WorldWideScience

Sample records for vertical displacement measurements

  1. Asymmetric SOL Current in Vertically Displaced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, J. D.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments at the DIII-D tokamak demonstrate a non-monotonic relationship between measured scrape-off layer (SOL) currents and vertical displacement event (VDE) rates with SOL currents becoming largely n=1 dominant as plasma is displaced by the plasma control system (PCS) at faster rates. The DIII-D PCS is used to displace the magnetic axis 10x slower than the intrinsic growth time of similar instabilities in lower single-null plasmas. Low order (n control is disabled. Previous inquiry shows VDE asymmetry characterized by SOL current fraction and geometric parameters of tokamak plasmas. We note that, of plasmas displaced by the PCS, short displacement time scales near the limit of the PCS temporal control appear to result in larger n=1/n=2 asymmetries. Work supported under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  2. Annual variations in GPS-measured vertical displacements near Upernavik Isstrøm (Greenland) and contributions from surface mass loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lin; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; van Dam, Tonie

    2017-01-01

    variability. Here we examine the annual changes of the vertical displacements measured at two GPS stations (SRMP and UPVK) near Upernavik Isstrøm in western Greenland. We model elastic loading displacements due to various surface mass loading including three non-ice components: atmospheric pressure, ocean...... bottom pressure, continental water storage, and one ice component, i.e., surface mass balance (SMB). We find that the contribution from atmospheric pressure changes can explain 46% and 78% of the annual amplitude observed in the GPS verticals at SRMP and UPVK, respectively. We also show that removing...... the predicted loading displacements due to SMB adversely increases the annual variance of the GPS residuals. However, using the GPS data alone, we cannot identify the exact cause(s) of this discrepancy because the annual loading displacements are sensitive to the SMB changes from over 85% of the ice sheet area...

  3. A Comparison of Vertical Stiffness Values Calculated from Different Measures of Center of Mass Displacement in Single-Leg Hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, Kurt L; Gupta, Amitabh; Green, Simon; Hobara, Hiroaki; Clothier, Peter J

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the agreement between Kvert calculated from 4 different methods of estimating vertical displacement of the center of mass (COM) during single-leg hopping. Healthy participants (N = 38) completed a 10-s single-leg hopping effort on a force plate, with 3D motion of the lower limb, pelvis, and trunk captured. Derived variables were calculated for a total of 753 hop cycles using 4 methods, including: double integration of the vertical ground reaction force, law of falling bodies, a marker cluster on the sacrum, and a segmental analysis method. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that Kvert calculated using segmental analysis and double integration methods have a relatively small bias (0.93 kN⋅m-1) and 95% limits of agreement (-1.89 to 3.75 kN⋅m-1). In contrast, a greater bias was revealed between sacral marker cluster and segmental analysis (-2.32 kN⋅m-1), sacral marker cluster and double integration (-3.25 kN⋅m-1), and the law of falling bodies compared with all methods (17.26-20.52 kN⋅m-1). These findings suggest the segmental analysis and double integration methods can be used interchangeably for the calculation of Kvert during single-leg hopping. The authors propose the segmental analysis method to be considered the gold standard for the calculation of Kvert during single-leg, on-the-spot hopping.

  4. Lepton flavor violation with displaced vertices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeck, Julian; Rodejohann, Werner

    2018-01-01

    If light new physics with lepton-flavor-violating couplings exists, the prime discovery channel might not be ℓ →ℓ‧ γ but rather ℓ →ℓ‧ X, where the new boson X could be an axion, majoron, familon or Z‧ gauge boson. The most conservative bound then comes from ℓ →ℓ‧ + inv , but if the on-shell X can decay back into leptons or photons, displaced-vertex searches could give much better limits. We show that only a narrow region in parameter space allows for displaced vertices in muon decays, μ → eX , X → γγ , ee, whereas tauon decays can have much more interesting signatures.

  5. Lepton flavor violation with displaced vertices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Heeck

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available If light new physics with lepton-flavor-violating couplings exists, the prime discovery channel might not be ℓ→ℓ′γ but rather ℓ→ℓ′X, where the new boson X could be an axion, majoron, familon or Z′ gauge boson. The most conservative bound then comes from ℓ→ℓ′+inv, but if the on-shell X can decay back into leptons or photons, displaced-vertex searches could give much better limits. We show that only a narrow region in parameter space allows for displaced vertices in muon decays, μ→eX,X→γγ,ee, whereas tauon decays can have much more interesting signatures.

  6. Static loading and vertical displacement at southern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V. Timofeev

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic method is usually used for elastic parametric estimation. This is why this method presents dynamic parameters of Earth. Frequency seismic range changes greatly from geodynamic modelling time. Now we have opportunity to use geodesy result for some years for elastic parameters estimation. Static solution from elastic theory may be used for the interpretation of long term results. It presents static elastic parameter. The inverse problem for different types of vertical surface loading on one year period is calculated. Two cases of loading with maximal and minimal area are presented. Results are determined by space geodesy and leveling methods. Current relation between atmospheric pressure and vertical displacements was estimated at the center of Siberian Anti Cyclone with size varied from 2000 km to 3000 km. Pressure-displacement coefficients (PDC can be achieved by three years observation (0.997 mm/mbar for NVSK GPS station. It is used for elastic module study of geology medium with maximum thickness up to 600 km. In the context of elastic model, the modulus of rigidity is estimated to be 113 GPa. Vast expanse of anti-cyclone may relate with rheology of crust and upper mantle. Smaller size of surface loading – local loading is seasonal variation of water reservoir. Annual vertical changes were obtained by leveling near the dam of the reservoir. PDC ratio was 1.15 mm/bar for these places. In elastic theory, the Young modulus E = 80 GPa (Poisson ratio = 0.25, the modulus of rigidity = 32 GPa was calculated by sixteen years of leveling measurements. This result can effectively be represented for upper crust. Our results were checked by solution for coseismic displacement of Chyia-Altai earthquake (Sep. 27, 2003, M = 7.3. Coseismic results calculated by static modules agree with experimental coseismic GPS data at 10% level.

  7. Measuring vulnerability to disaster displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Susan A.; Khazai, Bijan; Power, Christopher; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    Large scale disasters can cause devastating impacts in terms of population displacement. Between 2008 and 2013, on average 27 million people were displaced annually by disasters (Yonetani 2014). After large events such as hurricane Katrina or the Port-au-Prince earthquake, images of inadequate public shelter and concerns about large scale and often inequitable migration have been broadcast around the world. Population displacement can often be one of the most devastating and visible impacts of a natural disaster. Despite the importance of population displacement in disaster events, measures to understand the socio-economic vulnerability of a community often use broad metrics to estimate the total socio-economic risk of an event rather than focusing on the specific impacts that a community faces in a disaster. Population displacement is complex and multi-causal with the physical impact of a disaster interacting with vulnerability arising from the response, environmental issues (e.g., weather), cultural concerns (e.g., expectations of adequate shelter), and many individual factors (e.g., mobility, risk perception). In addition to the complexity of the causes, population displacement is difficult to measure because of the wide variety of different terms and definitions and its multi-dimensional nature. When we speak of severe population displacement, we may refer to a large number of displaced people, an extended length of displacement or associated difficulties such as poor shelter quality, risk of violence and crime in shelter communities, discrimination in aid, a lack of access to employment or other difficulties that can be associated with large scale population displacement. We have completed a thorough review of the literature on disaster population displacement. Research has been conducted on historic events to understand the types of negative impacts associated with population displacement and also the vulnerability of different groups to these impacts. We

  8. Displaced vertices from pseudo-Dirac dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoli, Alessandro; De Simone, Andrea; Jacques, Thomas; Sanz, Verónica

    2017-11-01

    Displaced vertices are relatively unusual signatures for dark matter searches at the LHC. We revisit the model of pseudo-Dirac dark matter (pDDM), which can accommodate the correct relic density, evade direct detection constraints, and generically provide observable collider signatures in the form of displaced vertices. We use this model as a benchmark to illustrate the general techniques involved in the analysis, the complementarity between monojet and displaced vertex searches, and provide a comprehensive study of the current bounds and prospective reach.

  9. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for $R$-parity violating supersymmetry has been performed using proton-proton collision data collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$. The data analyzed correspond to an integrated luminosity of $17.6~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model where the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. Based on a sample of events with two displaced vertices, the pair production cross section is bounded as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. For a mass of 400 GeV and mean proper decay length of 10 mm, the analysis excludes cross sections above $0.6~\\mathrm{fb}$ at $95\\%$ confidence level.

  10. Loading effects in GPS vertical displacement time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memin, A.; Boy, J. P.; Santamaría-Gómez, A.; Watson, C.; Gravelle, M.; Tregoning, P.

    2015-12-01

    Surface deformations due to loading, with yet no comprehensive representation, account for a significant part of the variability in geodetic time series. We assess effects of loading in GPS vertical displacement time series at several frequency bands. We compare displacement derived from up-to-date loading models to two global sets of positioning time series, and investigate how they are reduced looking at interannual periods (> 2 months), intermediate periods (> 7 days) and the whole spectrum (> 1day). We assess the impact of interannual loading on estimating velocities. We compute atmospheric loading effects using surface pressure fields from the ECMWF. We use the inverted barometer (IB) hypothesis valid for periods exceeding a week to describe the ocean response to the pressure forcing. We used general circulation ocean model (ECCO and GLORYS) to account for wind, heat and fresh water flux. We separately use the Toulouse Unstructured Grid Ocean model (TUGO-m), forced by air pressure and winds, to represent the dynamics of the ocean response at high frequencies. The continental water storage is described using GLDAS/Noah and MERRA-land models. Non-hydrology loading reduces the variability of the observed vertical displacement differently according to the frequency band. The hydrology loading leads to a further reduction mostly at annual periods. ECMWF+TUGO-m better agrees with vertical surface motion than the ECMWF+IB model at all frequencies. The interannual deformation is time-correlated at most of the locations. It is adequately described by a power-law process of spectral index varying from -1.5 to -0.2. Depending on the power-law parameters, the predicted non-linear deformation due to mass loading variations leads to vertical velocity biases up to 0.7 mm/yr when estimated from 5 years of continuous observations. The maximum velocity bias can reach up to 1 mm/yr in regions around the southern Tropical band.

  11. Computations of Vertical Displacement Events with Toroidal Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovinec, C. R.; Bunkers, K. J.

    2017-10-01

    Nonlinear numerical MHD modeling with the NIMROD code [https://nimrodteam.org] is being developed to investigate asymmetry during vertical displacement events. We start from idealized up/down symmetric tokamak equilibria with small levels of imposed toroidally asymmetric field errors. Vertical displacement results when removing current from one of the two divertor coils. The Eulerian reference-frame modeling uses temperature-dependent resistivity and anisotropic thermal conduction to distinguish the hot plasma region from surrounding cold, low-density conditions. Diffusion through a resistive wall is slow relative to Alfvenic scales but much faster than resistive plasma diffusion. Loss of the initial edge pressure and current distributions leads to a narrow layer of parallel current, which drives low-n modes that may be related to peeling-dominated ELMs. These modes induce toroidal asymmetry in the conduction current, which connects the simulated plasma to the wall. Work supported by the US DOE through Grant Numbers DE-FG02-06ER54850 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  12. Extending the LHC reach for new physics with sub-millimeter displaced vertices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hayato; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Moroi, Takeo; Nagata, Natsumi; Otono, Hidetoshi

    2017-08-01

    Particles with a sub-millimeter decay length appear in many models of physics beyond the Standard Model. However, their longevity has been often ignored in their LHC searches and they have been regarded as promptly-decaying particles. In this letter, we show that, by requiring displaced vertices on top of the event selection criteria used in the ordinary search strategies for promptly-decaying particles, we can considerably extend the LHC reach for particles with a decay length of ≳ 100 μm. We discuss a way of reconstructing sub-millimeter displaced vertices by exploiting the same technique used for the primary vertex reconstruction on the assumption that the metastable particles are always pair-produced and their decay products contain high-pT jets. We show that, by applying a cut based on displaced vertices on top of standard kinematical cuts for the search of new particles, the LHC reach can be significantly extended if the decay length is ≳ 100 μm. In addition, we may measure the lifetime of the target particle through the reconstruction of displaced vertices, which plays an important role in understanding the new physics behind the metastable particles.

  13. The ins and outs of modelling vertical displacement events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, David

    2017-10-01

    Of the many reasons a plasma discharge disrupts, Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) lead to the most severe forces and stresses on the vacuum vessel and Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). After loss of positional control, the plasma column drifts across the vacuum vessel and comes in contact with the first wall, at which point the stored magnetic and thermal energy is abruptly released. The vessel forces have been extensively modelled in 2D but, with the constraint of axisymmetry, the fundamental 3D effects that lead to toroidal peaking, sideways forces, field-line stochastisation and halo current rotation have been vastly overlooked. In this work, we present the main results of an intense VDE modelling activity using the implicit 3D extended MHD code M3D-C1 and share our experience with the multi-domain and highly non-linear physics encountered. At the culmination of code development by the M3D-C1 group over the last decade, highlighted by the inclusion of a finite-thickness resistive vacuum vessel within the computational domain, a series of fully 3D non-linear simulations are performed using realistic transport coefficients based on the reconstruction of so-called NSTX frozen VDEs, where the feedback control was purposely switched off to trigger a vertical instability. The vertical drift phase, the evolution of the current quench and the onset of 3D halo/eddy currents are diagnosed and investigated in detail. The sensitivity of the current quench to parameter changes is assessed via 2D non-linear runs. The growth of individual toroidal modes is monitored via linear-complex runs. The intricate evolution of the plasma, which is decaying to large extent in force-balance with induced halo/wall currents, is carefully resolved via 3D non-linear runs. The location, amplitude and rotation of normal currents and wall forces are analysed and compared with experimental traces.

  14. Analysis of vertical stability limits and vertical displacement event behavior on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mark; Battaglia, Devon; Gerhardt, Stefan; Menard, Jonathan; Mueller, Dennis; Myers, Clayton; Sabbagh, Steven; Smith, David

    2017-10-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) completed its first run campaign in 2016, including commissioning a larger center-stack and three new tangentially aimed neutral beam sources. NSTX-U operates at increased aspect ratio due to the larger center-stack, making vertical stabilization more challenging. Since ST performance is improved at high elongation, improvements to the vertical control system were made, including use of multiple up-down-symmetric flux loop pairs for real-time estimation, and filtering to remove noise. Similar operating limits to those on NSTX (in terms of elongation and internal inductance) were achieved, now at higher aspect ratio. To better understand the observed limits and project to future operating points, a database of vertical displacement events and vertical oscillations observed during the plasma current ramp-up on NSTX/NSTX-U has been generated. Shots were clustered based on the characteristics of the VDEs/oscillations, and the plasma parameter regimes associated with the classes of behavior were studied. Results provide guidance for scenario development during ramp-up to avoid large oscillations at the time of diverting, and provide the means to assess stability of target scenarios for the next campaign. Results will also guide plans for improvements to the vertical control system. Work supported by U.S. D.O.E. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Modeling Displacement Measurement using Vibration Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGOSTON Katalin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some aspects regarding to small displacement measurement using vibration transducers. Mechanical faults, usages, slackness’s, cause different noises and vibrations with different amplitude and frequency against the normal sound and movement of the equipment. The vibration transducers, accelerometers and microphone are used for noise and/or sound and vibration detection with fault detection purpose. The output signal of the vibration transducers or accelerometers is an acceleration signal and can be converted to either velocity or displacement, depending on the preferred measurement parameter. Displacement characteristics are used to indicate when the machine condition has changed. There are many problems using accelerometers to measure position or displacement. It is important to determine displacement over time. To determinate the movement from acceleration a double integration is needed. A transfer function and Simulink model was determinate for accelerometers with capacitive sensing element. Using these models the displacement was reproduced by low frequency input.

  16. Sterile neutrino searches via displaced vertices at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2017-11-01

    We explore the sensitivity of displaced vertex searches at LHCb for testing sterile neutrino extensions of the Standard Model towards explaining the observed neutrino masses. We derive estimates for the constraints on sterile neutrino parameters from a recently published displaced vertex search at LHCb based on run 1 data. They yield the currently most stringent limit on active-sterile neutrino mixing in the sterile neutrino mass range between 4.5 GeV and 10 GeV. Furthermore, we present forecasts for the sensitivities that could be obtained from the run 2 data and also for the high-luminosity phase of the LHC.

  17. Vertical Temperature Distribution in a Room with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    in comparison with mixing ventilation. It is necessary to have a design method for the temperature distribution used for instance in connection with the tlow element method and the energy calculations. The temperature distribution is also important in connection with thermal comfort in a room. It is necessary......A displacement ventilation system exploits the use of energy efficiently because it is possible to remove exhaust air from a room with a temperature that is several degrees above the temperature in the occupied zone. This process will allow a higher air inlet temperature at the same load...... to consider the temperature gradient in the occupied zone, as well as the asymmetric radiation from the ceiling, in connection with the design of a displacement ventilation system and the evaluation of thermal comfort. This paper will introduce five temperature distribution models with different levels...

  18. Vertical displacement of Ips Latidens and Ips Pini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller

    2000-01-01

    The effect of semiochemical interruptants was examined for Ips latidens (LeConte) and Ips pini (Say) using artificial trees (tall-traps) consisting of an array of seven Lindgren multiple-funnel traps suspended vertically on a rope ladder. S-(+)- Ipsdienol reduced the numbers of I. latidens captured in (±)-ipsenol...

  19. Comparison between aluminum chloride and tetryzoline hydrochloride for control of vertical gingival displacement and crevicular fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis Lamartine de MORAES MELO NETO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of a gingival displacement cord with a gingival displacement substance is a common procedure for taking a quality impression of the cervical terminal in teeth for prosthetic purposes. Objective To evaluate whether the mechanical-chemical method with 0.05% tetryzoline hydrochloride or 25% aluminum chloride is capable of reducing crevicular fluid, and displacing a statistically significant larger quantity of gingival tissue vertically, compared with the mechanical method (without chemical substances. Material and method Ten patients were selected, and then No. 000 and 1 Ultrapak cords were randomly positioned on teeth 13, 21 and 23. Group I – cord with no chemical substance; Group II – cords impregnated with tetryzoline hydrochloride and Group III – cords impregnated with aluminum chloride. Using dental stone models, thirty images were captured with a camera coupled to a loupe to analyze the degree of gingival displacement. Crevicular fluid was quantified using a high-precision scale and individualized strips of absorbent paper for each tooth on which gingival displacement was performed. Result There was no statistical difference between the three groups relative to the amount of vertical gingival displacement (Anova, p=0.26. As regards reduction in crevicular fluid, there was no difference between the test and control groups (Wilcoxon and Friedman, p < 0.05. Conclusion The use of tetryzoline hydrochloride or aluminum chloride to impregnate the gingival displacement cord did not improve the quantity of vertical gingival displacement and did not reduce the amount of crevicular fluid.

  20. Probing the Type I Seesaw mechanism with displaced vertices at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago, Alberto M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Lima (Peru); Hernandez, Pilar [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Jones-Perez, Joel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Lima (Peru); CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Losada, Marta; Moreno Briceno, Alexander [Universidad Antonio Narino, Centro de Investigaciones en Ciencias Basicas y Aplicadas, Bogota, D. C. (Colombia)

    2015-10-15

    The observation of Higgs decays into heavy neutrinos would be strong evidence for new physics associated to neutrino masses. In this work we propose a search for such decays within the Type I Seesaw model in the few-GeV mass range via displaced vertices. Using 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, at 13 TeV, we explore the region of parameter space where such decays are measurable. We show that, after imposing pseudorapidity cuts, there still exists a region where the number of events is larger than O(10). We also find that conventional triggers can greatly limit the sensitivity of our signal, so we display several relevant kinematical distributions which might aid in the optimization of a dedicated trigger selection. (orig.)

  1. Monsoonal loading in Ethiopia and Eritrea from vertical GPS displacement time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Yelebe; Bendick, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    Vertical GPS displacement time series from 16 continuous sites over a period from 2007 to 2014 are compared to time series of monthly averages of liquid water equivalent thickness from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment and precipitation from the Climate Research Unit to investigate hydrologic loading in Ethiopia and Eritrea. The GPS vertical time series record the presence of one or two rainy seasons, the amplitude surface displacements in response to monsoon water load, and phases consistent with a purely elastic response to a water load that accumulates throughout the rainy period. Comparison of observed amplitudes to those calculated for an average Earth model shows no systematic weakness related to the rift.

  2. Validity of Ski Skating Center-of-Mass Displacement Measured by a Single Inertial Measurement Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Håvard; Gløersen, Øyvind; Hallén, Jostein

    2015-12-01

    In regard to simplifying motion analysis and estimating center of mass (COM) in ski skating, this study addressed 3 main questions concerning the use of inertial measurement units (IMU): (1) How accurately can a single IMU estimate displacement of os sacrum (S1) on a person during ski skating? (2) Does incorporating gyroscope and accelerometer data increase accuracy and precision? (3) Moreover, how accurately does S1 determine COM displacement? Six world-class skiers roller-ski skated on a treadmill using 2 different subtechniques. An IMU including accelerometers alone (IMU-A) or in combination with gyroscopes (IMU-G) were mounted on the S1. A reflective marker at S1, and COM calculated from 3D full-body optical analysis, were used to provide reference values. IMU-A provided an accurate and precise estimate of vertical S1 displacement, but IMU-G was required to attain accuracy and precision of < 8 mm (root-mean-squared error and range of displacement deviation) in all directions and with both subtechniques. Further, arm and torso movements affected COM, but not the S1. Hence, S1 displacement was valid for estimating sideways COM displacement, but the systematic amplitude and timing difference between S1 and COM displacement in the anteroposterior and vertical directions inhibits exact calculation of energy fluctuations.

  3. Measurements of vertical displacement of power station buildings using an automatic stationary hydrostatic measuring system; Anwendung des automatisierten stationaeren hydrostatischen Messsystems fuer die Aufnahme der Vertikalverschiebungen an den Objekten der Kern- und Waermekraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J. [Forschungsinstitut fuer Geodaesie, Topographie und Kartographie, Zdiby (Czechoslovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The contribution describes hydrostatic stationary measuring systems for measurements of height variations of a turbine unit. The measuring system developed at the research institute and the algorithms for calibration, measurement and evaluation are presented. Measurements were made on a 500 MW turbogenerator unit at different states of operation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Beitrag enthaelt eine kurze Uebersicht ueber die hydrostatischen stationaeren Messsysteme fuer das Gebiet der Messung der Hoehenaenderung eines Grossturbinentisches. Es wird das automatische stationaere hydrostatische Messsystem, das im Forschungsinstitut entwickelt wurde, der Algorithmus der Kalibrierung, der Messung und der Auswertung der Messergebnisse vorgestellt. Es wird das Messergebnis der Vertikalverschiebungen der Konstruktion des Turbogenerators mit der Leistung 500 Megawatt bei seinem verschiedenen Betriebszustand angefuehrt. (orig.)

  4. Vertical finger displacement is reduced in index finger tapping during repeated bout rate enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2017-01-01

    The present study tested 1) whether a recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement in finger tapping (i.e. a cumulating increase in freely chosen finger tapping frequency following submaximal muscle activation in form of externally unloaded voluntary tapping) could be replicated......, and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency......, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip...

  5. Using in situ vertical displacements to characterize changes in moisture load

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murdoch, Lawrence C; Freeman, Clay E; Germanovich, Leonid N; Thrash, Colby; DeWolf, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Changes in soil moisture content alter the load on underlying material, and we have developed a technique for characterizing this effect by using an extensometer to measure the displacement caused by the load change...

  6. Utilization of an ultrasound beam steering angle for measurements of tissue displacement vector and lateral displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikayoshi Sumi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chikayoshi SumiDepartment of Information and Communication Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: A number of ultrasonic displacement/velocity measurement methods have been extensively developed for measurements of blood flow, tissue motion, and strain. Lateral modulation (LM methods have also been reported using steered, crossed beams, and these methods permit measurements of displacement vectors. In this report, a new beam steering method for the transmission and reception of ultrasound is proposed, which can enable measurements of lateral displacements and of arbitrary displacement vectors with a very high degree of accuracy. Because this beam steering method uses only a steering angle, this method is referred to as ASTA. With ASTA, the number of available methods to obtain a displacement vector measurement is limited to previously developed block-matching methods, such as the multidimensional cross-spectrum phase gradient method, and the multidimensional autocorrelation method (MAM and the multidimensional Doppler method (MDM using a block-matching method (the methods using block matching are referred to as MAMb and MDMb, respectively. Being dependent on the measurement method, only a lateral displacement measurement can be made even if the methods are multidimensional, ie, previously developed MAM and MDM using a moving average and a mirror setting of the obtained steered beams, and one-dimensional (1D, such as an autocorrelation method. Considerations of beamforming schemes using LM and ASTA show that the simple ASTA beamforming method increases capabilities for real-time measurements and requires a small physical aperture when compared with LM. For lateral displacement measurements (eg, blood flow in a carotid artery, a lateral coordinate must correspond to the direction of the target’s lateral motion, and the steering angle used is as large as possible to increase the measurement accuracy

  7. Vertical Displacements Driven by Groundwater Storage Changes in the North China Plain Detected by GPS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renli Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The North China Plain (NCP has been experiencing the most severe groundwater depletion in China, leading to a broad region of vertical motions of the Earth’s surface. This paper explores the seasonal and linear trend variations of surface vertical displacements caused by the groundwater changes in NCP from 2009 to 2013 using Global Positioning System (GPS and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE techniques. Results show that the peak-to-peak amplitude of GPS-derived annual variation is about 3.7~6.0 mm and is highly correlated (R > 0.6 for most selected GPS stations with results from GRACE, which would confirm that the vertical displacements of continuous GPS (CGPS stations are mainly caused by groundwater storage (GWS changes in NCP, since GWS is the dominant component of total water storage (TWS anomalies in this area. The linear trends of selected bedrock-located IGS CGPS stations reveal the distinct GWS changes in period of 2009–2010 (decrease and 2011–2013 (rebound, which are consistent with results from GRACE-derived GWS anomalies and in situ GWS observations. This result implies that the rate of groundwater depletion in NCP has slowed in recent years. The impacts of geological condition (bedrock or sediment of CGPS stations to their results are also investigated in this study. Contrasted with the slight linear rates (−0.69~1.5 mm/a of bedrock-located CGPS stations, the linear rates of sediment-located CGPS stations are between −44 mm/a and −17 mm/a. It is due to the opposite vertical displacements induced by the Earth surface’s porous and elastic response to groundwater depletion. Besides, the distinct renewal characteristics of shallow and deep groundwater in NCP are discussed. The GPS-based vertical displacement time series, to some extent, can reflect the quicker recovery of shallow unconfined groundwater than the deep confined groundwater in NCP; through one month earlier to attain the maximum height for CGPS

  8. Quantitative Measurement of Out-of-plane Displacement Using Shearography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Gu; Kim, Kyung Suk; Beack, Sang Kyu; Jang, Ho Sub [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung Suk [Mokpo Science College, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry is a common method for measuring out-of-plane displacement and in-plane displacement and applied for vibration analysis and strain/stress analysis. However, ESPI is sensitive to environmental disturbance, which provide the limitation of industrial application. On the other hand, Shearography based on shearing interferometer can directly measure the first derivative of out-of-plane displacement, which is insensitive to vibration disturbance. This paper proposes the out-of-plane displacement extraction technique from results of Shearography by numerical processing and measurement results of ESPI and Shearoraphy are compared quantitatively.

  9. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  10. Monitoring Surface Vertical Displacements Over Permafrost Area in Barrow, Alaska Using Reflected GPS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Larson, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Over areas underlain by permafrost, the ground surface undergoes seasonal vertical displacements associated with the freeze/thaw cycle. Superimposed over the seasonal cycle, inter-annual and long-term changes of ground surface elevation may occur as a result of permafrost degradation or aggradation. Geodetic methods, such as leveling and GPS, have been commonly used in permafrost studies, but only conducted in field campaigns. The difficulties for continuous monitoring using GPS are not only due to logistic challenges, but also a dilemma of setting the monument at the ground surface or within the active layer or deeply frozen monument's base within the permafrost. In the first case, the three-dimensional position of the receiver is unstable when the active layer is thawed and mechanically weak. Whereas in the second case, receiver position changes reflect tectonic movement instead of changes of active layer or permafrost. Here we develop a new method to measure temporal changes of ground surface elevation in the geocentric reference frame with reflected GPS signals. We use the data collected by a continuous GPS receiver (site code SG27) in Barrow, Alaska. The height of the monument is about 3.5 m above ground, extending about 5 m beneath the surface, well frozen in the permafrost. We calculate both (1) the vertical position of the GPS receiver antenna and (2) the distance between the antenna and surface reflector under the antenna. Combining these two observables, we are able to retrieve daily changes of surface elevation during thaw seasons from 2003 to 2015. Our results show distinct temporal variations at three time scales: (1) regular thaw settlement within each summer, (2) inter-annual variability in the cumulative thaw settlement for each summer, ranging from 4 to 11 cm, and (3) a secular subsidence trend of about 1 cm/year from 2003 to 2011, followed by an uplift trend from 2012 to 2015 (Figure 1). The variabilities are associated with changes in ground

  11. Measurement of local relative displacements in large structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesauro, Angelo; Eder, Martin Alexander; Nielsen, Magda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel measurement technique to measure local relative displacements between parts of large-scale structures. The measured deformations can be of significant importance for fracture analyses in many different types of structures in general, and for adhesive connections...... in particular. The measurement of small local relative displacements in structures subjected to large global deformations is complex and hardly feasible with conventional measurement methods. Therefore, a Small Displacement Measurement System (SDMS) has been devised. The SDMS is based on stereo photogrammetry...... and capable of measuring 3D local displacements with a high degree of accuracy. In this article, the technique is used to measure local deformations in the vicinity of the adhesive trailing edge joint of a wind turbine rotor blade. The SDMS results correspond well with another independent measurement method....

  12. Coral 13C/12C records of vertical seafloor displacement during megathrust earthquakes west of Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagan, Michael K.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Scott-Gagan, Heather; Sieh, Kerry; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Briggs, Richard W.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Rifai, Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge of megathrust earthquakes and tsunami disasters has highlighted the need for a comprehensive understanding of earthquake cycles along convergent plate boundaries. Space geodesy has been used to document recent crustal deformation patterns with unprecedented precision, however the production of long paleogeodetic records of vertical seafloor motion is still a major challenge. Here we show that carbon isotope ratios () in the skeletons of massive Porites   corals from west Sumatra record abrupt changes in light exposure resulting from coseismic seafloor displacements. Validation of the method is based on the coral  response to uplift (and subsidence) produced by the March 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias–Simeulue earthquake, and uplift further south around Sipora Island during a M∼8.4 megathrust earthquake in February 1797. At Nias, the average step-change in coral  was 0.6±0.1‰/m for coseismic displacements of +1.8 m and −0.4 m in 2005. At Sipora, a distinct change in Porites  microatoll growth morphology marks coseismic uplift of 0.7 m in 1797. In this shallow water setting, with a steep light attenuation gradient, the step-change in microatoll  is2.3‰/m, nearly four times greater than for the Nias Porites  . Considering the natural variability in coral skeletal , we show that the lower detection limit of the method is around 0.2 m of vertical seafloor motion. Analysis of vertical displacement for well-documented earthquakes suggests this sensitivity equates to shallow events exceedingMw∼7.2 in central megathrust and back-arc thrust fault settings. Our findings indicate that the coral  paleogeodesy technique could be applied to convergent tectonic margins throughout the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans, which host prolific coral reefs, and some of the world's greatest earthquake catastrophes. While our focus here is the link between coral , light exposure and coseismic crustal deformation, the same principles

  13. A Vision-Based Sensor for Noncontact Structural Displacement Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Feng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional displacement sensors have limitations in practical applications. This paper develops a vision sensor system for remote measurement of structural displacements. An advanced template matching algorithm, referred to as the upsampled cross correlation, is adopted and further developed into a software package for real-time displacement extraction from video images. By simply adjusting the upsampling factor, better subpixel resolution can be easily achieved to improve the measurement accuracy. The performance of the vision sensor is first evaluated through a laboratory shaking table test of a frame structure, in which the displacements at all the floors are measured by using one camera to track either high-contrast artificial targets or low-contrast natural targets on the structural surface such as bolts and nuts. Satisfactory agreements are observed between the displacements measured by the single camera and those measured by high-performance laser displacement sensors. Then field tests are carried out on a railway bridge and a pedestrian bridge, through which the accuracy of the vision sensor in both time and frequency domains is further confirmed in realistic field environments. Significant advantages of the noncontact vision sensor include its low cost, ease of operation, and flexibility to extract structural displacement at any point from a single measurement.

  14. Large scale intender test program to measure sub gouge displacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Been, Ken; Lopez, Juan [Golder Associates Inc, Houston, TX (United States); Sancio, Rodolfo [MMI Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The production of submarine pipelines in an offshore environment covered with ice is very challenging. Several precautions must be taken such as burying the pipelines to protect them from ice movement caused by gouging. The estimation of the subgouge displacements is a key factor in pipeline design for ice gouged environments. This paper investigated a method to measure subgouge displacements. An experimental program was implemented in an open field to produce large scale idealized gouges on engineered soil beds (sand and clay). The horizontal force required to produce the gouge, the subgouge displacements in the soil and the strain imposed by these displacements were monitored on a buried model pipeline. The results showed that for a given keel, the gouge depth was inversely proportional to undrained shear strength in clay. The subgouge displacements measured did not show a relationship with the gouge depth, width or soil density in sand and clay tests.

  15. Internal fixation of displaced inferior pole of the patella fractures using vertical wiring augmented with Krachow suturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyoung-Keun; Choo, Suk-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Wan; Lee, Mark

    2015-12-01

    We present the surgical technique of separate vertical wiring for displaced inferior pole fractures of the patella combined with Krachow suture and report the surgical outcomes. Between September 2007 to May 2012, 11 consecutive patients (mean age, 54.6 years) with inferior pole fractures of the patella (AO/OTA 34-A1) were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Through longitudinal incision, all patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation by separate vertical wiring combined with Krackow suture. The range of motion, loss of fixation, and Bostman score were primary outcome measures. The union time was 10 weeks after surgery on average (range: 8-12). No patient had nonunion, loss of reduction and wire breakage. There was no case of wound problem and irritation from the implant. At final follow-up, the average range of motion arc was 129.4° (range: 120-140). The mean Bostman score at last follow-up was 29.6 points (range: 28-30) and graded excellent in all cases. Separate vertical wiring combined with Krackow suture for inferior pole fractures of the patella is a useful technique that is easy to perform and can provide stable fixation with excellent results in knee function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Spencer, Billie F

    2013-07-01

    Displacement measurements are useful information for various engineering applications such as structural health monitoring (SHM), earthquake engineering and system identification. Most existing displacement measurement methods are costly, labor-intensive, and have difficulties particularly when applying to full-scale civil structures because the methods require stationary reference points. Indirect estimation methods converting acceleration to displacement can be a good alternative as acceleration transducers are generally cost-effective, easy to install, and have low noise. However, the application of acceleration-based methods to full-scale civil structures such as long span bridges is challenging due to the need to install cables to connect the sensors to a base station. This article proposes a low-cost wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration. Developed with smart sensors that are low-cost, wireless, and capable of on-board computation, the wireless displacement measurement system has significant potential to impact many applications that need displacement information at multiple locations of a structure. The system implements an FIR-filter type displacement estimation algorithm that can remove low frequency drifts typically caused by numerical integration of discrete acceleration signals. To verify the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed system, laboratory tests are carried out using a shaking table and on a three storey shear building model, experimentally confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  17. Measuring fast stochastic displacements of bio-membranes with dynamic optical displacement spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzel, C.; Schmidt, D.; Kleusch, C.; Kirchenbüchler, D.; Seifert, U.; Smith, A.-S.; Sengupta, K.; Merkel, R.

    2015-10-01

    Stochastic displacements or fluctuations of biological membranes are increasingly recognized as an important aspect of many physiological processes, but hitherto their precise quantification in living cells was limited due to a lack of tools to accurately record them. Here we introduce a novel technique--dynamic optical displacement spectroscopy (DODS), to measure stochastic displacements of membranes with unprecedented combined spatiotemporal resolution of 20 nm and 10 μs. The technique was validated by measuring bending fluctuations of model membranes. DODS was then used to explore the fluctuations in human red blood cells, which showed an ATP-induced enhancement of non-Gaussian behaviour. Plasma membrane fluctuations of human macrophages were quantified to this accuracy for the first time. Stimulation with a cytokine enhanced non-Gaussian contributions to these fluctuations. Simplicity of implementation, and high accuracy make DODS a promising tool for comprehensive understanding of stochastic membrane processes.

  18. Vertical and horizontal surface displacements near Jakobshavn Isbræ driven by melt-induced and dynamic ice loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Spada, G.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze Global Positioning System (GPS) time series of relative vertical and horizontal surface displacements from 2006 to 2012 at four GPS sites located between ∼5 and ∼150 km from the front of Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI) in west Greenland. Horizontal displacements during 2006–2010 at KAGA, ILUL, a...... to 2006–2010. The sudden change in vertical and horizontal displacements is due to enhanced melt-induced ice loss in 2010 and 2012....... of surface elevations from 2006, 2009, and 2010. However, horizontal displacements during 2010–2012 at KAGA and ILUL are directed more towards the west suggesting a change in the spatial distribution of the ice mass loss. In addition, we observe an increase in the uplift rate during 2010–2012 as compared...

  19. Preliminary structural assessment of DEMO vacuum vessel against a vertical displacement event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzillo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.mozzillo@unina.it [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Tarallo, Andrea; Marzullo, Domenico [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion PMU, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Di Gironimo, Giuseppe [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Mazzone, Giuseppe [Unità Tecnica Fusione - ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper focuses on a preliminary structural analysis of the current concept design of DEMO vacuum vessel. • The Vacuum Vessel was checked against the VDE in combinations with the weight force of all components that the vessel shall bear. • Different configurations for the vacuum vessel supports are considered, showing that the best solution is VV supported at the lower port. • The analyses evaluated the “P damage” according to RCC-MRx code. - Abstract: This paper focuses on a preliminary structural analysis of the current concept design of DEMO vacuum vessel (VV). The VV structure is checked against a vertical load due to a Vertical Displacement Event in combination with the weight force of all components that the main vessel shall bear. Different configurations for the supports are considered. Results show that the greatest safety margins are reached when the tokamak is supported through the lower ports rather than the equatorial ports, though all analyzed configurations are compliant with RCC-MRx design rules.

  20. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the effects of ionization and displacement damage in vertical, high voltage GaN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizkelethy, G.; King, M. P.; Aktas, O.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Kaplar, R. J.

    2017-08-01

    Radiation responses of high-voltage, vertical gallium-nitride (GaN) diodes were investigated using Sandia National Laboratories' nuclear microprobe. Effects of the ionization and the displacement damage were studied using various ion beams. We found that the devices show avalanche effect for heavy ions operated under bias well below the breakdown voltage. The displacement damage experiments showed a surprising effect for moderate damage: the charge collection efficiency demonstrated an increase instead of a decrease for higher bias voltages.

  1. Vertical displacements of circum-Arctic lithosphere caused by glacial erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Hartz, Ebbe; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic, as many other places, is affected by complex geodynamic features, including the effects of plumes, heat, basin formation etc. In contrast with other places, however, effects of complex features in the Arctic are masked by the last, and in many ways obvious, geodynamic effects of ice and erosion. We aim to resolve this overriding geodynamic event and quantify its effects before older and more complex processes are debated. During the Quaternary, the northern hemisphere was intensely sculptured by thick icecaps, and ice-streams. In some areas, like central East Greenland, or NE Canada, huge fjords and inlets are carved more than 3 km below the summit surface. This erosion cause major unloading, and thus uplift which we model by numerically placing back eroded material, and calculating the flexural isostatic response (vertical motion) repeatedly backwards in time until eroded features are filled to the summit surface. Model results show that Late Cenozoic (mostly glacial) erosion has caused dramatic vertical motions and tilts. Regions such as greater Ellesmere-NW Greenland and central East Greenland have experienced regional erosional uplift in excess of 1 km, which is of the scale of the vertical displacement (down) induced by the load of the Greenland icecap. Interestingly, this erosional uplift solves long-standing enigmas of the occurrence of marine sediments above 1 km altitude in tectonically quiet areas like East Greenland and some islands of Canadian Arctic archipelago and adds systematics between regional AFT ages and elevation. In some areas, like Svalbard and Iceland, modelled erosional uplift and associated down flexing are highly influenced by the assumed effective elastic thickness, and the results thus give direct input to our understanding of the Earth's interior.

  2. Out-of-plane displacement field measurement by shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Pengxiang; Zhu, Feipeng; He, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-01

    Existing shearography systems measuring out-of-plane displacements suffer from boundary-constraint or reference surface requirements. Therefore, we propose an accurate non-uniform out-of-plane displacement field measurement method based on a modified shearography system and two-step integration method. The proposed method combines high-resolution interferometry with the advantage of relaxing the environmental stability requirements. The modified shearography system adopts three beam splitters and two switches when compared with conventional optical configurations. The three beam splitters are used to construct a modified Michelson interferometer that shears the image along two orthogonal directions, and the shearing direction can be switched by the two hardware switches between the orthogonal directions. With phase shifting performed on the recorded images, the out-of-plane displacement gradients along the orthogonal directions are extracted sequentially. In general, without boundary restrictions on the object surface, it is difficult to directly extract out-of-plane displacement from a single displacement gradient field. Accordingly, the two-step integration method is proposed and applied to the orthogonal displacement gradients to extract the relative out-of-plane displacement field without any boundary conditions of the object surface provided. Experiments are performed on a clamped circular plate with uniform loading, and the results are compared with electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) results to validate the proposed method.

  3. Precision displacement measurement using a modulating ESPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Kang, Young June; Hong, Dong Pyo; Kim, Kyung Suk; Park, Nak Kyu; Ryu, Weon Jae; Choi, Man Young

    2007-10-01

    Laser interferometry is widely used as a measuring system in many fields because of its high resolution and ability to measure a broad area in real-time all at once. In conventional LASER interferometry, for example Out-of-plane ESPI(Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry), In plane ESPI, Shearography and Holography, it uses PZT or other components as a phase shift instrumentation to extract 3D deformation data, vibration mode and others. However, in most cases PZT has some disadvantages, which include non-linear errors and limited time of use. In the present study, a new type of LASER interferometry using a laser diode is proposed. Using LASER Diode Sinusoidal Phase Modulating (LD-SPM) interferometry, the phase modulation can directly modulated by controlling the LASER Diode injection current thereby eliminating the need for PZT and its components. This makes the interferometry more compact. This paper reports on a new approach to the LD Modulating interferometry that involves four-bucket phase shift method. This study proposes a four-bucket phase mapping algorithm, which developed to have a guaranteed application, to stabilize the system in the field and to be a user-friendly GUI. In this paper, LD modulating interferometry had shown the theory for LD wavelength modulation and sinusoidal phase modulation. Four-bucket phase mapping algorithm then introduced.

  4. An Inexpensive Interferometric Setup for Measuring Microscopic Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanís, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Martínez, Carlos; Álvarez, Liliana; Salazar, Germán

    2004-04-01

    In an interesting article published in an issue of The Physics Teacher, Reichert gives some didactic examples about static friction force between a plastic block and a wooden plane on which it rests. To explain the experiments, he uses a simple model based on a microscopic "elastic band" that connects the atoms of both surfaces. Reichert remarks that "the block moves, albeit a microscopic distance," and that it would be helpful if the student could see these displacements. In another paragraph he states that "measuring it (displacement) requires delicate and expensive optical instruments." Effectively, a measurement of such small displacements generally requires interferometric devices. At our university, we teach basic physics and we are aware of the difficulties that beginners have grasping the concepts involved in static friction force. At the same time, as our research field is related to optics metrology, we could not ignore Reichert's statement. Could we design an experimental device to measure the microscopic displacement referred to by Reichert, keeping it inexpensive and easy to implement? Incidentally, in the same issue of The Physics Teacher, Sawicki2 gives an excellent example of how, with a few common elements, a simple experiment of interferometric measurement can be put within students' reach. In this paper, we suggest the use of a simple interferometric device, built with very common and inexpensive elements, and describe an experiment on static friction force in which the instrument is applied to measure microscopic displacements.

  5. PC Based Linear Variable Differential Displacement Measurement Uses Optical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar MAITI

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available PC based linear variable differential displacement (LVDD measurement with optical approach has been presented. The technique is a good blending of both hardware and software and is basically an alternative method of linear variable differential transformer (LVDT. A visual basic (VB programming is used for this PC based measurement. Here the voltage output and the displacement of the reflector can be studied and stored continuously. Theoretical predictions are supported by experimental results. This technique can be used for the measurement of some non-electrical parameters e.g. force, torque and liquid level etc.

  6. Interferometric measurement of displacements and displacement velocities for nondestructive quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpeĭzman, V. V.; Peschanskaya, N. N.

    2007-07-01

    It is shown that the interferometric measurement of small displacements and small-displacement velocities can be used to determine internal stresses or the stresses induced by an applied load in solids and to control structural changes in them. The interferometric method based on the measurement of the reaction of a solid to a small perturbation in its state of stress is applied to determine stresses from the deviation of the reaction to perturbations from that in the standard stress-free case. For structural control, this method is employed to study the specific features of the characteristics of microplastic deformation that appear after material treatment or operation and manifest themselves in the temperature and force dependences of the rate of a small inelastic strain.

  7. Kinetic mixing between a Higgs boson and a nearly degenerate dark scalar: Oscillations and displaced vertices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanovsky, Daniel; Chen, Junmou

    2017-11-01

    Extensions beyond the standard model allow for a gauge singlet scalar to be kinetically coupled with the Higgs. We consider kinetic mixing between a dark scalar gauge singlet nearly degenerate with the Higgs, focusing on the dynamical aspects of the mixing phenomena. The renormalization program is carried out by obtaining the one-loop effective action which yields an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian to study the dynamics of mixing. The scalar Higgs becomes a coherent superposition of the mass eigenstates, thus kinetic mixing leads to oscillations and common decay channels in striking similarity with neutral meson mixing. Near degeneracy yields an enhancement of the kinetic coupling. For small kinetic mixing we find that the mass eigenstates feature different lifetimes which result in a wide separation of time scales of evolution along with important coherence aspects from dark scalar-Higgs interference. The wide separation of scales is manifest as displaced decay vertices which could potentially be a telltale experimental signal of kinetic mixing.

  8. Digital system for dynamic turbine engine blade displacement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a technique for measuring blade tip displacements which employs optical probes and an array of microcomputers. A system directly digitizing a minimum of a 2048-point time-deflection history for each of the three measurement locations on each blade is described.

  9. In vitro force delivery of nickel-titanium superelastic archwires in vertical displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the force delivered by different superlastic nickel-titanium wires during vertical displacement, in order to determine whether their stress release meets the criteria for constant and light forces that are usually accredited to these archwires. METHOD: Ten samples of 6 brands of 0.016-in archwires (Ormco, GAC, Morelli, TP, American Orthodontics e Rocky Mountain were tested in a complete metal model using Dynalock brackets (3M Unitek™. In the canine position, there was a sliding bracket connected to a pole. This set was related to a load cell of 0.5 kg attached to a universal testing machine (Autograph AG-199kNG, Shimadzu. The crosshead speed was 0.5 mm/min and the maximum displacement was 1.0 mm. The model was submerged in temperature-controlled water. The results were analyzed by ANOVA (p OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a força liberada por diferentes fios de níquel-titânio (NiTi superelástico em deslocamento vertical, a fim de determinar se a liberação de estresse por esses satisfaz o critério de forças suaves e constantes, geralmente atribuído a tais arcos. MÉTODOS: dez amostras de seis arcos de NiTi superelástico 0,016” de marcas comerciais diferentes (Ormco, GAC, Morelli, TP, American Orthodontics e Rocky Mountain foram testados em um modelo metálico usando braquetes Dynalock (3M Unitek. Na região do canino, havia um braquete móvel conectado a uma haste, a qual estava relacionada com uma célula de carga de 0,5kg de uma máquina universal de ensaios (Autograph AG-199kNG, Shimadzu. O deslocamento do conjunto na região do canino foi realizado a uma velocidade constante de 0,5mm/min e o deslocamento máximo foi de 1,0mm. O conjunto foi submerso em água com temperatura controlada a 37ºC. RESULTADOS: os resultados obtidos foram avaliados por ANOVA (p <0,05, usando o software SAS System 8.02, Cry, NC, EUA. O arco da TP apresentou a menor força durante todo o

  10. Which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement? Evaluating the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament by ultrasound speckle tracking imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and one cause of rotator cuff disease. We aimed to identify which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement by measuring the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament using ultrasound speckle tracking imaging. Sixteen shoulders without shoulder disability were enrolled. All subjects were men, and the average age was 28.6 years. The vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament were analyzed by the motion tracing program during the following active assisted motions (active motion controlled by the examiner): (1) forward flexion in the scapular plane, (2) horizontal abduction in the axial plane, (3) external rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (ER0), (4) internal rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (IR0), (5) internal rotation with the arm at 90° abduction (IR90), and (6) internal rotation at the back (IRB). The mean vertical displacement of the coracoacromial ligament during forward flexion (2.2 mm), horizontal abduction (2.2 mm), and IR90 (2.4 mm) was significantly greater than that during the other motions (ER0, -0.7 mm; IR0, 0.5 mm; IRB, 1.0 mm; P impingement. It is recommended that patients with impingement syndrome or a repaired rotator cuff avoid these shoulder motions. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  12. Micro-vision-based displacement measurement with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qinghua; Zhang, Xianmin; Fan, Yanbin

    2011-12-01

    The micro-motion stages are widely used in micro/nano manufacturing technology. In this paper, an integrated approach for measuring micro-displacement of micro-motion stage that incorporates motion estimation algorithm into the computer microvision is proposed. At first, the basic principle of the computer microvision measurement is analyzed. Then, a robust multiscale motion estimation algorithm for micro-motion measurement is proposed. Finally, the microdisplacement of the micro-motion stage based on the piezoelectric ceramic actuators and the compliant mechanisms is measured using the integrated approach. The maximal bias of the proposed approach reached 13 nm. Experimental results show that the new integrated method can measure micro-displacement with nanometer accuracy.

  13. Vertical profile measurements of lower troposphere ionisation

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K.A.; Aplin, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Vertical soundings of the atmospheric ion production rate have been obtained from Geiger counters integrated with conventional meteorological radiosondes. In launches made from Reading (UK) during 2013-2014, the Regener-Pfotzer ionisation maximum was at an altitude equivalent to a pressure of (63.1±2.4) hPa, or, expressed in terms of the local air density, (0.101±0.005) kgm−3. The measured ionisation profiles have been evaluated against the Usoskin-Kovaltsov model and, separately, surface neu...

  14. Differential optical feedback interferometry for the measurement of nanometric displacements

    OpenAIRE

    Azcona Guerrero, Francisco Javier; Atashkhooei, Reza; Royo Royo, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We have recently proposed differential optical feedback interferometry as a convenient method to measure nanometric displacements. In this paper, we present experimental results to support the proposed method. The acquisition system (in particular the conditioning electronics), and, the signal processing algorithm applied to the captured signal, will be described. Obtained results show good agreement with measurements performed using a capacitive sensor employed as reference. © Sociedad Españ...

  15. TID and Displacement Damage Effects in Vertical and Lateral Power MOSFETs for Integrated DC-DC Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F; Michelis, S; Faccio, Federico; Fuentes, C; Allongue, B; Sorge, R; Orlandi, S

    2010-01-01

    TID and displacement damage effects are studied for vertical and lateral power MOSFETs in five different technologies in view of the development of radiation-tolerant fully integrated DC-DC converters. Investigation is pushed to the very high level of radiation expected for an upgrade to the LHC experiments. TID induces threshold voltage shifts and, in n-channel transistors, source-drain leakage currents. Wide variability in the magnitude of these effects is observed. Displacement damage increases the on-resistance of both vertical and lateral high-voltage transistors. In the latter case, degradation at high particle fluence might lead to a distortion of the output characteristics curve. HBD techniques to limit or eliminate the radiation-induced leakage currents are successfully applied to these high-voltage transistors, but have to be used carefully to avoid consequences on the breakdown voltage.

  16. The small-sized ultraprecision sensor for measuring linear displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, D. S.; Zherdev, A. Y.; Odinokov, S. B.; Markin, V. V.; Gurylev, O. A.; Shishova, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    The article describes a new optical scheme of noncontact sensor for measuring linear displacement - linear encoder. This sensor is an optical device in which the measurement of displacement is performed by analyzing the optical signal, which pass through two diffraction gratings, one of which is moved relative to the other. The optical signal is obtained by the diffraction of light in these diffraction gratings and subsequent interference of diffracted beams. Often this type of sensors are multi-channel devices with symmetrically positioned of detectors. This scheme is proposed to use a multisection phase mask that allows to make a small-sized sensor. Sections of this multi-section phase mask are the optical windows and they made the final interference signals to be shifted relative to each other in phase. The number of sections in the multi-section phase mask can be varied. Estimated sufficient number of sections is four or more.

  17. A Differential Monolithically Integrated Inductive Linear Displacement Measurement Microsystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Podhraški

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An inductive linear displacement measurement microsystem realized as a monolithic Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC is presented. The system comprises integrated microtransformers as sensing elements, and analog front-end electronics for signal processing and demodulation, both jointly fabricated in a conventional commercially available four-metal 350-nm CMOS process. The key novelty of the presented system is its full integration, straightforward fabrication, and ease of application, requiring no external light or magnetic field source. Such systems therefore have the possibility of substituting certain conventional position encoder types. The microtransformers are excited by an AC signal in MHz range. The displacement information is modulated into the AC signal by a metal grating scale placed over the microsystem, employing a differential measurement principle. Homodyne mixing is used for the demodulation of the scale displacement information, returned by the ASIC as a DC signal in two quadrature channels allowing the determination of linear position of the target scale. The microsystem design, simulations, and characterization are presented. Various system operating conditions such as frequency, phase, target scale material and distance have been experimentally evaluated. The best results have been achieved at 4 MHz, demonstrating a linear resolution of 20 µm with steel and copper scale, having respective sensitivities of 0.71 V/mm and 0.99 V/mm.

  18. A comparison of displacement measuring systems for single-axis measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdale, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses an attempt to make a relative comparison of the performance of an ordinary supermicrometer retrofitted with several different displacement measuring systems. The methodology used was a gage repeatability and reproducibility study. The environment, equipment, and operators were held constant in an experimental design that highlights the difference in capability of the various displacement measuring systems.

  19. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  20. CENTIMETER COSMO-SKYMED RANGE MEASUREMENTS FOR MONITORING GROUND DISPLACEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fratarcangeli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery are widely used in order to monitor displacements impacting the Earth surface and infrastructures. The main remote sensing technique to extract sub-centimeter information from SAR imagery is the Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR, based on the phase information only. However, it is well known that DInSAR technique may suffer for lack of coherence among the considered stack of images. New Earth observation SAR satellite sensors, as COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, and the coming PAZ, can acquire imagery with high amplitude resolutions too, up to few decimeters. Thanks to this feature, and to the on board dual frequency GPS receivers, allowing orbits determination with an accuracy at few centimetres level, the it was proven by different groups that TerraSAR-X imagery offer the capability to achieve, in a global reference frame, 3D positioning accuracies in the decimeter range and even better just exploiting the slant-range measurements coming from the amplitude information, provided proper corrections of all the involved geophysical phenomena are carefully applied. The core of this work is to test this methodology on COSMO-SkyMed data acquired over the Corvara area (Bolzano – Northern Italy, where, currently, a landslide with relevant yearly displacements, up to decimeters, is monitored, using GPS survey and DInSAR technique. The leading idea is to measure the distance between the satellite and a well identifiable natural or artificial Persistent Scatterer (PS, taking in account the signal propagation delays through the troposphere and ionosphere and filtering out the known geophysical effects that induce periodic and secular ground displacements. The preliminary results here presented and discussed indicate that COSMO-SkyMed Himage imagery appear able to guarantee a displacements monitoring with an accuracy of few centimetres using only the amplitude data, provided few (at least one stable PS’s are

  1. Development of methodology for measurements of residual stresses in welded joint based on displacement of points in a coordinated table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Veras Siqueira Filho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses in a welded joint of ASTM A131 grade AH32 steel was measured either by the X-ray diffraction or by displacements of referenced points measured on a coordinate measuring machine before and after heat treatment. For all tests, the welding was performed with Shielded Metal Arc Welding, vertical-up position, by a certified welder. After welding, some specimens were subjected to marking, made through small holes evenly spaced and mapped on a coordinate measuring machine. After labeling, the samples were subjected to heat treatment at temperatures nearby recrystallization. After heat treatment, the samples were subjected to new measurements by coordinate measuring machine to evaluate the displacements of the points produced by the recrystallization. In parallel, residual stress measurements were made by XRD for validation of this new methodology. The results obtained either by X-ray or by coordinate measuring machine showed a good correlation between the two measurement methodologies employed.

  2. Measuring coseismic displacements with point-like targets offset tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Xie

    2014-01-01

    Offset tracking is an important complement to measure large ground displacements in both azimuth and range dimensions where synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry is unfeasible. Subpixel offsets can be obtained by searching for the cross-correlation peak calculated from the match patches uniformly distributed on two SAR images. However, it has its limitations, including redundant computation and incorrect estimations on decorrelated patches. In this letter, we propose a simple strategy that performs offset tracking on detected point-like targets (PT). We first detect image patches within bright PT by using a sinc-like template from a single SAR image and then perform offset tracking on them to obtain the pixel shifts. Compared with the standard method, the application on the 2010 M 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake shows that the proposed PT offset tracking can significantly increase the cross-correlation and thus result in both efficiency and reliability improvements. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Experimental determinations of correction factors as a function of vertical displacement of radioactive sources in the radionuclide calibrators of the CRCN-NE, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceiao de Farias; Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa; Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de; Oliveira, Mercia L. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In nuclear medicine, the accurate knowledge of the activity of radio-pharmaceuticals which will be administered to the patients is an important factor to ensure the success of diagnosis or therapy. The activity measurements are performed in reentrant ionization chambers, also known as radionuclide calibrators. These equipment are sensitive to changes in radioactive sample geometry and its position within the chamber well. The purpose this work was to evaluate the behavior of radionuclide calibrators by means of vertical displacement of radioactive sources in the well and to determine experimentally the correction factors for each radionuclide, recognizing the specific positions in which the measurements must be made to ensure the highest sensitivity. The highest activity was obtained between 6 and 8 cm from the bottom of the well for both radionuclide calibrators utilized at this work. (author)

  4. Management of metrology in measuring of the displacement of building construction

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Kratochvíl

    2007-01-01

    The metrology management of the measurement of the displacement of building construction is not regulated in the standard ČSN ISO 73 0405 - Measurement of the displacement of building construction. But the metrology management has to be included in the project of measurement of the displacement (Stage of project). Then we have to pay an attention to the metrological management during this measurement (Stage of realization) and during the evaluation of this measurement (Stage of evaluation). W...

  5. Vertical displacement during late-collisional escape tectonics (Brasiliano Orogeny) in the Ribeira Belt, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackspacher, P. C.; Godoy, A. M.

    1999-07-01

    During the Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogeny, West Gondwana formed by collisional processes around the São Francisco-Congo Craton. The Ribeira belt, in southeastern Brazil, resulted from northwestward collision (650-600 Ma), followed by large-scale northeast-southwest dextral strike-slip shear movements related to late-collisional escape tectonics ( ca 600 Ma). In São Paulo State, three groups, also interpreted as terranes, are recognised in the Ribeira Belt, the Embu, Itapira and São Roque Groups. The Embu and Itapira Groups are formed of sillimanite-gneisses, schists and migmatites intruded by Neoproterozoic calc-alkaline granitoids, all thrusted northwestward. The São Roque Group is composed of metasediments and metavolcanics in greenschist-facies. Its deformation indicates a transpressional regime associated with tectonic escape. Sub-alkaline granites were emplaced in shallow levels during this regime. Microstructural studies along the Itu, Moreiras and Taxaquara Shear Zones demonstrate the coexistence of horizontal and vertical displacement components during the transpressional regime. The vertical component is regarded as responsible for the lateral juxtaposition of different crustal levels.

  6. Dynamic measurement of local displacements within curing resin-based dental composite using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Rahman, Mohammed Wahidur; Donnan, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using optical coherence elastography to measure internal displacements during the curing phase of a light-activated, resin-based composite material. Displacement vectors were spatially mapped over time within a commercial dental composite. Measurements revealed that the orientation of cure-induced displacement vectors varied spatially in a complex manner; however, each vector showed a systematic evolution with time. Precision of individual displacements was estimated to be ˜1 to 2 μm, enabling submicrometer time-varying displacements to be detected.

  7. A noncontact FMCW radar sensor for displacement measurement in structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cunlong; Chen, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Rong; Xu, Hengyi; Qi, Yi

    2015-03-26

    This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The principle of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ) card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy.

  8. A Noncontact FMCW Radar Sensor for Displacement Measurement in Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunlong Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM. The principle of three-dimensional (3-D displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy.

  9. Measurements of fluid transport by controllable vertical migrations of plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Isabel A.; Dabiri, John O.

    2016-11-01

    Diel vertical migration of zooplankton has been proposed to be a significant contributor to local and possibly large-scale fluid transport in the ocean. However, studies of this problem to date have been limited to order-of-magnitude estimates based on first principles and a small number of field observations. In this work, we leverage the phototactic behavior of zooplankton to stimulate controllable vertical migrations in the laboratory and to study the associated fluid transport and mixing. Building upon a previous prototype system, a laser guidance system induces vertical swimming of brine shrimp (Artemia salina) in a 2.1 meter tall, density-stratified water tank. The animal swimming speed and spacing during the controlled vertical migration is characterized with video analysis. A schlieren imaging system is utilized to visualize density perturbations to a stable stratification for quantification of fluid displacement length scales and restratification timescales. These experiments can add to our understanding of the dynamics of active particles in stratified flows. NSF and US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  10. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Mattsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Mats

    Full-scale experiments were made in a displacement ventilated room with two breathing thermal manikins to study the effect of movements and breathing on the vertical contaminant distribution, and on the personal exposure of occupants. Concentrations were measured with tracer gas equipment...... in the room and in the inhalation of both manikins. Tracer gas was added in the heat plume above a sitting manikin, or in the exhalation through either the nose or the mouth. The other manikin moved back and forth at different speeds on a low trolley. The mentioned experimental conditions have a significant...

  11. Simulation and analysis of vertical displacement characteristics of three wheels reverse trike vehicle with PID controller application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Lambang, Lullus; Erick Chandra, N.; Muhayat, Nurul; Jaka S., B.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain a mathematical model (Full Vehicle Model) and compare the performance of passive and active suspension systems of a Three-Wheels Reverse Trike vehicle. Vehicle suspension system should able to provide good steering handling and passenger comfort. Vehicle suspension system generally only uses passive suspension components with fix spring and damper coefficients. An active suspension developed from the traditional (passive) suspension design can directly control the actuator force in the suspension system. In this paper, modeling and simulation of passive and active suspension system for a Full Vehicle Model is performed using Simulink-MATLAB software. Ziegler & Nichols tuning method is used to obtain controller parameters of Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller. Comparison between passive and active suspension with PID controller is conducted for disturbances input of single bump road surface profile 0.1 meters. The results are the displacement and acceleration of the vehicle body in the vertical direction of active suspension system with PID control is better in providing handling capabilities and comfort for the driver than of passive suspension system. The acceleration of 1,8G with the down time of 2.5 seconds is smaller than the acceleration of 2.5G with down time of 5.5 seconds.

  12. Effect of motion artifacts and scan circle displacements on Cirrus HD-OCT retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Peterson, Gregory C; Syed, Misha F; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2014-04-07

    To evaluate the effect of scan circle displacements on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measurements in Cirrus HD-OCT scans with motion artifacts affecting the optic disc. In this cross-sectional study, 70 scans from 18 healthy eyes and 100 scans from 26 glaucomatous eyes were divided into 85 pairs, each composed by a scan with one motion artifact affecting the optic disc, and a scan from the same eye without motion artifacts. En face images underwent automated realignment, and horizontal/vertical scan circle displacements were determined. Multiple regression analysis evaluated the relationship between scan circle displacements and RNFLT change. Scans with motion artifacts showed similar displacements in healthy and glaucomatous eyes (P values ≥ 0.08). Average RNFLT and quadrants were relatively unchanged, while clock-hours showed more changes (e.g., in glaucomatous eyes, clock-hour-7 RNFLT was lower in scans with motion artifacts, P = 0.05). Scan circle displacements produced average RNFLT changes above test-retest variability in 3/85 cases (3.53%). Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness tended to decrease in sectors moved away from the disc and to increase in sectors closer to the disc (R(2) ≤ 0.40 and R(2) ≤ 0.22 in healthy and glaucomatous eyes, respectively). In healthy eyes, horizontal displacements ≥ 423 and 325 μm were associated with average and quadrant RNFLT changes above test-retest variability, respectively. Scan circle displacements occurred in all scans with motions artifacts affecting the optic disc. Average RNFLT and quadrants were more robust than clock-hours. Because motion artifacts may be difficult to detect, clinicians should carefully inspect en face OCT images for their presence and interpret clock-hour results cautiously.

  13. Detecting seasonal and long-term vertical displacement in the North China Plain using GRACE and GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linsong; Chen, Chao; Du, Jinsong; Wang, Tongqing

    2017-06-01

    In total, 29 continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) time series data together with data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) are analysed to determine the seasonal displacements of surface loadings in the North China Plain (NCP). Results show significant seasonal variations and a strong correlation between GPS and GRACE results in the vertical displacement component; the average correlation and weighted root-mean-squares (WRMS) reduction between GPS and GRACE are 75.6 and 28.9 % respectively, when atmospheric and non-tidal ocean effects were removed, but the annual peak-to-peak amplitude of GPS (1.2-6.3 mm) is greater than the data (1.0-2.2 mm) derived from GRACE. We also calculate the trend rate as well as the seasonal signal caused by the mass load change from GRACE data; the rate of GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) loss (after multiplying by the scaling factor) in the NCP was 3.39 cm yr-1 (equivalent to 12.42 km3 yr-1) from 2003 to 2009. For a 10-year time span (2003 to 2012), the rate loss of TWS was 2.57 cm yr-1 (equivalent to 9.41 km3 yr-1), which is consistent with the groundwater storage (GWS) depletion rate (the rate losses of GWS were 2.49 and 2.72 cm yr-1 during 2003-2009 and 2003-2012 respectively) estimated from GRACE-derived results after removing simulated soil moisture (SM) data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)/Noah model. We also found that GRACE-derived GWS changes are in disagreement with the groundwater level changes from observations of shallow aquifers from 2003 to 2009, especially between 2010 and 2013. Although the shallow groundwater can be recharged from the annual climate-driven rainfall, the important facts indicate that GWS depletion is more serious in deep aquifers. The GRACE-derived result shows an overall uplift in the whole region at the 0.37-0.95 mm yr-1 level from 2004 to 2009, but the rate of change direction is inconsistent in different GPS stations at the -0.40-0.51 mm yr-1

  14. Detecting seasonal and long-term vertical displacement in the North China Plain using GRACE and GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In total, 29 continuous Global Positioning System (GPS time series data together with data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE are analysed to determine the seasonal displacements of surface loadings in the North China Plain (NCP. Results show significant seasonal variations and a strong correlation between GPS and GRACE results in the vertical displacement component; the average correlation and weighted root-mean-squares (WRMS reduction between GPS and GRACE are 75.6 and 28.9 % respectively, when atmospheric and non-tidal ocean effects were removed, but the annual peak-to-peak amplitude of GPS (1.2–6.3 mm is greater than the data (1.0–2.2 mm derived from GRACE. We also calculate the trend rate as well as the seasonal signal caused by the mass load change from GRACE data; the rate of GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage (TWS loss (after multiplying by the scaling factor in the NCP was 3.39 cm yr−1 (equivalent to 12.42 km3 yr−1 from 2003 to 2009. For a 10-year time span (2003 to 2012, the rate loss of TWS was 2.57 cm yr−1 (equivalent to 9.41 km3 yr−1, which is consistent with the groundwater storage (GWS depletion rate (the rate losses of GWS were 2.49 and 2.72 cm yr−1 during 2003–2009 and 2003–2012 respectively estimated from GRACE-derived results after removing simulated soil moisture (SM data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS/Noah model. We also found that GRACE-derived GWS changes are in disagreement with the groundwater level changes from observations of shallow aquifers from 2003 to 2009, especially between 2010 and 2013. Although the shallow groundwater can be recharged from the annual climate-driven rainfall, the important facts indicate that GWS depletion is more serious in deep aquifers. The GRACE-derived result shows an overall uplift in the whole region at the 0.37–0.95 mm yr−1 level from 2004 to 2009, but the rate of change direction is

  15. Effects of Buoyancy Forces on Immiscible Water/Oil Displacements in a Vertically Oriented Porous Medium Effets des facteurs de flottabilité sur les déplacements non-miscibles eau/huile dans un milieu poreux vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavu S. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of buoyancy forces on liquid-liquid displacement processes occurring in porous media are important in a variety of practical situations, in particular during the displacement of oil from partially-depleted underground reservoirs by means of aqueous solutions. Most previous studies involving the visualization of water/oil displacements in porous media have been undertaken in horizontal two-dimensional porous medium cells. The objective of the present work was to determine the effects of buoyancy forces; on the fingering pattern and oil recovery by conducting immiscible displacement experiments in two-dimensional consolidated porous medium cells aligned in the vertical plane. In order to obtain a clear understanding of the favourable and unfavourable effects of buoyancy forces, experiments were carried out in three different flow modes, namely horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward. As the effects of buoyancy forces are negligible for two-dimensional porous media in the horizontal flow mode, the recoveries obtained in this mode were used as a reference for comparison with those obtained in the two vertical modes. Displacements using five different density ratios were studied. The breakthrough time and percentage oil recovery were measured in each case. The effects of buoyancy forces, viscous forces, and capillary forces, as well as the injection flow rate, were also recorded. The results obtained indicate that the effects of buoyancy forces are very pronounced at low flow rates and low oil/water density ratios, and that even a slight increase in the flow rate causes the buoyancy forces to rapidly become less significant. Les facteurs de flottabilité exercent un effet important sur les déplacements liquide/liquide en milieu poreux dans toute une gamme de situations pratiques, en particulier lorsqu'on veut déplacer l'huile de roches réservoirs partiellement épuisées à l'aide de solutions aqueuses. La plupart des

  16. Thermal diffusivity measurement of solid materials by the pulsed photothermal displacement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, G. L.; Vyas, R.; Gupta, R.; Ang, S.; Brown, W. D.

    1998-10-01

    A simple, noncontact technique for the measurement of thermal diffusivity of solids is experimentally demonstrated. The technique is based on the photothermal displacement effect. Excellent agreement between the quasistatic theory of photothermal displacement and the experiment has been obtained. The technique has been demonstrated by measuring the thermal diffusivities of GaAs and InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells.

  17. Earthquake source parameters from GPS-measured static displacements with potential for real-time application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Toole, T.B.; Valentine, A.P.; Woodhouse, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method for determining an optimal centroid– moment tensor solution of an earthquake from a set of static displacements measured using a network of Global Positioning System receivers. Using static displacements observed after the 4 April 2010, MW 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah, Mexico,

  18. Monitoring of Bridges by a Laser Pointer: Dynamic Measurement of Support Rotations and Elastic Line Displacements: Methodology and First Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Artese

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deck inclination and vertical displacements are among the most important technical parameters to evaluate the health status of a bridge and to verify its bearing capacity. Several methods, both conventional and innovative, are used for structural rotations and displacement monitoring; however, none of these allow, at the same time, precision, automation, static and dynamic monitoring without using high cost instrumentation. The proposed system uses a common laser pointer and image processing. The elastic line inclination is measured by analyzing the single frames of an HD video of the laser beam imprint projected on a flat target. For the image processing, a code was developed in Matlab® that provides instantaneous rotation and displacement of a bridge, charged by a mobile load. An important feature is the synchronization of the load positioning, obtained by a GNSS receiver or by a video. After the calibration procedures, a test was carried out during the movements of a heavy truck maneuvering on a bridge. Data acquisition synchronization allowed us to relate the position of the truck on the deck to inclination and displacements. The inclination of the elastic line at the support was obtained with a precision of 0.01 mrad. The results demonstrate the suitability of the method for dynamic load tests, and the control and monitoring of bridges.

  19. Comparing measured with simulated vertical soil stress under vehicle load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Thomas; Lamandé, Mathieu; Arvidsson, Johan

    in the soil profile at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m depth was measured during wheeling at field capacity on five soils (13-66% clay). Stress propagation was then simulated with the semi-analytical model, using vertical stress at 0.1 m depth estimated from tyre characteristics as upper boundary condition, and v...

  20. Dynamic displacement estimation by fusing LDV and LiDAR measurements via smoothing based Kalman filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a smoothing based Kalman filter to estimate dynamic displacement in real-time by fusing the velocity measured from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the displacement from a light detection and ranging (LiDAR). LiDAR can measure displacement based on the time-of-flight information or the phase-shift of the laser beam reflected off form a target surface, but it typically has a high noise level and a low sampling rate. On the other hand, LDV primarily measures out-of-plane velocity of a moving target, and displacement is estimated by numerical integration of the measured velocity. Here, the displacement estimated by LDV suffers from integration error although LDV can achieve a lower noise level and a much higher sampling rate than LiDAR. The proposed data fusion technique estimates high-precision and high-sampling rate displacement by taking advantage of both LiDAR and LDV measurements and overcomes their limitations by adopting a real-time smoothing based Kalman filter. To verify the performance of the proposed dynamic displacement estimation technique, a series of lab-scale tests are conducted under various loading conditions.

  1. Measurement of the Vertical Distribution of Reflected Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsu Aoki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a devicefor measuring the vertical distribution of the reflected radiation to the inside of a room from terrace to building.The proposed device is attached to aluminum plates that are painted matte black at intervals of 20 cm on polystyrene insulation. The surface temperature of the aluminum plate, called the SAT (sol-air temperature, is used as an indicator of the quantity of solar radiation. In order to compare terrace materials, two of the measuring devices were located facing south.Concrete tile, artificial turf, and wood chips were selected as materials to be comparedfor the surface of the terrace and were laid in front of the measuring devices. The results indicate that the SAT reflected onto a vertical plane was higher closer to the ground for all materials. Hourly fluctuations of the vertical distribution of the reflected solar radiation differed, depending on the terrace surface material. When concrete tiles of different thicknesses were compared, the temporal heating patterns varied due to differences in heat capacity. These results lead us to the conclusion that using the developed measuringdevice enables grasping the effect of vertical distribution of reflected solar radiation from a terrace.

  2. Subpixel displacement measurement method based on the combination of particle swarm optimization and gradient algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang, Chen; Qibo, Feng; Keqin, Ding; Zhan, Gao

    2017-10-01

    A subpixel displacement measurement method based on the combination of particle swarm optimization (PSO) and gradient algorithm (GA) was proposed for accuracy and speed optimization in GA, which is a subpixel displacement measurement method better applied in engineering practice. An initial integer-pixel value was obtained according to the global searching ability of PSO, and then gradient operators were adopted for a subpixel displacement search. A comparison was made between this method and GA by simulated speckle images and rigid-body displacement in metal specimens. The results showed that the computational accuracy of the combination of PSO and GA method reached 0.1 pixel in the simulated speckle images, or even 0.01 pixels in the metal specimen. Also, computational efficiency and the antinoise performance of the improved method were markedly enhanced.

  3. Consideration of generated beam angles increases the accuracy of ultrasonic displacement measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chikayoshi Sumi, Yuuki Takanashi, Kento IchimaruDepartment of Information and Communication Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The development of practical ultrasonic (US tissue displacement measurement methods increases the number of available and useful applications of displacement/strain measurements that can be made (eg, various blood flow measurements and measurements of tissue motion in organs such as the heart, liver, and so forth. Previously developed lateral modulation (LM methods with a multidimensional autocorrelation method (MAM or multidimensional Doppler method (MDM and a steering angle method (ASTA with lateral Doppler method produced accurate displacement vector and lateral displacement measurements, respectively. Such measurements cannot be obtained using only a conventional Doppler technique. Another new method has also been reported, using multiple crossed beams (MCBs to obtain high-accuracy displacement vector measurements; that is, a displacement vector is synthesized using accurately measured axial displacements with previously developed multidimensional displacement measurement methods, including the one-dimensional autocorrelation method (1D AM with a multidimensional moving average (MA, together with conventional rotation processing of global echo data or a coordinate system (ie, a global echo rotation referred to as r method by the negative value of the steering angles used in beamforming. However, in real-world applications, directivities of transmission and reception apertures, scattering, reflection, and attenuation affect the direction and properties of US beams used for conventional axial displacement measurements employing beamforming methods such as a conventional nonsteered, steered, or secta beam, and they also affect ASTA and MCB methods. In this report, to improve accuracy in the measurements of an arbitrary directional displacement and a displacement vector

  4. Highly sensitive displacement measurement based on spectral interferometry and Vernier effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militky, J.; Kadulova, M.; Hlubina, P.

    2016-05-01

    A highly sensitive measurement of the displacement of an interferometer mirror based on spectral interferometry and Vernier effect is proposed and demonstrated. The displacement measurement employs two interferometers in tandem, an interferometer represented by a combination of a polarizer, a birefrigent quartz crystal and an analyzer, and a Michelson interferometer. In the setup the Vernier effect is generated and the resultant channeled spectrum is with the envelope which shifts with the displacement of the interferometer mirror. We analyze the new measurement method theoretically and show that the sensitivity of the displacement measurement based on the wavelength interrogation is substantially increased in comparison to a standard method with a Michelson interferometer. We also demonstrate the realization of the measurement setup in which the position of the interferometer mirror is controlled via a closed-loop piezo positioning system. Experimental results show that the displacement measurement can reach a sensitivity of 264 nm/μm, which is substantially increased in comparison to -34 nm/μm reached for a standard measurement.

  5. Standard practices for verification of displacement measuring systems and devices used in material testing machines

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover procedures and requirements for the calibration and verification of displacement measuring systems by means of standard calibration devices for static and quasi-static testing machines. This practice is not intended to be complete purchase specifications for testing machines or displacement measuring systems. Displacement measuring systems are not intended to be used for the determination of strain. See Practice E83. 1.2 These procedures apply to the verification of the displacement measuring systems associated with the testing machine, such as a scale, dial, marked or unmarked recorder chart, digital display, etc. In all cases the buyer/owner/user must designate the displacement-measuring system(s) to be verified. 1.3 The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems m...

  6. Digital holographic measurements of shape and 3D sound-induced displacements of Tympanic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Lu, Weina; Dobrev, Ivo; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J

    2013-10-01

    Acoustically-induced vibrations of the Tympanic Membrane (TM) play a primary role in the hearing process, in that these motions are the initial mechanical response of the ear to airborne sound. Characterization of the shape and 3D displacement patterns of the TM is a crucial step to a better understanding of the complicated mechanics of sound reception by the ear. In this paper, shape and sound-induced 3D displacements of the TM in cadaveric chinchillas are measured by a lensless Dual-Wavelength Digital Holography system (DWDHS). The DWDHS consists of Laser Delivery (LD), Optical Head (OH), and Computing Platform (CP) subsystems. Shape measurements are performed in double-exposure mode and with the use of two wavelengths of a tunable laser while nanometer-scale displacements are measured along a single sensitivity direction and with a constant wavelength. In order to extract the three principal components of displacement in full-field-of-view, and taking into consideration the anatomical dimensions of the TM, we combine principles of thin-shell theory together with both, displacement measurements along the single sensitivity vector and TM surface shape. To computationally test this approach, Finite Element Methods (FEM) are applied to the study of artificial geometries.

  7. Measurement of absolute displacement-amplitude of ultrasonic wave using piezo-electric detection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Hyun; Kim, Jong Beom; Jhang, Kyung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    A nonlinear ultrasonic parameter is defined by the ratio of displacement amplitude of the fundamental frequency component to that of the second-order harmonic frequency component. In this study, the ultrasonic displacement amplitude of an SUS316 specimen was measured via a piezo-electric-based method to identify the validity of piezo-electric detection method. For comparison, the ultrasonic displacement was also determined via a laser-based Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The experimental results for both measurements were in good agreement. Additionally, the stability of the repeated test results from the piezo-electric method exceeded that of the laser-interferometric method. This result indicated that the piezo-electric detection method can be utilized to measure a nonlinear ultrasonic parameter due to its excellent stability although it involves a complicated process.

  8. TEM10 homodyne detection as an optimal small-displacement and tilt-measurement scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delaubert, Vincent; Treps, Nikolas; Lassen, Mikael Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of optimal measurements of small displacement and tilt of a Gaussian beam - two conjugate variables - involving a homodyne detection with a TEM10 local oscillator. We verify that the standard split detection is only 64% efficient. We also show a displacemen...... measurement beyond the quantum noise limit, using a squeezed vacuum TEM10 mode within the input beam....

  9. A NEW DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION SOFTWARE FOR DISPLACEMENTS FIELD MEASUREMENT IN STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ravanelli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a growing interest in studying non-contact techniques for strain and displacement measurement. Within photogrammetry, Digital Image Correlation (DIC has received particular attention thanks to the recent advances in the field of lowcost, high resolution digital cameras, computer power and memory storage. DIC is indeed an optical technique able to measure full field displacements and strain by comparing digital images of the surface of a material sample at different stages of deformation and thus can play a major role in structural monitoring applications. For all these reasons, a free and open source 2D DIC software, named py2DIC, was developed at the Geodesy and Geomatics Division of DICEA, University of Rome La Sapienza. Completely written in python, the software is based on the template matching method and computes the displacement and strain fields. The potentialities of Py2DIC were evaluated by processing the images captured during a tensile test performed in the Lab of Structural Engineering, where three different Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer samples were subjected to a controlled tension by means of a universal testing machine. The results, compared with the values independently measured by several strain gauges fixed on the samples, demonstrate the possibility to successfully characterize the deformation mechanism of the investigated material. Py2DIC is indeed able to highlight displacements at few microns level, in reasonable agreement with the reference, both in terms of displacements (again, at few microns in the average and Poisson’s module.

  10. Right hemidiaphragmatic mobility: assessment with US measurement of craniocaudal displacement of left branches of portal vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Nair S G; Kodaira, Sergio K; Massarollo, Paulo C B; Pereira, Osvaldo I; Mies, Sergio

    2003-08-01

    To evaluate the correlation and agreement between ultrasonographic (US) measurement of craniocaudal displacement of the left intrahepatic branches of the portal vein and radiographic measurement of right hemidiaphragmatic mobility. Fifty-one patients with indications for abdominal angiography or percutaneous cholangiography prospectively underwent radiographic evaluation of right hemidiaphragmatic mobility and B-mode US measurement of craniocaudal displacement of the left intrahepatic branches of the portal vein. US was performed by using a 3.5-MHz convex transducer in a right subcostal position with a longitudinal orientation. Statistical analyses were performed by using linear regression, paired Student t test, and Bland-Altman analyses. The correlation between the US and radiographic measurements was found to be linear: hemidiaphragmatic mobility = (-1.562 + 1.032) x portal vein branch displacement (r = 0.651, P mobility measured at radiography was 34.8 mm +/- 17.0. The mean difference between the two measurements was not statistically significant (0.4 mm +/- 12.9, P =.807). US measurement of craniocaudal displacement of the left intrahepatic branches of the portal vein can be used for indirect assessment of right hemidiaphragmatic mobility. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  11. FPGA-Based Smart Sensor for Online Displacement Measurements Using a Heterodyne Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Garcia-Perez, Arturo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Serroukh, Ibrahim; Cabal-Yepez, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of small displacements on the nanometric scale demands metrological systems of high accuracy and precision. In this context, interferometer-based displacement measurements have become the main tools used for traceable dimensional metrology. The different industrial applications in which small displacement measurements are employed requires the use of online measurements, high speed processes, open architecture control systems, as well as good adaptability to specific process conditions. The main contribution of this work is the development of a smart sensor for large displacement measurement based on phase measurement which achieves high accuracy and resolution, designed to be used with a commercial heterodyne interferometer. The system is based on a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) allowing the integration of several functions in a single portable device. This system is optimal for high speed applications where online measurement is needed and the reconfigurability feature allows the addition of different modules for error compensation, as might be required by a specific application. PMID:22164040

  12. Management of metrology in measuring of the displacement of building construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kratochvíl

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The metrology management of the measurement of the displacement of building construction is not regulated in the standard ČSN ISO 73 0405 - Measurement of the displacement of building construction. But the metrology management has to be included in the project of measurement of the displacement (Stage of project. Then we have to pay an attention to the metrological management during this measurement (Stage of realization and during the evaluation of this measurement (Stage of evaluation. We have to insist on the subsequent improving of metrology management within the frame of the next project (so-called feedback. The metrology management in the measurement of the displacement during the stages should be based on an application of statutory instruments and technical standards. We should insist especially on the system of standards for the quality control ISO 9000. Considering specialities of geodetic measurements it is necessary to adapt the metrology management. That is why it will differ from the metrology management in other fields of knowledge. This paper includes some steps of metrological provision which must not be ignored.

  13. Homodyne and heterodyne optical interferometry for frequency dependent piezoelectric displacement measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahoussaye, Keith; Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar

    2014-09-01

    The electromechanical coupling in piezoelectric materials has been widely studied however a unified view of this interaction as function of frequencies using different measurement techniques has not previously been available. This study examines and compares multiple optical based homodyne and heterodyne interferometry techniques for displacement measurement over a wide range of frequencies and including a comparison made by using a commercial Laser Doppler Vibrometer. Ferroelectric lead titanate PbTiO3 with high ferroelectric strain is studied in this work. Frequency dependence of the electromechanical displacement is obtained using multiple techniques and the emphasis is given to near resonant frequency interrogations.

  14. Measurement of the Dynamic Displacements of Railway Bridges Using Video Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a non-contact dynamic displacement measurement system for railway bridges based on video technology. The system, consisting of a high speed video camera, an optical lens, lighting lamps and a precision target, can perform measurements with high precision for distances from the camera to the target up to 25 m, with acquisition frame rates ranging from 64 fps to 500 fps, and be articulated with other measurement systems, which promotes its integration in structural health monitoring systems. The system’s performance was evaluated based on two tests, one in the laboratory and other on the field. The laboratory test evaluated the performance of the system in measuring the displacement of a steel beam, subjected to a point load applied dynamically, for distances from the camera to the target between 3 m and 15 m. The field test allowed evaluating the system’s performance in the dynamic measurement of the displacement of a point on the deck of a railway bridge, induced by passing trains at speeds between 160 km/h and 180 km/h, for distances from the camera to the target up to 25 m. The results of both tests show a very good agreement between the displacement measurement obtained with the video system and with a LVDT.

  15. Visible imaging measurement of position and displacement of the last closed flux surface in EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, G.S., E-mail: gsxu@ipp.ac.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Y.L.; Yang, J.H.; Yan, N.; Liu, L.; Yuan, S.; Luo, Z.P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Sang, C.F. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Gu, S.; Xu, J.C.; Hu, G.H.; Wang, Y.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Peng, Y.K.M.; Wan, B.N. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A new method for measuring the position and displacement of the LCFS has been developed in EAST tokamak. • This method is based on the visible imaging diagnostic and shown to be an effective and convenient approach. • This method can be applied to measure displacements of the LCFS during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields. - Abstract: A new method for measuring the position and displacement of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) with visible imaging diagnostics has been developed in EAST. By measuring the relative intensity profiles of the green visible Li-II emission in the tangential planes of the optical systems, it is possible to infer the positions of certain points on the LCFS. This emission line is readily available in discharges with Li-coating wall routinely employed to improve the plasma performance. We describe the measuring method, giving results which are compared with those obtained by EFIT, and showing this as an effective and convenient approach to determine the position of the LCFS. This method is further applied to measure the displacements of the LCFS during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields in the EAST tokamak.

  16. Improved SAR Amplitude Image Offset Measurements for Deriving Three-Dimensional Coseismic Displacements

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Teng

    2015-02-03

    Offsets of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images have played an important role in deriving complete three-dimensional (3-D) surface displacement fields in geoscientific applications. However, offset maps often suffer from multiple outliers and patch-like artifacts, because the standard offset-measurement method is a regular moving-window operation that does not consider the scattering characteristics of the ground. Here, we show that by focusing the offset measurements on predetected strong reflectors, the reliability and accuracy of SAR offsets can be significantly improved. Application to the 2011 Van (Turkey) earthquake reveals a clear deformation signal from an otherwise decorrelated interferogram, making derivation of the 3-D coseismic displacement field possible. Our proposed method can improve mapping of coseismic deformation and other ground displacements, such as glacier flow and landslide movement when strong reflectors exist.

  17. Search for $R$-parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= $ 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Forthomme, Laurent; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Oh, Sung Bin; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Rusinov, Vladimir; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Topakli, Huseyin; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Jesus, Orduna; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Diamond, Brendan; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-25

    Results are reported from a search for $R$-parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb$^{-1}$. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair production cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Assuming gluino pair production cross sections, gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean ...

  18. [Separate vertical wiring combined with tension band and Kirschner-wire plus cerclage wire in the treatment of displaced inferior pole fractures of the patella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jiang, X Y; Huang, X W

    2016-06-18

    To investigate the clinical efficacy and outcomes of two separate vertical wiring combined with tension band and Kirschner-wire plus cerclage wire in the treatment of displaced inferior pole fractures of the patella. From January 2013 to January 2015, 15 consecutive patients (mean age 54.5 years) with inferior pole fractures of the patella were retrospectively included in this study. All the patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation by separate vertical wiring combined with tension band and Kirschner-wire plus cerclage wire through longitudinal incision, 4.5 d (range: 3.1-5.9 d) after initial injury. A safety check for early knee range of motion was performed before wound closure. The complications including infection, nonunion, loss of fixation and any wire breakage or irritation from implant were recorded. Anteroposterior and lateral views of the knee joint obtained during the follow-up were used to assess bony union based on the time when the fracture line disappeared. At the time of the final outpatient follow up, functional evaluation of the knee joint was conducted by Bostman system. The follow-up time was 13.1 months (range: 12-19 months) after surgery on average, immediate motion without immobilization in all the cases was allowed and there was no case of reduction loss of the fracture and wire breakage. There was no case of irritation from the implant. At the final follow-up, the average range of motion (ROM) arc was 126.7° (range: 115°-140°), the average ROM lag versus contralateral healthy leg was 10.3° (range: 0°-35°). The mean Bostman score at the last follow-up was 28.9 (range: 27-30), and graded excellent in most cases. Two separate vertical wiring is an easy and effective method to reduce the displaced inferior pole fracture of patella. Augmentation of separate vertical wiring with tension band and Kirschner-wire plus cerclage wire in these patients provides enough strength to protected the early exercise of the knee joint and

  19. Study on measuring vibration displacement by shear interference based on sinusoidal phase modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guotian; Tang, Feng; Song, Li; Jiang, Helun

    2009-05-01

    The semiconductor laser (LD) Taimangelin interferometer based on sinusoidal phase modulation is vulnerable to external vibration, temperature changes, vibration, and other air interference which causes great measurement error. This paper presents a new semiconductor laser sinusoidal phase modulation shear interference technology and anti-jamming wavelet transform algorithm which is not sensitive to environment interference. It changes the original optical technology in the plane mirror to three pyramid-shear, causing a certain amount of displacement of reference light and object light. and partial use of high resolution wavelet transform algorithm solves the problem in measuring the vibration displacement of measured object..Vibration shear interferometry expression is launched, and theoretically discusses the measurement principle. Using MATLAB before and after the improvement of the methods to simulate contrast obtains the impact of shear volume size on measurement accuracy with experimental test. Experimental results show that it effectively reduces the impact of outside interference on measurement accuracy.

  20. Force-displacement measurements of earlywood bordered pits using a mesomechanical tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Keith J. Bourne; John C. Hermanson; Samuel V. Glass; Adriana Costa; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2015-01-01

    The elastic properties of pit membranes are reported to have important implications in understanding air-seeding phenomena in gymnosperms, and pit aspiration plays a large role in wood technological applications such as wood drying and preservative treatment. Here we present force–displacement measurements for pit membranes of circular bordered pits, collected on a...

  1. High precision optical measurement of displacement and simultaneous determinations of piezoelectric coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Bryan M.; Malladi, Madhuri; Vadlamani, Ramya; Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar

    2016-09-01

    PZT are also well known for their applications in Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS). It is necessary to study the piezoelectric coefficients of the materials accurately in order to design a sensor as an example, which defines their strain dependent applications. Systematic study of the electro mechanic displacement measurement was conducted and compared using a white light fiber optic sensor, a heterodyne laser Doppler vibrometer, and a homodyne laser interferometry setup. Frequency dependent measurement is conducted to evaluate displacement values well below and near the piezoelectric resonances. UHF-120 ultra-high frequency Vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal piezoelectric displacement or x33 and the MTI 2000 FotonicTM Sensor is used to measure the transverse piezoelectric displacement or x11 over 100Hz to 2MHz. A Multiphysics Finite Element Analysis method, COMSOL, is also adopted in the study to generate a three dimensional electromechanical coupled model based on experimentally determined strains x33 and x11 as a function of frequency of the electric field applied. The full family of piezoelectric coefficients of the poled electronic ceramic PZT, d33, d31, and d15, can be then derived, upon satisfactory simulation of the COMSOL. This is achieved without the usual need of preparation of piezoelectric resonators of fundamental longitudinal, transversal, and shear modes respectively.

  2. An interferometric radar for displacement measurement and its application in civil engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, D.; Nagayama, T.; Sun, Z.; Fujino, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Recent progress in radar techniques and systems has led to the development of a microwave interferometer, potentially suitable for non-contact displacement monitoring of civil engineering structures. This paper describes a new interferometric radar system, named IBIS-S, which is possible to measure the static or dynamic displacement at multiple points of structures simultaneously with high accuracy. In this paper, the technical characteristics and specification of the radar system is described. Subsequently, the actual displacement sensitivity of the equipment is illustrated using the laboratory tests with random motion upon a shake table. Finally the applications of the radar system to the measurement on a cable-stayed bridge and a prestressed concrete bridge are presented and discussed. Results show that the new system is an accurate and effective method to measure displacements of multiple targets of structures. It should be noted that the current system can only measure the vibration of the target position along the sensor's line of sight. Hence, proper caution should be taken when designing the sensor posture and prior knowledge of the direction of motion is necessary.

  3. Perceptual, durational and tongue displacement measures following articulation therapy for rhotic sound errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressmann, Tim; Harper, Susan; Zhylich, Irina; Kulkarni, Gajanan V

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of articulation therapy for rhotic errors are usually assessed perceptually. However, our understanding of associated changes of tongue movement is limited. This study described perceptual, durational and tongue displacement changes over 10 sessions of articulation therapy for /ɹ/ in six children. Four of the participants also received ultrasound biofeedback of their tongue shape. Speech and tongue movement were recorded pre-therapy, after 5 sessions, in the final session and at a one month follow-up. Perceptually, listeners perceived improvement and classified more productions as /ɹ/ in the final and follow-up assessments. The durations of VɹV syllables at the midway point of the therapy were longer. Cumulative tongue displacement increased in the final session. The average standard deviation was significantly higher in the middle and final assessments. The duration and tongue displacement measures illustrated how articulation therapy affected tongue movement and may be useful for outcomes research about articulation therapy.

  4. Application of Blue Laser Triangulation Sensors for Displacement Measurement Through Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Matthew S; Smith, Christopher M

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the use of blue laser triangulation sensors to measure displacement of a target located behind or in the close proximity of natural gas diffusion flames. This measurement is critical for providing high-quality data in structural fire tests. The position of the laser relative to the flame envelope can significantly affect the measurement scatter, but has little influence on the mean values. We observe that the measurement scatter is normally distributed and increases linearly with the distance of the target from the flame along the beam path. Based on these observations, we demonstrate how time-averaging can be used to achieve a standard uncertainty associated with the displacement error of less than 0.1 mm, which is typically sufficient for structural fire testing applications. Measurements with the investigated blue laser sensors were not impeded by the thermal radiation emitted from the flame or the soot generated from the relatively clean-burning natural gas.

  5. A heterodyne straightness and displacement measuring interferometer with laser beam drift compensation for long-travel linear stage metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Benyong; Cheng, Liang; Yan, Liping; Zhang, Enzheng; Lou, Yingtian

    2017-03-01

    The laser beam drift seriously influences the accuracy of straightness or displacement measurement in laser interferometers, especially for the long travel measurement. To solve this problem, a heterodyne straightness and displacement measuring interferometer with laser beam drift compensation is proposed. In this interferometer, the simultaneous measurement of straightness error and displacement is realized by using heterodyne interferometry, and the laser beam drift is determined to compensate the measurement results of straightness error and displacement in real time. The optical configuration of the interferometer is designed. The principle of the simultaneous measurement of straightness, displacement, and laser beam drift is depicted and analyzed in detail. And the compensation of the laser beam drift for the straightness error and displacement is presented. Several experiments were performed to verify the feasibility of the interferometer and the effectiveness of the laser beam drift compensation. The experiments of laser beam stability show that the position stability of the laser beam spot can be improved by more than 50% after compensation. The measurement and compensation experiments of straightness error and displacement by testing a linear stage at different distances show that the straightness and displacement obtained from the interferometer are in agreement with those obtained from a compared interferometer and the measured stage. These demonstrate that the merits of this interferometer are not only eliminating the influence of laser beam drift on the measurement accuracy but also having the abilities of simultaneous measurement of straightness error and displacement as well as being suitable for long-travel linear stage metrology.

  6. Employing Beam-Gas Interaction Vertices for Transverse Profile Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, Mariana; Baglin, Vincent; Barschel, Colin; Bay, Aurelio; Blanc, Frederic; Bravin, Enrico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Chritin, Nicolas; Dehning, Bernd; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Gaspar, Clara; Gianì, Sebastiana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Greim, Roman; Haefeli, Guido; Hopchev, Plamen; Jacobsson, Richard; Jensen, Lars; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Jurado, Nicolas; Kain, Verena; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kirn, Thomas; Kuhn, Maria; Luthi, Berengere; Magagnin, Paolo; Matev, Rosen; Nakada, Tatsuya; Neufeld, Niko; Panman, Jaap; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Salvant, Benoit; Schael, Stefan; Schneider, Olivier; Schwering, Georg; Tobin, Mark; Veness, Raymond; Veyrat, Quentin; Vlachos, Sotiris; Wlochal, Michael; Xu, Zhirui; von Dratzig, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of high-energy beam particles with residual gas offer a unique opportunity to measure the beam profile in a non-intrusive fashion. Such a method was successfully pioneered* at the LHCb experiment using a silicon microstrip vertex detector. During the recent Large Hadron Collider shutdown at CERN, a demonstrator Beam-Gas Vertexing system based on eight scintillating-fibre modules was designed**, constructed and installed on Ring 2 to be operated as a pure beam diagnostics device. The detector signals are read out and collected with LHCb-type front-end electronics and a DAQ system consisting of a CPU farm. Tracks and vertices will be reconstructed to obtain a beam profile in real time. Here, first commissioning results are reported. The advantages and potential for future applications of this technique are discussed.

  7. Internal displacement and strain measurement using digital volume correlation: a least-squares framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bing; Wu, Dafang; Wang, Zhaoyang

    2012-04-01

    As a novel tool for quantitative 3D internal deformation measurement throughout the interior of a material or tissue, digital volume correlation (DVC) has increasingly gained attention and application in the fields of experimental mechanics, material research and biomedical engineering. However, the practical implementation of DVC involves important challenges such as implementation complexity, calculation accuracy and computational efficiency. In this paper, a least-squares framework is presented for 3D internal displacement and strain field measurement using DVC. The proposed DVC combines a practical linear-intensity-change model with an easy-to-implement iterative least-squares (ILS) algorithm to retrieve 3D internal displacement vector field with sub-voxel accuracy. Because the linear-intensity-change model is capable of accounting for both the possible intensity changes and the relative geometric transform of the target subvolume, the presented DVC thus provides the highest sub-voxel registration accuracy and widest applicability. Furthermore, as the ILS algorithm uses only first-order spatial derivatives of the deformed volumetric image, the developed DVC thus significantly reduces computational complexity. To further extract 3D strain distributions from the 3D discrete displacement vectors obtained by the ILS algorithm, the presented DVC employs a pointwise least-squares algorithm to estimate the strain components for each measurement point. Computer-simulated volume images with controlled displacements are employed to investigate the performance of the proposed DVC method in terms of mean bias error and standard deviation error. Results reveal that the present technique is capable of providing accurate measurements in an easy-to-implement manner, and can be applied to practical 3D internal displacement and strain calculation.

  8. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng, E-mail: hupc@hit.edu.cn; Ding, Xue-Mei, E-mail: X.M.Ding@outlook.com; Tan, Jiu-Bin [Harbin Institute of Technology, D-403 Science Park, 2 Yikuang Street, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2016-08-15

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer’s effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

  9. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Xue-Mei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2016-08-01

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer's effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

  10. Spatial filtering velocimetry for real-time out-of-plane displacement measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Yura, H.T.; Jakobsen, Michael Linde

    2016-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the axial distance between the object and the observation plane changes. With the purpose of measuring out-of-plane motion in real time, we apply optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics. To achieve this, a rotationally sym...... element which implements the spatial filter and experimentally demonstrate the ability of the technology to obtain displacement measurements of a vibrating object in real-time....

  11. A new method to assess long term small sea-bottom vertical displacement in shallow water from bottom pressure sensor: the case of Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malservisi, R.; Chierici, F.; Iannaccone, G.; Guardato, S.; Pignagnoli, L.; Locritani, M.; Embriaco, D.; Donnarumma, G. P.; Rodgers, M.; Beranzoli, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new methodology aimed at assessing long term small vertical seafloor deformation in shallow water environments by using Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) measurements jointly with ancillary sea level, water column and barometric data. These measurements are presently acquired only in areas where the amount of vertical deformation is large and in deep water environment, where the noise induced by the sea state and other near surface disturbances is low. We applied the method to the data acquired in 2011 by a BPR deployed at about 96 m depth in the marine sector of the Campi Flegrei Caldera, during a quasi-symmetric seafloor uplift episode of a few centimeters amplitude. The method provides an estimation of the vertical uplift of the caldera of 2.5 +/- 1.3 cm achieving an unprecedented level of precision in the measurement of the seafloor vertical deformation in shallow water. We reached this result by taking into account the contribution of the BPR instrumental drift and the contribution of the sea water density variations, which can affect the measurement on the order of tens of centimeters. The estimation of the vertical deformation obtained in this way compares favorably with data acquired by a land based GPS station, which is located at the same distance from the area of maximum deformation as the BPR

  12. A versatile stereo photogrammetry based technique for measuring fracture mode displacements in structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarado, Jonathan Shmueli; Eder, Martin Alexander; Tesauro, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of fracture mode displacements in structures which are susceptible to cracking such as adhesive joints in composite components – is becoming increasingly important. Such measurements are essential for the understanding of the root causes for specific fracture damage types......, complementary measurements obtained by linear transducers are compared with the associated LRD component obtained by the SDMS. The 3D LRD measurements showed to be in good agreement with the predictions of non-linear finite element analysis. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the proposed measurement...

  13. Using a Fiber Loop and Fiber Bragg Grating as a Fiber Optic Sensor to Simultaneously Measure Temperature and Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu-Chih Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study integrated a fiber loop manufactured by using commercial fiber (SMF-28, Corning and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG to form a fiber optic sensor that could simultaneously measure displacement and temperature. The fiber loop was placed in a thermoelectric cooling module with FBG affixed to the module, and, consequently, the center wavelength displacement of FBG was limited by only the effects of temperature change. Displacement and temperature were determined by measuring changes in the transmission of optical power and shifts in Bragg wavelength. This study provides a simple and economical method to measure displacement and temperature simultaneously.

  14. Small-size, high-resolution angular displacement measurement technology based on an imaging detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai; Wan, Qiuhua; Lu, Xinran; Du, Yingcai; Yang, Shouwang

    2017-01-20

    It is challenging to design a photoelectric encoder that is small in size while ensuring it has sufficiently high resolution and accuracy. Traditional displacement measurement via the moiré fringe signal does not facilitate high resolution at small grate sizes; photoelectric and digital photo processing can significantly improve the angle measurement resolution over traditional techniques. The primary focus of this paper includes grating displacement coding and decoding, as well as the corresponding high-resolution subdivision and measurement error factors. A small-size absolute photographic encoder was designed (50 mm diameter) that exhibits resolution of 1.24'' (20 bit) with a standard deviation of error of 14.3''. The results presented here may provide a theoretical and technological foundation for further research on small-size, high-resolution photographic rotary encoders.

  15. Traction Induced Vertical Displacement of Odontoid due to Type III Odontoid Fracture with Unrecognized Ligamentous Injury: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dens fractures are a common traumatic cervical spine injury. Among them, a type III fracture is the second common fracture. Although there are several treatment options, it has been accepted that type III fracture is usually healed by non-surgical method. After adequate reduction with traction, subsequent external immobilization has been associated with successful union rates. However, in the review of literatures, there are some cases with neurological deterioration after application of skull traction. So, the authors report a case of type III dens fracture with initially unrecognized ligamentous injury in which vertical dissociation and quadriplegia occurred after only five-pound Gardner-Well tongs traction. And also, the authors raise awareness of this potentially injury. PMID:27169054

  16. Melting and evaporation analysis of the first wall in a water-cooled breeding blanket module under vertical displacement event by using the MARS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Material phase change of first wall was simulated for vertical displacement event. • An in-house first wall module was developed to simulate melting and evaporation. • Effective heat capacity method and evaporation model were proposed. • MARS code was proposed to predict two-phase phenomena in coolant channel. • Phase change simulation was performed by coupling MARS and in-house module. - Abstract: Plasma facing components of tokamak reactors such as ITER or the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) can be subjected to damage by plasma instabilities. Plasma disruptions like vertical displacement event (VDE) with high heat flux, can cause melting and vaporization of plasma facing materials and burnout of coolant channels. In this study, to simulate melting and vaporization of the first wall in a water-cooled breeding blanket under VDE, one-dimensional heat equations were solved numerically by using an in-house first wall module, including phase change models, effective heat capacity method, and evaporation model. For thermal-hydraulics, the in-house first wall analysis module was coupled with the nuclear reactor safety analysis code, MARS, to take advantage of its prediction capability for two-phase flow and critical heat flux (CHF) occurrence. The first wall was proposed for simulation according to the conceptual design of the K-DEMO, and the heat flux of plasma disruption with a value of 600 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.1 s was applied. The phase change simulation results were analyzed in terms of the melting and evaporation thicknesses and the occurrence of CHF. The thermal integrity of the blanket first wall is discussed to confirm whether the structural material melts for the given conditions.

  17. Vertical Electric Field Measurements with Copper Plates by Sounding Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shao-Chun; Chiu, Cheng-Hsiu; Bing-Chih Chen, Alfred; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong

    2015-04-01

    The vertical electric field plays an important role in driving the circulation of the global electric circuit, and crucial to the formation of the transient luminous events (TLEs). The in-situ measurement of the electric field in the upper atmosphere, especially from cloud top to the bottom of the ionosphere is very challenging but essential. Limited by the flight vehicle, the measurements of the electric field in and above cloud, especiall thundercloud, is rare up to now. A light-weight electric field meter was developed independently and sent to 30 km height by small meteorological balloons successfully. Other than the existing long-spaced, spherical probe design, an improved electric field meter has been built and tested carefully. A new circuit with ultra high input impedance and a high voltage amplifier is implemented to reduce the AC noise induced by the voltage divider. Two copper plates are used to replace the double spherical probes which is spaced by a long fiberglass boom. The in-lab calibration and tests show that this new model is superior to the existing design and very sensitive to the variation of the DC electric field. In this poster, the design and the in-lab tests will be presented, and preliminary results of the flight experiments are also discussed.

  18. Phenomenology of new physics beyond the Standard Model: signals of Supersymmetry with displaced vertices and an extended Higgs sector at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334334

    2017-08-02

    Our current understanding of matter and its interactions is summarised in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Many experiments have tested the predictions of the SM with great success, but others have brought our ignorance into focus by showing us there are new phenomena that we can not describe within the framework of the SM. These include the experimental observations of neutrino masses and dark matter, which confirms there must be new physics. What this new physics may look like at colliders motivates the original work in this thesis, which comprises three studies: the prospects of future electron-positron colliders in testing a model with an extended Higgs sector with a scalar triplet, doublet and singlet; the discovery potential at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of a non-minimal Supersymmetric model via conventional sparticle searches and via searches for displaced vertices; and the experimental search for long-lived massive particles via a displaced vertex signature using data of proton-proton...

  19. Inter-genomic displacement via lateral gene transfer of bacterial trp operons in an overall context of vertical genealogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyhani Nemat O

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing conviction that lateral gene transfer plays a significant role in prokaryote genealogy opens up a need for comprehensive evaluations of gene-enzyme systems on a case-by-case basis. Genes of tryptophan biosynthesis are frequently organized as whole-pathway operons, an attribute that is expected to facilitate multi-gene transfer in a single step. We have asked whether events of lateral gene transfer are sufficient to have obscured our ability to track the vertical genealogy that underpins tryptophan biosynthesis. Results In 47 complete-genome Bacteria, the genes encoding the seven catalytic domains that participate in primary tryptophan biosynthesis were distinguished from any paralogs or xenologs engaged in other specialized functions. A reliable list of orthologs with carefully ascertained functional roles has thus been assembled and should be valuable as an annotation resource. The protein domains associated with primary tryptophan biosynthesis were then concatenated, yielding single amino-acid sequence strings that represent the entire tryptophan pathway. Lateral gene transfer of several whole-pathway trp operons was demonstrated by use of phylogenetic analysis. Lateral gene transfer of partial-pathway trp operons was also shown, with newly recruited genes functioning either in primary biosynthesis (rarely or specialized metabolism (more frequently. Conclusions (i Concatenated tryptophan protein trees are congruent with 16S rRNA subtrees provided that the genomes represented are of sufficiently close phylogenetic spacing. There are currently seven tryptophan congruency groups in the Bacteria. Recognition of a succession of others can be expected in the near future, but ultimately these should coalesce to a single grouping that parallels the 16S rRNA tree (except for cases of lateral gene transfer. (ii The vertical trace of evolution for tryptophan biosynthesis can be deduced. The daunting complexities engendered

  20. A high accuracy algorithm of displacement measurement for a micro-positioning stage

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Zhang; Xianmin Zhang; Heng Wu; Jinqiang Gan; Hai Li

    2017-01-01

    A high accuracy displacement measurement algorithm for a two degrees of freedom compliant precision micro-positioning stage is proposed based on the computer micro-vision technique. The algorithm consists of an integer-pixel and a subpixel matching procedure. Series of simulations are conducted to verify the proposed method. The results show that the proposed algorithm possesses the advantages of high precision and stability, the resolution can attain to 0.01 pixel theoretically. In addition,...

  1. Experimental Aspects of In-Plane Displacement Measurement Using a Moire Fringe Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    AD-A174 048 EXPERIMENTAL ASPECTS OF IN-PLANE DISPLACEMENT 1 / 1’ MEASUREMENT USING A NOIRE F.. (U) AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH I LABS MELBOURNE (AUSTRALIA...solution poured rapidly over their central area. However, this technique resulted in streaking of the film coating. This problem was minimized by varying...defined when flash lighting was employed. The magnification of the image and rotational misalignment of the film mount, were adjusted with the aid of a

  2. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  3. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaretti-Grizon, Florence; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Chappard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials.

  4. A general procedure for estimating dynamic displacements using strain measurements and operational modal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Anders; Aenlle, Manuel L.; Brincker, Rune

    2016-01-01

    and used in health monitoring algorithms. But the use of accelerometers is not suitable for all structures. Structures like wind turbine blades and wings on airplanes can be exposed to lightning, which can cause the measurement systems to fail. Structures like these are often equipped with fiber sensors...... measuring the in-plane deformation. This paper proposes a method in which the displacement mode shapes and responses can be predicted using only strain measurements. The method relies on the newly discovered principle of local correspondence, which states that each experimental mode can be expressed...

  5. A nodal model to predict vertical temperature distribution in a room with floor heating and displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Fang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    be calculated by solving energy balance equations for each node, using boundary parameters as inputs. The predictions agree quite well with experimentally measured data for floor surface temperatures between 25 and 28 °C, supply air temperatures between 14 and 18 °C and air change rates from 3.1 to 4...

  6. Evaluation of some software measuring displacements using GPS in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John

    2006-01-01

    in the 24-hour solutions. To do this, each site has a 2.4 GHz radio and a telemetry buffer. The telemetry buffer holds 24-hours of data (in the event that the telemetry link is broken) and converts the RS232 data stream from the GPS receiver into a form compatible with an IP (Internet protocol) network connection. In contrast with the Long Valley system, the telemetry link for GPS at Parkfield consists of a single radio at each remote sites and a single radio at the central site. Although position estimates are produced within 1-second of the observations, these results are not immediately available because there is no high speed Internet connection to Parkfield. Instead, the data are stored on a removable disk and sent to UCSD once per month.Below, I describe the results of a simple experiment to examine the response of some of these systems to simulated deformation that could be an analogue of a tectonic or volcanic event. In many engineering applications, the system response is tested by inputting a step to the system and measuring the output of the system. Essentially, this is what I've done. The experiment described below moves the GPS antenna from its original position to a new position within 1 second; the software tracks the translation. These measurements were conducted in August 2004 with the RTD software at Parkfield, and twice in Long Valley. The first Long Valley test was conducted in September 2004 using 3DTracker on a single baseline. The test was repeated in September 2005 using 3DTracker on two baselines and, importantly, saving the RINEX files of the data so that the data could be replayed through 3DTracker using other options in the program and, using other software packages including TRACK. In addition, we observed a short-term event at the Three Sisters volcano in Oregon. This event was snow melt at a remote GPS site which gave an apparent 15 cm displacement in vertical in less than one-day. 3DTracker is used to monitor this site, and the event

  7. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  8. Problems of systems dataware using optoelectronic measuring means of linear displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazykin, S. N.; Bazykina, N. A.; Samohina, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    Problems of the dataware of the systems with the use of optoelectronic means of the linear displacement are considered in the article. The classification of the known physical effects, realized by the means of information-measuring systems, is given. The organized analysis of information flows in technical systems from the standpoint of determination of inaccuracies of measurement and management was conducted. In spite of achieved successes in automation of machine-building and instruments-building equipment in the field of dataware of the technical systems, there are unresolved problems, concerning the qualitative aspect of the production process. It was shown that the given problem can be solved using optoelectronic lazer information-measuring systems. Such information-measuring systems are capable of not only executing the measuring functions, but also solving the problems of management and control during processing, thereby guaranteeing the quality of final products.

  9. Averaged cov-driven subspace identification for modal analysis of a modified troposkien blade with displacement measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Najafi, Nadia; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    An operational modal analysis study has been carried out on a 1- kW, vertical-axis wind turbine rotor blade, using a stereo vision technique. Numerical simulation has also been carried out and results were compared to classical modal analysis and OMA results. The displacement time series used in ......) obtained at different points. Finally the natural frequencies and mode shapes obtained from classical modal analysis and OMA results are compared to numerical simulations of the blade with COMSOL....

  10. Attention effects at auditory periphery derived from human scalp potentials: displacement measure of potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazunari; Hayashi, Akiko; Sekiguchi, Takahiro; Era, Shukichi

    2006-10-01

    It is known in humans that electrophysiological measures such as the auditory brainstem response (ABR) are difficult to identify the attention effect at the auditory periphery, whereas the centrifugal effect has been detected by measuring otoacoustic emissions. This research developed a measure responsive to the shift of human scalp potentials within a brief post-stimulus period (13 ms), that is, displacement percentage, and applied it to an experiment to retrieve the peripheral attention effect. In the present experimental paradigm, tone pips were exposed to the left ear whereas the other ear was masked by white noise. Twelve participants each conducted two conditions of either ignoring or attending to the tone pips. Relative to averaged scalp potentials in the ignoring condition, the shift of the potentials was found within early component range during the attentive condition, and displacement percentage then revealed a significant magnitude difference between the two conditions. These results suggest that, using a measure representing the potential shift itself, the peripheral effect of attention can be detected from human scalp potentials.

  11. Modeling of the nonlinearity in nano-displacement measuring system based on the neural network approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyaee, Saeed; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Hamedi, Samaneh; Jafarlou, Farzad M.

    2009-08-01

    Periodic nonlinearity is the main limitation on the accuracy of the nano-displacement measurements in the heterodyne interferometers. It is mainly produced by non-ideal polarized beams of the leaser and imperfect alignment of the optical components. In this paper, we model the periodic nonlinearity resulting from non-orthogonality and ellipticity of the laser beam by using combination of neural networks such as stacked generalization method and mixture of experts. The ensemble neural networks used for nonlinearity modeling are compared with single neural networks such as multi layer percepterons and radial basis function.

  12. Compact optical system for measuring linear and angular displacement of solid structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M.L.; Larsen, H.E.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2004-01-01

    and rotation of the target. The presented free space propagation design can provide a sensor with no direct sensitivity on the working distance. The electrical signals from the sensor are processed with a digital algorithm, based on zero-crossings detection to provide real-time displacement measurements....... The spatial filter of the sensor is characterized here, and the precision of the sensor, integrated with a processor, which applies zero-crossing detection to the signal, is considered. © 2004 COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted...

  13. A theoretical performance study of an external cavity fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer for displacement measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Kumar

    The objective of this research is to explore a mathematical model developed by Wilkinson and Pratt for the external cavity fiber-based Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) and to create a Michelson interferometer setup to validate a frequency modulation component of this model. A laser diode with nominal wavelength 635 nm is modulated by oscillating the diode current of maximum amplitude 22.62 mA to create correspondingly varying wavelength. Experiments are included to evaluate a rotating vector representation of the modulation harmonics in the signal received at the photodetector as of a cube corner translated by a piezo-electric actuator is displaced. Wavelength modulation as a function of diode current, the coherence length of the laser, and characteristics of the modulation harmonics are evaluated. A real time DAQ system and two lock-in amplifiers are utilized for detecting three side-band harmonics of the signal. For short range displacements this interferometer setup is monitored using a capacitance displacement sensor. The capacitance displacement measurement differed from the Michelson interferometer by 160 nm. The piezoelectric stage actuated with a 15 V Ramp signal produced 2.54 mum displacement of the cube corner. The setup is tested with Ramp signals of 75 V to 1.5 V and with the Ramp periods of 1 to 20 seconds to find the resolution of the interferometer, modulation of the wavelength sensitivity and the coherence length of the laser as 10.53 nm, 1.786 nm·A-1 and >1 m respectively. The best quadrature signal achieved corresponded to modulating the laser at amplitude of 18.86 mA at 1 kHz frequency with a path length difference of 6.35 mm. The amplitude comparison of side-band harmonics with Bessel function curves is consistent with a modulation amplitude of 1.28 rad corresponding to amplitude ratios of 0.5 (second and first) , 0.15 (third and second) and 0.06 (third and first) in the first through third Bessel function values.

  14. Displacement measurement of the compliant positioning stage based on a computer micro-vision method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a practical computer micro-vision-based method for displacement measurements of the compliant positioning stage. The algorithm of the proposed method is based on a template matching approach composed of an integer-pixel search and a sub-pixel search. By combining with an optical microscopy, a high resolution CCD camera and the proposed algorithm, an extremely high measuring precision is achieved. Various simulations and experiments are conducted. The simulation results demonstrate that the matching precision can reach to 0.01 pixel when the noise interference is low. A laser interferometer measurement system (LIMS is established for comparison. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method possesses the same performance as the LIMS but exhibits a greater flexibility and operability. The measuring precision can theoretically attain to 2.83 nm/pixel.

  15. Optimized Method for Knee Displacement Measurement in Vehicle Sled Crash Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an optimized method for measuring dummy’s knee displacement in vehicle sled crash test. The proposed method utilizes completely new elements for measurement, which are acceleration and angular velocity of dummy’s pelvis, as well as the rotational angle of its femur. Compared with the traditional measurement only using camera-based high-speed motion image analysis, the optimized one can not only maintain the measuring accuracy, but also avoid the disturbance caused by dummy movement, dashboard blocking and knee deformation during the crash. An experiment is made to verify the accuracy of the proposed method, which eliminates the strong dependence on single target tracing in traditional method. Moreover, it is very appropriate for calculating the penetration depth to the dashboard.

  16. High-resolution fibre-optic sensor for angular displacement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiat, A.; Lamarque, F.; Prelle, C.; Bencheikh, N.; Dupont, E.

    2010-02-01

    The design of a fibre-optic sensor able to measure high-precision angular displacements is presented. The sensor has a small size which allows easy integration in miniature mechanical systems. Two configurations are designed: lens-free configuration and GRIN micro-lens configuration for which the micro-lens is fixed on the tip of the probe. The experimental results obtained by the angular displacement sensor based on the lens-free configuration are compared with the simulation results based on the modelling of the system and a good agreement is found. Then, a long-range measurement technique is described. In the 'lens-free and long-range configuration', the limit of resolution is measured (2 × 10-3°) or calculated (4.8 × 10-4°) over a range of [-23.4°, +23.4°]. In the 'GRIN lens and long-range configuration', the best limit of resolution is decreased to 2.2 × 10-4° but over a smaller range of [-14.5°, +14.5°]. Finally, the sensor in its 'lens-free configuration' design is integrated into a miniature electromagnetic actuator to determine its stroke by a comparison of the output signal obtained between this unknown-stroke actuator and a rotating stage for which the stroke was precisely known.

  17. Measurement of Membrane Displacement with a Motionless Camera Equipped with a Fixed Focus Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murawski Krzysztof

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a technique for measuring membrane displacements with one motionless camera. The method consists in measuring the distance to an object based on one image obtained from a motionless camera with a fixed-focus lens. The essence of the proposed measurement technique is to determine changes of the distance between a membrane and a video camera based on analysis of changes in the focus view of a marker placed on the membrane plane. It is proven that the used technique allows to monitor the frequency and amplitude of the membrane vibration. The tests were performed for the oscillation frequency in the range from 0.5 Hz to 6 Hz and deviations from the neutral position in the range of ±3 mm.

  18. Multiplex and simultaneous measurement of displacement and temperature using tapered fiber and fiber Bragg grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Chongke; Zhao Chunliu; Kang Juan; Dong Xinyong; Jin Shangzhong [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2012-05-15

    A simple method to work out the multiplexing of tapered fiber based sensors is proposed and demonstrated. By cascading a tapered fiber with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG), the sensor head is provided with a wavelength identification, different FBGs provide the sensor heads with different reflective peaks and they can be distinguished in optical spectrum. By compositing several such sensor heads with a multi-channel beam splitter, a star-style topological structure sensor for multipoint sensing is achieved. At the same time, the output intensity at the peak wavelength is sensitive to one external physical parameter applied on the related FBG-cascaded tapered fiber and the central wavelength of the peak is only sensitive to temperature, so that that parameter and temperature can be measured simultaneously. A sensor for dual-point measurement of the displacement and temperature simultaneously is experimentally demonstrated by using a 2 x 2 coupler in this paper. Experiment results show that the sensor works well and the largest sensitivities reach to 0.11 dB/{mu}m for displacement in the range of 0-400 {mu}m, and {approx}0.0097 nm/ deg. C for temperature between 20 deg. C and 70 deg. C.

  19. 3D displacement measurements of the tympanic membrane with digital holographic interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, S Muñoz; Santoyo, F Mendoza; Hernández-Montes, M del Socorro

    2012-02-27

    A digital holographic interferometry (DHI) system with three object-illumination beams is used for the first time to measure micro-deformations along the x, y and z axes (3D) on the tympanic membrane (TM) surface of a post-mortem cat. In order to completely and accurately measure the TM surface displacements its shape is required to map on it the x, y and z micro-deformations. The surface contour is obtained by applying small shifts to the object illumination source position. A cw laser in stroboscopic mode and a CCD camera were used and synchronized to the acoustic excitation wave that produces a resonant vibration mode on the tympanic membrane surface. This research work reports on the 3D full field of view response of the TM to sound pressure, and has as its main goal the presentation of DHI as an alternative technique to study the TM real displacement behavior when subjected to sound waves, so it can be used as a diagnostic tool to prevent and treat TM diseases.

  20. Regional subsidence modelling in Murcia city (SE Spain using 1-D vertical finite element analysis and 2-D interpolation of ground surface displacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tessitore

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropogenic origin causing important economic losses. The area of Murcia city (SE Spain has been affected by subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation since the year 1992. The main observed historical piezometric level declines occurred in the periods 1982–1984, 1992–1995 and 2004–2008 and showed a close correlation with the temporal evolution of ground displacements. Since 2008, the pressure recovery in the aquifer has led to an uplift of the ground surface that has been detected by the extensometers. In the present work an elastic hydro-mechanical finite element code has been used to compute the subsidence time series for 24 geotechnical boreholes, prescribing the measured groundwater table evolution. The achieved results have been compared with the displacements estimated through an advanced DInSAR technique and measured by the extensometers. These spatio-temporal comparisons have showed that, in spite of the limited geomechanical data available, the model has turned out to satisfactorily reproduce the subsidence phenomenon affecting Murcia City. The model will allow the prediction of future induced deformations and the consequences of any piezometric level variation in the study area.

  1. Measurements of mixed-mode crack surface displacements and comparison with theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Altiero, N. J.; Mirmohamadsadegh, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a finite-width tension specimen containing a crack oriented at various angles to the load axis is attacked from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Displacements of an electro-machined slot, 12.5 mm long and oriented at angles of 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 deg, are measured using a laser-based in-plane measuring technique. Various width specimens, ranging from a crack-length/width ratio of 0.167 to 0.794, are tested. A boundary-integral equation method is extended to deal with the presence of a sharp crack. Agreement between the two approaches is generally good except near the tips of the cracks.

  2. Standard test method for crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness measurement

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of critical crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) values at one or more of several crack extension events, and may be used to measure cleavage crack initiation toughness for materials that exhibit a change from ductile to brittle behavior with decreasing temperature, such as ferritic steels. This test method applies specifically to notched specimens sharpened by fatigue cracking. The recommended specimens are three-point bend [SE(B)], compact [C(T)], or arc-shaped bend [A(B)] specimens. The loading rate is slow and influences of environment (other than temperature) are not covered. The specimens are tested under crosshead or clip gage displacement controlled loading. 1.1.1 The recommended specimen thickness, B, for the SE(B) and C(T) specimens is that of the material in thicknesses intended for an application. For the A(B) specimen, the recommended depth, W, is the wall thickness of the tube or pipe from which the specimen is obtained. Superficial surface machini...

  3. Clinical comparison of tympanic membrane displacement with invasive intracranial pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbles, S; Dodd, C; Banister, K; Mendelow, A D; Chambers, I R

    2005-12-01

    A non-invasive method of assessing intracranial pressure (ICP) would be of benefit to patients with abnormal cerebral pathology that could give rise to changes in ICP. In particular, it would assist the regular monitoring of hydrocephalus patients. This study evaluated a technique using tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, which has been reported to provide a reliable, non-invasive measure of ICP. A group of 135 hydrocephalus patients was studied, as well as 13 patients with benign intracranial hypertension and a control group of 77 volunteers. TMD measurements were carried out using the Marchbanks measurement system analyser and compared between the groups. In 36 patients, invasive measurements of ICP carried out at the same time were compared with the TMD values. A highly significant relationship was found between TMD and ICP but intersubject variability was high and the predictive value of the technique low. Taking the normal range of ICP to be 10-15 mmHg, the predictive limits of the regression are an order of magnitude wider than this and therefore Vm cannot be used as a surrogate for ICP. In conclusion, TMD measurements do not provide a reliable non-invasive measure of ICP in patients with shunted hydrocephalus.

  4. Identification of structural stiffness and excitation forces in time domain using noncontact vision-based displacement measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dongming; Feng, Maria Q.

    2017-10-01

    The emerging noncontact vision-based displacement sensor system offers a promising alternative to the conventional sensors for quantitative structural integrity assessment. Significant advantages of the noncontact vision-based sensor include its low cost, ease of operation, and flexibility to extract structural displacement responses at multiple points. This study aims to link the measured displacement data to the quantification of the structural health condition, by validating the feasibility of simultaneous identification of structural stiffness and unknown excitation forces in time domain using output-only vision-based displacement measurement. Numerical analysis are first carried out to investigate the accuracy, convergence and robustness of identified results to different noise levels, sensor numbers, and initial estimates of structural parameters. Then, experiment on a laboratory scaled beam structure is conducted. Results show that the global stiffness of the beam specimen as well as external hammer excitation forces can be successfully and accurately identified from displacement measurement at two points using one camera. The proposed output-only time-domain identification procedure utilizing vision-based displacement measurement represents a low-cost method for either periodic or long-term bridge performance assessment.

  5. Thermal conductivity of low temperature grown vertical carbon nanotube bundles measured using the three-? method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebregt, S.; Banerjee, S.; Beenakker, K.; Ishihara, R.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of as-grown vertical multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) bundles fabricated at low temperature (500?°C) was measured using a vertical 3?-method. For this, CNT were selectively grown inside an oxide opening and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. The validity of the

  6. Using Smartphone Pressure Sensors to Measure Vertical Velocities of Elevators, Stairways, and Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Martí, Arturo C.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairs, and drones (flying unmanned aerial vehicles), by means of smartphone pressure sensors. The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related to the altitude of the device via the hydrostatic approximation. From the altitude values, vertical velocities are…

  7. Measurement of Cabbibo-suppressed {tau} lepton decays and the determination of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, Stefan

    2008-07-07

    This work presents simultaneous branching fraction measurements of the decay modes {tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n=0,1,2,3 and {tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n=3,4. The analysis is based on a data sample of 427 x 10{sup 6}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 464.4 fb{sup -1}. The measured values are B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(6.57{+-}0.03{+-}0.11) x 10{sup -3}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(4.61{+-}0.03{+-}0.11) x 10{sup -3}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(5.05{+-}0.17{+-}0.44) x 10{sup -4}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.31{+-}0.43{+-}0.40) x 10{sup -4}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.263{+-}0.008{+-}0.078) x 10{sup -2} and B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(9.6{+-}0.5{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -4}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. All measurements are compatible with the current world averages whereas the uncertainties are significantly smaller by a factor of up to five. The determination of B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is the first measurement of this branching fraction. The measured branching fractions are combined with the current world averages. Using the new averages, an updated determination of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke from hadronic {tau} decays yields vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke =0.2146{+-}0.0025, which improves previous measurements by 19%. Its uncertainty is comparable to the one of the current world average from semileptonic kaon decays. (orig.)

  8. Theoretical Accuracy of Along-Track Displacement Measurements from Multiple-Aperture Interferometry (MAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Sup Jung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of precise along-track displacements has been made with the multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI. The empirical accuracies of the MAI measurements are about 6.3 and 3.57 cm for ERS and ALOS data, respectively. However, the estimated empirical accuracies cannot be generalized to any interferometric pair because they largely depend on the processing parameters and coherence of the used SAR data. A theoretical formula is given to calculate an expected MAI measurement accuracy according to the system and processing parameters and interferometric coherence. In this paper, we have investigated the expected MAI measurement accuracy on the basis of the theoretical formula for the existing X-, C- and L-band satellite SAR systems. The similarity between the expected and empirical MAI measurement accuracies has been tested as well. The expected accuracies of about 2–3 cm and 3–4 cm (γ = 0.8 are calculated for the X- and L-band SAR systems, respectively. For the C-band systems, the expected accuracy of Radarsat-2 ultra-fine is about 3–4 cm and that of Sentinel-1 IW is about 27 cm (γ = 0.8. The results indicate that the expected MAI measurement accuracy of a given interferometric pair can be easily calculated by using the theoretical formula.

  9. Theoretical accuracy of along-track displacement measurements from multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyung-Sup; Lee, Won-Jin; Zhang, Lei

    2014-09-23

    The measurement of precise along-track displacements has been made with the multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI). The empirical accuracies of the MAI measurements are about 6.3 and 3.57 cm for ERS and ALOS data, respectively. However, the estimated empirical accuracies cannot be generalized to any interferometric pair because they largely depend on the processing parameters and coherence of the used SAR data. A theoretical formula is given to calculate an expected MAI measurement accuracy according to the system and processing parameters and interferometric coherence. In this paper, we have investigated the expected MAI measurement accuracy on the basis of the theoretical formula for the existing X-, C- and L-band satellite SAR systems. The similarity between the expected and empirical MAI measurement accuracies has been tested as well. The expected accuracies of about 2-3 cm and 3-4 cm (γ = 0.8) are calculated for the X- and L-band SAR systems, respectively. For the C-band systems, the expected accuracy of Radarsat-2 ultra-fine is about 3-4 cm and that of Sentinel-1 IW is about 27 cm (γ = 0.8). The results indicate that the expected MAI measurement accuracy of a given interferometric pair can be easily calculated by using the theoretical formula.

  10. Correlation of Air Displacement Plethysmography with Alternative Body Fat Measurement Techniques in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Brittany L; Pohlman, Roberta; Hartzler, Lynn

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions with serious health consequences. Techniques used to measure body fat (BF) yield variable BF estimates, and this variability may lead to underestimation or overestimation of BF and subsequent treatment options. The measurements that are most accurate (Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) and Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP)) are expensive and often unavailable. The purpose of this study is to find the commonly available BF measurement that is the most accurate and practical for individual body types in the general population and compare these measurements to ADP (BOD POD®) as the standard. Field measurements include skinfolds (SKF), upper, lower, and whole body bioelectrical impedance (BI), waist and hip circumference ratios, body mass index calculations (BMI), and ADP. Our data indicate that BI is the least accurate measurement of body fat in males and females (paired t-tests of % body fat: BI vs. ADP, p0.05). However, preliminary data suggest female- specific SKF equations more accurately predict body fat in obese males than male-specific SKF equations. Given the current obesity trends, it is imperative to update these formulae to accurately reflect the current population.

  11. A Method Using Optical Contactless Displacement Sensors to Measure Vibration Stress of Small-Bore Piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Noda, Michiyasu

    2014-02-01

    In nuclear power plants, vibration stress of piping is frequently evaluated to prevent fatigue failure. A simple and fast measurement method is attractive to evaluate many piping systems efficiently. In this study, a method to measure the vibration stress using optical contactless displacement sensors was proposed, the prototype instrument was developed, and the instrument practicality for the method was verified. In the proposed method, light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used as measurement sensors and the vibration stress was estimated by measuring the deformation geometry of the piping caused by oscillation, which was measured as the piping curvature radius. The method provided fast and simple vibration estimates for small-bore piping. Its verification and practicality were confirmed by vibration tests using a test pipe and mock-up piping. The stress measured by both the proposed method and an accurate conventional method using strain gauges were in agreement, and it was concluded that the proposed method could be used for actual plant piping systems.

  12. Snowpack displacement measured by terrestrial radar interferometry as precursor for wet snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caduff, Rafael; Wiesmann, Andreas; Bühler, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Wet snow and full depth gliding avalanches commonly occur on slopes during springtime when air temperatures rise above 0°C for longer time. The increase in the liquid water content changes the mechanical properties of the snow pack. Until now, forecasts of wet snow avalanches are mainly done using weather data such as air and snow temperatures and incoming solar radiation. Even tough some wet snow avalanche events are indicated before the release by the formation of visible signs such as extension cracks or compressional bulges in the snow pack, a large number of wet snow avalanches are released without any previously visible signs. Continuous monitoring of critical slopes by terrestrial radar interferometry improves the scale of reception of differential movement into the range of millimetres per hour. Therefore, from a terrestrial and remote observation location, information on the mechanical state of the snow pack can be gathered on a slope wide scale. Recent campaigns in the Swiss Alps showed the potential of snow deformation measurements with a portable, interferometric real aperture radar operating at 17.2 GHz (1.76 cm wavelength). Common error sources for the radar interferometric measurement of snow pack displacements are decorrelation of the snow pack at different conditions, the influence of atmospheric disturbances on the interferometric phase and transition effects from cold/dry snow to warm/wet snow. Therefore, a critical assessment of those parameters has to be considered in order to reduce phase noise effects and retrieve accurate displacement measurements. The most recent campaign in spring 2015 took place in Davos Dorf/GR, Switzerland and its objective was to observe snow glide activity on the Dorfberg slope. A validation campaign using total station measurements showed good agreement to the radar interferometric line of sight displacement measurements in the range of 0.5 mm/h. The refinement of the method led to the detection of numerous gliding

  13. Measuring full-field displacement spectral components using photographs taken with a DSLR camera via an analogue Fourier integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javh, Jaka; Slavič, Janko; Boltežar, Miha

    2018-02-01

    Instantaneous full-field displacement fields can be measured using cameras. In fact, using high-speed cameras full-field spectral information up to a couple of kHz can be measured. The trouble is that high-speed cameras capable of measuring high-resolution fields-of-view at high frame rates prove to be very expensive (from tens to hundreds of thousands of euro per camera). This paper introduces a measurement set-up capable of measuring high-frequency vibrations using slow cameras such as DSLR, mirrorless and others. The high-frequency displacements are measured by harmonically blinking the lights at specified frequencies. This harmonic blinking of the lights modulates the intensity changes of the filmed scene and the camera-image acquisition makes the integration over time, thereby producing full-field Fourier coefficients of the filmed structure's displacements.

  14. MD#1826: Measurement of Quench Heater vertical kick

    CERN Document Server

    Valette, Matthieu; Lindstrom, Bjorn Hans Filip; Bortot, Lorenzo; Fernandez Navarro, Alejandro; Schmidt, Rudiger; Verweij, Arjan

    2018-01-01

    Following the observation of vertical orbit oscillations of the LHC beam between the detection of a (beam induced) quench of an LHC main dipole and the beam dump, a study was started to verify that the orbit distortions are caused by the firing of the quench heaters (QH). Simulation of the magnetic field generated by the discharge of the QH and its effect on the beam confirmed it was the most likely cause. A dedicated experiment with 450 GeV proton beams was performed to validate the simulation results. The results are presented below and compared to the simulations. Furthermore, estimates on the effect of quench heater firing in superconducting magnets other than the studied LHC main dipoles on the circulating proton beams in LHC and the future HL-LHC are discussed.

  15. Measurement of the $B^{+}$ and $B^{0}$ lifetimes and search for CP(T) violation using reconstructed secondary vertices

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B+ and B0 mesons, and their ratio, have been measured in the OPAL experiment using 2.4 million hadronic Z0 decays recorded at LEP. Z0 -> b bbar decays were tagged using displaced secondary vertices and high momentum electrons and muons. The lifetimes were then measured using well-reconstructed charged and neutral secondary vertices selected in this tagged data sample. The results are tau(B+) = 1.643 +- 0.037 +- 0.025 ps tau(B0) = 1.523 +- 0.057 +- 0.053 ps ratio tau(B+)/tau(B0) = 1.079 +- 0.064 +- 0.041 where in each case the first error is statistical and the second systematic. A larger data sample of 3.1 million hadronic Z0 decays has been used to search for CP and CPT violating effects by comparison of inclusive b and bbar hadron decays. No evidence for such effects is seen. The CP violation parameter Re(epsilon_B) is measured to be Re(epsilon_B) = 0.001 +- 0.014 +- 0.003 and the fractional difference between b and bbar hadron lifetimes is measured to be -0.001 +- 0.012 +- 0.008

  16. Introduction of anti-rolling active vertical fin and its application to maneuverability for displacement-type super high speed ship. 2nd Report.; Haisuiryogata chokosokusen no yokoyure seishiyo active suichoku fin no donyu to sojuseieno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, T.; Saito, Y. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Niihara, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Discussed herein are the effects of vertical fin projecting downwards from the bottom of a displacement-type superhigh-speed ship, installed to improve its transverse stability and turning ability. The system for simultaneously controlling rudder and vertical fin by the optimum regulator was studied for maneuverability in directional following waves and smooth water, and maneuverability was simulated numerically. A ship is greatly rolled and sloped when running in waves. It is found that the vertical fin shows a high anti-rolling effect when the ship runs straight. The optimum regulator greatly improves maneuverability in waves, reducing rolling by 92%. Increased rolling with the vertical fin, observed in the previous study in directional following waves, is found to be due to the rudder. The optimum position of the fin is determined to control transverse sloping of a turning ship in a superhigh-speed region. 21 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. High resolution and stability roll angle measurement method for precision linear displacement stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Xia, Guizheng; Hou, Wenmei; Le, Yanfen; Han, Sen

    2017-02-01

    A method for high resolution roll angle measurement of linear displacement stages is developed theoretically and tested experimentally. The new optical configuration is based on a special differential plane mirror interferometer, a wedge prism assembly, and a wedge mirror assembly. The wedge prisms assembly is used as a roll angle sensor, which converts roll angle to the changes of optical path. The special interferometer, composed a polarization splitter plane, a half wave plate, a beam splitter, a retro-reflector and a quarter wave plate, is designed for high resolution measurement of the changes of the optical path. The interferometric beams are a completely common path for the adoption of the centrosymmetrical measurement structure, and the cross talk of the straightness, yaw, and pitch errors is avoided. The angle measurement resolution of the proposed method is 3.5 μrad in theoretical with a phase meter which has a resolution of 2 π /512 . The experimental result also shows the great stability and accuracy of the present roll angle measurement system.

  18. High-resolution and wide range displacement measurement based on planar grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Guan, Jian; Wen, Feng; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-12-01

    High/ultra-precision motion measurements for precision translation stages are highly desired in modern manufacturing systems and instruments. In this work, we introduce a wide range three-axis grating encoder with nanometric resolution, which can measure the x-, y- and z-axial translational motions of a stage simultaneously. The grating encoder is composed of a reflective-type planar scale grating with a period of 8 μm and an optical reading head. A planar reference grating, which is the same as the planar scale grating except the length and width, is employed in the optical reading head. The x- and y- directional ±1st order diffractive beams of the planar scale grating interfere with the corresponding diffractive beams of the planar reference grating, forming the measurement signals. The x- and y- directional ±1st order diffractive beams of the two planar gratings propagate against their original incident path, working as the autocollimatic diffractive beams. Therefore, the z-axial measurement range of the proposed grating encoder is greatly enhanced. The x- and y- axial measurement ranges depend on the size of the planar scale grating. To make the grating encoder more compact, a double grating beam-splitting (DGBS) unit and two diffractive optical elements (DOEs) are introduced. The experimental results indicate that the z-axial displacement resolution is as high as 4 nm with an electronic data division card of 80 segments developed by our lab.

  19. AGS vertical beta function measurements for Run 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ahrens, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-10-07

    One key parameter for running the AGS efficiently is by maintaining a low emittance. To measure emittance, one needs to measure the beta function throughout the cycle. This can be done by measuring the beta function at the ionization profile monitors (IPM) in the AGS. This tech note delves into the motivation, the measurement, and some strides that were made throughout Run15.

  20. A general procedure for estimating dynamic displacements using strain measurements and operational modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte, Anders; Aenlle, Manuel L.; Brincker, Rune

    2016-02-01

    Measurement systems are being installed in more and more civil structures with the purpose of monitoring the general dynamic behavior of the structure. The instrumentation is typically done with accelerometers, where experimental frequencies and mode shapes can be identified using modal analysis and used in health monitoring algorithms. But the use of accelerometers is not suitable for all structures. Structures like wind turbine blades and wings on airplanes can be exposed to lightning, which can cause the measurement systems to fail. Structures like these are often equipped with fiber sensors measuring the in-plane deformation. This paper proposes a method in which the displacement mode shapes and responses can be predicted using only strain measurements. The method relies on the newly discovered principle of local correspondence, which states that each experimental mode can be expressed as a unique subset of finite element modes. In this paper the technique is further developed to predict the mode shapes in different states of the structure. Once an estimate of the modes is found, responses can be predicted using the superposition of the modal coordinates weighted by the mode shapes. The method is validated with experimental tests on a scaled model of a two-span bridge installed with strain gauges. Random load was applied to simulate a civil structure under operating condition, and strain mode shapes were identified using operational modal analysis.

  1. Subpixelic Measurement of Large 1D Displacements: Principle, Processing Algorithms, Performances and Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelpa, Valérian; Laurent, Guillaume J.; Sandoz, Patrick; Zea, July Galeano; Clévy, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a visual measurement method able to sense 1D rigid body displacements with very high resolutions, large ranges and high processing rates. Sub-pixelic resolution is obtained thanks to a structured pattern placed on the target. The pattern is made of twin periodic grids with slightly different periods. The periodic frames are suited for Fourier-like phase calculations—leading to high resolution—while the period difference allows the removal of phase ambiguity and thus a high range-to-resolution ratio. The paper presents the measurement principle as well as the processing algorithms (source files are provided as supplementary materials). The theoretical and experimental performances are also discussed. The processing time is around 3 μs for a line of 780 pixels, which means that the measurement rate is mostly limited by the image acquisition frame rate. A 3-σ repeatability of 5 nm is experimentally demonstrated which has to be compared with the 168 μm measurement range. PMID:24625736

  2. Vestibulo-Ocular Responses to Vertical Translation using a Hand-Operated Chair as a Field Measure of Otolith Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Campbell, D. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Prather, L.; Clement, G.

    2016-01-01

    The translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (tVOR) is an important otolith-mediated response to stabilize gaze during natural locomotion. One goal of this study was to develop a measure of the tVOR using a simple hand-operated chair that provided passive vertical motion. Binocular eye movements were recorded with a tight-fitting video mask in ten healthy subjects. Vertical motion was provided by a modified spring-powered chair (swopper.com) at approximately 2 Hz (+/- 2 cm displacement) to approximate the head motion during walking. Linear acceleration was measured with wireless inertial sensors (Xsens) mounted on the head and torso. Eye movements were recorded while subjects viewed near (0.5m) and far (approximately 4m) targets, and then imagined these targets in darkness. Subjects also provided perceptual estimates of target distances. Consistent with the kinematic properties shown in previous studies, the tVOR gain was greater with near targets, and greater with vision than in darkness. We conclude that this portable chair system can provide a field measure of otolith-ocular function at frequencies sufficient to elicit a robust tVOR.

  3. Evaluation of Stiffness Changes in a High-Rise Building by Measurements of Lateral Displacements Using GPS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Woon Choi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The outrigger truss system is one of the most frequently used lateral load resisting structural systems. However, little research has been reported on the effect of installation of outrigger trusses on improvement of lateral stiffness of a high-rise building through full-scale measurements. In this paper, stiffness changes of a high-rise building due to installation of outrigger trusses have been evaluated by measuring lateral displacements using a global positioning system (GPS. To confirm the error range of the GPS measurement system used in the full-scale measurement tests, the GPS displacement monitoring system is investigated through a free vibration test of the experimental model. Then, for the evaluation of lateral stiffness of a high-rise building under construction, the GPS displacement monitoring system is applied to measurements of lateral displacements of a 66-story high-rise building before and after installation of outrigger truss. The stiffness improvement of the building before and after the installation is confirmed through the changes of the natural frequencies and the ratios of the base shear forces to the roof displacements.

  4. Experimental Evaluation of an Invasive Medical Instrument Based on a Displacement Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadis, Dimitris A; Astaras, Alexandros; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Papathanasiou, Kostas; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking the position of a medical instrument's tip. The system is based on phase locking a high frequency signal transmitted from the medical instrument's tip to a reference signal. Displacement measurement is established having the loop open, in order to get a low frequency voltage representing the medical instrument's movement; therefore, positioning is established by means of conventional measuring techniques. The voltage-controlled oscillator stage of the phase-locked loop (PLL), combined to an appropriate antenna, comprises the associated transmitter located inside the medical instrument tip. All the other low frequency PLL components, low noise amplifier and mixer, are located outside the human body, forming the receiver part of the system. The operating details of the proposed system were coded in Verilog-AMS. Simulation results indicate robust medical instrument tracking in 1-D. Experimental evaluation of the proposed position tracking system is also presented. The experiments described in this paper are based on a transmitter moving opposite a stationary receiver performing either constant velocity or uniformly accelerated movement, and also together with two stationary receivers performing constant velocity movement again. This latter setup is implemented in order to demonstrate the prototype's accuracy for planar (2-D) motion measurements. Error analysis and time-domain analysis are presented for system performance characterization. Furthermore, preliminary experimental assessment using a saline solution container to more closely approximate the human body as a radio frequency wave transmission medium has proved the system's capability of operating underneath the skin.

  5. A Wireless Passive Sensing System for Displacement/Strain Measurement in Reinforced Concrete Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Ozbey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show a wireless passive sensing system embedded in a reinforced concrete member successfully being employed for the measurement of relative displacement and strain in a simply supported beam experiment. The system utilizes electromagnetic coupling between the transceiver antenna located outside the beam, and the sensing probes placed on the reinforcing bar (rebar surface inside the beam. The probes were designed in the form of a nested split-ring resonator, a metamaterial-based structure chosen for its compact size and high sensitivity/resolution, which is at µm/microstrains level. Experiments were performed in both the elastic and plastic deformation cases of steel rebars, and the sensing system was demonstrated to acquire telemetric data in both cases. The wireless measurement results from multiple probes are compared with the data obtained from the strain gages, and an excellent agreement is observed. A discrete time measurement where the system records data at different force levels is also shown. Practical issues regarding the placement of the sensors and accurate recording of data are discussed. The proposed sensing technology is demonstrated to be a good candidate for wireless structural health monitoring (SHM of reinforced concrete members by its high sensitivity and wide dynamic range.

  6. Multiplex pressure measurement in microsystems using volume displacement of particle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwanghun; Lee, Hyewon; Lu, Hang

    2009-12-07

    We demonstrate a simple image-based method to measure pressure in microsystems using volume displacement of fluorescent particle suspensions. These micro pressure-sensors are composed of two layers with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane in between: the flow layer includes a flow channel and the sensor layer contains a detection channel filled with suspensions of fluorescent particles. The pressure increase in the flow channel deflects the membrane, and this membrane deformation can be quantified by measuring the cross-sectional areas at specific focal planes. These simple sensors have the advantage that a broad sensing-range can be achieved by tuning the mechanical property and the geometry of the membrane during design and fabrication, and even simpler by tuning the focal plane or the pressure of a reference chamber while in operation. We also demonstrate here a pressure transduction scheme coupled with the image-based sensing method as a multiplex pressure measurement tool for simultaneously detecting pressures in multiple locations in a microsystem. Overall, the image-based pressure sensing method has high precision when operated in both direct and remote detection modes. Compared to conventional mechanical methods of pressure detection, this technique is inexpensive because it does not require complex off-chip equipment to quantify the pressure-dependent membrane deformation. In addition, the image analysis using the software code developed here is fast, and it generates data that are simple to interpret.

  7. Clinical evaluation of body fat percentage in 11,833 Japanese measured by air displacement plethysmograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Takenami, Sumiko; Kawasaki, Yuriko; Kunihashi, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Hidetaka; Numata, Takeyuki

    2005-07-01

    Body fat percentage is commonly used for assessing body composition. We investigated the body fat percentage in Japanese subjects measured by air displacement plethysmograph (ADP) termed BOD POD. Cross-sectional clinical investigation study. We used data of 11,833 Japanese subjects aged 20-79 years [body mass index (BMI): 23.2+/-3.7 kg/m2]. Body fat percentage was evaluated by BOD POD. Anthropometric parameters such as height, weight, BMI, waist circumference and hip circumference were also measured. Mean values of body fat percentage measured by BOD POD were 24.5+/-6.6% in men and 31.1+/-7.1% in women, mean values were also calculated as classified into aged groups in normal weight subjects. Body fat percentage was significantly correlated with BMI and 25.1% of men and 34.6% of women corresponded to 25 kg/m2 in BMI. Mean value of body fat percentage in normal weight Japanese subjects was revealed. In addition, the level of 25% in men and 35% in women corresponded to 25 kg/m2 of BMI.

  8. Case Study of an Ice Sensor using Computational Fluid Dynamics, Measurements and Pictures - Boundary displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Sørensen, Henrik; Martinez, Benjamin

    This paper presents an icing model developed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). One key part part of the model development is the surface boundary displacement due to the accumulated mass of ice. The paper presents the development of a boundary layer displacement method to be included...... in the CFD icing model using ANSYS-FLUENT....

  9. Measurement of slow-moving along-track displacement from an efficient multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Min-Jeong; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Won, Joong-Sun; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta; Lu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) has demonstrated outstanding measurement accuracy of along-track displacement when compared to pixel-offset-tracking methods; however, measuring slow-moving (cm/year) surface displacement remains a challenge. Stacking of multi-temporal observations is a potential approach to reducing noise and increasing measurement accuracy, but it is difficult to achieve a significant improvement by applying traditional stacking methods to multi-temporal MAI interferograms. This paper proposes an efficient MAI stacking method, where multi-temporal forward- and backward-looking residual interferograms are individually stacked before the MAI interferogram is generated. We tested the performance of this method using ENVISAT data from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, where displacement on the order of several centimeters per year is common. By comparing results from the proposed stacking methods with displacements from GPS data, we documented measurement accuracies of about 1.03 and 1.07 cm/year for the descending and ascending tracks, respectively—an improvement of about a factor of two when compared with that from the conventional stacking approach. Three-dimensional surface-displacement maps can be constructed by combining stacked InSAR and MAI observations, which will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of geological phenomena.

  10. Computer Vision-Based Structural Displacement Measurement Robust to Light-Induced Image Degradation for In-Service Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junhwa; Lee, Kyoung-Chan; Cho, Soojin; Sim, Sung-Han

    2017-10-11

    The displacement responses of a civil engineering structure can provide important information regarding structural behaviors that help in assessing safety and serviceability. A displacement measurement using conventional devices, such as the linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), is challenging owing to issues related to inconvenient sensor installation that often requires additional temporary structures. A promising alternative is offered by computer vision, which typically provides a low-cost and non-contact displacement measurement that converts the movement of an object, mostly an attached marker, in the captured images into structural displacement. However, there is limited research on addressing light-induced measurement error caused by the inevitable sunlight in field-testing conditions. This study presents a computer vision-based displacement measurement approach tailored to a field-testing environment with enhanced robustness to strong sunlight. An image-processing algorithm with an adaptive region-of-interest (ROI) is proposed to reliably determine a marker's location even when the marker is indistinct due to unfavorable light. The performance of the proposed system is experimentally validated in both laboratory-scale and field experiments.

  11. Determination of fracture mechanics parameters on a base of local displacement measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. Matvienko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available New experimental technique for a determination of the stress intensity factor (SIF and T-stress values is developed and verified. The approach assumes combining the crack compliance method and optical interferometric measurements of local deformation response on small crack length increment. Initial experimental information has a form of in-plane displacement component values, which are measured by electronic speckle-pattern interferometry at some specific points located near a crack tip. Required values of fracture mechanics parameters follow from the first four coefficients of Williams’ series. A determination of initial experimental data at the nearest vicinity of notch tip is the main feature of the developed approach. That is why it is not necessary to involve complex numerical models, which include global geometrical parameters, loading and boundary conditions of the object under study, in a stage of experimental data interpretation. An availability of high-quality interference fringe patterns, which are free from rigid-body motions, serves as a reliable indicator of real stress state around a crack tip. A verification of the technique is performed by comparing experimental results with analogous data of FEM modelling. Experimentally determined mode I SIF for DCB specimen with end crack is in 5 per cent agreement with the numerically simulated case. Proposed approach is capable of estimating an influence of the notch radius on fracture mechanics parameters. Comparing SIF and T-stress obtained for U notches of different radius both in actual and residual stress field confirms this statement.

  12. Direct measurement of the image displacement instability in a linear induction accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, T. J.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Moir, D. C.

    2017-06-01

    The image displacement instability (IDI) has been measured on the 20 MeV Axis I of the dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility and compared to theory. A 0.23 kA electron beam was accelerated across 64 gaps in a low solenoid focusing field, and the position of the beam centroid was measured to 34.3 meters downstream from the cathode. One beam dynamics code was used to model the IDI from first principles, while another code characterized the effects of the resistive wall instability and the beam break-up (BBU) instability. Although the BBU instability was not found to influence the IDI, it appears that the IDI influences the BBU. Because the BBU theory does not fully account for the dependence on beam position for coupling to cavity transverse magnetic modes, the effect of the IDI is missing from the BBU theory. This becomes of particular concern to users of linear induction accelerators operating in or near low magnetic guide fields tunes.

  13. Meteodrones - Meteorological Planetary Boundary Layer Measurements by Vertical Drone Soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jonas; Fengler, Martin

    2017-04-01

    As of today, there is a gap in the operational data collection of meteorological observations in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). This lack of spatially and temporally reliable knowledge of PBL conditions and energy fluxes with the surface causes shortcomings in the prediction of micro- and mesoscale phenomena such as convection, temperature inversions, local wind systems or fog. The currently used remote sensing instruments share the drawback of only partially covering necessary variables. To fill this data gap, since 2012, Meteomatics has been developing a drone measurement system, the Meteodrone, to measure the parameters wind speed, wind direction, dewpoint, temperature and air pressure of the PBL up to 1.5 km above ground. Both the data quality and the assimilation into a regional numerical weather model could be determined in several pilot studies. Besides, a project in cooperation with the NSSL (National Severe Storms Laboratory) was launched in October 2016 with the goal of capturing pre-convective conditions for improved severe storm forecasts in Oklahoma. Also, related measurements, such as air pollution measurements in the Misox valley to determine LDSP values, were successfully conducted. The main goal of the project is the operational data collection of PBL measurements and the assimilation of this data into regional numerical weather forecast models. Considering the high data quality indicated in all conducted studies as well as the trouble-free execution, this goal is both worthwhile and realistic.

  14. Extrinsic calibration of a laser displacement sensor in a non-contact coordinate measuring machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao BI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to implement 3D scanning of those complicated parts such as blades in the aviation field, a non-contact optical measuring system is established in the paper, which integrates a laser displacement sensor, a probe head, the frame of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM, etc. As the output of the laser sensor directly obtained possesses the 1D length of the laser beam, it needs to determine the unit direction vector of the laser beam denoted as (l, m, n by calibration so as to convert the 1D values into 3D coordinates of target points. Therefore, an extrinsic calibration method based on a standard sphere is proposed to accomplish this task in the paper. During the calibration procedure, the laser sensor moves along with the motion of the CMM and gathers the required data on the spherical surface. Then, both the output of the laser sensor and the grating readings of the CMM are substituted into the constraint equation of the spherical surface, in which an over-determined nonlinear equation group containing unknown parameters is established. For the purpose of solving the equation group, a method based on non-linear least squares optimization is put forward. Finally, the system after calibration is utilized to measure the diameter of a metallic sphere 10 times from different orientations to verify the calibration accuracy. In the experiment, the errors between the measured results and the true values are all smaller than 0.03 mm, which manifests the validity and practicality of the extrinsic calibration method presented in the paper.

  15. Novel design and sensitivity analysis of displacement measurement system utilizing knife edge diffraction for nanopositioning stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Lee, Sun-Kyu; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel design and sensitivity analysis of a knife edge-based optical displacement sensor that can be embedded with nanopositioning stages. The measurement system consists of a laser, two knife edge locations, two photodetectors, and axillary optics components in a simple configuration. The knife edge is installed on the stage parallel to its moving direction and two separated laser beams are incident on knife edges. While the stage is in motion, the direct transverse and diffracted light at each knife edge is superposed producing interference at the detector. The interference is measured with two photodetectors in a differential amplification configuration. The performance of the proposed sensor was mathematically modeled, and the effect of the optical and mechanical parameters, wavelength, beam diameter, distances from laser to knife edge to photodetector, and knife edge topography, on sensor outputs was investigated to obtain a novel analytical method to predict linearity and sensitivity. From the model, all parameters except for the beam diameter have a significant influence on measurement range and sensitivity of the proposed sensing system. To validate the model, two types of knife edges with different edge topography were used for the experiment. By utilizing a shorter wavelength, smaller sensor distance and higher edge quality increased measurement sensitivity can be obtained. The model was experimentally validated and the results showed a good agreement with the theoretically estimated results. This sensor is expected to be easily implemented into nanopositioning stage applications at a low cost and mathematical model introduced here can be used for design and performance estimation of the knife edge-based sensor as a tool.

  16. The effect of frog pressure and downward vertical load on hoof wall weight-bearing and third phalanx displacement in the horse - an in vitro study : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olivier

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A shoe was designed to combine the advantages of a reverse shoe and an adjustable heart bar shoe in the treatment of chronic laminitis. This reverse even frog pressure (REFP shoe applies pressure uniformly over a large area of the frog solar surface. Pressure is applied vertically upward parallel to the solar surface of the frog and can be increased or decreased as required. Five clinically healthy horses were humanely euthanased and their dismem-bered forelimbs used in an in vitro study. Frog pressure was measured by strain gauges applied to the ground surface of the carrying tab portion of the shoe. A linear variable distance transducer (LVDT was inserted into a hole drilled in the dorsal hoof wall. The LVDT measured movement of the third phalanx (P3 in a dorsopalmar plane relative to the dorsal hoof wall. The vertical component of hoof wall compression was measured by means of unidirectional strain gauges attached to the toe, quarter and heel of the medial hoof wall of each specimen. The entire limb was mounted vertically in a tensile testing machine and submitted to vertical downward compressive forces of 0 to 2500 Nat a rate of 5 cm/minute. The effects of increasing frog pressure on hoof wall weight-bearing and third phalanx movement within the hoof were determined. Each specimen was tested with the shoe under the following conditions: zero frog pressure; frog pressure used to treat clinical cases of chronic laminitis (7 N-cm; frog pressure clinically painful to the horse as determined prior to euthanasia; frog pressure just alleviating this pain. The specimens were also tested after shoe removal. Total weight-bearing on the hoof wall at zero frog pressure was used as the basis for comparison. Pain-causing and pain-alleviating frog pressures decreased total weight-bearing on the hoof wall (P < 0.05. Frog pressure of 7 N-cm had no statistically significant effect on hoof wall weight-bearing although there was a trend for it to decrease as

  17. Differential optical shadow sensor for sub-nanometer displacement measurement and its application to drag-free satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Andreas; Tan, Si; Saraf, Shailendhar; Alfauwaz, Abdul; DeBra, Dan; Buchman, Sasha; Lipa, John A

    2017-10-16

    We present a method for 3D sub-nanometer displacement measurement using a set of differential optical shadow sensors. It is based on using pairs of collimated beams on opposite sides of an object that are partially blocked by it. Applied to a sphere, our 3-axis sensor module consists of 8 parallel beam-detector sets for redundancy. The sphere blocks half of each beam's power in the nominal centered position, and any displacement can be measured by the differential optical power changes amongst the pairs of detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated a displacement sensitivity of 0.87nm/Hz at 1 Hz and 0.39nm/Hz at 10 Hz. We describe the application of the module to the inertial sensor of a drag-free satellite, which can potentially be used for navigation, geodesy and fundamental science experiments as well as ground based applications.

  18. Scientific Ground of a New Optical Device for Contactless Measurement of the Small Spatial Displacements of Control Object Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, I. P.; Parinov, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    It is proposed the computational-experimental ground of newly developed optical device for contactless measurement of small spatial displacements of control object surfaces based on the use of new methods of laser interferometry. The proposed device allows one to register linear and angular components of the small displacements of control object surfaces during the diagnosis of the condition of structural materials for forced elements of goods under exploring by using acoustic non-destructive testing methods. The described results are the most suitable for application in the process of high-precision measurements of small linear and angular displacements of control object surfaces during experimental research, the evaluation and diagnosis of the state of construction materials for forced elements of goods, the study of fast wave propagation in layered constructions of complex shape, manufactured of anisotropic composite materials, the study of damage processes in modern construction materials in mechanical engineering, shipbuilding, aviation, instrumentation, power engineering, etc.

  19. Measurement of a small vertical emittance with a laser wire beam profile monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakai

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe in this paper a measurement of vertical emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF damping ring at KEK with a laser wire beam profile monitor. This monitor is based on the Compton scattering process of electrons with a laser light target which is produced by injecting a cw laser beam into a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We installed the monitor at a straight section of the damping ring and measured the vertical emittance with three different ring conditions. In all cases, the ATF ring was operated at 1.28 GeV in a single bunch mode. When the ring was tuned for ultralow emittance, the vertical emittance of ε_{y}=(1.18±0.08×10^{-11}   mrad was achieved. This shows that the ATF damping ring has realized its target value also vertically.

  20. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  1. Seasonal and multi-year surface displacements measured by DInSAR in a High Arctic permafrost environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; Short, Naomi; Brisco, Brian

    2018-02-01

    Arctic landscapes undergo seasonal and long-term changes as the active layer thaws and freezes, which can result in localized or irregular subsidence leading to the formation of thermokarst terrain. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) is a technique capable of measuring ground surface displacements resulting from thawing permafrost at centimetre precision and is quickly gaining acceptance as a means of measuring ground displacement in permafrost regions. Using RADARSAT-2 stacked DInSAR data from 2013 and 2015 we determined the magnitude and patterns of land surface change in a continuous permafrost environment. At our study site situated in the Canadian High Arctic, DInSAR seasonal ground displacement patterns were consistent with field observations of permafrost degradation. As expected, many DInSAR values are close to the detection threshold (i.e., 1 cm) and therefore do not indicate significant change; however, DInSAR seasonal ground displacement patterns aligned well with climatological and soil conditions and offer geomorphological insight into subsurface processes in permafrost environments. While our dataset is limited to two years of data representing a three-year time period, the displacements derived from DInSAR provide insight into permafrost change in a High Arctic environment and demonstrate that DInSAR is an applicable tool for understanding environmental change in remote permafrost regions.

  2. Improved 3D displacement measurements method and calibration of a combined fringe projection and 2D-DIC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, Philip; Felipe-Sese, Luis; Diaz-Garrido, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    An improved measurement method and an automatic calibration procedure are proposed for a combined 2D Digital Image Correlation and Fringe Projection system that allows measuring in- and out-of-plane displacement maps with only one image at each deformation stage of a specimen. The proposed method increases the accuracy and range of the out-of-plane displacements by taking into account the divergences of both the projected fringes (uncollimated) and the camera (with non-zero FOV). The calibration is performed automatically by acquiring a sequence of images of a reference plane by displacing perpendicular to it the camera and fringe projector with a motorized translation stage. The acquired images are then used to obtain a fringe function for each pixel and the necessary parameters required for the correction of the in-plane displacements. Furthermore, a closed form expression is obtained that relates the out-of-plane displacements with the shifted phase at each pixel for a given experimental set-up. This expression is in good agreement with the fringe function obtained by fitting a simple 2nd order polynomial to the experimental obtained calibration data. Finally, the polynomial approach is proposed as a fringe function because it avoids the errors in the determination of the required parameters of the theoretical expression as well as some small misalignment or aberration effects.

  3. Active chatter suppression with displacement-only measurement in turning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haifeng; Wu, Jianhua; Yang, Liuqing; Xiong, Zhenhua

    2017-08-01

    Regenerative chatter is a major hindrance for achieving high quality and high production rate in machining processes. Various active controllers have been proposed to mitigate chatter. However, most of existing controllers were developed on the basis of multi-states feedback of the system and state observers were usually needed. Moreover, model parameters of the machining process (mass, damping and stiffness) were required in existing active controllers. In this study, an active sliding mode controller, which employs a dynamic output feedback sliding surface for the unmatched condition and an adaptive law for disturbance estimation, is designed, analyzed, and validated for chatter suppression in turning process. Only displacement measurement is required by this approach. Other sensors and state observers are not needed. Moreover, it facilitates a rapid implementation since the designed controller is established without using model parameters of the turning process. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experiments on a computer numerical control (CNC) lathe are presented. It shows that the chatter can be substantially attenuated and the chatter-free region can be significantly expanded with the presented method.

  4. Global carbon monoxide vertical distributions from spaceborne high-resolution FTIR nadir measurements

    OpenAIRE

    B. Barret; Turquety, S.; Hurtmans, D; Clerbaux, C.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; I. Bey; Auvray, M.; P.-F. Coheur

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the first global distributions of CO vertical profiles retrieved from a thermal infrared FTS working in the nadir geometry. It is based on the exploitation of the high resolution and high quality spectra measured by the Interferometric Monitor of Greenhouse gases (IMG) which flew onboard the Japanese ADEOS platform in 1996-1997. The retrievals are performed with an algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) and are characterized in terms of vertical sensitivity...

  5. Measurement of the Average B Hadron Lifetime Using Reconstructed Vertices in Three-Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, S

    2003-12-17

    This thesis describes a measurement of the average B hadron lifetime using data collected with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Collider in 1993. An inclusive analysis selects three dimensional vertices with B hadron lifetime information in a sample of 50,000 Z{sup 0} decays. A lifetime of 1.564 {+-} 0.030(stat) {+-} 0.036(syst) ps is extracted from the decay length distribution of these vertices using a binned maximum likelihood method.

  6. Performance characterisation of a new photo-microsensor based sensing head for displacement measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Potdar, Akshay Anand; Fletcher, Simon; Longstaff, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robust displacement sensor with nanometre-scale resolution over a micrometre range. It is composed of low cost commercially available slotted photo-microsensors (SPMs). The displacement sensor is designed with a particular arrangement of a compact array of SPMs with specially designed shutter assembly and signal processing to significantly reduce sensitivity to ambient light, input voltage variation, circuit electronics drift, etc. The sensor principle and the characteri...

  7. An advanced vision-based system for real-time displacement measurement of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Han; Ho, Hoai-Nam; Shinozuka, Masanobu; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2012-12-01

    This paper introduces an advanced vision-based system for dynamic real-time displacement measurement of high-rise buildings using a partitioning approach. The partitioning method is based on the successive estimation of relative displacements and rotational angles at several floors using a multiple vision-based displacement measurement system. In this study, two significant improvements were made to realize the partitioning method: (1) time synchronization, (2) real-time dynamic measurement. Displacement data and time synchronization information are wirelessly transferred via a network using the TCP/IP protocol. The time synchronization process is periodically conducted by the master system to guarantee the system time at the master and slave systems are synchronized. The slave system is capable of dynamic real-time measurement and it is possible to economically expand measurement points at slave levels using commercial devices. To verify the accuracy and feasibility of the synchronized multi-point vision-based system and partitioning approach, many laboratory tests were carried out on a three-story steel frame model. Furthermore, several tests were conducted on a five-story steel frame tower equipped with a hybrid mass damper to experimentally confirm the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  8. Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Riche R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their

  9. A dual-function ESPI system for the measurement of out-of-plane displacement and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, B.; Mohan, N. K.; Kothiyal, M. P.

    2006-06-01

    A dual-function ESPI system is developed for the measurement of out-of-plane displacement and its slope change. The proposed system is convenient and also efficient to switch over from an out-of-plane sensitive configuration to shearography. A difference-of-phase method with a five-step algorithm is used for speckle fringe analysis.

  10. Non-invasive perilymphatic pressure measurement in normal hearing subjects using the MMS-10 tympanic displacement analyser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosingh, HJ; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    The MMS-10 Tympanic Displacement Analyser (TDA) is a new device to measure the perilymphatic pressure of the human inner ear in a non-invasive way. In this study, the instrument was used in 50 normal hearing subjects (100 ears) in three different conditions: i) sitting upright and supine; ii) in the

  11. Inversion analysis on vertical radiocesium distribution in pond sediment from γ-ray count measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Minami, Kimitaka; Kawamoto, Tohru; Kanai, Ramon; Ishikawa, Kohei; Kamimura, Ryuichi

    2017-09-01

    Evaluation of vertical distribution of radiocesium in bottom sediment by measuring vertical γ-ray count profile was discussed. A stable inversion formula was derived based on the maximum entropy method. Efficiency of the formula was confirmed by using a low-cost apparatus composed of an array of PIN photodiodes and a single board computer with real-time inversion code. In-door experiment by using five model sediment disks showed good reproducibility of vertical radiocesium profile. On-site experiment was also carried out at a pond in Fukushima to confirm the efficiency. It was suggested that combination of the simple apparatus and MEM inversion formula gave reasonable estimates on vertical radiocesium distribution in bottom sediment of 1 kBq/kg-wet level within about 10 min. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of the force–displacement response of in vivo human skin under a rich set of deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Flynn, Cormac

    2011-06-01

    The non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic properties of human skin vary according to location on the body, age, and individual. The measurement of skin\\'s mechanical properties is important in several fields including medicine, cosmetics, and forensics. In this study, a novel force-sensitive micro-robot applied a rich set of three-dimensional deformations to the skin surface of different areas of the arms of 20 volunteers. The force-displacement response of each area in different directions was measured. All tested areas exhibited a non-linear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic force-displacement response. There was a wide quantitative variation in the stiffness of the response. For the right anterior forearm, the ratio of the maximum probe reaction force to maximum probe displacement ranged from 0.44Nmm-1 to 1.45Nmm-1. All volunteers exhibited similar qualitative anisotropic characteristics. For the anterior right forearm, the stiffest force-displacement response was when the probe displaced along the longitudinal axis of the forearm. The response of the anterior left forearm was stiffest in a direction 20° to the longitudinal axis of the forearm. The posterior upper arm was stiffest in a direction 90° to the longitudinal axis of the arm. The averaged posterior upper arm response was less stiff than the averaged anterior forearm response. The maximum probe force at 1.3mm probe displacement was 0.69N for the posterior upper arm and 1.1N for the right anterior forearm. The average energy loss during the loading-unloading cycle ranged from 11.9% to 34.2%. This data will be very useful for studying the non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic behaviour of skin and also for generating material parameters for appropriate constitutive models. © 2011 IPEM.

  13. Methane flux, vertical gradient and mixing ratio measurements in a tropical forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querino, C.A.S.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/191522236; Vigano, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831956; Holzinger, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337989338; Moura, V.; Gatti, L. V.; Martinewski, A.; Manzi, A.O.; de Araújo, A.C.; Röckmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838233

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of CH4 mixing ratio, vertical gradients and turbulent fluxes were carried out in a tropical forest (Reserva Biológica Cuieiras), about 60 km north of Manaus, Brazil. The methane mixing ratio and flux measurements were performed at a height of 53 m (canopy height 35 m). In addition,

  14. The contribution of satellite SAR-derived displacement measurements in landslide risk management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspini, Federico; Bardi, Federica; Bianchini, Silvia; Ciampalini, Andrea; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Farina, Paolo; Ferrigno, Federica; Solari, Lorenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Landslides are common phenomena that occur worldwide and are a main cause of loss of life and damage to property. The hazards associated with landslides are a challenging concern in many countries, including Italy. With 13% of the territory prone to landslides, Italy is one of the European countries with the highest landslide hazard, and on a worldwide scale, it is second only to Japan among the technologically advanced countries. Over the last 15 years, an increasing number of applications have aimed to demonstrate the applicability of images captured by space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors in slope instability investigations. InSAR (SAR Interferometry) is currently one of the most exploited techniques for the assessment of ground displacements, and it is becoming a consolidated tool for Civil Protection institutions in addressing landslide risk. We present a subset of the results obtained in Italy within the framework of SAR-based programmes and applications intended to test the potential application of C- and X-band satellite interferometry during different Civil Protection activities (namely, prevention, prevision, emergency response and post-emergency phases) performed to manage landslide risk. In all phases, different benefits can be derived from the use of SAR-based measurements, which were demonstrated to be effective in the field of landslide analysis. Analysis of satellite-SAR data is demonstrated to play a major role in the investigation of landslide-related events at different stages, including detection, mapping, monitoring, characterization and prediction. Interferometric approaches are widely consolidated for analysis of slow-moving slope deformations in a variety of environments, and exploitation of the amplitude data in SAR images is a somewhat natural complement for rapid-moving landslides. In addition, we discuss the limitations that still exist and must be overcome in the coming years to manage the transition of satellite SAR

  15. Measurement of Instantaneous Angular Displacement Fluctuation and its applications on gearbox fault detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Xining; Wu, Tingting

    2018-02-08

    Recently, Instantaneous Angular Speed (IAS) measurement is successfully established and prevalently applied to a wide variety of machines due to the hypothesis that the speed fluctuation of rotating machinery carries plentiful dynamic responses. Nevertheless, exploration and application based on angular signal are still insufficient. Under the same hypothesis, in this paper, we introduced an extended algorithm named Instantaneous Angular Phase Demodulation (IAPD), together with the selection of optimal sideband family to extract the Instantaneous Angular Displacement Fluctuation (IADF) signal. In order to evaluate the performance of IADF signal, an effective approach was demonstrated using IADF signal to address the fault detection and diagnosis issue. After extracting the IADF signal, a much effective method was developed to deal with the large amount of data generated during the signal collection process. Then, we used the well-developed techniques, i.e., empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and envelope analysis, to undertake the signal de-noising and feature extraction task. The effectiveness and capability of the IADF signal were evaluated by two kinds of gearboxes under differentconditions in practice. In particular, the prevalent IAS signal and vibration signal were also involved and testified by the proposed procedure. Experimental results demonstrated that by means of the IADF signal, the combination of EMD and envelope analysis not only provided accurate identification results with a higher signal-to-noise ratio, but was also capable of revealing the fault characteristics significantly and effectively. In contrast, although the IAS signal had the potential ability to diagnose the serious fault, it failed for the slight crack case. Moreover, the same procedure even its improvements, i.e., ensemble empirical mode decomposition and local mean decomposition, all failed to recognize the faults in terms of vibration signals. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by

  16. Nasal cavity dimensions in guinea pig and rat measured by acoustic rhinometry and fluid-displacement method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straszek, Sune; Pedersen, O.F.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure nasal passageway dimensions in guinea pigs and rats by use of acoustic rhinometry (AR) and by a previously described fluid-displacement method (FDM) (Straszek SP, Taagehoej F, Graff S, and Pedersen OF. J Appl Physiol 95: 635-642, 2003) to investigate...... the potential of AR in pharmacological research with these animals. We measured the area-distance relationships by AR of nasal cavities postmortem in five guinea pigs (Duncan Hartley, 400 g) and five rats (Wistar, 250 g) by using custom-made equipment scaled for the purpose. Nosepieces were made from plastic...... pipette tips and either inserted into or glued onto the nostrils. We used liquid perfluorocarbon in the fluid-displacement study, and it was carried out subsequent to the acoustic measurements. We found for guinea pigs that AR measured a mean volume of 98 mm(3) (95-100 mm(3)) (mean and 95% confidence...

  17. Improved vertical optical fiber borehole strainmeter design for measuring Earth strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Scott; Wyatt, Frank K.; Zumberge, Mark A.; Hatfield, William

    2015-11-01

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. A new 250 m, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the design and deployment at the Piñon Flat Observatory are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 ɛ2/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio for local near surface material of 0.25 that is consistent with previous results.

  18. Synchronous triple-optical-path digital speckle pattern interferometry with fast discrete curvelet transform for measuring three-dimensional displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guoqing; Wang, Kaifu; Wang, Yanfang; She, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established and widely used optical measurement technique for obtaining qualitative as well as quantitative measurements of objects deformation. The simultaneous measurement of an object's surface displacements in three dimensions using DSPI is of great interest. This paper presents a triple-optical-path DSPI based method for the simultaneous and independent measurement of three-dimensional (3D) displacement fields. In the proposed method, in-plane speckle interferometers with dual-observation geometry and an out-of-plane interferometer are optimally combined to construct an integrated triple-optical-path DSPI system employing the phase shift technique, which uses only a single laser source and three cameras. These cameras are placed along a single line to synchronously capture real-time visible speckle fringe patterns in three dimensions. In addition, a pre-filtering method based on the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) is utilized for denoising the obtained wrapped phase patterns to improve measurement accuracy. Finally, the simultaneous measurement of the 3D displacement fields of a simple beam and a composite laminated plate respectively subjected to three-point and single-point bend loading are investigated to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Improved accuracy of capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement with angular-to-linear displacement conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinran; Zhu, Fan; Wang, Chao; Shi, Jian; Qi, Xue; Yu, Yang; Yuan, Feng; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement (CSMAM) method that uses an angular-to-linear displacement conversion to achieve high accuracy. The principal and secondary error components of CSMAMs are modeled and analyzed to reveal their impacts on the measurement accuracy. The theoretical accuracies of six types of commonly used CSMAMs are analyzed to determine the optimum configuration of capacitive sensors for 1D and 2D micro-angle measurements. An angular-to-linear displacement conversion method with a linear motional stage and a hemisphere decoupler is used to eliminate the principal error of CSMAM. Experimental results indicate that the optimized CSMAM can achieve accuracies of 0.157 arc sec and 0.052 arc sec in the ranges of ±900 arc sec and ±300 arc sec, respectively, in the case that the effective length of the rotation arm is 100 mm and the linear displacement measurement accuracy of the capacitive sensor is 2 nm. These results can be used as a reference to further improve CSMAM designs and achieve high accuracy in a large measurement range, for use in a wide range of precision engineering applications including angle metrology, micro- and nano-radian angle generators, beam steering mechanisms, and high-performance precision stages.

  20. Improved accuracy of capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement with angular-to-linear displacement conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinran; Zhu, Fan; Wang, Chao; Shi, Jian; Qi, Xue; Yu, Yang; Yuan, Feng; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement (CSMAM) method that uses an angular-to-linear displacement conversion to achieve high accuracy. The principal and secondary error components of CSMAMs are modeled and analyzed to reveal their impacts on the measurement accuracy. The theoretical accuracies of six types of commonly used CSMAMs are analyzed to determine the optimum configuration of capacitive sensors for 1D and 2D micro-angle measurements. An angular-to-linear displacement conversion method with a linear motional stage and a hemisphere decoupler is used to eliminate the principal error of CSMAM. Experimental results indicate that the optimized CSMAM can achieve accuracies of 0.157 arc sec and 0.052 arc sec in the ranges of ±900 arc sec and ±300 arc sec, respectively, in the case that the effective length of the rotation arm is 100 mm and the linear displacement measurement accuracy of the capacitive sensor is 2 nm. These results can be used as a reference to further improve CSMAM designs and achieve high accuracy in a large measurement range, for use in a wide range of precision engineering applications including angle metrology, micro- and nano-radian angle generators, beam steering mechanisms, and high-performance precision stages.

  1. Full-field displacement and strain measurement of small complex bony structures with digital speckle pattern interferometry and shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soons, Joris; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a simple digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) and shearography setup to measure the displacement and the corresponding strains of small complex bony structures. We choose both optical techniques because we want to obtain very small deformations (+/- 20 μm) of small objects (+/- 1cm). Furthermore full field and in situ measurements are preferred. We first use a Michelson DSPI arrangement with phase shifting. In this way we can obtain the out-of-plane displacements precisely. Second, shearography is introduced to measure the derivative of the out-ofplane displacement. In this way some intrinsic disadvantages of DSPI can be overcome. We have developed these setups to measure the out-of-plane deformations of (small) bird beaks when realistic external forces are applied. In this way, we have a full field validation measurement to which we can compare the outcome of realistic finite element models. The aim is to determine whether the shape, and not only the size, of the bird beaks are optimized to deal with the biting forces that a species encounters. This quantitative analysis will help biologists to investigate if beak morphology is adapted to feeding habits. Applying the method to the famous evolution model of the Darwin's finches will provide scientific proof of functional evolution. In this paper we will present both the DSPI and shearography setup, a comparison of the performance of both techniques on a simple deflection of a cantilever beam and the first results obtained on loaded bird beaks.

  2. Assessment of Volume Measurement of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema by Three Methods: Circumference Measurement, Water Displacement, and Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Caroline; Zerahn, B.; Hendel, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Following treatment for breast cancer 12%-60% develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). There are several ways of assessing BCRL. Circumference measurement (CM) and water displacement (WD) for volume measurements (VM) are frequently used methods in practice and research...

  3. 3D dynamic displacement-field measurement for structural health monitoring using inexpensive RGB-D based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbarr, Mohamed; Chen, Yulu Luke; Jahanshahi, Mohammad R.; Masri, Sami F.; Shen, Wei-Men; Qidwai, Uvais A.

    2017-12-01

    The advent of inexpensive digital cameras with depth sensing capabilities (RGB-D cameras) has opened the door to numerous useful applications that need quantitative measures of dynamic fields whose simultaneous time history quantification (at many points as dictated by the resolution of the camera) provides capabilities that were previously accessible only through expensive sensors (e.g., laser scanners). This paper presents a comprehensive experimental and computational study to evaluate the performance envelope of a representative RGB-D sensor (the first generation of Kinect sensor) with the aim of assessing its suitability for the class of problems encountered in the structural dynamics field, where reasonably accurate information of evolving displacement fields (as opposed to few discrete locations) that have simultaneous dynamic planar translational motion with significant rotational (torsional) components. This study investigated the influence of key system parameters of concern in selecting an appropriate sensor for such structural dynamic applications, such as amplitude range, spectral content of the dynamic displacements, location and orientation of sensors relative to target structure, fusing of measurements from multiple sensors, sensor noise effects, rolling-shutter effects, etc. The calibration results show that if the observed displacement field generates discrete (pixel) sensor measurements with sufficient resolution (observed displacements more than 10 mm) beyond the sensor noise floor, then the subject sensors can typically provide reasonable accuracy for transnational motion (about 5%) when the frequency range of the evolving field is within about 10 Hz. However, the expected error for torsional measurements is around 6% for static motion and 10% for dynamic rotation for measurements greater than 5°.

  4. Global carbon monoxide vertical distributions from spaceborne high-resolution FTIR nadir measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Barret

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first global distributions of CO vertical profiles retrieved from a thermal infrared FTS working in the nadir geometry. It is based on the exploitation of the high resolution and high quality spectra measured by the Interferometric Monitor of Greenhouse gases (IMG which flew onboard the Japanese ADEOS platform in 1996-1997. The retrievals are performed with an algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM and are characterized in terms of vertical sensitivity and error budget. It is found that most of the IMG measurements contain between 1.5 and 2.2 independent pieces of information about the vertical distribution of CO from the lower troposphere to the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS. The retrievals are validated against coincident NOAA/CMDL in situ surface measurements and NDSC/FTIR total columns measurements. The retrieved global distributions of CO are also found to be in good agreement with the distributions modeled by the GEOS-CHEM 3D CTM, highlighting the ability of IMG to capture the horizontal as well as the vertical structure of the CO distributions.

  5. Measurement and Calculation of Vertical Temperature Gradients in Rooms with Convective Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overby, H.

    The paper deals with experimental and theoretical examinations of the vertical temperature gradient in rooms with convective flows under transient conditions. The measurements are carried out in a laboratory test room of three different sizes. A small room (7.25 m2) with a normal room height of 2...

  6. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  7. Using smartphones' pressure sensors to measure vertical velocities in elevators, stairways and drones

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    By means of smartphones' pressure sensors we measure vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairways and flying unmanned aerial vehicles (or \\textit{drones}). The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related, thanks to the hydrostatic approximation, to the altitude of the device. From the altitude values, the vertical velocity is accordingly derived. The approximation considered is valid in the first hundreds meters of the inner layers of the atmosphere. Simultaneously to the pressure, the acceleration values, reported by the buit-in accelerometers, are also recorded. Integrating numerically the acceleration, vertical velocity and altitude are also obtained. We show that data obtained with the pressure sensor is considerable less noisy than that obtained with the accelerometer in the experiments proposed here. Accumulatioin of errors are also evident in the numerical integration of the acceleration values. The comparison with reference values taken from the architectural plans ...

  8. A relaxed eddy accumulation system for measuring vertical fluxes of nitrous acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system combined with a nitrous acid (HONO analyzer was developed to measure atmospheric HONO vertical fluxes. The system consists of three major components: (1 a fast-response sonic anemometer measuring both vertical wind velocity and air temperature, (2 a fast-response controlling unit separating air motions into updraft and downdraft samplers by the sign of vertical wind velocity, and (3 a highly sensitive HONO analyzer based on aqueous long path absorption photometry that measures HONO concentrations in the updrafts and downdrafts. A dynamic velocity threshold (±0.5σw, where σw is a standard deviation of the vertical wind velocity was used for valve switching determined by the running means and standard deviations of the vertical wind velocity. Using measured temperature as a tracer and the average values from two field deployments, the flux proportionality coefficient, β, was determined to be 0.42 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the theoretical estimation. The REA system was deployed in two ground-based field studies. In the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex study in Bakersfield, California in summer 2010, measured HONO fluxes appeared to be upward during the day and were close to zero at night. The upward HONO flux was highly correlated to the product of NO2 and solar radiation. During the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX 2009 at Blodgett Forest, California in July 2009, the overall HONO fluxes were small in magnitude and were close to zero. Causes for the different HONO fluxes in the two different environments are briefly discussed.

  9. Computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target positions on EPID cine images in stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Anai, Shigeo; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Terashima, Hiromi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target position on electronic portal imaging device (EPID) cine images in a treatment without implanted markers. Our proposed method was based on a template matching technique with cross-correlation coefficient between a reference portal (RP) image and each consecutive portal (CP) image acquired by the EPID. EPID images with 512×384 pixels (pixel size:0.56 mm) were acquired in a cine mode at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame/sec by using an energy of 4, 6, or 10MV on linear accelerators. The displacement vector of the target on each cine image was determined from the position in which took the maximum cross-correlation value between the RP image and each CP image. We applied our method to EPID cine images of a lung phantom with a tumor model simulating respiratory motion, and 5 cases with a non-small cell lung cancer and one case of metastasis. For validation of our proposed method, displacement vectors of a target position calculated by our method were compared with those determined manually by two radiation oncologists. As a result, for lung phantom images, target displacements by our method correlated well with those by the oncologists (r=0.972 - 0.994). Correlation values for 4 cases ranged from 0.854 to 0.991, but the values for the other two cases were 0.609 and 0.644. This preliminary result suggested that our method may be useful for monitoring of displacement vectors of target positions without implanted markers in stereotactic radiotherapy.

  10. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF, enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02–i0.017(±0.003 at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  11. A measurement system for vertical seawater profiles close to the air–sea interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Sims

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a near-surface ocean profiler, which has been designed to precisely measure vertical gradients in the top 10 m of the ocean. Variations in the depth of seawater collection are minimized when using the profiler compared to conventional CTD/rosette deployments. The profiler consists of a remotely operated winch mounted on a tethered yet free-floating buoy, which is used to raise and lower a small frame housing sensors and inlet tubing. Seawater at the inlet depth is pumped back to the ship for analysis. The profiler can be used to make continuous vertical profiles or to target a series of discrete depths. The profiler has been successfully deployed during wind speeds up to 10 m s−1 and significant wave heights up to 2 m. We demonstrate the potential of the profiler by presenting measured vertical profiles of the trace gases carbon dioxide and dimethylsulfide. Trace gas measurements use an efficient microporous membrane equilibrator to minimize the system response time. The example profiles show vertical gradients in the upper 5 m for temperature, carbon dioxide and dimethylsulfide of 0.15 °C, 4 µatm and 0.4 nM respectively.

  12. Edge detection applied to Cassini images reveals no measurable displacement of Ontario Lacus' margin between 2005 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Thomas; Bourgeois, Olivier; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Phillip D.

    2012-07-01

    Ontario Lacus is thus far the largest flat-floored topographic depression of Titan's southern hemisphere interpreted as a permanent or ephemeral lake. From 2005 to 2010, it was imaged several times and at various wavelengths by ISS, VIMS and RADAR instruments onboard Cassini's spacecraft. We analyze the position and uncertainty of Ontario Lacus' margin in all these images using an edge detection method based on image derivation. We find that, given the range of uncertainties in contour locations derived from images, no measurable displacement of Ontario Lacus' margin can be detected between 2005 and 2010 at the actual image spatial resolutions. The discrepancy between this result and previous ones is attributable to differences in (1) the basics behind the methods used, (2) the actual spatial resolutions and contrasts of the available images due to differential atmospheric scattering effects at different wavelengths, and (3) the geomorphological interpretation of contours derived from images acquired at different wavelengths. This lack of measurable displacement in the images suggests that the imaged contour corresponds either (1) to the border of a surface liquid body, provided that potential changes in its extent over five terrestrial years were not sufficiently large to be measured, or (2) to the stationary topographic border between Ontario Lacus' depression and the surrounding alluvial plain. Potential displacements of Ontario Lacus' margin between 2005 and 2010 are thus below the actual resolution of currently available images or have to be sought for within the extent of the topographic depression rather than along its borders.

  13. Air-displacement plethysmography for the measurement of body composition in children aged 6-48 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendale, Ryan P; Bartok, Cynthia J

    2012-03-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is an age-appropriate method for measuring relative fat mass (%FM) in children; however, the accuracy of this method has not been evaluated in children aged 5 y or younger. Mean %FM values measured by ADP (17.9 ± 8.0%) and by total body water (TBW) (23.7 ± 6.3%) were significantly different (P BOD POD; Life Measurement, Concord, CA) by comparing %FM results from ADP with those obtained from TBW by deuterium (D(2)O) dilution (reference method) in 72 children aged 6-48 mo.

  14. Passive Smoking in a Displacement Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The aim of this research is to see if the displacement ventilation principle can protect a person from exposure to passive tobacco smoking. This is done by full-scale experiments with two breathing thermal manikins, smoke visualisations, and tracer gas measurements. In some situations, exhaled...... smoke will stratify in a certain height due to the vertical temperature gradient. This horizontal layer of exhaled tobacco smoke may lead to exposure. In other situations, the smoke is mixed into the upper zone, and the passive smoker is protected to some extent by the displacement principle...

  15. Programmable color liquid-crystal television spatial light modulator: transmittance properties and application to speckle-correlation displacement measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, J; Bates, B

    2000-01-10

    Drive electronics developed for a color liquid-crystal television (LCTV) display enable data to be written onto individual pixels. Display transmittance characteristics obtained with the new and the original TV drive electronics are compared. The enhanced performance obtained through this development has some potential for spatial light modulator applications in color, optical information processing based on the low-cost LCTV. As an example, we describe a novel, to our knowledge, speckle metrology technique used to display fringes and to output correlation peaks resulting from in-plane object displacement. This requires only a single LC display to encode, simultaneously in three pixel colors, speckle and fringe patterns for real-time measurements. Relative merits of this technique, including displacement range and temporal resolution, are discussed.

  16. Comparisons of Soft Tissue Thickness Measurements in Adult Patients With Various Vertical Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Seyhan Cezairli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purposes of this study were to evaluate to study soft tissue facial profile among the different vertical patterns using the Holdaway analysis and the soft tissue thickness measurements. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 90 patients divided into 3 groups: low angle group (30 patients; mean age, 20.38±3.76 years, normal angle group (30 patients; mean age, 19.36±2.83 years and high angle group (30 patients; mean age, 19.44±2.14 years. The study sample, comprised a total of 90 patients (54 women and 36 men divided into low-angle, normal-angle and high angle groups based on vertical growth pattern using the SN/GoGn angle (high-angle group >37°; low-angle group <27°; and control group or normal angle group 27-37°. Facial soft-tissue thickness and Holdaway measurements were analyzed on each radiograph with Image J programme. One-way analysis of variance and post-hoc test (Tukey were used to compare Holdaway measurements and soft tissue thicknesses among the three groups. Results: Significant differences among vertical patterns were observed for the ‘gnathion’, ‘menton’, ‘stomion’ and ‘inferior sulcus to H line’ when both genders were combined. These measurements were thinner in the high-angle group. Significant differences among vertical patterns were observed for ‘gnathion’ and ‘lower lip to H line’ in women; for ‘stomion’ and ‘nose prominence’ in men when examined separately. Conclusion: Facial soft tissue measurements except some for in high angle group were thinner than in low angle group. All soft tissue measurements were greater except for gnathion in low angle group in men than in women.

  17. Accuracy of Computerized Vertical Measurements on Digital Orthopantomographs: Posterior Mandibular Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Assaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Orthopantomographs are commonly used for diagnosis in clinical dentistry. Although the manufacturers claim a constant magnification effect, the reliability of measuring dimensions on the panoramic radiographs is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of measuring vertical dimensions in the posterior mandibular area on digital orthopantomographs. Materials and Methods: A retrospective survey of 20 orthopantomographs with unrestored implants (only with cover screw in the mandibular posterior region (molars and premolars was conducted. All radiographs were taken using the same machine by skilled technicians. Two examiners were asked to measure the vertical dimension of the implants seen on the radiographs viewed using two differently sized display screens. Inter-examiner and intra-examiner reliability tests were performed. Differences between the measured length and the actual length using each screen type were compared. Results: High coefficients of reliability were observed on intra- and inter-examiner correlation. The overall reliability of measuring the vertical dimensions of implants between both examiners for the large screen and the small screen were 97.4% (Cronbach′s alpha 0.993 and 94.0% (Cronbach′s alpha 0.984, respectively. There were no significant differences between the errors seen with either the large screen or the small screen, when each of them was compared to the original length (P = 0.146. Conclusion: This study shows that vertical dimensions in the posterior mandibular region (molar and premolars can be reliably measured on an orthopantomograph using a calibrated machine and special software.

  18. Articular disc displacement in mandibular asymmetry patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boonsiva Buranastidporn; Hisano, Masataka; Soma, Kunimichi

    2004-01-01

    ...) inmandibular asymmetry have not been clearlydefined. This study examines the degree anddirection of disc displacement and their relationshipwith vertical asymmetry in terms of both clinicaland biomechanical aspects...

  19. Vertical Position and Current Profile Measurements by Faraday-effect Polarimetry On EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weixing; Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X.; Brower, D. L.; Qian, J. P.; Zou, Z. Y.; Lian, H.; Wang, S. X.; Luo, Z. P.; Xiao, B. J.; Ucla Team; Asipp Team

    2017-10-01

    A primary goal for ITER and prospective fusion power reactors is to achieve controlled long-pulse/steady-state burning plasmas. For elongated divertor plasmas, both the vertical position and current profile have to be precisely controlled to optimize performance and prevent disruptions. An eleven-channel laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system has been developed for measuring the internal magnetic field in the EAST tokamak and can be used to obtain the plasma current profile and vertical position. Current profiles are determined from equilibrium reconstruction including internal magnetic field measurements as internal constraints. Horizontally-viewing chords at/near the mid-plane allow us to determine plasma vertical position non-inductively with subcentimeter spatial resolution and time response up to 1 s. The polarimeter-based position measurement, which does not require equilibrium reconstruction, is benchmarked against conventional flux loop measurements and can be exploited for feedback control. Work supported by US DOE through Grants No. DE-FG02-01ER54615 and No. DC-SC0010469.

  20. Displacement Ventilation in a Room with Low-Level Diffusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Ventilation systems with vertical displacement flow have been used in industrial areas with high thermal loads for many years. Quite resently the vertical displacement flow systems have grown popular as comfort ventilation in rooms with thermal loads e.g. offices.......Ventilation systems with vertical displacement flow have been used in industrial areas with high thermal loads for many years. Quite resently the vertical displacement flow systems have grown popular as comfort ventilation in rooms with thermal loads e.g. offices....

  1. Vertical Crustal Motion Derived from Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges, and Comparisons with DORIS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2010-01-01

    A somewhat unorthodox method for determining vertical crustal motion at a tide-gauge location is to difference the sea level time series with an equivalent time series determined from satellite altimetry, To the extent that both instruments measure an identical ocean signal, the difference will be dominated by vertical land motion at the gauge. We revisit this technique by analyzing sea level signals at 28 tide gauges that are colocated with DORIS geodetic stations. Comparisons of altimeter-gauge vertical rates with DORIS rates yield a median difference of 1.8 mm/yr and a weighted root-mean-square difference of2.7 mm/yr. The latter suggests that our uncertainty estimates, which are primarily based on an assumed AR(l) noise process in all time series, underestimates the true errors. Several sources of additional error are discussed, including possible scale errors in the terrestrial reference frame to which altimeter-gauge rates are mostly insensitive, One of our stations, Male, Maldives, which has been the subject of some uninformed arguments about sea-level rise, is found to have almost no vertical motion, and thus is vulnerable to rising sea levels. Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of COSPAR.

  2. Measuring vertical oxygen profiles in the hyporheic zone using planar optodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-04-01

    On of the key parameters, controlling biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone (HZ) is the distribution of oxygen. A reliable measurement of the vertical oxygen distribution is an important tool to understand the dynamic fluctuations of the aerobic zone within the HZ. With repeated measurements of continuous profiles, mixing of surface water and groundwater as well as the consumption of oxygen can be evaluated. We present a novel approach for the in situ measurements of vertical oxygen distribution in the riverbed using a planar optode. The luminescence based optode measurement enables a non invasive measurement without consumption of oxygen, no creation of preferential flow paths and only minimal disturbance of the flow field. Possible atmospheric contamination by pumping pore water into a vessel can be avoided and the readings are independent of flow velocity. A self manufactured planar optode is wrapped around an acrylic tube and installed in the riverbed. The measurement is performed by vertically moving a profiler-piston inside the acrylic tube. The piston holds a robust polymer optical fibre which emits a modulated light signal through the acrylic glass to the optode-foil and transmits the induced luminescence signal back to a commercially available trace oxygen meter. Temperature compensation is accomplished using a depth-oriented temperature probe nearby and processing the raw data within a Matlab script. Robust and unbiased oxygen profiles are obtained by averaging multiple consecutive measurements. To ensure a constant velocity of the profiler for replicating the exact measuring depths, an electric motor device is used. First results at our test site show a variable oxygen profile down to 40 cm depth which is strongly influenced by stream level and upwelling groundwater conditions. The measured oxygen profiles will serve as input parameter for a 3D solute transport and chemical reaction subsurface model of the HZ.

  3. The seating mechanics of head-neck modular tapers in vitro: Load-displacement measurements, moisture, and rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Eric S; Shenoy, Aarti A; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2017-09-08

    The mechanically-assisted crevice corrosion performance of head-neck modular tapers is a significant concern in orthopedic biomaterials. Fretting crevice corrosion processes in modular tapers are thought to be influenced by a wide array of factors including seating mechanics of the junction, hence there is a need for in vitro test methods that can assess their performance. This study presented a test method to directly measure the load-displacement seating mechanics of modular tapers and used this method to compare the seating mechanics for different tapers, moisture, seating loads and seating rates. Seating mechanics were explored whereby the instantaneous load-displacement behavior of the head seating onto the neck is captured and used to define the mechanics of seating. Two distinct taper design/material combinations were assembled wet or dry using axially applied loads (500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 N) at two loading rates of 100 and 104  N/s (n = 5 for each condition) using a servohydraulic test frame. The results showed that pull-off strength scaled with seating load and ranged between 43-68% of seating load depending on sample and wetness. Tapers seated wet had higher pull-off strengths (2200 N +/- 300 N) than those seated dry (1800 N +/- 200 N, P mechanics (load-displacement plots) varied due to sample type and due to wetness with differences in seating energy, seating stiffness and seating displacement. These results show the detailed mechanics of seating during assembly and provide significant insight into the complex interplay of factors associated with even "ideal" seating (axial, quasistatic) loading. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomechanics of the mandible part I: measurement of mandibular functional deformation using custom-fabricated displacement transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Helenius, Miia; Lindqvist, Christian; Kelleway, John

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure corporal approximation, dorsoventral shear, and corporal rotation in edentulous subjects treated with dental implants, during normal mandibular movements. Three patterns of jaw deformation (corporal approximation [CA], corporal rotation [CR], and dorsoventral [DV] shear) were measured using custom-fabricated displacement transducers in 12 edentulous subjects who had been treated with dental implants. Measurements were made in real time using a multichannel analogue/digital converter and a personal computer for data storage and analysis. Corporal approximation was measured as the linear change in the orientation of the 2 implants in the horizontal plane. Corporal rotation was recorded as a relative rotation of the right and left mandibular bodies projected into the frontal plane, and dorsoventral shear as the relative rotation of the 2 implants projected onto the median sagittal plane. All 3 patterns of mandibular deformation occurred concurrently and immediately on commencement of jaw movement. Different jaw movements produced different patterns of mandibular deformation. The highest values of jaw deformation were recorded during protrusion. CA ranged between 11.0 microm and 57.8 microm. Corporal rotation and DV shear ranged between 0.4 degrees and 2.8 degrees . This clinical study shows and measures 3 different and concurrent patterns of jaw deformation, during normal mandibular movements, using custom fabricated displacement transducers. The transducers may have a potential for routine clinical applications.

  5. Measurement of the components of plastic displacement gradients in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster Nielsen, Søren; Beckmann, F.; Godiksen, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    A method for non-destructive characterization of plastic deformation in bulk materials is presented. The method is based on X-ray absorption microtomography investigations using X-rays from a synchrotron source. The method can be applied to materials that contain marker particles, which have...... are then used to identify local displacement gradient components, from which the local 3D plastic strain tensor can be determined. This allows us to map the strain components as a function of location inside a deforming metallic solid....... of the maker particles is 1-2 mum with the present spatial resolution at HASYLAB. The position (x,y,z) of all the detected marker particles within 1 mm(3) was determined as function of strain. The sample was deformed in stepwise compression along the axis of the cylinder. A tomographic scan was performed after...

  6. Direct measurements of the axial displacement and evolving size of optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, K. J.; Reid, J. P.; Hanford, K. L.; Hudson, A. J.; Mitchem, L.

    2007-08-01

    The axial displacement of optically tweezed liquid aerosol droplets has been studied directly through the application of side imaging at 90° to the trapping laser beam. In conjunction with imaging in the plane of the optical trap and cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS), the optical forces experienced by a trapped aerosol have been interrogated. By varying the power of the trapping laser and observing changes in the axial position of a trapped particle it has been possible to examine the fine balance between the gradient and scattering forces, a key parameter in optical manipulation. Clear differences observed in sizing trapped particles from bright field microscopy and CERS have been reconciled. As a consequence, a novel technique for probing the evolving size of a single aerosol particle is proposed.

  7. Serial non-invasive measurements of dermal carotenoid concentrations in dairy cows following recovery from abomasal displacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Klein

    Full Text Available Maintaining the health of farm animals forms the basis for a sustainable and profitable production of food from animal origin. Recently, the effects of carotenoids on the oxidative status as well as on reproductive and immune functions in cattle have been demonstrated. The present study aimed at investigating dermal carotenoid levels in cattle recovering from abomasal displacement. For this purpose, serial in vivo measurements were undertaken using a miniaturized scanner system that relies on reflection spectroscopy (Opsolution GmbH, Kassel, Germany. In a first trial, repeated measurements of dermal carotenoid concentrations were performed on the udder skin of healthy non-lactating cattle (n = 6 for one month in weekly intervals. In a second trial, in vivo dermal carotenoid concentrations were determined in intervals in 23 cows following surgical treatment of abomasal displacement. The results show that dermal carotenoid concentrations, determined on a weekly basis over a period of one month, showed variations of up to 18% in the healthy individuals kept under constant conditions with respect to housing and nutrition. Repeated measurements during the recovery period following surgical treatment of abomasal displacement resulted in an increase in dermal carotenoid concentrations in 18 of 20 animals with a favourable outcome when compared with results obtained within 12 hours following surgery. The mean increase in dermal carotenoid concentrations in subsequent measurements was 53 ± 44%, whereas levels decreased (mean 31 ± 27% in cattle with a fatal outcome.These results indicate potential applications for reflection spectroscopy for non-invasive early detection of changes in the dermal carotenoid concentrations as a reflection of the antioxidant status in an animal.

  8. Search for long-lived, massive particles in events with displaced vertices and missing transverse momentum in 13 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for long-lived, massive particles, as generically predicted by many theories beyond the Standard Model, is presented. The search targets final states with large missing transverse momentum and at least one high-mass displaced vertex with five or more tracks, and used 32.7 fb$^{−1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observed yield is consistent with the expected background. The observed yield is consistent with the expected background. The results are used to extract 95% CL exclusion limits on the production of long-lived gluinos with masses up to 2.2 TeV in a simplified model inspired by Split Supersymmetry.

  9. Determination of vertical ozone distributions by spacecraft measurements using a limb-scan technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruga, T; Heath, D F

    1982-08-15

    A method for inference of vertical ozone profiles from measurements of the limb radiance resulting from scattered solar ultraviolet radiation is described in terms of a new inversion technique using multiple wavelengths. The inversion equation for this method is based on weighting functions which correspond to the sensitivity of the limb radiance to the relative increment of ozone density at each altitude, and the equation is solved by an iteration technique. In principle, the ozone vertical profile can be recovered from the inversion of a limb scan at a single wavelength. In practice, however, much more information of a higher accuracy over a wider height range can be obtained if one uses multiple wavelengths. Computer simulations were done for 280, 300, 320, and 340 nm. These results indicate the feasibility of determining ozone profiles on a global basis from satellite platforms over the altitude range of ~20-70 km with a vertical resolution of 1-2 km. The inferred profile error is about three to four times larger than measurement error in the 20-70-km altitude region. If one uses the wavelengths down to 260 nm, the accuracy of ozone profile of the highest altitude region may be improved. Ozone densities can be inferred above 70 km from the observations, although the errors are significantly larger.

  10. Velocity measurements in the wake of laboratory-scale vertical axis turbines and rotating circular cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2014-11-01

    We present experimental data to compare the wake characteristics of a laboratory-scale vertical-axis turbine with that of a rotating circular cylinder. The cylinder is constructed to have the same diameter and height as the turbine in order to provide a comparison that is independent of the tunnel boundary conditions. Both the turbine and cylinder are motor-driven to tip-speed ratios based on previous experiments. An analysis of the effect of the motor-driven flow is also presented. These measurements are relevant for exploring the complex structure of the vertical axis turbine wake relative to the canonical wake of a circular cylinder. 2D particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field in a two-dimensional plane normal to the axis of rotation. This velocity field is then used to compare time-averaged streamwise velocity, phase-averaged vorticity, and the velocity power spectrum in the wake of the two configurations. The results give insight into the extent to which solid cylinders could be used as a simplified model of the flow around vertical axis turbines in computational simulations, especially for turbine array optimization.

  11. Displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Mundt, Elisabeth

    The aim of this Guidebook is to give the state-of-the art knowledge of the displacement ventilation technology, and to simplify and improve the practical design procedure. The Guidebook discusses methods of total volume ventilation by mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation and it gives...... insights of the performance of the displacement ventilation. It also shows practical case studies in some typical applications and the latest research findings to create good local micro-climatic conditions....

  12. Scaling from Surface Satellite Measurements of PIC to Integrated Euphotic Estimates over the Global Ocean: Do Vertical Profiles of Coccolithophores Look Like Vertical Profiles of Chlorophyll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, W. M.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.; Lyczkowski, E.; Lubelczyk, L.

    2016-02-01

    We have participated in a number of cruises throughout the world ocean, observing the vertical and horizontal distributions of coccolithophores, their particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and associated optical properties. We will provide a synthesis of our observations in support of the NASA ocean color algorithm for PIC, highlighting how the integrated concentration of these plants can be interpreted from surface satellite measurements. Our work has shown consistencies in the vertical distributions of coccolithophores that allow us to extrapolate surface PIC observations (from the top optical depth observed by satellite) to the integrated euphotic zone on depth scales of 100m. Such results are a function of the degree of eutrophy and are critical for understanding the global consequences of this phytoplankton functional group, their associated biogeochemistry and implications to the alkalinity pump. We will end by showing whether the vertical distributions of PIC differ from those of diatom biogenic silica.

  13. An Approach of Electronic Subdividing Method for Measuring Straightness and Displacement of a Precision Linear Stage Simultaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Hsiu-An

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical encoders are commonly used in modern positioning systems. The accuracy and resolution of the optical encoders are always restricted by generated sinusoidal signals and the assembly technique. In this study, an electronic signal subdividing system is developed. This system is based on FPGA in combination with A/D and D/A converting circuits. Subdividing algorithm improves the segmenting signal amplitude method. Furthermore, we also construct a laser encoder for measuring straightness error and displacement of a linear stage simultaneously. The laser encoder consisting of the stainless steel bar and the sensor are developed for two-axis (X- and Z-axis position measurement. The two dimensional sinusoidal array on the stainless steel bar are machined by ultrasonic elliptical vibration cutting system. The stainless steel bar has a three dimensional micro-structured surface, which is a superposition of periodic sinusoidal waves in the X- and Z-directions with spatial wavelengths of 350 µm and amplitudes of 0.5 µm. The laser-based two-axis position sensor is used to detect local slope profiles of the grid surface, and the displacement and straightness error could be extracted from the X- and Z-axis sensing signal. The sensing signal is processed by FPGA subdividing system. In addition, the proposed subdividing method is verified by the performances and effects of measuring results.

  14. Comparison of Reduced Displacement Potentials from Spe Free Field Measurements: SPE-4PRIME Versus Previous Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, H. J.; Rougier, E.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, the U. S. Department of Energy has funded a series of chemical tests at the National Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) in Climax Stock granite as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of the generation and propagation of seismic energy from underground explosions in hard rock media. To date, four tests have been conducted in the same borehole with yields of 100, 1000, 900 and 100 kg at different depths of burials. The nominal scaled depths of burial are 938, 363, 376 and 1556 m/kt1/3 compared to standard containment practices of ~120 m/kt1/3. A quite dense array of free field accelerometers were installed around the borehole, both on and off shot depth. Acceleration data were corrected for shock-generated baseline-shifts, and free field ground velocity waveforms were obtained. This work concentrates on the qualitative analysis of the reduced displacement potentials and the explosion source spectra for the last shot of the series (SPE-4Prime) and the comparison of the obtained results against the previous events. Finally, the results obtained from the experimental data are compared to the Mueller-Murphy empirical explosion model both using the Heard and Ackerman and Denny and Johnson cavity radius scaling laws.

  15. A Target-Less Vision-Based Displacement Sensor Based on Image Convex Hull Optimization for Measuring the Dynamic Response of Building Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insub; Kim, JunHee; Kim, Donghyun

    2016-12-08

    Existing vision-based displacement sensors (VDSs) extract displacement data through changes in the movement of a target that is identified within the image using natural or artificial structure markers. A target-less vision-based displacement sensor (hereafter called "TVDS") is proposed. It can extract displacement data without targets, which then serve as feature points in the image of the structure. The TVDS can extract and track the feature points without the target in the image through image convex hull optimization, which is done to adjust the threshold values and to optimize them so that they can have the same convex hull in every image frame and so that the center of the convex hull is the feature point. In addition, the pixel coordinates of the feature point can be converted to physical coordinates through a scaling factor map calculated based on the distance, angle, and focal length between the camera and target. The accuracy of the proposed scaling factor map was verified through an experiment in which the diameter of a circular marker was estimated. A white-noise excitation test was conducted, and the reliability of the displacement data obtained from the TVDS was analyzed by comparing the displacement data of the structure measured with a laser displacement sensor (LDS). The dynamic characteristics of the structure, such as the mode shape and natural frequency, were extracted using the obtained displacement data, and were compared with the numerical analysis results. TVDS yielded highly reliable displacement data and highly accurate dynamic characteristics, such as the natural frequency and mode shape of the structure. As the proposed TVDS can easily extract the displacement data even without artificial or natural markers, it has the advantage of extracting displacement data from any portion of the structure in the image.

  16. A Target-Less Vision-Based Displacement Sensor Based on Image Convex Hull Optimization for Measuring the Dynamic Response of Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insub Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing vision-based displacement sensors (VDSs extract displacement data through changes in the movement of a target that is identified within the image using natural or artificial structure markers. A target-less vision-based displacement sensor (hereafter called “TVDS” is proposed. It can extract displacement data without targets, which then serve as feature points in the image of the structure. The TVDS can extract and track the feature points without the target in the image through image convex hull optimization, which is done to adjust the threshold values and to optimize them so that they can have the same convex hull in every image frame and so that the center of the convex hull is the feature point. In addition, the pixel coordinates of the feature point can be converted to physical coordinates through a scaling factor map calculated based on the distance, angle, and focal length between the camera and target. The accuracy of the proposed scaling factor map was verified through an experiment in which the diameter of a circular marker was estimated. A white-noise excitation test was conducted, and the reliability of the displacement data obtained from the TVDS was analyzed by comparing the displacement data of the structure measured with a laser displacement sensor (LDS. The dynamic characteristics of the structure, such as the mode shape and natural frequency, were extracted using the obtained displacement data, and were compared with the numerical analysis results. TVDS yielded highly reliable displacement data and highly accurate dynamic characteristics, such as the natural frequency and mode shape of the structure. As the proposed TVDS can easily extract the displacement data even without artificial or natural markers, it has the advantage of extracting displacement data from any portion of the structure in the image.

  17. A Target-Less Vision-Based Displacement Sensor Based on Image Convex Hull Optimization for Measuring the Dynamic Response of Building Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insub; Kim, JunHee; Kim, Donghyun

    2016-01-01

    Existing vision-based displacement sensors (VDSs) extract displacement data through changes in the movement of a target that is identified within the image using natural or artificial structure markers. A target-less vision-based displacement sensor (hereafter called “TVDS”) is proposed. It can extract displacement data without targets, which then serve as feature points in the image of the structure. The TVDS can extract and track the feature points without the target in the image through image convex hull optimization, which is done to adjust the threshold values and to optimize them so that they can have the same convex hull in every image frame and so that the center of the convex hull is the feature point. In addition, the pixel coordinates of the feature point can be converted to physical coordinates through a scaling factor map calculated based on the distance, angle, and focal length between the camera and target. The accuracy of the proposed scaling factor map was verified through an experiment in which the diameter of a circular marker was estimated. A white-noise excitation test was conducted, and the reliability of the displacement data obtained from the TVDS was analyzed by comparing the displacement data of the structure measured with a laser displacement sensor (LDS). The dynamic characteristics of the structure, such as the mode shape and natural frequency, were extracted using the obtained displacement data, and were compared with the numerical analysis results. TVDS yielded highly reliable displacement data and highly accurate dynamic characteristics, such as the natural frequency and mode shape of the structure. As the proposed TVDS can easily extract the displacement data even without artificial or natural markers, it has the advantage of extracting displacement data from any portion of the structure in the image. PMID:27941635

  18. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  19. Investigating vertical distribution patterns of lower tropospheric PM2.5 using unmanned aerial vehicle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Chang; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Wang, Zhan-Yong

    2018-01-01

    A lightweight unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was outfitted with miniaturized sensors to investigate the vertical distribution patterns and sources of fine aerosol particles (PM2.5) within the 1 000 m lower troposphere. A total of 16 UAV flights were conducted in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, China, from the summer to winter in 2014. The associated ground-level measurements from two environmental monitoring stations were also used for background analysis. The results show that ground-level PM2.5 concentrations demonstrated a decreasing trend from Feb. to Jul. and an increasing trend from Aug. to Jan. (the following year). Higher PM2.5 concentrations during the day were mainly observed in the morning (Local Time, LT 05-09) in the spring and summer. However, higher PM2.5 concentrations occurred mainly in the late afternoon and evening (LT 16-20) in the autumn and winter, excluding severe haze pollution days when higher PM2.5 concentrations were also observed during the morning periods. Lower tropospheric PM2.5 concentrations exhibited similar diurnal vertical distribution patterns from the summer to winter. The PM2.5 concentrations decreased with height in the morning, with significantly large vertical gradients from the summer to winter. By contrast, the aerosol particles were well mixed with PM2.5 concentrations of lower than 35 μg ṡm-3 in the early afternoon (LT 12-16) due to sufficient expansions of the planetary boundary layer. The mean vertical PM2.5 concentrations within the 1 000 m lower troposphere in the morning were much larger in the winter (∼87.5 μg ṡm-3) than in the summer and autumn (∼20 μg ṡm-3). However, subtle differences of ∼11 μg ṡm-3 in the mean vertical PM2.5 concentrations were observed in the early afternoon from the summer to winter. The vertical distribution patterns of black carbon and its relationships with PM2.5 indicated that the lower tropospheric aerosol particles might be mainly derived from fossil

  20. Glyoxal vertical columns from GOME-2 backscattered light measurements and comparisons with a global model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lerot

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxal vertical column densities have been retrieved from nadir backscattered radiances measured from 2007 to 2009 by the spaceborne GOME-2/METOP-A sensor. The retrieval algorithm is based on the DOAS technique and optimized settings have been used to determine glyoxal slant columns. The liquid water absorption is accounted for using a two-step DOAS approach, leading to a drastic improvement of the fit quality over remote clear water oceans. Air mass factors are calculated by means of look-up tables of weighting functions pre-calculated with the LIDORT v3.3 radiative transfer model and using a priori glyoxal vertical distributions provided by the IMAGESv2 chemical transport model. The total error estimate comprises random and systematic errors associated to the DOAS fit, the air mass factor calculation and the cloud correction. The highest glyoxal vertical column densities are mainly observed in continental tropical regions, while the mid-latitude columns strongly depend on the season with maximum values during warm months. An anthropogenic signature is also observed in highly populated regions of Asia. Comparisons with glyoxal columns simulated with IMAGESv2 in different regions of the world generally point to a missing glyoxal source, most probably of biogenic origin.

  1. Using smartphone pressure sensors to measure vertical velocities of elevators, stairways, and drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Martí, Arturo C.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairs, and drones (flying unmanned aerial vehicles), by means of smartphone pressure sensors. The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related to the altitude of the device via the hydrostatic approximation. From the altitude values, vertical velocities are derived. The approximation considered is valid in the first hundred meters of the inner layers of the atmosphere. In addition to pressure, acceleration values were also recorded using the built-in accelerometer. Numerical integration was performed, obtaining both vertical velocity and altitude. We show that data obtained using the pressure sensor is significantly less noisy than that obtained using the accelerometer. Error accumulation is also evident in the numerical integration of the acceleration values. In the proposed experiments, the pressure sensor also outperforms GPS, because this sensor does not receive satellite signals indoors and, in general, the operating frequency is considerably lower than that of the pressure sensor. In the cases in which it is possible, comparison with reference values taken from the architectural plans of buildings validates the results obtained using the pressure sensor. This proposal is ideally performed as an external or outreach activity with students to gain insight about fundamental questions in mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics.

  2. Vertical migration of Karenia brevis in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico observed from glider measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Barnes, Brian B; Qi, Lin; Lembke, Chad; English, David

    2016-09-01

    The toxic marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis (the species responsible for most of red tides or harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico), is known to be able to swim vertically to adapt to the light and nutrient environments, nearly all such observations have been made through controlled experiments using cultures. Here, using continuous 3-dimensional measurements by an ocean glider across a K. brevis bloom in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico between 1 and 8 August 2014, we show the vertical migration behavior of K. brevis. Within the bloom where K. brevis concentration is between 100,000 and 1,000,000cellsL-1, the stratified water shows a two-layer system with the depth of pycnocline ranging between 14-20m and salinity and temperature in the surface layer being 28°C, respectively. The bottom layer shows the salinity of >36 and temperature of migration at a mean speed of 0.5-1mh-1. The upward migration appears to start at sunrise at a depth of 8-10m, while the downward migration appears to start at sunset (or when surface light approaches 0) at a depth of ∼2m. These vertical migrations are believed to be a result of the need of K. brevis cells for light and nutrients in a stable, stratified, and CDOM-rich environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical microscope for three-dimensional surface displacement and shape measurements at the microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuman; Pan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jingwen

    2014-07-15

    We report a novel optical microscope for full-field, noncontact measurements of three-dimensional (3D) surface deformation and topography at the microscale. The microscope system is based on a seamless integration of the diffraction-assisted image correlation (DAIC) method with fluorescent microscopy. We experimentally demonstrate the microscope's capability for 3D measurements with submicrometer spatial resolution and subpixel measurement accuracy.

  4. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  5. A Sensor Fusion Method for Tracking Vertical Velocity and Height Based on Inertial and Barometric Altimeter Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Maria Sabatini; Vincenzo Genovese

    2014-01-01

    A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU). An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally,...

  6. Simultaneous measurement of lateral and vertical size of nanoparticles using transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, E.; Bug, M. U.; Bergmann, D.; Cizmar, P.; Frase, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope operated in transmission mode (TSEM) enables both the measurement of the lateral and vertical size (thickness) of nanoparticles. The lateral size is measured with a previously described technique where the particle boundary is determined in the TSEM image. Particle thickness is deduced from the TSEM signal level measured at the centre of the particle, which requires prior knowledge of the expected TSEM signal level. We applied different and well-known Monte-Carlo based simulation tools (Geant4 and MCSEM) to describe the electron diffusion in solid states and to calculate the expected TSEM signals taking into account particle and instrument properties. The simulation results of the different simulation models differ slightly revealing current limits of small-angle and low-energy electron scattering modelling in solid states. Nonetheless, the method allows one to correlate lateral and vertical particle thickness and thus to obtain additional information about the 3D morphology of nanoparticles. We demonstrate the method for silica particles with sizes in the range of about 10 nm-100 nm.

  7. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris B. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regional sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51 and the fine particle mass fraction (64%. Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.

  8. Reliability of radiologic measures of hip displacement in a cohort of preschool-aged children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Alex; Pym, Aaron; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-09-01

    Radiologic hip surveillance is recommended for children with cerebral palsy (CP) at risk of hip displacement. Young children with abnormal proximal femoral geometry (Hilgenreiner epiphyseal angle, HEA) may be more likely to develop hip displacement, less likely to respond to nonsurgical intervention, and may benefit from earlier surgical referral. The reliability of radiographic measures of migration percentage (MP) in the immature pelvis of young children has been reported in smaller retrospective studies; HEA has not been examined in this population. This prospective study describes the reliability of MP and HEA in very young children with CP. Participants were entered from tertiary referral center CP clinics into a prospectively recruited population-based cohort for hip surveillance with pelvic radiography using standardized patient position, at 18, 24, 30, 36, and 48 months. All Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels were included. Two independent raters assessed radiographs for HEA and MP. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was computed as a measure of interrater and intrarater reliability. The correlation coefficient between HEA and femoral position was computed. Ninety-eight children less than 25 months (spasticity=83, 85%; GMFCS IV-V=38, 39%), and 114 children 25 to 48 months (spasticity=96, 85%; GMFCS IV-V=37, 32%) were included from 133 unique participants (spasticity=111, 84%; GMFCS IV-V=42, 32%). Of these 79 children were studied in both age groups. Overall interrater and intrarater reliability of MP was high [ICC=0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-0.95]; SEM was 3.9% (single) and 5.5% (sequential). Perfect concordance for classification of marked hip displacement (MP>30%) occurred in 217 cases (95.2%); nonweighted κ=0.80; 95% CI, 0.68-0.91. For HEA, overall reliability was high (ICC=0.89; 95% CI, 0.85-0.93); SEM=4.8% (single) and 6.7% (sequential). Correlation between changes in HEA and femoral abduction was poor

  9. Estimation of vertical tuber coxae movement in the horse from a single inertial measurement unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Thilo; Starke, Sandra D; Tröster, Susanne; Roepstorff, Lars

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic movement is altered in hind limb lame horses. A simple method using one inertial measurement unit (IMU) attached to the sacrum, which objectively measures 'hip hike', will help detecting hind limb lameness in large scale studies. In this study, IMUs over the sacrum and the left and right tuber coxae (TC) quantified vertical movement symmetry (MS) in 10 clinically lame horses. A simple geometrical model was used to estimate TC movement from the sacrum IMU. The differences between measured and estimated MS values (mean±SD) and MS changes during different exercise conditions (straight, circle, flexion) were quantified using established MS parameters to assess the performance of the sacral IMU for estimating TC movement. Mean differences between measured and estimated MS values were variable between horses and ranged from 5 to 30 mm, SD of differences ranged from 7 to 14 mm. However, the difference between measured and estimated change in MS induced by lungeing or flexion test, was lower, with a value measure, which assesses differences between left and right TC movement. Estimating TC movement from sacral movement does not accurately quantify the true state of TC MS since limits of agreement (LoA) overlap the decision boundaries for detecting mild lameness. The LoA of changes in vertical TC movement between exercises compared favourably with the average changes between exercise conditions. While in moderate to severe cases, changes in TC movement may be estimated from a single sensor over the sacrum, in mildly lame horses it should be measured with additional sensors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    Displacement ventilation is an interesting new type of air distribution principle which should be considered in connection with design of comfort ventilation in both smal1 and large spaces. Research activities on displacement ventilation are large all over the world and new knowledge of design...... methods appears continuously. This book gives an easy introduction to the basis of displacement ventilation and the chapters are written in the order which is used in a design procedure. The main text is extended by five appendices which show some of the new research activities taking place at Aalborg...

  11. Vertical Variability of Rain Drop Size Distribution from Micro Rain Radar Measurements during IFloodS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Tokay, Ali; Roberto, Nicoletta; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Montopoli, Mario; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Ground based weather radars are highly used to generate rainfall products for meteorological and hydrological applications. However, weather radar quantitative rainfall estimation is obtained at a certain altitude that depends mainly on the radar elevation angle and on the distance from the radar. Therefore, depending on the vertical variability of rainfall, a time-height ambiguity between radar measurement and rainfall at the ground can affect the rainfall products. The vertically pointing radars (such as the Micro Rain Radar, MRR) are great tool to investigate the vertical variability of rainfall and its characteristics and ultimately, to fill the gap between the ground level and the first available radar elevation. Furthermore, the knowledge of rain Drop Size Distribution (DSD) variability is linked to the well-known problem of the non-uniform beam filling that is one of the main uncertainties of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Dual frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). During GPM Ground Validation Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) field experiment, data collected with 2D video disdrometers (2DVD), Autonomous OTT Parsivel2 Units (APU), and MRR profilers at different sites were available. In three different sites co-located APU, 2DVD and MRR are available and covered by the S-band Dual Polarimetric Doppler radar (NPOL). The first elevation height of the radar beam varies, among the three sites, between 70 m and 1100 m. The IFloodS set-up has been used to compare disdrometers, MRR and NPOL data and to evaluate the uncertainties of those measurements. First, the performance of disdrometers and MRR in determining different rainfall parameters at ground has been evaluated and then the MRR based parameters have been compared with the ones obtained from NPOL data at the lowest elevations. Furthermore, the vertical variability of DSD and integral rainfall parameters within the MRR bins (from ground to 1085 m each 35 m) has been investigated in order to provide

  12. Comparison of the inversion algorithms applied to the ozone vertical profile retrieval from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozanov

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to an intercomparison of ozone vertical profiles retrieved from the measurements of scattered solar radiation performed by the SCIAMACHY instrument in the limb viewing geometry. Three different inversion algorithms including the prototype of the operational Level 1 to 2 processor to be operated by the European Space Agency are considered. Unlike usual validation studies, this comparison removes the uncertainties arising when comparing measurements made by different instruments probing slightly different air masses and focuses on the uncertainties specific to the modeling-retrieval problem only. The intercomparison was performed for 5 selected orbits of SCIAMACHY showing a good overall agreement of the results in the middle stratosphere, whereas considerable discrepancies were identified in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere altitude region. Additionally, comparisons with ground-based lidar measurements are shown for selected profiles demonstrating an overall correctness of the retrievals.

  13. Comparison of methods for measuring vertical hydraulic properties in a sedimentary rock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, Kent; Worley, Jessica

    2013-04-01

    The characterization of groundwater flow in fractured bedrock aquifers is presently based on a variety of hydraulic testing methods. Pumping tests are often employed, the interpretation of which are based on models derived for porous media environments that do not fully represent the complexities of fractured rock settings. In this paper, we measure aquifer properties using a variety of testing methods in order to evaluate which methods are best capable of producing reliable parameter estimates. The study was performed in a fractured sedimentary rock aquifer using four different field methods: constant head tests conducted using a straddle-packer system, pulse interference tests conducted under open-hole conditions, 12-hour isolated interval pumping tests and 48-hour open-hole pumping tests. Using the results of the constant head tests as the most reliable method for estimation of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, the results obtained using the other three methods were compared with particular emphasis on the estimation of vertical hydraulic parameters in this setting. The effects of test measurement scale on hydraulic parameter estimates were also investigated. Evaluation of the open-hole pumping test data was performed using an analytical model that accommodates multiple horizontal fractures and a connection to a free surface boundary. The comparison shows that estimates of horizontal hydraulic conductivity were not dependent on test method with all methods providing equivalent results. Open-well pumping tests, however, were found not to reliably estimate values of vertical hydraulic conductivity and specific yield for this setting. Alternatively, pulse interference tests conducted under open-hole conditions may offer a less time-intensive option to constant head injection tests for determining vertical hydraulic parameters in a sedimentary rock setting.

  14. Household expenditures as a measure of socioeconomic status among Iraqis displaced in Jordan and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, James R; Doocy, Shannon; Frattaroli, Shannon; McGready, John

    2012-01-01

    Various measures are used to represent socioeconomic status (SES) in health research, including income. However, reliability of income data can be low. Household expenditures are an accepted proxy for income as a more reliable measure but have been studied little in refugee populations. Health and SES measures from cross-sectional surveys of Iraqi refugees in Jordan and Syria were analyzed using logistic regression to assess the interchangeability of household income and expenditures. In Jordan, odds ratios in the regression models including income quartiles were frequently similar to odds ratios found in the models including expenditure quartiles, indicating interchangeability. In Syria, fewer similarities were observed. This study provides some evidence that household expenditures may be used interchangeably with household income for some populations, allowing for the potential collection and use of data related to expenditures as a measure of SES, similar in importance to that of income.

  15. Past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone – Part 1: Measurement techniques, uncertainties and availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hassler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Peak stratospheric chlorofluorocarbon (CFC and other ozone depleting substance (ODS concentrations were reached in the mid- to late 1990s. Detection and attribution of the expected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer in an atmosphere with reduced ODSs as well as efforts to understand the evolution of stratospheric ozone in the presence of increasing greenhouse gases are key current research topics. These require a critical examination of the ozone changes with an accurate knowledge of the spatial (geographical and vertical and temporal ozone response. For such an examination, it is vital that the quality of the measurements used be as high as possible and measurement uncertainties well quantified. In preparation for the 2014 United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP/World Meteorological Organization (WMO Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion, the SPARC/IO3C/IGACO-O3/NDACC (SI2N Initiative was designed to study and document changes in the global ozone profile distribution. This requires assessing long-term ozone profile data sets in regards to measurement stability and uncertainty characteristics. The ultimate goal is to establish suitability for estimating long-term ozone trends to contribute to ozone recovery studies. Some of the data sets have been improved as part of this initiative with updated versions now available. This summary presents an overview of stratospheric ozone profile measurement data sets (ground and satellite based available for ozone recovery studies. Here we document measurement techniques, spatial and temporal coverage, vertical resolution, native units and measurement uncertainties. In addition, the latest data versions are briefly described (including data version updates as well as detailing multiple retrievals when available for a given satellite instrument. Archive location information for each data set is also given.

  16. Dynamic Sensing Performance of a Point-Wise Fiber Bragg Grating Displacement Measurement System Integrated in an Active Structural Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ching Ma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensing system which can measure the transient response of out-of-plane point-wise displacement responses is set up on a smart cantilever beam and the feasibility of its use as a feedback sensor in an active structural control system is studied experimentally. An FBG filter is employed in the proposed fiber sensing system to dynamically demodulate the responses obtained by the FBG displacement sensor with high sensitivity. For comparison, a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV is utilized simultaneously to verify displacement detection ability of the FBG sensing system. An optical full-field measurement technique called amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI is used to provide full-field vibration mode shapes and resonant frequencies. To verify the dynamic demodulation performance of the FBG filter, a traditional FBG strain sensor calibrated with a strain gauge is first employed to measure the dynamic strain of impact-induced vibrations. Then, system identification of the smart cantilever beam is performed by FBG strain and displacement sensors. Finally, by employing a velocity feedback control algorithm, the feasibility of integrating the proposed FBG displacement sensing system in a collocated feedback system is investigated and excellent dynamic feedback performance is demonstrated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the FBG sensor is capable of performing dynamic displacement feedback and/or strain measurements with high sensitivity and resolution.

  17. Aerosol and cloud vertical structure in New York City: micro-pulse lidar measurements and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassebo, Ahmed; Ahmed, Sameh; Hassebo, Yasser Y.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the measurements of aerosol and cloud vertical structure in New York City (NYC) using the first polarization Micro pulse Lidar (MPL) located at the City University of New York (CUNY). MPL operation, setup, data collection and correction will be introduced. Preliminary results and comparison analysis between 2015 and 2016 of cloud vertical structure and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) above NYC will be discussed. An investigation analysis of the impact of NYC rush hour pollution on the level of PBL depth will be introduced using the MPL measurements (such as temporal and spatial trends in aerosol and cloud structure). Applications of the MPL tow-polarization channels will be investigated. Potential future studies and collaborations in protecting NYC against environmental disasters by employing more devices along with MPL real-time data will be emphasized. For pedagogical purposes, a lab module was developed to be implemented in the newly developed undergraduate track in Earth System Science and Environmental Engineering (ESE) at LaGuardia Community College of CUNY (LaGCC), more details will be presented.

  18. A comparison of selected vertical wind measurement techniques on basis of the EUCAARI IMPACT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabas, S.; Baehr, C.; Boquet, M.; Dufournet, Y.; Pawlowska, H.; Siebert, H.; Unal, C.

    2009-04-01

    The poster presents a comparison of selected methods for determination of the vertical wind in the boundary layer used during the EUCAARI IMPACT campaign that took place in May 2008 in The Netherlands. The campaign covered a monthlong intensified ground-based and airborne measurements in the vicinity of the CESAR observatory in Cabauw. Ground-based vertical wind remote sensing was carried out using the Leosphere WindCube WLS70 IR Doppler lidar, Vaisala LAP3000 radar wind-profiler and the TUDelft TARA S-band radar. In-situ airborne measurements were performed using an ultrasonic anemometer (on the ACTOS helicopter underhung platform) and a 5-hole pressure probe (on the SAFIRE ATR-42 airplane radome). Several in-situ anemometers were deployed on the 200-meter high tower of the CESAR observatory. A summary of the characteristics and principles of the considered techniques is presented. A comparison of the results obtained from different platforms depicts the capabilities of each technique and highlights the time, space and velocity resolutions.

  19. Note: Interference technique for minimally invasive, subnanometer, microsecond measurements of displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujovne, Irene; Kerssemakers, Jacob; Cappello, G; Dekker, Cees

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel high-resolution technique for single-molecule experiments, viz., differential traveling wave tracking. This is an interference-based scattering technique where we use gold nanoparticles for high scattering intensities and incorporate differential measurements along one in-plane direction to subtract mechanical noise and drift of the system. In addition, out-of-plane distances are measured via scattered light intensity in a total internal reflectance illumination field. In plane, we demonstrate a rms noise level of only 0.10 nm at 10 kHz and less than 0.5 nm at 600 kHz.

  20. Predicted Versus Measured Thoracic Gas Volume For The Bod Pod® Air Displacement Plethysmography System

    OpenAIRE

    Blaney, Phil A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference between measured values of thoracic gas volume (MTGV) and predicted values of thoracic gas volume (PTGV) using the Bod Pod®. One hundred and thirteen college freshmen, both males and females, were tested using the Bod Pod® by first measuring thoracic gas volume with the Bod Pod® technique, then by using pre-determined values based on height, weight, and age that predict thoracic gas volume. Results of a paire...

  1. Note : Interference technique for minimally invasive, subnanometer, microsecond measurements of displacements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dujovne, I.; Kerssemakers, J.; Capello, G.; Dekker, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel high-resolution technique for single-molecule experiments, viz., differential traveling wave tracking. This is an interference-based scattering technique where we use gold nanoparticles for high scattering intensities and incorporate differential measurements along one in-plane

  2. Trade-offs limiting the evolution of coloniality: ecological displacement rates used to measure small costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kiyoko; Sterner, Robert W

    2011-02-07

    Multicellular organisms that benefit from division of labour are presumably descended from colonial species that initially derived benefits from larger colony size, before the evolution of specialization. Life in a colony can have costs as well as benefits, but these can be hard to measure. We measured physiological costs to life in a colony using a novel method based on population dynamics, comparing growth rates of unicells and kairomone-induced colonies of a green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus against a reference co-occurring species. Coloniality negatively affected growth during the initial log growth phase, while no adverse effect was detected under nutrient-limited competitive conditions. The results point to costs associated with traits involved in rapid growth rather than those associated with efficient growth under resource scarcity. Some benefits of coloniality (e.g. defence from herbivory) may be different from when this trait evolved, but our approach shows how costs would have depended on conditions.

  3. Determination of Vertical Jump as a Measure of Neuromuscular Readiness and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Casey M; Barillas, Saldiam R; Wong, Megan A; Archer, David C; Dobbs, Ian J; Lockie, Robert G; Coburn, Jared W; Tran, Tai T; Brown, Lee E

    2017-12-01

    Watkins, CM, Barillas, SR, Wong, MA, Archer, DC, Dobbs, IJ, Lockie, RG, Coburn, JW, Tran, TT, and Brown, LE. Determination of vertical jump as a measure of neuromuscular readiness and fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 31(12): 3305-3310, 2017-Coaches closely monitor training loads and periodize sessions throughout the season to create optimal adaptations at the proper time. However, only monitoring training loads ignores the innate physiological stress each athlete feels individually. Vertical jump (VJ) is widely used as a measure of lower-body power, and has been used in postmatch studies to demonstrate fatigue levels. However, no pretraining monitoring by VJ performance has been previously studied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of VJ as a measure of readiness and fatigue on a daily sessional basis. Ten healthy resistance-trained males (mass = 91.60 ± 13.24 kg; height = 179.70 ± 9.23 cm; age = 25.40 ± 1.51 years) and 7 females (mass = 65.36 ± 12.29 kg; height = 162.36 ± 5.75 cm; age = 25.00 ± 2.71 years) volunteered to participate. Vertical jump and BRUNEL Mood Assessment (BAM) were measured 4 times: pre-workout 1, post-workout 1, pre-workout 2, and post-workout 2. Workout intensity was identical for both workouts, consisting of 4 sets of 5 repetitions for hang cleans, and 4 sets of 6 repetitions for push presses at 85% 1 repetition maximum (1RM), followed by 4 sets to failure of back squats (BSs), Romanian deadlift, and leg press at 80% 1RM. The major finding was that VJ height decrement (-8.05 ± 9.65 cm) at pre-workout 2 was correlated (r = 0.648) with BS volume decrement (-27.56 ± 24.56%) between workouts. This is important for coaches to proactively understand the current fatigue levels of their athletes and their readiness to resistance training.

  4. PSI Wide Area Product (WAP) for measuring Ground Surface Displacements at regional level for multi-hazards studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Javier; Iglesias, Rubén; Blanco, Pablo; Albiol, David; Koudogbo, Fifamè

    2015-04-01

    The Wide Area Product (WAP) is a new interferometric product developed to provide measurement over large regions. Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) has largely proved their robust and precise performance in measuring ground surface deformation in different application domains. In this context, however, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas (more than 10.000 km2) characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. The main reason for that is the inclusion of low quality and more distant persistent scatterers in order to bridge low-quality areas, such as water bodies, crop areas and forested regions. This fact yields to spatial propagation errors on PSI integration process, poor estimation and compensation of the Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) and the difficult to face residual long-wavelength phase patterns originated by orbit state vectors inaccuracies. Research work for generating a Wide Area Product of ground motion in preparation for the Sentinel-1 mission has been conducted in the last stages of Terrafirma as well as in other research programs. These developments propose technological updates for keeping the precision over large scale PSI analysis. Some of the updates are based on the use of external information, like meteorological models, and the employment of GNSS data for an improved calibration of large measurements. Usually, covering wide regions implies the processing over areas with a land use which is chiefly focused on livestock, horticulture, urbanization and forest. This represents an important challenge for providing continuous InSAR measurements and the application of advanced phase filtering strategies to enhance the coherence. The advanced PSI processing has been performed out over several areas, allowing a large scale analysis of tectonic patterns, and motion caused by multi-hazards as volcanic, landslide and

  5. Quantitative measurement of out of plane displacement by ESPI and shearrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Suk; Yoon, Hong Seok; Chang, Ho Seob [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Seung Pil [Dept. of Ophthalmic Optics, Dong A injae College, Youngam (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Deuk Nam [NAMIN Co.,Ltd, Sacheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-15

    The paper described the quantitative measurement of Out-of-plane by Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry(ESPI) and Shearography. Shearography is used widely for non-destructive inspection because of less sensitivity to environmental disturbance and simple interferometer. However, it is difficult to determine the defect size quantitatively because there are so many effect factors- shearing distance, shearing direction, and induced load, which depend on operators skill and crack information. These effective factors in Shearography are optimized for quantitative analysis and the size of crack is determined. And also, ESPI is used for determination of crack size quantitatively.

  6. A compact ESPI system for displacement measurements of specular reflecting or optical rough surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    . The speckled reference wave is established by reflecting a part of the diffuse illumination wave from a glass plate placed in front of the object. Besides relaxing the alignment tolerances of the set-up, the diffuse illumination eliminates the need for any preparation of the surface under test, which turns...... the system into a candidate for testing micro mechanical systems. When using the interferometer for measurements of the eye, the risk of focusing the laser beam on the retina is decreased due to the diffuse object illumination. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. A wireless laser displacement sensor node for structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo Seon; Kim, Jong Moon; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-09-30

    This study describes a wireless laser displacement sensor node that measures displacement as a representative damage index for structural health monitoring (SHM). The proposed measurement system consists of a laser displacement sensor (LDS) and a customized wireless sensor node. Wireless communication is enabled by a sensor node that consists of a sensor module, a code division multiple access (CDMA) communication module, a processor, and a power module. An LDS with a long measurement distance is chosen to increase field applicability. For a wireless sensor node driven by a battery, we use a power control module with a low-power processor, which facilitates switching between the sleep and active modes, thus maximizing the power consumption efficiency during non-measurement and non-transfer periods. The CDMA mode is also used to overcome the limitation of communication distance, which is a challenge for wireless sensor networks and wireless communication. To evaluate the reliability and field applicability of the proposed wireless displacement measurement system, the system is tested onsite to obtain the required vertical displacement measurements during the construction of mega-trusses and an edge truss, which are the primary structural members in a large-scale irregular building currently under construction. The measurement values confirm the validity of the proposed wireless displacement measurement system and its potential for use in safety evaluations of structural elements.

  8. The coseismic displacements of the 2013 Lushan Mw6.6 earthquake determined using continuous global positioning system measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on Continuous GPS (CGPS observation data of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and the Sichuan Continuous Operational Reference System (SCCORS, we calculated the horizontal coseismic displacements of CGPS sites caused by the 2013 Lushan Mw 6. 6 earthquake. The results indicate that the horizontal coseismic deformations of CGPS stations are consistent with thrust-compression rupture. Furthermore, the sites closest to the epicenter underwent significant coseismic displacements. Three network stations exhibited displacements greater than 9 mm (the largest is 20. 9 mm at SCTQ, while the others were displaced approximately 1–4 mm.

  9. A Sensor Fusion Method for Tracking Vertical Velocity and Height Based on Inertial and Barometric Altimeter Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Maria Sabatini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE was in the range 0.04–0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5–68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions.

  10. A sensor fusion method for tracking vertical velocity and height based on inertial and barometric altimeter measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Genovese, Vincenzo

    2014-07-24

    A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU). An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was in the range 0.04-0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5-68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions.

  11. Measurement of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol by Globally Distributed MP Lidar Network Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhirne, James; Welton, Judd; Campbell, James; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global distribution of aerosol has an important influence on climate through the scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation and through modification of cloud optical properties. Current satellite and other data already provide a great amount of information on aerosol distribution. However there are critical parameters that can only be obtained by active optical profiling. For aerosol, no passive technique can adequately resolve the height profile of aerosol. The aerosol height distribution is required for any model for aerosol transport and the height resolved radiative heating/cooling effect of aerosol. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is an orbital lidar to be launched by 2002. GLAS will provide global measurements of the height distribution of aerosol. The sampling will be limited by nadir only coverage. There is a need for local sites to address sampling, and accuracy factors. Full time measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol are now being acquired at a number of globally distributed MP (micro pulse) lidar sites. The MP lidar systems provide profiling of all significant cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation from compact, eye safe instruments. There are currently six sites in operation and over a dozen planned. At all sites there are a complement of passive aerosol and radiation measurements supporting the lidar data. Four of the installations are at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program sites. The aerosol measurements, retrievals and data products from the network sites will be discussed. The current and planned application of data to supplement satellite aerosol measurements is covered.

  12. Microgravity vertical gradient measurement in the site of VIRGO interferometric antenna (Pisa plain, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fidecaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The site of the European Gravitational Observatory (EGO located in the countryside near Pisa (Tuscany, Italy was investigated by a microgravity vertical gradient (MVG survey. The EGO site houses the VIRGO interferometric antenna for gravitational waves detection. The microgravity survey aims to highlight the gravity anomalies of high-frequency related to more superficial geological sources in order to obtain a detailed model of the lithologic setting of the VIRGO site, that will allow an estimate of the noise induced by seismic waves and by Newtonian interference. This paper presents the results of the gradiometric survey of 2006 in the area of the interferometric antenna. MVG measurements allow us to enhance the high frequency signal strongly associated with the shallow structures. The gradient gravity map shows a main negative pattern that seems related to the trending of the high density layer of gravel that was evidenced in geotechnical drillings executed along the orthogonal arms during the construction of the VIRGO complex. Calibrating the relationship between the vertical gradient and the depth of the gravel interface we have computed a model of gravity gradient for the whole VIRGO site, defining the 3D distribution of the top surface of this layer. This latter shows a NE-SW negative pattern that may represent a palaeo-bed alluvial of the Serchio from the Bientina River system.

  13. Measuring Depression in a Non-Western War-Affected Displaced Population: Measurement Equivalence of the Beck Depression Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Nuwan Jayawickreme; Jay Verkuilen; Eranda Jayawickreme; Kaylaliz Acosta; Foa, Edna B.

    2017-01-01

    Depression is commonly seen in survivors of conflict and disaster across the world. There is a dearth of research on the validity of commonly used measures of depression in these populations. Measurements of depression that are used in multiple contexts need to meet measurement equivalence, i.e., the instrument measures the same construct in the same manner across different groups. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered to female trauma survivors in the United States (n = 268) a...

  14. Vertical Sampling Scales for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Measurements from Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Hemingway

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The lowest portion of the Earth’s atmosphere, known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL, plays an important role in the formation of weather events. Simple meteorological measurements collected from within the ABL, such as temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind velocity, are key to understanding the exchange of energy within this region, but conventional surveillance techniques such as towers, radar, weather balloons, and satellites do not provide adequate spatial and/or temporal coverage for monitoring weather events. Small unmanned aircraft, or aerial, systems (sUAS provide a versatile, dynamic platform for atmospheric sensing that can provide higher spatio-temporal sampling frequencies than available through most satellite sensing methods. They are also able to sense portions of the atmosphere that cannot be measured from ground-based radar, weather stations, or weather balloons and have the potential to fill gaps in atmospheric sampling. However, research on the vertical sampling scales for collecting atmospheric measurements from sUAS and the variabilities of these scales across atmospheric phenomena (e.g., temperature and humidity is needed. The objective of this study is to use variogram analysis, a common geostatistical technique, to determine optimal spatial sampling scales for two atmospheric variables (temperature and relative humidity captured from sUAS. Results show that vertical sampling scales of approximately 3 m for temperature and 1.5–2 m for relative humidity were sufficient to capture the spatial structure of these phenomena under the conditions tested. Future work is needed to model these scales across the entire ABL as well as under variable conditions.

  15. Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Ilaria; Curci, Gabriele; Falasca, Serena; Ferrero, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys Ilaria Gandolfi1,2, Gabriele Curci1,2, Serena Falasca1,2, Luca Ferrero3 1 Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 2 Center of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 3 POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126, Milan, Italy Last decades were characterized by a growing interest in aerosols: mainly for their effect on human health and on the energy balance of solar and planetary radiation, thus their role in climate change. In this study, we analyze the evolution of vertical profile of black carbon (BC) through tethered balloon observations and chemistry-transport modelling. Black carbon is regarded as the second most important anthropogenic climate forcing agent and its concentration varies significantly depending on the altitude and the sources on the territory. In winter of 2010 University Of Milan Bicocca conducted three intensive measurements campaigns over three Italian basin valleys (Terni, Po Valley, Passiria Valley). The choice of the valleys was made taking into consideration the orography and the river basin structure. The measurement campaign was based on a helium-filled tethered balloon, on which the instrumentation for the analysis has been mounted; the instrumentation consisted on a meteorological station, an OPC, a cascade impactor and a micro-Aethalometer. Subsequently, at University of L'Aquila simulations were produced to help interpretation of these vertical aerosol profiles (mass, composition and distribution) and related optical properties (scattering, absorption) using a chemistry-transport model (WRF-CHIMERE) at high horizontal resolution (1 km). The analysis focused primarily on the calculation of the heating rate and of the Direct Radiative Effect (DRE), and on the analysis of the

  16. Vertical gradients of nitrous acid (HONO) measured in Beijing during winter smog events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Louisa; Crilley, Leigh; Thomson, Steven; Bloss, William; Tong, Shengrui

    2017-04-01

    HONO is an important atmospheric constituent, as the photolysis of HONO leads to the formation of OH radicals in the boundary layer, with contributions of up to 60% in urban regions. This is particularly important in mega-cities, such as Beijing, where measured HONO levels can reach parts per billion. Research has shown that direct emissions, homogeneous gas phase reactions and heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surfaces all contribute to HONO in urban areas. There are, however, still uncertainties regarding the magnitude of these sources, and models are still unable to account for total measured HONO mixing ratios. To assess the sources of HONO, vertical profile measurements were performed up to an altitude of 260 m on the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) Meteorological Tower in Beijing. These measurements were performed as part of the Air Pollution and Human Health (APHH) project, during Nov/Dec 2016. Here we present HONO profile measurements using a long-path absorption photometer (LOPAP), during both clear and hazy days. HONO levels near the ground were very high during smog events with concentrations over 10 ppb observed. The data show a strong negative gradient with altitude, suggesting a source close to the surface. The largest gradients were observed overnight during smog events, with differences in HONO between the ground and the highest level up to 6 ppb.

  17. Vertical comb drive actuator for the measurement of piezoelectric coefficients in small-scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, J.; Muniz-Piniella, A.; Stewart, M.; Shean, T. A. V.; Weaver, P. M.; Cain, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) vertical levitation comb drive actuator has been created for the measurement of piezoelectric coefficients in thin/thick films or piezoelectrically active micro-scale components of other MEMS devices. The device exerts a dynamic force of 33 μN at an applied voltage of 100 V. The charge developed on the piezoelectric test device is measured using a charge sensitive pre-amplifier and lock-in technique, enabling measurements down to 1×10-5 pC. The system was tested with ten different piezoelectric samples with coefficients in the range 70-1375 pC N-1 and showed a good correlation (r = 0.9997) to measurements performed with macroscopic applied stresses, and piezoelectric impedance resonance techniques. The measurement of the direct piezoelectric effect in micro- and nano-scale piezo-materials has been made possible using MEMS processing technology. This new application of a MEMS metrology device has been developed and fully characterized in order to accurately evaluate the functional properties of piezoelectric materials at the scale required in micro- to nano-scale applications.

  18. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) vertical column density measurements by Pandora spectrometer over the Canadian oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Cede, Alexander; Davies, Jonathan; Mihele, Cristian; Netcheva, Stoyka; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 retrieved by a Pandora spectral sun photometer at Fort McKay, Alberta, Canada, from 2013 to 2015 were analysed. The Fort McKay site is located in the Canadian oil sands region, approximately 20 km north of two major SO2 sources (upgraders), with total emission of about 45 kt yr-1. Elevated SO2 VCD values were frequently recorded by the instrument, with the highest values of about 9 Dobson Units (DU; DU = 2.69 × 1016 molecules cm-2). Comparisons with co-located in situ measurements demonstrated that there was a very good correlation between VCDs and surface concentrations in some cases, while in other cases, elevated VCDs did not correspond to high surface concentrations, suggesting the plume was above the ground. Elevated VCDs and surface concentrations were observed when the wind direction was from south to southeast, i.e. from the direction of the two local SO2 sources. The precision of the SO2 measurements, estimated from parallel measurements by two Pandora instruments at Toronto, is 0.17 DU. The total uncertainty of Pandora SO2 VCD, estimated using measurements when the wind direction was away from the sources, is less than 0.26 DU (1σ). Comparisons with integrated SO2 profiles from concurrent aircraft measurements support these estimates.

  19. Quantitative measures of damage to subchondral bone are associated with functional outcome following treatment of displaced acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubovsky, Omri; Kreder, Michael; Wright, David A; Kiss, Alex; Gallant, Aimee; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2013-12-01

    Current analysis of displaced acetabular fractures is limited in its ability to predict functional outcome. This study aimed to (1) quantify initial acetabular damage following acetabular fracture through measurement of subchondral bone density and fracture lines, and (2) evaluate associations between acetabular damage and functional outcomes following fracture. Subchondral bone intensity maps were created for 24 patients with unilateral acetabular fractures. Measures of crack length and density differences between corresponding regions in the fractured acetabuli, normalized by the unfractured side, were generated from preoperative CT images. Damage measures were compared to quality of life survey data collected for each patient at least 2 years post-injury (Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment [MFA] and Short Form-36 [SF-36], with specific focus on parameters that best describe patients' physical health). CT image quantification of initial damage to acetabular subchondral bone was associated with functional outcome post-injury. In general, damage as quantified through differences in density in the superior dome region (zones 8 and 12) and the central anterior region of the acetabulum (zone 3) were found to be the strongest significant predictors of functional outcome (adjusted R(2) = 0.3-0.45, p fractures toward improving clinical prognoses. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  20. On measurement of acoustic pulse arrival angles using a vertical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    We consider a recently developed method to analyze the angular structure of pulsed acoustic fields in an underwater sound channel. The method is based on the Husimi transform that allows us to approximately link a wave field with the corresponding ray arrivals. The advantage of the method lies in the possibility of its practical realization by a vertical hydrophone array crossing only a small part of the oceanic depth. The main aim of the present work is to find the optimal parameter values of the array that ensure good angular accuracy and sufficient reliability of the algorithm to calculate the arrival angles. Broadband pulses with central frequencies of 80 and 240 Hz are considered. It is shown that an array with a length of several hundred meters allows measuring the angular spectrum with an accuracy of up to 1 degree. The angular resolution is lowered with an increase of the sound wavelength due to the fundamental limitations imposed by the uncertainty relation.

  1. Vertical Resolved Dust Mass Concentration and Backscatter Coefficient Retrieval of Asian Dust Plume Using Quartz Raman Channel in Lidar Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Noh Young M.; Mueller Detlef; Shin Sungkyun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust immersed in Asian dust plume using Raman scattering of quartz (silicon dioxide, silica). During the Asian dust period of March 15, 16, and 21 in 2010, Raman lidar measurements detected the presence of quartz, and successfully showed the vertical profiles of the quartz backscatter coefficient. Since the Raman backscatter coefficient was connected with the Raman backscatter differential cross section a...

  2. Validity and Usability of a New System for Measuring and Monitoring Variations in Vertical Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loturco, Irineu; Pereira, Lucas A; Kobal, Ronaldo; Kitamura, Katia; Cal Abad, César C; Marques, Guilherme; Guerriero, Aristide; Moraes, José E; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-09-01

    Loturco, I, Pereira, LA, Kobal, R, Kitamura, K, Cal Abad, CC, Marques, G, Guerriero, A, Moraes, JE, and Nakamura, FY. Validity and usability of a new system for measuring and monitoring variations in vertical jump performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2579-2585, 2017-Vertical jump (VJ) height is one of the most sensitive measures to quantify training-related fatigue and athletic performance in elite athletes. Currently, however, there is no equipment designed to graphically deliver the daily performance changes in VJ compared with the smallest worthwhile change (SWC), which is considered essential in "progressive statistics" to judge meaningful performance fluctuations. The aims of the study were to analyze the criterion validity of a new contact mat (i.e., Elite Jump), alongside testing its usability to detect meaningful changes in VJ of elite team sport athletes. A total of 31 athletes participated in the criterion validity part of the study, whereas 17 rugby players participated in the VJ sensitivity part. When compared with the force plate, the contact mat produced squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) values with very high intraclass correlation coefficients (0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and very low biases (-0.11 and -0.08 cm, respectively), as assessed by the Bland-Altman plot. In addition, during a training microcycle, rugby players presented identical meaningful changes in performance in both SJ and CMJ when comparing the Elite Jump and Hopkins' spreadsheet outputs. Therefore, the contact mat is valid and the proprietary software can properly execute the SWC calculations, providing coaches and researchers with accurate information concerning variations in the physical performance of elite athletes.

  3. Displacing use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Janet; Matthews, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically discusses the concept of use in design, suggesting that relevant relationships other than use are sometimes obscured by the usercentredness of design processes. We present a design case from the medical device domain that displaced the concept of use from the centre of a human...... medical conditions. Displacing use can be a valuable strategy for design, revealing some of the contextual conditions that influence an artefact's use, and broadening the space of alternatives explored in design. (c) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  5. Vertical-type chiroptical spectrophotometer (I): instrumentation and application to diffuse reflectance circular dichroism measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Takunori; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Reiko

    2008-07-01

    We have designed and built a novel universal chiroptical spectrophotometer (UCS-2: J-800KCMF), which can carry out in situ chirality measurement of solid samples without any pretreatment, in the UV-vis region and with high relative efficiency. The instrument was designed to carry out transmittance and diffuse reflectance (DR) circular dichroism (CD) measurements simultaneously, thus housing two photomultipliers. It has a unique feature that light impinges on samples vertically so that loose powders can be measured by placing them on a flat sample holder in an integrating sphere. As is our first universal chiroptical spectrophotometer, UCS-1, two lock-in amplifiers are installed to remove artifact signals arising from macroscopic anisotropies which are unique to solid samples. High performance was achieved by theoretically analyzing and experimentally proven the effect of the photoelastic modulator position on the CD base line shifts, and by selecting high-quality optical and electric components. Measurement of microcrystallines of both enantiomers of ammonium camphorsulfonate by the DRCD mode gave reasonable results.

  6. Left hemidiaphragmatic mobility: assessment with ultrasonographic measurement of the craniocaudal displacement of the splenic hilum and the inferior pole of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Nair S G; Kodaira, Sergio K; Massarollo, Paulo C B; Pereira, Osvaldo I; Dalmas, José Carlos; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Buchpiguel, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the radiographic and ultrasonographic measurements of craniocaudal displacement of the left hemidiaphragm. Forty-nine patients with clinical indications for interventional procedures prospectively underwent radiographic evaluation of left hemidiaphragmatic mobility and B-mode ultrasonographic measurement of craniocaudal displacement of the hilum and the inferior pole of the spleen. Ultrasonography was performed with a 3.5-MHz convex transducer in a left intercostal position under a longitudinal orientation. Statistical analyses were performed with linear regression, a paired Student t test, and Bland-Altman analyses. The correlation between the craniocaudal splenic hilum displacement and radiographic measurements was found to be linear: hemidiaphragmatic mobility = 17.795 + 0.429 x splenic hilum displacement (SE for the regression coefficient = 0 .12; P = .0012), although the values obtained with both methods were statistically different (P mobility = 9.5596 + 0.5455 x inferior polo displacement (SE for the regression coefficient = 0 .11; P mobility evaluation compared with radiography.

  7. High variability of the subjective visual vertical test of vertical perception, in some people with neck pain - Should this be a standard measure of cervical proprioception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Subjective visual vertical (SVV) assesses visual dependence for spacial orientation, via vertical perception testing. Using the computerized rod-and-frame test (CRFT), SVV is thought to be an important measure of cervical proprioception and might be greater in those with whiplash associated disorder (WAD), but to date research findings are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the most sensitive SVV error measurement to detect group differences between no neck pain control, idiopathic neck pain (INP) and WAD subjects. Cross sectional study. Neck Disability Index (NDI), Dizziness Handicap Inventory short form (DHIsf) and the average constant error (CE), absolute error (AE), root mean square error (RMSE), and variable error (VE) of the SVV were obtained from 142 subjects (48 asymptomatic, 36 INP, 42 WAD). The INP group had significantly (p proprioception in neck pain and more research is required before the SVV can be considered an important measure and utilized clinically. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Design and Realization of a Three Degrees of Freedom Displacement Measurement System Composed of Hall Sensors Based on Magnetic Field Fitting by an Elliptic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and realization of a three degrees of freedom (DOFs displacement measurement system composed of Hall sensors, which is built for the XYθz displacement measurement of the short stroke stage of the reticle stage of lithography. The measurement system consists of three pairs of permanent magnets mounted on the same plane on the short stroke stage along the Y, Y, X directions, and three single axis Hall sensors correspondingly mounted on the frame of the reticle stage. The emphasis is placed on the decoupling and magnetic field fitting of the three DOFs measurement system. The model of the measurement system is illustrated, and the XY positions and θZ rotation of the short stroke stage can be obtained by decoupling the sensor outputs. A magnetic field fitting by an elliptic function-based compensation method is proposed. The practical field intensity of a permanent magnet at a certain plane height can be substituted for the output voltage of a Hall sensors, which can be expressed by the elliptic function through experimental data as the crucial issue to calculate the three DOFs displacement. Experimental results of the Hall sensor displacement measurement system are presented to validate the proposed three DOFs measurement system.

  9. Vertical profile measurements of ozone at Lauder, New Zealand, during ASHOE/MAESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael; Singh, Upendra; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Matthews, Andrew; Bodeker, Gregory; Connor, Brian; Tsou, J. J.; Proffitt, Michael; Margitan, James

    1997-06-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center stratospheric ozone lidar was deployed at the National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) facility at Lauder, New Zealand (45°S, 169°E), during all four of the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) flight periods. The site is about 500 km south of Christchurch. Efforts were made to acquire lidar data before dawn and after sunset on the days the ER-2 was flown. A total of 79 measurements were made on 47 individual nights. Each measurement provided vertical profiles of aerosols, temperature, and ozone. Profiles begin at ˜8 km and extend to 35, 50-55, and 75 km for aerosols, ozone, and temperature, respectively. NIWA personnel launched electrochemical concentration cell ozonesondes on a number of these occasions. A summary of these data will be presented along with comparisons with data from ER-2 instruments. Average profiles for each of the four ASHOE/MAESA deployments were constructed for use as a climatological profile for model initialization.

  10. Proposta de medição da posição vertical da laringe em repouso Proposal of measurement of vertical larynx position at rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osiris de Oliveira Camponês do Brasil

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Esta pesquisa tem como objetivo propor uma forma de medir a posição vertical da laringe (PVL no pescoço, em repouso, de adultos jovens sem queixas vocais. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo de coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Participaram da pesquisa 68 sujeitos, faixa etária de 18 a 44 anos de idade, sendo 33 do sexo feminino e 35 do sexo masculino. Os pontos de referência utilizados para a pesquisa foram os ângulos da mandíbula direito e esquerdo (AMD e AME, o centro do arco da cartilagem cricóidea (CC e o centro da fúrcula esternal (FE. Para a obtenção das medidas, os sujeitos foram orientados a permanecerem sentados com a cabeça em hiperextensão máxima. Os materiais utilizados foram um compasso e uma régua de 20cm. RESULTADOS: A obtenção das medidas se mostrou ser de fácil realização e não apresentou qualquer tipo de desconforto aos participantes. Houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os sexos feminino e masculino quanto à posição vertical da laringe, sendo que as mulheres apresentaram a laringe em posição mais alta que os homens. A posição vertical da laringe foi de fácil obtenção e parece ser um parâmetro muito interessante no acompanhamento clínico intra-sujeitos.AIM: The purpose of this research is to propose a procedure to measure the vertical larynx position in the neck at rest in young adults without vocal complaint. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: There were 68 subjects, aged between 18 to 44 years, 33 female and 35 male. The anatomical landmarks used for this research study were the right and left jaw angle (RJA and LJA, the centre of the cricoid arch cartilage (CC and the centre of the sternal furculum (SF. In order to obtain the measures, the subjects were asked to be sitting still with their heads stretched up to the highest possible position. The devices used were a drawing compass and a 20-centimeter ruler. RESULTS: The measurement procedure

  11. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yuan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by means of a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if the fish become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS in the gate wells at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2 were intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system but have resulted in higher mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters in the gate well slots at turbine units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected, the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS were variable and typically less than 0.3 m/s, but fewer than 50% were less than or equal to 0.12 m/s. There was also large variance in sweep velocities across the face of the VBS with most measurements recorded at less than 1.5 m/s. Results of this study revealed that the approach velocities in the gate wells exceeded criteria intended to improve fish passage conditions that were recommended by National Marine Fisheries Service and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. The turbulence measured in the gate well may also result in suboptimal fish passage conditions but no established guidelines to contrast those results have been published.

  12. Evaluation of a New Prototype Geodetic Astrolabe for Measuring Deflections of the Vertical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, J. A.; Thompson, N.; Angell, L. E.; Belenkii, M. S.; Bruns, D. G.; Johnson, D. O.

    2009-12-01

    During the last three years, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), with assistance from the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO), sponsored the development of a new electronic geodetic astrolabe for measuring deflections of the vertical (DoV). NGA’s current operational astrolabes, built in 1995, have a number of undesirable features including the need for a pool of liquid mercury as a reflecting surface. The new state-of-the-art prototype instrument, completed by Trex Enterprises in early 2009, was designed to meet a 0.2 arcsec accuracy requirement. It reduces the weight, eliminates the mercury, and dramatically reduces observation times. The new astrolabe consists of a 101 mm aperture telescope with a 1.5° field of view and an inclinometer mounted inside a 92-cm high, 30-cm diameter tube, an external GPS receiver for timing, and a laptop computer that controls and monitors the instrument and performs the computations. Star images are recorded by an astronomical-grade camera with a 2,048 x 2,048 pixel CCD sensor that is externally triggered by time pulses from the GPS receiver. The prototype was designed for nighttime observation of visible stars equal to or brighter than magnitude 10.0. The inclinometer is a system of two orthogonal pendula that define the local gravitational vertical, each consisting of a brass plumb bob suspended from an aluminized polymer ribbon set between two electrodes. An internal reference collimator is rigidly tied to the inclinometer and projects an array of reference points of light onto the CCD sensor. After the astrolabe is coarsely leveled to within 20 arcsec, voice coil actuators automatically adjust and maintain the inclinometer vertical to within 0.02 arcsec. Independent images are collected at 6 second intervals using a 200 msec exposure time. The CCD coordinates are determined for each star and a collimator reference point on each image. Stars are identified by referencing a customized star catalog produced by USNO. A

  13. Intraindividual Variability in Test-Retest Air Displacement Plethysmography Measurements of Body Density for Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Ann L; Roper, Jenevieve L; Mermier, Christine M

    2016-10-01

    Air displacement plethysmography (ADP) is a popular method for estimating body density (Db). Most ADP tests are performed once, with test-retest investigations scarce. Therefore, we investigated test-retest reliability of ADP. Active men (n = 25) and women (n = 25) volunteered and followed standard pretest guidelines. Participants wore dry, form-fitting swimwear and manufacturer-supplied swim caps. In a single session, two ADP trials with measured thoracic gas volume (TGV) were performed without repositioning participants. Separate 2 (sex) × 2 (ADP trial) repeated-measures ANOVAs were performed to investigate within-between comparisons of Db, TGV, body volume (Vb), and relative fatness (%BF). Paired t tests were used to investigate significant differences as appropriate. The Bland and Altman technique was used to depict individual intertrial variations. For all analyses, α =.05. A significant main effect for sex was found; men were lower in %BF and higher in all other variables compared with women. Individual variability was notable (ADP1-ADP2). The range of individual intertrial differences were larger for women than men, respectively, for Db (-0.0096-0.0045 g/cc; -0.0019-0.0054 g/cc), TGV (-0.623-1.325 L; -0.584-0.378 L), Vb (-0.249-2.10 L; -0.234-0.397 L), and %BF (-2.1-4.4%; -0.2-0.9%). When assessing body composition of women via ADP or using Db from ADP in a multicomponent model, at least two trials with measured TGV should be performed and the average of the values recorded and reported.

  14. Ambulatory measurement of three-dimensional foot displacement during treadmill walking using wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon

    2015-03-01

    Techniques that could be used to monitor human motion precisely are helpful in various applications such as rehabilitation, gait analysis, and athletic performance analysis. This paper focuses on the 3-D foot trajectory measurements based on a wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network. The system consists of an ultrasonic transmitter (mobile) and several receivers (anchors) with fixed known positions. In order not to restrict the movement of subjects, a radio frequency (RF) module is used for wireless data transmission. The RF module also provides the synchronization clock between mobile and anchors. The proposed system measures the time-of-arrival (TOA) of the ultrasonic signal from mobile to anchors. Together with the knowledge of the anchor's position, the absolute distance that the signal travels can be computed. Then, the range information defines a circle centered at this anchor with radius equal to the measured distance, and the mobile resides within the intersections of several such circles. Based on the TOA-based tracking technique, the 3-D foot trajectories are validated against a camera-based motion capture system for ten healthy subjects walking on a treadmill at slow, normal, and fast speeds. The experimental results have shown that the ultrasonic system has sufficient accuracy of net root-mean-square error ( 4.2 cm) for 3-D displacement, especially for foot clearance with accuracy and standard deviation ( 0.62 ±7.48 mm) compared to the camera-based motion capture system. The small form factor and lightweight feature of the proposed system make it easy to use. Such a system is also much lower in cost compared to the camera-based tracking system.

  15. Measurement of time-varying displacement fields in cell culture for traction force optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanobiology is an emerging field which seeks to link mechanical forces and properties to the behaviors of cells and tissues in cancer, stem cell growth, and other processes. Traction force microscopy (TFM) is an imaging technique that enables the study of traction forces exerted by cells on their environment to migrate as well as sense and manipulate their surroundings. To date, TFM research has been performed using incoherent imaging modalities and, until recently, has been largely confined to the study of cell-induced tractions within two-dimensions using highly artificial and controlled environments. As the field of mechanobiology advances, and demand grows for research in physiologically relevant 3D culture and in vivo models, TFM will require imaging modalities that support such settings. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging modality which enables 3D cellular resolution imaging in highly scattering environments. Moreover, optical coherence elastography (OCE) enables the measurement of tissue mechanical properties. OCE relies on the principle of measuring material deformations in response to artificially applied stress. By extension, similar techniques can enable the measurement of cell-induced deformations, imaged with OCM. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a natural extension and partner to existing OCM and OCE methods. We report the first use of OCM data and digital image correlation to track temporally varying displacement fields exhibited within a 3D culture setting. These results mark the first steps toward the realization of TF-OCM in 2D and 3D settings, bolstering OCM as a platform for advancing research in mechanobiology.

  16. Climate-driven vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by continuous GPS geodesy

    KAUST Repository

    Compton, Kathleen

    2015-02-06

    © 2015 The Authors. Earth\\'s present-day response to enhanced glacial melting resulting from climate change can be measured using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. We present data from 62 continuously operating GPS instruments in Iceland. Statistically significant upward velocity and accelerations are recorded at 27 GPS stations, predominantly located in the Central Highlands region of Iceland, where present-day thinning of the Iceland ice caps results in velocities of more than 30mm/yr and uplift accelerations of 1-2mm/yr2. We use our acceleration estimates to back calculate to a time of zero velocity, which coincides with the initiation of ice loss in Iceland from ice mass balance calculations and Arctic warming trends. We show, through a simple inversion, a direct relationship between ice mass balance measurements and vertical position and show that accelerated unloading is required to reproduce uplift observations for a simple elastic layer over viscoelastic half-space model.

  17. The validity and reliability of an iPhone app for measuring vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Glaister, Mark; Lockey, Richard Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyse the concurrent validity and reliability of an iPhone app (called: My Jump) for measuring vertical jump performance. Twenty recreationally active healthy men (age: 22.1 ± 3.6 years) completed five maximal countermovement jumps, which were evaluated using a force platform (time in the air method) and a specially designed iPhone app. My jump was developed to calculate the jump height from flight time using the high-speed video recording facility on the iPhone 5 s. Jump heights of the 100 jumps measured, for both devices, were compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson product moment correlation coefficient (r), Cronbach's alpha (α), coefficient of variation and Bland-Altman plots. There was almost perfect agreement between the force platform and My Jump for the countermovement jump height (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.997, P Jump showed good validity for the CMJ height (r = 0.995, P < 0.001). The results of the present study showed that CMJ height can be easily, accurately and reliably evaluated using a specially developed iPhone 5 s app.

  18. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Sheridan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1 measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2 relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. The primary profile location was within 15 km of the NOAA/ESRL surface aerosol monitoring station near Bondville, Illinois. Identical instruments at the surface and on the aircraft ensured that the data from both platforms would be directly comparable and permitted a determination of how representative surface aerosol properties were of the lower column. Aircraft profiles were also conducted occasionally at two other nearby locations to increase the frequency of A-Train satellite underflights for the purpose of comparing in situ and satellite-retrieved aerosol data. Measurements of aerosol properties conducted at low relative humidity over the Bondville site compare well with the analogous surface aerosol data and do not indicate any major sampling issues or that the aerosol is radically different at the surface compared with the lowest flyby altitude of ~ 240 m above ground level. Statistical analyses of the in situ vertical profile data indicate that aerosol light scattering and absorption (related to aerosol amount decreases substantially with increasing altitude. Parameters related to the nature of the aerosol (e.g., single-scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, etc., however, are relatively constant throughout the mixed layer, and do not vary as much as the aerosol amount throughout the profile. While individual profiles often showed more variability, the median in situ single-scattering albedo was 0.93–0.95 for all sampled altitudes. Several parameters (e.g., submicrometer scattering fraction, hemispheric backscattering fraction, and

  19. Flow measurement behind a pair of vertical-axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Colin M.; Hummels, Raymond; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2017-11-01

    The wake from a pair of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) is measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). The VAWT models are mounted in a low-speed wind tunnel and driven using a motor control system. The rotation of the turbines is synced using a proportional controller that allows the turbine's rotational position to be set relative to each other. The rotation of the turbines is also synced with the PIV system for taking phase averaged results. The VAWTs are tested for both co- and counter-rotating cases over a range of relative phase offsets. Time averaged and phase averaged results are measured at the horizontal mid-plane in the near wake. The time-averaged results compare the bulk wake profiles from the pair of turbines. Phase averaged results look at the vortex interactions in the near wake of the turbines. By changing the phase relation between the turbines we can see the impact of the structure interactions in both the phase and time averaged results.

  20. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement and the displacement correction factor for cylindrical ionization chambers in a 6 MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, C; Hartmann, G H; Karger, C P

    2012-11-07

    The displacement effect of cylindrical ionization chambers is taken into account either by an effective point of measurement (EPOM) or, alternatively, by using a displacement correction factor. The dependence of these effects on water was examined as a function of the cavity radius for (60)Co gamma radiation in a previous paper. This paper describes results for high-energy photon beams using the same measurement technique. Additionally, the displacement correction factor was directly measured. Absorbed doses measured under reference conditions following the international protocol IAEA TRS-398 and the German protocol DIN 6800-2 agreed well between the chambers with different cavity radii within a standard uncertainty of 0.2%. However, there was a constant difference of 0.2% between both protocols. Similar to our observations made in (60)Co, absorbed doses measured with the different chambers at depths beyond the maximum showed deviations of up to 0.6% and 0.5% for IAEA TRS-398 and DIN 6800-2, respectively, and deviations of more than 1% were found for both protocols in the build-up and maximum region. We therefore propose modified formulas for the determination of the EPOM and the displacement correction factor.

  1. Improvement of vertical velocity statistics measured by a Doppler lidar through comparison with sonic anemometer observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Chilson, Phillip B.; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Since turbulence measurements from Doppler lidars are being increasingly used within wind energy and boundary-layer meteorology, it is important to assess and improve the accuracy of these observations. While turbulent quantities are measured by Doppler lidars in several different ways, the simplest and most frequently used statistic is vertical velocity variance (w'2) from zenith stares. However, the competing effects of signal noise and resolution volume limitations, which respectively increase and decrease w'2, reduce the accuracy of these measurements. Herein, an established method that utilises the autocovariance of the signal to remove noise is evaluated and its skill in correcting for volume-averaging effects in the calculation of w'2 is also assessed. Additionally, this autocovariance technique is further refined by defining the amount of lag time to use for the most accurate estimates of w'2. Through comparison of observations from two Doppler lidars and sonic anemometers on a 300 m tower, the autocovariance technique is shown to generally improve estimates of w'2. After the autocovariance technique is applied, values of w'2 from the Doppler lidars are generally in close agreement (R2≈0.95-0.98) with those calculated from sonic anemometer measurements.

  2. Point Coupled Displacement Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Real-time displacement measurement techniques are needed to acquire aerodynamic and structural system characteristics in flight. This proposal describes the...

  3. Measurements of the average properties of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Garcia, J. C.; Zenit, R.

    2008-11-01

    This investigation presents an experimental study of a system for which the bubble size is not monodisperse. In this work an experimental equipment was designed to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel, in which the dual limit of small Weber and large Reynolds number is satisfied. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, the range of Reynolds numbers was extended from 50 to 500, approximately. To avoid coalescence, a small amount of salt was added to the interstitial fluid, which did not affect the fluid properties significantly. Measurements of the size, bubble velocity, aspect ratio as well the equivalent diameter of the bubbles were obtained as a function of gas volume fraction. We found that the bidisperse nature of the flow changes the dynamics in a significant manner. We observed a modification of the flow agitation, characterized by the liquid velocity variance. Although the decrease of the mean velocity with gas volume fraction is similar to that observed for monodisperse flows (Martínez et. al. 2007), a general increase of the magnitude of fluctuations is observed for certain combinations of bubble size and gas fraction ratios.

  4. Highly Directional Sonar Beam of Narwhals (Monodon monoceros Measured with a Vertical 16 Hydrophone Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens C Koblitz

    Full Text Available Recordings of narwhal (Monodon monoceros echolocation signals were made using a linear 16 hydrophone array in the pack ice of Baffin Bay, West Greenland in 2013 at eleven sites. An average -3 dB beam width of 5.0° makes the narwhal click the most directional biosonar signal reported for any species to date. The beam shows a dorsal-ventral asymmetry with a narrower beam above the beam axis. This may be an evolutionary advantage for toothed whales to reduce echoes from the water surface or sea ice surface. Source level measurements show narwhal click intensities of up to 222 dB pp re 1 μPa, with a mean apparent source level of 215 dB pp re 1 μPa. During ascents and descents the narwhals perform scanning in the vertical plane with their sonar beam. This study provides valuable information for reference sonar parameters of narwhals and for the use of acoustic monitoring in the Arctic.

  5. Measurements of Burnout Conditions for Flow of Boiling Water in Vertical Round Ducts (Part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt M.; Persson, P.; Nilsson, L.; Eriksson, O.

    1963-06-15

    The present report deals with the results of the second phase of an experimental investigation of burnout conditions for flow of boiling water in vertical round ducts. The following ranges of variables were studied and 809 burnout measurements were obtained. Pressure 5. 3 < p < 37. 3 kg/cm{sup 2}; Inlet subcooling 56 < {delta}t{sub sub} < 212 deg C; Steam quality 0. 20 < x{sub BO} < 0.95; Heat Flux 50 < q/A < 515 W/cm{sup 2}; Mass velocity 100 < m'/F < 1890 kg/m{sup 2}s; Heated length 600 < L < 2500 mm; Duct diameter d = 10 mm. The results are presented in diagrams, where for a certain geometry, the burnout steam qualities, x{sub BO} , were plotted against the pressure with the surface heat flux as parameter. The data have been correlated by curves, and the scatter around the curves is less than {+-} 5 per cent. In the ranges investigated, the observed steam quality at burnout, X{sub BO} generally decreases with increasing heat flux and mass velocity but increases with increasing pressure. The data have been compared with the empirical correlation by Tong, and excellent agreement was found for pressures higher than 10 kg/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Gamma-ray-based measurement of concentration distribution in pipe flow of settling slurry: vertical profiles and tomographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupička Jan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Principles of gamma-ray-based measurement are summarized and their application is demonstrated on an operation of the radiometric facility installed in the test loop for slurry flows at the Institute of Hydrodynamics. The facility is able to measure vertical profiles of chord-averaged concentrations and concentration maps in the pipe cross section. A methodology of measurement is proposed including detection and quantification of random and systematic errors. Experimental results are discussed in the light of the proposed methodology. Experimentally determined vertical profiles of concentration are presented for slurry flows of four different fractions of glass beads. The tomographic application of the radiometric device is demonstrated on a measured concentration map and a suitable image reconstruction method is tested. High reliability of measured concentration distributions is proved except for regions near the pipe wall. The radiometric method is shown to be a useful tool for measurement of concentration distribution in slurry flow through a pipe.

  7. Radiographic diagnosis of sagittal plane rotational displacement in pelvic fractures: a cadaveric model and clinical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Kong, Jianzhong; Feng, Yongzeng; Hu, Wei; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to measure the sagittal plane rotational (flexion and extension) displacement of hemipelvis radiologically and analyze the ratio of flexion and extension displacement of unstable pelvic fractures. We used 8 cadaveric models to study the radiographic evidence of pelvic fractures in the sagittal plane. We performed pelvic osteotomy on 8 cadavers to simulate anterior and posterior pelvic ring injury. Radiological data were measured in the flexion and extension group under different angles (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°). We retrospectively reviewed 164 patients who were diagnosed with a unilateral fracture of the pelvis. Pelvic ring displacement was identified and recorded radiographically in cadaveric models. The flexion and extension displacement of pelvic fractures was measured in terms of the vertical distance of fracture from the top of iliac crest to the pubic tubercle (CD) or from the top of iliac crest to the lowest point of ischial tuberosity (AB). Fifty-seven pelves showed flexion displacement and 15 showed extension displacement. Closed reduction including internal fixation and external fixation was successfully used in 141 cases (86.0 %). The success rates of closed reduction in flexion and extension displacement groups were 77 and 73 %, respectively, which were lower than in unstable pelvic ring fractures. The sagittal plane rotation (flexion and extension) displacement of pelvic fractures could be measured by special points and lines on the radiographs. Minimally invasive reduction should be based on clearly identified differences between the sagittal plane rotation and the vertical displacement of pelvic fractures.

  8. Measurements and Mesoscale Modeling of Autumnal Vertical Ozone Profiles in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ping Peng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical measurements of ozone were made using a tethered balloon at the Linyuan site in Kaohsiung County, southern Taiwan. Ozone was monitored at altitudes of 0, 100, 300, 500, and 1000 m from November 23 to 25 in 2005. The potential temperature profiles revealed a stable atmosphere during the study period, largely because of the dominance of the high-pressure system and nocturnal radiation cooling close to the surface. The mixing height was low (50 - 300 m, particularly in the late night and early morning. The surface ozone concentrations that were predicted using TAPM (The Air Pollution Model were high (33.7 - 119 ppbv in the daytime (10:00 - 16:00 and were low (10 - 40 ppbv at other times; the predictions of which were consistent with the observations. The simulated surface ozone concentrations reveal that costal lands typically had higher ozone concentrations than those inland, because most industrial parks are located in or close to the boundaries of Kaohsiung City. Both measurements and simulations indicate that daytime ozone concentrations decreased quickly with increasing height at altitudes below 300 m; while nighttime ozone concentrations were lower at low altitudes (50 to 300 m than at higher altitudes, partly because of dry deposition and titration of surface ozone by the near-surface nitrogen oxides (NOx and partly because of the existence of the residual layer above the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The simulations show a good correlation between the maximum daytime surface ozone concentration and average nighttime ozone concentration above the nocturnal boundary layer.

  9. Displacement Parameter Inversion for a Novel Electromagnetic Underground Displacement Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanying Shentu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA. Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named “EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method”. Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0–100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications.

  10. Design and development of a novel test method to measure the slipper / swashplate interface fluid film in a positive displacement machine

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, Natalie A

    2014-01-01

    Although robust models of fluid film behavior between the slipper / swashplate lubricating interface in positive displacement machines have been developed, measuring this same fluid film thickness to a highly accurate degree inside a relatively unaltered axial piston unit has never been accomplished until now. A test method was created to close this gap in available data by measuring fluid film thickness between the slipper and swashplate in a 130cc axial piston pump. Precise knowledge of the...

  11. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  12. A new technique to determine vertical dimension of occlusion from anthropometric measurements of fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Ladda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO and length of fingers. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 dentate subjects comprising of 200 males and 200 females. Anthropometric measurements of VDO, length of index finger, length of little finger, and distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger of right hand were recorded clinically using modified digital vernier caliper. Correlation between VDO and length of fingers was studied using Spearman′s coefficient. For the execution of regression command and preparation of prediction equations to estimate VDO, Statistical Package for Social Sciences Software Version 11.5 was used. Results: VDO was significantly and positively correlated with all the parameters studied. In males, correlation of VDO was strongest for length of index finger (r-0.406 whereas in females, it was strongest for length of little finger (r-0.385. VDO estimation using regression equation had a standard error of ± 3.76 in males and ± 2.86 in females for length of index finger, ±3.81 and ± 2.74 in males and females respectively for length of little finger, ±3.99 and ± 2.89 in males and females respectively for distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger. Conclusions: Since the variations between VDO and finger lengths are within the range of 2-4 mm, VDO prediction through this method is reliable, and reproducible. Also the method is simple, economic, and non-invasive; hence, it could be recommended for everyday practice.

  13. Digital displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2014-01-01

    digital interface. However, the transformation of citizen services from traditional face-to-face interaction to digital self-service gives rise to new practices; some citizens need support to be able to manage self-service through digital tools. A mixture of support and teaching, named co...... digital reforms in Denmark and shows how citizen service is transformed from service to support. The frontline employee’s classical tasks such as casework are being displaced into educational and support-oriented tasks with less professional content. Thus an unintended effect of digitisation is blurred......In recent years digital reforms are being introduced in the municipal landscape of Denmark. The reforms address the interaction between citizen and local authority. The aim is, that by 2015 at least 80 per cent of all correspondence between citizens and public authority will be transmitted through...

  14. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  15. Validation of GOME (ERS-2) NO2 vertical column data with ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, D.; Sinyakov, V.; Semenov, V.

    Starting from 1995 the global monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is carried out by the measurements of nadir-viewing GOME spectrometer aboard ERS-2 satellite. Continuous validation of that data by means of comparisons with well-controlled ground-based measurements is important to ensure the quality of GOME data products and improve related retrieval algorithms. At the station of Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) the ground-based spectroscopic observations of NO2 vertical column have been started since 1983. The station is located on the northern shore of Issyk-Kul lake, 1650 meters above the sea level (42.6 N, 77.0 E). The site is equipped with grating spectrometer for the twilight measurements of zenith-scattered solar radiation in the visible range, and applies the DOAS technique to retrieve NO2 vertical column. It is included in the list of NDSC stations as a complementary one. The present study is focused on validation of GOME NO2 vertical column data, based on 8-year comparison with correlative ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul station in 1996-2003. Within the investigation, an agreement of both individual and monthly averaged GOME measurements with corresponding twilight ground-based observations is examined. Such agreement is analyzed with respect to different conditions (season, sun elevation), temporal/spatial criteria choice (actual overpass location, correction for diurnal variation) and data processing (GDP version 2.7, 3.0). In addition, NO2 vertical columns were integrated from simultaneous stratospheric profile measurements by NASA HALOE and SAGE-II/III satellite instruments and introduced to explain the differences with ground-based observations. In particular cases, NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from the twilight ground-based measurements at Issuk-Kul were also included into comparison. Overall, summertime GOME NO2 vertical columns were found to be systematicaly lower than ground-based data. This work was supported by International Association

  16. TransCom model simulations of methane: Comparison of vertical profiles with aircraft measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, R.; Patra, P.K.; Sweeney, C.; Machida, T.; Krol, M.C.; Houweling, S.; Bousquet, P.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Belikov, D.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.S.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Fraser, A.; Gatti, L.V.; Gloor, E.; Hess, P.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Locatelli, R.; Loh, Z.; Maksyutov, S.; Meng, L.; Miller, J.B.; Palmer, P.I.; Prinn, R.G.; Rigby, M.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    To assess horizontal and vertical transports of methane (CH4) concentrations at different heights within the troposphere, we analyzed simulations by 12 chemistry transport models (CTMs) that participated in the TransCom-CH4 intercomparison experiment. Model results are compared with aircraft

  17. One Year of Vertical Wind Profiles Measurements at a Mediterranean Coastal Site of South Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Gullì, Daniel; Avolio, Elenio

    2015-01-01

    To exploit wind energy both onshore and offshore in coastal area the effect of the coastal discontinuity is important. The shape of the vertical wind profiles and the related c parameter of the Weibull distribution are impacted by the atmospheric internal boundary layers developing from the coast...

  18. Tropical cyclone cloud‐top height and vertical temperature structure detection using GPS radio occultation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Ho, Shu‐Peng; Randel, William

    2013-01-01

    The accurate determination of tropical cyclone (TC) cloud-top height and its vertical thermal structure using the GPS radio occultation (RO) technique is demonstrated in this study. Cloud-top heights are determined by using the bending angle anomaly and the temperature anomaly profiles during the...

  19. Variable mode-mixity during fatigue cycles – crack tip parameters determined from displacement fields measured by digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vormwald

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focusses on discussing equivalent stress intensity factors and kink angles after a change of mode-mixity from one cycle to the next and when the mode-mixity changes continuously during the fatigue cycles. Thin-walled tubes with through-wall cracks have been loaded by proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion. In the experimental investigation, the region of fatigue crack growth was observed by applying the digital image correlation technique. Data on the variations of the displacement and strain fields during the cycles were acquired and used to determine mixed-mode variations of stress intensity factors associated with opening modes I, II and III. For each specific specimen the crack path was observed in order to relate its curvature – both kinks and continuously developing warped cracks – with the variations of the displacement field and associated stress intensity factors.

  20. Simultaneous in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement based on a dual-camera imaging system and its application to inspection of large-scale space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Umebayashi, Takashi; Sato, Akiyoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Optical methods providing full-field deformation data have potentially enormous interest for mechanical engineers. In this study, an in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement method based on a dual-camera imaging system is proposed. The in-plane and out-of-plane displacements are determined simultaneously using two measured in-plane displacement data observed from two digital cameras at different view angles. The fundamental measurement principle and experimental results of accuracy confirmation are presented. In addition, we applied this method to the displacement measurement in a static loading and bending test of a solid rocket motor case (CFRP material; 2.2 m diameter and 2.3 m long) for an up-to-date Epsilon rocket developed by JAXA. The effectiveness and measurement accuracy is confirmed by comparing with conventional displacement sensor. This method could be useful to diagnose the reliability of large-scale space structures in the rocket development.

  1. Measurements of the Effects of Spacers on the Burnout Conditions for Flow of Boiling Water in a Vertical Annulus and a Vertical 7-Rod Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt M.

    1965-03-15

    An analysis for predicting the burnout conditions for flow of boiling water in vertical round ducts is presented. The analysis which is based on the Vanderwater flow model predicts that the burnout conditions are independent of the inlet subcooling and the heated length, and depends only on the local values at the burnout position of pressure, heat flux, steam quality and, mass velocity and the duct diameter. The results of an experimental investigation covering 811 burnout measurements in the pressure range from 41 to 101 kg/cm{sup 2} is presented. These results together with 488 of our earlier burnout measurements at the pressures of 2, 7, 10, 20 and 30 kg/cm{sup 2} were used to determine two constants in the analytical results. The final correlation predicted the burnout heat fluxes of the 1299 measurements within 8 per cent and with an RMS error of 5.3 per cent. The measurements covered the following ranges of variables Diameter d, 3.93-24.95 mm; Heated length L 400-3,500 mm; L/d-ratio L/d 40-890; Pressure p, 2.7-101 kg/cm{sup 2}; Inlet sub-cooling {delta}t{sub sub} 30-240 deg C; Mass velocity G 120-5450 kg/m{sup 3}/s; Heat flux q/A 35-686 W/cm{sup 3}; Burnout steam quality X{sub BO} 0-1.00. The Columbia data and the Winfrith data were also analysed in terms of the measured and predicted burnout heat fluxes and enthalpies, and it was found, that a very good agreement existed between the present results and the Columbia and the Winfrith data. The Columbia data were on the average 3 per cent lower comparing the measured and predicted burnout heat fluxes. The scatter of the data was within + 10 and - 15 per cent and the RMS error was 8.4 per cent. The Winfrith data were on the average 6 per cent higher than the predicted heat fluxes and the deviations of the measured heat fluxes were within + 25 and - 15 per cent of the predictions. The RMS error was 10.8 per cent.

  2. Vertical Resolved Dust Mass Concentration and Backscatter Coefficient Retrieval of Asian Dust Plume Using Quartz Raman Channel in Lidar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noh Young M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a method for estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust immersed in Asian dust plume using Raman scattering of quartz (silicon dioxide, silica. During the Asian dust period of March 15, 16, and 21 in 2010, Raman lidar measurements detected the presence of quartz, and successfully showed the vertical profiles of the quartz backscatter coefficient. Since the Raman backscatter coefficient was connected with the Raman backscatter differential cross section and the number density of quartz molecules, the mass concentration of quartz in the atmosphere can be estimated from the quartz backscatter coefficient. The weight percentage from 40 to 70 % for quartz in the Asian dust was estimated from references. The vertical resolved mass concentration of dust was estimated by quartz mass concentration and weight percentage. We also present a retrieval method to obtain dust backscatter coefficient from the mixed Asian dust and pollutant layer. OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds simulations were conducted to calculate dust backscatter coefficient. The retrieved dust mass concentration was used as an input parameter for the OPAC calculations. These approaches in the study will be useful for characterizing the quartz dominated in the atmospheric aerosols and estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust. It will be especially applicable for optically distinguishing the dust and non-dust aerosols in studies on the mixing state of Asian dust plume. Additionally, the presented method combined with satellite observations is enable qualitative and quantitative monitoring for Asian dust.

  3. Experimental Vertical Stability Studies for ITER Performance and Design Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, D A; Casper, T A; Eidietis, N; Ferrera, M; Gates, D A; Hutchinson, I H; Jackson, G L; Kolemen, E; Leuer, J A; Lister, J; LoDestro, L L; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Sartori, F; Walker, M L; Welander, A S; Wolfe, S M

    2008-10-13

    Operating experimental devices have provided key inputs to the design process for ITER axisymmetric control. In particular, experiments have quantified controllability and robustness requirements in the presence of realistic noise and disturbance environments, which are difficult or impossible to characterize with modeling and simulation alone. This kind of information is particularly critical for ITER vertical control, which poses some of the highest demands on poloidal field system performance, since the consequences of loss of vertical control can be very severe. The present work describes results of multi-machine studies performed under a joint ITPA experiment on fundamental vertical control performance and controllability limits. We present experimental results from Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV, and JET, along with analysis of these data to provide vertical control performance guidance to ITER. Useful metrics to quantify this control performance include the stability margin and maximum controllable vertical displacement. Theoretical analysis of the maximum controllable vertical displacement suggests effective approaches to improving performance in terms of this metric, with implications for ITER design modifications. Typical levels of noise in the vertical position measurement which can challenge the vertical control loop are assessed and analyzed.

  4. Measurement errors when estimating the vertical jump height with flight time using photocell devices: the example of Optojump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, A; Dhahbi, W; Chaouachi, A; Padulo, J; Wong, D P; Chamari, K

    2017-03-01

    Common methods to estimate vertical jump height (VJH) are based on the measurements of flight time (FT) or vertical reaction force. This study aimed to assess the measurement errors when estimating the VJH with flight time using photocell devices in comparison with the gold standard jump height measured by a force plate (FP). The second purpose was to determine the intrinsic reliability of the Optojump photoelectric cells in estimating VJH. For this aim, 20 subjects (age: 22.50±1.24 years) performed maximal vertical jumps in three modalities in randomized order: the squat jump (SJ), counter-movement jump (CMJ), and CMJ with arm swing (CMJarm). Each trial was simultaneously recorded by the FP and Optojump devices. High intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) for validity (0.98-0.99) and low limits of agreement (less than 1.4 cm) were found; even a systematic difference in jump height was consistently observed between FT and double integration of force methods (-31% to -27%; p1.2). Intra-session reliability of Optojump was excellent, with ICCs ranging from 0.98 to 0.99, low coefficients of variation (3.98%), and low standard errors of measurement (0.8 cm). It was concluded that there was a high correlation between the two methods to estimate the vertical jump height, but the FT method cannot replace the gold standard, due to the large systematic bias. According to our results, the equations of each of the three jump modalities were presented in order to obtain a better estimation of the jump height.

  5. Measurement errors when estimating the vertical jump height with flight time using photocell devices: the example of Optojump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, A; Chaouachi, A; Padulo, J; Wong, DP; Chamari, K

    2016-01-01

    Common methods to estimate vertical jump height (VJH) are based on the measurements of flight time (FT) or vertical reaction force. This study aimed to assess the measurement errors when estimating the VJH with flight time using photocell devices in comparison with the gold standard jump height measured by a force plate (FP). The second purpose was to determine the intrinsic reliability of the Optojump photoelectric cells in estimating VJH. For this aim, 20 subjects (age: 22.50±1.24 years) performed maximal vertical jumps in three modalities in randomized order: the squat jump (SJ), counter-movement jump (CMJ), and CMJ with arm swing (CMJarm). Each trial was simultaneously recorded by the FP and Optojump devices. High intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) for validity (0.98-0.99) and low limits of agreement (less than 1.4 cm) were found; even a systematic difference in jump height was consistently observed between FT and double integration of force methods (-31% to -27%; p1.2). Intra-session reliability of Optojump was excellent, with ICCs ranging from 0.98 to 0.99, low coefficients of variation (3.98%), and low standard errors of measurement (0.8 cm). It was concluded that there was a high correlation between the two methods to estimate the vertical jump height, but the FT method cannot replace the gold standard, due to the large systematic bias. According to our results, the equations of each of the three jump modalities were presented in order to obtain a better estimation of the jump height. PMID:28416900

  6. Ground-Based Remote or In Situ Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Wind in the Lower Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Knowledge of winds in the lower troposphere is essential for a range of applications, including weather forecasting, transportation, natural hazards, and wind energy. This presentation focuses on the measurement of vertical profiles of wind in the lower troposphere for wind energy applications. This presentation introduces the information that wind energy site development and operations require, how it used, and the benefits and problems of current measurements from in-situ measurements and remote sensing. The development of commercial Doppler wind lidar systems over the last 10 years are shown, along with the lessons learned from this experience. Finally, potential developments in wind profiling aimed at reducing uncertainty and increasing data availability are introduced.

  7. Aerosol vertical distribution over east China from RIEMS-Chem simulation in comparison with CALIPSO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawei; Han, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    The horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosol extinction coefficient (AEC) and mass concentration over east China in October 2010 were investigated by using an online-coupled regional climate model and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) data. Model performance was evaluated comprehensively against ground observations of meteorological variables and PM10 concentrations and CALIPSO retrieved AEC profiles, which demonstrated a good ability of the model in simulating spatial distribution and evolution of aerosol concentration and optical properties. Severe pollution episodes were found over wide areas of east China during the study period, with the maximum mean PM10 concentration exceeding 200 μg m-3 in the Chongqing district and a part of the lower reaches of the Yellow River on 8-10 October. Both CALIPSO retrievals and model simulations revealed high AEC values (≥1 km-1) often occurred within 2 km above ground over most areas of east China. AEC vertical profile in or in the vicinity of China major cities along CALIPSO orbit track exhibited two typical features: one was AEC reached its maximum (∼4 km-1) near the surface (<200 m) and decreased rapidly to < 0.1 km-1 at altitudes above 1 km, another one was AEC peaked at higher altitudes of about 0.5-1 km with a maximum up to 3 km-1. AEC vertical profile was strongly dependent on vertical distribution of both aerosol concentration, composition and relative humidity. The vertical cross sections over typical regions of east China exhibited a decreasing AEC in magnitude from the continent to the China seas. Over the continent, AEC was either maximum near the surface or peaked at higher altitudes (0.5-1.0 km) due to increases of relative humidity or aerosol concentration in those regions, whereas over the seas of China, AEC profile was characterized by peak values at an altitude around 1 km, mainly due to an elevated relative humidity there, which favored rapid aerosol

  8. First measurement of the displacement rate of the Pacific Plate near the Japan Trench after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/acoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Fumiaki; Kido, Motoyuki; Osada, Yukihito; Hino, Ryota; Ohta, Yusaku; Iinuma, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    The subduction rate of an oceanic plate may accelerate after large earthquakes rupture the interplate coupling between the oceanic and overriding continental plates. To better understand postseismic deformation processes in an incoming oceanic plate, we directly measured the displacement rate of the Pacific Plate near the Japan Trench after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using a GPS/acoustic technique over a period of 2 years (September 2012 to September 2014). The displacement rate was measured to be 18.0 ± 4.5 cm yr-1 (N302.0°E) relative to the North American Plate, which is almost twice as fast as the predicted interseismic plate motion. Because the sum of steady plate motion and viscoelastic response to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake roughly accounts for the observed displacement rate, we conclude that viscoelastic relaxation is the primary mechanism responsible for postseismic deformation of the Pacific Plate and that significant subduction acceleration did not occur at least not during the observation period.

  9. An Improved Method for Dynamic Measurement of Deflections of the Vertical Based on the Maintenance of Attitude Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkai Dai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new method for dynamic measurement of deflections of the vertical (DOV is proposed in this paper. The integration of an inertial navigation system (INS and global navigation satellite system (GNSS is constructed to measure the body’s attitude with respect to the astronomical coordinates. Simultaneously, the attitude with respect to the geodetic coordinates is initially measured by a star sensor under quasi-static condition and then maintained by the laser gyroscope unit (LGU, which is composed of three gyroscopes in the INS, when the vehicle travels along survey lines. Deflections of the vertical are calculated by using the difference between the attitudes with respect to the geodetic coordinates and astronomical coordinates. Moreover, an algorithm for removing the trend error of the vertical deflections is developed with the aid of Earth Gravitational Model 2008 (EGM2008. In comparison with traditional methods, the new method required less accurate GNSS, because the dynamic acceleration calculation is avoided. The errors of inertial sensors are well resolved in the INS/GNSS integration, which is implemented by a Rauch–Tung–Striebel (RTS smoother. In addition, a single-axis indexed INS is adopted to improve the observability of the system errors and to restrain the inertial sensor errors. The proposed method is validated by Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that deflections of the vertical can achieve a precision of better than 1″ for a single survey line. The proposed method can be applied to a gravimetry system based on a ground vehicle or ship with a speed lower than 25 m/s.

  10. Correlation between transverse and vertical measurements in Brazilian growing patients, evaluated by Ricketts-Faltin frontal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Helena Lourenço Belluzzo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Currently in orthodontic diagnosis, besides the lateral cephalometric analysis which evaluates the anteroposterior and vertical direction, the frontal analysis may be added, leading us to another important dimension in space: the transverse dimension. OBJECTIVE: Few longitudinal samples with the frontal radiograph were published, so this cephalometric study was designed to correlate the transversal and vertical measures by Ricketts-Faltin frontal analysis into two radiographic times. METHODS: The sample consisted of 45 Brazilian children, 25 girls and 20 boys, all presenting mixed dentition, with balanced facial aesthetics and no previous orthodontic/orthopedic treatment. The initial average age (T1 was 7.7 years and the final (T2 13.3 years. The measurements evaluated were: FTD, MxTD, NTD, LITD, MdTD (transversal, OVD and TVD (vertical. RESULTS: All transversal measures were positively correlated with a medium or high correlation with each other and the vertical measurements; only LITD presented a low correlation with these measurements. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that the face has interdependent regions and that this feature remains with growth.INTRODUÇÃO: atualmente no diagnóstico ortodôntico, além da análise cefalométrica lateral - que avalia os sentidos anteroposterior e vertical -, deve-se acrescentar a análise no sentido frontal, a qual propicia outra dimensão importante no espaço, a transversal. OBJETIVO: poucas são as amostras longitudinais publicadas utilizando telerradiografias frontais; portanto, o presente estudo cefalométrico teve o intuito de correlacionar as medidas transversais e verticais por meio da análise frontal de Ricketts-Faltin, em dois tempos radiográficos. MÉTODOS: a amostra constou de 45 crianças brasileiras, sendo 25 meninas e 20 meninos, todos apresentando dentição mista, com perfil harmonioso e sem nunca terem sido tratadas ortodonticamente e/ou ortopedicamente. A idade m

  11. Permeability of displaced fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Christian; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Flow along fractures or in fissured systems becomes increasingly important in the context of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), shale gas recovery or nuclear waste deposit. Commonly, the permeability of fractures is approximated using the Hagen-Poiseuille solution of Navier Stokes equation. Furthermore, the flow in fractures is assumed to be laminar flow between two parallel plates and the cubic law for calculating the velocity field is applied. It is a well-known fact, that fracture flow is strongly influenced by the fracture surface roughness and the shear displacement along the fracture plane. Therefore, a numerical approach was developed which calculates the flow pattern within a fracture-matrix system. The flow in the fracture is described by a free fluid flow and the flow in the matrix is assumed to be laminar and therefore validates Darcy's law. The presented approach can be applied for artificially generated fractures or real fractures measured by surface scanning. Artificial fracture surfaces are generated using the power spectral density of the surface height random process with a spectral exponent to define roughness. For calculating the permeability of such fracture-matrix systems the mean fracture aperture, the shear displacement and the surface roughness are considered by use of a 3D numerical simulator. By use of this approach correlation between shear displacement and mean aperture, shear displacement and permeability, as well as surface roughness and permeability can be obtained. Furthermore, the intrinsic measured permeability presents a combination of matrix and fracture permeability. The presented approach allows the separation and quantification of the absolute magnitudes of the matrix and the fracture permeability and the permeability of displaced fractures can be calculated. The numerical approach which is a 3D numerical simulation of the fracture-matrix system can be applied for artificial as well as real systems.

  12. Body fat measurements in elite adolescent volleyball players: correlation between skinfold thickness, bioelectrical impedance analysis, air-displacement plethysmography, and body mass index percentiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Shawn; Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Adler-Portal, Dana; Burstein, Ruty Pilz; Lahav, Yair; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan; Eliakim, Alon

    2010-04-01

    Determination of body composition is an essential parameter in training athletes because low fat-muscle ratio might improve physical performance in many types of sports. Since training is often conducted in the field, it is important to determine whether simple field measurements of body composition assessment correlate with laboratory measurements. Examine the correlation of body fat content as measured using skinfold thicknesses (SF), air-displacement plethysmography (BOD POD), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and body mass index (BMI) age and gender adjusted percentiles. Body mass as measured by SF, BOD POD, BIA, and BMI percentiles were examined in 29 elite, national team level, male and female volleyball players (age range 13 to 18) at the beginning of the training season. Body fat percent measured by SF, BIA and BOD POD were highly positively correlated (r > 0.83). Measurements of body fat by SF, BIA and BOD POD were weakly correlated with BMI percentiles (r BOD POD are essentially interchangeable.

  13. A comparison between vertical motions measured by ADCP and inferred from temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. van Haren

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined vertical current (w and thermistor string data demonstrate that high-, near-buoyancy frequency internal "wave" trains along a pycnocline in a flat-bottom shelf sea consist for 2 periods of a dominant mode-1 non-linear part, while thereafter mainly of linear [mode-2, quadrupled frequency] waves, to first order. In a simple [linear] heat budget the use of unfiltered temperature gradient or its time mean changes results by only 10%. The observations also demonstrate that temperature is not always adequate to estimate vertical motions using the linear 1-D heat equation. In shallow seas, tidal-w estimated from temperature data can be an order of magnitude weaker than directly observed w, and thus do not represent free internal waves. In the ocean, not too far from the main internal wave topography source, tidal motions represent linear waves and are well described by temperature-inferred w. There however, temperature-inferred w and directly observed w differ strongly near the buoyancy frequency, at which w is dominated by non-linear waves, and near [sub]inertial frequencies, at which w is dominated by eddies and gyroscopic waves.

  14. Spatial and temporal film thickness measurement of a soap bubble based on large lateral shearing displacement interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Zhou, Huaichun; Lou, Chun; Zhu, Jinrong

    2012-12-20

    The film thickness of a hanging soap bubble has been studied along its gravitational orientation after its birth and before its bursting using large lateral shearing displacement interferometry, with a theoretical error of less than 0.325λ. The results show that the spatial distribution of the film thickness could be approximated with an exponential model in all captured frames, especially in the lower half of the soap bubble. Before its bursting, a special zone, where the water layer has drained out while the surfactant solution layer remains, will occur at the top of the soap bubble and gradually expand toward the bottom. Moreover, the simulated fringe patterns based on the computed values match well with the experimentally observed ones.

  15. How Well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.; hide

    2006-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well-characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well-proven and new aerosol instrumentation devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from six different instruments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, groundbased Raman lidar, and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measured sigma(ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002-0.004 Km!1 equivalent to 13-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(ep)(lambda) are higher: Bias differences are 0.004 Km(-1) (13%) and 0.007 Km(-1) (24%) for the two elastic backscatter lidars (MPLNET and MPLARM, lambda = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km(-1) (54%) for the Raman lidar (lambda = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP, and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated

  16. BrO vertical distributions from SCIAMACHY limb measurements: comparison of algorithms and retrieval results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozanov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents two scientific and one operational retrieval algorithms used to obtain vertical distributions of bromine monoxide (BrO from observations of the scattered solar light performed by the SCIAMACHY instrument in limb viewing geometry. The study begins with a discussion of the theoretical basis of all algorithms followed by an investigation of the retrieval sensitivity. Simulations with three different radiative transfer models allow us to analyze influence of the forward model implementation upon the retrieval results. By means of synthetic retrievals we analyze major sources of uncertainties in the resulting BrO profiles such as different BrO cross sections, their temperature dependence, and stratospheric aerosols. Finally, the reliability of SCIAMACHY BrO profile retrievals is demonstrated comparing results from different algorithms to each other and to balloon-borne observations.

  17. Miniaturised optical displacement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindele, Frank; Gaul, Frank; Kraus, Silvio; Sigloch, Susanne; Teubner, Ulrich

    2004-09-01

    The primary object presented in this contribution is the miniaturization of a displacement sensor system with the potential for high accuracy measurements and for cost-effective production in polymers. The measurement of linear displacements can be performed by different methods e.g. magnetoresistive, potentiometric, electromagnetic or inductive encoder systems. For movements in the millimeter range and above the most precise systems are based on optical methods. The displacement measurement of our sensor system uses the intensity modulation of two amplitude gratings, moving relative to each other and illuminated by a LED. To increase the system resolution and the signal quality the grating/detector combination is divided into four areas which are phase shifted to each other. The grating period is 25 μm with a geometrical accuracy below 1 μm. The amplitude gratings have been processed on a glass substrate lithographically. Applying electro-discharge machining a miniaturised optical bench for the passive alignment of the optical and the opto-electronic components has been realised. The sensor has an overall size of 6x4x3 mm3 and is designed for the future replication in one single polymer part. In combination with an electronic interpolation the sensor will be capable for a sub-micrometer accuracy.

  18. Vertical profiles of black carbon measured by a micro-aethalometer in summer in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Liang; Deng, Zhaoze; Xu, Xiaobin; Yan, Peng; Lin, Weili; Wang, Ying; Tian, Ping; Wang, Pucai; Pan, Weilin; Lu, Daren

    2016-08-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a dominant absorber in the visible spectrum and a potent factor in climatic effects. Vertical profiles of BC were measured using a micro-aethalometer attached to a tethered balloon during the Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols (VOGA) field campaign, in summer 2014 at a semirural site in the North China Plain (NCP). The diurnal cycle of BC vertical distributions following the evolution of the mixing layer (ML) was investigated for the first time in the NCP region. Statistical parameters including identified mixing height (Hm) and average BC mass concentrations within the ML (Cm) and in the free troposphere (Cf) were obtained for a selected dataset of 67 vertical profiles. Hm was usually lower than 0.2 km in the early morning and rapidly rose thereafter due to strengthened turbulence. The maximum height of the ML was reached in the late afternoon. The top of a full developed ML exceeded 1 km on sunny days in summer, while it stayed much lower on cloudy days. The sunset triggered the collapse of the ML, and a stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) gradually formed. Accordingly, the highest level Cm was found in the early morning and the lowest was found in the afternoon. In the daytime, BC was almost uniformly distributed within the ML and significantly decreased above the ML. During the field campaign, Cm averaged about 5.16 ± 2.49 µg m-3, with a range of 1.12 to 14.49 µg m-3, comparable with observational results in many polluted urban areas such as Milan in Italy and Shanghai in China. As evening approached, BC gradually built up near the surface and exponentially declined with height. In contrast to the large variability found both in Hm and Cm, Cf stayed relatively unaffected through the day. Cf was less than 10 % of the ground level under clean conditions, while it amounted to half of the ground level in some polluted cases. In situ measurements of BC vertical profiles would hopefully have an important implication for

  19. Short communication: Relationship between competitive success during displacements at an overstocked feed bunk and measures of physiology and behavior in Holstein dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzzey, J M; Grant, R J; Overton, T R

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how behavioral and physiological parameters are affected based on a cow's level of success at displacing others at an overstocked feed bunk. Forty Holstein nonlactating, late-gestation dairy cattle were housed in an overstocked pen [5 stalls/10 cows and 0.34 m of linear feed bunk (FB) space/cow] in groups of 10 (4 heifers and 6 multiparous cows) for 14 d. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids, glucose, and fecal cortisol metabolites (11,17-dioxoandrostanes) were measured in blood and feces sampled every 2d. A glucose tolerance test and an ACTH challenge were conducted on all cows on d 13 and 14, respectively to further explore the effects of competitive success on energy metabolism and stress physiology. Feeding behavior and displacements at the FB were recorded between d 7 to 10 of the observation period. A competition index (CInd) was calculated for each cow by dividing the number of times the cow displaced another at the FB by the total number of displacements the cow was involved in, either as an actor or reactor. Cows were then divided into 3 subgroups based on their CInd: high success (HS: CInd ≥0.6), medium success (0.4 ≤ CInd cows in the LS group had greater daily nonesterified fatty acid and 11,17-dioxoandrostane concentrations relative to cows in the HS group. No differences existed in cortisol response to an ACTH stimulation test between CInd categories. During the glucose tolerance test, glucose response curves were the same between all 3 CInd categories; however, the peak insulin response of LS cows was 130 μIU/mL greater than the peak HS response, indicating that LS cows may have decreased tissue responses to insulin or increased pancreatic responses to glucose. In an overstocked environment, dairy cattle physiology is associated with a cow's level of success at displacing other individuals at the feed bunk. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined effects of Mass and Velocity on forward displacement and phenomenological ratings: a functional measurement approach to the Momentum metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel-Ange Amorim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Representational Momentum (RepMo refers to the phenomenon that the vanishing position of a moving target is perceived as displaced ahead in the direction of movement. Originally taken to reflect a strict internalization of physical momentum, the finding that the target implied mass did not have an effect led to its subsequent reinterpretation as a second-order isomorphism between mental representations and principles of the physical world. However, very few studies have addressed the effects of mass on RepMo, and consistent replications of the null effect are lacking. The extent of motor engagement of the observers in RepMo tasks has, on the other hand, been suggested to determine the occurrence of the phenomenon; however, no systematic investigations were made of the degree to which it might modulate the effect of target mass. In the present work, we use Information Integration Theory to study the joint effects of different motor responses, target velocity and target mass on RepMo, and also of velocity and target mass on rating responses. Outcomes point not only to an effect of mass on RepMo, as to a differential effect of response modality on kinematic (e.g., velocity and dynamic (e.g., mass variables. Comparisons of patterns of mislocalisation with phenomenological ratings suggest that simplification of physical principles, rather than strict internalization or isomorphism per se, might underlie RepMo.

  1. Isometric measurement of wrist-extensor power following surgical treatment of displaced lateral condylar fracture of the humerus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Po-Hsin; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2008-10-01

    Muscle disability is a common sequel after fracture management. Previous research has shown divergent results concerning muscle-power recovery after bone healing. This study has investigated the muscle function of wrist extensors after lateral condylar fracture in children, as evaluated by a hand-held dynamometer and compared with sex- and age-matched children. From 1999 to 2004, 20 patients (13 boys and seven girls; mean age: 9 years and 4 months) with displaced lateral condylar fracture of the humerus were treated by open reduction and internal fixation with Kirschner wires (K-wire). The duration of K-wire fixation was 35 days and the mean follow-up time was 50 months. A total of 180 healthy age-, sex- and weight-matched children were used as control groups. A paired Student's test was applied for the analysis of statistical significance. The range of motion of the elbow and radiographic findings were not significantly different between the injured limb and normal control groups. The maximum isometric power of wrist-extensor muscles after surgical treatment of lateral condylar fracture of the humerus in final follow-up was not statistically different from that in the normal control children. Muscle power therefore recovers to its normal status after the healing of lateral condylar fracture of the humerus in children.

  2. Reliability of different facial measurements for determination of vertical dimension of occlusion in edentulous using accepted facial dimensions recorded from dentulous subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Abhishek; Parkash, Hari; Bhargava, Akshay; Chittaranjan, B

    2014-09-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of different facial measurements for determination of vertical dimension of occlusion in edentulous subjects using accepted facial dimensions recorded from dentulous subjects. The hypothesis was that facial measurements can be used to obtain the vertical dimension of occlusion for edentulous patients where no pre-extraction records exist. A total of 180 subjects were selected in the age groups of 50-60 years, consisting of 75 dentate male and 75 dentate female subjects for whom different facial measurements were recorded including vertical dimension of occlusion and rest, and 15 edentulous male and 15 edentulous female subjects for whom all the facial measurements were recorded including the vertical dimension of rest and occlusion following construction of upper and lower complete dentures. The left outer canthus of eye to angle of mouth distance and the right Ear-Eye distance were found to be as valuable adjuncts in the determination of occlusal vertical dimension. The Glabella-Subnasion distance, the Pupil-Stomion distance, the Pupil-Rima Oris distance and the distance between the two Angles of the Mouth did not have a significant role in the determination of the occlusal vertical dimension. The vertical dimension can be determined with reasonable accuracy by utilizing other facial measurements for patients for whom no pre-extraction records exist.

  3. Deslocamento vertical de nematóides entomopatogênicos (Rhabditida: Heterorhabditidae na busca por Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae em laboratório e casa-de-vegetação Vertical displacement of entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditida: Heterorhabditidae in search of Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae under laboratory and greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Sandra Alves

    2009-08-01

    directly linked with its efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the vertical displacement of entomopathogenic nematodes (Heterorhabditis to control the coffee root scale Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley. A test was conducted in a sand column of 5 cm depth under laboratory conditions, using a randomized design, with the strains CCA and JPM3 being applied in aqueous suspension at the top of the column in three concentrations (50, 100 and 500 IJs/insect, with evaluation of mortality after 5 days. It was also conducted an experiment in a 2x2x6 factorial design, at greenhouse conditions with a soil column of 30 cm depth, composed of six extracts of 5 cm. Two nematode strains (CCA and JPM3 and two methods of application (infected cadaver and aqueous suspension were evaluated at different depths. There was no difference between the strains evaluated in the laboratory experiment, and both reached values of 92% mortality. In the experiment conducted at the greenhouse, it was observed that JPM3 was more efficient than CCA, at the two methods of application assessed. Regarding With application methods, aqueous suspension showed better results for both strains and JPM3 was the best treatment in almost all depths evaluated.

  4. Study into the displacement of tumor localization needle during navigated breast cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Christina; Ungi, Tamas; Gauvin, Gabrielle; Jabs, Doris; Lasso, Andras; Engel, Jay; Rudan, John; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Early stage breast cancer is typically treated with lumpectomy. During lumpectomy, electromagnetic tracking can be used to monitor tumor position using a localization needle with an electromagnetic sensor fixed on the needle shaft. This needle is stabilized in the tumor with tissue locking wire hooks, which are deployed once the needle is inserted. The localization needle may displace from its initial position of insertion due to mechanical forces, providing false spatial information about the tumor position and increasing the probability of an incomplete resection. This study investigates whether gravitational and mechanical forces affected the magnitude of needle displacement. METHODS: Ten ultrasound scans were evaluated to measure needle displacement in vivo. Needle position was approximated by the distance between the needle tip and the tumor boundary on a 2D ultrasound image, and needle displacement was defined by the change in position. The angle between the localization needle and the coronal plane was computed in an open-source platform. RESULTS: A significant relationship (p = 0.04) was found between the needle to coronal plane angle and increased needle displacement. Needles inserted vertically, pointing towards the operating room ceiling, tended to exhibit greater needle displacement. Average needle displacement was 1.7 +/-1.2 mm. CONCLUSION: Angle between the needle and the horizontal plane has been shown to affect needle displacement, and should be taken into consideration when inserting the localization needle. Future works can be directed towards improving the clinical workflow and mechanical design of the localization needle to reduce slippage during surgery.

  5. Vertical Dynamic Deflection Measurement in Concrete Beams with the Microsoft Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Xiaojuan; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Chow, Jacky; Ang, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The Microsoft Kinect is arguably the most popular RGB-D camera currently on the market, partially due to its low cost. It offers many advantages for the measurement of dynamic phenomena since it can directly measure three-dimensional coordinates of objects at video frame rate using a single sensor. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the development of a Microsoft Kinect-based system for measuring the deflection of reinforced concrete beams subjected to cyclic loads. New ...

  6. Job Displacement and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; Ouazad, Amine

    no significantly increasing trend prior to displacement; and the crime rate of workers who will be displaced is not significantly higher than the crime rate of workers who will not be displaced. In contrast, displaced workers’ probability to commit any crime increases by 0.52 percentage points in the year of job...

  7. How well can we measure the vertical wind speed? Implications for fluxes of energy and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Kochendorfer; Tilden P. Meyers; John Frank; William J. Massman; Mark W. Heuer

    2012-01-01

    Sonic anemometers are capable of measuring the wind speed in all three dimensions at high frequencies (10­50 Hz), and are relied upon to estimate eddy-covariance-based fluxes of mass and energy over a wide variety of surfaces and ecosystems. In this study, wind-velocity measurement errors from a three-dimensional sonic anemometer with a nonorthogonal transducer...

  8. Measurement of vertical motions of bulk carriers navigating in port entrance channels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moes, J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available measurements of ship motions with simultaneous recording of tide, wave and ship conditions. The measured wave parameters include the wave height, period and direction. Based on these relationships, the maximum safe draught for Richards Bay can be determined...

  9. Determination of the concentration of aerosol particles in a vertical atmospheric column from satellite measurements of the spectral optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2011-11-01

    We propose a method for fast retrieval of the inhalable particle concentration (PM2.5 and PM10) in a vertical atmospheric column from satellite measurements of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) without using a priori assumptions concerning the refractive index and the aerosol particle size distribution function. The method is based on a polynomial regression between PM2.5, PM10, and AOD at the wavelengths 466 nm and 644 nm, established from AERONET data. We have studied the sensitivity of the method to errors in the optical measurements and have estimated the errors in retrieval of PM2.5 and PM10 for different atmospheric situations. We carry out parametrization of the regressions on the value of the integrated air moisture content.

  10. Measurements of the Aerodynamic Normal Forces on a 12-kW Straight-Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Dyachuk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of unsteady forces is necessary when designing vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs. Measurement data for turbines operating at an open site are still very limited. The data obtained from wind tunnels or towing tanks can be used, but have limited applicability when designing large-scale VAWTs. This study presents experimental data on the normal forces of a 12-kW straight-bladed VAWT operated at an open site north of Uppsala, Sweden. The normal forces are measured with four single-axis load cells. The data are obtained for a wide range of tip speed ratios: from 1.7 to 4.6. The behavior of the normal forces is analyzed. The presented data can be used in validations of aerodynamic models and the mechanical design for VAWTs.

  11. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities and aerosol optical properties form MAXDOAS measurements in Yangtze River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Van. Roozendael, Michel; Ding, Aijun; Zhou, Bin; Hendrick, François; Shen, Yicheng; Wang, Tin; Valks, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. Due to huge consumption of fossil fuels and rapid increase of traffic emissions in the past decades, many regions in China have been experiencing heavy air pollution. The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. For instance, there more than 60% of a year was haze days with poor visibility in Shanghai over the last few years. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. MAX-DOAS measurements were performed in Shanghai city center and Wujiang (border of Shanghai and Jiangsu Province) from 2010 to 2012 and in Nanjing (capital of Jiangsu Province) from April 2013. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on aerosol extinction vertical profiles. The total aerosol optical depths (AODs) calculated from the retrieved profiles were compared to MODIS, AERONET and local PM measurements. The aerosol information was input to LIDORT to calculate NO2 air mass factors. The retrieved tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) were compared to in-situ and satellite NO2 measurements.

  12. A system for vertical profile measurements of sensible heat and chemical concentrations near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyppoenen, M.; Walden, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The design, construction and measurements of a computer controlled system applicable to flux measurements of a scalar quantity by the gradient technique are described. Accuracy requirements for the measured variables which are used for flux calculations are considered, together with some practical aspects concerning data storage and control. The construction includes the hardware and the data acquisition, sample intake, and temperature measurement systems. The measurements comprise laboratory tests of the temperature probes and the hardware as well as field tests over wheat and grass land for temperature and wind speed and ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentration profiles. The hardware takes care of most of the operation and only the necessary part is done by the software. The data acquisition system is flexible, accepting the input of either digital and/or analog signals. It also controls the whole system, storing all the data in a single data file. The sample intake unit is designed to take continuous samples in to the monitors as well as grab samples into the canisters. Samples can be selected from one to four levels with no dead volumes in the sampling tubes. The temperature measurement system is constructed using a pair of temperature probes, Pt-100, which are connected to the same signal processing card, in order to remove the offset of the electronic components as well as the bias associated with single probes. This ensures the accuracy of the probes down to 0.005 deg C. According to the field measurements, the relative error limits for the sensible heat fluxes varied from 7 to 20 % in an unstable atmospheric situation. For the ozone flux, the error limits varied from 20 to 100 %, indicating a much poorer accuracy of the monitor compared to the temperature probes. (orig.) 16 refs.

  13. Technical Note: A new global database of trace gases and aerosols from multiple sources of high vertical resolution measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Bodeker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new database of trace gases and aerosols with global coverage, derived from high vertical resolution profile measurements, has been assembled as a collection of binary data files; hereafter referred to as the "Binary DataBase of Profiles" (BDBP. Version 1.0 of the BDBP, described here, includes measurements from different satellite- (HALOE, POAM II and III, SAGE I and II and ground-based measurement systems (ozonesondes. In addition to the primary product of ozone, secondary measurements of other trace gases, aerosol extinction, and temperature are included. All data are subjected to very strict quality control and for every measurement a percentage error on the measurement is included. To facilitate analyses, each measurement is added to 3 different instances (3 different grids of the database where measurements are indexed by: (1 geographic latitude, longitude, altitude (in 1 km steps and time, (2 geographic latitude, longitude, pressure (at levels ~1 km apart and time, (3 equivalent latitude, potential temperature (8 levels from 300 K to 650 K and time.

    In contrast to existing zonal mean databases, by including a wider range of measurement sources (both satellite and ozonesondes, the BDBP is sufficiently dense to permit calculation of changes in ozone by latitude, longitude and altitude. In addition, by including other trace gases such as water vapour, this database can be used for comprehensive radiative transfer calculations. By providing the original measurements rather than derived monthly means, the BDBP is applicable to a wider range of applications than databases containing only monthly mean data. Monthly mean zonal mean ozone concentrations calculated from the BDBP are compared with the database of Randel and Wu, which has been used in many earlier analyses. As opposed to that database which is generated from regression model fits, the BDBP uses the original (quality controlled measurements with no smoothing applied in any

  14. Relationship between Class III malocclusion and hyoid bone displacement during swallowing: a cine-magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Sila Mermut; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Gorgulu, Serkan; Karacay, Seniz; Akca, Eralp; Olmez, Huseyin

    2012-08-01

    The displacement of the hyoid bone (HB) is a critical biomechanical component of the swallowing function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the swallowing-induced vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB in subjects with 2 different magnitudes of skeletal Class III malocclusion, by means of real-time, balanced turbo-field-echo (B-TFE) cine-magnetic resonance imaging. The study population comprised 19 patients with mild skeletal Class III malocclusion, 16 with severe skeletal Class III malocclusion, and 20 with a skeletal Class I relationship. Before the commencement of the study, all subjects underwent cephalometric analysis to identify the nature of skeletal malformations. B-TFE images were obtained for the 4 consecutive stages of deglutition as each patient swallowed 10 mL of water, and the vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB were measured at each stage. At all stages of swallowing, the vertical position of the HB in the severe Class III malocclusion group was significantly lower than those in the mild Class III and Class I malocclusion groups. Similarly, the horizontal displacement of the HB was found to be significantly associated with the severity of malocclusion, i.e., the degree of Class III malocclusion, while the amount of anterior displacement of the HB decreased with an increase in the severity of the Class III deformity. Our findings indicate the existence of a relationship between the magnitude of Class III malocclusion and HB displacement during swallowing.

  15. An Improved Measurement Method for the Strength of Radiation of Reflective Beam in an Industrial Optical Sensor Based on Laser Displacement Meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngchul Bae

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical sensor such as a laser range finder (LRF or laser displacement meter (LDM uses reflected and returned laser beam from a target. The optical sensor has been mainly used to measure the distance between a launch position and the target. However, optical sensor based LRF and LDM have numerous and various errors such as statistical errors, drift errors, cyclic errors, alignment errors and slope errors. Among these errors, an alignment error that contains measurement error for the strength of radiation of returned laser beam from the target is the most serious error in industrial optical sensors. It is caused by the dependence of the measurement offset upon the strength of radiation of returned beam incident upon the focusing lens from the target. In this paper, in order to solve these problems, we propose a novel method for the measurement of the output of direct current (DC voltage that is proportional to the strength of radiation of returned laser beam in the received avalanche photo diode (APD circuit. We implemented a measuring circuit that is able to provide an exact measurement of reflected laser beam. By using the proposed method, we can measure the intensity or strength of radiation of laser beam in real time and with a high degree of precision.

  16. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz, E-mail: tataventorini@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  17. Predicted versus measured thoracic gas volumes of collegiate athletes made by the BOD POD air displacement plethysmography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Dale R

    2015-10-01

    Measured (TGVm) and predicted (TGVp) thoracic gas volumes from the BOD POD were compared in 33 lean, university athletes. On average, TGVp (3.529 L) was not significantly different (p = 0.343) from TGVm (3.628 L); however, there was a bias (r = -0.703, p < 0.001). The difference in the percentage of body fat (BF) was within ±2% BF for 76% of the sample, but athletes at the extremes of height should have TGV measured.

  18. Simulação do deslocamento de potássio em colunas verticais de solo não-saturado Potassium displacement simulation in vertical columns of unsaturated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbas H. Miranda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo do transporte de água e potássio em solo não-saturado é importante, tanto do ponto de vista do ambiente quanto do econômico. Assim sendo, o uso da modelagem computacional é importante, pois permite de maneira precisa e rápida o monitoramento do deslocamento de solutos, importante na prevenção de impactos ao ambiente. No presente trabalho, teve-se o objetivo de avaliar a simulação do deslocamento do íon potássio em colunas de solo não-saturado, utilizando o modelo MIDI, bem como apresentar a determinação dos parâmetros de transporte do íon potássio em um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo, fase arenosa. Concluiu-se que o modelo foi capaz de simular de maneira satisfatória o perfil de umidade e o deslocamento do íon potássio.Water and solute transport studies in unsaturated soil are important for both economical and environmental points of view and, in this sense, it should be emphasized the increase of agricultural use of urban and industrial residues, to the water resources and fertilizers saving. Thus, the computational modeling use is important, because it allows the monitoring of solute displacement, necessary to the environmental impacts prevention in a precise and fast way. The main objective of the present work is to simulate the displacement of potassium ion in unsaturated soil columns, using the MIDI model, as well as to present transport parameters determination of the potassium ion in a Red Yellowish Latossol, sandy phase. The obtained results allowed concluding that the model was capable to adequately simulate the potassium ion displacement.

  19. A Simple Method for Measuring the Verticality of Small-Diameter Driven Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Skov, Bent

    1994-01-01

    The presence of stones, solid waste, and other obstructions can deflect small-diameter driven wells during installation, leading to deviations of the well from its intended position. This could lead to erroneous results, especially for measurements of ground water levels by water level meters...... ground water flow directions....

  20. Measurement of the forward charged particle pseudorapidity density in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV using a displaced interaction point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antchev, G. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, INRNE-BAS, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Aspell, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Atanassov, I. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, INRNE-BAS, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Avati, V. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Baechler, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berardi, V. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica di Bari, Bari (Italy); Berretti, M. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (Italy); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bossini, E. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (Italy); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (Italy); Bottigli, U. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (Italy); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (Italy); Bozzo, M. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bruecken, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Buzzo, A. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Cafagna, F.S. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Catanesi, M.G. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Covault, C. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Physics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Csanad, M. [MTA Wigner Research Center, RMKI, Budapest (Hungary); Eoetvoes University, Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Csoergo, T. [MTA Wigner Research Center, RMKI, Budapest (Hungary); Deile, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Doubek, M. [Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Eggert, K. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Physics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ferro, F. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Fiergolski, A. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Garcia, F. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Georgiev, V. [University of West Bohemia, Plzen (Czech Republic); Giani, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Grzanka, L. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Polish Academy of Science, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Hammerbauer, J. [University of West Bohemia, Plzen (Czech Republic); Heino, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Hilden, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Karev, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kaspar, J. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kopal, J. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kundrat, V. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Lami, S. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Latino, G. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (Italy); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (Italy); Lauhakangas, R. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Leszko, T. [Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Lippmaa, E. [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics NICPB, Tallinn (Estonia); Lippmaa, J. [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics NICPB, Tallinn (Estonia); Lokajicek, M.V. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Losurdo, L. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (IT); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (IT); Lo Vetere, M. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (IT); Universita degli Studi di Genova, Genoa (IT); Lucas Rodriguez, F. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Macri, M. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (IT); Maeki, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (FI); Mercadante, A. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Minafra, N. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica di Bari, Bari (IT); CERN, Geneva (CH); Minutoli, S. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (IT); Nemes, F. [MTA Wigner Research Center, RMKI, Budapest (HU); Eoetvoes University, Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest (HU); Niewiadomski, H. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Oliveri, E. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (IT); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (IT); Oljemark, F. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (FI); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (FI); Orava, R. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (FI); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (FI); Oriunno, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (US); Oesterberg, K. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (FI); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (FI); Palazzi, P. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (IT); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (IT); Peroutka, Z. [University of West Bohemia, Plzen (CZ); Prochazka, J. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (CZ); Quinto, M. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica di Bari, Bari (IT); Radermacher, E. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Radicioni, E. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Ravotti, F. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Robutti, E. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (IT); Ropelewski, L. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Ruggiero, G. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Saarikko, H. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (FI); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (FI); Scribano, A. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (IT); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (IT); Smajek, J. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Snoeys, W. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Sodzawiczny, T. [CERN, Geneva (CH); Sziklai, J. [MTA Wigner Research Center, RMKI, Budapest (HU); Taylor, C. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Physics, Cleveland, OH (US); Turini, N. [Universita degli Studi di Siena (IT); Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (IT); Vacek, V. [Czech Technical University, Prague (CZ); Welti, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (FI); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (FI); Whitmore, J. [Penn State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (US); Wyszkowski, P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (PL); Zielinski, K. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (PL); Collaboration: TOTEM Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The pseudorapidity density of charged particles dN{sub ch}/dη is measured by the TOTEM experiment in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV within the range 3.9 < η < 4.7 and -6.95 < η < -6.9. Data were collected in a low intensity LHC run with collisions occurring at a distance of 11.25 m from the nominal interaction point. The data sample is expected to include 96-97 % of the inelastic proton-proton interactions. The measurement reported here considers charged particles with p{sub T} > 0 MeV/c, produced in inelastic interactions with at least one charged particle in -7 < η < -6 or 3.7 < η < 4.8. The dN{sub ch}/dη has been found to decrease with vertical stroke η vertical stroke, from 5.11 ± 0.73 at η = 3.95 to 1.81 ± 0.56 at η = -6.925. Several Monte Carlo generators are compared to the data and are found to be within the systematic uncertainty of the measurement. (orig.)

  1. Reliability and validity of a wireless microelectromechanicals based system (keimove™) for measuring vertical jumping performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Bernardo; García, Inmaculada; Requena, Francisco; Saez-Saez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Pääsuke, Mati

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of a microelectromechanicals (MEMs) based system (Keimove™) in measuring flight time and takeoff velocity during a counter-movement jump (CMJ). As criterion reference, data of a high- speed camera (HSC) and a force-platform (FP) synchronized with a linear position transducer (LPT) was used. Thirty professional soccer players completely familiarized with the CMJ technique performed three CMJs. The second and third trials were used for further analysis. The Keimove™ system, the HSC and the FP synchronized with the LPT (FP+LPT) simultaneously measured the CMJ performance. During each repetition, the Keimove™ system registered flight time and velocity at takeoff. At the same time and as criterion reference, both the HSC and the FP recorded the flight time while the LPT+FP registered the velocity at takeoff. Pearson correlation coefficients for the flight time were high (r = 0.99; p flight times and velocity at takeoff between the three devices. Intraclass correlations and coefficients of variation between trials were similar and ranged between 0.92-0.97 and 2.1-7.4, respectively. In conclusion, the Keimove™ system represents a valid and reliable instrument to measure velocity at takeoff and flight time during CMJ testing. Thus, this MEMs-based system will offer a portable, cost-effective tool for the assessment CMJ performance. The Keimove™ system is composed of specific software and a wireless MEMs-based device designed to be attached at the lumbar region of the athlete.The Keimove™ system is a mechanically valid and reliable instrument in measuring flight time and velocity at takeoff during CMJ.The validity of the Keimove™ system was determined by comparing its mean flight time and velocity at takeoff with data obtained simultaneously with both a high-speed camera and a force platform synchronized with a linear position transducer.

  2. Measurements of selected C2-C5 hydrocarbons in the troposphere - Latitudinal, vertical, and temporal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Viezee, William; Salas, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    The tropospheric distribution of 1077 C2-C5 hydrocarbon samples was determined. Shipboard measurements obtained over the eastern Pacific Ocean reveal large north-to-south gradients for most nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). The results show that NMHC concentrations can decrease by a factor of two or more during the passage of cold fronts in winter and spring, and that upper tropospheric concentrations were lower than those in the lower troposphere.

  3. Application of the phase method in radioisotope measurements of the liquid - solid particles flow in the vertical pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanus Robert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents idea and an application of the gamma-absorption method to a two-phase flow investigation in a vertical pipeline, where the flow of solid particles transported by water was examined by a set of two 241Am radioactive sources and probes with NaI(Tl scintillation crystals. In the described experiments as solid phase the ceramic models representing natural polymetallic ocean nodules were used. For advanced analysis of electrical signals obtained from detectors the phase of cross-spectral density function has been applied. Results of the average solid-phase velocity measurements were compared with one obtained by application of the classical cross-correlation. It was found that the combined uncertainties of the velocity of solid particles evaluation in the presented experiment did not exceed 0.6% in phase method and 3.2% in cross-correlation method.

  4. Recognition and measurement gas-liquid two-phase flow in a vertical concentric annulus at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Sun, Baojiang; Guo, Yanli; Gao, Yonghai; Zhao, Xinxin

    2018-02-01

    The air-water flow characteristics under pressure in the range of 1-6 MPa in a vertical annulus were evaluated in this report. Time-resolved bubble rising velocity and void fraction were also measured using an electrical void fraction meter. The results showed that the pressure has remarkable effect on the density, bubble size and rise velocity of the gas. Four flow patterns (bubble, cap-bubble, cap-slug, and churn) were also observed instead of Taylor bubble at high pressure. Additionally, the transition process from bubble to cap-bubble was investigated at atmospheric and high pressures, respectively. The results revealed that the flow regime transition criteria for atmospheric pressure do not work at high pressure, hence a new flow regime transition model for annular flow channel geometry was developed to predict the flow regime transition, which thereafter exhibited high accuracy at high pressure condition.

  5. Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing-Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple and Complex Mobility Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    a significant impact in the area of clinical prosthetic and rehabilitation practice with regard to persons who utilize artificial limbs . There are...Measures of Gait 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0748 Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing Return Prosthetic Feet...three different multi-function prosthetic feet (vertical shock, torsion control, multiaxial and energy storing). At this time, the study is still

  6. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF A WIRELESS MICROELECTROMECHANICALS BASED SYSTEM (KEIMOVE™ FOR MEASURING VERTICAL JUMPING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Requena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of a microelectromechanicals (MEMs based system (Keimove™ in measuring flight time and takeoff velocity during a counter-movement jump (CMJ. As criterion reference, data of a high- speed camera (HSC and a force-platform (FP synchronized with a linear position transducer (LPT was used. Thirty professional soccer players completely familiarized with the CMJ technique performed three CMJs. The second and third trials were used for further analysis. The Keimove™ system, the HSC and the FP synchronized with the LPT (FP+LPT simultaneously measured the CMJ performance. During each repetition, the Keimove™ system registered flight time and velocity at takeoff. At the same time and as criterion reference, both the HSC and the FP recorded the flight time while the LPT+FP registered the velocity at takeoff. Pearson correlation coefficients for the flight time were high (r = 0.99; p < 0.001 when Keimove™ system was compared with the HSC or the FP+LPT, respectively. For the velocity at takeoff variable, the Pearson r between the Keimove™ system and the FP+LPT was lower although significant at the 0.05 level. No significant differences in mean values were observed for flight times and velocity at takeoff between the three devices. Intraclass correlations and coefficients of variation between trials were similar and ranged between 0.92-0.97 and 2.1-7.4, respectively. In conclusion, the Keimove™ system represents a valid and reliable instrument to measure velocity at takeoff and flight time during CMJ testing. Thus, this MEMs-based system will offer a portable, cost-effective tool for the assessment CMJ performance

  7. Temperature dependence of the thermal diffusivity of GaAs in the 100-305 K range measured by the pulsed photothermal displacement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanolkotabi, M.; Bennis, G. L.; Gupta, R.

    1999-01-01

    We have measured the variation of the value of the thermal diffusivity of semi-insulating GaAs in the 100-305 K range. The method used is the pulsed photothermal displacement technique. This is a noncontact technique, and the value of the thermal diffusivity is derived from the temporal evolution of the signal rather than its amplitude. This makes the technique less susceptible to uncertainties. We find that the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of semi-insulating GaAs follows a power law as T-1.62, in disagreement with results obtained previously. Possible reasons for the deviation within this very important intermediate temperature range are discussed.

  8. A New Proxy Measurement Algorithm with Application to the Estimation of Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Using Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhu Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the ground reaction forces (GRF during walking is typically limited to laboratory settings, and only short observations using wearable pressure insoles have been reported so far. In this study, a new proxy measurement method is proposed to estimate the vertical component of the GRF (vGRF from wearable accelerometer signals. The accelerations are used as the proxy variable. An orthogonal forward regression algorithm (OFR is employed to identify the dynamic relationships between the proxy variables and the measured vGRF using pressure-sensing insoles. The obtained model, which represents the connection between the proxy variable and the vGRF, is then used to predict the latter. The results have been validated using pressure insoles data collected from nine healthy individuals under two outdoor walking tasks in non-laboratory settings. The results show that the vGRFs can be reconstructed with high accuracy (with an average prediction error of less than 5.0% using only one wearable sensor mounted at the waist (L5, fifth lumbar vertebra. Proxy measures with different sensor positions are also discussed. Results show that the waist acceleration-based proxy measurement is more stable with less inter-task and inter-subject variability than the proxy measures based on forehead level accelerations. The proposed proxy measure provides a promising low-cost method for monitoring ground reaction forces in real-life settings and introduces a novel generic approach for replacing the direct determination of difficult to measure variables in many applications.

  9. A Comparative Study of the Applied Methods for Estimating Deflection of the Vertical in Terrestrial Geodetic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Vittuari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares three different methods capable of estimating the deflection of the vertical (DoV: one is based on the joint use of high precision spirit leveling and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS, a second uses astro-geodetic measurements and the third gravimetric geoid models. The working data sets refer to the geodetic International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF co-location sites of Medicina (Northern, Italy and Noto (Sicily, these latter being excellent test beds for our investigations. The measurements were planned and realized to estimate the DoV with a level of precision comparable to the angular accuracy achievable in high precision network measured by modern high-end total stations. The three methods are in excellent agreement, with an operational supremacy of the astro-geodetic method, being faster and more precise than the others. The method that combines leveling and GNSS has slightly larger standard deviations; although well within the 1 arcsec level, which was assumed as threshold. Finally, the geoid model based method, whose 2.5 arcsec standard deviations exceed this threshold, is also statistically consistent with the others and should be used to determine the DoV components where local ad hoc measurements are lacking.

  10. A Comparative Study of the Applied Methods for Estimating Deflection of the Vertical in Terrestrial Geodetic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittuari, Luca; Tini, Maria Alessandra; Sarti, Pierguido; Serantoni, Eugenio; Borghi, Alessandra; Negusini, Monia; Guillaume, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods capable of estimating the deflection of the vertical (DoV): one is based on the joint use of high precision spirit leveling and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), a second uses astro-geodetic measurements and the third gravimetric geoid models. The working data sets refer to the geodetic International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) co-location sites of Medicina (Northern, Italy) and Noto (Sicily), these latter being excellent test beds for our investigations. The measurements were planned and realized to estimate the DoV with a level of precision comparable to the angular accuracy achievable in high precision network measured by modern high-end total stations. The three methods are in excellent agreement, with an operational supremacy of the astro-geodetic method, being faster and more precise than the others. The method that combines leveling and GNSS has slightly larger standard deviations; although well within the 1 arcsec level, which was assumed as threshold. Finally, the geoid model based method, whose 2.5 arcsec standard deviations exceed this threshold, is also statistically consistent with the others and should be used to determine the DoV components where local ad hoc measurements are lacking. PMID:27104544

  11. Simulating People Moving in Displacement Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, M.; Bjørn, Erik; Sandberg, M.

    A displacement ventilation system works better the more uni-directional the air flow through the ventilated room is: from floor to ceiling. Thus, from an air quality point of view, there should be as little vertical mixing of the room air as possible. It is therefore comprehensible that physical...

  12. Job Displacement and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; Ouazad, Amine

    We use a detailed employer-employee data set matched with detailed crime information (timing of crime, fines, convictions, crime type) to estimate the impact of job loss on an individual's probability to commit crime. We focus on job losses due to displacement, i.e. job losses in firms losing...... a substantial share of their workers, for workers with at least three years of tenure. Displaced workers are more likely to commit offenses leading to conviction (probation, prison terms) for property crimes and for alcohol-related traffic violations in the two years following displacement. We find no evidence...... that displaced workers' propensity to commit crime is higher than non-displaced workers before the displacement event; but it is significantly higher afterwards. Displacement impacts crime over and above what is explained by earnings losses and weeks of unemployment following displacement....

  13. Search for long-lived massive particles in events with displaced vertices and missing transverse momentum in $\\sqrt s = 13 $ TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Otono, Hidetoshi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for long-lived particles at the electroweak scale, which are predicted by a number of theories beyond the Standard Model, such as long-lived gluino in Split Supersymmetry, is pre- sented. The search uses 32.8 $\\rm{fb}^{−1}$ of 13 TeV $pp$ collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, and explores a multi-track vertex displaced from the collision point of proton-proton beams. The observed yield is consistent with the expectation from the background only hypoth- esis, resulting in 95% confidence-level exclusion of the long-lived gluino with masses up to 2.37 TeV at around $\\tau = 0.17$ ns.

  14. Search for long-lived, massive particles in events with displaced vertices and missing transverse momentum in $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Otono, Hidetoshi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for long-lived, massive particles, as generically predicted by many theories beyond the Standard Model, is presented. The search targets final states with large missing transverse momentum and at least one high-mass displaced vertex with five or more tracks, and used 32.7 $\\rm{fb}^{−1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV $pp$ collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observed yield is consistent with the expected background. The results are used to extract 95% CL exclusion limits on the production of long-lived gluinos with masses up to 2.2 TeV in a simplified model inspired by Split Supersymmetry.

  15. Search for long-lived, massive particles in events with displaced vertices and missing transverse momentum in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahmani, Marzieh; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Bandyopadhyay, Anjishnu; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barkeloo, Jason Tyler Colt; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Beck, Helge Christoph; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Beyer, Julien-christopher; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bittrich, Carsten; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolz, Arthur Eugen; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burch, Tyler James; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrá, Sonia; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Kingman; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Yun Sang; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czekierda, Sabina; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'eramo, Louis; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davis, Douglas; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Devesa, Maria Roberta; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Bello, Francesco Armando; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Dubreuil, Arnaud; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducourthial, Audrey; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dumitriu, Ana Elena; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Duvnjak, Damir; Dyndal, Mateusz; Dziedzic, Bartosz Sebastian; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; El Kosseifi, Rima; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Estrada Pastor, Oscar; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Ezzi, Mohammed; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Fabiani, Veronica; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenton, Michael James; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Förster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; García Pascual, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Geß{}ner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heer, Sebastian; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hildebrand, Kevin; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kellermann, Edgar; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitali, Vincent; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; La Ruffa, Francesco; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linck, Rebecca Anne; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jesse; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lutz, Margaret Susan; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyu, Feng; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magerl, Veronika; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majersky, Oliver; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mankinen, Katja Hannele; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mellenthin, Johannes Donatus; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Melzer, Alexander; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mkrtchyan, Tigran; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nitsche, Isabel; Nitta, Tatsumi; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'connor, Kelsey; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oppen, Henrik; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Peri, Francesco; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Forrest Hays; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Podberezko, Pavel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggi, Riccardo; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Ponomarenko, Daniil; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Poulsen, Trine; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proklova, Nadezda; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puri, Akshat; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rashid, Tasneem; Raspopov, Sergii; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravinovich, Ilia; Rawling, Jacob Henry; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rettie, Sebastien; Reynolds, Elliot; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ripellino, Giulia; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocco, Elena; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Bosca, Sergi; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Masahiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sampsonidou, Despoina; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo Rodolfo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Christian Oliver; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sano, Yuta; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schildgen, Lara Katharina; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Sciandra, Andrea; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scornajenghi, Matteo; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Senkin, Sergey; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Shen, Yu-Ting; Sherafati, Nima; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shipsey, Ian Peter Joseph; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shlomi, Jonathan; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Nikita; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Søgaard, Andreas; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Sopczak, Andre; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spieker, Thomas Malte; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapf, Birgit Sylvia; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; 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    A search for long-lived, massive particles predicted by many theories beyond the Standard Model is presented. The search targets final states with large missing transverse momentum and at least one high-mass displaced vertex with five or more tracks, and uses 32.8 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV $pp$ collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observed yield is consistent with the expected background. The results are used to extract 95\\% CL exclusion limits on the production of long-lived gluinos with masses up to 2.37 TeV and lifetimes of $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-2})$-$\\mathcal{O}(10)$ ns in a simplified model inspired by Split Supersymmetry.

  16. Search for long-lived, massive particles in events with displaced vertices and missing transverse momentum in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

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Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Kingman; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Yun Sang; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czekierda, Sabina; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'eramo, Louis; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davis, Douglas; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Devesa, Maria Roberta; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Bello, Francesco Armando; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Dubreuil, Arnaud; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducourthial, Audrey; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dumitriu, Ana Elena; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Duvnjak, Damir; Dyndal, Mateusz; Dziedzic, Bartosz Sebastian; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; El Kosseifi, Rima; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Estrada Pastor, Oscar; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Ezzi, Mohammed; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Fabiani, Veronica; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenton, Michael James; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Förster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; García Pascual, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Geß{}ner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heer, Sebastian; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hildebrand, Kevin; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kellermann, Edgar; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitali, Vincent; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; La Ruffa, Francesco; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linck, Rebecca Anne; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jesse; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lutz, Margaret Susan; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyu, Feng; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magerl, Veronika; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majersky, Oliver; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mankinen, Katja Hannele; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mellenthin, Johannes Donatus; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Melzer, Alexander; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mkrtchyan, Tigran; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nitsche, Isabel; Nitta, Tatsumi; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'connor, Kelsey; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oppen, Henrik; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Peri, Francesco; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Forrest Hays; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Podberezko, Pavel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggi, Riccardo; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Ponomarenko, Daniil; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Poulsen, Trine; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proklova, Nadezda; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puri, Akshat; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rashid, Tasneem; Raspopov, Sergii; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravinovich, Ilia; Rawling, Jacob Henry; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rettie, Sebastien; Reynolds, Elliot; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ripellino, Giulia; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocco, Elena; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Bosca, Sergi; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Masahiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sampsonidou, Despoina; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo Rodolfo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Christian Oliver; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sano, Yuta; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schildgen, Lara Katharina; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Sciandra, Andrea; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scornajenghi, Matteo; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Senkin, Sergey; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Shen, Yu-Ting; Sherafati, Nima; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shipsey, Ian Peter Joseph; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shlomi, Jonathan; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Nikita; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Søgaard, Andreas; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Sopczak, Andre; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spieker, Thomas Malte; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapf, Birgit Sylvia; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Stark, Simon Holm; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultan, D M S; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Tahirovic, Elvedin; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takasugi, Eric Hayato; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thiele, Fabian; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Todt, Stefanie; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tresoldi, Fabio; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsang, Ka Wa; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vadla, Knut Oddvar Hoie; Vaidya, Amal; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valente, Marco; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valéry, Lo\\"ic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallier, Alexis; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varni, Carlo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Ambrosius Thomas; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Viaux Maira, Nicolas; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vishwakarma, Akanksha; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Qing; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wei; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Zirui; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Aaron Foley; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Weber, Stephen; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weirich, Marcel; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Weston, Thomas; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Aaron; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Whitmore, Ben William; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkels, Emma; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wobisch, Markus; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolff, Robert; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Vincent Wai Sum; Worm, Steven; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xi, Zhaoxu; Xia, Ligang; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Xu, Tairan; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamatani, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yigitbasi, Efe; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, Georgios; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zemaityte, Gabija; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    A search for long-lived, massive particles predicted by many theories beyond the Standard Model is presented. The search targets final states with large missing transverse momentum and at least one high-mass displaced vertex with five or more tracks, and uses 32.8 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV $pp$ collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observed yield is consistent with the expected background. The results are used to extract 95\\% CL exclusion limits on the production of long-lived gluinos with masses up to 2.37 TeV and lifetimes of $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-2})$-$\\mathcal{O}(10)$ ns in a simplified model inspired by Split Supersymmetry.

  17. The relationship between running speed and measures of vertical jump in professional basketball players: a field-test approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalfawi, Shaher A I; Sabbah, Ammar; Kailani, Ghazi; Tønnessen, Espen; Enoksen, Eystein

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vertical jump measures and sprint speed over 10, 20, and 40 m in professional basketball players. Thirty-three professional basketball players aged (±SD) (27.4 ± 3.3 years), body mass (89.8 ± 11.1 kg), and stature (192 ± 8.2 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. All participants were tested on squat jump, countermovement jump, and 40-m running speed. The results show that all jump measures in absolute terms were correlated significantly to running performance over 10-, 20-, and 40-m sprint times. None of the jumping performance peak powers and reactive strength were found to have a correlation to running speed times in absolute term. Furthermore, all jump height measures relative to body mass except reactive strength had a marked and significant relationship with all sprint performance times. The results of this study indicate that while there is a strong and marked relationship between 10-, 20-, and 40-m sprint, there is also a considerable variation within the factors that contribute to performance over these distances. This may indicate that, separate training strategies could be implemented to improve running speed over these distances.

  18. GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the 22 April 1991, Valle de la Estrella , Costa Rica earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Paul R.; Wolf, Susan K.; Protti, Marino; Hurst, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented for analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made at sites in Costa Rica in February and July 1991. Significant horizontal and vertical displacements relative to February positions were observed. Differences were found in GPS derived vertical and horizontal displacements as compared to other types of geodetic measurements of uplift in the coastal regions. A slip dislocation model which fits the GPS measured displacement was computed. Differences between these data sets and their associated models were investigated in light of unmodeled slip heterogeneity on the fault and post-seismic displacements.

  19. The concurrent validity and reliability of a low-cost, high-speed camera-based method for measuring the flight time of vertical jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Tejero-González, Carlos M; del Campo-Vecino, Juan; Bavaresco, Nicolás

    2014-02-01

    Flight time is the most accurate and frequently used variable when assessing the height of vertical jumps. The purpose of this study was to analyze the validity and reliability of an alternative method (i.e., the HSC-Kinovea method) for measuring the flight time and height of vertical jumping using a low-cost high-speed Casio Exilim FH-25 camera (HSC). To this end, 25 subjects performed a total of 125 vertical jumps on an infrared (IR) platform while simultaneously being recorded with a HSC at 240 fps. Subsequently, 2 observers with no experience in video analysis analyzed the 125 videos independently using the open-license Kinovea 0.8.15 software. The flight times obtained were then converted into vertical jump heights, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plot, and Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated for those variables. The results showed a perfect correlation agreement (ICC = 1, p flight time and jump height and a highly reliable agreement (ICC = 0.997, p flight time and jump height using the HSC-Kinovea method and those obtained using the IR system, thus explaining 99.5% (p flight time and vertical jump height as more expensive equipment (i.e., IR). As such, coaches from many sports could use the HSC-Kinovea method to measure the flight time and height of their athlete's vertical jumps.

  20. Viscous Flow with Large Fluid-Fluid Interface Displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole; Saasen, Arild

    1998-01-01

    The arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) kinematic description has been implemented in a 3D transient finite element program to simulate multiple fluid flows with fluid-fluid interface or surface displacements. The description of fluid interfaces includes variable interfacial tension, and the formulation...... is useful in the simulation of low and intermediate Reynolds number viscous flow. The displacement of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical (concentric and eccentric) annulus and a (vertical and inclined)tube is simulated....

  1. H2 vertical profiles in the continental boundary layer: measurements at the Cabauw tall tower in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zahorowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In-situ, quasi-continuous measurements of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 have been performed since October 2007 at the Cabauw tall tower station in the Netherlands. Mole fractions of H2, CO and several greenhouse gases are determined simultaneously in air sampled successively at four heights, between 20 and 200 m above ground level. 222Rn measurements are performed in air sampled at 20 and 200 m. This H2 dataset represents the first in-situ, quasi-continuous long-term measurement series of vertical profiles of H2 in the lower continental boundary layer. Seasonal cycles are present at all heights in both H2 and CO, and their amplitude varies with the sampling height. The seasonality is evident in both the "baseline" values and in the short term (diurnal to synoptic time scales variability, the latter being significantly larger during winter. The observed H2 short term signals and vertical gradients are in many cases well correlated to other species, especially to CO. On the other hand, H2 has at times a unique behaviour, due to its particular distribution of sources and sinks. Our estimation for the regional H2 soil uptake flux, using the radon tracer method, is (−1.89 ± 0.26 × 10−5 g/(m2 h, significantly smaller than other recent results from Europe. H2/CO ratios of the traffic emissions computed from our data, with an average of 0.54 ± 0.07 mol:mol, are larger and more variable than estimated in some of the previous studies in Europe. This difference can be explained by a different driving regime, due to the frequent traffic jams in the influence area of Cabauw. The H2/CO ratios of the large scale pollution events have an average of 0.36 ± 0.05 mol:mol; these ratios were observed to slightly increase with sampling height, possibly due to a stronger influence of soil uptake at the lower sampling heights.

  2. Standardization of the Definitions of Vertical Resolution and Uncertainty in the NDACC-archived Ozone and Temperature Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Payen, Godin-Beekmann; Gabarrot, Franck; vanGijsel, Anne; Bandoro, J.; Sica, R.; Trickl, T.

    2012-01-01

    The international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is a global network of high-quality, remote-sensing research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the Earth atmosphere. As part of NDACC, over 20 ground-based lidar instruments are dedicated to the long-term monitoring of atmospheric composition and to the validation of space-borne measurements of the atmosphere from environmental satellites such as Aura and ENVISAT. One caveat of large networks such as NDACC is the difficulty to archive measurement and analysis information consistently from one research group (or instrument) to another [1][2][3]. Yet the need for consistent definitions has strengthened as datasets of various origin (e.g., satellite and ground-based) are increasingly used for intercomparisons, validation, and ingested together in global assimilation systems.In the framework of the 2010 Call for Proposals by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) located in Bern, Switzerland, a Team of lidar experts was created to address existing issues in three critical aspects of the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature data retrievals: signal filtering and the vertical filtering of the retrieved profiles, the quantification and propagation of the uncertainties, and the consistent definition and reporting of filtering and uncertainties in the NDACC- archived products. Additional experts from the satellite and global data standards communities complement the team to help address issues specific to the latter aspect.

  3. Three-phase material distribution measurements in a vertical flow using gamma-densitometry tomography and electrical-impedance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; O' HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,S.L.

    2000-03-28

    Experiments are presented in which electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) and gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) measurements were combined to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions in a vertical three-phase flow. The experimental testbed was a 19.05-cm diameter bubble column in which gas is injected at the bottom and exits out the top while the liquid and solid phases recirculate. The gas phase was air and the liquid phase was deionized water with added electrolytes. Four different particle classes were investigated for the solid phase: 40--100 {micro}m and 120--200 {micro}m glass beads (2.41 g/cm{sup 3}), and 170--260 {micro}m and 200--700 {micro}m polystyrene beads (1.04 g/cm{sup 3}). Superficial gas velocities of 3 to 30 cm/s and solid volume fractions up to 0.30 were examined. For all experimental conditions investigated, the gas distribution showed only a weak dependence on both particle size and density. Average gas volume fraction as a function of superficial gas velocity can be described to within {+-} 0.04 by curve passing through the center of the data. For most cases the solid particle appeared to be radically uniformly dispersed in the liquid.

  4. Measurement of τ decays into a charged hadron accompanied by neutral π-mesons and determination of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adametz, Aleksandra

    2011-07-06

    This thesis presents the branching fraction measurement of the τ{sup -}→K{sup -}(nπ{sup 0})ν{sub τ} (n=0,1,2,3) and τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(nπ{sup 0})ν{sub τ} (n=3,4) decays. The measurement is based on a data sample of 435 million τ pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and collected with the BABAR detector in 1999-2008. The analysis is validated using precisely known τ decays as control modes. The measured branching fractions are B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}ν{sub τ})=(7.100±0.033±0.156) x 10{sup -3}, B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}π{sup 0}ν{sub τ})=(5.000±0.020±0.139) x 10{sup -3}, B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}(2π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(5.654±0.144±0.323) x 10{sup -4}, B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}(3π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(1.642±0.279±0.375) x 10{sup -4}, B(τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(3π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(1.216±0.010±0.047) x 10{sup -2}, B(τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(4π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(1.041±0.067±0.090) x 10{sup -3}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The branching fraction B(τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(4π{sup 0})ν{sub τ}) is measured for the first time. The precision of the results is comparable or significantly improved with respect to previous measurements. The branching fraction B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}ν{sub τ}) is combined with a lattice QCD calculation of the kaon decay constant to obtain the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke =0.2224±0.0025(exp)±0.0029(theo). The branching fractions of the τ decays into a kaon are combined with the current world averages. The resulting averages are used in the determination of the total τ branching fraction, B{sub s}, into strangeness vertical stroke S vertical stroke =1 final states. B{sub s} is used in conjunction with vertical stroke V{sub ud} vertical stroke and a small SU(3)-symmetry breaking correction to compute vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke =0.2176±0.0025(exp)±0.0010(theo).

  5. Analysis of Agreement of Retinal-Layer Thickness Measures Derived from the Segmentation of Horizontal and Vertical Spectralis OCT Macular Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Caldito, Natalia; Antony, Bhavna; He, Yufan; Lang, Andrew; Nguyen, James; Rothman, Alissa; Ogbuokiri, Esther; Avornu, Ama; Balcer, Laura; Frohman, Elliot; Frohman, Teresa C; Bhargava, Pavan; Prince, Jerry; Calabresi, Peter A; Saidha, Shiv

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a reliable method used to quantify discrete layers of the retina. Spectralis OCT is a device used for this purpose. Spectralis OCT macular scan imaging acquisition can be obtained on either the horizontal or vertical plane. The vertical protocol has been proposed as favorable, due to postulated reduction in confound of Henle's fibers on segmentation-derived metrics. Yet, agreement of the segmentation measures of horizontal and vertical macular scans remains unexplored. Our aim was to determine this agreement. Horizontal and vertical macular scans on Spectralis OCT were acquired in 20 healthy controls (HCs) and 20 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. All scans were segmented using Heidelberg software and a Johns Hopkins University (JHU)-developed method. Agreement was analyzed using Bland-Altman analyses and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Using both segmentation techniques, mean differences (agreement at the cohort level) in the thicknesses of all macular layers derived from both acquisition protocols in MS patients and HCs were narrow (OCT segmentation measures of discrete retinal-layer thicknesses derived from both vertical and horizontal protocols on Spectralis OCT agree excellently at the cohort level (narrow mean differences), but only moderately at the individual level (wide LOA). This suggests patients scanned using either protocol should continue to be scanned with the same protocol. However, due to excellent agreement at the cohort level, measures derived from both acquisitions can be pooled for outcome purposes in clinical trials.

  6. Length-displacement scaling of thrust faults on the Moon and the formation of uphill-facing scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Hiesinger, Harald; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-08-01

    Fault populations on terrestrial planets exhibit a linear relationship between their length, L, and the maximum displacement, D, which implies a constant D/L ratio during fault growth. Although it is known that D/L ratios of faults are typically a few percent on Earth and 0.2-0.8% on Mars and Mercury, the D/L ratios of lunar faults are not well characterized. Quantifying the D/L ratios of faults on the Moon is, however, crucial for a better understanding of lunar tectonics, including for studies of the amount of global lunar contraction. Here, we use high-resolution digital terrain models to perform a topographic analysis of four lunar thrust faults - Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, and Racah X-1 - that range in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km. First, we determine the along-strike variation of the vertical displacement from ≥ 20 topographic profiles across each fault. For measuring the vertical displacements, we use a method that is commonly applied to fault scarps on Earth and that does not require detrending of the profiles. The resulting profiles show that the displacement changes gradually along these faults' strike, with maximum vertical displacements ranging from 17 ± 2 m for Simpelius-1 to 192 ± 30 m for Racah X-1. Assuming a fault dip of 30° yields maximum total displacements (D) that are twice as large as the vertical displacements. The linear relationship between D and L supports the inference that lunar faults gradually accumulate displacement as they propagate laterally. For the faults we investigated, the D/L ratio is ∼2.3%, an order of magnitude higher than theoretical predictions for the Moon, but a value similar for faults on Earth. We also employ finite-element modeling and a Mohr circle stress analysis to investigate why many lunar thrust faults, including three of those studied here, form uphill-facing scarps. Our analysis shows that fault slip is preferentially initiated on planes that dip in the same direction as the topography, because

  7. The first measurement of the deflection of the vertical in longitude -- The figure of the earth in the early 19th century

    CERN Document Server

    Schrimpf, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 1837 Christian Ludwig Gerling, a former student of Carl Friedrich Gau{\\ss}'s, organized the world wide first determination of the deflection of the vertical in longitude. From a mobile observatory at the Frauenberg near Marburg (Hesse) he measured the astronomical longitude difference between C.F. Gau{\\ss}'s observatory at G\\"ottingen and F.G.B. Nicolai's observatory at Mannheim within an error of 0.4". To achieve this precision he first used a series of light signals for synchronizing the observatory clocks and, second, he very carefully corrected for the varying reaction time of the observers. By comparing these astronomical results with the geodetic--determined longitude differences he had recently measured for the triangulation of Kurhessen, he was able to extract a combined value of the deflection of the vertical in longitude of G\\"ottingen and Mannheim. His results closely agree with modern vertical deflection data.

  8. Experimental Study on Welded Headed Studs Used In Steel Plate-Concrete Composite Structures Compared with Contactless Method of Measuring Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisała, Dawid; Tekieli, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    Steel plate-concrete composite structures are a new innovative design concept in which a thin steel plate is attached to the reinforced concrete beam by means of welded headed studs. The comparison between experimental studies and theoretical analysis of this type of structures shows that their behaviour is dependent on the load-slip relationship of the shear connectors used to ensure sufficient bond between the concrete and steel parts of the structure. The aim of this paper is to describe an experimental study on headed studs used in steel plate-concrete composite structures. Push-out tests were carried out to investigate the behaviour of shear connectors. The test specimens were prepared according to standard push-out tests, however, instead of I-beam, a steel plate 16 mm thick was used to better reflect the conditions in the real structure. The test specimens were produced in two batches using concrete with significantly different compressive strength. The experimental study was carried out on twelve specimens. Besides the traditional measurements based on LVDT sensors, optical measurements based on the digital image correlation method (DIC) and pattern tracking methods were used. DIC is a full-field contactless optical method for measuring displacements in experimental testing, based on the correlation of the digital images taken during test execution. With respect to conventional methods, optical measurements offer a wider scope of results and can give more information about the material or construction behaviour during the test. The ultimate load capacity and load-slip curves obtained from the experiments were compared with the values calculated based on Eurocodes, American and Chinese design specifications. It was observed that the use of the relationships developed for the traditional steel-concrete composite structures is justified in the case of ultimate load capacity of shear connectors in steel plate-concrete composite structures.

  9. Estimating Hydrologic Processes from Subsurface Soil Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C. E.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L.; MIller, S.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture and the processes that control it are important components of the hydrologic cycle, but measuring these processes remains challenging. We have developed a new measurement method that offers flexibility compared to existing technology. The approach is to measure small vertical displacements in the soil which responds proportionally to distributed surface load changes such as variation in the near-surface water content. The instrument may be installed at a depth of several meters to hundreds of meters below the surface. Because the measurement averaging region scales with the depth of the displacement measurements, this approach provides the means for estimating the soil moisture time series over tens of square meters to tens of thousands of square meters. The instrument developed for this application is called a Sand-X, which is short for Sand Extensometer. It is designed for applications in unconsolidated material, ranging from clay to sand. The instrument is simple and relatively inexpensive, and it can be installed in a boring made with a hand auger or with a small drill rig. Studies at the field scale are ongoing at a field site near Clemson, SC. The site is underlain by saprolite weathered primarily from biotite gneiss. Several Sand-X devices are installed at a field site that is instrumented for validating soil moisture, precipitation, and evapotranspiration estimates. These instruments are emplaced at a depth of 6 m and respond to the weight of a vehicle out to 18 m from the well. Calibration is performed by comparing precipitation measurements to the soil displacement response. For example, the coefficient for one installation is roughly 185 nm soil displacement/mm water content change. The resolution of the instrument is approximately 10 nm, so the Sand-X is capable of detecting changes of soil moisture on the order of tenths of one mm in compliant soils like saprolite. A typical soil displacement time series shows alternating periods of

  10. Electrostatic comb drive for vertical actuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1997-07-10

    The electrostatic comb finger drive has become an integral design for microsensor and microactuator applications. This paper reports on utilizing the levitation effect of comb fingers to design vertical-to-the-substrate actuation for interferometric applications. For typical polysilicon comb drives with 2 {micro}m gaps between the stationary and moving fingers, as well as between the microstructures and the substrate, the equilibrium position is nominally 1-2 {micro}m above the stationary comb fingers. This distance is ideal for many phase shifting interferometric applications. Theoretical calculations of the vertical actuation characteristics are compared with the experimental results, and a general design guideline is derived from these results. The suspension flexure stiffnesses, gravity forces, squeeze film damping, and comb finger thicknesses are parameters investigated which affect the displacement curve of the vertical microactuator. By designing a parallel plate capacitor between the suspended mass and the substrate, in situ position sensing can be used to control the vertical movement, providing a total feedback-controlled system. Fundamentals of various capacitive position sensing techniques are discussed. Experimental verification is carried out by a Zygo distance measurement interferometer.

  11. Uniqueness in the determination of vibration sources in rectangular Germain-Lagrange plates using displacement measurements over line segments with arbitrary small length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Alexandre

    2013-08-01

    The theme of this work is related to the field of vibration and source detection, which is important in naval, aerospace and civil engineering industries. The detection of unexpected vibration sources, in general, signals malfunctioning, or even an undesired presence in the case of defense systems. The focus will be on thin plates, which are among the basic building blocks of large complex structures. Here, we consider loads acting on a rectangular plate R of the product form g(t)Q(x), where the function of time g has a continuous first derivative and the spatial load distribution Q is a square-integrable function over R. We prove that the observation of the displacement of a line segment with arbitrary length parallel to one of the sides of the plate is enough for the determination of Q, provided that the interval of time is long enough. We also prove that the normal derivative along a side of the rectangle measured for an arbitrarily small interval of time is sufficient to determine the spatial load distribution Q. The method used to obtain the results is based on the series decomposition of the dynamic response and an analysis of the almost periodic distribution that arises from it.

  12. Perceived Displacement explains Wolfpack Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matúš eŠimkovic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of perceived displacement of moving agent-like stimuli on the performance in dynamic interactive tasks. In order to reliably measure perceived displacement we utilize multiple tasks with different task demands. The perceived center of an agent’s body is displaced in the direction in which the agent is facing and this perceived displacement is larger than the theoretical position of the center of mass would predict. Furthermore, the displacement in the explicit judgment is dissociated from the displacement obtained by the implicit measures. By manipulating the location of the pivot point, we show that it is not necessary to postulate orientation as an additional cue utilized by perception, as has been suggested by earlier studies. These studies showed that the agent’s orientation influences the detection of chasing motion and the detection-related performance in interactive tasks. This influence has been labeled wolfpack effect. In one of the demonstrations of the wolfpack effect participants control a green circle on a display with a computer mouse. It has been shown that participants avoid display areas withagents pointing towards the green circle. Participants do so in favor of areas where the agents point in the direction perpendicular to the circle. We show that this avoidance behavior arises because the agent’s pivot point selected by the earlier studies is different from where people locate the center of agent’s body. As a consequence, the nominal rotation confounds rotation and translation. We show that the avoidance behavior disappears once the pivot point is set to the center of agent’s body.

  13. Reply to comment by Mauder on "How well can we measure the vertical wind speed? Implications for fluxes of energy and mass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Kochendorfer; Tilden P. Meyers; John M. Frank; William J. Massman; Mark W. Heuer

    2013-01-01

    In Kochendorfer et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 145:383-398, 2012, hereafter K2012) the vertical wind speed (w) measured by a non-orthogonal three-dimensional sonic anemometer was shown to be underestimated by 12%. Turbulent statistics and eddycovariance fluxes estimated using w were also affected by this underestimate in w. Methodologies used in K2012 are clarified...

  14. An In Vitro Study of Condylar Displacement Caused by Interocclusal Records: Influence of Recording Material, Storage Time, and Recording Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Muhamad; Hedderich, Jürgen; Kern, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the condylar displacement after mounting working casts using different interocclusal recording materials and to analyze the influence of the storage time and the recording technique on the displacement caused by the interocclusal record. Eight interocclusal records were made in each of the following groups: G1: Aluwax (aluminum wax), G2: Beauty Pink wax (hydrocarbon wax compound), G3: Futar D Fast, G4: Futar Scan (G3, G4: vinylpolysiloxane), G5: Ramitec (polyether), G6: LuxaBite (composite resin based on bis-acryl), G7: LuxaBite corrected with Aluwax. A condylar-positioning indicator measured the condylar displacement in the three planes after storage of the records for two periods of 1 and 48 hours. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine the influences of recording materials and each of the following factors: (1) region (record and non-record side), (2) storage time, and (3) recording technique. The statistical significance level was set at p Ramitec) while the anteroposterior displacement ranged between 0.15 mm (Ramitec) and 0.04 mm (Futar Scan). The corrected resin record showed generally lower displacement values than other materials tested (0.03, 0.02, and 0.07, respectively). On the non-record side, the values were lower than that on the record side. The condylar displacement increased after a storage time of 48 hours for all materials. Both factors, storage time and recording technique, had statistically significant influence on the condylar displacement. Based on the results, the vertical displacement of the condyle caused by the interocclusal records was higher than the lateral or the anteroposterior displacement. Elastomers caused statistically significantly less condylar displacement than waxes or uncorrected composite resin. Corrected LuxaBite records with Aluwax showed significantly less condylar displacement than all other materials. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Within- and between-laboratory precision in the measurement of body volume using air displacement plethysmography and its effect on body composition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A L; Saunders, S; McCarthy, H D; Williams, J E; Fuller, N J

    2004-01-01

    To determine and compare the extent of within- and between-laboratory precision in body volume (BV) measurements using air displacement plethysmography (ADP), the BOD POD body composition system, and to interpret any such variability in terms of body composition estimates. Repeated test procedures of BV assessment using the BOD POD ADP were reproduced at two laboratories for the estimation of precision, both within and between laboratories. In total, 30 healthy adult volunteers, 14 men (age, 19-48 y; body mass index (BMI), 19.7-30.3 kg/m2) and 16 women (age, 19-40 y; BMI, 16.3-35.7 kg/m2), were each subjected to two test procedures at both laboratories. Two additional volunteers were independently subjected to 10 repeated test procedures at both laboratories. Repeated measurements of BV, uncorrected for the effects of isothermal air in the lungs and the surface area artifact, were obtained using the BOD POD ADP, with the identical protocol being faithfully applied at both laboratories. Uncorrected BV measurements were adjusted to give estimates of actual BV that were used to calculate body density (body weight (BWt)/actual BV) from which estimates of body composition were derived. The differences between repeated BV measurements or body composition estimates were used to assess within-laboratory precision (repeatability), as standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation; the differences between measurements reproduced at each laboratory were used to determine between-laboratory precision (reproducibility), as bias and 95% limits of agreement (from SD of the differences between laboratories). The extent of within-laboratory methodological precision for BV (uncorrected and actual) was variable according to subject, sample group and laboratory conditions (range of SD, 0.04-0.13 l), and was mostly due to within-individual biological variability (typically 78-99%) rather than to technical imprecision. There was a significant (PBOD POD instrument was reasonably

  16. A study of the effects of vertical resolution and measurement errors on an iteratively inverted temperature profile. [satellite observation of atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, M.-D.

    1975-01-01

    A direct inversion method for inverting the temperature profile from satellite-measured radiation is discussed. The nth power of the weighting function in the integral radiative-transfer equation is used as the weight in the averaging process. The vertical resolution of the inverted temperature profile and the response of the inverted temperature profile to the measurement errors are examined in terms of n. It is found that for smaller values of n, the vertical resolution and the effect of measurement errors are reduced. When n = 0, both the vertical resolution and error effect are minimum. The temperature profile is adjusted by a constant; any structure different from the initial shape cannot be resolved. This is equivalent to the case where the entire atmosphere is treated as one layer with a fixed shape of temperature profile. When n approaches infinity, both the vertical resolution and error effect are maximum. This is equivalent to the case where the entire atmosphere is divided into m (the number of spectral channels) layers. Within each layer, the temperatures are adjusted by a constant, and any structure different from the initial shape cannot be resolved. Also, the shape of the final solution is closer to the initial profile if the value of n is smaller.

  17. Displacement data assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, W. Steven [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Venkataramani, Shankar [Department of Mathematics and Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mariano, Arthur J. [Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33149 (United States); Restrepo, Juan M., E-mail: restrepo@math.oregonstate.edu [Department of Mathematics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information is important. While the displacement transformation is generic, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  18. XY displacement device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerens, W.C.; Laham, C.D.; Holman, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    An XY-displacement device (1) with a four-fold symmetry comprises a reference frame (10); an object mount (20) for holding an object (22) to be displaced; an X-manipulator (100) coupled between the reference frame (10) and the object mount (20), which provides a rigid coupling between the object

  19. Use of decision analysis to evaluate the delivery method of veterinary health care on dairy farms as measured by correction of left displaced abomasum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsburg, Darren W; Galligan, David T; Ferguson, James D

    2011-01-01

    To use decision and sensitivity analysis to examine the delivery of health care on US dairy farms as measured by correction of left displaced abomasum (LDA). 5 journal articles evaluating outcomes from veterinarian- or herd personnel-delivered correction of LDA via laparotomy or a roll-and-toggle procedure. Economic analysis. A decision tree was constructed on the basis of published outcome data for correction of LDAs performed by veterinarians and herd personnel. Sensitivity of the model to changing input assumptions was evaluated via an indifference curve and tornado graph. Decision tree analysis revealed that correction of an LDA provided by herd personnel had an expected economic advantage of $76, compared with correction provided by a veterinarian. Sensitivity of this analysis to variations in inputs indicated that changes of 2 input levels would shift the advantage to veterinarian-provided correction: a reduction (from 0.74 to 0.62) in the probability of success for correction provided by herd personnel or an increase (from 0.78 to 0.87) in the probability of success for correction provided by a veterinarian. In this model, LDA correction by herd personnel had a significant economic advantage, compared with veterinarian-provided correction. Continued absorption of traditional veterinary tasks by unlicensed herd personnel may threaten the veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR), which could have profound economic and regulatory impacts. Food animal veterinarians need to evaluate their business model to ensure they continue to provide relevant, sustainable services to their clients within the context of a valid VCPR.

  20. Functional limits of agreement applied as a novel method comparison tool for accuracy and precision of inertial measurement unit derived displacement of the distal limb in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Emil; Pfau, Thilo; Ritz, Christian

    2013-09-03

    Over ground motion analysis in horses is limited by a small number of strides and restraints of the indoor gait laboratory. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) are transforming the knowledge of human motion and objective clinical assessment through the opportunity to obtain clinically relevant data under various conditions. When using IMUs on the limbs of horses to determine local position estimates, conditions with high dynamic range of both accelerations and rotational velocities prove particularly challenging. Here we apply traditional method agreement and suggest a novel method of functional data analysis to compare motion capture with IMUs placed over the fetlock joint in seven horses. We demonstrate acceptable accuracy and precision at less than or equal to 5% of the range of motion for detection of distal limb mounted cranio-caudal and vertical position. We do not recommend the use of the latero-medial position estimate of the distal metacarpus/metatarsus during walk where the average error is 10% and the maximum error 111% of the range. We also show that functional data analysis and functional limits of agreement are sensitive methods for comparison of cyclical data and could be applied to differentiate changes in gait for individuals across time and conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MEASURING THE COSEISMIC DISPLACEMENTS OF 2010 Ms7.1 Yushu EARTHQUAKE BY USING SAR AND HIGH RESOLUTION OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available After the 2010, Mw7.1, Yushu earthquake, many researchers have conducted detail investigations of the surface rupture zone by optical image interpretation, field surveying and inversion of seismic waves. However, how larger of the crustal deformation area caused by the earthquake and the quantitative co-seismic displacements are still not available. In this paper, we first take advantage of D-InSAR, MAI, and optical image matching methods to determine the whole co-seismic displacement fields. Two PALSAR images and two SPOT5 images before and after the earthquake are processed and the co-seismic displacements at the surface rupture zone and far field are obtained. The results are consistent with the field investigations, which illustrates the rationality of the application of optical image matching technology in the earthquake.

  2. Measuring the Coseismic Displacements of 2010 Ms7.1 Yushu Earthquake by Using SAR and High Resolution Optical Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Wu, J.; Shi, F.

    2017-09-01

    After the 2010, Mw7.1, Yushu earthquake, many researchers have conducted detail investigations of the surface rupture zone by optical image interpretation, field surveying and inversion of seismic waves. However, how larger of the crustal deformation area caused by the earthquake and the quantitative co-seismic displacements are still not available. In this paper, we first take advantage of D-InSAR, MAI, and optical image matching methods to determine the whole co-seismic displacement fields. Two PALSAR images and two SPOT5 images before and after the earthquake are processed and the co-seismic displacements at the surface rupture zone and far field are obtained. The results are consistent with the field investigations, which illustrates the rationality of the application of optical image matching technology in the earthquake.

  3. Semi-automatic measurement of visual verticality perception in humans reveals a new category of visual field dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Kaleff

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous assessment of verticality by means of rod and rod and frame tests indicated that human subjects can be more (field dependent or less (field independent influenced by a frame placed around a tilted rod. In the present study we propose a new approach to these tests. The judgment of visual verticality (rod test was evaluated in 50 young subjects (28 males, ranging in age from 20 to 27 years by randomly projecting a luminous rod tilted between -18 and +18° (negative values indicating left tilts onto a tangent screen. In the rod and frame test the rod was displayed within a luminous fixed frame tilted at +18 or -18°. Subjects were instructed to verbally indicate the rod’s inclination direction (forced choice. Visual dependency was estimated by means of a Visual Index calculated from rod and rod and frame test values. Based on this index, volunteers were classified as field dependent, intermediate and field independent. A fourth category was created within the field-independent subjects for whom the amount of correct guesses in the rod and frame test exceeded that of the rod test, thus indicating improved performance when a surrounding frame was present. In conclusion, the combined use of subjective visual vertical and the rod and frame test provides a specific and reliable form of evaluation of verticality in healthy subjects and might be of use to probe changes in brain function after central or peripheral lesions.

  4. Estimates of Minor Ocean Tide Loading Displacement and Its Impact on Continuous GPS Coordinate Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The site displacement due to ocean tidal loading is regarded as one of the largest uncertainties in precise geodetic positioning measurements, among which the effect of minor ocean tides (MOT, except for the 11 main tidal constituents, are sometimes neglected in routine precise global positioning system (GPS data processing. We find that MOT can cause large vertical loading displacements with peak-to-peak variations reaching more than 8 mm at coastal/island stations. The impact of MOT on the 24-hour GPS solution is slightly larger than the magnitude of MOT loading itself, with peak-to-peak displacement variation at about 10 mm for the horizontal and 30 mm for the vertical components. We also find that the vertical velocity of all the selected stations in the Southwest Pacific was reduced by more than 10% after considering the MOT effect, while stations with weighted root mean square reduced data account for 62%, 59%, and 36% for the up, east, and north components respectively, in particular for most coastal/island stations. Furthermore, MOT correction could significantly reduce the annual signal of the global stacked east component, the near fortnightly and the long-term periodic signals in the up component. The power of some anomalous harmonics of 1.04 cycle per year is also decreased to some extent. These results further proved the benefits of MOT correction in precise GPS data processing.

  5. Comparison of tropospheric NO2 vertical columns in an urban environment using satellite, multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy, and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendolia, D.; D'Souza, R. J. C.; Evans, G. J.; Brook, J.

    2013-10-01

    Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities have been retrieved and compared for the first time in Toronto, Canada, using three methods of differing spatial scales. Remotely sensed NO2 vertical column densities, retrieved from multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy and satellite remote sensing, were evaluated by comparison with in situ vertical column densities estimated using a pair of chemiluminescence monitors situated 0.01 and 0.5 km a.g.l. (above ground level). The chemiluminescence measurements were corrected for the influence of NOz, which reduced the NO2 concentrations at 0.01 and 0.5 km by an average of 8 ± 1% and 12 ± 1%, respectively. The average absolute decrease in the chemiluminescence NO2 measurement as a result of this correction was less than 1 ppb. The monthly averaged ratio of the NO2 concentration at 0.5 to 0.01 km varied seasonally, and exhibited a negative linear dependence on the monthly average temperature, with Pearson's R = 0.83. During the coldest month, February, this ratio was 0.52 ± 0.04, while during the warmest month, July, this ratio was 0.34 ± 0.04, illustrating that NO2 is not well mixed within 0.5 km above ground level. Good correlation was observed between the remotely sensed and in situ NO2 vertical column densities (Pearson's R value ranging from 0.72 to 0.81), but the in situ vertical column densities were 52 to 58% greater than the remotely sensed columns. These results indicate that NO2 horizontal heterogeneity strongly impacted the magnitude of the remotely sensed columns. The in situ columns reflected an urban environment with major traffic sources, while the remotely sensed NO2 vertical column densities were representative of the region, which included spatial heterogeneity introduced by residential neighbourhoods and Lake Ontario. Despite the difference in absolute values, the reasonable correlation between the vertical column densities determined by three distinct methods increased confidence in the

  6. Comparison of tropospheric NO2 vertical columns in an urban environment using satellite, multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy, and in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mendolia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities have been retrieved and compared for the first time in Toronto, Canada, using three methods of differing spatial scales. Remotely sensed NO2 vertical column densities, retrieved from multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy and satellite remote sensing, were evaluated by comparison with in situ vertical column densities estimated using a pair of chemiluminescence monitors situated 0.01 and 0.5 km a.g.l. (above ground level. The chemiluminescence measurements were corrected for the influence of NOz, which reduced the NO2 concentrations at 0.01 and 0.5 km by an average of 8 ± 1% and 12 ± 1%, respectively. The average absolute decrease in the chemiluminescence NO2 measurement as a result of this correction was less than 1 ppb. The monthly averaged ratio of the NO2 concentration at 0.5 to 0.01 km varied seasonally, and exhibited a negative linear dependence on the monthly average temperature, with Pearson's R = 0.83. During the coldest month, February, this ratio was 0.52 ± 0.04, while during the warmest month, July, this ratio was 0.34 ± 0.04, illustrating that NO2 is not well mixed within 0.5 km above ground level. Good correlation was observed between the remotely sensed and in situ NO2 vertical column densities (Pearson's R value ranging from 0.72 to 0.81, but the in situ vertical column densities were 52 to 58% greater than the remotely sensed columns. These results indicate that NO2 horizontal heterogeneity strongly impacted the magnitude of the remotely sensed columns. The in situ columns reflected an urban environment with major traffic sources, while the remotely sensed NO2 vertical column densities were representative of the region, which included spatial heterogeneity introduced by residential neighbourhoods and Lake Ontario. Despite the difference in absolute values, the reasonable correlation between the vertical column densities determined by three distinct methods increased

  7. Information operator approach applied to the retrieval of vertical distributions of atmospheric constituents from ground-based FTIR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senten, Cindy; de Mazière, Martine; Vanhaelewyn, Gauthier; Vigouroux, Corinne; Delmas, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The retrieval of information about the vertical distribution of an atmospheric absorber from high spectral resolution ground-based Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra is an important issue in remote sensing. A frequently used technique at present is the optimal estimation method. This work introduces the application of an alternative method, namely the information operator approach (Doicu et al., 2007; Hoogen et al., 1999), for extracting the available information from such FTIR measurements. This approach has been implemented within the well-known retrieval code SFIT2, by adapting the optimal estimation method such as to take into account only the significant contributions to the solution. In particular, we demonstrate the feasibility of the method when applied to ground-based FTIR spectra taken at the southern (sub)tropical site Ile de La Réunion (21° S, 55° E) in 2007. A thorough comparison has been made between the retrieval results obtained with the original optimal estimation method and the ones obtained with the information operator approach, regarding profile and column stability, information content and corresponding full error budget evaluation. This has been done for the target species ozone (O3), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). It is shown that the information operator approach performs well and is capable of achieving the same accuracy as optimal estimation, with a gain of stability and with the additional advantage of being less sensitive to the choice of a priori information as well as to the actual signal-to-noise ratio. Keywords: ground-based FTIR, solar absorption spectra, greenhouse gases, information operator approach References Doicu, A., Hilgers, S., von Bargen, A., Rozanov, A., Eichmann, K.-U., von Savigny, C., and Burrows, J.P.: Information operator approach and iterative regularization methods for atmospheric remote sensing, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 103, 340-350, 2007

  8. Rising waters, displaced lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Brickle

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although Pakistan and Colombia have relatively advanced disaster management frameworks, they were unprepared and ill-equipped to assist and protect people displaced by recent floods.

  9. A case study for integrated STEM outreach in an urban setting using a do-it-yourself vertical jump measurement platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazan, John F; Danielsen, Heather; Vercelletto, Matthew; Loya, Amy; Davis, James; Eglash, Ron

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and deploy a low cost vertical jump platform using readily available materials for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and outreach in the inner city. The platform was used to measure the jumping ability of participants to introduce students to the collection and analysis of scientific data in an engaging, accessible manner. This system was designed and fabricated by a student team of engineers as part of a socially informed engineering and design class. The vertical jump platform has been utilized in 10 classroom lectures in physics and biology. The system was also used in an after school program in which high school volunteers prepared a basketball based STEM outreach program, and at a community outreach events with over 100 participants. At present, the same group of high school students are now building their own set of vertical jump platform under the mentorship of engineering undergraduates. The construction and usage of the vertical jump platform provides an accessible introduction to the STEM fields within the urban community.

  10. An approach to investigate new particle formation in the vertical direction on the basis of high time-resolution measurements at ground level and sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, H.; Zhu, Y.; Evans, G. J.; Yao, X.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated new particle formation (NPF) in the vertical direction using high time-resolution (1 s) measurements made by Fast Mobility Particle Sizers at ground level and at sea level. The coefficient of variation (CV), i.e., the ratio of standard deviation to mean value for percentiles of CVs associated with horizontal transport were 1-13 times smaller than those during strong vertical transport. We then compared the N100, GMD55 (geometric mean diameter of percentiles of CVs with those corresponding to the 95-100thpercentiles of CVs in five NPF events (Fig. 1). The comparative results are discussed in terms of different formation and growth rates in the vertical direction. The similar analysis was also conducted in various marine atmospheres. We found that the CV metric can improve our understanding of NPF in the vertical direction. Fig. 1 Time series of N100, GMD55, GMD100 corresponding to 95-100th percentile (left panel) and 0-5th percentile of CVs (right panel) for N100 in five NPF events (Case 5-9).

  11. Transverse vertical dispersion in groundwater and the capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, I D; Grathwohl, P

    2002-09-01

    Transverse dispersion is the most relevant process in mass transfer of contaminants across the capillary fringe (both directions), dilution of contaminants, and mixing of electron acceptors and electron donors in biodegrading groundwater plumes. This paper gives an overview on literature values of transverse vertical dispersivities alpha(tv) measured at different flow velocities and compares them to results from well-controlled laboratory-tank experiments on mass transfer of trichloroethene (TCE) across the capillary fringe. The measured values of transverse vertical dispersion in the capillary fringe region were larger than in fully saturated media, which is credited to enhanced tortuosity of the flow paths due to entrapped air within the capillary fringe. In all cases, the values observed for alpha(tv) were model, based on the mean square displacement and the pore size accounting for only partial diffusive mixing at increasing flow velocities, shows very good agreement with measured and published data.

  12. Measurements of the fluctuating liquid velocity of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Juan Carlos; Mendez, Santos; Zenit, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    Experiments were performed in a vertical channel to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. The capillaries are small enough