in comparison to the phakic fellow eye. Histopathologic examination of the aphakic eye revealed glaucomatous changes due to obstruction in the anterior chamber angle.

  11. Adaptation and adaptation transfer characteristics of five different saccade types in the monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Yoshiko; Fuchs, Albert F.; Soetedjo, Robijanto

    2015-01-01

    Shifts in the direction of gaze are accomplished by different kinds of saccades, which are elicited under different circumstances. Saccade types include targeting saccades to simple jumping targets, delayed saccades to visible targets after a waiting period, memory-guided (MG) saccades to remembered target locations, scanning saccades to stationary target arrays, and express saccades after very short latencies. Studies of human cases and neurophysiological experiments in monkeys suggest that ...

  12. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION IN AUSTRALIA FOLLOWING A MONKEY BITE IN INDONESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Grace H Y; Baird, Robert W; Druce, Julian; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2015-05-01

    A traveller returning to Australia developed Zika virus infection, with fever, rash and conjunctivitis, with onset five days after a monkey bite in Bali, Indonesia. Flavivirus RNA detected on PCR from a nasopharyngeal swab was sequenced and identified as Zika virus. Although mosquito-borne transmission is also possible, we propose the bite as a plausible route of transmission. The literature for non-vector transmissions of Zika virus and other flaviviruses is reviewed.

  13. Experimental cross-species infection of common marmosets by titi monkey adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Yu

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV, as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus. Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses.

  14. Cross-species transmission of a novel adenovirus associated with a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a new world monkey colony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice C Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that naturally infect many vertebrates, including humans and monkeys, and cause a wide range of clinical illnesses in humans. Infection from individual strains has conventionally been thought to be species-specific. Here we applied the Virochip, a pan-viral microarray, to identify a novel adenovirus (TMAdV, titi monkey adenovirus as the cause of a deadly outbreak in a closed colony of New World monkeys (titi monkeys; Callicebus cupreus at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC. Among 65 titi monkeys housed in a building, 23 (34% developed upper respiratory symptoms that progressed to fulminant pneumonia and hepatitis, and 19 of 23 monkeys, or 83% of those infected, died or were humanely euthanized. Whole-genome sequencing of TMAdV revealed that this adenovirus is a new species and highly divergent, sharing <57% pairwise nucleotide identity with other adenoviruses. Cultivation of TMAdV was successful in a human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line, but not in primary or established monkey kidney cells. At the onset of the outbreak, the researcher in closest contact with the monkeys developed an acute respiratory illness, with symptoms persisting for 4 weeks, and had a convalescent serum sample seropositive for TMAdV. A clinically ill family member, despite having no contact with the CNPRC, also tested positive, and screening of a set of 81 random adult blood donors from the Western United States detected TMAdV-specific neutralizing antibodies in 2 individuals (2/81, or 2.5%. These findings raise the possibility of zoonotic infection by TMAdV and human-to-human transmission of the virus in the population. Given the unusually high case fatality rate from the outbreak (83%, it is unlikely that titi monkeys are the native host species for TMAdV, and the natural reservoir of the virus is still unknown. The discovery of TMAdV, a novel adenovirus with the capacity to infect both monkeys and humans, suggests

  15. A single-cell and feeder-free culture system for monkey embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takashi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kato, Yosuke; Fujita, Risako; Araki, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Tomoko; Kato, Hidemasa; Torii, Ryuzo; Sato, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Primate pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hold great potential for research and application in regenerative medicine and drug discovery. To maximize primate PSC potential, a practical system is required for generating desired functional cells and reproducible differentiation techniques. Much progress regarding their culture systems has been reported to date; however, better methods would still be required for their practical use, particularly in industrial and clinical fields. Here we report a new single-cell and feeder-free culture system for primate PSCs, the key feature of which is an originally formulated serum-free medium containing FGF and activin. In this culture system, cynomolgus monkey ESCs can be passaged many times by single-cell dissociation with traditional trypsin treatment and can be propagated with a high proliferation rate as a monolayer without any feeder cells; further, typical PSC properties and genomic stability can be retained. In addition, it has been demonstrated that monkey ESCs maintained in the culture system can be used for various experiments such as in vitro differentiation and gene manipulation. Thus, compared with the conventional culture system, monkey ESCs grown in the aforementioned culture system can serve as a cell source with the following practical advantages: simple, stable, and easy cell maintenance; gene manipulation; cryopreservation; and desired differentiation. We propose that this culture system can serve as a reliable platform to prepare primate PSCs useful for future research and application.

  16. Mechanism of Interferon Uptake in Parental and Somatic Monkey-Mouse Hybrid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chany, C.; Grégoire, A.; Vignal, M.; Lemaitre-Moncuit, J.; Brown, P.; Besançon, F.; Suarez, H.; Cassingena, R.

    1973-01-01

    Dose-response curves of interferons in different sensitive cells are regularly sigmoidal. In somatic monkey-mouse hybrid cells, however, a significant decrease in the slope of the curve for primate interferon was observed, while the dose-response effect was unaltered for mouse interferon. High concentrations of primate interferon were 10- to 100-times less effective in hybrid clones than in parental monkey CV-1 cells; at low concentrations the antiviral effect was 10- to 20-times higher in hybrid clones than in the parental cells. The receptor(s) for primate interferon located on the cell membrane was destroyed by trypsin but not by EDTA. Similarly, acid pH inactivated these receptor sites. We, thus, postulate that the antiviral effect is, at least partially, related to the amount of interferon taken up by the cells. Uptake could be conditioned by active cooperation of two cell-specific factors: a receptor and an activator. The activator might be missing or inactivated for primate interferon in the hybrid cells. We suggest that the putative antiviral protein is not cell-species specific, and that information for its synthesis in the hybrid cells might be located on a mouse rather than a monkey chromosome. PMID:4346894

  17. Discrimination of locomotion direction in impoverished displays of walkers by macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangeneugden, Joris; Vancleef, Kathleen; Jaeggli, Tobias; VanGool, Luc; Vogels, Rufin

    2009-04-28

    A vast literature exists on human biological motion perception in impoverished displays, e.g., point-light walkers. Less is known about the perception of impoverished biological motion displays in macaques. We trained 3 macaques in the discrimination of facing direction (left versus right) and forward versus backward walking using motion-capture-based locomotion displays (treadmill walking) in which the body features were represented by cylinder-like primitives. The displays did not contain translatory motion. Discriminating forward versus backward locomotion requires motion information while the facing-direction/view task can be solved using motion and/or form. All monkeys required lengthy training to learn the forward-backward task, while the view task was learned more quickly. Once acquired, the discriminations were specific to walking and stimulus format but generalized across actors. Although the view task could be solved using form cues, there was a small impact of motion. Performance in the forward-backward task was highly susceptible to degradations of spatiotemporal stimulus coherence and motion information. These results indicate that rhesus monkeys require extensive training in order to use the intrinsic motion cues related to forward versus backward locomotion and imply that extrapolation of observations concerning human perception of impoverished biological motion displays onto monkey perception needs to be made cautiously.

  18. Neurodynamics of cognitive set shifting in monkey frontal cortex and its causal impact on behavioral flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamigaki, Tsukasa; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Tamura, Keita; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2012-11-01

    Flexible behavior depends on the ability to shift an internal cognitive set as soon as external demand changes. According to neuropsychological studies in human and nonhuman primates, selective lesion to the PFC impairs flexible behavioral shifting. Our previous fMRI study demonstrated that the prefrontal regions showed transient activation related to set shifting in humans and monkeys. To investigate the underlying neural processing, we recorded single-unit activities while monkeys performed a cognitive-set-shifting task, which required shifting between shape-matching and color-matching behaviors. We identified a group of neurons in the inferior arcuate region that exhibited selective activity when the monkeys were required to shift their cognitive set. These shift-related neurons were localized in the focal area along the posterior bank of the inferior arcuate sulcus. Reversible inactivation of this area ipsilateral to the response hand with a small volume of muscimol (even with 0.5 μl) selectively impaired the performance of behavioral shifting. Moreover, this selective behavioral impairment strongly correlated with the dose of muscimol. These results demonstrated localized neural processing for cognitive set shifting and its causal role for behavioral flexibility in primates.

  19. Characterization of dental pulp stem/stromal cells of Huntington monkey tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Brooke R; Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Yang, Jinjing; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Huang, Anderson H C; Chan, Anthony W S

    2011-09-12

    Dental pulp stem/stromal cells (DPSCs) are categorized as adult stem cells (ASCs) that retain multipotent differentiation capabilities. DPSCs can be isolated from individuals at any age and are considered to be true personal stem cells, making DPSCs one of the potential options for stem cell therapy. However, the properties of DPSCs from individuals with an inherited genetic disorder, such as Huntington's disease (HD), have not been fully investigated. To examine if mutant huntingtin (htt) protein impacts DPSC properties, we have established DPSCs from tooth germ of transgenic monkeys that expressed both mutant htt and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (rHD/G-DPSCs), and from a monkey that expressed only the GFP gene (rG-DPSCs), which served as a control. Although mutant htt and oligomeric htt aggregates were overtly present in rHD/G-DPSCs, all rHD/G-DPSCs and rG-DPSCs shared similar characteristics, including self-renewal, multipotent differentiation capabilities, expression of stemness and differentiation markers, and cell surface antigen profile. Our results suggest that DPSCs from Huntington monkeys retain ASC properties. Thus DPSCs derived from individuals with genetic disorders such as HD could be a potential source of personal stem cells for therapeutic purposes.

  20. Identification of MHC Haplotypes Associated with Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Whritenour, Jessica; Sanford, Jonathan C; Houle, Christopher; Adkins, Karissa K

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can significantly impact drug development and use. Studies to understand risk factors for drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions have identified genetic association with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Interestingly, drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can occur in nonhuman primates; however, association between drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles has not been described. In this study, tissue samples were collected from 62 cynomolgus monkeys from preclinical studies in which 9 animals had evidence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Microsatellite analysis was used to determine MHC haplotypes for each animal. A total of 7 haplotypes and recombinant MHC haplotypes were observed, with distribution frequency comparable to known MHC I allele frequency in cynomolgus monkeys. Genetic association analysis identified alleles from the M3 haplotype of the MHC I B region (B*011:01, B*075:01, B*079:01, B*070:02, B*098:05, and B*165:01) to be significantly associated (χ2 test for trend, p reactions. Sequence similarity from alignment of alleles in the M3 haplotype B region and HLA alleles associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in humans was 86% to 93%. These data demonstrate that MHC alleles in cynomolgus monkeys are associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, similar to HLA alleles in humans.