WorldWideScience

Sample records for venue management users

  1. User Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille

    User Innovation Management (UIM) is a method for fo-opereation with users in innovation projects. The UIM method emphasizes the practice of a participatorty attitude.......User Innovation Management (UIM) is a method for fo-opereation with users in innovation projects. The UIM method emphasizes the practice of a participatorty attitude....

  2. Venue of receiving diabetes self-management education and training and its impact on oral diabetic medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Noxon, Virginia; Lu, Zhiqiang Kevin

    2017-04-01

    To determine predictors associated with the diabetes self-management education and training (DSME) venue and its impact on oral antidiabetic (OAD) medication adherence. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey household component (MEPS-HC) data (2010-2012) identified adults with diabetes prescribed OAD medication(s) who completed a supplemental Diabetes Care Survey (DCS). Based on the DCS responses to questions about the number and type of DSME venue(s), two groups were created: (1) multiple venues (a physician or health professional plus internet and/or group classes) vs (2) single venue (physician or health professional only). The medication possession ratio (MPR) measured medication adherence, with 0.80 the cut-point defining adherent. Logistic regression examined factors associated with the DSME venue and its effect on OAD medication adherence. Of the 2119 respondents, 41.6% received DSME from multiple venues. Age (medication adherence was suboptimal (mean MPR 0.66 vs 0.64, p=0.245), and venue showed no influence on adherence (OR: 0.92, 95% CI, 0.73-1.16). Sociodemographic characteristics influence where adults with diabetes receive DSME. Adding different DSME venues may not address suboptimal OAD medication adherence. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing knowledge and attitudes of owners or managers of hospitality venues regarding a policy banning indoor smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaaeddine, G; Al Kuhaimi, T; Al Assaad, R; Dany, M; Diab, R; Hanna, E; Hirmas, N; Ismail, H; Mahmassani, D; Sleiman Tellawi, R; Nakkash, R

    2013-05-01

    In response to accumulating evidence on the detrimental health effects of second-hand smoke, governments throughout the world have adopted laws prohibiting indoor smoking in public places. Lebanon has recently enacted a law prohibiting indoor smoking in all of its forms, rendered effective as of 3 September 2012. This study examined the knowledge and attitudes of owners/managers of restaurants, cafes, pubs and nightclubs in Beirut towards the ban, three months before it came into effect. Self-administered cross-sectional survey. Data were derived from a self-administered cross-sectional survey conducted in June 2012. In total, 262 hospitality venues (restaurants, cafes, pubs and nightclubs) were sampled at random to participate. The response rate was 74% (194/262). Overall, 84% of owners/managers reported that they were aware of the ban, yet the average knowledge score was only 3.43/10. A general positive attitude was noted towards customer satisfaction (44.8%), law enforcement (61.1%) and employee protection from second-hand smoke (74%), while 55% of owners/managers were concerned that their revenues would decrease. However, 83.3% expressed their willingness to implement the law. This quantitative study is the first to examine the knowledge and attitudes of owners/managers of hospitality venues regarding the indoor smoking ban in Lebanon. Civil society and government bodies should use the findings to develop a campaign to address the knowledge and attitudes of owners/managers of hospitality venues to ensure successful enforcement. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. User Centric Policy Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  5. Realizing User-Relevant Conceptual Model for the Ski Jump Venue of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teakles, Andrew; Mo, Ruping; Dierking, Carl F.; Emond, Chris; Smith, Trevor; McLennan, Neil; Joe, Paul I.

    2014-01-01

    As was the case for most other Olympic competitions, providing weather guidance for the ski jump and Nordic combined events involved its own set of unique challenges. The extent of these challenges was brought to light before the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics during a series of outflow wind events in the 2008/2009 winter season. The interactions with the race officials during the difficult race conditions brought on by the outflows provided a new perspective on the service delivery requirements for the upcoming Olympic Games. In particular, the turbulent nature of the winds and its impact on the ski jump practice events that season highlighted the need of race officials for nowcasting advice at very short time scales (from 2 min to 1 h) and forecast products tailored to their decision-making process. These realizations resulted in last minute modifications to the monitoring strategy leading up to the Olympic Games and required forecasters' conceptual models for flow within the Callaghan Valley to be downscaled further to reflect the evolution of turbulence at the ski jump site. The SNOW-V10 (Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010) team provided support for these efforts by supplying diagnostic case analyses of important events using numerical weather data and by enhancing the real-time monitoring capabilities at the ski jump venue.

  6. Personalization and User Profile Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoise Petersen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Personalization and effective user profile management will be critical to meet the individual users’ needs and for achieving e-Inclusion and e-Accessibility. This paper outlines means to achieve the goal of the new ICT era where services and devices can be personalized by the users in order to meet their needs and preferences, in various situations. Behind every instance of personalization is a profile that stores the user preferences, context of use and other information that can be used to deliver a user experience tailored to their individual needs and preferences. Next Generation Networks (NGN and the convergence between telephony and Internet services offer a wide range of new terminal and service definition possibilities, and a much wider range of application in society. This paper describes the personalization and profile management activities at European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI Technical Committee Human Factors, together with relevant experimentations in recent European research projects.

  7. User-Centered Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Catarci, Tiziana; Kimani, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This lecture covers several core issues in user-centered data management, including how to design usable interfaces that suitably support database tasks, and relevant approaches to visual querying, information visualization, and visual data mining. Novel interaction paradigms, e.g., mobile and interfaces that go beyond the visual dimension, are also discussed. Table of Contents: Why User-Centered / The Early Days: Visual Query Systems / Beyond Querying / More Advanced Applications / Non-Visual Interfaces / Conclusions

  8. Managing End User Computing for Users with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidelines to assist federal Information Resources Managers in applying computer and related information technology to accommodate users with disabilities. It discusses managing the end user environment, assessing accommodation requirements, and providing end user tools and support. The major portion of the document consists…

  9. Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. E. Broz

    2008-12-22

    This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

  10. Interactive Multimodal Learning for Venue Recommendation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahálka, J.; Rudinac, S.; Worring, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose City Melange, an interactive and multimodal content-based venue explorer. Our framework matches the interacting user to the users of social media platforms exhibiting similar taste. The data collection integrates location-based social networks such as Foursquare with

  11. Integrated Approach to User Account Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselman, Glenn; Smith, William

    2007-01-01

    IT environments consist of both Windows and other platforms. Providing user account management for this model has become increasingly diffi cult. If Microsoft#s Active Directory could be enhanced to extend a W indows identity for authentication services for Unix, Linux, Java and Macintosh systems, then an integrated approach to user account manag ement could be realized.

  12. Major Sport Venues

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Major Public Venues dataset is composed of facilities that host events for the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Indy Racing League, Major League...

  13. Infrastructure Management Information System User Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This publication describes and explains the user interface for the Infrastructure Management Information System (IMIS). The IMIS is designed to answer questions regarding public water supply, wastewater treatment, and census information. This publica...

  14. Violence prevention and municipal licensing of indoor sex work venues in the Greater Vancouver Area: narratives of migrant sex workers, managers and business owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Solanna; Jia, Jessica Xi; Liu, Vivian; Chattier, Jill; Krüsi, Andrea; Allan, Sarah; Maher, Lisa; Shannon, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Using a socio-ecological, structural determinants framework, this study assesses the impact of municipal licensing policies and related policing practices across the Greater Vancouver Area (Canada) on the risk of violence within indoor sex work venues. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 46 migrant/immigrant sex workers, managers and owners of licensed indoor sex work establishments and micro-brothels. Findings indicate that policing practices and licensing requirements increase sex workers' risk of violence and conflict with clients and result in heightened stress, an inability to rely on police support, lost income and the displacement of sex workers to more hidden informal work venues. Prohibitive licensing and policing practices prevent sex workers, managers and owners from adopting safer workplace measures and exacerbate health and safety risks for sex workers. This study provides critical evidence of the negative public health implications of prohibitive municipal licensing in the context of a criminalised and enforcement-based approach to sex work. Workplace safety recommendations include the decriminalisation of sex work and the elimination of disproportionately high fees for licences, criminal record restrictions, door lock restrictions, employee registration requirements and the use of police as licensing inspectors.

  15. Violence prevention and municipal licensing of indoor sex work venues in the Greater Vancouver Area: narratives of migrant sex workers, managers and business owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Solanna; Jia, Jessica Xi; Liu, Vivian; Chattier, Jill; Krüsi, Andrea; Allan, Sarah; Maher, Lisa; Shannon, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Using a socio-ecological, structural determinants framework, this study assesses the impact of municipal licensing policies and related policing practices across the Greater Vancouver Area (Canada) on the risk of violence within indoor sex work venues. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 46 migrant/immigrant sex workers, managers and owners of licensed indoor sex work establishments and micro-brothels. Findings indicate that policing practices and licensing requirements increase sex workers’ risk of violence and conflict with clients, and result in heightened stress, an inability to rely on police support, lost income and the displacement of sex workers to more hidden informal work venues. Prohibitive licensing and policing practices prevent sex workers, managers and owners from adopting safer workplace measures and exacerbate health and safety risks for sex workers. This study provides critical evidence of the negative public health implications of prohibitive municipal licensing in the context of a criminalised and enforcement-based approach to sex work. Workplace safety recommendations include the decriminalisation of sex work and the elimination of disproportionately high fees for licenses, criminal record restrictions, door lock restrictions, employee registration requirements and the use of police as licensing inspectors. PMID:25686777

  16. Innovation Management, Lead Users and Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, M.; Brem, Alexander; Voigt, K.-I.

    2013-01-01

    to integrate external knowledge into innovation processes. This approach is discussed by considering the integration of customers and especially Lead-Users into corporate product development. Based on the concept of Open Innovation, we reflect the role of Lead-Users in the innovation process critically....... Mounting on our reflections, we show the potentials of social media for integrating Lead-Users and develop a conceptual framework for the integration of Lead-Users using different social media applications. Findings — In this paper, a conceptual framework for integrating Lead-Users by using different...... social media applications is developed and introduced. Originality/value — The unique conceptual framework derived in this chapter is enriched with a discussion of the challenges resulting from the implementation of Lead-User integration along with social media in corporate innovation management...

  17. New Yorker Melange: Interactive Brew of Personalized Venue Recommendation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahálka, J.; Rudinac, S.; Worring, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose New Yorker Melange, an interactive city explorer, which navigates New York venues through the eyes of New Yorkers having a similar taste to the interacting user. To gain insight into New Yorkers' preferences and properties of the venues, a dataset of more than a million

  18. Equipment management user's handbook for property custodians

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Equipment Management User's Handbook for Property Custodians is issued as an instructional guide for personnel designated as property custodians and technical personnel involved in the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This handbook provides general information and basic operational procedures for processing equipment transactions through the agency-wide NASA Equipment Management System (NEMS). Each NASA installation must prepare supplementary instructions for local requirements beyond the scope of NASA-wide policies and procedures contained herein, or as specified for local implementation in NHB 4200.1, 'NASA Equipment Management Manual.' NHB 4200.1 sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This handbook is a controlled document, issued in loose-leaf form and revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution.

  19. Condoms and sexual health education as evidence: impact of criminalization of in-call venues and managers on migrant sex workers access to HIV/STI prevention in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S; Shannon, K; Li, J; Lee, Y; Chettiar, J; Goldenberg, S; Krüsi, A

    2016-11-17

    Despite a large body of evidence globally demonstrating that the criminalization of sex workers increases HIV/STI risks, we know far less about the impact of criminalization and policing of managers and in-call establishments on HIV/STI prevention among sex workers, and even less so among migrant sex workers. Analysis draws on ethnographic fieldwork and 46 qualitative interviews with migrant sex workers, managers and business owners of in-call sex work venues in Metro Vancouver, Canada. The criminalization of in-call venues and third parties explicitly limits sex workers' access to HIV/STI prevention, including manager restrictions on condoms and limited onsite access to sexual health information and HIV/STI testing. With limited labour protections and socio-cultural barriers, criminalization and policing undermine the health and human rights of migrant sex workers working in -call venues. This research supports growing evidence-based calls for decriminalization of sex work, including the removal of criminal sanctions targeting third parties and in-call venues, alongside programs and policies that better protect the working conditions of migrant sex workers as critical to HIV/STI prevention and human rights.

  20. Knowledge and opinion about smoke-free laws and second-hand smoke among hospitality venue managers in Gujarat and Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay K; Arora, Monika; Sharma, Indrani; Nazar, Gaurang P; Modi, Bhavesh; Singh, Deepti; Millett, Christopher; Reddy, K Srinath

    2013-01-01

    India's Smoke-Free Law (SFL) was implemented in 2004 and reinforced on 2nd October 2008. This research attempts to understand the knowledge and opinion of hospitality venue (HV) managers about second-hand smoke (SHS) and SFL as well as self-reported compliance with SFL in two Indian states. A survey was conducted among 804 randomly sampled HVs from project STEPS (Strengthening of tobacco control efforts through innovative partnerships and strategies) in Gujarat and Andhra Pradesh, India. Four hundred and three HVs from two districts in Gujarat and 401 HVs from six districts in Andhra Pradesh were selected. The owner, manager or supervisor of each HV was interviewed using a pre-tested structured interview schedule. Association of opinion scales with respondents' background characteristics was assessed through the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method. Out of the 403 respondents in Gujarat and 401 in Andhra Pradesh, 56.1% and 84.3% had knowledge about SFL respectively. Compliance of HVs with SFL was 21.8% in Gujarat and 31.2% in Andhra Pradesh as reported by the managers. Knowledge about SHS was noted among 39.7% of respondents in Gujarat and 25.4% in Andhra Pradesh. Bivariate results indicated that more educated HV managers showed higher support for smoke-free public places (P < 0.001) and were more concerned about the health effects of SHS exposure (P = 0.002). Complete self-reported compliance with, and knowledge of SFL as well as SHS was not found in Gujarat and Andhra Pradesh. The education level of HV managers is an important determinant to ensure compliance with SFL in public places.

  1. The organization of sex work in low- and high-priced venues with a focus on the experiences of ethnic minority women working in these venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhuang, Kongshao; Henderson, Gail E; Shenglong, Quzhen; Fang, Jingwen; Yao, Huiqin; Qin, Jingxin; Yang, Yanzhen; Abler, Laurie

    2014-02-01

    Prior research on female sex workers (FSW) in China, and their risk for HIV and STI, neglects the nuanced experiences of ethnic minority FSW. We conducted participant observations and in-depth interviews with 33 FSW and six venue bosses to describe the experiences of FSW and management structures in low and high-priced sex work venues in Liuzhou, China. In low-priced venues, FSW had more autonomy and stronger relationships with their ethnic minority peers. Mid- and high-priced venues had more formal management structures. Ethnic minority FSW working in higher priced venues experienced less support and kinship with their peers. HIV/STI prevention outreach activities occurred in all of the venues, but they were not tailored for different venue types or for ethnic minority FSW. Our findings provide guidance for tailoring public health programs that meet the needs of ethnic minority women working in different types of sex work venues.

  2. The organization of sex work in low and high-priced venues with a focus on the experiences of ethnic minority women working in these venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liu; Zhuang, Kongshao; Henderson, Gail E.; Shenglong, Quzhen; Fang, Jingwen; Yao, Huiqin; Qin, Jingxin; Yang, Yanzhen; Abler, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    Prior research on female sex workers (FSW) in China, and their risk for HIV and STI, neglects the nuanced experiences of ethnic minority FSW. We conducted participant observations and in-depth interviews with 33 FSW and six venue bosses to describe the experiences of FSW and management structures in high and low-priced sex work venues in Liuzhou, China. In low-priced venues, FSW had more autonomy and stronger relationships with their ethnic minority peers. Mid and high-priced venues had more formal management structures. Ethnic minority FSW working in higher priced venues experienced less support and kinship with their peers. HIV/STI prevention outreach activities occurred in all of the venues, but they were not tailored for different venue types or for ethnic minority FSW. Our findings provide guidance for tailoring public health programs that meet the needs of ethnic minority women working in different types of sex work venues. PMID:23912337

  3. Condoms and sexual health education as evidence: impact of criminalization of in-call venues and managers on migrant sex workers access to HIV/STI prevention in a Canadian setting

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, S.; Shannon, K; Li, J; Lee, Y.; Chettiar, J; Goldenberg, S; Kr?si, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a large body of evidence globally demonstrating that the criminalization of sex workers increases HIV/STI risks, we know far less about the impact of criminalization and policing of managers and in-call establishments on HIV/STI prevention among sex workers, and even less so among migrant sex workers. Methods Analysis draws on ethnographic fieldwork and 46 qualitative interviews with migrant sex workers, managers and business owners of in-call sex work venues in Metro Vanco...

  4. Delivering heart failure disease management in 3 tertiary care centers: key clinical components and venues of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monica R; Whellan, David J; Peterson, Eric D; Nohria, Anju; Hasselblad, Vic; Xue, Zhenyi; Bowers, Margaret T; O'Connor, Christopher M; Califf, Robert M; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2008-04-01

    Little data exist to assist to help those organizing and managing heart failure (HF) disease management (DM) programs. We aimed to describe the intensity of outpatient HF care (clinic visits and telephone calls) and medical and nonpharmacological interventions in the outpatient setting. This was a prospective substudy of 130 patients enrolled in STARBRITE in HFDM programs at 3 centers. Follow-up occurred 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after discharge. The number of clinic visits and calls made by HF cardiologists, nurse practitioners, and nurses were prospectively tracked. The results were reported as medians and interquartile ranges. There were a total of 581 calls with 4 (2, 6) per patient and 467 clinic visits with 3 (2, 5) per patient. Time spent per patient was 8.9 (6, 10.6) minutes per call and 23.8 (20, 28.3) minutes per clinic visit. Nurses and nurse practitioners spent 113 hours delivering care on the phone, and physicians and nurse practitioners spent 187.6 hours in clinic. Issues addressed during calls included HF education (341 times [52.6%]) and fluid overload (87 times [41.8%]). Medical interventions included adjustments to loop diuretics (calls 101 times, clinic 156 times); beta-blockers (calls 18 times, clinic 126 times); vasodilators (calls 8 times, clinic 55 times). More than a third of clinician time was spent on calls, during which >50% of patient contacts and HF education and >39% of diuretic adjustments occurred. Administrators and public and private insurers need to recognize the amount of medical care delivered over the telephone and should consider reimbursement for these activities.

  5. The Role of User Organizations in the Management of Smallholder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Role of User Organizations in the Management of Smallholder Irrigations Schemes: The Case of the Binduri Water Users Association of the Bawku ... Ghana Journal of Development Studies ... The Water Users Association was formed to ensure active community involvement in the management of the community dam.

  6. Radiation management and credentialing of fluoroscopy users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Benjamin R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-09-15

    During the last 15 years, developments in X-ray technologies have substantially improved the ability of practitioners to treat patients using fluoroscopically guided interventional techniques. Many of these procedures require a greater use of fluoroscopy and more recording of images. This increases the potential for radiation-induced dermatitis and epilation, as well as severe radiation-induced burns to patients. Many fluoroscope operators are untrained in radiation management and do not realize that these procedures increase the risk of radiation injury and radiation-induced cancer in personnel as well as patients. The hands of long-time fluoroscope operators in some cases exhibit radiation damage - especially when sound radiation protection practices have not been followed. In response, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the United States Food and Drug Administration has issued an Advisory calling for proper training of operators. Hospitals and administrators need to support and enforce the need for this training by requiring documentation of credentials in radiation management as a prerequisite for obtaining fluoroscopy privileges. A concerted effort on the part of professional medical organizations and regulatory agencies will be required to train fluoroscopy users to prevent physicians from unwittingly imparting serious radiation injuries to their patients. (orig.)

  7. The User-Subjective Approach to Personal Information Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ofer; Beyth-Marom, Ruth; Nachmias, Rafi

    2003-01-01

    Explains personal information management (PIM) systems and suggests a user-subjective approach to PIM system design. Advocates that PIM systems relate to the subjective value-added attributes that the user gives the stored data so that the user can find information again, recall it when needed, and use it effectively in the next interaction.…

  8. User requirements for interruption management in mobile communications in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, Bernd G; Solvoll, Terje; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In hospitals, mobile communication devices increase the occurrence of inappropriate interruptions during clinical task performance. These interruptions have been related to decreased quality of clinical care. User requirements were elicited using a scenario based approach. The results present insights into user requirements for an interruption management system for hospitals. Hospital workflow protocols were identified as a major source of interruptions. Many suggestions for managing these interruptions related to improving workflow using IT. We have shown that even though the hospital is an exceptionally demanding environment, the user requirements for interruption management concur with earlier findings in the broader fields of context aware interruption management and computer supported cooperative work.

  9. User's guide : pavement marking management system database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Pavement markings play a critical role in maintaining a safe and efficient driving environment for road users, especially during nighttime conditions. The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) spends millions of dollars each year for installatio...

  10. User experience management essential skills for leading effective UX teams

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Arnie

    2011-01-01

    The role of UX manager is of vital importance -- it means leading a productive team, influencing businesses to adopt user-centered design, and delivering valuable products customers. Few UX professionals who find themselves in management positions have formal training in management. More often than not they are promoted to a management position after having proven themselves as an effective and successful practitioner.Yet as important as the position of manager is to the advancement of the field there are no books that specifically address the needs of user experience managers. Though informat

  11. The intelligent user interface for NASA's advanced information management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas, Jr.; Rolofs, Larry H.; Wattawa, Scott L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Intelligent Data Management Project to design and develop advanced information management systems. The project's primary goal is to formulate, design and develop advanced information systems that are capable of supporting the agency's future space research and operational information management needs. The first effort of the project was the development of a prototype Intelligent User Interface to an operational scientific database, using expert systems and natural language processing technologies. An overview of Intelligent User Interface formulation and development is given.

  12. ICT strategy in an ICT user perspective: exploring alignment between ICT users and managers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fardal, Harald

    2007-01-01

    This study adds to the body of knowledge in research of ICTs in organizations by exploring the relevance of alignment between ICT users and managers responsible for the ICT strategy and ICT project processes...

  13. Identifying User Experience Goals for Interactive Climate Management Business Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Barlow, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from interpretative phenomenological interviews about the user experience of interactive climate management with six growers and crop consultants. The focus of user experience research has been on quantitative studies of consumers’ initial usage experiences, for example...... of mobile phones or e-commerce websites. In contrast, this empirical paper provides an example of how to capture user experience in work contexts and with a qualitative methodology. We present a model of the essence of the emotional user experience of interactive climate management. Then we suggest...... interpretations of these experiences in the forms of nomological networks of emotions by expanding the model for each of three main factors. In conclusion, the findings for two main stakeholder groups are reported in a user experience target table, which can be the basis for future research on user experience...

  14. Managing the Risks Associated with End-User Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Maryam; Weiss, Ira R.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies organizational risks of end-user computing (EUC) associated with different stages of the end-user applications life cycle (analysis, design, implementation). Generic controls are identified that address each of the risks enumerated in a manner that allows EUC management to select those most appropriate to their EUC environment. (5…

  15. Managing End User Computing in the Federal Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report presents an initial approach developed by the General Services Administration for the management of end user computing in federal government agencies. Defined as technology used directly by individuals in need of information products, end user computing represents a new field encompassing such technologies as word processing, personal…

  16. Managing Dynamic User Communities in a Grid of Autonomous Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Alfieri, R; Gianoli, A; Spataro, F; Ciaschini, Vincenzo; dell'Agnello, L; Bonnassieux, F; Broadfoot, P; Lowe, G; Cornwall, L; Jensen, J; Kelsey, D; Frohner, A; Groep, DL; Som de Cerff, W; Steenbakkers, M; Venekamp, G; Kouril, D; McNab, A; Mulmo, O; Silander, M; Hahkala, J; Lhorentey, K

    2003-01-01

    One of the fundamental concepts in Grid computing is the creation of Virtual Organizations (VO's): a set of resource consumers and providers that join forces to solve a common problem. Typical examples of Virtual Organizations include collaborations formed around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. To date, Grid computing has been applied on a relatively small scale, linking dozens of users to a dozen resources, and management of these VO's was a largely manual operation. With the advance of large collaboration, linking more than 10000 users with a 1000 sites in 150 counties, a comprehensive, automated management system is required. It should be simple enough not to deter users, while at the same time ensuring local site autonomy. The VO Management Service (VOMS), developed by the EU DataGrid and DataTAG projects[1, 2], is a secured system for managing authorization for users and resources in virtual organizations. It extends the existing Grid Security Infrastructure[3] architecture with embedded VO ...

  17. Venue-level correlates of female sex worker registration status: a multilevel analysis of bars in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Tommi L; Rusch, Melanie L A; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Goldenberg, Shira M; Lozada, Remedios; Robertson, Angela M; Perkins, Emily; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Patterson, Thomas L

    2013-01-01

    In Tijuana, Mexico, sex work is regulated by the municipal government, through registration cards issued to female sex workers (FSWs) for an annual fee. Registration has been associated with decreased drug use and increase condom use and HIV testing. Previously, it was demonstrated that FSWs operating in bars were more likely than street-based FSWs to be registered. This implies that certain venues may be more accessible to local authorities for the enforcement of this type of programme. Taking a novel multilevel approach, we examined whether venue characteristics of bars reflecting greater organised management and visibility affect registration status of FSWs. In an analysis of venue-level characteristics, predictors of being registered were availability of free condoms at work and distance to the main sex strip; however, these were not independently associated after inclusion of FSWs' income, illicit drug use and history of HIV testing. Our findings suggest that sex work regulations may inadvertently exclude venues in which the more vulnerable and less visible FSWs, such as injection drug users and those with limited financial resources, are situated. Efforts to revise or reconsider sex work regulations to ensure that they best promote FSWs' health, human and labour rights are recommended.

  18. Lead User Design: Medication Management in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan; Weber, Jens H; Davies, Iryna; Bellwood, Paule

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in medication management may lead to a reduction of preventable errors. Usability and user experience issues are common and related to achieving benefits of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). This paper reports on a novel study that combines the lead user method with a safety engineering review to discover an innovative design for the medication management module in EMRs in primary care. Eight lead users were recruited that represented prescribers and clinical pharmacists with expertise in EMR design, evidence-based medicine, medication safety and medication research. Eight separate medication management module designs were prototyped and validated, one with each lead user. A parallel safety review of medicaiton management was completed. The findings were synthesized into a single common set of goals, activities and one interactive, visual prototype. The lead user method with safety review proved to be an effective way to elicit diverse user goals and synthesize them into a common design. The resulting design ideas focus on meeting the goals of quality, efficiency, safety, reducing the cognitive load on the user, and improving communication wih the patient and the care team. Design ideas are being adapted to an existing EMR product, providing areas for further work.

  19. Managing user experience design: The role of a "storykeeper"

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, Ioanna; Lindemann, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Particularities of user experience-UX highlight the need for effective management using special skills. A gatekeeper of experience should cope with quality requirements, user-centred methods and multidisciplinary teams, while influencing decision-making. Based on literature, experiences from an industrial project and a small empirical study, we identify the need for establishing the role of storykeeper and make a proposal for its description. A storykeeper´s main task is ensuring successful U...

  20. Managing User Access to Cloud Services by Company Administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanya Lazarova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The number and power of administrator services has been growing lately. In order to perform their job, administrators acquire rights to access user data such as names, addresses, occupations, passwords and so on. The maintenance of user accounts is designed in a manner so that consumers are protected in a situation like this - administrators cannot access anyuser passwords if auser has changed it during the registration process. However, to carry out his normal activities, anadministrator canchange the current user password, even if he does not know it. This situation requires special measures to be taken by company’s management to protect their employees’ data.

  1. User Behaviours Associated with Password Security and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Bryant

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Control mechanisms established on the boundary of an information system are an important preliminary step to minimising losses from security breaches. The primary function of such controls is to restrict the use of information systems and resources to authorized users. Password-based systems remain the predominant method of user authentication despite the many sophisticated and viable security alternatives that have emerged from research and development. However, the literature shows that passwords are often compromised through the poor security and management practices of users. This paper examines user password composition and security practices for email accounts. The results of a survey that examines user practice in creating and using passwords are reported. The results show that many users know about the risks of hackers, viruses and so on and take preliminary steps to combat them such as having passwords longer than eight characters. However, this appears to be as far as many users are willing to accede to the probability that their information and computing resources can be compromised. This paper makes some recommendations for the education of users in creating and maintaining their passwords. The responsibility for these educational programs can be shared between governments, organisations, educational institutions at all levels, and software vendors.

  2. Toward visual user interfaces supporting collaborative multimedia content management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husein, Fathi; Leissler, Martin; Hemmje, Matthias

    2000-12-01

    Supporting collaborative multimedia content management activities, as e.g., image and video acquisition, exploration, and access dialogues between naive users and multi media information systems is a non-trivial task. Although a wide variety of experimental and prototypical multimedia storage technologies as well as corresponding indexing and retrieval engines are available, most of them lack appropriate support for collaborative end-user oriented user interface front ends. The development of advanced user adaptable interfaces is necessary for building collaborative multimedia information- space presentations based upon advanced tools for information browsing, searching, filtering, and brokering to be applied on potentially very large and highly dynamic multimedia collections with a large number of users and user groups. Therefore, the development of advanced and at the same time adaptable and collaborative computer graphical information presentation schemes that allow to easily apply adequate visual metaphors for defined target user stereotypes has to become a key focus within ongoing research activities trying to support collaborative information work with multimedia collections.

  3. Activity Management System user reference manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, T.A.; Burdick, M.B.

    1994-09-22

    The Activity Management System (AMS) was developed in response to the need for a simple-to-use, low-cost, user interface system for collecting and logging Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project (HWVP) activities. This system needed to run on user workstations and provide common user access to a database stored on a local network file server. Most important, users wanted a system that provided a management tool that supported their individual process for completing activities. Existing system treated the performer as a tool of the system. All AMS data is maintained in encrypted format. Users can feel confident that any activities they have entered into the database are private and that, as the originator, they retain sole control over who can see them. Once entered into the AMS database, the activities cannot be accessed by anyone other than the originator, the designated agent, or by authorized viewers who have been explicitly granted the right to look at specific activities by the originator. This user guide is intended to assist new AMS users in learning how to use the application and, after the initial learning process, will serve as an ongoing reference for experienced users in performing infrequently used functions. Online help screens provide reference to some of the key information in this manual. Additional help screens, encompassing all the applicable material in this manual, will be incorporated into future AMS revisions. A third, and most important, source of help is the AMS administrator(s). This guide describes the initial production version of AMS, which has been designated Revision 1.0.

  4. Software process improvement: controlling developers, managers or users?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørbjerg, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses how the latest trend in the management of software development: software process improvement (SPI) may affect user-developer relations. At the outset, SPI concerns the "internal workings" of software organisations, but it may also be interpreted as one way to give the developer...

  5. User`s guide to the FFTF Plant Operational Data Management System (B1039)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J.V. Jr.

    1994-07-25

    The FFTF Plant Operational Data Management (PODM) System provides capabilities for storing, managing and retrieving data recorded by FFTF plant computers [the Plant Data System (PDS), in particular]. The PODM system is currently implemented on SUN{sup TM} Workstations{sup (R)}. This guide contains a description of the PODM System, and instructions for using programs available for retrieving and processing FFTF data stored in the data base. Section 2.0 provides a brief overview and the background of the system. The organization and content of the data base are described in more detail in Sections 3.0 and 4.0. Available computer programs are described in sections 5.0 and 6.0 while subroutines that can be called by a user`s FORTRAN program are described in section 7.0.

  6. User and Access Management in Belgian e-Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, Jos; Robben, Frank

    Efficient e-government is not possible without integrated information management. From a privacy protection per-spective systems integration has to be preferred over data integration. A well-accepted model for the organisation of user and access management in this perspective is a federation based on circles of trust. The following pages describe how this model is implemented in Belgium, using five building blocks: unique identification numbers, the electronic identity card, validated authentic sources, service integrators and sector committees for data protection. Using these building blocks user and access management is organised following a generic policy decision model. The objective is to illustrate that integrated e-government is not necessarily incompatible with optimal protection of privacy.

  7. Venue | Information | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Venue of the meeting. Multi-use Convention Centre North-Eastern Hill University Umshing Mawkynroh, Shillong 793022. Meghalaya, INDIA. Campus map. NEHU Campus Map. Quick links. Schedule. Day1 · Day2 · Day3 · Allied Events · Teachers & Spouses. For Participants. Venue · Hospitality · Logistics · Contact · Other ...

  8. Design and Implementation of Online Booking System of University Sports Venues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Can

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the imbalanced use of university sports venues, the online booking system of university sports venues based on the table tennis hall of Zhengzhou University is designed, combining the experience of the existing online booking systems, the main methods and the major ideal of building these systems both at home and aboard. The basic functions of the system are designed according to the general requirement analysis, including user’s registration and login, online venue booking, online payment, personal center, message board and database construction. The development of the system used Java programming language, JSP (a Web platform development technology, MySQL database processing technology, JDBC data access model, MyEclipse development platform and Tomcat server. The system has accomplished such functions as online booking, online payment and online message. The tests of the system are run in good conditions. The use of the system has made up for the current luck of sports venues management, solved the problems of the online booking function of university sports venues, improved the efficiency of the venues and meet the needs of efficient use of the venues. The system can be an experience of the management of the other college sports venues.

  9. Targeting improved user experience in KONE CRM opportunities management

    OpenAIRE

    Parada Suarez, Diana Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to enquire about potential elements for simplification and further enhancements of KONE CRM opportunities tab layout, and overall opportunity management at KONE, as means to improve users’ experience, foster adoption and increase levels of sales efficiency across KONE CRM users globally. This study´s theoretical framework highlights the contributions of authors like Adrian Payne (2008) and Ed Peelen (2005) in what concerns to the concept and strateg...

  10. Managing Recreational Trail Environments for Mountain Bike User Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmonds; Hammitt; Quisenberry

    2000-05-01

    / The carrying capacity model is an effective tool for the management of a wildland recreation resource. Within the model are four primary subcapacities, namely, physical capacity, biological capacity, social capacity, and facility capacity; combined, they are essential to the appropriate management of wildland recreation resource environments. This study focuses on environmental factors of recreational environments that are primarily used by mountain bikers. Little research has been conducted on the social carrying capacity of mountain biking environments, relative to the amount of physical and biological capacity research that has been conducted. The objective of this study was to further resource management knowledge of the mountain bike user in order to better incorporate social carrying capacity into the management of bike use environments. An email survey was used to identify such issues as mountain biker preference of soil erosion management techniques and to measure the effect on experience of resultant factors of soil erosion and trail design. Other issues, such as environmental concern, biker perception of other users, and biker commitment, were also measured. A 58% response rate was achieved. Data gathered from bikers in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand (N = 406), highlight some important issues concerning the design and management of wildland recreation environments that are primarily used for mountain biking. For example, bikers were found to significantly prefer water bars above all other tested soil erosion management techniques; trail erosion factors, including the presence of rocks, roots, and gullies, all added to biking experiences on average; trail design factors, such as the presence of turns, bumps, jumps, and obstacles, all added to biking experiences in general. These findings were used to address questions that resource managers should consider when striving to effectively manage wildland recreation areas

  11. Reducing HIV Risks in the Places Where People Drink: Prevention Interventions in Alcohol Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C

    2016-01-01

    Apart from individual alcohol drinking behavior, the context or places where people drink play a significant role in HIV transmission risk. In this paper, we review the research that has been conducted on alcohol venues to identify the social and structural factors (e.g., social norms, sexual behavior) that are associated with HIV risk in these places, to review HIV prevention interventions based in alcohol venues, and to discuss appropriate methodologies for alcohol venue research. Alcohol venues are defined here as places that sell or serve alcohol for onsite consumption, including bars, bottle stores, nightclubs, wine shops, and informal shebeens. Despite the many established HIV risk factors at play in alcohol venues, limited prevention strategies have been implemented in such places. A total of 11 HIV prevention interventions or programs were identified. HIV prevention interventions in alcohol venues may be conducted at the individual, social, or structural level. However, multilevel interventions that target more than one level appear to lead to the most sustainable behavior change. Strategies to incorporate alcohol venues in biomedical prevention strategies including antiretroviral therapy for alcohol users are also discussed.

  12. A Collaborative Extensible User Environment for Simulation and Knowledge Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Lansing, Carina S.; Porter, Ellen A.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Gorton, Ian

    2015-06-01

    In scientific simulation, scientists use measured data to create numerical models, execute simulations and analyze results from advanced simulators executing on high performance computing platforms. This process usually requires a team of scientists collaborating on data collection, model creation and analysis, and on authorship of publications and data. This paper shows that scientific teams can benefit from a user environment called Akuna that permits subsurface scientists in disparate locations to collaborate on numerical modeling and analysis projects. The Akuna user environment is built on the Velo framework that provides both a rich client environment for conducting and analyzing simulations and a Web environment for data sharing and annotation. Akuna is an extensible toolset that integrates with Velo, and is designed to support any type of simulator. This is achieved through data-driven user interface generation, use of a customizable knowledge management platform, and an extensible framework for simulation execution, monitoring and analysis. This paper describes how the customized Velo content management system and the Akuna toolset are used to integrate and enhance an effective collaborative research and application environment. The extensible architecture of Akuna is also described and demonstrates its usage for creation and execution of a 3D subsurface simulation.

  13. INFORMATION IN THE SYSTEM OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING AND ITS USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneliya Galinova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In an market economy, where each entity has autonomy in developing their production programs, production plans and social development to identify strategies pricing policy has significantly increased the responsibility of the management of taken by them management decisions. In order to develop effective and operative decisions managers need reliable information for both the production and the financial position of the company. As is known, traditional accounting, which covers much of the existing information systems do not provide managers at all levels of operational information, and this is achieved through management accounting. Namely the creation of nontraditional systems for forming information about production costs and the financial results, the use of new methods to management, the increased value of the information obtained for decision making appears at present one of the most actual problems of accounting, control and analysis of economic activity. In this article we aim to define the concept of management information, to systematize the information needs of different users and qualitative characteristics that should have useful information.

  14. Program MAMO: Models for avian management optimization-user guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumet, Alban; Paxton, Eben H.

    2017-01-01

    The following chapters describe the structure and code of MAMO, and walk the reader through running the different components of the program with sample data. This manual should be used alongside a computer running R, so that the reader can copy and paste code into R, observe the output, and follow along interactively. Taken together, chapters 2–4 will allow the user to replicate a simulation study investigating the consequences of climate change and two potential management actions on the population dynamics of a vulnerable and iconic Hawaiian forest bird, the ‘I‘iwi (Drepanis coccinea; hereafter IIWI).

  15. Shades of darkness : A pecking order of trading venues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menkveld, Albert J.; Yueshen, Bart Zhou; Zhu, Haoxiang

    2017-01-01

    We characterize the dynamic fragmentation of U.S. equity markets using a unique data set that disaggregates dark transactions by venue types. The “pecking order” hypothesis of trading venues states that investors “sort” various venue types, putting low-cost-low-immediacy venues on top and

  16. HIV infection and sexual behaviors among non-commercial men who have sex with men at different venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Chen, Lin; Cai, Wen-De; Tan, Jing-Guang; Tan, Wei; Zheng, Chen-Li; Cheng, Jin-Quan; Yang, Zheng-Rong; He, Ming-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) has increased rapidly in China. Previous studies suggested that some venue-specific characteristics could significantly affect MSM's sexual behaviors that were related to HIV transmission. Thus, to compare the HIV infection rates and related risky sexual behaviors among MSM at different venues, we conducted a cross-sectional study with time-location sampling in Shenzhen, China. Among the 801 MSM recruited in the study, 7.0 % (n = 56) were found to be HIV positive, with 0.9 % of MSM at bars (BMSM), 3.5 % of MSM at suburban recreational centers (RMSM), 8.1 % of MSM at saunas (SMSM), 9.3 % of MSM at parks (PMSM), and 10.1 % of MSM at dorm-based venues (DMSM). HIV infection was significantly more prevalent in MSM in dorm-based venues, parks, and saunas than in other venues. Compared to MSM in other venues, BMSM were more likely to be single, drug and alcohol users, but less likely to be HIV and syphilis positive. More PMSM reported having unprotected anal intercourse with other men while more SMSM reported having multiple male sex partners and more RMSM had a low level of HIV-related knowledge. The results indicated that MSM frequenting different venues were inconsistent with regards to demographic characteristics, HIV and syphilis infection rates, and risky sexual behaviors. Greater efforts are needed to develop intervention strategies that target specific venues and risky behaviors.

  17. [Issues on user participation in health care management in Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerouedan, D; Dauby, P

    2004-01-01

    The 1990s witnessed great progress in increasing community participation in the management of health care services as an objective for reform of healthcare systems especially in urban areas benefiting from funding from the international community. Community participation has taken various forms from one country to another in terms of sources of healthcare training (public, private, or both), organization of management committees (inclusion or not of healthcare personnel), and scope of public service assigned to district health care units (preventive and/or curative care, management of proceeds from provision of health care procedures and/or medication, etc.). These strategies have had variable results and, although some urban programs have been evaluated, no attempt has been made to use this experience as a basis for analyzing the political implications of issues involving citizenship and public health. This report presents some ideas on these issues from the point of view of both governments and citizens and restates the purpose of user participation in healthcare services in Africa. That intent involves the need not only to increase household contributions to the cost of healthcare especially within the uncertain economic environment of urban areas but also to improve access to as well as quality of healthcare services.

  18. Q&A. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Young

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial software companies employ product managers to handle the planning and marketing of software products, whereas few open source projects have a product manager. Does lack of product management impact the users of open source?

  19. Managing concrete bridges: Methods for reducing costs and user inconveniences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents experiences from modern bridge maintenance management, which has been forced to develop new and cost-efficient approaches in order to cope with the increase in overall deterioration of the aging bridge stock, the growing requirements to accessibility and the decreasing budgets....... These approaches are focused on cost reductions, but must as well lead to a reduction of the user inconveniences (traffic delays, noise, dust) and to a reduction of the environmental impact. These approaches can be based on an assessment of the structures safety, which incorporates the inaccuracies...... in the condition assessments, the models and the predictions in the strategies and the cost estimations. This may lead to increased inspection frequencies, detailed simulations, monitoring and testing to be used as alternatives to extensive repairs, rehabilitations or strengthening. The approaches will in other...

  20. Optimal Design of Primary User Spectrum Management Using Stackelberg Games

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini Kamal, Mahdad

    2008-01-01

    We consider a cognitive radio network in which a base station provides opportunistic unlicensed spectrum access for secondary base stations to transmit data to their subscribers. The primary user may decide to release some parts of its bandwidth for the use of secondary users. As a result, secondary users pay a fee to the primary user based on the interference they make. Considering cognitive radios, we propose and analyze a framework, whereby a primary user has the possibility to release its...

  1. Managing user queries using cloud services: KAUST library experience

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-03-01

    The provision of reference and information services are one of the major activities for academic libraries. Answering questions and providing relevant and timely answers for library users are just one of such services. Questions come in many format: in person, phone, email and even on social media platforms. The type of questions may also differ from simple, directional to complicated ones. One of the challenges for libraries is the capturing and managing of these inquiries. Libraries need to address some of these points: •\\tHow the questions will be captured •\\tHow the questions will be answered •\\tWho will answer these questions •\\tWhat is the turn-around time for answering these questions •\\tWhat kind of statistics to monitor •\\tHow are these statistics communicated to internal library staff and other stakeholders This paper describe the initiatives undertaken by KAUST, a brand new Graduate Research Library located in Saudi Arabia. This initiatives include the implementation of LibAnswers to assist the library in capturing and managing all inquiries. We are tracking inquiries coming in via email or widgets (such as online form), converting received questions into FAQ entries, creating and maintaining a public knowledge base for our users. In addition, it will also describe future plans in store to expand reference services for our library users. KAUST: (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) is a graduate research university located along the shores of the Red Sea. The university was inaugurated in September 2009. The main areas of study are: Mathematics and Computer Science, Physical Sciences and Life Sciences. The university library is situated at the heart of the campus. It is a digitally born library with collections comprising of print and electronic resources. The library has: •\\t310,000 e-book titles •\\tOver 50,000 e-journal titles •\\tOver 30 scientific databases •\\tAbout 3,500 print titles

  2. Venue | Information | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quick links. Schedule. Day1 · Day2 · Allied Events. For Participants. Venue · Accommodation · Transport · Press and Media · Contact. Downloads. Programme Poster · Programme Brochure · Speaker Profiles and Abstracts · Special Lectures Poster · List of Participants. © 2017 Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru.

  3. Venue | Information | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Venue of the conference. Lecture Hall Complex (LHC ) and Auditorium of Visitors' Hostel Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhopal, Bhopal Bypass Road, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, Madhya Pradesh, INDIA. Campus map. IISER Bhopal Master Plan. Quick links. Schedule. Day1 · Day2 · Day3 · Allied Events ...

  4. Use of paired management action grids for ease in depicting differences between users' and managers' perceptions of problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. J. Steele; James E. Fletcher

    1992-01-01

    This research was to determine whether differences exist between users and managers concerning perceptions of actual and perceived problems in parks and primarily to present a method of graphically depicting the differing perceptions of problems which exist between users and park managers which can be easily employed by area managers and related to the public, upper...

  5. The Role of Focus Group Venue: A Comparative Study of Face-to-Face, Telephone, and Internet Video-Based Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothberg, June E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the equivalence or non-inferiority for comparisons of telephone focus group venue to face-to-face focus group venue, Internet video-based focus group venue to face-to-face focus group venue, and Internet video-based focus group venue to telephone focus group venue. Research questions examined the…

  6. User expectations and perceptions of a patient management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R D; Deane, F P

    1996-01-01

    The use of computers in health care has become increasingly common. However, implemented systems at times have not met the expectations of the user group, resulting in disconfirmed expectations. This article takes a first tentative look at the notion of disconfirmed expectations and the possible impact disconfirmed expectations may have upon the perceptions of the system the user group may develop. Seventy-two pre-users and 30 users completed a questionnaire regarding their system expectations (pre-users) or system perceptions (user). Analysis examined occupation and use (pre-user/user) ratings. Results found vast differences in both use and occupation. When examining the observed differences in use (pre-user/user), a discriminant analysis identified nine factors that discriminated significantly between these groups, with 'user support' being the main factor. When examining the groups by occupation (clerical, nursing, other) it was found that differences were explained by how effective the system was at meeting their daily work requirement needs. These results are discussed in relation to system implementation strategies.

  7. Ecological user interface for emergency management decision support systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V.

    2003-01-01

    The user interface for decision support systems is normally structured for presenting relevant data for the skilled user in order to allow fast assessment and action of the hazardous situation, or for more complex situations to present the relevant rules and procedures to be followed in order...... to deal most efficiently with the situation. For situations not foreseen, however, no rules exist, and no support may be given to the user by suggested actions to be fulfilled. The idea of ecological user interface is to present to the user the complete situation at various interrelated levels...... of abstraction supporting the situation assessment and remedial actions based on the domain knowledge of the user. The concept of ecological user interface has been tested and appreciated in a variety of other domains using prototypes designed to be representative of industrial processes. The purpose...

  8. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  9. HIV prevention outreach in commercial gay venues in large cities: evaluation findings from London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, Chris; Strange, V; Allen, E; Barnett-Page, E

    2006-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention delivered in gay venues in US cities has been found to be effective in reducing HIV transmission in the 1990s but effects might not be generalizable to different times and settings. Doubts have been raised about: outreach's ability to address skills and explore personal behaviour; big-city commercial gay venues being appropriate sites for outreach because of gossip and social surveillance; and acceptability of outreach by professionals rather than 'popular opinion formers'. We evaluated coverage, feasibility, acceptability and perceived impact of venue-based HIV prevention outreach by professionals in London, employing observation, surveys and interviews with venue-users, and focus groups/semi-structured interviews with workers. We found high coverage especially among target groups. Addressing negotiation skills and personal behaviour was feasible but required worker motivation and skill. Social surveillance rarely impeded work. Gay men generally found outreach acceptable and useful, and professionals were not regarded negatively. Impact on knowledge was commonly reported; impacts on negotiation skills and reflection on personal behaviour were more common among men experiencing longer contacts. In conclusion, professional HIV prevention outreach in gay venues in large cities is a feasible and acceptable intervention with significant potential impacts. Workers need to be well briefed and trained to maximize impact.

  10. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. The management of user fees and other fundraising initiatives in self-managing public schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Mestry

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In view of redressing past imbalances created by the apartheid regime and achieving equity in funding public schools, the post-1994 government introduced the Norms and Standards for School Funding policy that severely reduces state funding to schools located within affluent areas. However, the South African Schools Act, No. 84 of 1996 makes provision for school governing bodies (SGBs, responsible for financial and physical resource management of schools, to supplement state funding. In order to ensure that effective teaching and learning takes place, self-managed SGBs secure funding from parents, corporates and the broader community through school (user fees, donations and unconventional fundraising projects. These additional funds enable SGBs to provide schools with state-of-the-art physical resources, and to employ teaching and nonteaching staff not provided for in the post-provisioning norms determined by the department of education. Using quantitative research, this study aimed to determine how self-managed SGBs manage funds through user fees and other fundraising initiatives. Findings revealed that governing bodies of most self-managed schools were able to secure substantial funding from school fees and other fundraising initiatives, and managed the funds effectively and efficiently.

  12. Action Information Management System (AIMS): a User's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskerchen, M.

    1984-01-01

    The initial approach used in establishing a user-defined information system to fulfill the needs of users at NASA Headquarters was unsuccessful in bringing this pilot endeaveor to full project status. The persistence of several users and the full involvement of the Ames Research Center were the ingredients needed to make the AIMS project a success. The lesson learned from this effort is that NASA should always work from its organizational strengths as a Headquarters-Center partnership.

  13. End user support plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.E.

    1998-09-29

    Primary objective of the End User Support Plan is to ensure that the end users have access that is reasonable and commensurate with job position functionality in order to perform their work effectively. Another objective is to ensure user support is provided to utilize the new BMS while minimizing significant security risks to BMS. The EUSP becomes effective as of this document`s acceptance and will provide guidance through implementation efforts and as a living document.

  14. Increasing security and privacy in user-centric identity management: The IdM card approach

    OpenAIRE

    Marx, R.; Simo Fhom, H.; Scheuermann, D.; Bayarou, K.M.; Perez, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how security and privacy can be increased in user-centric Identity Management (IdM) by the introduction of a so-called IdM card. This IdM card securely stores and processes identity data of the card owner, an end user. The card represents a trusted device that supports the user in managing its digital identities and also in performing secure and privacy-enhanced service authentication and authorization.

  15. Evaluating user impacts and management controls: Implications for recreation choice behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriet H. Christensen; Nanette J. Davis

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes potential factors affecting recreation choice behavior. Freedom and lack of constraints are experiences frequently sought by recreationists. Data in the paper are based on questionnaires completed by agency managers and informal conversations with users in the Mount Rainier area of Washington State. Managers' and users' perceptions of...

  16. Manage Computer Support Costs through Effective User Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Compagnon, Betty; Leydon, John F.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents the University of New Hampshire's approach to ongoing training of computer users and argues that training is an investment with a large payoff. The article considers factors affecting training success; computer support; academic computing training; and administrative computing training, including developing a user services…

  17. User-controlled resource management in federated clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mosch, Marc; Groß, Stephan; Schill, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    ... by cloud’s potential we propose a way to get rid of this drawback. We present π-Cloud, a personal secure cloud, that enables users to benefit from cloud computing and retain data sovereignty by federating the users own resources...

  18. Effective user management with high strength crypto –key in dynamic group environment in cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P. J.; Suganya, P.; Karthik, G.

    2017-11-01

    Cloud Clusters consists of various collections of files which are being accessed by multiple users of Cloud. The users are managed as a group and the association of the user to a particular group is dynamic in nature. Every group has a manager who handles the membership of a user to a particular group by issuing keys for encryption and decryption. Due to the dynamic nature of a user he/she may leave the group very frequently. But an attempt can be made by the user who has recently left the group to access a file maintained by that group. Key distribution becomes a critical issue while the behavior of the user is dynamic. Existing techniques to manage the users of group in terms of security and key distribution has been investigated so that to arrive at an objective to identify the scopes to increase security and key management scheme in cloud. The usage of various key combinations to measure the strength of security and efficiency of user management in dynamic cloud environment has been investigated.

  19. User requirements for NASA data base management systems. Part 1: Oceanographic discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, B.

    1981-01-01

    Generic oceanographic user requirements were collected and analyzed for use in developing a general multipurpose data base management system for future missions of the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA) of NASA. The collection of user requirements involved; studying the state-of-the-art technology in data base management systems; analyzing the results of related studies; formulating a viable and diverse list of scientists to be interviewed; developing a presentation format and materials; and interviewing oceanographic data users. More effective data management systems are needed to handle the increasing influx of data.

  20. An Evaluation of Users' Satisfaction with Property Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Customer or user satisfaction is an overall attitude regarding a good or service after its acquisition and use. The factor most important to satisfaction is the level of performance of the product. If the level of satisfaction with the product is high customers tend to be satisfied, even if they expect such level of performance. One of ...

  1. ERP as an organization innovation : Key users and cross-boundary knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.-B.; van Fenema, P.C.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide more insight in the ways key users act as knowledge managers and boundary spanners during the enterprise resource planning (ERP) system usage phase. Despite the recognized importance of key users during the implementation phase of an ERP system, little

  2. Graphical User Interface Development and Design to Support Airport Runway Configuration Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Debra G.; Lenox, Michelle; Onal, Emrah; Latorella, Kara A.; Lohr, Gary W.; Le Vie, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) System Oriented Runway Management (SORM) decision support tool to support runway management. This tool is expected to be used by traffic flow managers and supervisors in the Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facilities.

  3. Management strategies for aligning higher education accommodation with the user needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, Ronald; van der Voordt, D.J.M.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: – This paper aims to explore the management strategies of facility managers and corporate real estate managers to align corporate real estate (CRE) with the needs of their organization and the end users in a changing context. Design/methodology/approach: – The paper first outlines the

  4. Management strategies for aligning higher education accomodation with the user needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronald Beckers; Geert Dewulf; Theo van der Voordt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to explore the management strategies of facility managers and corporate real estate managers to align corporate real estate (CRE) with the needs of their organization and the end users in a changing context. Design/methodology/approach The paper first outlines the

  5. [User guide for Vegetation Structure survey at Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Habitat structure user guide for the vegetation structure monitoring survey at Kulm Wetland Management District. This recurring survey happens every year from May...

  6. The Management of End-User Computing Documents: The Urgent Task of Keeping Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Cherackal

    1992-01-01

    Focuses on the management of documentation requirements of information generated because of end user computing. Points out historical trends, proposes patterns for meeting documentation requirements, introduces techniques for facilitating documentation, and discusses recommendations for completion of the documentation task. (JOW)

  7. A Survey of Health Management User Objectives in Aerospace Systems Related to Diagnostic and Prognostic Metrics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the most prominent technical challenges to effective deployment of health management systems is the vast difference in user objectives with respect to...

  8. User guide to power management for PCs and monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordman, B.; Piette, M.A.; Kinney, K.; Webber, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.

    1997-01-01

    Power management of personal computers (PCs) and monitors has the potential to save significant amounts of electricity as well as deliver other economic and environmental benefits. The Environmental Protection Agency`s ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program has transformed the PC market so that equipment capable of power management is now widely available. However, previous studies have found that many Energy Star compliant computer systems are not accomplishing energy savings. The principal reasons for this are systems not being enabled for power management or a circumstance that prevents power management from operating. This guide is intended to provide information to computer support workers to increase the portion of systems that successfully power manage. The guide introduces power management concepts and the variety of benefits that power management can bring. It then explains how the parts of a computer system work together to enter and leave power management states. Several common computer system types are addressed, as well as the complications that networks bring to power management. Detailed instructions for checking and configuring several system types are provided, along with trouble shooting advice. The guide concludes with a discussion of how to purchase Energy Star compliant systems and future directions for power management of PCs and related equipment.

  9. Dynamically Allocated Virtual Clustering Management System Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    dynamically create, deploy, and manage virtual clusters of heterogeneous nodes within a cloud computing environment. The system allows researchers to create... Storage Management 21 8. Creating a New Virtual Hard Disk From a Cluster Node 26 9. Conclusion 30 Distribution List 31 Approved for public...dynamically create, deploy, and manage virtual clusters of heterogeneous nodes within a cloud computing environment. The system allows researchers to

  10. Dashboard Task Monitor for managing ATLAS user analysis on the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, L; Jha, M; Karavakis, E; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Saiz, P; Schovancova, J; Tuckett, D

    2014-01-01

    The organization of the distributed user analysis on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks among the computing activities at the Large Hadron Collider. The Experiment Dashboard offers a solution that not only monitors but also manages (kill, resubmit) user tasks and jobs via a web interface. The ATLAS Dashboard Task Monitor provides analysis users with a tool that is independent of the operating system and GRID environment . This contribution describes the functionality of the application and its implementation details, in particular authentication, authorization and audit of the management operations.

  11. Dashboard Task Monitor for managing ATLAS user analysis on the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, L; The ATLAS collaboration; Jha, M; Karavakis, E; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Saiz, P; Schovancova, J; Tuckett, D

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the distributed user analysis on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks among the computing activities at the Large Hadron Collider. The Experiment Dashboard offers a solution that not only monitors but also manages (kill, resubmit) user tasks and jobs via a web interface. The ATLAS Dashboard Task Monitor provides analysis users with a tool that is operating system and GRID environment independent. This contribution describes the functionality of the application and its implementation details, in particular authentication, authorization and audit of the management operations.

  12. Managing recreation areas for quality user experiences: a theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. More; Gregory J. Buhyoff

    1979-01-01

    The production of opportunities for high-quality visitor experiences is a basic goal of recreation management. Recreation quality can be interpreted using concepts from psychological field theory to relate emotion to the strength of motivation. Applications to on-site management for recreation quality and use regulation are suggested.

  13. Open data for informal settlements: Toward a user׳s guide for urban managers and planners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Chakraborty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Informal settlements exist in a legally contested space and the quality of – and access to – information about them has been historically limited. The open data movement promises to address this gap by offering alternative sources for information and free or low cost analytical platforms. However, in order to use open data effectively, urban managers and planners need guidance to navigate these new data sources, software, and server platforms, as well as acquire the necessary skills. In this paper, we begin to address these issues by developing a framework that organizes the sprawling and rapidly evolving world of open urban data. Our framework includes three broad categories (1 inputs and resources, (2 activities and outputs, and (3 outcomes. We then identify and describe the key subcomponents under each, and list the prominent products and resources available to urban managers and planners. For example, under inputs and resources, we discuss open urban data sources such as Open Street Maps, cyberinfrastructure for web hosting, application deployment, and data processing, and open source software that can be used to analyze and visualize collected or derived data. We also identify the key resources available to planners for training and discuss the complementary opportunities presented by conventional datasets such as census and open urban data. Finally, using examples from ongoing activities in Mumbai, we show how open data resources can be useful for understanding urbanization and better integrating informal settlements into formal urban management and planning processes. We suggest that urban managers and planners working in informal settlements should take greater advantage of open data resources in order to both better address current challenges as well as for shaping a better future for the communities they serve.

  14. Software Management Environment (SME) release 9.4 user reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, R.; Kistler, D.; Manter, K.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains user reference material for the Software Management Environment (SME) prototype, developed for the Systems Development Branch (Code 552) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) of Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The SME provides an integrated set of management tools that can be used by software development managers in their day-to-day management and planning activities. This document provides an overview of the SME, a description of all functions, and detailed instructions concerning the software's installation and use.

  15. Second-hand smoke in indoor hospitality venues in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, S M A; Moin, O; Khan, J A

    2011-07-01

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) constitutes a significant public health threat in countries with a high smoking prevalence. However, data assessing the quality of indoor air at public venues in Pakistan are limited. To measure mean concentrations of PM(2.5) (particulate matter ≤2.5 microns in diameter), a sensitive indicator of SHS, in hospitality venues in Pakistan. Data were collected discreetly from 39 indoor venues such as cafes, restaurants and shisha (water-pipe) bars from three major cities in Pakistan. Data were recorded using a portable air quality monitoring device. The overall mean PM(2.5) value for the visited venues was 846 μg/m(3) (95%CI 484-1205). The mean PM(2.5) value was 101 μg/m(3) (95%CI 69-135 μg/m(3)) for non-smoking venues, 689 μg/m(3) (95%CI 241-1138) for cigarette smoking venues and 1745 μg/m(3) (95%CI 925-2565) for shisha smoking venues. The significant levels of SHS recorded in this study, in particular from shisha smoking venues, could represent a major public health burden in Pakistan. Appropriate legislation needs to be enforced to protect the health of those exposed to the hazards of second-hand tobacco smoke.

  16. The GRIN-Global Information Management System – A Preview and Opportunity for Public User Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GRIN-Global Information Management System, under development for the past two years, will provide the world's crop genebanks and plant genetic resource (PGR) users with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use PGR information management system. Developed jointly by the USDA Agricultural Research Servi...

  17. Information Technology Management: Defense Civilian Personnel Data System Functionality and User Satisfaction (D-2003-110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-27

    Information Technology Management Department of Defense Office of the Inspector General June 27, 2003 AccountabilityIntegrityQuality Defense...SUBTITLE Information Technology Management : Defense Civilian Personnel Data System Functionality and User Satisfaction (D-2003-110) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  18. Knowledge management roles of librarians for transformative user ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was found that for librarians to play their KM roles successfully, the University Library leadership must provide the support, create atmosphere for top down communication and encourage or ganizational learning. Based on the findings, some recommendations were made. Key Words : Knowledge, Management, Librarians ...

  19. STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL USER'S MANUAL VERSION 5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is a dynamic rainfall-runoff simulation model used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. SWMM was first developed in 1971 and has undergone several major upgrade...

  20. CAVEMAN: Configuration And VErsion MANagement. User`s guide, v2.1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, K.M.

    1993-03-12

    The mission of the CAVEMAN project is to provide the tools for large code systems so that those who work on them can perform source control and configuration control on UNIX-based file servers, rather than the LC Crays. An outside product called cvs has been chosen as the underlying source control system. The initials stand for {open_quotes}Concurrent Versions System{close_quotes}. It is a freeware program that runs on most UNIX stations. To quote from the cvs man page: {open_quotes}cvs is a front end to the rcs revision control system which extends the notion of revision control from a collection of files in a single directory to a hierarchical collection of directories consisting of revision controlled files. These directories and files can be combined together to form a software release. cvs provides the functions necessary to manage these software releases and to control the concurrent editing of source files among multiple software developers.{close_quotes} While cvs may be run directly, there are several tasks in the LLNL environment that it seemed either safer or easier to automate. CAVEMAN provides the needed functionality, generally in the form of wrappers to cvs.

  1. A user behaviour-driven smart-home gateway for energy management

    OpenAIRE

    Vastardis, N.; Kampouridis, Michael; Yang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Current smart-home and automation systems have reduced generality and modularity, thus confining users in terms of functionality. This paper proposes a novel system architecture and describes the implementation of a user-centric smart-home gateway that is able to support home-automation, energy usage management and reduction, as well as smart-grid operations. This is enabled through a middleware service that exposes a control API, allowing the manipulation of the home network devices and info...

  2. Mobility management for highly mobile users and vehicular networks in heterogeneous environments

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Karl; Åhlund, Christer; Gukhool, Balkrishna Sharma; Cherkaoui, Soumaya

    2008-01-01

      With the recent developments in wireless networks, different radio access technologies are used in different places depending on capacity in terms of throughput, cell size, scalability etc. In this context, mobile users, and in particular highly mobile users and vehicular networks, will see an increasing number and variety of wireless access points enabling Internet connectivity. Such a heterogeneous networking environment needs, however, an efficient mobility management scheme offering ...

  3. The determination of user information requirements during the development of management information systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardella, Paul Richard Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited One of the major causes for the failure of Management Information Systems (MIS) is that they do not satisfy the users' information requirements. This, in turn, is most often caused by the fact that those requirements are difficult to obtain accurately and completely. Simply "asking" the user what he needs is inadequate. This thesis reviews the Information Requirements Analysis (IRA) literature, briefly describing some of the techniq...

  4. Dynamic boundaries of user communities: exploiting synergies rather than managing dilemmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsdahl Lauritzen, Ghita; Salomo, Søren; La Cour, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A large body of literature indicates that innovation not only stems from a firm’s internal investments but also relies on input from external sources. This is also reflected in an increasing interest in user innovation. In particular, users, who increasingly gather in communities, can offer...... literature characterises such tensions as dilemmas between competing demands that firms must balance to encourage and benefit from user contributions. This paper brings in a systems theory perspective to show that what is currently described as trade-offs that must be managed are in fact synergies...

  5. Comparing two anesthesia information management system user interfaces: a usability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Rao, Anoop V; Rothwell, Sarah H; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2012-11-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been developed by multiple vendors and are deployed in thousands of operating rooms around the world, yet not much is known about measuring and improving AIMS usability. We developed a methodology for evaluating AIMS usability in a low-fidelity simulated clinical environment and used it to compare an existing user interface with a revised version. We hypothesized that the revised user interface would be more useable. In a low-fidelity simulated clinical environment, twenty anesthesia providers documented essential anesthetic information for the start of the case using both an existing and a revised user interface. Participants had not used the revised user interface previously and completed a brief training exercise prior to the study task. All participants completed a workload assessment and a satisfaction survey. All sessions were recorded. Multiple usability metrics were measured. The primary outcome was documentation accuracy. Secondary outcomes were perceived workload, number of documentation steps, number of user interactions, and documentation time. The interfaces were compared and design problems were identified by analyzing recorded sessions and survey results. Use of the revised user interface was shown to improve documentation accuracy from 85.1% to 92.4%, a difference of 7.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] for the difference 1.8 to 12.7). The revised user interface decreased the number of user interactions by 6.5 for intravenous documentation (95% CI 2.9 to 10.1) and by 16.1 for airway documentation (95% CI 11.1 to 21.1). The revised user interface required 3.8 fewer documentation steps (95% CI 2.3 to 5.4). Airway documentation time was reduced by 30.5 seconds with the revised workflow (95% CI 8.5 to 52.4). There were no significant time differences noted in intravenous documentation or in total task time. No difference in perceived workload was found between the user interfaces. Two user interface

  6. Environmental tobacco smoke in hospitality venues in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardavas, Constantine I; Kondilis, Barbara; Travers, Mark J; Petsetaki, Elisabeth; Tountas, Yiannis; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2007-10-23

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is a major threat to public health. Greece, having the highest smoking prevalence in the European Union is seriously affected by passive smoking. The purpose of this study was to measure environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in the non smoking areas of hospitality venues and offices in Greece and to compare the levels of exposure to levels in the US, UK and Ireland before and after the implementation of a smoking ban. Experimental measurements of particulate matter 2.5 microm (PM2.5), performed during a cross sectional study of 49 hospitality venues and offices in Athens and Crete, Greece during February - March 2006. Levels of ETS ranged from 19 microg/m3 to 612 microg/m3, differing according to the place of measurement. The average exposure in hospitality venues was 268 microg/m3 with ETS levels found to be highest in restaurants with a mean value of 298 microg/m3 followed by bars and cafes with 271 microg/m3. ETS levels were 76% lower in venues in which smoking was not observed compared to all other venues (p hospitality venues while levels in Ireland with a total smoking ban are 89% lower and smoke-free communities in the US are 91 - 96% lower than levels in Greece. Designated non-smoking areas of hospitality venues in Greece are significantly more polluted with ETS than outdoor air and similar venues in Europe and the United States. The implementation of a total indoor smoking ban in hospitality venues has been shown to have a positive effect on workers and patrons' health. The necessity of such legislation in Greece is thus warranted.

  7. Study on User Authority Management for Safe Data Protection in Cloud Computing Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In cloud computing environments, user data are encrypted using numerous distributed servers before storing such data. Global Internet service companies, such as Google and Yahoo, recognized the importance of Internet service platforms and conducted self-research and development to create and utilize large cluster-based cloud computing platform technology based on low-priced commercial nodes. As diverse data services become possible in distributed computing environments, high-capacity distributed management is emerging as a major issue. Meanwhile, because of the diverse forms of using high-capacity data, security vulnerability and privacy invasion by malicious attackers or internal users can occur. As such, when various sensitive data are stored in cloud servers and used from there, the problem of data spill might occur because of external attackers or the poor management of internal users. Data can be managed through encryption to prevent such problems. However, existing simple encryption methods involve problems associated with the management of access to data stored in cloud environments. Therefore, in the present paper, a technique for data access management by user authority, based on Attribute-Based Encryption (ABE and secret distribution techniques, is proposed.

  8. Two graphical user interfaces for managing and analyzing MODFLOW groundwater-model scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Scenario Manager and Scenario Analyzer are graphical user interfaces that facilitate the use of calibrated, MODFLOW-based groundwater models for investigating possible responses to proposed stresses on a groundwater system. Scenario Manager allows a user, starting with a calibrated model, to design and run model scenarios by adding or modifying stresses simulated by the model. Scenario Analyzer facilitates the process of extracting data from model output and preparing such display elements as maps, charts, and tables. Both programs are designed for users who are familiar with the science on which groundwater modeling is based but who may not have a groundwater modeler’s expertise in building and calibrating a groundwater model from start to finish. With Scenario Manager, the user can manipulate model input to simulate withdrawal or injection wells, time-variant specified hydraulic heads, recharge, and such surface-water features as rivers and canals. Input for stresses to be simulated comes from user-provided geographic information system files and time-series data files. A Scenario Manager project can contain multiple scenarios and is self-documenting. Scenario Analyzer can be used to analyze output from any MODFLOW-based model; it is not limited to use with scenarios generated by Scenario Manager. Model-simulated values of hydraulic head, drawdown, solute concentration, and cell-by-cell flow rates can be presented in display elements. Map data can be represented as lines of equal value (contours) or as a gradated color fill. Charts and tables display time-series data obtained from output generated by a transient-state model run or from user-provided text files of time-series data. A display element can be based entirely on output of a single model run, or, to facilitate comparison of results of multiple scenarios, an element can be based on output from multiple model runs. Scenario Analyzer can export display elements and supporting metadata as a Portable

  9. Climate Change and Water Working Group - User Needs to Manage Hydrclimatic Risk from Days to Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, D. A.; Brekke, L. D.; Werner, K.; Wood, A.; White, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Federal Climate Change Water Working Group (CCAWWG) provides engineering and scientific collaborations in support of water management. CCAWWG objectives include building working relationships across federal science and water management agencies, provide a forum to share expertise and leverage resources, develop education and training forums, to work with water managers to understand scientific needs and to foster collaborative efforts across the Federal and non-Federal water management and science communities to address those needs. Identifying and addressing water management needs has been categorized across two major time scales: days to a decade and multi-decadal, respectively. These two time periods are termed "Short-Term" and "Long-Term" in terms of the types of water management decisions they support where Short-Term roughly correlates to water management operations and Long-Term roughly correlates to planning activities. This presentation will focus on portraying the identified water management user needs across these two time periods. User Needs for Long-Term planning were identified in the 2011 Reclamation and USACE "Addressing Climate Change in Long-Term Water Resources Planning and Management: User Needs for Improving Tools and Information." User needs for Long-Term planning are identified across eight major categories: Summarize Relevant Literature, Obtain Climate Change Information, Make Decisions About How to Use the Climate Change Information, Assess Natural Systems Response, Assess Socioeconomic and Institutional Response, Assess System Risks and Evaluate Alternatives, Assess and Characterize Uncertainties, and Communicating Results and Uncertainties to Decisionmakers. User Needs for Short-Term operations are focused on needs relative to available or desired monitoring and forecast products from the hydroclimatic community. These needs are presenting in the 2012 USACE, Reclamation, and NOAA - NWS "Short-Term Water Management Decisions: User

  10. IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment for a smart space management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-11-20

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  11. Environmental tobacco smoke in hospitality venues in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tountas Yiannis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is a major threat to public health. Greece, having the highest smoking prevalence in the European Union is seriously affected by passive smoking. The purpose of this study was to measure environmental tobacco smoke (ETS exposure in the non smoking areas of hospitality venues and offices in Greece and to compare the levels of exposure to levels in the US, UK and Ireland before and after the implementation of a smoking ban. Methods Experimental measurements of particulate matter 2.5 μm (PM2.5, performed during a cross sectional study of 49 hospitality venues and offices in Athens and Crete, Greece during February – March 2006. Results Levels of ETS ranged from 19 μg/m3 to 612 μg/m3, differing according to the place of measurement. The average exposure in hospitality venues was 268 μg/m3 with ETS levels found to be highest in restaurants with a mean value of 298 μg/m3 followed by bars and cafes with 271 μg/m3. ETS levels were 76% lower in venues in which smoking was not observed compared to all other venues (p Conclusion Designated non-smoking areas of hospitality venues in Greece are significantly more polluted with ETS than outdoor air and similar venues in Europe and the United States. The implementation of a total indoor smoking ban in hospitality venues has been shown to have a positive effect on workers and patrons' health. The necessity of such legislation in Greece is thus warranted.

  12. 76 FR 5830 - FBI Records Management Division; National Name Check Program Section; New User Fees Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation FBI Records Management Division; National Name Check Program Section; New User Fees Schedule AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Justice. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...(e)(2), the fee study employed the same Activity Based Cost (ABC) accounting method detailed in the...

  13. Game-Theoretic Energy Management for Residential Users with Dischargeable Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingtuan Gao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV has attracted more and more attention because of the energy crisis and environmental pollution, which is also the main shiftable load of the residential users’ demand side management (DSM system in the future smart grid (SG. In this paper, we employ game theory to provide an autonomous energy management system among residential users considering selling energy back to the utility company by discharging the PEV’s battery. By assuming all users are equipped with smart meters to execute automatic energy consumption scheduling (ECS and the energy company can adopt adequate pricing tariffs relating to time and level of energy usage, we formulate an energy management game, where the players are the residential users and the strategies are their daily schedules of household appliance use. We will show that the Nash equilibrium of the formulated energy management game can guarantee the global optimization in terms of minimizing the energy costs, where the depreciation cost of PEV’s battery because of discharging and selling energy back is also considered. Simulation results verify that the proposed game-theoretic approach can reduce the total energy cost and individual daily electricity payment. Moreover, since plug-in electric bicycles (PEBs are currently widely used in China, simulation results of residential users owing household appliances and bidirectional energy trading of PEBs are also provided and discussed.

  14. Computerized Placement Management Software (CPMS): User Manual, Version 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This guide is designed to enable the beginner, as well as the advanced user, to understand and use the Computerized Placement Management Software (CPMS). The CPMS is a system for evaluating information about students and recommending their placement into courses best suited for them. It also tracks their progress and maintains their records. The…

  15. Confidentiality Protection of User Data and Adaptive Resource Allocation for Managing Multiple Workflow Performance in Service-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ho

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive data is sent in…

  16. Realization of User Level Fault Tolerant Policy Management through a Holistic Approach for Fault Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung H [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Geist, Al [ORNL; Tippens, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Many modern scientific applications, which are designed to utilize high performance parallel com- puters, occupy hundreds of thousands of computational cores running for days or even weeks. Since many scien- tists compete for resources, most supercomputing centers practice strict scheduling policies and perform meticulous accounting on their usage. Thus computing resources and time assigned to a user is considered invaluable. However, most applications are not well prepared for un- foreseeable faults, still relying on primitive fault tolerance techniques. Considering that ever-plunging mean time to interrupt (MTTI) is making scientific applications more vulnerable to faults, it is increasingly important to provide users not only an improved fault tolerant environment, but also a framework to support their own fault tolerance policies so that their allocation times can be best utilized. This paper addresses a user level fault tolerance policy management based on a holistic approach to digest and correlate fault related information. It introduces simple semantics with which users express their policies on faults, and illustrates how event correlation techniques can be applied to manage and determine the most preferable user policies. The paper also discusses an implementation of the framework using open source software, and demonstrates, as an example, how a molecular dynamics simulation application running on the institutional cluster at Oak Ridge National Laboratory benefits from it.

  17. IoT-Based User-Driven Service Modeling Environment for a Smart Space Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoan-Suk Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users’ needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  18. Disclosure Management on Social Network Sites: Individual Privacy Perceptions and User-Directed Privacy Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp K. Masur

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The social web and specifically social network sites (SNS have offered new opportunities for interaction and communication, but have also increased the risk of privacy violations. In this study, we investigated how far users imply different disclosure management strategies in status updates and chat conversations. We hypothesized that users perceive specific information as differently private depending on their personal privacy preference, but generally show the same disclosure management pattern: the higher the perceived privacy level of an information, the less frequently it will be shared. We tested the hypothesis using an online survey with 316 German SNS users. The findings suggest that respondents engaged in disclosure management taking both communication channel and type of information into account. We further found that trust toward SNS contacts and use of privacy settings significantly influenced disclosure management in one-to-many (status updates but not in one-to-one communications situations (chat conversations. The results complement existing research by showing the pivotal role of individual privacy perceptions in explaining users’ privacy management in the social web.

  19. User and group storage management the CMS CERN T2 centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminara, G.; Franzoni, G.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of detector commissioning, calibration and data analysis tasks is carried out by CMS using dedicated storage resources available at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre. Relying on the functionalities of the EOS disk-only storage technology, the optimal exploitation of the CMS user/group resources has required the introduction of policies for data access management, data protection, cleanup campaigns based on access pattern, and long term tape archival. The resource management has been organised around the definition of working groups and the delegation to an identified responsible of each group composition. In this paper we illustrate the user/group storage management, and the development and operational experience at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre in the 2012-2015 period.

  20. User and group storage management the CMS CERN T2 centre

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, G; Pfeiffer, A

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of detector commissioning, calibration and data analysis tasks is carried out by CMS using dedicated storage resources available at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre. Relying on the functionalities of the EOS disk-only storage technology, the optimal exploitation of the CMS user/group resources has required the introduction of policies for data access management, data protection, cleanup campaigns based on access pattern, and long term tape archival. The resource management has been organised around the definition of working groups and the delegation to an identified responsible of each group composition. In this paper we illustrate the user/group storage management, and the development and operational experience at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre in the 2012-2015 period.

  1. The Johnson Space Center management information systems: User's guide to JSCMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Erickson, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center Management Information System (JSCMIS) is an interface to computer data bases at the NASA Johnson Space Center which allows an authorized user to browse and retrieve information from a variety of sources with minimum effort. The User's Guide to JSCMIS is the supplement to the JSCMIS Research Report which details the objectives, the architecture, and implementation of the interface. It is a tutorial on how to use the interface and a reference for details about it. The guide is structured like an extended JSCMIS session, describing all of the interface features and how to use them. It also contains an appendix with each of the standard FORMATs currently included in the interface. Users may review them to decide which FORMAT most suits their needs.

  2. Operation care: a pilot case management intervention for frequent emergency medical system users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Dietrich, Elisabeth; Kodeck, Traci; Westcoat, Kathleen

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to determine if a prehospital case management intervention reduces transport and nontransport emergency medical system (EMS) responses to frequent EMS users. The 25 most frequent EMS users in a major metropolitan area were identified, and 10 were enrolled in the intervention. These patients received linkage to psychosocial and medical resources through weekly case management visits for 5 to 12 weeks between May and August 2008. Main outcome measures were the number of transport and nontransport EMS responses to patients during the intervention as compared with predicted EMS responses based on each patient's previous year's EMS use. Transport data were available for all patients, but nontransport data were unavailable for 1 patient who was homeless and 6 patients living in apartment buildings. Secondary outcome measures included cost savings to the entire health care system and the Baltimore City Fire Department. Transport responses decreased 32% over the 76 predicted transport responses during the intervention, and nontransport responses decreased 79% over the 24 predicted nontransport responses during the intervention. Including the dedicated case manager's salary, this represented a cost savings to the entire health care system and to the Baltimore City Fire Department of $14 461 and $6311, respectively, over 12 weeks. Prehospital case management may reduce EMS use in high-frequency EMS users and create significant cost savings to municipalities and the health care system. Additional large-scale studies are needed to validate these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Secondhand tobacco smoke in public venues in three Indonesian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Byron

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to measure secondhand tobacco (including kretek smoke (SHS concentrations in public places in Jakarta, Bogor, and Palembang before laws banning smoking in public spaces went into effect.Methods: Particulate matter (PM2.5 was measured in 15 hospitals, 15 government offices, 30 restaurants, and 26 entertainment venues throughout the three cities. Also, in Jakarta, vapor-phase nicotine was measured in 5 schools, 5 hospitals, 5 government offices, 9 restaurants, and 10 entertainment venues. Data were analyzed descriptively. Differences by city and venue characteristics were analyzed by Student’s t-test, ANOVA, and Bonferroni pairwise statistical tests.Results: Geometric mean PM2.5 levels were highest in entertainment venues (96 μg/m3, followed by restaurants (78 μg/m3, government offices (57 μg/m3, and hospitals (46 μg/m3. Air nicotine levels in Jakarta were highest in designated smoking areas (4.71 μg/m3 and designated non-smoking areas (1.55 μg/m3 of entertainment venues. These were followed by government offices (0.30 μg/m3, designated smoking areas (0.24 μg/m3 and designated non-smoking areas (0.19 μg/m3 of restaurants, hospitals (0.01 μg/m3, and schools (0.01 μg/m3.Conclusion: SHS was detected in all venues in the three cities in Indonesia. High levels of air nicotine were found in non-smoking areas of restaurants and entertainment venues, indicating that designated smoking areas are not an effective solution to eliminate SHS. There is no safe level of SHS exposure and thus SHS in these venues increases the risk of adverse health effects among children and adults. These findings support the need for 100% smoke-free laws covering all public venues in these and other Indonesian cities. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:232-7. doi: 10.13181/mji.v22i4.606 Keywords: Cigarettes, kretek, protection, protect, secondhand smoke, smoke-free policy, tobacco

  4. Rock and pop venues acoustic and architectural design

    CERN Document Server

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner

    2014-01-01

    Popular music plays an substantial role in most people’s life. The demand and financial revenue of Rock and pop concerts is large and still increasing. Though 80% of the music turnover is done in Rock and Pop Music, books assess only Classical concert and opera houses. However, the requirements for pop music halls are different from classical Music and opera houses. This book closes this gap including the following features: In part one, the book A. Gives a objective methodology to assess Rock and Pop Music Venues B. Shows essential construction details and choices of building materials in the design of new venues or the renovation of old ones. In part two, the book C. Presents a set of famous European rock and pop venues, their architecture, their beauty and their properties. D. These Venues are assessed by a new and comparably simple method to objectively rate halls. Subjective data complete the assessment and give a full picture of the sound quality of a venue.

  5. CMS users data management service integration and first experiences with its NoSQL data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Riahi, H; Cinquilli, M; Hernandez, J M; Konstantinov, P; Mascheroni, M; Santocchia, A

    2014-01-01

    The distributed data analysis workflow in CMS assumes that jobs run in a different location to where their results are finally stored. Typically the user outputs must be transferred from one site to another by a dedicated CMS service, AsyncStageOut. This new service is originally developed to address the inefficiency in using the CMS computing resources when transferring the analysis job outputs, synchronously, once they are produced in the job execution node to the remote site.The AsyncStageOut is designed as a thin application relying only on the NoSQL database (CouchDB) as input and data storage. It has progressed from a limited prototype to a highly adaptable service which manages and monitors the whole user files steps, namely file transfer and publication. The AsyncStageOut is integrated with the Common CMS/Atlas Analysis Framework. It foresees the management of nearly 200k users files per day of close to 1000 individual users per month with minimal delays, and providing a real time monitoring and repor...

  6. Toward zero waste: Composting and recycling for sustainable venue based events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hottle, Troy A., E-mail: troy.hottle@asu.edu [Arizona State University, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, 370 Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 4 (ISTB4), 781 East Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287-6004 (United States); Bilec, Melissa M., E-mail: mbilec@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 153 Benedum Hall, 3700 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261-3949 (United States); Brown, Nicholas R., E-mail: nick.brown@asu.edu [Arizona State University, University Sustainability Practices, 1130 East University Drive, Suite 206, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Landis, Amy E., E-mail: amy.landis@asu.edu [Arizona State University, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, 375 Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 4 (ISTB4), 781 East Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287-6004 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Venues have billions of customers per year contributing to waste generation. • Waste audits of four university baseball games were conducted to assess venue waste. • Seven scenarios including composting were modeled using EPA’s WARM. • Findings demonstrate tradeoffs between emissions, energy, and landfill avoidance. • Sustainability of handling depends on efficacy of collection and treatment impacts. - Abstract: This study evaluated seven different waste management strategies for venue-based events and characterized the impacts of event waste management via waste audits and the Waste Reduction Model (WARM). The seven waste management scenarios included traditional waste handling methods (e.g. recycle and landfill) and management of the waste stream via composting, including purchasing where only compostable food service items were used during the events. Waste audits were conducted at four Arizona State University (ASU) baseball games, including a three game series. The findings demonstrate a tradeoff among CO{sub 2} equivalent emissions, energy use, and landfill diversion rates. Of the seven waste management scenarios assessed, the recycling scenarios provide the greatest reductions in CO{sub 2} eq. emissions and energy use because of the retention of high value materials but are compounded by the difficulty in managing a two or three bin collection system. The compost only scenario achieves complete landfill diversion but does not perform as well with respect to CO{sub 2} eq. emissions or energy. The three game series was used to test the impact of staffed bins on contamination rates; the first game served as a baseline, the second game employed staffed bins, and the third game had non staffed bins to determine the effect of staffing on contamination rates. Contamination rates in both the recycling and compost bins were tracked throughout the series. Contamination rates were reduced from 34% in the first game to 11% on the second night

  7. END-USER TRAINING ON DIGITAL TEACHING TOOLS: REACTION, LEARNING, BEHAVIOR, RESULTS, AND MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave E. Marcial

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed digital teaching tools, namely mobile class record application and portable learning management system were launched and distributed. This paper measures the evaluation rating of the region-wide end-user training on the classroom use and integration of the two digital teaching tools. A total of 74 trainees in Central Visayas, Philippines were trained. Using the New World Kirkpatrick Model, the trainees evaluated the training regarding reaction, learning, behavior, results, and management. The data show that the trainees rated the training with an overall mean of 3.70 described as “strongly agree.” The result implies that the end-user training on digital teaching tools is very successful and excellent.

  8. Development and Evaluation of Disaster Information Management System Using Digital Pens and Tabletop User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Hidemi; Kobayashi, Kazue; Satou, Kenji; Kawana, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomohiro

    Most traditional disaster information systems are necessary to post expert staff with high computer literacy to operate the system quickly and correctly in the tense situation when a disaster occurs. However, in the current disaster response system of local governments, it is not easy for local governments to post such expert staff because they are struggling with staff cuts due to administrative and fiscal reform. In this research, we propose a disaster information management system that can be easily operated, even under the disorderly conditions of a disaster, by municipal personnel in charge of disaster management. This system achieves usability enabling easy input of damage information, even by local government staff with no expertise, by using a digital pen and tabletop user interface. Evaluation was conducted by prospective users using a prototype, and the evaluation results are satisfactory with regard to the function and operationality of the proposed system.

  9. Scaling Task Management in Space and Time: Reducing User Overhead in Ubiquitous-Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-28

    limitation of this approach is that it does not easily scale to large numbers of tasks over extended periods. Busy users may intermittently touch on...RETSINA framework, with applications in domains such as financial portfolio management, ecommerce and military logistics [88]; and more recently Carnegie...complex tasks. Examples can be found in the workflow modeling of business processes, and in some agent-based systems, where the description of the

  10. AsyncStageOut: Distributed User Data Management for CMS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, H. [CERN; Wildish, T. [Princeton U.; Ciangottini, D. [Perugia U.; Hernández, J. M. [Madrid, CIEMAT; Andreeva, J. [CERN; Balcas, J. [Vilnius U.; Karavakis, E. [CERN; Mascheroni, M. [INFN, Milan Bicocca; Tanasijczuk, A. J. [UC, San Diego; Vaandering, E. W. [Fermilab

    2015-12-23

    AsyncStageOut (ASO) is a new component of the distributed data analysis system of CMS, CRAB, designed for managing users' data. It addresses a major weakness of the previous model, namely that mass storage of output data was part of the job execution resulting in inefficient use of job slots and an unacceptable failure rate at the end of the jobs. ASO foresees the management of up to 400k files per day of various sizes, spread worldwide across more than 60 sites. It must handle up to 1000 individual users per month, and work with minimal delay. This creates challenging requirements for system scalability, performance and monitoring. ASO uses FTS to schedule and execute the transfers between the storage elements of the source and destination sites. It has evolved from a limited prototype to a highly adaptable service, which manages and monitors the user file placement and bookkeeping. To ensure system scalability and data monitoring, it employs new technologies such as a NoSQL database and re-uses existing components of PhEDEx and the FTS Dashboard. We present the asynchronous stage-out strategy and the architecture of the solution we implemented to deal with those issues and challenges. The deployment model for the high availability and scalability of the service is discussed. The performance of the system during the commissioning and the first phase of production are also shown, along with results from simulations designed to explore the limits of scalability.

  11. Akuna: An Open Source User Environment for Managing Subsurface Simulation Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, V. L.; Agarwal, D.; Bensema, K.; Finsterle, S.; Gable, C. W.; Keating, E. H.; Krishnan, H.; Lansing, C.; Moeglein, W.; Pau, G. S. H.; Porter, E.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is investing in development of a numerical modeling toolset called ASCEM (Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management) to support modeling analyses at legacy waste sites. ASCEM is an open source and modular computing framework that incorporates new advances and tools for predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM toolset includes both a Platform with Integrated Toolsets (called Akuna) and a High-Performance Computing multi-process simulator (called Amanzi). The focus of this presentation is on Akuna, an open-source user environment that manages subsurface simulation workflows and associated data and metadata. In this presentation, key elements of Akuna are demonstrated, which includes toolsets for model setup, database management, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, and visualization of both model setup and simulation results. A key component of the workflow is in the automated job launching and monitoring capabilities, which allow a user to submit and monitor simulation runs on high-performance, parallel computers. Visualization of large outputs can also be performed without moving data back to local resources. These capabilities make high-performance computing accessible to the users who might not be familiar with batch queue systems and usage protocols on different supercomputers and clusters.

  12. AsyncStageOut: Distributed user data management for CMS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, H.; Wildish, T.; Ciangottini, D.; Hernández, J. M.; Andreeva, J.; Balcas, J.; Karavakis, E.; Mascheroni, M.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Vaandering, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    AsyncStageOut (ASO) is a new component of the distributed data analysis system of CMS, CRAB, designed for managing users' data. It addresses a major weakness of the previous model, namely that mass storage of output data was part of the job execution resulting in inefficient use of job slots and an unacceptable failure rate at the end of the jobs. ASO foresees the management of up to 400k files per day of various sizes, spread worldwide across more than 60 sites. It must handle up to 1000 individual users per month, and work with minimal delay. This creates challenging requirements for system scalability, performance and monitoring. ASO uses FTS to schedule and execute the transfers between the storage elements of the source and destination sites. It has evolved from a limited prototype to a highly adaptable service, which manages and monitors the user file placement and bookkeeping. To ensure system scalability and data monitoring, it employs new technologies such as a NoSQL database and re-uses existing components of PhEDEx and the FTS Dashboard. We present the asynchronous stage-out strategy and the architecture of the solution we implemented to deal with those issues and challenges. The deployment model for the high availability and scalability of the service is discussed. The performance of the system during the commissioning and the first phase of production are also shown, along with results from simulations designed to explore the limits of scalability.

  13. Optimization Models and Methods for Demand-Side Management of Residential Users: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antimo Barbato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The residential sector is currently one of the major contributors to the global energy balance. However, the energy demand of residential users has been so far largely uncontrollable and inelastic with respect to the power grid conditions. With the massive introduction of renewable energy sources and the large variations in energy flows, also the residential sector is required to provide some flexibility in energy use so as to contribute to the stability and efficiency of the electric system. To address this issue, demand management mechanisms can be used to optimally manage the energy resources of customers and their energy demand profiles. A very promising technique is represented by demand-side management (DSM, which consists in a proactive method aimed at making users energy-efficient in the long term. In this paper, we survey the most relevant studies on optimization methods for DSM of residential consumers. Specifically, we review the related literature according to three axes defining contrasting characteristics of the schemes proposed: DSM for individual users versus DSM for cooperative consumers, deterministic DSM versus stochastic DSM and day-ahead DSM versus real-time DSM. Based on this classification, we provide a big picture of the key features of different approaches and techniques and discuss future research directions.

  14. Identity management and privacy languages technologies: Improving user control of data privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José Enrique López; García, Carlos Alberto Gil; Pacheco, Álvaro Armenteros; Organero, Pedro Luis Muñoz

    The identity management solutions have the capability to bring confidence to internet services, but this confidence could be improved if user has more control over the privacy policy of its attributes. Privacy languages could help to this task due to its capability to define privacy policies for data in a very flexible way. So, an integration problem arises: making work together both identity management and privacy languages. Despite several proposals for accomplishing this have already been defined, this paper suggests some topics and improvements that could be considered.

  15. Interchance and cooperation with user agencies. [dissemination of earth resources data to inventory and management personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is apparent that the rate of remote sensing technique development is increasing at a much faster pace than is the rate at which these same techniques are being put to practical use by earth resource managers and inventory specialists. It has become increasingly important to bridge this widening gap between remote sensing specialists and potential users. Members of the University of California project on remote sensing of earth resources have been actively participating in efforts to overcome this gap by maintaining library facilities, disseminating research findings, training remote sensing specialists, and interacting with resource managers.

  16. What motivates Australian health service users with chronic illness to engage in self-management behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowsey, Tanisha; Pearce-Brown, Carmen; Douglas, Kirsty A; Yen, Laurann

    2014-04-01

    Health policy in Australia emphasizes the role of health service users (HSU) in managing their own care but does not include mechanisms to assist HSUs to do so. To describe motivation towards or away from self-management in a diverse group of older Australians with diabetes, chronic heart failure (CHF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and suggest policy interventions to increase patient motivation to manage effectively. Content and thematic analyses of in-depth semi-structured interviews. Participants were asked to describe their experience of having chronic illness, including experiences with health professionals and health services. Secondary analysis was undertaken to expose descriptions of self-management behaviours and their corresponding motivational factors. Health service users with diabetes, COPD and/or CHF (N=52). Participant descriptions exposed internal and external sources of motivation. Internal motivation was most often framed positively in terms of the desire to optimize health, independence and wellness and negatively in terms of avoiding the loss of those attributes. External motivation commonly arose from interactions with family, carers and health professionals. Different motivators appeared to work simultaneously and interactively in individuals, and some motivators seemed to be both positive and negative drivers. Successful management of chronic illness requires recognition that the driving forces behind motivation are interconnected. In particular, the significance of family as an external source of motivation suggests a need for increased investment in the knowledge and skill building of family members who contribute to care. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. (Un)organizing equal collaboration between users and professionals: on management of patient education in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar

    2013-03-01

    This is an article about how patient education is managed in Norway, but it also addresses a matter of broader relevance that of how an organization imbued with a request for rational choices is able to take on board a contradictory ideology. In Norway, patient education under the auspice of hospitals is to be conducted as an equal collaboration between users and professionals, posing challenges to the ethos of rationally justified choices within the hospital sector. This calls for an exploration of how the organization copes with the contradictory demands. A theoretical approach on the basis of theories from Scandinavian institutional theory and science and technology studies, informed by documents, interviews and experiences from national, regional and local levels in Norway. The field of patient education is divided into three decoupled domains: one at management level, one at the practical level, and in the middle a domain that acts as an interface between management and practice. This interface mediates the relationship between ideas and practice, without making overt the fact that ideas might not be possible to put into practice and that practice might not reflect ideas. The decoupling of practice and management allows patient education as equal collaboration between users and professionals to thrive as an idea, not subjugated by practical challenges. Thus, it can exist as a guiding star that both management and practitioners can attune to, but this situation might now be threatened by the demand for quality assurance in the field. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. (Un)organizing equal collaboration between users and professionals: on management of patient education in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  This is an article about how patient education is managed in Norway, but it also addresses a matter of broader relevance that of how an organization imbued with a request for rational choices is able to take on board a contradictory ideology. In Norway, patient education under the auspice of hospitals is to be conducted as an equal collaboration between users and professionals, posing challenges to the ethos of rationally justified choices within the hospital sector. This calls for an exploration of how the organization copes with the contradictory demands. Methods  A theoretical approach on the basis of theories from Scandinavian institutional theory and science and technology studies, informed by documents, interviews and experiences from national, regional and local levels in Norway. Discussion  The field of patient education is divided into three decoupled domains: one at management level, one at the practical level, and in the middle a domain that acts as an interface between management and practice. This interface mediates the relationship between ideas and practice, without making overt the fact that ideas might not be possible to put into practice and that practice might not reflect ideas. Conclusions  The decoupling of practice and management allows patient education as equal collaboration between users and professionals to thrive as an idea, not subjugated by practical challenges. Thus, it can exist as a guiding star that both management and practitioners can attune to, but this situation might now be threatened by the demand for quality assurance in the field. PMID:21624027

  19. Animation or denigration? Using urban public spaces as event venues

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, A.

    2017-01-01

    City events are increasingly staged outside purpose built venues in urban public spaces. Parks, streets and squares have always been used for civic events, but there is now pressure to use them for a wider range of occasions including large-scale, ticketed events. This paper identifies why this trend is occurring and outlines the implications for public spaces. The use of London’s parks as venues for music festivals, elite sport events, and trade exhibitions is the main focus of the paper. Th...

  20. CMS users data management service integration and first experiences with its NoSQL data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, H.; Spiga, D.; Boccali, T.; Ciangottini, D.; Cinquilli, M.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Konstantinov, P.; Mascheroni, M.; Santocchia, A.

    2014-06-01

    The distributed data analysis workflow in CMS assumes that jobs run in a different location to where their results are finally stored. Typically the user outputs must be transferred from one site to another by a dedicated CMS service, AsyncStageOut. This new service is originally developed to address the inefficiency in using the CMS computing resources when transferring the analysis job outputs, synchronously, once they are produced in the job execution node to the remote site. The AsyncStageOut is designed as a thin application relying only on the NoSQL database (CouchDB) as input and data storage. It has progressed from a limited prototype to a highly adaptable service which manages and monitors the whole user files steps, namely file transfer and publication. The AsyncStageOut is integrated with the Common CMS/Atlas Analysis Framework. It foresees the management of nearly nearly 200k users' files per day of close to 1000 individual users per month with minimal delays, and providing a real time monitoring and reports to users and service operators, while being highly available. The associated data volume represents a new set of challenges in the areas of database scalability and service performance and efficiency. In this paper, we present an overview of the AsyncStageOut model and the integration strategy with the Common Analysis Framework. The motivations for using the NoSQL technology are also presented, as well as data design and the techniques used for efficient indexing and monitoring of the data. We describe deployment model for the high availability and scalability of the service. We also discuss the hardware requirements and the results achieved as they were determined by testing with actual data and realistic loads during the commissioning and the initial production phase with the Common Analysis Framework.

  1. Going to where the users are! Making the collaborative resource management and science workspace mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, D.; Osti, A.

    2013-12-01

    People are very busy today and getting stakeholders the information they need is an important part of our jobs. The BDL application is the mobile extension of the California collaborative resource management portal www.baydeltalive.com. BDL has been visited by more than 250,000 unique visitors this past year from various areas of water use and management including state and federal agencies, agriculture, scientists, policy makers, water consumers, voters, operations management and more. The audience is a qualified user group of more than 15,000 individuals participating in California hydrological ecosystem science, water management and policy. This is an important effort aimed to improve how scientists and policy makers are working together to understand this complicated and divisive system and how they are becoming better managers of that system. The BayDetaLive mobile application gives California watershed management stakeholders and water user community unprecedented access to real time natural resource management information. The application provides user with the following: 1. Access to Real Time Environmental Conditions from the more than the 600 California Data Exchange Sensors including hydrodynamic, water quality and meteorological data. Save important stations as favorites for easy access later. 2. Daily Delta Operations Data including estimated hydrology, daily exports, status of infrastructure operations, reservoir storage, salvage data, major stations, drinking water quality reports, weather forecasts and more. 3. Photos/Videos/Documents: Browse and share from the more than 1000 current documents in the BDL library. Relevant images, videos, science journals, presentations and articles. 4. Science: Access the latest science articles, news, projects and journals. 5. Data Visualizations: View recently published real time data interpolations of Delta Conditions. From 30-day turbidity models to daily forecasts. This service is published as conditions

  2. Data Quality, Provenance and IPR Management services: their role in empowering geospatial data suppliers and users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Keiran

    2015-04-01

    This paper looks at current experiences of geospatial users and geospatial suppliers and how they have been limited by suitable frameworks for managing and communicating data quality, data provenance and intellectual property rights (IPR). Current political and technological drivers mean that increasing volumes of geospatial data are available through a plethora of different products and services, and whilst this is inherently a good thing it does create a new generation of challenges. This paper consider two examples of where these issues have been examined and looks at the challenges and possible solutions from a data user and data supplier perspective. The first example is the IQmulus project that is researching fusion environments for big geospatial point clouds and coverages. The second example is the EU Emodnet programme that is establishing thematic data portals for public marine and coastal data. IQmulus examines big geospatial data; the data from sources such as LIDAR, SONAR and numerical simulations; these data are simply too big for routine and ad-hoc analysis, yet they could realise a myriad of disparate, and readily useable, information products with the right infrastructure in place. IQmulus is researching how to deliver this infrastructure technically, but a financially sustainable delivery depends on being able to track and manage ownership and IPR across the numerous data sets being processed. This becomes complex when the data is composed of multiple overlapping coverages, however managing this allows for uses to be delivered highly-bespoke products to meet their budget and technical needs. The Emodnet programme delivers harmonised marine data at the EU scale across seven thematic portals. As part of the Emodnet programme a series of 'check points' have been initiated to examine how useful these services and other public data services actually are to solve real-world problems. One key finding is that users have been confused by the fact that often

  3. End-user searching: impetus for an expanding information management and technology role for the hospital librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M S; Ross, F

    1997-07-01

    Using the results of the 1993 Medical Library Association (MLA) Hospital Libraries Section survey of hospital-based end-user search services, this article describes how end-user search services can become an impetus for an expanded information management and technology role for the hospital librarian. An end-user services implementation plan is presented that focuses on software, hardware, finances, policies, staff allocations and responsibilities, educational program design, and program evaluation. Possibilities for extending end-user search services into information technology and informatics, specialized end-user search systems, and Internet access are described. Future opportunities are identified for expanding the hospital librarian's role in the face of changing health care management, advances in information technology, and increasing end-user expectations.

  4. Website creation and resource management: developing collaborative strategies for asynchronous interaction with library users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Mark E; Summers-Ables, Joy E; Clifton, Shari C; Coffman, Michael A

    2011-06-01

    To make electronic resources available to library users while effectively harnessing intellectual capital within the library, ultimately fostering the library's use of technology to interact asynchronously with its patrons (users). The methods used in the project included: (1) developing a new library website to facilitate the creation, management, accessibility, maintenance and dissemination of library resources; and (2) establishing ownership by those who participated in the project, while creating effective work allocation strategies through the implementation of a content management system that allowed the library to manage cost, complexity and interoperability. Preliminary results indicate that contributors to the system benefit from an increased understanding of the library's resources and add content valuable to library patrons. These strategies have helped promote the manageable creation and maintenance of electronic content in accomplishing the library's goal of interacting with its patrons. Establishment of a contributive system for adding to the library's electronic resources and electronic content has been successful. Further work will look at improving asynchronous interaction, particularly highlighting accessibility of electronic content and resources. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  5. Using soft constraints to guide users in flexible business process management systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansen, Christian; Borch, Signe Ellegård

    2008-01-01

    Current Business Process Management Systems (BPMS) allow designers to specify processes in highly expressive languages supporting numerous control flow constructs, exceptions, complex predicates, etc., but process specifications are expressed in terms of hard constraints, and this leads to an unf......Current Business Process Management Systems (BPMS) allow designers to specify processes in highly expressive languages supporting numerous control flow constructs, exceptions, complex predicates, etc., but process specifications are expressed in terms of hard constraints, and this leads...... to an unfortunate trade off: information about preferred practices must either be abandoned or promoted to hard constraints. If abandoned, the BPMS cannot guide its users; if promoted to hard constraints, it becomes a hindrance when unanticipated deviations occur. Soft constraints can make this trade-off less...... painful. Soft constraints specify what rules can be violated and by how much. With soft constraints, the BPMS knows what deviations it can permit, and it can guide the user through the process. The BPMS should allow designers to easily specify soft goals and allow its users to immediately see...

  6. Secondhand smoke exposure in hospitality venues in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maria J; Nebot, Manel; Albertini, Marco; Birkui, Pierre; Centrich, Francesc; Chudzikova, Monika; Georgouli, Maria; Gorini, Giuseppe; Moshammer, Hanns; Mulcahy, Maurice; Pilali, Maria; Serrahima, Eulalia; Tutka, Piotr; Fernandez, Esteve

    2008-11-01

    Although in the last few years some European countries have implemented smoking bans in hospitality venues, the levels of secondhand smoke (SHS) in this occupational sector could still be extremely high in most countries. The aim of this study was to assess exposure to SHS in hospitality venues in 10 European cities. We included 167 hospitality venues (58 discotheques and pubs, 82 restaurants and cafeterias, and 27 fast-food restaurants) in this cross-sectional study. We carried out fieldwork in 10 European cities: Vienna (Austria), Paris (France), Athens (Greece), Florence and Belluno (Italy), Galway (Ireland), Barcelona (Spain), Warsaw and Lublin (Poland), and Bratislava (Slovak Republic). We measured vapor-phase nicotine as an SHS marker. We analyzed 504 samples and found nicotine in most samples (97.4%). We found the highest median concentrations in discos/pubs [32.99 microg/m(3); interquartile range (IQR), 8.06-66.84 microg/m(3)] and lower median concentrations in restaurants/cafeterias (2.09 microg/m(3); IQR, 0.49-6.73 microg/m(3)) and fast-food restaurants (0.31 microg/m(3); IQR, 0.11-1.30 microg/m(3)) (p Hospitality venues from European cities without smoking regulations have very high levels of SHS exposure. Monitoring of SHS on a regular basis as well as a total smoking ban in hospitality sector would be needed.

  7. Evaluating Conflicts of Interest in Research Presented in CME Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nancy L.; Galliher, James M.; Spano, Mindy S.; Main, Deborah S.; Brannigan, Michael; Pace, Wilson D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: There is much in the literature regarding the potential for commercial bias in clinical research and in continuing medical education (CME), but no studies were found regarding the potential for bias in reporting original research in CME venues. This pilot study investigated the presence of perceived bias in oral and print content of…

  8. MSAT wide-area fleet management: End-user requirements and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Allister

    1995-01-01

    MSAT (Mobile SATellite) Services will become a reality in North America in 1995. MSAT will provide wide-area voice, data and fax services to land, marine and aeronautical mobile users anywhere in North America including 200 nautical miles off the coasts and into the Arctic waters. MSAT will also convey GPS position information from mobiles to dispatch centers. One broad application of MSAT is Wide Area Fleet Management (WAFM). This paper defines WAFM, outlines end-user requirements and identifies potential applications of MSAT WAFM. The paper draws from information obtained in several preMSAT WAFM field trials in land, marine and aeronautical mobile environments. The paper concludes with an outline of the potential benefits of MSAT WAFM.

  9. Office of university affairs management information system: Users guide and documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distin, J.; Goodwin, D.; Greene, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on the NASA-University relationship are reported that encompass research in over 600 schools through several thousand grants and contracts. This user-driven system is capable of producing a variety of cyclical and query-type reports describing the total NASA-University profile. The capabilities, designed as part of the system, require a minimum of user maintenance in order to ensure system efficiency and data validity to meet the recurrent Statutory and Executive Branch information requirements as well as ad hoc inquiries from NASA general management, Congress, other Federal agencies, private sector organizations, universities and individuals. The data base contains information on each university, the individual projects and the financial details, current and historic, on all contracts and grants. Complete details are given on the system from its unique design features to the actual steps required for daily operation.

  10. XUIMS the X-Window User Interface Management System at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Eynden, M

    1995-01-01

    The CERN X-Window User Interface Management System (XUIMS) is a modular and highly configurable software development environment allowing the interactive design, prototyping, and production of OSF/Motif Human Computer Interfaces (HCI). Fully compliant with the X11R5 and OSF/Motif industry standards, XUIMS covers complex software areas like the development of schematics, the visualization and on-line interactions with 2D and 3D scientific data, the display of relational database data, and the direct access to CERN SPS and LEP accelerators equipment. The guarantee of consistency across the applications and the encapsulation of complex functionality in re-usable and user-friendly components has also been implemented through the development of home made graphical objects (widgets) and templates. The XUIMS environment is built with commercial software products integrated in the CERN SPS and LEP controls infrastructure with a very limited home-made effort. Productivity and quality have been improved through less co...

  11. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Vigne, Ralph; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained...

  12. DeMAID/GA USER'S GUIDE Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition with a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Many companies are looking for new tools and techniques to aid a design manager in making decisions that can reduce the time and cost of a design cycle. One tool that is available to aid in this decision making process is the Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID). Since the initial release of DEMAID in 1989, numerous enhancements have been added to aid the design manager in saving both cost and time in a design cycle. The key enhancement is a genetic algorithm (GA) and the enhanced version is called DeMAID/GA. The GA orders the sequence of design processes to minimize the cost and time to converge to a solution. These enhancements as well as the existing features of the original version of DEMAID are described. Two sample problems are used to show how these enhancements can be applied to improve the design cycle. This report serves as a user's guide for DeMAID/GA.

  13. Do Service Users with Intellectual Disabilities Want to Be Involved in the Risk Management Process? A Thematic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcommons, Aoiffe M.; Withers, Paul; Moreno-Lopez, Agueda

    2012-01-01

    Background: Involving ID service users in risk decision making necessitates consideration of an individual's ability to assess the implications and associated risks and thus make an informed choice. This calls for research on service users' awareness and understanding of risk management (RM). Method: Thirteen people in a residential ID service who…

  14. Perceived Case Management Needs and Service Preferences of Frequent Emergency Department Users: Lessons Learned in a Large Urban Centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Kahan

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the service needs and preferences of frequent emergency department users with mental health and addictions concerns who participated in a brief intensive case management intervention.We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 20 frequent emergency department users with mental health and addictions challenges, 13 service providers involved in the delivery of a brief case management intervention, and a focus group with intervention case managers. Thematic analysis was used to explore perceived service user profiles, service needs and preferences of care.Service users experienced complex health and social needs and social isolation, while exhibiting resilience and the desire to contribute. They described multiple instances of stigmatization in interactions with healthcare professionals. Components of the brief intensive case management intervention perceived to be helpful included system navigation, advocacy, intermediation, and practical needs assistance. Frequent service users valued relational responsiveness, a non-judgmental stance, and a recovery orientation in case managers.Interventions for frequent service users in mental health may be enhanced by focusing on the engagement of formal and informal social supports, practical needs assistance, system navigation, advocacy and intermediation, and attention to the recovery goals of service users.

  15. Indirect effect of management support on users' compliance behaviour towards information security policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidi, Norshima; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2018-01-01

    Health information systems are innovative products designed to improve the delivery of effective healthcare, but they are also vulnerable to breaches of information security, including unauthorised access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification or destruction, and duplication of passwords. Greater openness and multi-connectedness between heterogeneous stakeholders within health networks increase the security risk. The focus of this research was on the indirect effects of management support (MS) on user compliance behaviour (UCB) towards information security policies (ISPs) among health professionals in selected Malaysian public hospitals. The aim was to identify significant factors and provide a clearer understanding of the nature of compliance behaviour in the health sector environment. Using a survey design and stratified random sampling method, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 454 healthcare professionals in three hospitals. Drawing on theories of planned behaviour, perceived behavioural control (self-efficacy (SE) and MS components) and the trust factor, an information system security policies compliance model was developed to test three related constructs (MS, SE and perceived trust (PT)) and their relationship to UCB towards ISPs. Results showed a 52.8% variation in UCB through significant factors. Partial least squares structural equation modelling demonstrated that all factors were significant and that MS had an indirect effect on UCB through both PT and SE among respondents to this study. The research model based on the theory of planned behaviour in combination with other human and organisational factors has made a useful contribution towards explaining compliance behaviour in relation to organisational ISPs, with trust being the most significant factor. In adopting a multidimensional approach to management-user interactions via multidisciplinary concepts and theories to evaluate the association between the integrated management-user

  16. Control Freaks: How User-Generated Content is Managed in Advertising Campaigns. The Romanian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Maria SĂVULESCU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of Web 2.0 has brought about a paradigm shift in communication: from an informational Web to an editable one. Consequently, the “one-to-many” communication model of the mass media industry has been replaced by one that involves “many-to-many”. Web 2.0 enables those who were formerly conceptualized as audiences/consumers to be part of an open-source movement that means participating into the production of brands and their meanings. It is an era of convergence, of overlapping roles between producers and users/consumers – in short, of “produsage”, “prosumption” and “user-generated content” (UGC. This article investigates how this new paradigm influences marketing communication by addressing the specific case of the Romanian advertising industry. By using in depth-interviews with 20 advertising professionals, it points out to the fact that in communication campaigns with user-generated content there is still a high degree of control from the brand management and agency teams that cannot quite grasp the concept of brand communication democratization.

  17. Storm-Water Management Model, Version 4. Part a: user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, W.C.; Dickinson, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    The EPA Storm-Water Management Model (SWMM) is a comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of urban runoff water quality and quantity in storm and combined sewer systems. All aspects of the urban hydrologic and quality cycles are simulated, including surface and subsurface runoff, transport through the drainage network, storage and treatment. Part A of the two-volume report is an update of the user's manuals issued in 1971, 1975, and 1981. Part B is a user's manual for EXTRAN, a flow-routing model that can be used both as a block of the SWMM package and as an independent model. The SWMM user's manual provides detailed descriptions for program blocks for Runoff, Transport, Storage/Treatment, Combine, Statistics, Rain, Temp and Graph (part of the Executive Block). EXTRAN represents a drainage system as links and nodes, allowing simulation of parallel or looped-pipe networks; weirs, orifices, and pumps; and system surcharges.

  18. Factors associated with sex in the context of methamphetamine use in different sexual venues among HIV-positive men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zians Jim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Harm reduction has focused primarily on reduction of high-risk substance using behaviors rather than reductions in high-risk sexual behaviors. Furthermore, most studies focus on individual behavior change, with less attention paid to the social and environmental context. This paper promotes understanding of the interplay between the individual and the social context by examining the psychosocial and behavioral characteristics of 321 methamphetamine-using HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM in San Diego, CA based on the locations or venues of their sexual activities when "high" on methamphetamine. Methods Participants in a safer-sex intervention study underwent a baseline assessment that queried demographic and psychosocial characteristics as well as drug use and sexual risk behaviors. For purposes of analysis, respondents were classified according to their preference of sexual venue: private (e.g., home, commercial (e.g., bathhouse, or public (e.g., public park or restroom. Results The commercial venue group was younger, better educated, more likely to identify as gay, and significantly more likely to have used "club drugs" as compared to the other two groups. Men in the commercial- and public-venue groups reported more high-risk sex compared to the private-venue group. The public-venue group reported heavier drug and alcohol use, had significantly higher Beck depression scores, reported more experiences of stigma, and scored higher on a measure of sexual compulsivity than did the other two groups. Conclusion In an effort to reduce HIV/STI risk-behaviors, future studies should investigate the feasibility of modifying personal, psychosocial and structural factors associated with the use of risky sexual venues where HIV-positive methamphetamine users engage in sexual activity when "high" on methamphetamine. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00432926

  19. Can we prevent drug related deaths by training opioid users to recognise and manage overdoses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manning Victoria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naloxone has been evidenced widely as a means of reducing mortality resulting from opiate overdose, yet its distribution to drug users remains limited. However, it is drug users who are most likely to be available to administer naloxone at the scene and who have been shown to be willing and motivated to deliver this intervention. The current study builds on a national training evaluation in England by assessing 6-month outcome data collected primarily in one of the participating centres. Methods Seventy patients with opioid dependence syndrome were trained in the recognition and management of overdoses in Birmingham (n = 66 and London (n = 4, and followed up six months after receiving naloxone. After successful completion of the training, participants received a supply of 400 micrograms of naloxone (in the form of a preloaded syringe to take home. The study focused on whether participating users still had their naloxone, whether they retained the information, whether they had witnessed an overdose and whether they had naloxone available and were still willing to use it in the event of overdose. Results & Discussion The results were mixed - although the majority of drug users had retained the naloxone prescribed to them, and retention of knowledge was very strong in relation to overdose recognition and intervention, most participants did not carry the naloxone with them consistently and consequently it was generally not available if they witnessed an overdose. The paper discusses the reasons for the reluctance to carry naloxone and potential opportunities for how this might be overcome. Future issues around training and support around peer dissemination are also addressed. Conclusion Our findings confirm that training of drug users constitutes a valuable resource in the management of opiate overdoses and growth of peer interventions that may not otherwise be recognised or addressed. Obstacles have been identified at individual

  20. GPP Webinar: Green Power Use and Opportunities for Sports Teams & Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Power Partnership webinar on the green power use by sports teams and their venues. Focused on how and why sports teams and venues use green power, review of available product options, and best practices for procuring renewable energy.

  1. Management, leadership, and user control in self-advocacy: an english case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive and grow. In particular, the paper explores themes of management, leadership, and user control, linking these to external perceptions about self-advocacy organizations. The organization in my study developed an "interdependent" governance model based on key organizational roles for nondisabled advisors and self-advocates, which proved popular with external funders. Despite the organization's notable achievements, its success raises questions for the wider self-advocacy movement, notably how leadership capacity can be developed among self-advocates.

  2. Orchestrating End-User Perspectives in the Software Release Process: An Integrated Release Management Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Cleveland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Software bugs discovered by end-users are inevitable consequences of a vendor’s lack of testing. While they frequently result in costly system failures, one way to detect and prevent them is to engage the customer in acceptance testing during the release process. Yet, there is a considerable lack of empirical studies examining release management from end-users’ perspective. To address this gap, we propose and empirically test a release framework that positions the customer release manager in the center of the release process. Using a participatory action research strategy, a twenty-seven-month study was conducted to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of the framework through seven major and 39 minor releases.

  3. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Serfon, Cedric; Vigne, Ralph; Garonne, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained frontends like ...

  4. A gLite FTS based solution for managing user output in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinquilli, M. [CERN; Riahi, H. [INFN, Perugia; Spiga, D. [CERN; Grandi, C. [INFN, Bologna; Mancinelli, V. [CERN; Mascheroni, M. [CERN; Pepe, F. [INFN, Bologna; Vaandering, E. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    The CMS distributed data analysis workflow assumes that jobs run in a different location from where their results are finally stored. Typically the user output must be transferred across the network from one site to another, possibly on a different continent or over links not necessarily validated for high bandwidth/high reliability transfer. This step is named stage-out and in CMS was originally implemented as a synchronous step of the analysis job execution. However, our experience showed the weakness of this approach both in terms of low total job execution efficiency and failure rates, wasting precious CPU resources. The nature of analysis data makes it inappropriate to use PhEDEx, the core data placement system for CMS. As part of the new generation of CMS Workload Management tools, the Asynchronous Stage-Out system (AsyncStageOut) has been developed to enable third party copy of the user output. The AsyncStageOut component manages glite FTS transfers of data from the temporary store at the site where the job ran to the final location of the data on behalf of that data owner. The tool uses python daemons, built using the WMCore framework, and CouchDB, to manage the queue of work and FTS transfers. CouchDB also provides the platform for a dedicated operations monitoring system. In this paper, we present the motivations of the asynchronous stage-out system. We give an insight into the design and the implementation of key features, describing how it is coupled with the CMS workload management system. Finally, we show the results and the commissioning experience.

  5. An information management system for patients with tuberculosis: usability assessment with end-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Jonathan; Black, Jim; Morrison, David; Buising, Kirsty

    2012-01-01

    Information systems with clinical decision support (CDS) offer great potential to assist the co-ordination of patients with chronic diseases and to improve patient care. Despite this, few have entered routine clinical use. Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection of public health importance. It has complex interactions with many comorbid conditions, requires close supervised care and prolonged treatment for effective cure. These features make it suitable for use with an information management system with CDS features. In close consultation with key stakeholders, a clinical application was developed for the management of TB patients in Victoria. A formal usability assessment using semi-structured case-scenario based exercises was performed. Subjects were 12 individuals closely involved in the care of TB patients, including Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Physicians, and Public Health Nurses. Two researchers conducted the sessions, independently analysed responses and discrepancies compared to the voice record for validity. Despite varied computer experience, responses were positive regarding user interface and content. Data location was not always intuitive, however this improved with familiarity of the program. Decision support was considered valuable, with useful suggestions for expansion of these features. Automated reporting for correspondence and notification to the Health Department were felt worth the initial investment in data entry. An important workflow-based issue regarding dismissal of alerts and several errors were detected. Usability assessment validated many design elements of the system, provided a unique insight into workflow issues faced by users and hopefully will impact on its ultimate clinical utility.

  6. Evaluating user perceptions of mobile medication management applications with older adults: a usability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Kelly Anne; Li, Melissa; Gates, Allison

    2014-03-14

    Medication nonadherence has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals with chronic disease. Several mobile medication management applications are available to help users track, remember, and read about their medication therapy. The objective of this study was to explore the usability and usefulness of existing medication management applications for older adults. We recruited 35 participants aged 50 and over to participate in a 2-hour usability session. The average age ranged from 52-78 years (mean 67 years) and 71% (25/35) of participants were female. Each participant was provided with an iPad loaded with four medication management applications: MyMedRec, DrugHub, Pillboxie, and PocketPharmacist. These applications were evaluated using the 10 item System Usability Scale (SUS) and visual analog scale. An investigator-moderated 30-minute discussion followed, and was recorded. We used a grounded theory (GT) approach to analyze qualitative data. When assessing mobile medication management applications, participants struggled to think of a need for the applications in their own lives. Many were satisfied with their current management system and proposed future use only if cognition and health declined. Most participants felt capable of using the applications after a period of time and training, but were frustrated by their initial experiences with the applications. The early experiences of participants highlighted the benefits of linear navigation and clear wording (eg, "undo" vs "cancel") when designing for older users. While there was no order effect, participants attributed their poor performance to the order in which they tried the applications. They also described being a part of a technology generation that did not encounter the computer until adulthood. Of the four applications, PocketPharmacist was found to be the least usable with a score of 42/100 (Papplications for their medication management. However, in order to adopt such technology

  7. Publishing Venues for Education Scholarship: A Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Jones, David; Williams, Dustin; Druck, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Education research is a developing field. It is unknown if there are adequate venues for scholarship distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify types of education scholarship produced, where this type of scholarship is published, barriers to achieving publication for education scholarship, and perceptions of adequacy of publication venues. Study participants were emergency medicine (EM) education and academic leaders who completed an online survey consisting of multiple-choice, completion, and 10-point Likert scale items. A total of 45 of 59 (76.3%) subjects completed the survey. A total of 33 of 45 (73.3%) respondents had published education scholarship. Most (29/44, 65.9%) felt that there were inadequate venues for publishing education scholarship. Of those who publish education scholarship, most (30/33; 90.9%) publish either less than one or one to two peer-reviewed products per year, but collaborate with others more frequently (less than one per year, 7/33, 21.2%; one or two per year, 17/33, 51.5%; three or four per year, 7/33, 21.2%; five or more per year, 2/33, 6.1%). The most frequently published scholarship were curricular innovations and original research, with mean ratings of 5.61 and 5.21, respectively, on a 10-point Likert scale. Peer-reviewed print journal was the most frequently utilized venue, with a mean rating of 6.21. Other venues (mean rating) include peer-reviewed online journal (4.0), MedEd Portal (3.58), free open-access education (3.47), newsletter (3.0), and curricular toolbox (2.55). The most common rejection reason was "not suitable for this journal/venue," with a mean rating of 5.33. Other reasons include research methodology (4.07), small sample size (4.17), single-site study (4.28), and misunderstanding of project purpose (4.10). Respondents believed that additional education supplements in journals would be most helpful in increasing successful publication, with a mean rating of 8.31. Other helpful items included a

  8. Tritium as an indicator of venues for nuclear tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, O N; Lukashenko, S N; Mulgin, S I; Zhdanov, S V

    2013-10-01

    Currently, due to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons there is a highly topical issue of an accurate verification of nuclear explosion venues. This paper proposes to consider new method for verification by using tritium as an indicator. Detailed studies of the tritium content in the air were carried in the locations of underground nuclear tests - "Balapan" and "Degelen" testing sites located in Semipalatinsk Test Site. The paper presents data on the levels and distribution of tritium in the air where tunnels and boreholes are located - explosion epicentres, wellheads and tunnel portals, as well as in estuarine areas of the venues for the underground nuclear explosions (UNE). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. No Borders for Tobacco Smoke in Hospitality Venues in Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Neuberger

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In public places many countries banned smoking as the most important indoor source of fine airborne particulate matter. In Austria partial bans have been in force since 2009, with exemptions for the hospitality industry. From February to October 2010 we investigated PM2.5 concentrations in the breathing area of guests in well frequented Viennese establishments of all sizes, and compared these chance indoor samples with PM2.5 concentrations measured during the same half hour at the next outdoor monitoring station. The laser particle counter (OPC1.108, Grimm® used for indoor measurements had been calibrated by ß-attenuation (FH 62 I-R, Eberline®, which was used outdoors. 48% of 112 venues visited did not fully comply with the law, notwithstanding its weakness.  Highest median concentrations (in µg/m3 were found in bars (443.7, followed by nightclubs/discotheques (421.1, pubs (147.7, cafes (106.1 and restaurants (23.4. Concentrations increased with number of smokers present (p < 0.01, with medians of 282.4/241,3/67.6/6.9 µg/m³ in smoking venues/smoking rooms/adjacent non-smoking rooms/exclusive non-smoking venues. Only for the latter, a significant correlation was found with outdoor concentrations (r = 0.48, p < 0.01, while concentrations in non-smoking rooms were higher (p < 0.01 and unrelated to outdoor concentrations, but significantly dependent on concentrations in the adjacent smoking room (r = 0.64, p < 0.01. In conclusion, the partial smoking ban failed and guests of Viennese hospitality venues continue to risk disease from passive smoking, even in so-called “non-smoking rooms”, which are second-hand smoke rooms.

  10. Secondhand Smoke Exposure in Hospitality Venues in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maria J.; Nebot, Manel; Albertini, Marco; Birkui, Pierre; Centrich, Francesc; Chudzikova, Monika; Georgouli, Maria; Gorini, Giuseppe; Moshammer, Hanns; Mulcahy, Maurice; Pilali, Maria; Serrahima, Eulalia; Tutka, Piotr; Fernandez, Esteve

    2008-01-01

    Background Although in the last few years some European countries have implemented smoking bans in hospitality venues, the levels of secondhand smoke (SHS) in this occupational sector could still be extremely high in most countries. Objective The aim of this study was to assess exposure to SHS in hospitality venues in 10 European cities. Methods We included 167 hospitality venues (58 discotheques and pubs, 82 restaurants and cafeterias, and 27 fast-food restaurants) in this cross-sectional study. We carried out fieldwork in 10 European cities: Vienna (Austria), Paris (France), Athens (Greece), Florence and Belluno (Italy), Galway (Ireland), Barcelona (Spain), Warsaw and Lublin (Poland), and Bratislava (Slovak Republic). We measured vapor-phase nicotine as an SHS marker. Results We analyzed 504 samples and found nicotine in most samples (97.4%). We found the highest median concentrations in discos/pubs [32.99 μg/m3; interquartile range (IQR), 8.06–66.84 μg/m3] and lower median concentrations in restaurants/cafeterias (2.09 μg/m3; IQR, 0.49–6.73 μg/m3) and fast-food restaurants (0.31 μg/m3; IQR, 0.11–1.30 μg/m3) (p < 0.05). We found differences of exposure between countries that may be related to their smoking regulations. Where we sampled smoking and nonsmoking areas, nicotine concentrations were significantly lower in nonsmoking areas. Conclusions Hospitality venues from European cities without smoking regulations have very high levels of SHS exposure. Monitoring of SHS on a regular basis as well as a total smoking ban in hospitality sector would be needed. PMID:19057698

  11. Acoustics of a Music Venue/Bar—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani Ramakrishnan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A vacant unit, once used by a Portuguese Deli, was converted to a bar/music room in Toronto. The unit was divided into two spaces along its north-south axis. The western portion was designed as a music room that would provide a performance space from a solo artist to a Jazz combo to a small rock band. The eastern part was designed as a regular bar/dining area. The plan also called for a microbrewery unit at the back of the unit. The bar music can be loud, while the music room can be pianissimo to forte depending on the type of performance. The acoustical design aspects are critical for the music room. In addition, the acoustical separation between the two spaces is equally important. The music room/bar is currently in use. The design results are compared to actual field measurements. The results showed that the music venue performed satisfactorily. The acoustical separation between the music venue and the bar/restaurant was better than expected other than an installation deficiency of the south side sound lock doors. The background sound along the northern portion was NC-35 or less. However, the southern portion’s background sound exceeded NC-35 due to the hissing of the return air grille. The acoustical design and the performance results of the music venue-bar/restaurant are presented in this paper.

  12. [Statistics and evaluation of a graphic SQL user interface in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, M; Junger, A; Quinzio, L; Jost, A; Hempelmann, G

    1999-01-01

    Since 1997, the Anaesthesia Information Management Systems (AIMS) in our department has produced extensive data material (DGAI core data, vital sign parameters, respiratory parameters, material consumed, etc.) which is stored in a relational data bank. The processing of this data by means of SQL queries was restricted to a few persons with special knowledge only. It was the objective of the project to create an evaluation tool which enables each member of the department to enter queries concerning topics such as efficiency records, quality management, training and research at any time. The tool was also intended to present results in an adequate form. Since 1997, the data of the performed anaesthesia procedures have been recorded using the online anaesthesia documentation software NarkoData Version 4 (ProLogic GmbH, Erkrath) within the AIMS. The recorded data sets have been imported into a relational Oracle data bank (Oracle Corporation). The commercial programme Voyant (Brossco Systems, Espoo, Finland) enables for the user to formulate SQL-requests (Structured Query Language) with the help of a graphic user interface and to present the results in a variety of graphics and tables. Repetition of the evaluation using the current data is possible at any time. During 1997 and the first quarter of 1998, the data of 26,030 anaesthesia procedures have been registered and stored in the anaesthesiological data base. 235 queries could be formulated with the SQL-capable graphic tool Voyant. They are available to each member of the department by the application of NarkoStatistik (IMS GmbH, Giessen) within the AIMS, together with the corresponding documentation (HTML pages). The query catalogue covers the main topics of efficiency, quality management, organisation, diagnoses and surgery, pre-, intra- and postoperative data and day-care unit. Even without much previous experience with the system it is possible to carry out evaluations with the current data at selected AIMS

  13. Development of services for irrigation management: the experience with the users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, Francesco; Neugebauer, Nikolaus; D'Urso, Guido; De Michele, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the main user of freshwater resources (30% in Central Europe, 60% in the South). Efficient water management is therefore of essential importance, especially where water scarcity and water quality are becoming severe challenges. To achieve a successful and effective use of resources, farmers and water managers require easy-to-use decision support tools and reliable information. Our approach is based on Earth observation (EO) techniques and decision support tools. Generally, the service concept is based on two main components: i) the processing of time-series of high spatial resolution (10-30-m pixel size) images from satellite, currently available from public and commercial data providers, to timely monitor the crop growth and to estimate the crop water requirements throughout the growing season; ii) the adaptation and integration in local management practices & tools of easy to use geo-spatial technologies to make the information available to users and to support the decision-making process in near-real-time. The participation and feedback we receive from the users is fundamental to develop and provide easy-to-use technologies that can be embedded in standard approaches. In this paper, we briefly describe some examples of pre- and fully operational applications at field and irrigation scheme level and report some success stories of cooperation between decision makers and scientists. The paper includes the outcomes of ongoing activities such as Irrisat (www.irrisat.it), a regional operational service supported by rural development funds in Southern Italy and EO4Water (www.eo4water.com), a case study of knowledge and technology transfer in Eastern Austria funded by the Austrian Space Application Programme. The new capacities we develop to assist farmers in monitoring their crops are a step towards a better integration of tools and production. More technical advice and recommendation regarding sustainable land and resource use could then be

  14. Distributed demand-side management optimisation for multi-residential users with energy production and storage strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Chifuel Manasseh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study considers load control in a multi-residential setup where energy scheduler (ES devices installed in smart meters are employed for demand-side management (DSM. Several residential end-users share the same energy source and each residential user has non-adjustable loads and adjustable loads. In addition, residential users may have storage devices and renewable energy sources such as wind turbines or solar as well as dispatchable generators. The ES devices exchange information automatically by executing an iterative distributed algorithm to locate the optimal energy schedule for each end-user. This will reduce the total energy cost and the peak-to-average ratio (PAR in energy demand in the electric power distribution. Users possessing storage devices and dispatchable generators strategically utilise their resources to minimise the total energy cost together with the PAR. Simulation results are provided to evaluate the performance of the proposed game theoretic-based distributed DSM technique.

  15. How Usable Are the Learning Management Systems? The Users Have their Say

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Althobaiti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available E-learning is an innovative way of learning that is both symbolic and derivative of ‘the information age.’ When used as part of the learning process, it provides users with greater flexibility in terms of time and location. For an E-learning application to be considered effective, it should provide its users with a certain standard of usability; otherwise, the learning process is likely to become cumbersome and frustrating for the learner. Focusing on this dilemma, this paper aims to assess the usability of the Jusur Learning Management System (LMS that is used in higher education in Saudi Arabia. Nine factors have been incorporated into a survey to evaluate the system: content, learning and support, visual design, navigation, accessibility, interactivity, selfassessment, learnability, and motivation. The results show that E-learners who use the Jusur LMS tend to find that Jusur is a usable and desirable application in terms of its users’ experiences and perspectives.

  16. Developing Framework for Agent- Based Diabetes Disease Management System: User Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the characteristics of agents is mobility which makes them very suitable for remote electronic health and tele medicine. The aim of this study is developing a framework for agent based diabetes information management at national level through identifying required agents. Methods: The main tool is a questioner that is designed in three sections based on studying library resources, performance of major organizations in the field of diabetes in and out of the country and interviews with experts in the medical, health information management and software fields. Questionnaires based on Delphi methods were distributed among 20 experts. In order to design and identify agents required in health information management for the prevention and appropriate and rapid treatment of diabetes, the results were analyzed using SPSS 17 and Results were plotted with FREEPLANE mind map software. Results: Access to data technology in proposed framework in order of priority is: mobile (mean 1/80), SMS, EMAIL (mean 2/80), internet, web (mean 3/30), phone (mean 3/60), WIFI (mean 4/60). Conclusions: In delivering health care to diabetic patients, considering social and human aspects is essential. Having a systematic view for implementation of agent systems and paying attention to all aspects such as feedbacks, user acceptance, budget, motivation, hierarchy, useful standards, affordability of individuals, identifying barriers and opportunities and so on, are necessary. PMID:24757407

  17. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, M.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.; Barisits, M.; Garonne, V.; Serfon, C.

    2015-12-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for usergenerated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained frontends like web-browsers as well as remote services. This contribution will detail the reasons for these principles and the design choices taken. Additionally, the implementation, the interactions with external systems, and an evaluation of the system in production, both from a technological and user perspective, conclude this contribution.

  18. Developing framework for agent- based diabetes disease management system: user perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2014-02-01

    One of the characteristics of agents is mobility which makes them very suitable for remote electronic health and tele medicine. The aim of this study is developing a framework for agent based diabetes information management at national level through identifying required agents. The main tool is a questioner that is designed in three sections based on studying library resources, performance of major organizations in the field of diabetes in and out of the country and interviews with experts in the medical, health information management and software fields. Questionnaires based on Delphi methods were distributed among 20 experts. In order to design and identify agents required in health information management for the prevention and appropriate and rapid treatment of diabetes, the results were analyzed using SPSS 17 and Results were plotted with FREEPLANE mind map software. ACCESS TO DATA TECHNOLOGY IN PROPOSED FRAMEWORK IN ORDER OF PRIORITY IS: mobile (mean 1/80), SMS, EMAIL (mean 2/80), internet, web (mean 3/30), phone (mean 3/60), WIFI (mean 4/60). In delivering health care to diabetic patients, considering social and human aspects is essential. Having a systematic view for implementation of agent systems and paying attention to all aspects such as feedbacks, user acceptance, budget, motivation, hierarchy, useful standards, affordability of individuals, identifying barriers and opportunities and so on, are necessary.

  19. Hypoglycemia Prevention and User Acceptance of an Insulin Pump System with Predictive Low Glucose Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Pratik; Olsen, Birthe S; Conget, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The MiniMed 640G sensor-augmented insulin pump system (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) can automatically suspend insulin delivery in advance of predicted hypoglycemia and restart it upon recovery. The aims of this analysis were to determine the rate at which predicted hypoglycemia...... was avoided with this strategy, as well as to assess user acceptance of the system and its insulin management features. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty subjects with type 1 diabetes used the system for 4 weeks. We retrospectively evaluated performance of the system, using downloaded pump and sensor data.......1%) of the predictive suspensions did not reach the preset low limit. Nadir SG values of ≤50 and ≤60 mg/dL were seen in 207 (8.9%) and 356 (15.3%) of the predictive suspensions, respectively. Blood glucose (BG) and SG values before and during the study were comparable (P > 0.05). The mean absolute relative difference...

  20. UIMX: A User Interface Management System For Scientific Computing With X Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, Michael

    1989-09-01

    Applications with iconic user interfaces, (for example, interfaces with pulldown menus, radio buttons, and scroll bars), such as those found on Apple's Macintosh computer and the IBM PC under Microsoft's Presentation Manager, have become very popular, and for good reason. They are much easier to use than applications with traditional keyboard-oriented interfaces, so training costs are much lower and just about anyone can use them. They are standardized between applications, so once you learn one application you are well along the way to learning another. The use of one reinforces the common elements between applications of the interface, and, as a result, you remember how to use them longer. Finally, for the developer, their support costs can be much lower because of their ease of use.

  1. Managing preconceived expectations: mental health service users experiences of going home from hospital: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, B; Callaghan, P; Higgins, A

    2015-11-01

    What is known on the subject? The time of discharge from a mental health hospital can be challenging for mental health service users, with high rates of readmission in the immediate months following discharge. Although some research exists that explores service users' perspectives of being discharged, little evidence exists that explores the processes influencing or used by service users' to adapt to the transition from in-patient acute mental health service. What this papers adds to existing knowledge? The findings of this grounded theory study demonstrates the strategies service users used to managed their own, as well as their social audiences, preconceived expectations arising from their new identity as 'psychiatric patients' following their discharge from hospital. While there is a move to develop recovery-orientated mental health services, key indicators of recovery-oriented practices were often absent from service users' experiences of service provision. What are the implications for practice? Nurses and other mental health professionals need to recognize their contribution to the architecture of stigma that transcends the physical structures of hospital or ward and are entrenched within attitudes, interactions and practices. The findings of this study can provide guidance to those working with service users and help them to understand the complexities of their experiences when using mental health services, which go far beyond the management of their symptoms. Following a period of hospitalization, the transition to home can result in increased vulnerability and a source of stress for mental health service users. Readmission rates have been suggested as one indicator of the success of the transition from hospital to community care. Despite knowledge of some of the factors that impact on service users following discharge, no coherent model or theoretical framework could be located in the literature, which explains or aides an in-depth understanding of the

  2. Venues, Patrons, and Alcohol Use Dynamics: The Creation of a High Risk Sexual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balán, Iván C.; Barreda, Victoria; Marone, Rubén; Ávila, María Mercedes; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Venue-based HIV prevention interventions, especially in sex on premise venues, can disrupt high-risk sexual networks. However, prior to intervening, it is essential to understand the person-venue dynamics that contribute to HIV risk. As such, we conducted five ethnographic observations at each of six venues where alcohol is sold and sex occurs onsite (2 each porn theaters, sex clubs, and dance clubs) frequented by gay and other men who have sex with men (G&MSM) in the Buenos Aires metropolitan area. Alcohol use, sexual behavior, and person-venue dynamics differed markedly across venue types. In dance clubs, substantial alcohol consumption often preceded visits to the darkroom for sex which, at times, included unprotected anal and vaginal intercourse. Condoms, although available, were not easily accessible. HIV prevention messaging was generally non-existent. These venues are in critical need of interventions to reduce HIV transmission risk. PMID:24691922

  3. Intelligent Systems and Advanced User Interfaces for Design, Operation, and Maintenance of Command Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    Historically Command Management Systems (CMS) have been large, expensive, spacecraft-specific software systems that were costly to build, operate, and maintain. Current and emerging hardware, software, and user interface technologies may offer an opportunity to facilitate the initial formulation and design of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as a to develop a more generic or a set of core components for CMS systems. Current MOC (mission operations center) hardware and software include Unix workstations, the C/C++ and Java programming languages, and X and Java window interfaces representations. This configuration provides the power and flexibility to support sophisticated systems and intelligent user interfaces that exploit state-of-the-art technologies in human-machine systems engineering, decision making, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. One of the goals of this research is to explore the extent to which technologies developed in the research laboratory can be productively applied in a complex system such as spacecraft command management. Initial examination of some of the issues in CMS design and operation suggests that application of technologies such as intelligent planning, case-based reasoning, design and analysis tools from a human-machine systems engineering point of view (e.g., operator and designer models) and human-computer interaction tools, (e.g., graphics, visualization, and animation), may provide significant savings in the design, operation, and maintenance of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as continuity for CMS design and development across spacecraft with varying needs. The savings in this case is in software reuse at all stages of the software engineering process.

  4. User Management with LDAP(Light weight Directory Access Protocolfor access to technology and Information Services in Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Teodoro Mejía Viteri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to conduct an analysis of management services information and users with LDAP (Lightweight / Simplified Directory Access Protocol, their interaction with other technology services company, allowing it to be accessed through a single user and password. This study allowed us to collect information through a literature review on the LDAP service and its ability to interact with your user directory Open source technology services; also with Windows Server and Active Directory service is used by companies for their ease of management and access resources on Windows clients; is intended to provide an alternative for the implementation of each of the services required by public and private companies with tools free use and access to services for management and administration can be done by integrating or synchronizing with the directory LDAP.

  5. Factors affecting collective action for forest fire management: a comparative study of community forest user groups in central Siwalik, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Lok Mani; Shrestha, Rajendra Prasad; Jourdain, Damien; Shivakoti, Ganesh P

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of social ecological systems affect the management of commons. Strengthening and enhancing social capital and the enforcement of rules and sanctions aid in the collective action of communities in forest fire management. Using a set of variables drawn from previous studies on the management of commons, we conducted a study across 20 community forest user groups in Central Siwalik, Nepal, by dividing the groups into two categories based on the type and level of their forest fire management response. Our study shows that the collective action in forest fire management is consistent with the collective actions in other community development activities. However, the effectiveness of collective action is primarily dependent on the complex interaction of various variables. We found that strong social capital, strong enforcement of rules and sanctions, and users' participation in crafting the rules were the major variables that strengthen collective action in forest fire management. Conversely, users' dependency on a daily wage and a lack of transparency were the variables that weaken collective action. In fire-prone forests such as the Siwalik, our results indicate that strengthening social capital and forming and enforcing forest fire management rules are important variables that encourage people to engage in collective action in fire management.

  6. URBAN FRESHWATER USERS WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR UPLAND DEGRADED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT: THE CASE OF DECHATU IN DIRE DAWA ADMINISTRATION, ETHIOPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alem MEZGEBO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study assesses urban freshwater users’ perception of watershed degradation and users' willingness to pay for upland degraded watershed management. Cross sectional data was collected from 282 urban freshwater users. A number of causes and effects of watershed degradation and water supply problems are identified. Economic instruments and mechanisms are also identified as the basis of charging and collecting the fee for watershed management, respectively. Besides, contingent valuation result shows that about 82 percent of the respondents were willing to pay for upland degraded watershed management. The mean willingness to pay from the spike model was computed to be 97 Ethiopian birr (ETB per annum for five years whereas the mean willingness to pay from the open-ended elicitation method was computed 70 ETB per year. Urban freshwater user willingness to pay is affected by total income, initial bids, marital status, ownership of house and educational levels. The study recommends that any watershed management activities need to consider the socio-economic variables of the affected respondents. Besides, it is worthy to consider the demand of the urban dweller (downstream users for any upland degraded watershed management.

  7. User's Guide for Requirement Traceability Management Tool Used in the Development of Nuclear Power Plant DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.Y.; Yoon, M.H.; Moon, H.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-06-01

    This report contains the user's guide for RMT(Requirement Management Tool) used in the development of nuclear power plant DCS. The RMT supports the efficient requirement centric communications among remotely located engineers, requirement traceability management, automatic document generation from RMT and the management of development document DB(Historical Management). Using these essential functional characteristics of RMT, it is expected that the activities of development and V and V of nuclear power plant DCS will be accomplished efficiently. (author). 6 figs.

  8. SBexpert users guide (version 2.0): a knowledge-based decision-support system for spruce beetle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith M. Reynolds; Edward H. Holsten

    1997-01-01

    SBexpert version 2.0 is a knowledge-based decision-support system for spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kby.)) management developed for use in Microsoft (MS) Windows with the KnowledgePro Windows development language. Version 2.0 is a significant enhancement of version 1.0. The SBexpert users guide provides detailed instructions on the use of...

  9. User Requirements for the Application of Remote Sensing in the Planning and Management of Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgy, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Data relating to hydrologic and water resource systems and subsystems management are reported. Systems models, user application, and remote sensing technology are covered. Parameters governing water resources include evaportranspiration, vegetation, precipitation, streams and estuaries, reservoirs and lakes, and unsaturate and saturated soil zones.

  10. Promoting Service User Inclusion in Risk Assessment and Management: A Pilot Project Developing a Human Rights-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Beth; Whitehead, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports highlight the extent to which many people with learning disabilities are not afforded access to their basic human rights. In addition, traditional approaches to risk management often focus on professional assessments of risks and challenging behaviour and exclude service user perspectives. In this paper, we outline what we believe…

  11. Enhancing Learning Management Systems Utility for Blind Students: A Task-Oriented, User-Centered, Multi-Method Evaluation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Rakesh; Singh, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel task-oriented, user-centered, multi-method evaluation (TUME) technique and shows how it is useful in providing a more complete, practical and solution-oriented assessment of the accessibility and usability of Learning Management Systems (LMS) for blind and visually impaired (BVI) students. Novel components of TUME…

  12. SBexpert users guide (version 1.0): a knowledge-based decision-support system for spruce beetle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith M. Reynolds; Edward H. Holsten; Richard A. Werner

    1994-01-01

    SBexpert version 1.0 is a knowledge-based decision-support system for spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rutipennis (Kby.)) management developed for use in Microsoft Windows with the KnowledgePro Windows development language. The SBexpert users guide provides detailed instructions on the use of all SBexpert features. SBexpert has four main topics (...

  13. Exploring the Influence of User Perception of Spam on Managers of Small Manufacturing Firms in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Darrell G.

    2010-01-01

    Unsolicited bulk email received by business users has increased exponentially in volume and complexity since the introduction of email. However, the factors that influence managers to purchase spam filters have never been fully documented or identified, only assumed. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify, understand and document…

  14. Configuring a Graphical User Interface for Managing Local HYSPLIT Model Runs Through AWIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, mark M.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.; Hoeth, Brian; VanSpeybroeck, Kurt M.

    2009-01-01

    Responding to incidents involving the release of harmful airborne pollutants is a continual challenge for Weather Forecast Offices in the National Weather Service. When such incidents occur, current protocol recommends forecaster-initiated requests of NOAA's Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model output through the National Centers of Environmental Prediction to obtain critical dispersion guidance. Individual requests are submitted manually through a secured web site, with desired multiple requests submitted in sequence, for the purpose of obtaining useful trajectory and concentration forecasts associated with the significant release of harmful chemical gases, radiation, wildfire smoke, etc., into local the atmosphere. To help manage the local HYSPLIT for both routine and emergency use, a graphical user interface was designed for operational efficiency. The interface allows forecasters to quickly determine the current HYSPLIT configuration for the list of predefined sites (e.g., fixed sites and floating sites), and to make any necessary adjustments to key parameters such as Input Model. Number of Forecast Hours, etc. When using the interface, forecasters will obtain desired output more confidently and without the danger of corrupting essential configuration files.

  15. Frameworks for risk communication and disease management: the case of Lyme disease and countryside users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quine, Christopher P; Barnett, Julie; Dobson, Andrew D M; Marcu, Afrodita; Marzano, Mariella; Moseley, Darren; O'Brien, Liz; Randolph, Sarah E; Taylor, Jennifer L; Uzzell, David

    2011-07-12

    Management of zoonotic disease is necessary if countryside users are to gain benefit rather than suffer harm from their activities, and to avoid disproportionate reaction to novel threats. We introduce a conceptual framework based on the pressure-state-response model with five broad responses to disease incidence. Influencing public behaviour is one response and requires risk communication based on an integration of knowledge about the disease with an understanding of how publics respond to precautionary advice. A second framework emphasizes how risk communication involves more than information provision and should address dimensions including points-of-intervention over time, place and audience. The frameworks are developed by reference to tick-borne Lyme borreliosis (also known as Lyme disease), for which informed precautionary behaviour is particularly relevant. Interventions to influence behaviour can be directed by knowledge of spatial and temporal variation of tick abundance, what constitutes risky behaviour, how people respond to information of varying content, and an understanding of the social practices related to countryside use. The frameworks clarify the response options and help identify who is responsible for risk communication. These aspects are not consistently understood, and may result in an underestimation of the role of land-based organizations in facilitating appropriate precautionary behaviour.

  16. Perceptions of HIV transmission risk in commercial and public sex venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Martin J

    2012-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual behaviors of men who have sex with men (MSM) that occur in sexually charged venues (e.g., bathhouse, sex club, public park) are a target for research and intervention due to concerns about the role these venues may have in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, these efforts often exclude how individuals perceive HIV risk in terms of sex venue use. This paper analyzes how venue-specific perceptions of HIV transmission risk differ across venues and by onsite sexual behavior. METHOD: Cross-sectional data collected using an Internet survey completed by 139 MSM who attended at least one sex venue (e.g., bathhouse, sex club, gym/health club, public park) in the past month. RESULTS: Risk perceptions were highest for bathhouses and sex clubs, though no significant differences were detected between any of the venues. With few exceptions, men who reported not engaging in sex or low-risk behaviors (i.e., masturbation or mutual masturbation) during venue attendance perceived higher risks than those who engaged in high-risk behaviors (i.e., anal sex). Interestingly, risk perceptions of public bathrooms, parks, and video/buddy booths were lower for attendees who reported unprotected oral sex with ejaculation than men who reported safer or riskier behaviors. CONCLUSION: These findings provide important insights into how MSM perceive HIV risk in sex venues and highlight a need for expanded outreach and education in locations where sexual risk taking may be underestimated.

  17. [Medical doctors driving technological innovation: questions about and innovation management approaches to incentive structures for lead users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Kientzler, Fionn

    2010-01-01

    Management science defines user-generated innovations as open innovation and lead user innovation. The medical technology industry finds user-generated innovations profitable and even indispensable. Innovative medical doctors as lead users need medical technology innovations in order to improve patient care. Their motivation to innovate is mostly intrinsic. But innovations may also involve extrinsic motivators such as gain in reputation or monetary incentives. Medical doctors' innovative activities often take place in hospitals and are thus embedded into the hospital's organisational setting. Hospitals find it difficult to gain short-term profits from in-house generated innovations and sometimes hesitate to support them. Strategic investment in medical doctors' innovative activities may be profitable for hospitals in the long run if innovations provide first-mover competitive advantages. Industry co-operations with innovative medical doctors offer chances but also bear potential risks. Innovative ideas generated by expert users may result in even higher complexity of medical devices; this could cause mistakes when applied by less specialised users and thus affect patient safety. Innovations that yield benefits for patients, medical doctors, hospitals and the medical technology industry can be advanced by offering adequate support for knowledge transfer and co-operation models.

  18. An evaluation framework and a pilot study of a mobile platform for diabetes self-management: insights from pediatric users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padman, Rema; Jaladi, Sravani; Kim, Sean; Kumar, Saumitra; Orbeta, Philip; Rudolph, Kate; Tran, Tony

    2013-01-01

    According to WHO, pediatric diabetes is a rising global public health problem, with increasing impact on developing nations. This study summarizes a multidimensional, scalable pilot evaluation of a diabetes self-management platform combining mobile technology with social networking to capture four key metrics of Type 1 diabetes self-management, associated social interactions, and gaming features providing targeted feedback to 8 pediatric users. Based on their 2-month interaction with the application, we analyze click-stream data from social interactions, key health metrics, text comments, and usability and satisfaction surveys to evaluate engagement with the platform and effectiveness in controlling blood glucose using a product-process-program framework. Our preliminary results indicate that this framework was successful in demonstrating the potential of the mobile health platform to effectively leverage the growing use of mobile applications and social media to present a unique benefit that engaged pediatric users and provided useful insights for self-health management.

  19. The Effect of Password Management Procedures on the Entropy of User Selected Passwords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enamait, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining the security of information contained within computer systems poses challenges for users and administrators. Attacks on information systems continue to rise. Specifically, attacks that target user authentication are increasingly popular. These attacks are based on the common perception that traditional alphanumeric passwords are weak…

  20. User Preferences and Design Recommendations for an mHealth App to Promote Cystic Fibrosis Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Hahn, Amy; Ridge, Alana K; Eakin, Michelle N; Riekert, Kristin A

    2014-10-24

    mHealth apps hold potential to provide automated, tailored support for treatment adherence among individuals with chronic medical conditions. Yet relatively little empirical research has guided app development and end users are infrequently involved in designing the app features or functions that would best suit their needs. Self-management apps may be particularly useful for people with chronic conditions like cystic fibrosis (CF) that have complex, demanding regimens. The aim of this mixed-methods study was to involve individuals with CF in guiding the development of engaging, effective, user-friendly adherence promotion apps that meet their preferences and self-management needs. Adults with CF (n=16, aged 21-48 years, 50% male) provided quantitative data via a secure Web survey and qualitative data via semi-structured telephone interviews regarding previous experiences using apps in general and for health, and preferred and unwanted features of potential future apps to support CF self-management. Participants were smartphone users who reported sending or receiving text messages (93%, 14/15) or emails (80%, 12/15) on their smartphone or device every day, and 87% (13/15) said it would be somewhat or very hard to give up their smartphone. Approximately one-half (53%, 8/15) reported having health apps, all diet/weight-related, yet many reported that existing nutrition apps were not well-suited for CF management. Participants wanted apps to support CF self-management with characteristics such as having multiple rather than single functions (eg, simple alarms), being specific to CF, and minimizing user burden. Common themes for desired CF app features were having information at one's fingertips, automation of disease management activities such as pharmacy refills, integration with smartphones' technological capabilities, enhancing communication with health care team, and facilitating socialization within the CF community. Opinions were mixed regarding gamification and

  1. End User and Implementer Experiences of mHealth Technologies for Noncommunicable Chronic Disease Management in Young Adults: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Helen; Campbell, Jared M; Stinson, Jennifer N; Burley, Megan M; Briggs, Andrew M

    2017-12-12

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as asthma, diabetes, cancer, and persistent musculoskeletal pain impose an escalating and unsustainable burden on young people, their families, and society. Exploring how mobile health (mHealth) technologies can support management for young people with NCDs is imperative. The aim of this study was to identify, appraise, and synthesize available qualitative evidence on users' experiences of mHealth technologies for NCD management in young people. We explored the perspectives of both end users (young people) and implementers (health policy makers, clinicians, and researchers). A systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. Eligibility criteria included full reports published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2007 to December 2016, searched across databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, and PsycINFO. All qualitative studies that evaluated the use of mHealth technologies to support young people (in the age range of 15-24 years) in managing their chronic NCDs were considered. Two independent reviewers identified eligible reports and conducted critical appraisal (based on the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument: JBI-QARI). Three reviewers independently, then collaboratively, synthesized and interpreted data through an inductive and iterative process to derive emergent themes across the included data. External validity checking was undertaken by an expert clinical researcher and for relevant content, a health policy expert. Themes were subsequently subjected to a meta-synthesis, with findings compared and contrasted between user groups and policy and practice recommendations derived. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Among studies of end users (N=7), mHealth technologies supported the management of young people with diabetes, cancer, and asthma. Implementer studies (N=5) covered the management of cognitive and communicative disabilities, asthma

  2. Overdose beliefs and management practices among ethnic Vietnamese heroin users in Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Lisa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnic Vietnamese injecting drug users (IDUs in Australia draw on a range of beliefs and etiologic models, sometimes simultaneously, in order to make sense of health and illness. These include understandings of illness as the result of internal imbalances and Western concepts of disease causation including germ/pollution theory. Methods Observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews were conducted between 2001 and 2006 in neighbourhoods characterised by high proportions of Asian background IDUs and street-based drug markets. Eligibility criteria for the study were: 1 ethnic Vietnamese cultural background; 2 aged 16 years and over and; 3 injected drugs in the last 6 months. Results Participants commonly attempted to treat heroin overdose by withdrawing blood (rút máu from the body. Central to this practice are cultural beliefs about the role and function of blood in the body and its relationship to illness and health. Participants' beliefs in blood were strongly influenced by understandings of blood expressed in traditional Chinese and Vietnamese medicine. Many participants perceived Western drugs, particularly heroin, as "hot" and "strong". In overdose situations, it was commonly believed that an excessive amount of drugs (particularly heroin entered the bloodstream and traveled to the heart, making the heart work too hard. Withdrawing blood was understood to reduce the amount of drugs in the body which in turn reduced the effects of drugs on the blood and the heart. Conclusion The explanatory model of overdose employed by ethnic Vietnamese IDUs privileges traditional beliefs about the circulatory, rather than the respiratory, system. This paper explores participants' beliefs about blood, the effects of drugs on blood and the causes of heroin overdose in order to document the explanatory model of overdose used by ethnic Vietnamese IDUs. Implications for overdose prevention, treatment and management are identified and

  3. Data Management for Flexible Access - Implementation and Lessons Learned from work with Multiple User Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, K. K.; Scott, S.; Hudspeth, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    There is no shortage of community-specific and generic data discovery and download platforms and protocols (e.g. CUAHSI HIS, DataONE, GeoNetwork Open Source, GeoPortal, OGC CSW, OAI PMH), documentation standards (e.g. FGDC, ISO 19115, EML, Dublin Core), data access and visualization standards and models (e.g. OGC WxS, OpenDAP), and general-purpose web service models (i.e. REST & SOAP) upon which Geo-informatics cyberinfrastructure (CI) may be built. When attempting to develop a robust platform that may service a wide variety of users and use cases the challenge is one of identifying which existing platform (if any) may support those current needs while also allowing for future expansion for additional capabilities. In the case of the implementation of a data storage, discovery and delivery platform to support the multiple projects at the Earth Data Analysis Center at UNM, no single platform or protocol met the joint requirements of two initial applications (the New Mexico Resource Geographic Information System [http://rgis.unm.edu] and the New Mexico EPSCoR Data Portal [http://nmepscor.org/dataportal]) and furthermore none met anticipated additional requirements as new applications of the platform emerged. As a result of this assessment three years ago EDAC embarked on the development of the Geographic Storage, Transformation, and Retrieval Engine (GSToRE) platform as a general purpose platform upon which n-tiered geospatially enabled data intensive applications could be built. When initially released in 2010 the focus was on the publication of dynamically generated Open Geospatial Consortium services based upon a PostgreSQL/PostGIS backend database. The identification of additional service interface requirements (implementation of the DataONE API and CUAHSI WaterML services), use cases provided by the NM EPSCoR education working group, and expanded metadata publication needs have led to a significant update to the underlying data management tier for GSToRE - the

  4. Patterns of User Engagement With the Mobile App, Manage My Pain: Results of a Data Mining Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Quazi Abidur; Janmohamed, Tahir; Pirbaglou, Meysam; Ritvo, Paul; Heffernan, Jane M; Clarke, Hance; Katz, Joel

    2017-07-12

    Pain is one of the most prevalent health-related concerns and is among the top 3 most common reasons for seeking medical help. Scientific publications of data collected from pain tracking and monitoring apps are important to help consumers and healthcare professionals select the right app for their use. The main objectives of this paper were to (1) discover user engagement patterns of the pain management app, Manage My Pain, using data mining methods; and (2) identify the association between several attributes characterizing individual users and their levels of engagement. User engagement was defined by 2 key features of the app: longevity (number of days between the first and last pain record) and number of records. Users were divided into 5 user engagement clusters employing the k-means clustering algorithm. Each cluster was characterized by 6 attributes: gender, age, number of pain conditions, number of medications, pain severity, and opioid use. Z tests and chi-square tests were used for analyzing categorical attributes. Effects of gender and cluster on numerical attributes were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variances (ANOVAs) followed up by pairwise comparisons using Tukey honest significant difference (HSD). The clustering process produced 5 clusters representing different levels of user engagement. The proportion of males and females was significantly different in 4 of the 5 clusters (all P ≤.03). The proportion of males was higher than females in users with relatively high longevity. Mean ages of users in 2 clusters with high longevity were higher than users from other 3 clusters (all P <.001). Overall, males were significantly older than females (P <.001). Across clusters, females reported more pain conditions than males (all P <.001). Users from highly engaged clusters reported taking more medication than less engaged users (all P <.001). Females reported taking a greater number of medications than males (P =.04). In 4 of 5 clusters, the percentage

  5. User experience analysis of e-TB Manager, a nationwide electronic tuberculosis recording and reporting system in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Niranjan; Sawyer, Kelly; Nizova, Nataliya

    2017-04-01

    Ukraine has successfully implemented e-TB Manager nationwide as its mandatory national tuberculosis registry after first introducing it in 2009. Our objective was to perform an end-of-programme evaluation after formal handover of the registry administration to Ukraine's Centre for Disease Control in 2015. We conducted a nationwide, cross-sectional, anonymous, 18-point user experience survey, and stratified the registry's transaction statistics to demonstrate usability. Contrary to initial implementation experience, older users (aged >50 years), often with limited or no computer proficiency prior to using the registry, had significantly better user experience scores for at least six of the 12 measures compared to younger users (aged 18-29 years). Using the registry for >3 years was associated with significantly higher scores for having capacity, adequacy of training received and satisfaction with the registry. Of the 5.9 million transactions over a 4-year period, nine out of 24 oblasts (regions) and Kiev city accounted for 62.5% of all transactions, and corresponded to 59% of Ukraine's tuberculosis burden. There were 437 unique active users in 486 rayons (districts) of Ukraine, demonstrating extensive reach. Our key findings complement the World Health Organization and European Respiratory Society's agenda for action on digital health to help implement the End TB Strategy.

  6. A comparative analysis of user preference-based and existing knowledge management systems attributes in the aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Nishad G.

    Knowledge management (KM) exists in various forms throughout organizations. Process documentation, training courses, and experience sharing are examples of KM activities performed daily. The goal of KM systems (KMS) is to provide a tool set which serves to standardize the creation, sharing, and acquisition of business critical information. Existing literature provides numerous examples of targeted evaluations of KMS, focusing on specific system attributes. This research serves to bridge the targeted evaluations with an industry-specific, holistic approach. The user preferences of aerospace employees in engineering and engineering-related fields were compared to profiles of existing aerospace KMS based on three attribute categories: technical features, system administration, and user experience. The results indicated there is a statistically significant difference between aerospace user preferences and existing profiles in the user experience attribute category, but no statistically significant difference in the technical features and system administration attribute categories. Additional analysis indicated in-house developed systems exhibit higher technical features and user experience ratings than commercial-off-the-self (COTS) systems.

  7. User experience analysis of e-TB Manager, a nationwide electronic tuberculosis recording and reporting system in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Konduri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ukraine has successfully implemented e-TB Manager nationwide as its mandatory national tuberculosis registry after first introducing it in 2009. Our objective was to perform an end-of-programme evaluation after formal handover of the registry administration to Ukraine's Centre for Disease Control in 2015. We conducted a nationwide, cross-sectional, anonymous, 18-point user experience survey, and stratified the registry's transaction statistics to demonstrate usability. Contrary to initial implementation experience, older users (aged >50 years, often with limited or no computer proficiency prior to using the registry, had significantly better user experience scores for at least six of the 12 measures compared to younger users (aged 18–29 years. Using the registry for >3 years was associated with significantly higher scores for having capacity, adequacy of training received and satisfaction with the registry. Of the 5.9 million transactions over a 4-year period, nine out of 24 oblasts (regions and Kiev city accounted for 62.5% of all transactions, and corresponded to 59% of Ukraine's tuberculosis burden. There were 437 unique active users in 486 rayons (districts of Ukraine, demonstrating extensive reach. Our key findings complement the World Health Organization and European Respiratory Society's agenda for action on digital health to help implement the End TB Strategy.

  8. No place like home? Explaining venue selection of regional offices in Brussels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyers, J.; Donas, T. Fraussen B.

    2015-01-01

    While subnational authorities strongly mobilize in Brussels, they do not lobby all EU-level venues to the same extent. This article explains the varying intensity with which regional offices interact with various EU-level policy-making venues when seeking to influence EU policies. Theoretically, we

  9. Mort User's Manual: For use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  10. Technology User Groups and Early Childhood Education: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parette, Howard P.; Hourcade, Jack J.; Blum, Craig; Watts, Emily H.; Stoner, Julia B.; Wojcik, Brian W.; Chrismore, Shannon B.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a preliminary examination of the potential of Technology User Groups as a professional development venue for early childhood education professionals in developing operational and functional competence in using hardware and software components of a Technology toolkit. Technology user groups are composed of varying numbers of…

  11. NASIS data base management system: IBM 360 TSS implementation. Volume 8: Data base administrator user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Data Base Administrator User's Guide for the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) multi-terminal tasking, (2) data base executive, (3) utilities, (4) maintenance, (5) terminal support, and (6) retrieval subsystem.

  12. Factors to Improve the Management of Hepatitis C in Drug Users: An Observational Study in an Addiction Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Moussalli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to management of HCV in injection drug users are related to patients, health providers, and facilities. In a primary care drug user's addiction centre we studied access to HCV standard of care before and after using an onsite total care concept provided by a multidisciplinary team and noninvasive liver fibrosis evaluation. A total of 586 patients were seen between 2002 and 2004. The majority, 417 patients, were HCV positive and of these patients 337 were tested positive for HCV RNA. In 2002, patients were sent to the hospital. with the Starting of 2003, patients were offered standard of care HCV management in the center by a team of general practitioners, a consultant hepatologist, psychiatrists, nurses, and a health counsellor. Liver fibrosis was assessed by a non invasive method. In 2002, 6 patients had liver fibrosis assessment at hospital facilities, 4 patients were assessed with liver biopsy and 2 patients with Fibrotest-Actitest. 2 patients were treated for HCV at hospital. In 2003 and 2004, 224 patients were assessed with Fibrotest-Actitest on site. Of these, 85 were treated for HCV. SVR was achieved in 43%. We conclude that the combination of an onsite multidisciplinary team with the use of a noninvasive assessment method led to improved management of HCV infection in drug users' primary care facility.

  13. [Second-hand smoke exposure in hospitality venues in Barcelona: measurement of respirable particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Nazmy; López, María José; Sánchez-Martínez, Francesca; Fernández, Esteve; Nebot, Manel

    2011-01-01

    To quantify the concentration of respirable particles equal to or smaller than 2.5μm (PM(2.5)) as a marker of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure in a sample of hospitality venues in Barcelona 2 years after the Spanish smoking law came into effect. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study from October to December 2007. The study population consisted of 40 hospitality venues in Barcelona selected by a random route sampling, with representation of the different types of smoking regulation included in the law (smoking allowed, smoking ban and venues with smoking areas). SHS levels were quantified by measuring PM(2.5) concentrations, which were measured using a laser photometer (Side Pack AM 510 Personal Aerosol Monitor). The measurements were carried out for 5 minutes outside the venue and for 30 minutes inside the venue. In addition, observational variables related to the characteristics of the venue and signs of tobacco consumption were recorded. The concentration of PM(2.5) in venues where smoking was still allowed was five times higher than that in venues where smoking was banned (182μg/m(3) and 34μg/m(3), respectively) and exceeded the concentration established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as harmful (35μg/m(3)). However, in venues where smoking was banned, the concentration was lower than the EPA standard and there were no significant differences with the outdoor PM(2.5) concentration. Two years after the introduction of the Spanish smoking law, SHS exposure in venues where smoking was allowed was q still very high, representing a significant health risk for hospitality workers. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing a personalised self-management system for post stroke rehabilitation; utilising a user-centred design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Susan; Nasr, Nasrin; Parker, Jack; Zheng, Huiru; Davies, Richard; Mountain, Gail

    2014-11-01

    To develop and evaluate an information and communication technology (ICT) solution for a post-stroke Personalised Self-Managed Rehabilitation System (PSMrS). The PSMrS translates current models of stroke rehabilitation and theories underpinning self-management and self-efficacy into an ICT-based system for home-based post-stroke rehabilitation. The interdisciplinary research team applied a hybrid of health and social sciences research methods and user-centred design methods. This included a series of home visits, focus groups, in-depth interviews, cultural probes and technology biographies. The iterative development of both the content of the PSMrS and the interactive interfaces between the system and the user incorporates current models of post-stroke rehabilitation and addresses the factors that promote self-managed behaviour and self-efficacy such as mastery, verbal persuasion and physiological feedback. The methodological approach has ensured that the interactive technology has been driven by the needs of the stroke survivors and their carers in the context of their journey to both recovery and adaptation. Underpinned by theories of motor relearning, neuroplasticity, self-management and behaviour change, the PSMrS developed in this study has resulted in a personalised system for self-managed rehabilitation, which has the potential to change motor behaviour and promote the achievement of life goals for stroke survivors.

  15. Efficacy of the Smartphone-Based Glucose Management Application Stratified by User Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Sung Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe aimed to assess the efficacy of the smartphone-based health application for glucose control and patient satisfaction with the mobile network system used for glucose self-monitoring.MethodsThirty-five patients were provided with a smartphone device, and self-measured blood glucose data were automatically transferred to the medical staff through the smartphone application over the course of 12 weeks. The smartphone user group was divided into two subgroups (more satisfied group vs. less satisfied group based on the results of questionnaire surveys regarding satisfaction, comfort, convenience, and functionality, as well as their willingness to use the smartphone application in the future. The control group was set up via a review of electronic medical records by group matching in terms of age, sex, doctor in charge, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c.ResultsBoth the smartphone group and the control group showed a tendency towards a decrease in the HbA1c level after 3 months (7.7%±0.7% to 7.5%±0.7%, P=0.077. In the more satisfied group (n=27, the HbA1c level decreased from 7.7%±0.8% to 7.3%±0.6% (P=0.001, whereas in the less satisfied group (n=8, the HbA1c result increased from 7.7%±0.4% to 8.1%±0.5% (P=0.062, showing values much worse than that of the no-smartphone control group (from 7.7%±0.5% to 7.7%±0.7%, P=0.093.ConclusionIn addition to medical feedback, device and network-related patient satisfaction play a crucial role in blood glucose management. Therefore, for the smartphone app-based blood glucose monitoring to be effective, it is essential to provide the patient with a well-functioning high quality tool capable of increasing patient satisfaction and willingness to use.

  16. Drinking Games as a Venue for Sexual Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana S. E. Hone

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on sexual selection theory, we hypothesized that sex differences in mating effort and social competitiveness—and subsequent sex differences in sexual and competitive motivations for participating in drinking games—are responsible for the well-documented sex differences in college students' drinking game behaviors. Participants in a cross-sectional study were 351 women and 336 men aged 17 to 26. In a mediation model, we tested sex differences in mating effort, social competitiveness, sexual and competitive motivations for participating in drinking games, drinking game behaviors, and alcohol-related problems. Men participated in drinking games more frequently, consumed more alcohol while participating in drinking games, and experienced more problems associated with drinking. These sex differences appeared to be partially mediated by mating effort, social competitiveness, and sexual and competitive motivations for participating in drinking games. Drinking games are a major venue in which college students engage in heavy episodic drinking, which is a risk factor for college students' behavioral and health problems. Thus, the functional perspective we used to analyze them here may help to inform public health and university interventions and enable better identification of at-risk students.

  17. Bridge Management Strategy Based on Extreme User Costs for Bridge Network Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislaus Lwambuka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical approach for prioritization of bridge maintenance within a given bridge network. The maintenance prioritization is formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem where the simultaneous satisfaction of several conflicting objectives includes minimization of maintenance costs, maximization of bridge deck condition, and minimization of traffic disruption and associated user costs. The prevalence of user cost during maintenance period is twofold; the first case refers to the period of dry season where normally the traffic flow is diverted to alternative routes usually resurfaced to regain traffic access. The second prevalence refers to the absence of alternative routes which is often the case in the least developed countries; in this case the user cost referred to results from the waiting time while the traffic flow is put on hold awaiting accomplishment of the maintenance activity. This paper deals with the second scenario of traffic closure in the absence of alternative diversion routes which in essence results in extreme user cost. The paper shows that the multiobjective optimization approach remains valid for extreme cases of user costs in the absence of detour roads as often is the scenario in countries with extreme poor road infrastructure.

  18. Accessibility of Catering Service Venues and Adolescent Drinking in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the association between accessibility of catering service venues and adolescents’ alcohol use over the previous 30 days. The data were collected from cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2014, 2223 students at 27 high schools in Chaoyang and Xicheng districts, Beijing using self-administered questionnaires to collect the adolescents information on socio-demographic characteristics and recent alcohol experiences. The accessibility of, and proximity to, catering service venues were summarized by weights, which were calculated by multiplication of the type-weight and the distance-weight. All sampled schools were categorized into three subgroups (low, middle, and high geographic density based on the tertile of nearby catering service venues, and a multi-level logistic regression analysis was performed to explore variance between the school levels. Considering the setting characteristics, the catering service venues weighted value was found to account for 8.6% of the school level variance of adolescent alcohol use. The odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI of drinking over the past 30-days among adolescents with medium and high accessibility of catering service venues were 1.17 (0.86, 1.57 and 1.47 (1.06, 2.02, respectively (p < 0.001 for trend test. This study addressed a gap in the adolescent drinking influence by the catering service venues around schools in China. Results suggest that the greater accessibility of catering service venues around schools is associated with a growing risk of recent drinking.

  19. Drug driving and the management of risk: the perspectives and practices of a sample of problem drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, James; O'Brien, Tommy; McKeganey, Neil

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study of the attitudes and risk management strategies of a sample of problem drug users in relation to driving while under the influence of drugs. Interviews were conducted with 26 individuals (21 men and 5 women) all of whom had been addicted to heroin and had admitted to driving while under the influence of illegal drugs. The drug users reported four main strategies for managing the risks associated with drug driving: attempting to limit their drug intake to their tolerance level; delaying driving after taking a drug until they felt safe; stopping driving if they felt unsafe while behind the wheel; and avoiding driving altogether under the influence of certain drugs. However, the interviewees' accounts of their drug driving behaviour suggest that these strategies are not only far from reliable, they may also act to encourage drug driving by creating a false sense of security. The reassurance they provide may also undermine any educational messages targeting drug driving. There was little in the problem users' accounts to suggest that media campaigns or a more effective method of detection would have much influence upon their behaviour. The paper concludes that the most realistic approach to the problem may be to incorporate drug driving interventions within drug treatment programmes.

  20. Toward zero waste: composting and recycling for sustainable venue based events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottle, Troy A; Bilec, Melissa M; Brown, Nicholas R; Landis, Amy E

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated seven different waste management strategies for venue-based events and characterized the impacts of event waste management via waste audits and the Waste Reduction Model (WARM). The seven waste management scenarios included traditional waste handling methods (e.g. recycle and landfill) and management of the waste stream via composting, including purchasing where only compostable food service items were used during the events. Waste audits were conducted at four Arizona State University (ASU) baseball games, including a three game series. The findings demonstrate a tradeoff among CO2 equivalent emissions, energy use, and landfill diversion rates. Of the seven waste management scenarios assessed, the recycling scenarios provide the greatest reductions in CO2 eq. emissions and energy use because of the retention of high value materials but are compounded by the difficulty in managing a two or three bin collection system. The compost only scenario achieves complete landfill diversion but does not perform as well with respect to CO2 eq. emissions or energy. The three game series was used to test the impact of staffed bins on contamination rates; the first game served as a baseline, the second game employed staffed bins, and the third game had non staffed bins to determine the effect of staffing on contamination rates. Contamination rates in both the recycling and compost bins were tracked throughout the series. Contamination rates were reduced from 34% in the first game to 11% on the second night (with the staffed bins) and 23% contamination rates at the third game. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of Factors for Incorporating User Preferences in Air Traffic Management: A system Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kapil S.; Gutierrez-Nolasco, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of factors that impact user flight schedules during air traffic congestion. In pre-departure flight planning, users file one route per flight, which often leads to increased delays, inefficient airspace utilization, and exclusion of user flight preferences. In this paper, first the idea of filing alternate routes and providing priorities on each of those routes is introduced. Then, the impact of varying planning interval and system imposed departure delay increment is discussed. The metrics of total delay and equity are used for analyzing the impact of these factors on increased traffic and on different users. The results are shown for four cases, with and without the optional routes and priority assignments. Results demonstrate that adding priorities to optional routes further improves system performance compared to filing one route per flight and using first-come first-served scheme. It was also observed that a two-hour planning interval with a five-minute system imposed departure delay increment results in highest delay reduction. The trend holds for a scenario with increased traffic.

  2. Implementation of a Workflow Management System for Non-Expert Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Bart

    2016-01-01

    In the Danish CLARIN-DK infrastructure, chaining language technology (LT) tools into a workflow is easy even for a non-expert user, because she only needs to specify the input and the desired output of the workflow. With this information and the registered input and output profiles of the available...

  3. Are Password Management Applications Viable? An Analysis of User Training and Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Passwords have the distinction of being the most widely-used form of authentication--and the most vulnerable. With the dramatic increase today in the number of accounts that require passwords, overwhelmed users usually resort to creating weak passwords or reusing the same password for multiple accounts, thus making passwords the weakest link in…

  4. Managing a User’s Vulnerability on a Social Networking Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    aid not only the cyberbullying of teenagers but also the cyberstalking and cyberharassment of adults3. On a social networking site, an individual user...news/2011-07-23-facebook-stalker- sentenced_n.htm 3en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Cyberbullying 1 posts and subsequent interactions. The owner of the site

  5. The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness: Examining changes in use, users, and management challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Dvorak; Alan E. Watson; Neal Christensen; William T. Borrie; Ann Schwaller

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine trends in use and user characteristics at the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Based on data from 1969, 1991, and 2007, the average age of visitors has increased significantly, education levels have increased, and visitors remain predominantly male. Visitors in 2007 report seeing twice as many groups since 1961 and 1991...

  6. Managing the uncontrollable: Empirical studies of user-generated content online

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Addressing "uncontrollability' of online buzz, this thesis examines unstructured user-generated content in response to corporate social responsibility communications in the blogosphere and explores the content of company-administered co-creation communities. Analyzing text-based content online, the

  7. Characterization and communicative analysis of wildlife managers and recreational users of Virginiaâ s Wildlife Management Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Carrozzino-Lyon, Amy L

    2012-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) manages wildlife management areas (WMAs) to provide wildlife habitat and hunting and fishing opportunities, along with opportunities for compatible wildlife-related recreation. Despite having responsibility for managing 39 WMAs, comprising more than 200,000 acres, VDGIF had only anecdotal information about who recreated on Virginiaâ s WMAs, to what extent, and how they felt about management of the WMAs. My goals were to (1) deter...

  8. Quick Link Selection Method by Using Pricing Strategy Based on User Equilibrium for Implementing an Effective Urban Travel Demand Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Afandizadeh Zargari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-stage model of optimization as a quick method to choose the best potential links for implementing urban travel demand management (UTDM strategy like road pricing. The model is optimized by minimizing the hidden cost of congestion based on user equilibrium (MHCCUE. It forecasts the exact amount of flows and tolls for links in user equilibrium condition to determine the hidden cost for each link to optimize the link selection based on the network congestion priority. The results show that not only the amount of total cost is decreased, but also the number of selected links for pricing is reduced as compared with the previous toll minimization methods. Moreover, as this model just uses the traffic assignment data for calculation, it could be considered as a quick and optimum solution for choosing the potential links.

  9. Template for assessing climate change impacts and management options: TACCIMO user guide version 2.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrys Treasure; Steven McNulty; Jennifer Moore Myers; Lisa Nicole Jennings

    2014-01-01

    The Template for Assessing Climate Change Impacts and Management Options (TACCIMO) is a Web-based tool developed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture to assist Federal, State, and private land managers and planners with evaluation of climate change science implications for sustainable natural resource management. TACCIMO is a dynamic information...

  10. Duty of Care and Autonomy: How Support Workers Managed the Tension between Protecting Service Users from Risk and Promoting Their Independence in a Specialist Group Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, R.; Redley, M.; Holland, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the UK those paid to support adults with intellectual disabilities must manage two potentially conflicting duties that are set out in policy documents as being vital to their role: protecting service users (their duty of care) and recognising service users' autonomy. This study focuses specifically on the support of people with the…

  11. Food venue choice, consumer food environment, but not food venue availability within daily travel patterns are associated with dietary intake among adults, Lexington Kentucky 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Alison; Christian, Jay W; Lewis, Sarah; Moore, Kate; Jilcott, Stephanie

    2013-01-29

    The retail food environment may be one important determinant of dietary intake. However, limited research focuses on individuals' food shopping behavior and activity within the retail food environment. This study's aims were to determine the association between six various dietary indicators and 1) food venue availability; 2) food venue choice and frequency; and 3) availability of healthy food within food venue. In Fall, 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults (n=121) age 18 years and over in Lexington, Kentucky. Participants wore a global position system (GPS) data logger for 3-days (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day) to track their daily activity space, which was used to assess food activity space. They completed a survey to assess demographics, food shopping behaviors, and dietary outcomes. Food store audits were conducted using the Nutrition Environment Measurement Survey-Store Rudd (NEMS-S) in stores where respondents reported purchasing food (n=22). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between six dietary variables with food venue availability within activity space; food venue choice; frequency of shopping; and availability of food within food venue. 1) Food venue availability within activity space - no significant associations. 2) Food Venue Choice - Shopping at farmers' markets or specialty grocery stores reported higher odds of consuming fruits and vegetables (OR 1.60 95% CI [1.21, 2.79]). Frequency of shopping - Shopping at a farmers' markets and specialty stores at least once a week reported higher odds of consumption of fruits and vegetables (OR 1.55 95% CI [1.08, 2.23]). Yet, shopping frequently at a super market had higher odds of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (OR 1.39 95% CI [1.03, 1.86]). 3) Availability of food within store - those who shop in supermarkets with high availability of healthy food has lower odds of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (OR 0.65 95% CI [0.14, 0.83]). Interventions aimed at

  12. Food venue choice, consumer food environment, but not food venue availability within daily travel patterns are associated with dietary intake among adults, Lexington Kentucky 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafson Alison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The retail food environment may be one important determinant of dietary intake. However, limited research focuses on individuals’ food shopping behavior and activity within the retail food environment. This study’s aims were to determine the association between six various dietary indicators and 1 food venue availability; 2 food venue choice and frequency; and 3 availability of healthy food within food venue. Methods In Fall, 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults (n=121 age 18 years and over in Lexington, Kentucky. Participants wore a global position system (GPS data logger for 3-days (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day to track their daily activity space, which was used to assess food activity space. They completed a survey to assess demographics, food shopping behaviors, and dietary outcomes. Food store audits were conducted using the Nutrition Environment Measurement Survey-Store Rudd (NEMS-S in stores where respondents reported purchasing food (n=22. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between six dietary variables with food venue availability within activity space; food venue choice; frequency of shopping; and availability of food within food venue. Results 1 Food venue availability within activity space – no significant associations. 2 Food Venue Choice – Shopping at farmers’ markets or specialty grocery stores reported higher odds of consuming fruits and vegetables (OR 1.60 95% CI [1.21, 2.79]. Frequency of shopping - Shopping at a farmers’ markets and specialty stores at least once a week reported higher odds of consumption of fruits and vegetables (OR 1.55 95% CI [1.08, 2.23]. Yet, shopping frequently at a super market had higher odds of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (OR 1.39 95% CI [1.03, 1.86]. 3 Availability of food within store – those who shop in supermarkets with high availability of healthy food has lower odds of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages

  13. Food venue choice, consumer food environment, but not food venue availability within daily travel patterns are associated with dietary intake among adults, Lexington Kentucky 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective The retail food environment may be one important determinant of dietary intake. However, limited research focuses on individuals’ food shopping behavior and activity within the retail food environment. This study’s aims were to determine the association between six various dietary indicators and 1) food venue availability; 2) food venue choice and frequency; and 3) availability of healthy food within food venue. Methods In Fall, 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults (n=121) age 18 years and over in Lexington, Kentucky. Participants wore a global position system (GPS) data logger for 3-days (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day) to track their daily activity space, which was used to assess food activity space. They completed a survey to assess demographics, food shopping behaviors, and dietary outcomes. Food store audits were conducted using the Nutrition Environment Measurement Survey-Store Rudd (NEMS-S) in stores where respondents reported purchasing food (n=22). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between six dietary variables with food venue availability within activity space; food venue choice; frequency of shopping; and availability of food within food venue. Results 1) Food venue availability within activity space – no significant associations. 2) Food Venue Choice – Shopping at farmers’ markets or specialty grocery stores reported higher odds of consuming fruits and vegetables (OR 1.60 95% CI [1.21, 2.79]). Frequency of shopping - Shopping at a farmers’ markets and specialty stores at least once a week reported higher odds of consumption of fruits and vegetables (OR 1.55 95% CI [1.08, 2.23]). Yet, shopping frequently at a super market had higher odds of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (OR 1.39 95% CI [1.03, 1.86]). 3) Availability of food within store – those who shop in supermarkets with high availability of healthy food has lower odds of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (OR 0.65 95

  14. Formulation of consumables management models. Volume 2: Mission planning processor user guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J. K.; Torian, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    A user guide for the MPP (Mission Planning Processor) is presented. The MPP is used in the evaluation of particular missions, with appropriate display and storage of related consumables data. Design goals are accomplished by the use of an on-line/demand mode computer terminal Cathode Ray Tube Display. The process is such that the user merely adds specific mission/flight functions to a skeleton flight and/or alters the skeleton. The skeleton flight includes operational aspects from prelaunch through ground support equipment connect after rollout as required to place the STS (Space Transportation System) in a parking orbit, maintain the spacecraft and crew for the stated on-orbit period and return.

  15. User involvement and supporting tools in business-to-business service innovations: Insights from Facility Management services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    the research question. By following Miles and Huberman (1984)’s this study started with a literature review of studies investigating service innovation, service innovations models, user roles and tools in service innovation in general, to conduct an empirical investigation in facility management (FM) services...... and expectations with respect to such service innovation. In addition the study reveals that face-to-face tools are preferred to ICT-based tools in business-to-business FM service innovations. Research limitations/implications – As in all qualitative research, the main limitation of our study...

  16. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model. Version 2.0; User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a guide for using the model in analysis. Those interested in making enhancements or modification to the model should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Technical Description.

  17. Demographic Risk Factors for Alcohol-Related Aggression In and Around Licensed Venues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Curtis, Ashlee; Meurer, Hannah; Miller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ...) as independent predictors of alcohol-related aggression (ARA) in and around licensed venues. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between gender, area-level SES and individual SES...

  18. The motives of young people in Turkey in venue selection for political participation

    OpenAIRE

    Sakarya, Nihan

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the determinants of the venue selection for youth political participation. The research question of the study is “What are the motives of young people in Turkey in deciding their venue for political participation?” In addition, the sub questions aim to discover the young people’s stories of political involvement, their opinions about the institution they are involved in, their political activities in their organizations and through those institutions, their involvem...

  19. Remote discovery and management of end-user devices in heterogeneous private networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delphinanto, A.; Hillen, B.A.G.; Passchier, I.; Schoonhoven, B.H.A. van; Hartog, F.T.H. den

    2009-01-01

    End-to-end broadband service delivery requires remote management of devices in the home network, beyond the home gateway (HG). The service provider can only put limited requirements to these of-the-shelf devices, and therefore has to make intelligent use of their given control and management

  20. User experience goals for interactive climate management systems in green houses

    OpenAIRE

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Barlow, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings from interpretative phenomenological interviews about the UX of interactive climate management with six growers and crop consultants. A model of UX of interactive climate management is presented. The findings are reported in a UX target table, which can be the basis for future research on UX at work in this domain.

  1. The Graduate Management Admission Test: Technical Report on Test Development and Score Interpretation for GMAT Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, William B.

    This report provides information on test development, test administration, and score interpretation for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). The GMAT, first administered in 1954, provides objective measures of an applicant's abilities for use in admissions decisions by graduate management schools. It is currently composed of five…

  2. Accessibility of Catering Service Venues and Adolescent Drinking in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shijun; Du, Songming; Ren, Zhoupeng; Zhao, Jing; Chambers, Christina; Wang, Jinfeng; Ma, Guansheng

    2015-06-26

    This study assessed the association between accessibility of catering service venues and adolescents' alcohol use over the previous 30 days. The data were collected from cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2014, 2223 students at 27 high schools in Chaoyang and Xicheng districts, Beijing using self-administered questionnaires to collect the adolescents information on socio-demographic characteristics and recent alcohol experiences. The accessibility of, and proximity to, catering service venues were summarized by weights, which were calculated by multiplication of the type-weight and the distance-weight. All sampled schools were categorized into three subgroups (low, middle, and high geographic density) based on the tertile of nearby catering service venues, and a multi-level logistic regression analysis was performed to explore variance between the school levels. Considering the setting characteristics, the catering service venues weighted value was found to account for 8.6% of the school level variance of adolescent alcohol use. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of drinking over the past 30-days among adolescents with medium and high accessibility of catering service venues were 1.17 (0.86, 1.57) and 1.47 (1.06, 2.02), respectively (p schools in China. Results suggest that the greater accessibility of catering service venues around schools is associated with a growing risk of recent drinking.

  3. A conceptual design for an integrated data base management system for remote sensing data. [user requirements and data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, P. A.; Lefler, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements of potential users were considered in the design of an integrated data base management system, developed to be independent of any specific computer or operating system, and to be used to support investigations in weather and climate. Ultimately, the system would expand to include data from the agriculture, hydrology, and related Earth resources disciplines. An overview of the system and its capabilities is presented. Aspects discussed cover the proposed interactive command language; the application program command language; storage and tabular data maintained by the regional data base management system; the handling of data files and the use of system standard formats; various control structures required to support the internal architecture of the system; and the actual system architecture with the various modules needed to implement the system. The concepts on which the relational data model is based; data integrity, consistency, and quality; and provisions for supporting concurrent access to data within the system are covered in the appendices.

  4. User embracement in practices care in psychosocial care centers the perspective of local managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Kelly Cardoso da Silva Soares

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychosocial care centres (CAPS, strategic IN articulation of psychosocial care network and health system gateway, propose to the reorganization of health practices, by adopting a new ethic of care, based on respect to the singularity of the subjects and in the reception to the health needs of the users. Reception is a device for transforming practices and humanizing health care.  Objective: To analyse the operation of the host users of CAPS from the perspective of local coordinators in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil.  Method: Qualitative research with case study design, performed with CAPS coordinators of the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observation, being submitted to the analysis of thematic content.  Results: The host constituted innovative device in mental health practices, as triggered the construction of new ways of dealing with the subject in psychological distress, by incorporating technologies such as qualified listening, building autonomy, with attention focused on the user. Provided a reorientation of work and service processes, requesting the articulation for network care. In addition, it was configured as a strategy for humanization in the CAPS. Was presented, however, operational difficulties related to the environment and to the effectiveness of the network of attention.  Final considerations: The host device configured for reorienting health practices, enhancing the consolidation of psychosocial care model, with humanization and increased solvability. However, challenges remain to be overcome, related to the environment and to the effectiveness of the network of care.

  5. Environmental epigenetics: A promising venue for developing next-generation pollution biomonitoring tools in marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2015-09-15

    Environmental epigenetics investigates the cause-effect relationships between specific environmental factors and the subsequent epigenetic modifications triggering adaptive responses in the cell. Given the dynamic and potentially reversible nature of the different types of epigenetic marks, environmental epigenetics constitutes a promising venue for developing fast and sensible biomonitoring programs. Indeed, several epigenetic biomarkers have been successfully developed and applied in traditional model organisms (e.g., human and mouse). Nevertheless, the lack of epigenetic knowledge in other ecologically and environmentally relevant organisms has hampered the application of these tools in a broader range of ecosystems, most notably in the marine environment. Fortunately, that scenario is now changing thanks to the growing availability of complete reference genome sequences along with the development of high-throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatic methods. Altogether, these resources make the epigenetic study of marine organisms (and more specifically marine invertebrates) a reality. By building on this knowledge, the present work provides a timely perspective highlighting the extraordinary potential of environmental epigenetic analyses as a promising source of rapid and sensible tools for pollution biomonitoring, using marine invertebrates as sentinel organisms. This strategy represents an innovative, groundbreaking approach, improving the conservation and management of natural resources in the oceans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Social participation in health: user community leaders, managers and policy makers in Colombia. A qualitative view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Gallego, María Eugenia; Vázquez Navarrete, María Luisa; Zapata Bermúdez, Yolanda; Hernán García, Mariano

    2005-01-01

    Health sector reforms taking place in Colombia during the Nineties included policies to promote social participation in the health system, which is considered essential to its functioning. The aim of this article is to analyse the meaning and the significance of participation in health for the different social actors involved in implementing policies in Colombia. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory study was carried out using focal groups (FG) and semi-structured individual interviews (I) of the different social actors: 210 users (FG), 40 community leaders (FG), 3 policy makers (E) and 36 healthcare professionals (E). A carried out analysis was content up of the contents. The study area corresponded to the municipalities of Tulua and Palmira in Colombia. The concept of participation was interpreted differently depending on the actor studied: for users and leaders the concept referred to contributing ideas, presence in social spaces, solidarity and frequently, and use of the health services. Healthcare professionals considered the activities carried out by institutions together with the community as social participation, the use of services and affiliation to the health system. Policy markers considered participation to concern evaluation and control of the health services by the community, to improve its quality. The different concepts of participation reveal dif ferences between the content of the policy and how it is understood and interpreted by the different social actors in their interaction with the health services. These different perspectives must be taken into account to develop a link between society and the health services.

  7. Users' Perception as a Tool to Improve Urban Beach Planning and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Omar; Espejel, Ileana; Arellano, Evarista; Delhumeau, Sheila

    2008-08-01

    Four beaches that share physiographic characteristics (sandy, wide, and long) but differ in socioeconomic and cultural terms (three are located in northwestern Mexico and one in California, USA) were evaluated by beach users. Surveys (565) composed of 36 questions were handed out to beach users on weekends and holidays in 2005. The 25 questions that revealed the most information were selected by factor analysis and classified by cluster analysis. Beach users’ preferences were assigned a value by comparing the present survey results with the characteristics of an “ideal” recreational urban beach. Cluster analysis separated three groups of questions: (a) services and infrastructure, (b) recreational activities, and (c) beach conditions. Cluster linkage distance ( r = 0.82, r = 0.78, r = 0.67) was used as a weight and multiplied by the value of beach descriptive factors. Mazatlán and Oceanside obtained the highest values because there are enough infrastructure and services; on the contrary, Ensenada and Rosarito were rated medium and low because infrastructure and services are lacking. The presently proposed method can contribute to improving current beach evaluations because the final score represents the beach users’ evaluation of the quality of the beach. The weight considered in the present study marks the beach users’ preferences among the studied beaches. Adding this weight to beach evaluation will contribute to more specific beach planning in which users’ perception is considered.

  8. Topological Interference Management for K-User Downlink Massive MIMO Relay Network Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaprabhu, Poongundran; Chinnadurai, Sunil; Li, Jun; Lee, Moon Ho

    2017-08-17

    In this paper, we study the emergence of topological interference alignment and the characterizing features of a multi-user broadcast interference relay channel. We propose an alternative transmission strategy named the relay space-time interference alignment (R-STIA) technique, in which a K -user multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) interference channel has massive antennas at the transmitter and relay. Severe interference from unknown transmitters affects the downlink relay network channel and degrades the system performance. An additional (unintended) receiver is introduced in the proposed R-STIA technique to overcome the above problem, since it has the ability to decode the desired signals for the intended receiver by considering cooperation between the receivers. The additional receiver also helps in recovering and reconstructing the interference signals with limited channel state information at the relay (CSIR). The Alamouti space-time transmission technique and minimum mean square error (MMSE) linear precoder are also used in the proposed scheme to detect the presence of interference signals. Numerical results show that the proposed R-STIA technique achieves a better performance in terms of the bit error rate (BER) and sum-rate compared to the existing broadcast channel schemes.

  9. Towards risk-based drought management in the Netherlands: making water supply levels transparent to water users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat Judith, Ter; Marjolein, Mens; Vuren Saskia, Van; der Vat Marnix, Van

    2016-04-01

    To prepare the Dutch Delta for future droughts and water scarcity, a nation-wide 4-year project, called Delta Programme, assessed the impact of climate change and socio-economic development, and explored strategies to deal with these impacts. The Programme initiated a joint approach to water supply management with stakeholders and developed a national adaptation plan that is able to adapt to future uncertain conditions. The adaptation plan consists of a set of preferred policy pathways - sequences of possible actions and measures through time - to achieve targets while responding in a flexible manner to uncertain developments over time, allowing room to respond to new opportunities and insights. With regard to fresh water allocation, the Delta Programme stated that supplying water of sufficient quality is a shared responsibility that requires cohesive efforts among users in the main and regional water system. The national and local authorities and water users involved agreed that the water availability and, where relevant, the water quality should be as transparent and predictable as possible under normal, dry and extremely dry conditions. They therefore introduced the concept of "water supply service levels", which should describe water availability and quality that can be delivered with a certain return period, for all regions and all relevant water users in the Netherlands. The service levels form an addition to the present policy and should be decided on by 2021. At present water allocation during periods of (expected) water shortage occurs according to a prearranged ranking system (a water hierarchy scheme based on a list of priorities), if water availability drops below a critical low level. The aim is to have supply levels available that are based on the probability of occurrence and economic impact of water shortage, and that are transparent for all water users in the regional water systems and the main water system. As part of the European project

  10. Service user involvement in risk assessment and management: the Transition Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Daryl G

    2012-04-01

    Drawing on self-prediction theory and the positive benefits of increasing health service user participation in risk assessments, the Transition Inventory (TI) was developed. It is an aid to the assessment of areas that people anticipate will be of difficulty in the next stage of transition, for example from open hospital to the community. The aim of this paper is to determine reliability and convergent/discriminant validity data for the TI and its subscales, including behavioral impulsivity, social pressure, substance misuse, financial/employment, leisure, negative affect, interpersonal and family concerns and social alienation. Eighty-eight male offenders coming towards the end of a period of imprisonment were asked to complete the TI. Their results were compared with the staff-rated Measures of Criminal Attitudes and Associates (MCAA) scale, alcohol blame and causation of crime items. Comparisons with the MCAA's antisocial intent scale, which is a future-orientated scale, and the associates scale allowed for convergent/discriminant validity to be examined with TI scales. With a community offender sample, TI results were used to predict researcher ratings. The TI scales demonstrated adequate internal consistency. Overall, the MCAA's antisocial intent scale had higher correlations with the TI than with a nonfuture-orientated scale. TI scales also demonstrated convergent validity with other measures and preliminary predictive validity with researcher ratings. The TI provides a way to increase service user involvement in the assessments that determine when and how they transfer to settings where they will have more independence. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. User Acceptance of Mobile Knowledge Management Learning System: Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Thanks to advanced developments in wireless technology, learners can now utilize digital learning websites at anytime and anywhere. Mobile learning captures more and more attention in the wave of digital learning. Evolving use of knowledge management plays an important role to enhance problem solving skills. Recently, innovative approaches for…

  12. Application of user statistics and additional data for collection management of Wageningen UR digital library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veller, van M.G.P.; Spikman, G.

    2010-01-01

    Good collection management is necessary to guarantee the quality, quantity and costs of the online journal collection of Wageningen University and Research Centre (Wageningen UR) Digital Library. Via quantitative research on both subscription prices and usage statistics (i.e. download data from

  13. Pluralities of place: A user's guide to place concepts, theories, and philosophies in natural resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2008-01-01

    Place ideas are capturing increasing attention in recreation and natural resource management. But there are important and sometimes incompatible differences among the various concepts. In this paper I describe some of the reasons for the growing interest in place concepts and distinguish between four basic approaches: attitude, meaning, ethical, and political. My aim...

  14. Are People Responsive to a More Sustainable, Decentralized, and User-Driven Management of Urban Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Chelleri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart, green, and resilient city paradigms have been mainly promoted through top-down and technocratic approaches. However, based on the notion to return to “the right to the city”, emerging community-driven initiatives are providing self-managed infrastructures contributing to urban sustainability transitions. This paper explores the relevance of the behavioral aspects of people-centered approaches in dealing with two different facets of urban metabolism: physical infrastructure (involvement with the management of decentralized infrastructures and consumption patterns (involvement in proactive reduction of resources used. In the first case we assessed community perceptions about the roles, benefits, and willingness to proactively engage in the management of decentralized green infrastructures in Bogotá City, Colombia. For the second facet, we measured the effectiveness of change agents in re-shaping energy consumption decisions within urban social networks in South Africa and Saudi Arabia. This paper’s results show that pre-determined and standardized strategies do not guarantee positive, nor homogeneous, results in terms of meeting sustainability targets, or promoting community involvement. Hence, a better integration of people-centered and top-down approaches is needed through context-dependent policies, for enhancing both users’ appreciation of and commitment to urban metabolism participative management.

  15. The management of user fees and other fundraising initiatives in self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mestry, Raj

    2016-05-06

    May 6, 2016 ... governing bodies (SGBs), responsible for financial and physical resource management of schools, to supplement state funding. In order ..... Sports fields and apparatus could be a source of income after school hours or during the weekends if rented to external sports clubs and societies. Other possibilities ...

  16. Management, Leadership, and User Control in Self-Advocacy: An English Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive…

  17. Managing the safe mobility of older road users: How to cope with their diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Marin-Lamellet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Against the background of an ageing population, the management of older people's safe mobility is becoming an increasingly important issue. Mobility is vital for older people's quality of life and several examples of good practice that support older people's safe mobility already exist. However, ...

  18. Investigating and Comparing User Experiences of Course Management Systems: Blackboard vs. Moodle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Zafer; Unal, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to report the results of a comparative usability study conducted in 2008-2009 on two different course management systems (CMS), BlackBoard and Moodle. 135 students enrolled in the fall 2008 and spring 2009 section of Introduction to Educational Technology participated in the study (72 and 63 respectively). At the…

  19. Appropriate designs and appropriating irrigation systems : irrigation infrastructure development and users' management capability in Bolivia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez Pérez, Z.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this book are to explore and demonstrate the 'divorce' that is taking place in how critical actors think about irrigation infrastructure design and management, and in how designers often impose their own narrow preferences in infrastructure composition and performance without

  20. Visitor's knowledge of federal wilderness: implications for wilderness user research and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen S. Hockett; Troy E. Hall

    2000-01-01

    Earlier research using interviews of backcountry hikers in Shenandoah National Park raised concerns that visitors may not know much about federal wilderness. This lack of knowledge has implications for research on wilderness experience and for support for wilderness management policies. In this study, self-assessed knowledge of wilderness, researcher-assessed knowledge...

  1. Migrating from user fees to social health insurance: exploring the prospects and challenges for hospital management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atinga Roger A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 Ghana introduced a social health insurance scheme which resulted in the separation of purchasing of health services by the health insurance authority on the one hand and the provision of health services by hospitals at the other side of the spectrum. This separation has a lot of implications for managing accredited hospitals. This paper examines whether decoupling purchasing and service provision translate into opportunities or challenges in the management of accredited hospitals. Methods A qualitative exploratory study of 15 accredited district hospitals were selected from five of Ghana’s ten administrative regions for the study. A semi-structured interview guide was designed to solicit information from key informants, Health Service Administrators, Pharmacists, Accountants and Scheme Managers of the hospitals studied. Data was analysed thematically. Results The results showed that under the health insurance scheme, hospitals are better-off in terms of cash flow and adequate stock levels of drugs. Adequate stock of non-drugs under the scheme was reportedly intermittent. The major challenges confronting the hospitals were identified as weak purchasing power due to low tariffs, non computerisation of claims processing, unpredictable payment pattern, poor gate-keeping systems, lack of logistics and other new and emerging challenges relating to moral hazards and the use of false identity cards under pretence for medical care. Conclusion Study’s findings have a lot of policy implications for proper management of hospitals. The findings suggest rationalisation of the current tariff structure, the application of contract based payment system to inject efficiency into hospitals management and piloting facility based vetting systems to offset vetting loads of the insurance authority. Proper gate-keeping mechanisms are also needed to curtail the phenomenon of moral hazard and false documentation.

  2. Targeting Parents for Childhood Weight Management: Development of a Theory-Driven and User-Centered Healthy Eating App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sudakshina; Brown, Katherine Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The proliferation of health promotion apps along with mobile phones' array of features supporting health behavior change offers a new and innovative approach to childhood weight management. However, despite the critical role parents play in children’s weight related behaviors, few industry-led apps aimed at childhood weight management target parents. Furthermore, industry-led apps have been shown to lack a basis in behavior change theory and evidence. Equally important remains the issue of how to maximize users’ engagement with mobile health (mHealth) interventions where there is growing consensus that inputs from the commercial app industry and the target population should be an integral part of the development process. Objective The aim of this study is to systematically design and develop a theory and evidence-driven, user-centered healthy eating app targeting parents for childhood weight management, and clearly document this for the research and app development community. Methods The Behavior Change Wheel (BCW) framework, a theoretically-based approach for intervention development, along with a user-centered design (UCD) philosophy and collaboration with the commercial app industry, guided the development process. Current evidence, along with a series of 9 focus groups (total of 46 participants) comprised of family weight management case workers, parents with overweight and healthy weight children aged 5-11 years, and consultation with experts, provided data to inform the app development. Thematic analysis of focus groups helped to extract information related to relevant theoretical, user-centered, and technological components to underpin the design and development of the app. Results Inputs from parents and experts working in the area of childhood weight management helped to identify the main target behavior: to help parents provide appropriate food portion sizes for their children. To achieve this target behavior, the behavioral diagnosis

  3. What do service users with bipolar disorder want from a web-based self-management intervention? A qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nicholas J; Jones, Steven H; Lobban, Fiona A

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and recurrent severe mental health problem. A web-based self-management intervention provides the opportunity to widen access to psychological interventions. This qualitative study aims to identify what an ideal web-based intervention would look like for service users with BD. Twelve service users with BD were recruited in the UK and took part in a series of focus groups to inform and refine the development of a web-based self-management intervention. Reported here is a subset analysis of data gathered with the primary aim of identifying the needs and desires of service users for such an intervention for BD. We analysed service users' responses to questions about content, outcomes, format, barriers and support. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was employed. The data were ordered into four key themes: (1) gaining an awareness of and managing mood swings; (2) not just about managing mood swings: the importance of practical and interpersonal issues; (3) managing living within mood swings without losing the experience; (4) internet is the only format: freely accessible, instant and interactive; (5) professional and peer support to overcome low motivation and procrastination difficulties. The small group of participants are not representative of those living with BD. These findings have significantly enhanced our understanding of what service users with BD want from a web-based self-management intervention and have clear implications for the future development of such approaches. Service users desire a web-based self-management approach that gives them the techniques they need to not only manage their moods but also manage their lives alongside the disorder, including interpersonal and practical issues. Service users describe their primary outcome, not as a cure or reduction in their symptoms, but instead being able to live a fulfilling life alongside their condition. Service users see the internet as their

  4. Exploring representations and experiences of case-management users: towards difficulties and solutions to leading qualitative interviews with older people with complex living conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balard, Frédéric; Corre, Stéphanie Pin Le; Trouvé, Hélène; Saint-Jean, Olivier; Somme, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    By matching needs to resource services, case management could be a useful tool for improving the care of older people with complex living conditions. Collecting and analysing the users' experiences represents a good way to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of a case-management service. However, in the literature, fieldwork is very rarely considered and the users included in qualitative research seem to be the most accessible. This study was undertaken to describe the challenges of conducting qualitative research with older people with complex living conditions in order to understand their experiences with case-management services. Reflective analysis was applied to describe the process of recruiting and interviewing older people with complex living conditions in private homes, describing the protocol with respect to fieldwork chronology. The practical difficulties inherent in this type of study are addressed, particularly in terms of defining a sample, the procedure for contacting the users and conducting the interview. The users are people who suffer from a loss of autonomy because of cognitive impairment, severe disease and/or psychiatric or social problems. Notably, most of them refuse care and assistance. Reflective analysis of our protocol showed that the methodology and difficulties encountered constituted the first phase of data analysis. Understanding the experience of users of case management to analyse the outcomes of case-management services requires a clear methodology for the fieldwork.

  5. Physical therapy in the emergency department: development of a novel practice venue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming-McDonnell, Debra; Czuppon, Sylvia; Deusinger, Susan S; Deusinger, Robert H

    2010-03-01

    The American Physical Therapy Association's Vision 2020 advocates that physical therapists be integral members of health care teams responsible for diagnosing and managing movement and functional disorders. This report details the design and early implementation of a physical therapist service in the emergency department (ED) of a large, urban hospital and presents recommendations for assessing the effectiveness of physical therapists in this setting. Emergency departments serve multiple purposes in the American health care system, including care of patients with non-life-threatening illnesses. Physical therapists have expertise in screening for problems that are not amenable to physical therapy and in addressing a wide range of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain problems. This expertise invites inclusion into the culture of ED practice. This administrative case report describes planning and early implementation of a physical therapist practice in an ED, shares preliminary outcomes, and provides suggestions for expansion and effectiveness testing of practice in this novel venue. Referrals have increased and length of stay has decreased for patients receiving physical therapy. Preliminary surveys suggest high patient and practitioner satisfaction with physical therapy services. Outpatient physical therapy follow-up options were developed. Educating ED personnel to triage patients who show deficits in pain and functional mobility to physical therapy has challenged the usual culture of ED processes. Practice in the hospital ED enables physical therapists to fully use their knowledge, diagnostic skills, and ability to manage acute pain and musculoskeletal injury. Recommendations for future action are made to encourage more institutions across the country to incorporate physical therapy in EDs to enhance the process and outcome of nonemergent care.

  6. Remote Sensing for Crop Water Management: From ET Modelling to Services for the End Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Calera

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The experiences gathered during the past 30 years support the operational use of irrigation scheduling based on frequent multi-spectral image data. Currently, the operational use of dense time series of multispectral imagery at high spatial resolution makes monitoring of crop biophysical parameters feasible, capturing crop water use across the growing season, with suitable temporal and spatial resolutions. These achievements, and the availability of accurate forecasting of meteorological data, allow for precise predictions of crop water requirements with unprecedented spatial resolution. This information is greatly appreciated by the end users, i.e., professional farmers or decision-makers, and can be provided in an easy-to-use manner and in near-real-time by using the improvements achieved in web-GIS methodologies (Geographic Information Systems based on web technologies. This paper reviews the most operational and explored methods based on optical remote sensing for the assessment of crop water requirements, identifying strengths and weaknesses and proposing alternatives to advance towards full operational application of this methodology. In addition, we provide a general overview of the tools, which facilitates co-creation and collaboration with stakeholders, paying special attention to these approaches based on web-GIS tools.

  7. Remote Sensing for Crop Water Management: From ET Modelling to Services for the End Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calera, Alfonso; Campos, Isidro; Osann, Anna; D’Urso, Guido; Menenti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The experiences gathered during the past 30 years support the operational use of irrigation scheduling based on frequent multi-spectral image data. Currently, the operational use of dense time series of multispectral imagery at high spatial resolution makes monitoring of crop biophysical parameters feasible, capturing crop water use across the growing season, with suitable temporal and spatial resolutions. These achievements, and the availability of accurate forecasting of meteorological data, allow for precise predictions of crop water requirements with unprecedented spatial resolution. This information is greatly appreciated by the end users, i.e., professional farmers or decision-makers, and can be provided in an easy-to-use manner and in near-real-time by using the improvements achieved in web-GIS methodologies (Geographic Information Systems based on web technologies). This paper reviews the most operational and explored methods based on optical remote sensing for the assessment of crop water requirements, identifying strengths and weaknesses and proposing alternatives to advance towards full operational application of this methodology. In addition, we provide a general overview of the tools, which facilitates co-creation and collaboration with stakeholders, paying special attention to these approaches based on web-GIS tools. PMID:28492515

  8. Remote Sensing for Crop Water Management: From ET Modelling to Services for the End Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calera, Alfonso; Campos, Isidro; Osann, Anna; D'Urso, Guido; Menenti, Massimo

    2017-05-11

    The experiences gathered during the past 30 years support the operational use of irrigation scheduling based on frequent multi-spectral image data. Currently, the operational use of dense time series of multispectral imagery at high spatial resolution makes monitoring of crop biophysical parameters feasible, capturing crop water use across the growing season, with suitable temporal and spatial resolutions. These achievements, and the availability of accurate forecasting of meteorological data, allow for precise predictions of crop water requirements with unprecedented spatial resolution. This information is greatly appreciated by the end users, i.e., professional farmers or decision-makers, and can be provided in an easy-to-use manner and in near-real-time by using the improvements achieved in web-GIS methodologies (Geographic Information Systems based on web technologies). This paper reviews the most operational and explored methods based on optical remote sensing for the assessment of crop water requirements, identifying strengths and weaknesses and proposing alternatives to advance towards full operational application of this methodology. In addition, we provide a general overview of the tools, which facilitates co-creation and collaboration with stakeholders, paying special attention to these approaches based on web-GIS tools.

  9. The analysis of wms management system: a multi case study in developer companies and users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Furlan Soriano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the number of companies that use WMS on its storage operation has increased. However, a great part of organizations that adopt this system has difficulties in the implementation process or in fully exploit its resources. In this context, this research aims to analyze the WMS system, identifying the key barriers inherent in its implementation process, the benefits and features curently offered to the market, as well as the trends to the tool development. This analysis was performed through the method of multicase study under the perspective of two system developers and three users. Based on the content analysis of the informations from literature review, the semi-structered interviews and the documentary analysis performed was possible to identify as the main difficulties in the process of system implementation the flaws in registration of products and addresses, mapping of logistics processes, the staff training and cultural work change. Regarding the system benefits, stands out the better operational control and the stock accuracy improvement. Finally the trends for the tool improvement involve linking the system with tablets and smartphones, integrations with RFID technology and customized reports generation.

  10. Special report writer: A flexible information management system. Documentation and user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A special report writer (SSR) was developed which performs multiple correlations on files containing several data hierarchies. Output reports are specified in a simple notation, readily learned by persons having limited familarity with ADP. The SRR system can be adopted by other NASA installations while the basic techniques themselves are compatible with the information management needs of a wide range of organizations. Specifically, the program lends itself to generalization and can be readily adapted for other file management purposes. Extensive details on the characteristics of the SRR program are presented along with a full explanation of the system for those contemplating its application to other data bases. The complete COBOL program and documentation are available.

  11. User-centred and context-aware identity management in mobile ad-hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Arabo, Abdullahi

    2013-01-01

    The emergent notion of ubiquitous computing makes it possible for mobile devices to communicate and provide services via networks connected in an ad-hoc manner. These have resulted in the proliferation of wireless technologies such as Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANets), which offer attractive solutions for services that need flexible setup as well as dynamic and low cost wireless connectivity. However, the growing trend outlined above also raises serious concerns over Identity Management (IM) du...

  12. User Perspectives of Reference Management Software in a Context-Based Learning Situation

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Akramy; Fredrik Offerlind

    2013-01-01

    Scientific writing is an important aspect of the student's education. Writing requires the student to give reference sources in a proper manner in accordance with a certain style. Experience has found that the process to deal with different styles requires time. Critical thinking is a fundamental requirement in scientific work and as such requires no detailed knowledge about different styles structure. Today's technology makes it possible to facilitate scientific writing using reference manag...

  13. Development of a Web-Based Self-management Intervention for Intermittent Urinary Catheter Users With Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; Fairbanks, Eileen; Parshall, Robert; Zhang, Feng; Miner, Sarah; Thayer, Deborah; Harrington, Brian; Brasch, Judith; McMAHON, James M

    2015-11-01

    While Web-based interventions have proliferated recently, information in the literature is often lacking about how the intervention was developed. In response to that gap, this is a report of the development of a Web-based self-management intervention for intermittent urinary catheter users and pretesting with four adults with spinal cord injury living in the community. Two Web sites were created, one for recruitment and the other for the intervention itself. The intervention involved developing new Web-based technology, including an interactive urinary diary (with fluid intake/urine output and a journal), extensive catheter products information, three intervention nurse phone call consultations, and user-community discussion forums. Study participants completed an online survey and were interviewed twice about the enrollment process and their perceptions of their involvement in the intervention. Suggestions from the pretesting participants were used to revise the Web site applications prior to the next stage of research (a feasibility study). Numerous recommendations and comments were received related to content, interactivity of components, and usability. This article provides a description of how the Web sites were developed (including the technology and software programs used), issues encountered and what was done to address them, and how the Web-based intervention was modified for improvements.

  14. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-02-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients' self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists' toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation.

  15. Abbreviated Goal Management Training Shows Preliminary Evidence as a Neurorehabilitation Tool for HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders among Substance Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Moore, David J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Umlauf, Anya; Scott, J. C.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Substance use disorders are highly comorbid with and contribute to the increased prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction observed in HIV infection. Despite their adverse impact on everyday functioning, there are currently no compensatory-based neurorehabilitation interventions validated for use among HIV+ substance users (HIV/SUD). This study examined the effectiveness of Goal Management Training (GMT) alone or GMT as part of a metacognitive training among HIV/SUD individuals with executive dysfunction. Methods Ninety HIV/SUD individuals were randomized to a single 15-minute session: 1) GMT (n=30); 2) GMT plus metacognitive training (neurocognitive awareness; GMT+Meta; n=30); or 3) active control (n=30). Following a brief neurocognitive battery and study condition, participants performed a complex laboratory-based function task, Everyday Multitasking Test (Everyday MT), during which metacognition (awareness) was evaluated. Results There was an increasing, but nonsignificant tendency for better Everyday MT performances across study conditions (Control≤GMT≤GMT+Meta; pseffect-size benefits in Everyday MT performance and metacognitive task appraisals as compared to the control condition. Among participants who underwent GMT, benefits were most prominent in persons with poorer pre-training dual-tasking ability, depression, and methamphetamine use disorders (ds=0.35–1.04). Conclusions A brief compensatory strategy has benefits for everyday multitasking and metacognition among HIV+ substance users with executive dysfunction. Future work exploring more intensive trainings, potentially complimentary to other restorative approaches and/or pharmacological treatments, is warranted. PMID:26753986

  16. Perioperative management of anticoagulant users scheduled for glaucoma surgery: a survey among the Brazilian Glaucoma Society members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Balbino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate and describe, among the members of the Brazilian Glaucoma Society (BGS, the practices regarding the perioperative management of anticoagulants (warfarin and aspirin use in patients scheduled for glaucoma surgery. METHODS: The active members of the Brazilian Glaucoma Society answered a questionnaire evaluating different aspects of their current perioperative management of glaucomatous patients taking warfarin or aspirin. RESULTS: A total of 52 participants returned a complete questionnaire. Warfarin or aspirin was routinely interrupted prior to glaucoma surgery by 82.7% of the respondents. The majority of the surgeons who discontinued these medications reported doing so 7 days prior to surgery and resumed their use the day after the procedure. Almost half of our interviewees reported hemorrhagic complications that could be related to anticoagulant therapy. A large number of the surgeons (86.5% preferred a particular surgical technique for anticoagulated patients; however, most of them (88.5% do not change the anesthetic planning in such patients. Finally, the majority of the participants (90.4% refer their anticoagulated patients to a preoperative appointment with a cardiologist or a general practitioner before the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of Brazilian Glaucoma Society members participating in this study interrupt either warfarin or aspirin prior to glaucoma surgery. Although there is scant information available in the literature to offer definitive guidance, most participants from the Brazilian Glaucoma Society seem to share the same opinion when it comes to perioperative management of anticoagulant users.

  17. Pediatric dentistry clinical education venues evaluation by pre and post-doctoral students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimstein, E; Mayes, A; Mittal, Hc

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate dental students' perspectives about pre- and post-doctoral pediatric dentistry education venues. Surveys with visual analog scales (from 0 to 100) measuring the educational contribution of pediatric dentistry venues were conducted. The pre-doctoral venues included a 3rd year university twilight clinic (UTC), a 3rd year urban community based clinic (CBC) and 4th year mobile clinics (MCs). The post-doctoral venues included treatment of children under general anesthesia, oral sedations, a regular clinic (no sedations), seminars, journal club, case conferences and studding for the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Analyses of variance between the scores indicated that the 3rd year CBC score (68.2 ± 4.5) was statistically significant higher (p= .007) than the one for the 3rd year UTC score (44.9 ± 6.1). The 4th year students' MCs score (61.4 ± 4.0) was statistically significant higher than their retrospective scores for the 3rd year CBC (56.4 ± 4.4) or UTC (42.2 ± 4.9) scores (p= .03 and .004 respectively). Among the didactic or clinical post-doctoral venues, the regular clinic and the seminars received the highest scores (84.3 ± 1.7 and 71.6 ± 2.8 respectively). pre-doctoral community-based clinical education and post-doctoral regular university based clinic are considered by students to provide the main contribution to pediatric dental education.

  18. HIV-related risk among female migrants working in entertainment venues in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Operario, Don; Dong, Yanyan; Zaller, Nickolas; Song, Dandan; He, Huan; Tao, Haidong; Xia, Junrui; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-06-01

    China has experienced a surge in internal migration during the past decade, and migrant populations have been identified as a high-risk group for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Young female migrants often find employment in entertainment venues (bars, karaoke parlors, and massage parlors) located in metropolitan cities, and sex work transactions frequently occur in these venues. We examined factors associated with risk for HIV, other STIs, and reproductive health challenges in a cross-sectional study of 358 young female migrants, ages 18-29, working in entertainment venues in a rapidly growing urban city in China. Results indicate high levels of behavioral risk for HIV and other STIs, low rates of HIV testing, and high prevalence of problem drinking and mental health problems, including recent depression symptoms and suicidal ideation. Factors associated with increased STIs and genitourinary tract infections included commercial sex work, early sexual debut, abortion history, illicit drug use, and anxiety. Factors associated with increased HIV testing included employment in an affluent entertainment venue, education level, knowledge about where to obtain free HIV tests, condom use, and general HIV/AIDS knowledge. Findings of this study highlight the insufficient coverage of current public health services to female migrants working in entertainment venues and call for more assertive prevention interventions to mitigate risk for sexual, reproductive, behavioral, and mental health problems in this mobile population.

  19. The evolution of TV systems, content, and users towards interactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); K. Chorianopoulos

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractInteractive TV research spans across a rather diverse body of scientific subfields. Research articles have appeared in several venues, such as multimedia, HCI, CSCW, UIST, user modeling, media and communication sciences. In this study, we explore the state-of-the-art and consider

  20. User Perspectives of Reference Management Software in a Context-Based Learning Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Akramy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific writing is an important aspect of the student's education. Writing requires the student to give reference sources in a proper manner in accordance with a certain style. Experience has found that the process to deal with different styles requires time. Critical thinking is a fundamental requirement in scientific work and as such requires no detailed knowledge about different styles structure. Today's technology makes it possible to facilitate scientific writing using reference management software. The current reference management tools available are license-based and others are available free through the Internet. In recent years, social media, such as Facebook, Blogs and Wikipedia have received increasing attention. The discussion, in educational settings, has touched on the pros and cons, but also on the potential opportunities using social media in educational settings. Social media creates opportunities for communication, which in turn affects learning. This learning can be described as collaborative. Illeris (2007 points out that such learning refers to activities where a group of people strive to learn and develop something together. Thus, it is the technical possibilities that facilitate communication and learning. From an educational point of view Vygotsky appears to be central in terms of pedagogy and technology. His theoretical argument is based on a sociocultural perspective where people learn from each other and are believed to be active in its social context using technology as a helpful instrument. Individual knowledge thus grows between individuals (Vygotsky, 1978. The teacher's role, based on Vygotsky's sociocultural perspective, is to encourage good learning environments, and thus use existing technology in the educational setting. With this background, the purpose of this study was to examine two different reference management software tools, Zotero (a social media free downloaded from Internet and EndNote (license

  1. A framework for implementation of user-centric identity management systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Joseph K.; Olesen, Henning

    2010-01-01

    -ernments in many countries are implementing identity man-agement systems (IdMS) to curtail these incidences and to offer citizens the power to exercise informational self-determination. Using concepts from technology adoption and fit-viability theo-ries as well as the laws of identity, this paper analyzes...... the crite-ria for successful implementation and defines a framework for a citizen-centric national IdMS. Results from a survey con-ducted in Ghana are also included....

  2. Impact of post-event avoidance behavior on commercial facilities sector venues-literature review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsa, M. E.; Baldwin, T. E.; Berry, M. S.; Guzowski, L. B.; Martinez-Moyano, I.; Nieves, A. L.; Ramarasad, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2011-03-24

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11), focused a great deal of interest and concern on how individual and social perceptions of risk change behavior and subsequently affect commercial sector venues. Argonne conducted a review of the literature to identify studies that quantify the direct and indirect economic consequences of avoidance behaviors that result from terrorist attacks. Despite a growing amount of literature addressing terrorism impacts, relatively little is known about the causal relationships between risk perception, human avoidance behaviors, and the economic effects on commercial venues. Nevertheless, the technical and academic literature does provide some evidence, both directly and by inference, of the level and duration of post-event avoidance behaviors on commercial venues. Key findings are summarized in this Executive Summary. Also included as an appendix is a more detailed summary table of literature findings reproduced from the full report.

  3. Drug use and sexual risk among gay and bisexual men who frequent party venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Peter S; Durán, Ron E; Antoni, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    Research connecting club drug use to risky sex among gay/bisexual men (GBM) contains methodological issues that have limited knowledge about the relative risks of distinct drugs. This paper reports drug use and sexual behavior data from 197 GBM who frequented at least one party venue within 3 months of participating. Alarming rates of drug use and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with casual sex-partners were reported in connection with time spent at a bar, club or circuit party. Structural equation modeling revealed that use of methamphetamine, gammahydroxybutrate (GHB), and/or ketamine (K), but not use of ecstasy, at a party venue helped explain likelihood of UAI with a casual sex-partner while under the influence of a drug during/following time partying (β = 0.41, p party venues increases risk for subsequent UAI with casual sex-partners. Study implications, limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  4. Design as a Cultural Venue for Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geert Jensen, Birgitte; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Volf, Mette

    2014-01-01

    and facilitating processes in a methodical and systematic manner. The user centred framing of designers, their imaginative capabilities and their expressive skills enable them to span complex boundaries within and across multidisciplinary teams. The aim of the present paper is to outline that designer's methods......Sense Making has become the strategic fuel for meaningful Change Making in organizations today. 1 When designers enter into and facilitate large interdisciplinary teams it changes the role of the designer from being characterised by aesthetic professionalism to thinking strategically...... and visual skills can be the link between mental models and languages that occur in interdisciplinary teams. The designer's methods such as visualization and prototyping as well as their Sensemaking methods2 can strengthen a team's chance to imagine future scenarios and their implications. It provides...

  5. Venue-Based Networks May Underpin HCV Transmissions amongst HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bradshaw

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the potential influence of venue-based networks on HCV transmission in HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM.This was a prospectively recruited cohort of HIV-infected GBM with recently-acquired HCV infection resident in Melbourne and Sydney. Clinical and demographic data were collected together with blood samples for HCV sequencing. Phylogenies were inferred and clusters of individuals infected with HCV with genetic sequence homology were identified. Venues used for sourcing sexual partners were identified; sourcing partners from the same venue was considered a potential social link. Using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, associations were identified between the network of sites where men sourced sex partners and transmission relationships as defined by phylogenetic clustering.Forty individuals were recruited, of whom 62.5% were considered to have sexually- and 37.5% IDU-acquired HCV. Venue use was consistent with men being members of a more sexually adventurous gay community subculture. Six phylogenetically-determined pairs or clusters were identified, comprising fifteen (15/28, 53.6% individuals. Participants belonging to phylogenetic clusters were observed within the same networks. There was a significant correlation between the network and phylogenetic clustering when both cities were considered simultaneously (p = 0.005, raising the possibility that social connections may be important for HCV transmissions.Venue-based network elicitation is a promising approach for elucidating HCV transmissions amongst HIV-infected GBM. Public health approaches targeting individuals and venues prominent within networks may reduce onward HCV transmission.

  6. Natural Aggregation Approach based Home Energy Manage System with User Satisfaction Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F. J.; Ranzi, G.; Dong, Z. Y.; Murata, J.

    2017-07-01

    With the prevalence of advanced sensing and two-way communication technologies, Home Energy Management System (HEMS) has attracted lots of attentions in recent years. This paper proposes a HEMS that optimally schedules the controllable Residential Energy Resources (RERs) in a Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing and high solar power penetrated environment. The HEMS aims to minimize the overall operational cost of the home, and the user’s satisfactions and requirements on the operation of different household appliances are modelled and considered in the HEMS. Further, a new biological self-aggregation intelligence based optimization technique previously proposed by the authors, i.e., Natural Aggregation Algorithm (NAA), is applied to solve the proposed HEMS optimization model. Simulations are conducted to validate the proposed method.

  7. Traceability of patient records usage: barriers and opportunities for improving user interface design and data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Correia, Ricardo; Lapão, Luís; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Although IT governance practices (like ITIL, which recommends on the use of audit logs for proper service level management) are being introduced in many Hospitals to cope with increasing levels of information quality and safety requirements, the standard maturity levels of hospital IT departments is still not enough to reach the level of frequent use of audit logs. This paper aims to address the issues related to the existence of AT in patient records, describe the Hospitals scenario and to produce recommendations. Representatives from four hospitals were interviewed regarding the use of AT in their Hospital IS. Very few AT are known to exist in these hospitals (average of 1 per hospital in an estimate of 21 existing IS). CIOs should to be much more concerned with the existence and maintenance of AT. Recommendations include server clock synchronization and using advanced log visualization tools.

  8. Urbancontext: A Management Model For Pervasive Environments In User-Oriented Urban Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia L. Zuniga-Canon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, urban computing has gained a lot of interest for guiding the evolution of citiesinto intelligent environments. These environments are appropriated for individuals’ inter-actions changing in their behaviors. These changes require new approaches that allow theunderstanding of how urban computing systems should be modeled.In this work we present UrbanContext, a new model for designing of urban computingplatforms that applies the theory of roles to manage the individual’s context in urban envi-ronments. The theory of roles helps to understand the individual’s behavior within a socialenvironment, allowing to model urban computing systems able to adapt to individuals statesand their needs.UrbanContext collects data in urban atmospheres and classifies individuals’ behaviorsaccording to their change of roles, to optimize social interaction and offer secure services.Likewise, UrbanContext serves as a generic model to provide interoperability, and to facilitatethe design, implementation and expansion of urban computing systems.

  9. The Influence of External User Interdependence of Financial Statements, Possibility of Clients Facing Financial Difficulties, and Auditor Evaluation of Management Integrity To Acceptable Audit Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andini Sih Afsari Utami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to analyze. Analyses the influence of external users reliance on financial statements, likelihood of financial difficulties and management integrity toward acceptable audit risk were performed with 10 public accountant office who had listed from Direktorat IAPI 2013. The sample used the “Gay” theory. The analyzed method in this research uses multiple linear. The result shown that performing external users reliance on financial statements significantly influences toward acceptable audit risk, likelihood of financial difficulties significantly influences toward acceptable audit risk, and management integrity significantly influences toward acceptable audit risk.

  10. Validity of self-reported exposure to second-hand smoke in hospitality venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Iñaki; Mayo, Elga; López, María J; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Fu, Marcela; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Schiaffino, Anna; Moncada, Albert; Montes, Agustín; Nebot, Manel; Fernández, Esteve

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to assess the validity of self-reported exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) in 50 hospitality venues of Madrid (Spain) in 2010, taking as a reference vapour-phase nicotine measured by active sampling. The questions posed in the questionnaire permitted distinguishing between the different levels of SHS. However, the moderate relationship found (Spearman׳s correlation=0.387, phospitality venues, based solely on self-reported information, should be used with caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlates of verbal and physical aggression among patrons of licensed venues in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Shannon; Coomber, Kerri; Pennay, Amy; Droste, Nicolas; Curtis, Ashlee; Mayshak, Richelle; Lam, Tina; Gilmore, William; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Miller, Peter G

    2017-04-25

    The current study aimed to examine the association between patron demographics and substance use, and experiences of verbal and physical aggressive incidents within the last 3 months among patrons of night-time entertainment precincts (NEP) in Australia. Patron interviews (n = 4216) were conducted around licensed venues in the NEPs of five Australian cities. Seven correlates of verbal and physical aggressive incidents were examined: gender, age, occupation, blood alcohol concentration, pre-drinking, energy drink use and illicit drug use in the current session. A total of 7.5% and 8.2% of respondents reported involvement in a verbally and physically aggressive incident in the past 3 months, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models indicated men and people verbal and physical aggressive incidents. A significant occupation effect showed lower levels of both verbal and physical aggression in managers/professionals compared with non-office workers. The likelihood of being involved in a verbally aggressive incident significantly increased with energy drink consumption, while the likelihood of being involved in a physically aggressive incident significantly increased with blood alcohol concentration, energy drink consumption and illicit drug use. This study highlights the different correlates of verbal and physical aggression within NEPs, suggesting they should be viewed as distinct types of violence, rather than points on a continuum. Major modifiable correlates with verbal and physical aggression included intoxication, energy drink consumption, and illicit drug use, suggesting the need for further interventions and policy development to address these key issues. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  12. SMTMS - SM18 Magnet Tests Management System: a Brief User Guide for Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Chohan, N; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2004-01-01

    As the number of magnets to be tested under cryogenic conditions increased during the course of 2003, it was clear that a versatile computer-based tool was urgently required for keeping track of all the necessary tests that were carried out for each magnet as well as the outcome of the tests. It was also essential to keep track of the times taken during different phases in magnet preparation for the tests, including Cryogenic connections, cool-downs, warm ups and so forth. SMTMS uses the CERN provided backbone in Web based services and Access database to fulfil these urgent needs and was successfully made operational within a very short time. It has considerably eased & simplified the work in operation for cold testing the magnets with a few permanent core operational staff and a considerably large number of rotational personnel of short duration. This is because SMTMS is now the exclusive & unique Web-based tool to manage the tests and collate the essential electrical characterisation and quench resu...

  13. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion-PESTCommander, a graphical user interface for file and run management across networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanovic, Marinko; Muffels, Christopher T.; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    Models of environmental systems have become increasingly complex, incorporating increasingly large numbers of parameters in an effort to represent physical processes on a scale approaching that at which they occur in nature. Consequently, the inverse problem of parameter estimation (specifically, model calibration) and subsequent uncertainty analysis have become increasingly computation-intensive endeavors. Fortunately, advances in computing have made computational power equivalent to that of dozens to hundreds of desktop computers accessible through a variety of alternate means: modelers have various possibilities, ranging from traditional Local Area Networks (LANs) to cloud computing. Commonly used parameter estimation software is well suited to take advantage of the availability of such increased computing power. Unfortunately, logistical issues become increasingly important as an increasing number and variety of computers are brought to bear on the inverse problem. To facilitate efficient access to disparate computer resources, the PESTCommander program documented herein has been developed to provide a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that facilitates the management of model files ("file management") and remote launching and termination of "slave" computers across a distributed network of computers ("run management"). In version 1.0 described here, PESTCommander can access and ascertain resources across traditional Windows LANs: however, the architecture of PESTCommander has been developed with the intent that future releases will be able to access computing resources (1) via trusted domains established in Wide Area Networks (WANs) in multiple remote locations and (2) via heterogeneous networks of Windows- and Unix-based operating systems. The design of PESTCommander also makes it suitable for extension to other computational resources, such as those that are available via cloud computing. Version 1.0 of PESTCommander was developed primarily to work with the

  14. How important are venue-based HIV risks among male clients of female sex workers? A mixed methods analysis of the risk environment in nightlife venues in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Gallardo, Manuel; Nguyen, Lucie; Lozada, Remedios; Semple, Shirley J; Patterson, Thomas L

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, 400 males ≥18 years old who paid or traded for sex with a female sex worker (FSW) in Tijuana, Mexico, in the past 4 months completed surveys and HIV/STI testing; 30 also completed qualitative interviews. To analyze environmental sources of HIV vulnerability among male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, we used mixed methods to investigate correlates of clients who met FSWs in nightlife venues and clients' perspectives on venue-based HIV risk. Logistic regression identified micro-level correlates of meeting FSWs in nightlife venues, which were triangulated with clients' narratives regarding macro-level influences. In a multivariate model, offering increased pay for unprotected sex and binge drinking were micro-level factors that were independently associated with meeting FSWs in nightlife venues versus other places. In qualitative interviews, clients characterized nightlife venues as high risk due to the following macro-level features: social norms dictating heavy alcohol consumption; economic exploitation by establishment owners; and poor enforcement of sex work regulations in nightlife venues. Structural interventions in nightlife venues are needed to address venue-based risks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Where and Why Users Check In

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    frequently and repeatedly to the same venue. Figure 2 shows the activity of three users on Do- lores Park Cafe in San Francisco. User A,B,C (bottom 3...over-time. Figure 2: Three users’ activity profiles at Dolores Park Cafe 2009.9.1 2009.12.1 2010.3.1 2010.6.1 V N E -O p a 2009.9.1 2009.12.1 2010.3.1...San Francisco New York 303 second st. Plaza Tasti D lite (ice cream) Chinatown (restaurant) Cafe 28 Golf smith (shop) or others Moschino Botique

  16. Derivation and Implementation of a Model Teaching the Nature of Science Using Informal Science Education Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Barbara S.; Burkett, Ruth; Leard, Cyndy

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a model for using informal science education venues as contexts within which to teach the nature of science. The model was initially developed to enable university education students to teach science in elementary schools so as to be consistent with "National Science Education Standards" (NSES) (1996) and "A Framework for…

  17. How Leisure Venues Are and Why? A Geospatial Perspective in Wuhan, Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaolin Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban leisure venues proffer spatial carriers for citizens’ leisure activities and their functions rely heavily on the spatial configuration, which have largely been ignored. The increasing needs for healthy leisure life and the availability of geospatial open data provide a rising opportunity to fill this gap. To examine the spatial distribution of leisure venues and explore its underlying dominating factors, we adopt geospatial analysis techniques—point pattern analysis and cluster analysis with multi-sources geospatial data in Wuhan, Central China. Results conclude interesting spatial discrepancy based on a three-level clustered pattern of 86520 leisure venues. We find that (1 most clusters are in urban center along the Yangtze River with all 1st-level clusters and plentiful 2nd-level and 3rd-level clusters; (2 There are just sporadic clusters in suburban areas—no 1st-level, merely one 2nd-level and some few 3rd-level ones. Moreover, we demonstrate three underlying dominating factors (i.e., the policy, population and economy and identify that (1 No systematic (spatial-relevant leisure policy framework is formed; (2 Population density and commercial centers have positive correlation with the distribution of leisure venues. This study contributes to spatial-relevant leisure policy-making for facilitating healthy leisure life, optimizing leisure space, guiding people-oriented urbanization transition and promoting urban competence.

  18. Gambling and the Multidimensionality of Accessibility: More than Just Proximity to Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anna Christina; Bates, Glen; Moore, Susan; Kyrios, Michael; Meredyth, Denise; Jessop, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Accessibility to gambling has been linked to gambling behaviour but remains poorly understood. This study used data from semi-structured focus groups and interviews with 38 participants (Median age 42 years) to explore wider aspects of accessibility. People preferred venues which were open long hours and located close to home, work or regular…

  19. Prevalence of Sun Protection at Outdoor Recreation and Leisure Venues at Resorts in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkosz, Barbara J.; Scott, Michael D.; Buller, David B.; Andersen, Peter A.; Beck, Larry; Cutter, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Exposure to solar ultra violet radiation (UVR) is a primary risk factor for skin cancer. Vacationers often fail to protect themselves from harmful UVR. Purpose: The study assessed the sun protection practices of resort guests in various outdoor leisure and recreation venues during warm-weather seasons. Method: Forty-one North American…

  20. 12.30 pm Realizing the Demographic Dividend in Africa Venue

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Timothée Fruhauf

    2013-03-24

    Mar 24, 2013 ... Venue: Palais des Congrès, Sofitel Abidjan Hotel Ivoire. Chair: H.E. Mr. Carlos Lopes, United Nations Under-Secretary-. General and Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic ... Industry, Kingdom of Thailand and Chairman of the Board of. Executive Directors, Bangkok Bank Public Company ...

  1. What mental health workers and service users talk about, when they talk about violence management – experiences from a co-operative inquiry research project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauge Berring, Lene

    2016-01-01

    Mental health workers and service users express the intricate nature of violent and threatening interactions in their narratives. These narratives give important clues to a valuable development of violence management, and make the participants aware of their different perspectives. This fosters c...

  2. Progress Report Phase I: Use, access, and fire/fuels management attitudes and preferences of user groups concerning the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) and adjacent areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Anschuetz; Carol B. Raish

    2010-01-01

    This document represents a progress report of activities completed during Phase I of the study titled, Use, Access, and Fire/Fuels Management Attitudes and Preferences of User Groups Concerning the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) and Adjacent Areas, and the preliminary findings of this work.

  3. What is the evidence for harm minimisation measures in gambling venues?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Rintoul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of electronic gambling machines (EGMs in Australia and New Zealand constitutes the largest sector of the gambling industry. The costs arising from the harms of gambling detract significantly from its benefits, and in all Australian jurisdictions various policy measures have been implemented to reduce these harms. If successful, these would maximise the net benefits associated with EGM gambling. This article reviews the available evidence for a range of these practices, particularly those implemented within EGM venues via ‘codes of practice’. These codes of practice are intended to give effect to the principles of ‘responsible gambling’ within EGM venues. These measures are: self-exclusion, signage, messages, interaction with gamblers, the removal of ATMs from gambling venues, and ‘responsible gambling’ assessed overall in a venue context. In addition, we review the evidence in support of two major recommendations of the Productivity Commission’s 2010 report into gambling, pre-commitment and one-dollar maximum wagers. We conclude that there is a modest level of evidence supporting some measures, notably self-exclusion and, to a greater extent, the removal of ATMs. There is also some evidence that ‘responsible gambling’ measures have, collectively, reduced the harms associated with gambling. However, there is limited evidence to confirm the effectiveness of most individual ‘responsible gambling’ measures actually implemented in venues. Further, policy measures implemented outside the control of venues (such as ATM removal, reduction in bet limits, and the prohibition of smoking appear to be associated with more significant effects, based on analysis of EGM revenue data in Victoria. The evidence for prospective measures is necessarily limited since the ultimate test is post-implementation efficacy, but there is growing evidence to suggest that pre-commitment, one-dollar maximum bets or other machine design changes may

  4. The management of dental caries in primary teeth - involving service providers and users in the design of a trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Zoe; Innes, Nicola; Deery, Chris; Hall, Melanie; Speed, Chris; Douglas, Gail; Clarkson, Jan; Rodd, Helen

    2012-08-22

    There is a lack of evidence for the effective management of dental caries in children's primary teeth. The trial entitled 'Filling Children's Teeth: Indicated Or Not?' (FiCTION) was designed to examine the clinical and cost effectiveness, in primary dental care, of three different approaches to the management of caries in primary teeth. However, before the FiCTION main trial commenced, a pilot trial was designed. Service provider (dentists and other members of the team including dental nurses and practice managers) and participant (child participants and their parents) involvement was incorporated into the pilot trial. The aim of this study is to describe service providers' and users' perspectives on the pilot trial to identify improvements to the conduct and design of the FiCTION main trial. Qualitative interviews (individual and group) were held with dentists, dental team members, children and parents involved in the FiCTION pilot trial. Individual interviews were held with four dentists and a group interview was held with 17 dental team members. Face-to-face interviews were held with four parents and children (four- to eight-years old) representing the three arms of the trial and five telephone interviews were conducted with parents. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. Framework analysis was used. Overall, service providers, children and parents found the pilot trial to be well conducted and an interesting experience. Service providers highlighted the challenges of adhering to research protocols, especially managing the documentation and undertaking new clinical techniques. They indicated that the time and financial commitments were greater than they had anticipated. Particular difficulties were found recruiting suitable patients within the timeframe. For parents recruitment was apparently more related to trusting their dentist than the content of information packs. While some of the older children understood what a study was, others did not understand or

  5. Contributions to early HIV diagnosis among patients linked to care vary by testing venue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trott Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Early HIV diagnosis reduces transmission and improves health outcomes; screening in non-traditional settings is increasingly advocated. We compared test venues by the number of new diagnoses successfully linked to the regional HIV treatment center and disease stage at diagnosis. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using structured chart review of newly diagnosed HIV patients successfully referred to the region's only HIV treatment center from 1998 to 2003. Demographics, testing indication, risk profile, and initial CD4 count were recorded. Results There were 277 newly diagnosed patients meeting study criteria. Mean age was 33 years, 77% were male, and 46% were African-American. Median CD4 at diagnosis was 324. Diagnoses were earlier via partner testing at the HIV treatment center (N = 8, median CD4 648, p = 0.008 and with universal screening by the blood bank, military, and insurance companies (N = 13, median CD4 483, p = 0.05 than at other venues. Targeted testing by health care and public health entities based on patient request, risk profile, or patient condition lead to later diagnosis. Conclusion Test venues varied by the number of new diagnoses made and the stage of illness at diagnosis. To improve the rate of early diagnosis, scarce resources should be allocated to maximize the number of new diagnoses at screening venues where diagnoses are more likely to be early or alter testing strategies at test venues where diagnoses are traditionally made late. Efforts to improve early diagnosis should be coordinated longitudinally on a regional basis according to this conceptual paradigm.

  6. Perspectives on User Satisfaction Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena

    2001-01-01

    Discusses academic libraries, digital environments, increasing competition, the relationship between service quality and user satisfaction, and user surveys. Describes the SERVQUAL model that measures service quality and user satisfaction in academic libraries; considers gaps between user expectations and managers' perceptions of user…

  7. The User Knows What to Call It: Incorporating Patient Voice Through User-Contributed Tags on a Participatory Platform About Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Rachel M; Kaplan, Samantha Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background Body listening, described as the act of paying attention to the body’s signals and cues, can be an important component of long-term health management. Objective The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate the Body Listening Project, an innovative effort to engage the public in the creation of a public resource—to leverage collective wisdom in the health domain. This project involved a website where people could contribute their experiences of and dialogue with others concerning body listening and self-management. This article presents an analysis of the tags contributed, with a focus on the value of these tags for knowledge organization and incorporation into consumer-friendly health information retrieval systems. Methods First, we performed content analysis of the tags contributed, identifying a set of categories and refining the relational structure of the categories to develop a preliminary classification scheme, the Body Listening and Self-Management Taxonomy. Second, we compared the concepts in the Body Listening and Self-Management Taxonomy with concepts that were automatically identified from an extant health knowledge resource, the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), to better characterize the information that participants contributed. Third, we employed visualization techniques to explore the concept space of the tags. A correlation matrix, based on the extent to which categories tended to be assigned to the same tags, was used to study the interrelatedness of the taxonomy categories. Then a network visualization was used to investigate structural relationships among the categories in the taxonomy. Results First, we proposed a taxonomy called the Body Listening and Self-Management Taxonomy, with four meta-level categories: (1) health management strategies, (2) concepts and states, (3) influencers, and (4) health-related information behavior. This taxonomy could inform future efforts to organize knowledge and content of this

  8. The User Knows What to Call It: Incorporating Patient Voice Through User-Contributed Tags on a Participatory Platform About Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Annie T; Carriere, Rachel M; Kaplan, Samantha Jan

    2017-09-07

    Body listening, described as the act of paying attention to the body's signals and cues, can be an important component of long-term health management. The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate the Body Listening Project, an innovative effort to engage the public in the creation of a public resource-to leverage collective wisdom in the health domain. This project involved a website where people could contribute their experiences of and dialogue with others concerning body listening and self-management. This article presents an analysis of the tags contributed, with a focus on the value of these tags for knowledge organization and incorporation into consumer-friendly health information retrieval systems. First, we performed content analysis of the tags contributed, identifying a set of categories and refining the relational structure of the categories to develop a preliminary classification scheme, the Body Listening and Self-Management Taxonomy. Second, we compared the concepts in the Body Listening and Self-Management Taxonomy with concepts that were automatically identified from an extant health knowledge resource, the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), to better characterize the information that participants contributed. Third, we employed visualization techniques to explore the concept space of the tags. A correlation matrix, based on the extent to which categories tended to be assigned to the same tags, was used to study the interrelatedness of the taxonomy categories. Then a network visualization was used to investigate structural relationships among the categories in the taxonomy. First, we proposed a taxonomy called the Body Listening and Self-Management Taxonomy, with four meta-level categories: (1) health management strategies, (2) concepts and states, (3) influencers, and (4) health-related information behavior. This taxonomy could inform future efforts to organize knowledge and content of this subject matter. Second, we compared the

  9. Integrating World Views, Knowledge and Venues in Climate Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Chase, M. J.; Demientieff, S.; Brunacini, J.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Reaching Arctic Communities Facing Climate Change Project integrates traditional and western knowledge and observations in climate science to facilitate dialog and learning among Alaska Native adults about climate change and its impacts on the environment and on Alaskan communities. In one of the models we have tested, the informal education took place at a 4-day camp by the Tanana River in Fairbanks, Alaska. Participants included Alaska Native elders, leaders, educators and natural resource managers, community members and university scientists. Results of pre/post camp surveys showed increased awareness of scientific and technical language used in climate science, improved ability to locate resources, tools, and strategies for learning about climate change, enhanced capacity to communicate climate change in a relevant way to their audiences and communities, confirmed the value of elders in helping them understand, respond and adapt to climate change, and that the camp setting facilitated an in-depth discussion and sharing of knowledge. The camp also enhanced the awareness about weather, climate and the environment of the camp facilitators who also noticed a shift in their own thinking and behavior. After the camp one participant who is an educator shared some of the hands-on tools developed by Polar Learning and Responding Climate Change Education Partnership project and used at the camp, with her 6th grade students, with the other teachers in her school and also at a state conference. Another shared what she learned with her family and friends as well as at a conference sponsored by her faith community where she was an invited speaker. Another camp was scheduled for this past summer but was cancelled due to some unforeseen weather/climate related events. A camp is planned for early summer in 2016; however other models of reaching the adult Native populations in a similar culturally responsive manner as the camps will also be explored and tested.

  10. Effectiveness of Using a Change Management Approach to Convey the Benefits of an Information Security Implementation to Technology Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeannine B.

    2012-01-01

    This study addressed the problems associated with users' understanding, accepting, and complying with requirements of security-oriented solutions. The goal of the research was not to dispute existing theory on IT project implementations, but rather to further the knowledge on the topic of technology user acceptance of security-oriented IT…

  11. [Secondhand smoke in hospitality venues. Exposure, body burden, economic and health aspects in conjunction with smoking bans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H; Kuhn, J; Bolte, G

    2009-04-01

    Secondhand smoke was classified by national and international organisations as a known cause of cancer in humans and has many adverse health effects, especially cardiovascular diseases and lung tumours. Global studies have clearly shown that hospitality venues have the highest levels of indoor air pollution containing different substances that are clearly carcinogenic--such as tobacco-related chemicals--compared with other, smoke-free indoor spaces. Data from the human biomonitoring of non-smoking employees in the food service industry confirm this high exposure level. Non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke in these environments are at increased risk for adverse health effects. The consistent protection of non-smokers in public places such as restaurants and bars through a smoking ban results in a significant reduction of the pollutants in the air (mostly > 90%) and clearly reduces the internal body burden for users and employees. Furthermore, health complaints by non-smoking employees are reduced and the higher risk for lung tumours of employees in the food service industry compared with the general population can be effectively reduced as well. According to current standards of knowledge, other measures such as spatial separation of smoking areas or the use of mechanical venting systems do not achieve a comparably high and effective pollutant reduction under field conditions. Studies concerning the economic effects of prohibiting smoking in public places conducted in various countries have shown that beverage-focused gastronomic enterprises experience a short-term down trend but that food-focused gastronomic enterprises do not experience any negative or even positive effects. The positive effects of a ban on smoking in public places on the general population are a decline in cigarette consumption and the reduction of secondhand smoke exposure by non-smokers. Smoking bans in hospitality venues are not necessarily linked with a shift of the tobacco consumption to

  12. Venue-Mediated Weak Ties in Multiplex HIV Transmission Risk Networks Among Drug-Using Male Sex Workers and Associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Wang, Peng; Ross, Michael W; Williams, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the structural characteristics of a multiplex HIV transmission risk network of drug-using male sex workers and their associates. Using a sample of 387 drug-using male sex workers and their male and female associates in Houston, Texas, we estimated an exponential random graph model to examine the venue-mediated relationships between individuals, the structural characteristics of relationships not linked to social venues, and homophily. We collected data in 2003 to 2004. The network comprised social, sexual, and drug-using relationships and affiliations with social venues. Individuals affiliated with the same social venues, bars, or street intersections were more likely to have nonreciprocated (weak) ties with others. Sex workers were less likely than were other associates to have reciprocated (strong) ties to other sex workers with the same venues. Individuals tended to have reciprocated ties not linked to venues. Partner choice tended to be predicated on homophily. Social venues may provide a milieu for forming weak ties in HIV transmission risk networks centered on male sex workers, which may foster the efficient diffusion of prevention messages as diverse information is obtained and information redundancy is avoided.

  13. ISS National Laboratory Education Project: Enhancing and Innovating the ISS as an Educational Venue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Leland D.

    2011-01-01

    The vision is to develop the ISS National Laboratory Education Project (ISS NLE) as a national resource for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education, utilizing the unique educational venue of the International Space Station per the NASA Congressional Authorization Act of 2005. The ISS NLE will serve as an educational resource which enables educational activities onboard the ISS and in the classroom. The ISS NLE will be accessible to educators and students from kindergarten to post-doctoral studies, at primary and secondary schools, colleges and universities. Additionally, the ISS NLE will provide ISS-related STEM education opportunities and resources for learners of all ages via informal educational institutions and venues Though U.S. Congressional direction emphasized the involvement of U.S. students, many ISS-based educational activities have international student and educator participation Over 31 million students around the world have participated in several ISS-related education activities.

  14. Proposed Requirements-driven User-scenario Development Protocol for the Belmont Forum E-Infrastructure and Data Management Cooperative Research Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, B.; Car, N.; Percivall, G.; Allen, D.; Fitch, P. G.; Baumann, P.; Waldmann, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Belmont Forum E-Infrastructure and Data Management Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) is designed to foster a global community to collaborate on e-infrastructure challenges. One of the deliverables is an implementation plan to address global data infrastructure interoperability challenges and align existing domestic and international capabilities. Work package three (WP3) of the CRA focuses on the harmonization of global data infrastructure for sharing environmental data. One of the subtasks under WP3 is the development of user scenarios that guide the development of applicable deliverables. This paper describes the proposed protocol for user scenario development. It enables the solicitation of user scenarios from a broad constituency, and exposes the mechanisms by which those solicitations are evaluated against requirements that map to the Belmont Challenge. The underlying principle of traceability forms the basis for a structured, requirements-driven approach resulting in work products amenable to trade-off analyses and objective prioritization. The protocol adopts the ISO Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (RM-ODP) as a top level framework. User scenarios are developed within RM-ODP's "Enterprise Viewpoint". To harmonize with existing frameworks, the protocol utilizes the conceptual constructs of "scenarios", "use cases", "use case categories", and use case templates as adopted by recent GEOSS Architecture Implementation Project (AIP) deliverables and CSIRO's eReefs project. These constructs are encapsulated under the larger construct of "user scenarios". Once user scenarios are ranked by goodness-of-fit to the Belmont Challenge, secondary scoring metrics may be generated, like goodness-of-fit to FutureEarth science themes. The protocol also facilitates an assessment of the ease of implementing given user scenario using existing GEOSS AIP deliverables. In summary, the protocol results in a traceability graph that can be extended to coordinate

  15. User 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porras, Jari; Heikkinen, Kari; Kinnula, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The User 2020 vision is of the changing needs and habits of a user in the future digital world. In order to understand the needs of the future users, we need to look at how users and technology have changed during recent years. The different generations of users are products of their own time...... and environment, and each has had its effect on the development of technology. The closer we come to the current generation, the bigger is the effect of technology on the characteristics of that generation. User needs guide the technology and the technology shapes the users. This WWRF Outlook analyses...... this evolutionary process. The basis of this Outlook lies in studies of user generations. Although it’s controversial to do so, users have been divided into generations based on their ability and willingness to use ICT solutions. Whether the users are digital ‘tourists’, ‘immigrants’ or ‘natives’ is mainly...

  16. Occupational noise exposure and regulatory adherence in music venues in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Barlow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise in most working environments is an unwanted by-product of the process. In most countries, noise exposure for workers has been controlled by legislation for many years. In the music industry the "noise" is actually the "desired" product, and for a long time the UK entertainment industry was exempt from these regulations. From April 2008, however, it became regulated under the Noise at Work Regulations 2005, meaning that employers from orchestras to nightclubs are legally required to adhere to the same requirements (based on ISO 9612:2009 for controlling noise exposure for their staff that have been applied to other industries for many years. A key question is to what degree, 2 years after implementation, these employers are complying with their legal responsibilities to protect the staff from noise? This study assessed four public music venues where live and/or recorded music is regularly played. Thirty staff members in different roles in the venues were monitored using noise dosimetry to determine noise exposure. Questionnaires were used to determine work patterns, attitudes to noise and hearing loss, and levels of training about noise risk. Results showed that the majority of staff (70% in all venues exceeded the daily noise exposure limit value in their working shift. Use of hearing protection was rare (<30% and not enforced by most venues. The understanding of the hazard posed by noise was low, and implementation of the noise regulations was haphazard, with staff regularly exceeding regulatory limits. The implication is that the industry is failing to meet regulatory requirements.

  17. Alcohol Use, Drinking Venue Utilization, and Child Physical Abuse: Results from a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Freisthler, Bridget

    2011-01-01

    A positive relationship between parents’ drinking and child physical abuse has been established by previous research. This paper examines how a parent’s use of drinking locations is related to physical abuse. A convenience sample of 103 parents answered questions on physical abuse with the Conflict Tactics Scale-Parent Child version (CTS-PC), current drinking behavior, and the frequency with which they drank at different venues, including bars and parties. Ordered probit models were used to a...

  18. VIERS- User Preference Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Preferences service provides a means to store, retrieve, and manage user preferences. The service supports definition of enterprise wide preferences, as well as...

  19. Occupational noise exposure and regulatory adherence in music venues in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Christopher; Castilla-Sanchez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Noise in most working environments is an unwanted by-product of the process. In most countries, noise exposure for workers has been controlled by legislation for many years. In the music industry the "noise" is actually the "desired" product, and for a long time the UK entertainment industry was exempt from these regulations. From April 2008, however, it became regulated under the Noise at Work Regulations 2005, meaning that employers from orchestras to nightclubs are legally required to adhere to the same requirements (based on ISO 9612:2009) for controlling noise exposure for their staff that have been applied to other industries for many years. A key question is to what degree, 2 years after implementation, these employers are complying with their legal responsibilities to protect the staff from noise? This study assessed four public music venues where live and/or recorded music is regularly played. Thirty staff members in different roles in the venues were monitored using noise dosimetry to determine noise exposure. Questionnaires were used to determine work patterns, attitudes to noise and hearing loss, and levels of training about noise risk. Results showed that the majority of staff (70%) in all venues exceeded the daily noise exposure limit value in their working shift. Use of hearing protection was rare (noise was low, and implementation of the noise regulations was haphazard, with staff regularly exceeding regulatory limits. The implication is that the industry is failing to meet regulatory requirements.

  20. Exposure to ultrafine particles in hospitality venues with partial smoking bans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Manfred; Moshammer, Hanns; Schietz, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Fine particles in hospitality venues with insufficient smoking bans indicate health risks from passive smoking. In a random sample of Viennese inns (restaurants, cafes, bars, pubs and discotheques) effects of partial smoking bans on indoor air quality were examined by measurement of count, size and chargeable surface of ultrafine particles (UFPs) sized 10-300 nm, simultaneously with mass of particles sized 300-2500 nm (PM2.5). Air samples were taken in 134 rooms unannounced during busy hours and analyzed by a diffusion size classifier and an optical particle counter. Highest number concentrations of particles were found in smoking venues and smoking rooms (median 66,011 pt/cm(3)). Even non-smoking rooms adjacent to smoking rooms were highly contaminated (median 25,973 pt/cm(3)), compared with non-smoking venues (median 7408 pt/cm(3)). The particle number concentration was significantly correlated with the fine particle mass (Phospitality premises. Health protection of non-smoking guests and employees from risky UFP concentration is insufficient, even in rooms labeled "non-smoking". Partial smoking bans with separation of smoking rooms failed.

  1. Alcohol Use, Drinking Venue Utilization, and Child Physical Abuse: Results from a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisthler, Bridget

    2011-04-01

    A positive relationship between parents' drinking and child physical abuse has been established by previous research. This paper examines how a parent's use of drinking locations is related to physical abuse. A convenience sample of 103 parents answered questions on physical abuse with the Conflict Tactics Scale-Parent Child version (CTS-PC), current drinking behavior, and the frequency with which they drank at different venues, including bars and parties. Ordered probit models were used to assess relationships between parent demographics, drinking patterns, places of drinking, and CTS-PC scores. Frequent drinking, frequently going to bars, frequently going to parties in a parent's own home, and frequently going to parties in friends' homes were positively related to child physical abuse. The number of drinking locations was positively related to child physical abuse such that parents who report attending and drinking at more of these venues were more likely to be perpetrators of physical abuse. This suggests that time spent in these venues provides opportunities to mix with individuals that may share the same attitudes and norms towards acting violently.

  2. MORT User's Manual for use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram. [Contains a list of System Safety Development Center publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1,500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  3. NASIS data base management system - IBM 360/370 OS MVT implementation. 7: Data base administrator user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Data Base Administrator User's Guide for the NASA Aerospace Safety information system is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) multi-terminal tasking, (2) data base executive, (3) utilities, (4) maintenance, and (5) update mode functions.

  4. User participation in implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical...... system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff...... experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need...

  5. Часть 1. Transport logistics in terms of Olympics venue construction in Sochi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Babaev

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights one of the possible methods of solving logistic problems concerning construction of Olympics-2014 venues in Sochi. Focuses on mathematical programming of the aspect.

  6. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Salt Lake City Olympics Venues, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This computer generated perspective image provides a northward looking 'view from space' that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling, and the nearby Snow Basin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City area ski resorts host the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and a Landsat 5 satellite image mosaic. Topographic expression is exaggerated four times.For a full-resolution, annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60

  7. Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the user’s palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the user’s fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hand’s characteristics just into the system’s mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interface’s controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

  8. The effect of Sao Paulo's smoke-free legislation on carbon monoxide concentration in hospitality venues and their workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Jaqueline S; Abe, Tania M O; Pereira, Alexandre C; Megid, Maria Cristina; Shimabukuro, Cristina E; Valentin, Luis Sergio O; Ferreira, Marizete M da C; Nobre, Moacyr R C; Lancarotte, Ines; Barretto, Antonio Carlos Pereira

    2011-03-01

    Studies have shown that there is no safe level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and there is a close link between SHS and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the most important components present in SHS. To evaluate the impact of the smoking ban law in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, on the CO concentration in restaurants, bars, night clubs and similar venues and in their workers. In the present study we measured CO concentration in 585 hospitality venues. CO concentration was measured in different environments (indoor, semi-open and open areas) from visited venues, as well as, in the exhaled air from approximately 627 workers of such venues. Measurements were performed twice, before and 12 weeks after the law implementation. In addition, the quality of the air in the city during the same period of our study was verified. RESULTS The CO concentration pre-ban and pot-ban in hospitality venues was indoor area 4.57 (3.70) ppm vs 1.35 (1.66) ppm (phospitality venues and in their workers, whether they smoke or not.

  9. Feasibility of providing interventions for injection drug users in pharmacy settings: a case study among San Francisco pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Valerie J; Lutnick, Alexandra; Kral, Alex H

    2014-01-01

    In addition to syringe exchange programs, pharmacies are important venues where injection drug users (IDUs) can access non-prescription syringes and other prevention interventions. This study assessed the feasibility of providing a range of interventions for IDUs in pharmacy settings. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 participants (policy makers, owner/managers, dispensing pharmacists, and pharmacy staff) from independent and chain/retail pharmacies in San Francisco, California, USA. The highest level of support was for a coupon syringe program and educational materials. Several overarching themes illustrate challenges to implementing pharmacy-based preventive interventions: time, space, sufficient staff, pharmacist training, legal considerations, pharmacist attitudes toward IDUs, and cost and reimbursement issues. This study provides concrete examples of the types of preventive services that pharmacists support and consider feasible, and illustrates that pharmacists welcome the opportunity to broaden their role as critical partners in public health matters related to injection drug use.

  10. National water management in the Republic of South Africa — Towards a consultative partnership with diverse users in a semi-arid country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Alan H.; Midgley, Desmond C.

    1988-07-01

    A resourceful holistic water management strategy has been developed for ensuring equitable provision of adequate quantities of water of satisfactory quality at acceptable risk and affordable cost to a wide international range of competing user groups subject to adverse physical and hydrological factors and under rapidly changing social conditions. Scarce resource allocation strategies, based on scientific studies and supported by modern data processing facilities, focus primarily on supply, demand and quality. Supply management implies creation of the best combination of affordable elements of infrastructure for bulk water supplies from available runoff, groundwater, re-use, imports and unconventional sources, sized to meet determinable requirements with appropriate degrees of assurance, coupled with continuous optimization of system operation. Demand management seeks optimum allocation of available supplies to towns, power generation, industry, mining, agriculture, forestry, recreation and ecology, according to priority criteria determined from scientific, economic and socioeconomic studies. Quality management strategies relate to the control of salination, eutrophication and pollution from both diffuse and point sources. As the combined demands of complex First and Third World societies and economies on the available resources rise, increasing attention has to be paid to finding practical compromises to facilitate handling of conflict between legitimate users having widely divergent interests, aspirations and levels of sophistication. For optimum joint utilization, the central regulating authority is striving to forge a consultative partnership within which to promote, among the widest possible spectrum of users, enlightened understanding of the opportunities and limitations in handling complex international, social, political, legal, economic and financial issues associated with water development. These cannot readily be resolved by the methods of traditional

  11. Correlates of HIV infection among street-based and venue-based sex workers in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thuy Tc; Nguyen, Quoc C; Tran, Ha Tt; Schwandt, Michael; Lim, Hyun J

    2016-10-01

    SummaryCommercial sex work is one of the driving forces of the HIV epidemic across the world. In Vietnam, although female sex workers (FSWs) carry a disproportionate burden of HIV, little is known about the risk profile and associated factors for HIV infection among this population. There is a need for large-scale research to obtain reliable and representative estimates of the measures of association. This study involved secondary data analysis of the 'HIV/STI Integrated Biological and Behavioral Surveillance' study in Vietnam in 2009-2010 to examine the correlates of HIV among FSWs. Data collected from 5298 FSWs, including 2530 street-based sex workers and 2768 venue-based sex workers from 10 provinces in Vietnam, were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. HIV prevalence among the overall FSW population was 8.6% (n = 453). However, when stratified by FSW subpopulations, HIV prevalence was 10.6% (n = 267) for street-based sex workers and 6.7% (n = 186) for venue-based sex workers. Factors independently associated with HIV infection in the multivariate analysis, regardless of sex work types, were injecting drug use, high self-perceived HIV risk, and age ≥ 25 years. Additional factors independently associated with HIV risk within each FSW subpopulation included having ever been married among street-based sex workers and inconsistent condom use with clients and having sex partners who injected drugs among venue-based sex workers. Apart from strategies addressing modifiable risk behaviours among all FSWs, targeted strategies to address specific risk behaviours within each FSW subpopulation should be adopted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Municipal Management, Infrastructure And Perception Of Users: A Description Of National Program For Improving Access And Quality Of Primary Care In The Brazilian Semiarid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Gomes de Sousa Bezerra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ministry of Health with the aim of improving the service provided by the Unified Health System has been creating work tools to identify which points need to receive more attention to be optimized. Objective: Description of the role of municipal management, infrastructure assessment and perception of users of primary care. Method: Cross-sectional and descriptive study, conducted with Basic Units of Piauí municipality in 2015. The data were represented by tables. Results: 90% of the units reported receiving support for the planning and organization of the work process. Only 14, 81% of the units have equipment and supplies for proper operation. Users recommend the service in 92,62% of the cases. Conclusion: despite the precarious structure of the basic units of the county, the population still recognizes them as the best care.

  13. User group attitudes toward forest management treatments on the Shawnee National Forest: application of a photo-evaluation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Cohen; Jean C. Mangun; Mae A. Davenport; Andrew D. Carver

    2008-01-01

    Diverse public opinions, competing management goals, and polarized interest groups combine with problems of scale to create a complex management arena for managers in the Central Hardwood Forest region. A mixed-methods approach that incorporated quantitative analysis of data from a photo evaluation-attitude scale survey instrument was used to assess attitudes toward...

  14. Emergency Management Standards for NCAA Division I-A Football Stadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogstra, Joshua R.

    2012-01-01

    In the best of times, emergency managers of athletic event venues struggle with the responsibilities of venue security. The possibility of terrorist threats exacerbates the situation, especially when security threats can involve a critical mass of spectators at an event. Emergency managers at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)…

  15. Knowledge is power: using nursing information management and leadership interventions to improve services to patients, clients and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janice

    2005-11-01

    This paper examines the purpose, role and function of information and information management within health care today. It is set within the context of a specialist forensic learning disability setting. Changes in politics, government legislation and reforms of the National Health Service (NHS) have created a need to equip managers with the necessary tools and skills to be able to lead and manage effectively. As such there has been a great emphasis upon specialist training, such as the government-driven Leading an Empowered Organisation courses, for nurse managers and nurses with leadership potential. Yet with the drive to generate a new wave culture within the NHS of inspirational leaders, are we still overlooking a critical and key area which is fundamental in achieving and delivering cost effective, quality health care--the area of information management within health care today? The processes presented in this paper are structured through a strategic nursing management and leadership performance implementation model, the Clinical Nursing Leadership Learning and Action Process (CLINLAP) model, which facilitates work-based learning and capability development in the reality of everyday clinical activities. Through the model, the emphasis is to make clinical goals specific, roles explicit, processes clear and encourage these activities to be carried out within an environment of open relationships. The use of CLINLAP model assisted as a management and leadership technology to manage change in the workplace so as to improve services to patients in Yelday Lodge. Structured management and leadership interventions led to observable positive change in information management on Yelday Lodge. The conclusion is that sustained quality information could be embedded in nursing practice at Yelday Lodge or elsewhere by evaluating and discussing the different information management approaches within the practice area through the use of structured management and leadership

  16. Lead User Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Larsen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    User innovation and especially the integration of lead users is a key topic in the innovation management literature of recent years. This paper contributes by providing a rare perspective into what easily could be seen as innovation failure, shown from two perspectives. We show how a lack of shared...... imagination hampers participation and kills innovation between interdependent stakeholders at the threshold between invention and innovation in practice. We present a first case in the fun-sport industry where an external lead user and diverse firm representatives in different functions fail to create......, deliver and capture the value of an innovatively new device together. From the perspective of the lead user, we show antecedents and effects of social interaction between organizational actors and the lead user on the development of social capital, especially trust and shared imagination. The second case...

  17. AMPS data management requirements study. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A data simulation is presented for instruments and associated control and display functions required to perform controlled active experiments of the atmosphere. A comprehensive user's guide is given for the data requirements and software developed for the following experiments: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observation of ambient plasmas; (3) ionospheric measurements with a subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustic gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A complete description of each experiment is given.

  18. A Study of the Relationship between User Attitudes and the Success of the MAJCOM and AFRCE Work Information Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    AirComan IL ARCE BallsticLangey AB,24 Misl Supr)-FC Norton AF CA ( Estr Region) - AFRCE (United Kingdom) Ruislip AB UK UntdSae0i Fre nErp * Ramstein AB...the variables are intended to be indicative of association rather than causality. In this model, MIS success is influenced by cognitive A behavior and...attitudes of the user. Attitudes are modified by individual differences which can be clatsified into cognitive style, personality and demographic

  19. The gross anatomy laboratory: a novel venue for critical thinking and interdisciplinary teaching in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Kevin C; Joy, Anita

    2015-03-01

    Reports on the status of dental education have concluded that there is a need for various types of curricular reform, making recommendations that include better integration of basic, behavioral, and clinical sciences, increased case-based teaching, emphasis on student-driven learning, and creation of lifelong learners. Dental schools faced with decreasing contact hours, increasing teaching material, and technological advancements have experimented with alternate curricular strategies. At Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine, curricular changes have begun with a series of integrated biomedical sciences courses. During the process of planning and implementing the integrated courses, a novel venue-the gross anatomy laboratory-was used to introduce all Year 1 students to critical thinking, self-directed learning, and the scientific method. The venture included student-driven documentation of anatomical variations encountered in the laboratory using robust scientific methods, thorough literature review, and subsequent presentation of findings in peer review settings. Students responded positively, with over 75% agreeing the experience intellectually challenged them. This article describes the process of re-envisioning the gross anatomy laboratory as an effective venue for small group-based, student-driven projects that focus on key pedagogical concepts to encourage the development of lifelong learners.

  20. Multiple Abortions and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Young Migrant Women Working in Entertainment Venues in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanyan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Yongyang; Tao, Haidong; Xu, Song; Xia, Junrui; Huang, Wen; He, Huan; Zaller, Nickolas; Operario, Don

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey of 358 young migrant women working in entertainment venues in China to explore the prevalence of and factors associated with two indicators of sexual and reproductive health: (1) multiple abortions and (2) the dual risk of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and abortion history. One quarter (25.4 percent) of the women in this sample had multiple abortions during their lifetime and, of those with any abortion history, 18.3 percent had had an abortion outside of a regulated health clinic. One-third (33.0 percent) of the sample had had an STI during the past year, and approximately one-fourth (23.7 percent) of those women did not receive STI treatment in a public hospital. Approximately one-fourth (23.5 percent) of the sample reported both a history of abortion and an STI during the past year. Women with a history of multiple abortions had significantly lower income levels, were more likely to have sex with clients and with husbands, and tended more to use alcohol before sex. Women who experienced both abortion and STI risks were more likely to report having had unprotected sex, genitourinary tract infections symptoms, anxiety, illicit drug use, and suicidal ideation. Enhanced efforts are needed to improve reproductive and sexual health for female migrants in urban China, particularly those working in entertainment venues.

  1. Blaming the building: How venue quality influences consumer bias against stigmatized leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Derek R; McKay, Patrick F; Volpone, Sabrina D

    2016-08-01

    Because stigmatized individuals are viewed as incongruent with commonly held implicit leadership theories, they are often deemed less fit to lead than their nonstigmatized counterparts (Eagly & Karau, 2002). This suggests consumers might use such views to discredit not only stigmatized leaders, but also the companies they represent. However, cognition based on social categories (1 potential form of stigma) may be more likely when there are readily available alternative factors to account for one's decisions via casuistry. Across 2 complementary studies (field and experiment), we find that customers react negatively to stigmatized leaders only when the physical state of the company venue provides an ostensible defense to mask their biased behavior. When facilities are of lower quality, consumers appear to use a leader's stigma to infer lower product quality, coinciding in less patronage for companies with stigmatized as opposed to nonstigmatized leaders. Thus, consumers penalize companies with stigmatized leaders only when doing so can easily be attributed to an alternative factor (e.g., a lower quality venue) not involving the leader's stigma. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Inhalational Chlorine Injuries at Public Aquatic Venues - California, 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Jason A; DiMaggio, Michele; Kaufmann, Matthew; O'Connor, Kevin; Smorodinsky, Svetlana; Armatas, Christina; Barreau, Tracy; Kreutzer, Richard; Ancheta, Lino

    2017-05-19

    In June 2015, personnel from California's Contra Costa Health Services Environmental Health and Hazardous Materials (hazmat) divisions were alerted to a possible chemical release at a swimming pool in an outdoor municipal water park. Approximately 50 bathers were in the pool when symptoms began; 34 (68%) experienced vomiting, coughing, or eye irritation. Among these persons, 17 (50%) were treated at the scene by Contra Costa's Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and released, and 17 (50%) were transported to local emergency departments; five patients also were evaluated later at an emergency department or by a primary medical provider. Environmental staff members determined that a chemical controller malfunction had allowed sodium hypochlorite and muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid) solutions to be injected into the main pool recirculation line while the recirculation pump was off; when the main recirculation pump was restarted, toxic chlorine gas (generated by the reaction of concentrated sodium hypochlorite and muriatic acid) was released into the pool. A review of 2008-2015 California pesticide exposure records identified eight additional such instances of toxic chlorine gas releases at public aquatic venues caused by equipment failure or human error that sickened 156 persons. Chemical exposures at public aquatic venues can be prevented by proper handling, storage, and monitoring of pool chemicals; appropriate equipment operation and maintenance; training of pool operators and staff members on pool chemical safety; and reporting of chemical exposures.

  3. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School–Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L.; Martino, Steven C.; Kovalchik, Stephanie A.; Becker, Kirsten M.; Shadel, William G.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth’s exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Method: Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles–area youth ages 11–14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. Results: African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Conclusions: Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school–age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth. PMID:27172570

  4. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School-Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L; Martino, Steven C; Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Becker, Kirsten M; Shadel, William G; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth's exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles-area youth ages 11-14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school-age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth.

  5. Local organizations` expectations towards remote management of heating units: a building management system users group; Attentes des collectivites locales dans le domaine de la telegestion des chaufferies: le groupement des utilisateurs de systemes de telegestion (GUST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irigoin, M. [Mairie de Montpellier, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1995-12-01

    A users group has been created in France for collective local organizations (cities, etc.) using remote management systems for heating plants and units, public buildings, etc., with several objectives: comparison of the various control equipment and software codes and evaluation of their system compatibility, promotion of control systems for small size units and integration of non-energy related functions, monitoring and maintenance of heating systems, training, development of data transmission protocols

  6. Venue-based recruitment of women at elevated risk for HIV: an HIV Prevention Trials Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Danielle F; Golin, Carol; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Hughes, James P; Wang, Jing; Roman Isler, Malika; Mannheimer, Sharon; Kuo, Irene; Lucas, Jonathan; DiNenno, Elizabeth; Justman, Jessica; Frew, Paula M; Emel, Lynda; Rompalo, Anne; Polk, Sarah; Adimora, Adaora A; Rodriquez, Lorenna; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Hodder, Sally

    2014-06-01

    The challenge of identifying and recruiting U.S. women at elevated risk for HIV acquisition impedes prevention studies and services. HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 064 was a U.S. multisite, longitudinal cohort study designed to estimate HIV incidence among women living in communities with prevalent HIV and poverty. Venue-based sampling (VBS) methodologies and participant and venue characteristics are described. Eligible women were recruited from 10 U.S. communities with prevalent HIV and poverty using VBS. Participant eligibility criteria included age 18-44 years, residing in a designated census tract/zip code, and self-report of at least one high-risk personal and/or male sexual partner characteristic associated with HIV acquisition (e.g., incarceration history). Ethnography was conducted to finalize recruitment areas and venues. Eight thousand twenty-nine women were screened and 2,099 women were enrolled (88% black, median age 29 years) over 14 months. The majority of participants were recruited from outdoor venues (58%), retail spaces (18%), and social service organizations (13%). The proportion of women recruited per venue category varied by site. Most participants (73%) had both individual and partner characteristics that qualified them for the study; 14% were eligible based on partner risk only. VBS is a feasible and effective approach to rapidly recruit a population of women at enhanced risk for HIV in the United States. Such a recruitment approach is needed in order to engage women most at risk and requires strong community engagement.

  7. Increase in use of protective earplugs by Rock and Roll concert attendees when provided for free at concert venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jieun; Smukler, Simon R; Chung, Yuan; House, Ron; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of hearing protection use among attendees of Rock and Roll concerts at baseline and in concerts where earplugs are provided for free at concert venue entrances. Six concerts performed at two music venues in Toronto, Canada were evaluated. Study personnel observed and recorded the use of hearing protection at three concerts where no earplugs were distributed, and three concerts where earplugs were provided for free at the concert venue entrance. A total of 955 individuals over the age of 18 were observed at six concerts. Six hundred and thirty-seven individuals (64% male) were observed at concerts where no earplugs were provided, and 318 individuals (68% male) were observed at concerts where free earplugs were provided. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in hearing protection usage at concerts where earplugs were provided for free at the concert venue entrance, odds ratio 7.27 (95% CI: 3.24-16.30). The provision of free earplugs at concert venues may be a simple and inexpensive intervention that could be a component of a larger public health campaign to prevent non-occupational noise-induced hearing loss.

  8. Remote management of non-TR-069 UPnP end-user devices in a private network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillen, B.A.G.; Passchier, I.; Schoonhoven, B.H.A. van; Hartog, F.T.H. den

    2009-01-01

    End-to - end broadband service delivery requires remote management of devices in the home network, beyond the home gateway (HG). The service provider can only put limited requirements to these of-the-shelf devices, and therefore has to make intelligent use of their given control and management

  9. Analysis of the importance of drug packaging quality for end users and pharmaceutical industry as a part of the quality management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we collected and analyzed information on the importance of drug packaging quality to end users and pharmaceutical industry, as an indicator of the process of traceability and originality of drugs. Two surveys were conducted: one among the end users of drugs (252 patients and the other among professionals working in seven pharmaceutical companies in Serbia. For most end users (82.5% quality on the packaging of drugs was important, but only 41.8% of them thought that the appearance of the packaging could be an indicator of genuinity of drugs. The existence of the control marks (KM on drug packaging was not of great importance, since most of them (86.9% know, its function, but majority (60.2% would nevertheless decide to buy the drug without KM. Regarding the experts from the pharmaceutical industry, more then two-thirds of them (68.4% believed that the existence of KM did not contribute to efficient operations. Although a great number of pharmaceutical industry professionals (84.2% answered that the introduction of GS1 DataMatrix system would allow for complete traceability of the drug from the manufacturer to the end user, only 22.2% of them introduced this system to their products. This study also showed that domestic producers did not have a great interest for additional protection (special inks, holograms, special graphics, smart multicolor design, watermark, chemically labeled paper and cardboard etc.. on their products, given that only 15.8 % of them had some kind of additional protection against counterfeiting. Monitoring drug traceability from a manufacturer to end user is achieved by many complex activities regulated by law. A high percentage of responders said they were satisfied with the functionality of traceability systems used in their companies. As a way to increase the quality of drug packaging and business performance most responders saw in the continuous improvement of the system of traceability within the company

  10. Managing and caring for distressed and disturbed service users: the thoughts and feelings experienced by a sample of English mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, M; Kantaris, X; Guise, V; Välimäki, M

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the thoughts and feelings experienced by registered mental health nurses caring for distressed and/or disturbed service users in acute inpatient psychiatric settings in England. The prevailing thoughts of nurses were of cognitive dissonance and the conflict between benevolence and malevolence if coercive measures were seen as negative rather than positive; prevailing feelings experienced by nurses were fear, anxiety and vulnerability. To enhance care quality, nurses expressed the need for better communication with service users, and preventing the use of coercive measures and promotion of alternative methods of care and management. The nurses considered that debriefing dialogues following untoward incidents, practice development initiatives, education and training together with clinical supervision could be the way forward. The paper builds on the existing literature in offering clear explanations of nurses' thoughts and feelings when caring for distressed and/or disturbed service users in an English acute, inpatient psychiatric setting. Despite the small sample size and the limitations that it generates, the study findings will be of interest to the wider mental health nursing community. The findings will link to other national and international studies and therefore be valuable for future research studies of this kind. Collectively, they are building up a general picture of the distress, cognitive and emotional dissonance experienced by mental health nurses when using coercive interventions. The findings will help to develop mental health nurse education and enhance practice. High levels of distress and disturbance among service users experiencing acute mental illness is a major problem for mental health nurses (MHNs). The thoughts and feelings experienced by these nurses when caring for service users are of paramount importance as they influence clinical practice and caregiving. Similarly to research by other countries, this paper reports

  11. Management administrative and its incidence in the profitability and quality of the services to the users of an institution educational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Fernando Tubay Moreira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to determine the cost-effectiveness and quality of services enabling continuous improvement and optimization of the use of resources to run the Organization in a professional perspective allowing the user to their growth and development in profitability and attention. The current situation of the company was analyzed through the collection of legal, historical, financial data, etc., in different situations and moments. Subsequently compared with references that suggest the process management, the company is to be highly competitive, achieving its objectives of growth and development. At the end, there are conclusions necessary to achieve management with total quality in all areas of a company.

  12. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... tested in library contexts and the aim of this article is to identify the main approaches and to discuss their perspectives, including their strenghts and weaknesses in, especially, public library contexts. The purpose is also to prsent and discuss the results of a recent - 2014 - Danish library user...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  13. Towards Multimodal Error Management:Experimental Evaluation of User Strategies in Event of Faulty Application Behavior in Automotive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor McGlaun

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of a study analyzing the reactions of subjects on simulated errors of a dedicated in-car interface for controlling infotainment and communication services. The test persons could operate the system, using different input modalities, such as natural or command speech as well as head and hand gestures, or classical tactile paradigms. In various situational contexts, we scrutinized the interaction patterns the test participants applied to overcome different operation tasks. Moreover, we evaluated individual user behavior concerning modality transitions and individual fallback strategies in case of system errors. Two different error types (Hidden System Errors and Apparent System Errors were provoked. As a result, we found out that initially, i.e. with the system working properly, most users prefer tactile or speech interaction. In case of Hidden System Errors, mostly changes from speech to tactile interaction and vice versa occurred. Concerning Apparent System Errors, 87% of the subjects automatically interrupted or cancelled their input procedure. 73% of all test persons who continued interaction, when the reason for the faulty system behavior was gone, strictly kept the selected modality. Regarding the given input vocabulary, none of the subjects selected head or hand gesture input as the leading fallback modality.

  14. Legal pluralism, hydraulic property creation and sustainability: the materialized nature of water rights in user-managed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, R.A.; Vos, J.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, most irrigation systems are managed by farmer collectives, in contexts of legal pluralism. National and supranational legislation and policy-making, however, focus on governance frameworks established by State and market actors. Consequently, development planning often ignores farmers’

  15. Analysis of User Preferences for Management and Search Features in E-book Reader Libraries in Smartphone Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihye Kim

    2015-01-01

    ... of downloaded e-books in an e-book reader library. However, there are comparatively few features for e-book management and search in most e-book reader libraries, particularly in smartphone environments...

  16. UIL -User Interface Language

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, J; CERN. Geneva

    1990-01-01

    Some widget examples, widget categories, the push button widget, menus, the FORM widget, using UIL for an application program, the MOTIF Resource Manager (MRM), execution thread of an application using UIL and MRM, opening hierarchies, binding UIL names to application addresses, fetching widget hierarchies and managing them, changing widget resources using UIL and MRM, fetching literal values from the UID file. Introduction to the User Interface Language, defining a user interface, advantages of using UIL, accessing UID files from the application, UIL Syntax, the UIL module structure, defining a widget instance hierarchy, declaration of literals colors, icons, fonts

  17. Towards user-oriented control of end-user computing in large organizations

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Neil; Wood-Harper, A. T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper questions the traditional IT view of end-user computing which stifles the development of new systems by users and imposes technical controls on them. It proposes a new user-oriented view of end-user computing which will be of significant use to IT management and explores the dynamic nature of end-user computing using causal maps.

  18. Air contamination due to smoking in German restaurants, bars, and other venues--before and after the implementation of a partial smoking ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, Florian; Mons, Ute; Pötschke-Langer, Martina

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined the reduction in exposure to tobacco smoke in German hospitality venues following the implementation of a partial smoking ban by measuring the indoor air concentration of PM(2.5) in 2005 and 2009, that is, before and after the legislation was implemented. The concentration of respirable suspended particles (PM(2.5)) in the indoor air of German hospitality venues was measured using a laser photometer (AM510). The prelegislation sample from 2005 included 80 venues of which 58 could be revisited in 2009. After replenishment, the postlegislation sample consisted of 79 venues. Compared with the prelegislation measurement, the concentration of PM(2.5) in hospitality venues was reduced significantly after introduction of the smoke-free legislation. The median mass concentration of PM(2.5) was reduced by 87.1% in coffee bars, by 88.7% in restaurants, by 66.3% in bars, and by 90.8% in discotheques. Notably, legal exemptions to the smoking ban are an issue: At the postlegislation measurement in 2009, the mass concentrations of PM(2.5) were substantially higher in venues allowing smoking in the whole venue or in a designated smoking room than in completely smoke-free venues. The German smoke-free legislation significantly reduced the levels of respirable suspended particles in the indoor air of hospitality venues, benefiting the health of employees and patrons alike. But legal exemptions attenuated the effectiveness of the policy.

  19. Impact of the 2011 Spanish smoking ban in hospitality venues: indoor secondhand smoke exposure and influence of outdoor smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, María J; Fernández, Esteve; Pérez-Rios, Mónica; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Schiaffino, Anna; Galán, Iñaki; Moncada, Albert; Fu, Marcela; Montes, Agustín; Saltó, Esteve; Nebot, Manel

    2013-05-01

    The Spanish tobacco control law of 2006 was modified in January 2011, banning smoking in all hospitality venues. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of the 2011 Spanish smoking ban on secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in hospitality venues, and to analyze the potential impact of outdoor smokers close to entrances on indoor SHS levels after the law came into force. Before-and-after evaluation study with repeated measures. The study was carried out in three regions of Spain (Catalonia, Galicia, and Madrid) and included a random sample of 178 hospitality venues. We measured vapor-phase nicotine and particulate matter 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter (PM2.5) as SHS markers at baseline (November-December 2010) and at follow-up (April-June 2011). We also recorded tobacco consumption variables such as the presence of butts, ashtrays, and smokers. In the posttest assessment, we also recorded the number of outdoor smokers close to the entrance. A total of 351 nicotine and 160 PM2.5 measurements were taken. Both nicotine and PM2.5 concentrations decreased by more than 90% (nicotine from 5.73 to 0.57 µg/m(3), PM2.5 from 233.38 to 18.82 µg/m(3)). After the law came into force, both nicotine and PM2.5 concentrations were significantly higher in venues with outdoor smokers close to the entrance than in those without outdoor smokers. All the observational tobacco consumption variables significantly decreased (p hospitality venues dramatically decreased after the 2011 Spanish smoking ban. SHS from outdoor smokers close to entrances seems to drift inside venues. Smoking control legislation should consider outdoor restrictions to ensure complete protection against SHS.

  20. Web-based self-management for young cancer survivors: consideration of user requirements and barriers to implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Louise; Turner, Andrew; Osmond, Jane; Hooker, Louise; Kosmala-Anderson, Joanna; Batehup, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    As the population of young cancer survivors increases, there is a need to develop alternative ways of providing post-treatment support. Online systems potentially offer self-management and e-learning support following cancer treatment. This research aims to explore the self-management support needs of teenage and young adult cancer survivors and consider whether those needs can be met through a web-based self-management resource. A mixed methods approach was adopted including an online survey (n = 24), focus groups and interviews with teenage and young adult cancer survivors (n = 7) and interviews with parents of survivors (n = 6), information technology specialists (n = 8) and clinical, nursing and social work professionals (n = 11). All stakeholders were supportive of web-based self-management to meet information and support needs that would supplement continued direct interaction with clinical staff. Barriers to implementation were identified in terms of risks to young people, governance issues and the challenges of providing a long-term service. Computer access and use amongst teenagers and young adults is commonplace, and there is an expectation that self-management needs will be met at least partially online in the future. There is a desire for online social support through peer interaction as well personal developmental and clinical management. These elements may need to be run through different systems to cater for governance requirements. An online self-management system could provide support at a number of different levels. The barriers to implementation should be addressed, to ensure that survivors can be supported in this way in the future.

  1. Developing Knowledge Generation, Communication and Management in Teacher Education: A Successful Attempt at Teaching Novice Computer Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This unique colloquium of research for lecturers took place in an academic college of education focused on discussing and peer reviewing through an On-Line Forum and on participating in a conference. Both aimed at enhancing the level and quality of the research activity in the college by developing knowledge generation, communication and management. This study followed studies, which indicated that lecturers do not know and experience enough about generating, communicating and managing knowledge, especially with regards to the didactics of knowledge. Most of the studies carried out by the lecturers who participated in the colloquium focused on integrating disciplines with pedagogic-didactic applications. The method of the colloquium was based on virtual peer teaching, sharing their generated knowledge and experience, and then managing it. The findings indicated that the process was advanced very fast. The lecturers were able to integrate theory and practice while carrying out their research and instruction. This certainly affected the lecturers

  2. User Types in Online Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Online applications are presented in the context of information society. Online applications characteristics are analyzed. Quality characteristics are presented in relation to online applications users. Types of users for AVIO application are presented. Use cases for AVIO application are identified. The limitations of AVIO application are defined. Types of users in online applications are identified. The threedimensional matrix of access to the online application resources is built. The user type-oriented database is structured. Access management of the fields related to the database tables is analyzed. The classification of online applications users is done.

  3. Demographic Risk Factors for Alcohol-Related Aggression In and Around Licensed Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Curtis, Ashlee; Meurer, Hannah; Miller, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Few studies have examined the role of gender and both area-level and individual socio-economic status (SES) as independent predictors of alcohol-related aggression (ARA) in and around licensed venues. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between gender, area-level SES and individual SES (operationalised as occupational category) and ARA in and around licensed venues. The sample comprised 697 men and 649 women aged 16-47, who completed a patron intercept survey as part of a larger study assessing trends in harm and stakeholders' views surrounding local community level interventions in dealing with alcohol-related problems in the night-time economy. Binary logistic regression analyses showed that age, gender, occupational category, area-level SES and level of intoxication at time of interview were all significant predictors of involvement in ARA. Being male doubled the odds of involvement in ARA, while age was a protective factor. Blue collar workers had more than double the odds of ARA involvement of professionals, while those living in the most socio-economically disadvantaged areas were over twice as likely to report experiencing ARA compared to those living in the most advantaged areas. However, assessment of the predictive model by gender revealed that effects of age, occupational category and area-level SES were restricted to male participants, with greater intoxication no longer predictive. ARA among patrons was significantly more likely to occur among men, those in blue collar occupations, and individuals living in low SES areas, suggesting both individual and area-level disadvantage may play a role in ARA. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  4. Providing earplugs to young adults at risk encourages protective behaviour in music venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Elizabeth Francis; Nielsen, Lillian; Gilliver, Megan

    2016-06-01

    For some young people, nightclubs and other music venues are a major source of noise exposure, arising from a combination of very high noise levels; relatively long attendance duration; and frequent, sustained participation over several years. Responsibility for hearing protection is largely left to individuals, many of whom choose not to wear earplugs. In order to encourage earplug use in these settings, a new approach is needed. The aim of the study was to examine whether presentation of hearing health information would result in increased use of earplugs, or whether provision of earplugs alone would be sufficient to change behaviour. A total of 51 regular patrons of music venues were allocated to either a low-information (lo-info) or high-information (hi-info) group. Both groups completed a survey about their current noise exposure, earplug usage and perceived risk of hearing damage. Both groups were also provided with one-size-fits-all filtered music earplugs. The hi-info group was also provided with audio-visual and written information about the risks of excessive noise exposure. After 4 weeks, and again after an additional 12 weeks, participants were asked about their recent earplug usage, intention to use earplugs in the future, and perceived risk of hearing damage. The results showed that after 4 weeks, the hi-info group's perceived personal risk of hearing damage was significantly higher than that of the lo-info group. After 16 weeks, these differences were no longer evident; however, at both 4 and 16 weeks, both the lo- and hi-info groups were using the earplugs equally often; and both groups intended to use earplugs significantly more often in the future. This suggests that the information was unnecessary to motivate behavioural change. Rather, the simple act of providing access to earplugs appears to have effectively encouraged young at-risk adults to increase their earplug use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Design, Analysis and User Acceptance of Architectural Design Education in Learning System Based on Knowledge Management Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Wu; Lin, Yu-An; Wen, Ming-Hui; Perng, Yeng-Hong; Hsu, I-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to develop an architectural design knowledge management learning system with corresponding learning activities to help the students have meaningful learning and improve their design capability in their learning process. Firstly, the system can help the students to obtain and share useful knowledge. Secondly,…

  6. Building stewardship with recreation users: an approach of market segmentation to meet the goal of public-lands management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po-Hsin Lai; Chia-Kuen Cheng; David Scott

    2007-01-01

    Participation in outdoor recreation has been increasing at a rate far exceeding the population growth since the 1980s. The growing demand for outdoor recreation amenities has imposed a great challenge on resource management agencies of public lands. This study proposed a segmentation framework to identify different outdoor recreation groups based on their attitudes...

  7. LANDIS 4.0 users guide. LANDIS: a spatially explicit model of forest landscape disturbance, management, and succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong S. He; Wei Li; Brian R. Sturtevant; Jian Yang; Bo Z. Shang; Eric J. Gustafson; David J. Mladenoff

    2005-01-01

    LANDIS 4.0 is new-generation software that simulates forest landscape change over large spatial and temporal scales. It is used to explore how disturbances, succession, and management interact to determine forest composition and pattern. Also describes software architecture, model assumptions and provides detailed instructions on the use of the model.

  8. Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus, Pig-Tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina and Tiger (Panthera tigris Populations at Tourism Venues in Thailand and Aspects of Their Welfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schmidt-Burbach

    Full Text Available This study focused on determining the size and welfare aspects of Asian elephant, pig-tailed macaque and tiger populations at facilities open to tourists in Thailand. Data were gathered from 118 venues through direct observations and interviews with staff. A score sheet-based welfare assessment was used to calculate scores between 1 and 10, indicating each venue's welfare situation. Factors such as freedom of movement for the animals, access to veterinary care, environmental noise quality, hygiene standards and work intensity were included in the score sheet. 1688 elephants, 371 macaques and 621 tigers were found at the venues. 89 venues exclusively kept elephants, 9 designated 'Monkey schools' offered macaque shows, 4 venues kept primarily tigers, mostly for petting and photo opportunities, and the remaining venues kept a mix of these animals. A strong imbalance in female to male gender ratios was recorded with about 4:1 for adult elephants and 1:4 for adult macaques. Severely inadequate welfare conditions were common, with 75% of macaques and 99% of tigers being kept at venues with scores less than 5. 86% of elephants were kept in inadequate conditions at venues with scores between 3 and 5, but a significant number of venues with scores above 5 were found. 4.6% of elephants were provided commendable conditions, reaching assessment scores of 8 and above. 71% of venues did not offer any sort of education about animals to visitors. This study is the first to assess welfare aspects of captive wild animals at tourism venues across Thailand. It concludes that significant concerns exist about the welfare of wild animals in the tourism sector of Thailand. Urgent attention needs to be given to address these concerns and prevent further suffering. But also to ensure the demand for wild animals doesn't have a negative impact on wild populations.

  9. Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Pig-Tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina) and Tiger (Panthera tigris) Populations at Tourism Venues in Thailand and Aspects of Their Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Burbach, Jan; Ronfot, Delphine; Srisangiam, Rossukon

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on determining the size and welfare aspects of Asian elephant, pig-tailed macaque and tiger populations at facilities open to tourists in Thailand. Data were gathered from 118 venues through direct observations and interviews with staff. A score sheet-based welfare assessment was used to calculate scores between 1 and 10, indicating each venue's welfare situation. Factors such as freedom of movement for the animals, access to veterinary care, environmental noise quality, hygiene standards and work intensity were included in the score sheet. 1688 elephants, 371 macaques and 621 tigers were found at the venues. 89 venues exclusively kept elephants, 9 designated 'Monkey schools' offered macaque shows, 4 venues kept primarily tigers, mostly for petting and photo opportunities, and the remaining venues kept a mix of these animals. A strong imbalance in female to male gender ratios was recorded with about 4:1 for adult elephants and 1:4 for adult macaques. Severely inadequate welfare conditions were common, with 75% of macaques and 99% of tigers being kept at venues with scores less than 5. 86% of elephants were kept in inadequate conditions at venues with scores between 3 and 5, but a significant number of venues with scores above 5 were found. 4.6% of elephants were provided commendable conditions, reaching assessment scores of 8 and above. 71% of venues did not offer any sort of education about animals to visitors. This study is the first to assess welfare aspects of captive wild animals at tourism venues across Thailand. It concludes that significant concerns exist about the welfare of wild animals in the tourism sector of Thailand. Urgent attention needs to be given to address these concerns and prevent further suffering. But also to ensure the demand for wild animals doesn't have a negative impact on wild populations.

  10. HIV-Risk Behaviors and Social Support Among Men and Women Attending Alcohol-Serving Venues in South Africa: Implications for HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloza, Jennifer; Watt, Melissa H; Abler, Laurie; Skinner, Donald; Kalichman, Seth C; Dennis, Alexis C; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2017-11-01

    Alcohol use is associated with increased HIV-risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and number of sex partners. Alcohol-serving venues can be places to engage in HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, but are also important sites of social support for patrons, which may mitigate risks. We sought to examine the relationship between alcohol-serving venue attendance, social support, and HIV-related sexual risk behavior, by gender, in South Africa. Adult patrons (n = 496) were recruited from six alcohol-serving venues and completed surveys assessing frequency of venue attendance, venue-based social support, and recent sexual behaviors. Generalized estimating equations tested associations between daily venue attendance, social support, and sexual behaviors, separately by gender. Interaction effects between daily attendance and social support were assessed. Models were adjusted for venue, age, education, and ethnicity. Daily attendance at venues was similar across genders and was associated with HIV-related risk behaviors, but the strength and direction of associations differed by gender. Among women, daily attendance was associated with greater number of partners and higher proportion of unprotected sex. Social support was a significant moderator, with more support decreasing the strength of the relationship between attendance and risk. Among men, daily attendance was associated with a lower proportion of unprotected sex; no interaction effects were found for attendance and social support. Frequent venue attendance is associated with additional HIV-related risks for women, but this risk is mitigated by social support in venues. These results were not seen for men. Successful HIV interventions in alcohol-serving venues should address the gendered context of social support and sexual risk behavior.

  11. Is the Medium Really the Message? A Comparison of Face-to-Face, Telephone, and Internet Focus Group Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothberg, June; Applegate, Brooks; Reeves, Patricia; Kohler, Paula; Thurston, Linda; Peterson, Lori

    2013-01-01

    With increased use of technology in qualitative research, it is important to understand unintended, unanticipated, and unobvious consequences to the data. Using a side-by-side comparison of face-to-face, telephone, and Internet with video focus groups, we examined the yield differences of focus group venue (medium) to the data (message) rendered…

  12. Schools as potential vaccination venue for vaccines outside regular EPI schedule: results from a school census in Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soofi, S.B.; Haq, I.U.; Khan, M.I.; Siddiqui, M.B.; Mirani, M.; Tahir, R.; Hussain, I.; Puri, M.K.; Suhag, Z.H.; Khowaja, A.R.; Lasi, A.R.; Clemens, J.D.; Favorov, M.; Ochiai, R.L.; Bhutta, Z.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccines are the most effective public health intervention. Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) provides routine vaccination in developing countries. However, vaccines that cannot be given in EPI schedule such as typhoid fever vaccine need alternative venues. In areas where school

  13. Tobacco smoke exposure and impact of smoking legislation on rural and non-rural hospitality venues in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner-Schmidt, Kelly; Lobo, Marie L; Travers, Mark J; Boursaw, Blake

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study in a stratified random sample of 135 bars and restaurants in North Dakota was to describe factors that influenced tobacco smoke pollution levels in the venues; to compare the quantity of tobacco smoke pollution by rurality and by presence of local ordinances; and to assess compliance with state and local laws. In data collection in 2012, we measured the indoor air quality indicator of particulate matter (2.5 microns aerodynamic diameter or smaller), calculated average smoking density and occupant density, and determined compliance with state and local smoking ordinances using observational methods. As rurality increased, tobacco smoke pollution in bars increased. A significant association was found between stringency of local laws and level of tobacco smoke pollution, but the strength of the association varied by venue type. Compliance was significantly lower in venues in communities without local ordinances. Controlling for venue type, 69.2% of smoke-free policy's impact on tobacco smoke pollution levels was mediated by observed smoking. This study advances scientific knowledge on the factors influencing tobacco smoke pollution and informs public health advocates and decision makers on policy needs, especially in rural areas. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Danish User-Centered Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Lars Bo

    2007-01-01

    Danish User-centered Innovation Lab (DUCI lab) is a collaboration between faculty at Copenhagen Business School, Aarhus School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, based at Copenhagen Business School. DUCI lab is a unique effort to understand the issues involved in user innovation...... processes, with particular emphasis on managing user driven innovation. The project takes advantage of CBS location in Denmark. Denmark has been at the forefront in creating policies that favor user driven innovation. CBS's location at the heart of one of the world's most vibrant user driven regions...... provides valuable information for scholars, managers and policy makers. The DUCI lab team consists of a number of academics, six major Danish companies and representatives from Danish Government. The efforts of the DUCI team focuses on the identification of best practice user innovation inside leading edge...

  15. Exposure to secondhand smoke in terraces and other outdoor areas of hospitality venues in eight European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Maria J; Fernández, Esteve; Gorini, Giuseppe; Moshammer, Hanns; Polanska, Kinga; Clancy, Luke; Dautzenberg, Bertrand; Delrieu, Agnes; Invernizzi, Giovanni; Muñoz, Glòria; Precioso, Jose; Ruprecht, Ario; Stansty, Peter; Hanke, Wojciech; Nebot, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor secondhand smoke (SHS) concentrations are usually lower than indoor concentrations, yet some studies have shown that outdoor SHS levels could be comparable to indoor levels under specific conditions. The main objectives of this study were to assess levels of SHS exposure in terraces and other outdoor areas of hospitality venues and to evaluate their potential displacement to adjacent indoor areas. Nicotine and respirable particles (PM2.5) were measured in outdoor and indoor areas of hospitality venues of 8 European countries. Hospitality venues of the study included night bars, restaurants and bars. The fieldwork was carried out between March 2009 and March 2011. We gathered 170 nicotine and 142 PM2.5 measurements during the study. The median indoor SHS concentration was significantly higher in venues where smoking was allowed (nicotine 3.69 µg/m3, PM2.5: 120.51 µg/m3) than in those where smoking was banned (nicotine: 0.48 µg/m3, PM2.5: 36.90 µg/m3). The median outdoor nicotine concentration was higher in places where indoor smoking was banned (1.56 µg/m3) than in venues where smoking was allowed (0.31 µg/m3). Among the different types of outdoor areas, the highest median outdoor SHS levels (nicotine: 4.23 µg/m3, PM2.5: 43.64 µg/m3) were found in the semi-closed outdoor areas of venues where indoor smoking was banned. Banning indoor smoking seems to displace SHS exposure to adjacent outdoor areas. Furthermore, indoor settings where smoking is banned but which have a semi-closed outdoor area have higher levels of SHS than those with open outdoor areas, possibly indicating that SHS also drifts from outdoors to indoors. Current legislation restricting indoor SHS levels seems to be insufficient to protect hospitality workers--and patrons--from SHS exposure. Tobacco-free legislation should take these results into account and consider restrictions in the terraces of some hospitality venues to ensure effective protection.

  16. Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Terraces and Other Outdoor Areas of Hospitality Venues in Eight European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Maria J.; Fernández, Esteve; Gorini, Giuseppe; Moshammer, Hanns; Polanska, Kinga; Clancy, Luke; Dautzenberg, Bertrand; Delrieu, Agnes; Invernizzi, Giovanni; Muñoz, Glòria; Precioso, Jose; Ruprecht, Ario; Stansty, Peter; Hanke, Wojciech; Nebot, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Background Outdoor secondhand smoke (SHS) concentrations are usually lower than indoor concentrations, yet some studies have shown that outdoor SHS levels could be comparable to indoor levels under specific conditions. The main objectives of this study were to assess levels of SHS exposure in terraces and other outdoor areas of hospitality venues and to evaluate their potential displacement to adjacent indoor areas. Methods Nicotine and respirable particles (PM2.5) were measured in outdoor and indoor areas of hospitality venues of 8 European countries. Hospitality venues of the study included night bars, restaurants and bars. The fieldwork was carried out between March 2009 and March 2011. Results We gathered 170 nicotine and 142 PM2.5 measurements during the study. The median indoor SHS concentration was significantly higher in venues where smoking was allowed (nicotine 3.69 µg/m3, PM2.5: 120.51 µg/m3) than in those where smoking was banned (nicotine: 0.48 µg/m3, PM2.5: 36.90 µg/m3). The median outdoor nicotine concentration was higher in places where indoor smoking was banned (1.56 µg/m3) than in venues where smoking was allowed (0.31 µg/m3). Among the different types of outdoor areas, the highest median outdoor SHS levels (nicotine: 4.23 µg/m3, PM2.5: 43.64 µg/m3) were found in the semi-closed outdoor areas of venues where indoor smoking was banned. Conclusions Banning indoor smoking seems to displace SHS exposure to adjacent outdoor areas. Furthermore, indoor settings where smoking is banned but which have a semi-closed outdoor area have higher levels of SHS than those with open outdoor areas, possibly indicating that SHS also drifts from outdoors to indoors. Current legislation restricting indoor SHS levels seems to be insufficient to protect hospitality workers – and patrons – from SHS exposure. Tobacco-free legislation should take these results into account and consider restrictions in the terraces of some hospitality venues to ensure effective

  17. The management of dental caries in primary teeth - involving service providers and users in the design of a trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshman Zoe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of evidence for the effective management of dental caries in children’s primary teeth. The trial entitled ‘Filling Children’s Teeth: Indicated Or Not?’ (FiCTION was designed to examine the clinical and cost effectiveness, in primary dental care, of three different approaches to the management of caries in primary teeth. However, before the FiCTION main trial commenced, a pilot trial was designed. Service provider (dentists and other members of the team including dental nurses and practice managers and participant (child participants and their parents involvement was incorporated into the pilot trial. The aim of this study is to describe service providers’ and users’ perspectives on the pilot trial to identify improvements to the conduct and design of the FiCTION main trial. Methods Qualitative interviews (individual and group were held with dentists, dental team members, children and parents involved in the FiCTION pilot trial. Individual interviews were held with four dentists and a group interview was held with 17 dental team members. Face-to-face interviews were held with four parents and children (four- to eight-years old representing the three arms of the trial and five telephone interviews were conducted with parents. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. Framework analysis was used. Results Overall, service providers, children and parents found the pilot trial to be well conducted and an interesting experience. Service providers highlighted the challenges of adhering to research protocols, especially managing the documentation and undertaking new clinical techniques. They indicated that the time and financial commitments were greater than they had anticipated. Particular difficulties were found recruiting suitable patients within the timeframe. For parents recruitment was apparently more related to trusting their dentist than the content of information packs. While some of the older

  18. Beliefs and Attitudes Associated with ERP Adoption Behaviours: A Grounded Theory Study from IT Manager and End-user Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunthari, Santipat; Hasan, Helen

    (1998, p. 121) defines an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system as an enterprise system that promises seamless integration of all information flowing through a company, including financial and accounting information, human resource information, supply chain information, customer information. ERP systems came on the scene in the early 1990s as a response to the proliferation of standalone business applications to service these separate information needs in most large organisations. Enterprise wide projects, such as data warehousing, requiring integrated approaches to organisational operations and information management were inhibited through a proliferation of incompatible off-the-shelf packages, in-house developments and aging legacy systems.

  19. Impact of a smoking ban in hospitality venues on second hand smoke exposure: a comparison of exposure assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Bauer, Georg F; Hoffmann, Susanne; Röösli, Martin

    2013-06-04

    In May 2010, Switzerland introduced a heterogeneous smoking ban in the hospitality sector. While the law leaves room for exceptions in some cantons, it is comprehensive in others. This longitudinal study uses different measurement methods to examine airborne nicotine levels in hospitality venues and the level of personal exposure of non-smoking hospitality workers before and after implementation of the law. Personal exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) was measured by three different methods. We compared a passive sampler called MoNIC (Monitor of NICotine) badge, to salivary cotinine and nicotine concentration as well as questionnaire data. Badges allowed the number of passively smoked cigarettes to be estimated. They were placed at the venues as well as distributed to the participants for personal measurements. To assess personal exposure at work, a time-weighted average of the workplace badge measurements was calculated. Prior to the ban, smoke-exposed hospitality venues yielded a mean badge value of 4.48 (95%-CI: 3.7 to 5.25; n = 214) cigarette equivalents/day. At follow-up, measurements in venues that had implemented a smoking ban significantly declined to an average of 0.31 (0.17 to 0.45; n = 37) (p = 0.001). Personal badge measurements also significantly decreased from an average of 2.18 (1.31-3.05 n = 53) to 0.25 (0.13-0.36; n = 41) (p = 0.001). Spearman rank correlations between badge exposure measures and salivary measures were small to moderate (0.3 at maximum). Nicotine levels significantly decreased in all types of hospitality venues after implementation of the smoking ban. In-depth analyses demonstrated that a time-weighted average of the workplace badge measurements represented typical personal SHS exposure at work more reliably than personal exposure measures such as salivary cotinine and nicotine.

  20. Sensor to User - NASA/EOS Data for Coastal Zone Management Applications Developed from Integrated Analyses: Verification, Validation and Benchmark Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie; Arnone, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program seeks to transfer NASA data, models, and knowledge into the hands of end-users by forming links with partner agencies and associated decision support tools (DSTs). Through the NASA REASoN (Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network) Cooperative Agreement, the Oceanography Division of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRLSSC) is developing new products through the integration of data from NASA Earth-Sun System assets with coastal ocean forecast models and other available data to enhance coastal management in the Gulf of Mexico. The recipient federal agency for this research effort is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The contents of this report detail the effort to further the goals of the NASA Applied Sciences Program by demonstrating the use of NASA satellite products combined with data-assimilating ocean models to provide near real-time information to maritime users and coastal managers of the Gulf of Mexico. This effort provides new and improved capabilities for monitoring, assessing, and predicting the coastal environment. Coastal managers can exploit these capabilities through enhanced DSTs at federal, state and local agencies. The project addresses three major issues facing coastal managers: 1) Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs); 2) hypoxia; and 3) freshwater fluxes to the coastal ocean. A suite of ocean products capable of describing Ocean Weather is assembled on a daily basis as the foundation for this semi-operational multiyear effort. This continuous realtime capability brings decision makers a new ability to monitor both normal and anomalous coastal ocean conditions with a steady flow of satellite and ocean model conditions. Furthermore, as the baseline data sets are used more extensively and the customer list increased, customer feedback is obtained and additional customized products are developed and provided to decision makers. Continual customer feedback and response with new improved

  1. Exploiting OAuth 2.0: from User Delegation for OGC Services to a Generic Federation-as-a-Service Solution for Federated Identity Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Philip; Jensen, Jens; Stephens, Ag; van Engen, Willem

    2013-04-01

    We explore an application of OAuth to enable user delegation for OGC-based services and the evolution of this solution to form part of a wider Federation-as-a-Service offering for federated identity management. OAuth has established itself in the commercial sector as a means for users to delegate access to secured resources under their control to third parties. It has also found its way into the academic and research domains as a solution for user delegation. Notable examples including the CILogon project for Teragrid in the US, and also, closer to the Earth Sciences, as part of the OGC Web Services, Phase 6 Testbed. Both are examples of OAuth 1.0 implementations. Version 2.0 has seen significant changes to this original specification which have not been without controversy but it has arguably provided a greater degree of flexibility in how it can be applied and the use cases that it can address. At CEDA (Centre for Environmental Data Archival, STFC), a Python implementation of OAuth 2.0 was made to explore these capabilities with a focus on providing a solution for user delegation for data access, processing and visualisation services for the Earth Observation and Climate sciences domains. The initial goal was to provide a means of delegating short-lived user credentials to trusted services along the same lines as the established approach of Proxy certificates widely used in Grid computing. For the OGC and other HTTP-based services employed by CEDA, OAuth makes a natural fit for this role, integrating with minimal impact on existing interfaces. Working implementations have been made for CEDA's COWS Web Processing Service and Web Map Service. Packaging the software and making it available in Open Source repositories together with the generic nature of the solution have made it readily exploitable in other application domains. At the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen, The Netherlands), the software will be used to integrate some tools in the

  2. What You Know is Who You Know? Communication Patterns Among Resource Users as a Prerequisite for Co-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Crona

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The social networks is one factor determining the flow of information within communities and as such may be important in determining successful implementation of community based management. We mapped the social network used for communication of knowledge and information related to natural resource extraction among villagers in a coastal seascape in Kenya. We further identified subgroups and examined their interrelations while measuring to what extent personal attributes such as occupation can explain observed group structure. Finally, we compared the local ecological knowledge held by villagers of different occupations with the structure of the communication network to map how well this structure can explain distribution of ecological knowledge among them. Results show that communication occurs primarily between fishermen who use the same gear type, which may inhibit exchange of ecological knowledge within the community. This may partly explain why the community has been unsuccessful in regulating resource extraction, especially since potentially influential groups of nonfishermen have a limited communication with the various fisher groups. Analysis of network structure also shows that groups most central, and hence potentially most influential, are dominated in numbers by migrant deep sea fishermen, hypothetically less motivated to initiate collective action for resource management. Hence, we conclude that a lack of collective action to remedy an unsustainable situation may be attributed to various different but distinct aspects of the specific structure of the social network.

  3. Product Manager C4ISR On-The-Move Experimentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Utroska, William; Langan, Russell; Amabile, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Product Manager C4ISR On-The-Move (PM C4ISR OTM) provides a relevant operational field experimentation venue for the purpose of assessing emerging technologies in a System-of- Systems (SoS) environment...

  4. Interobserver variation in the endoscopic diagnosis of gastroduodenal ulcer scars: implications for clinical management of NSAIDs users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishimura Norihisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A clinical history of peptic ulcer has been reported to be associated with a high rate of ulcer recurrence in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID users. Therefore, it is a very important issue to precisely know the previous history prior to NSAIDs administration. To clarify the possible difficulty to identify the history, we determined the sensitivity and diagnostic concordance of endoscopy for the identification of ulcer scars indicative of previous clinical history of peptic ulcer diseases. Methods The first study enrolled 200 consecutive patients with a clinical history of gastric or duodenal ulcers previously confirmed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The sensitivity of endoscopy for identifying scars was determined for these patients. In the second study, the extent of interobserver agreement was determined for 47 endoscopists who identified ulcer scars in endoscopic photographs of 30 sites of previous active gastric ulcers and 30 sites of previous active duodenal ulcers. The kappa coefficient of reliability was calculated to measure the interobserver agreement on the diagnosis of ulcer scars. Results Out of 190 patients eligible for analysis, 104 (54.7% were found to have gastric or duodenal ulcer scars on endoscopy; there were no gastric or duodenal ulcer scars seen in the remaining patients (45%. In the second study, the kappa values for endoscopic diagnosis of gastric and duodenal ulcer scars were 0.14 (95% CI 0.13-0.16 and 0.29 (95% CI 0.27-0.32, respectively. The addition of indigo-carmine chromoendoscopy did not provide a statistically significant improvement in diagnostic concordance in patients with gastric ulcer scar since the kappa value for chromoendoscopic diagnosis was 0.15; 95% CI 0.13-0.17 as low as for un-contrasted scars. Conclusions The sensitivity and concordance of endoscopic diagnosis of gastric and duodenal ulcer scars are not satisfactory for the use of endoscopy only to identify previous

  5. Unwanted Sexual Attention in Licensed Venues: Considering LGBTIQ Young Adults’ Experiences and Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Fileborn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexual violence within the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ communities remains largely under-researched and under-theorised. Yet, emerging research suggests that sexual violence is a significant issue within the LGBTIQ communities. Additionally, the occurrence of sexual violence and unwanted sexual attention within specific social and cultural contexts is, for the most part, insufficiently examined. This article draws on research exploring young LGBTIQ adults’ perceptions and experiences of unwanted sexual attention in licensed venues. Firstly, I consider the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of ‘unwanted sexual attention’ as a category of analysis. I then move on to consider participants’ use of licensed venues, the particular significance of pubs and clubs to LGBTIQ young people, and their perceptions and experiences of unwanted sexual attention. Finally, I discuss the implications of these findings for theoretical and conceptual understandings of unwanted sexual attention and sexual violence. En general, se ha investigado y teorizado muy poco sobre la violencia sexual dentro de las comunidades de lesbianas, gays, bisexuales, transgénero / transexuales, intersex y queer (LGBTIQ. Sin embargo, investigaciones recientes sugieren que la violencia sexual es un problema importante en estas comunidades. Además, la incidencia de la violencia sexual y atención sexual no deseada dentro de contextos sociales y culturales específicos no está, en su mayor parte, suficientemente examinada. Este artículo se basa en la investigación de la percepción y experiencias de atención sexual no deseada en locales con licencia para vender alcohol. En primer lugar, se tienen en cuenta los fundamentos teóricos y conceptuales de “atención sexual no deseada” como una categoría de análisis. A continuación, se considera el uso de locales con licencia por parte de los participantes, el significado

  6. QMRPACK user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, R.W. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  7. Tobacco Smoke Pollution in Hospitality Venues Before and After Passage of Statewide Smoke-Free Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner-Schmidt, Kelly; Boursaw, Blake; Lobo, Marie L; Travers, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    In 2012, North Dakota enacted a comprehensive statewide law prohibiting smoking in enclosed public places. Disparities in tobacco control exist in rural areas. This study's objective was to determine the extent to which the passage of a comprehensive, statewide, smoke-free law in a predominantly rural state influenced tobacco smoke pollution in rural and nonrural venues. A longitudinal cohort design study comparing the levels of tobacco smoke pollution before and after passage of the statewide smoke-free law was conducted in 64 restaurants and bars statewide in North Dakota. Particulate matter with a median aerodynamic diameter of pollution) was assessed. A significant 83% reduction in tobacco smoke pollution levels occurred after passage of the law. Significant reductions in tobacco smoke pollution levels occurred in each of the rural categories; however, no difference by rurality was noted in the analysis after passage of the law, in contrast to the study before passage. To our knowledge, this was the largest, single, rural postlaw study globally. A comprehensive statewide smoke-free law implemented in North Dakota dramatically decreased the level of tobacco smoke pollution in bars and restaurants. © 2016 The Authors. Public Health Nursing Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Listener Habits and Choices — and Their Implications for Public Performance Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    DODD, G.

    2001-01-01

    An 11-year longitudinal survey of patterns and preferences in music listening has revealed that a large majority of people would prefer to listen to music performed live but that only a small percentage of their exposure to music actually occurs at live performances. An initial analysis of the first few years of the survey suggests that choices concerning music can be influenced by cultural background, and that predominant music sources change as new technology becomes available. Reasons given by listeners for preferring to listen to a traditional, mechanical instrument rather than an electro-acoustic version of it indicate they are sensitive to an “originality” criterion. As a consequence, concert halls should be designed to operate as passive acoustics spaces. Further, listeners' reasons for electing to attend a live performance rather than listen to a recording or a live broadcast suggest that hall designers should try to maximize the sense of two-way communication between performers and listeners. An implication of this is that where active acoustics systems are to be incorporated in variable acoustics auditoria, those active systems which use a non-in-line approach are to be preferred over in-line schemes. However, listener evolution and new expectations may require a fundamental change in our approach to the acoustics of live performance venues.

  9. Emergency dispatcher assistance decreases time to defibrillation in a public venue: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyapan, Sattha; Lubin, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    We attempted to determine the effect of prearrival instructions that included the specific location of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in a public venue on the time to defibrillation in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario using untrained bystanders. The study was a randomized controlled trial at an urban shopping mall. Participants were asked to retrieve an AED and come back to defibrillate a mannequin. Only the experimental group received the location of the AED. We measured the percentage of shocks that were delivered in less than 3 minutes from the start of the scenario and also recorded several other time intervals. Thirty-nine participants completed the study, with 20 participants in the experimental group. The median time to defibrillation in the experimental group was 2.6 minutes (interquartile range, 2.4-2.8) which was significantly less than the control group's median time of 5.9 minutes (interquartile range, 4.38-7.65). Ninety percent (95% confidence interval, 68.3%-98.8%) of the participants in the experimental group defibrillated within 3 minutes, which was significantly different from the control group (10.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.3%-33.1%). In this study, a prearrival protocol providing participants with the location of the nearest AED in a public building resulted in a significant decrease in the time required to deliver a simulated shock. Further investigations in various types of public settings are needed to confirm the results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Australian men's sexual practices in saunas, sex clubs and other male sex on premises venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony; Smith, Anthony M A; Grierson, Jeffrey W; von Doussa, Henry

    2010-06-01

    Sex on premises venues (SOPVs) where men have sex with men have been implicated in the spread of sexually transmissible infections, but few studies have described men's sexual encounters in SOPVs, particularly the degree to which men from different backgrounds engage in risky sexual practices. Interviewer administered surveys were conducted with 186 Australian men who have sex with men (MSM) within 48 h of visiting an SOPV. They reported their sexual practices, the characteristics of their partners and other circumstances surrounding their sexual encounters. All analyses were based on the number of sexual encounters (n = 430). Oral sex was the most common practice, occurring in 74.9% of encounters, followed by massage, frottage or kissing (53.7%), solo or mutual masturbation (36.3%), and anal sex (32.1%). Multivariate analyses revealed age as a significant factor for having protected anal sex (P = 0.001), insertive anal sex (P = 0.004) and receptive anal sex (P masturbation (P = 0.03) was more frequent among older men. When men's sexual partners were affected by alcohol, encounters were less likely to involve unprotected anal intercourse (P = 0.006) and more likely to involve massage, frottage or kissing (P = 0.009). Men disclosed their HIV status in only 7.7% of encounters. With the likelihood of risky sexual practices varying according to background, results from this study should be used to guide interventions aiming to promote safer sex in SOPVs.

  11. Monitoring Fires from Space and Getting Data in to the hands of Users: An Example from NASA's Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D.; Wong, M.; Ilavajhala, S.; Molinario, G.; Justice, C. O.

    2012-12-01

    meet the needs of protected area managers, who like the managers in ENP had limited resources to cover large, remote areas. It was quickly realized that these data could be used for a wide range of applications beyond wildfire management including ecological studies, informing fire policy and public outreach. Today, FIRMS sends approximately 2000 email alerts daily to users in over 120 countries. In addition to the direct users of the MODIS fire data, there are a growing number of brokers who add value to the data, by combining them with targeted geospatial information and re-distribute the information. In addition to the English, French and Spanish fire notifications sent out by FIRMS, some brokers translate the alerts in to local languages and distribute them in Thailand, Indonesia, Russia and India.

  12. Indoor air pollution (PM2.5) due to secondhand smoke in selected hospitality and entertainment venues of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafees, Asaad Ahmed; Taj, Tahir; Kadir, Muhammad Masood; Fatmi, Zafar; Lee, Kiyoung; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2012-09-01

    To determine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) levels at various hospitality and entertainment venues of Karachi, Pakistan. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at various locations in Karachi, during July 2009. Sampling was performed at 20 enclosed public places, including hospitality (restaurants and cafés) and entertainment (snooker/billiard clubs and gaming zones) venues. PM(2.5) levels were measured using an aerosol monitor. All entertainment venues had higher indoor PM(2.5) levels as compared to the immediate outdoors. The indoor PM(2.5) levels ranged from 25 to 390 μg/m(3) and the outdoor PM(2.5) levels ranged from 18 to 96 μg/m(3). The overall mean indoor PM(2.5) level was 138.8 μg/m(3) (± 112.8). Among the four types of venues, the highest mean indoor PM(2.5) level was reported from snooker/billiard clubs: 264.7 μg/m(3) (± 85.4) and the lowest from restaurants: 66.4 μg/m(3) (± 57.6) while the indoor/outdoor ratio ranged from 0.97 to 10.2, highest being at the snooker/billiard clubs. The smoking density ranged from 0.21 to 0.57, highest being at gaming zones. The indoor PM(2.5) concentration and smoking density were not significantly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.113; p = 0.636). This study demonstrates unacceptably high levels of PM(2.5) exposure associated with secondhand smoke (SHS) at various entertainment venues of Karachi even after 8 years since the promulgation of smoke-free ordinance (2002) in Pakistan; however, better compliance may be evident at hospitality venues. The results of this study call for effective implementation and enforcement of smoke-free environment at public places in the country.

  13. Measuring the User Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry B. Santoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to develop an adapted version of User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ and evaluate a learning management system. Although there is a growing interest on User Experience, there are still limited resources (i.e. measurement tools or questionnaires available to measure user experience of any products, especially learning management systems. Two hundreds and thirteen computer science students participated and completed the adapted version of UEQ. In the study, the researchers used a learning management system named Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCELE. Several types of learning materials are posted in SCELE such as audio files, simulations, PowerPoint slides, multimedia contents, and webpage links. Most of the lecturers use discussion forums in their courses to encourage students to participate in active learning setting. Staff and lecturers sometimes post academic-related announcements on the SCELE homepage. Two hundred thirteen students enrolled in Computer Science program were invited to evaluate the SCELE. This study will benefit UX practitioners, HCI educators, program and center of learning resources administrators, and learning management system developers. Findings of the present study may also be valuable for universities and high schools which are using computer-based learning environments.

  14. User acceptance of HIV TIDES--Tailored Interventions for Management of Depressive Symptoms in persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tsai-Ya; Larson, Elaine L; Rockoff, Maxine L; Bakken, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    The Tailored Interventions for management of DEpressive Symptoms (TIDES) program was designed based on social cognitive theory to provide tailored, computer-based education on key elements and self-care strategies for depressive symptoms in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). Based on an extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), a cross-sectional design was used to assess the acceptance of the HIV TIDES prototype and explore the relationships among system acceptance factors proposed in the conceptual model. Thirty-two PLWHAs were recruited from HIV/AIDS clinics. The majority were African American (68.8%), male (65.6%), with high school or lower education (68.7%), and in their 40s (62.5%). PARTICIPANTS spent an average of 10.4 minutes (SD = 5.6) using HIV TIDES. The PLWHAs rated the system as easy to use (Mean = 9.61, SD = 0.76) and useful (Mean = 9.50, SD = 1.16). The high ratings of behavior intention to use (Mean = 9.47, SD = 1.24) suggest that HIV TIDES has the potential to be accepted and used by PLWHAs. Four factors were positively correlated with behavioral intention to use: perceived usefulness (r = 0.61), perceived ease of use (r = 0.61), internal control (r = 0.59), and external control (r = 0.46). Computer anxiety (r = -0.80), tailoring path (r = 0-.35) and depressive symptoms (r = -0.49) were negatively correlated with behavioral intention to use. The results of this study provide evidence of the acceptability of HIV TIDES by PLWHAs. Individuals are expected to be empowered through participating in the interactive process to generate their self-care plan. HIV TIDES enables information sharing about depression prevention and health promotion and has the potential to reframe the traditional patient-provider relationship.

  15. User Acceptance of HIV TIDES—Tailored Interventions for Management of Depressive Symptoms in Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tsai-Ya; Larson, Elaine L.; Rockoff, Maxine L.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Objective The Tailored Interventions for management of DEpressive Symptoms (TIDES) program was designed based on social cognitive theory to provide tailored, computer-based education on key elements and self-care strategies for depressive symptoms in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). Design and Measurement Based on an extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), a cross-sectional design was used to assess the acceptance of the HIV TIDES prototype and explore the relationships among system acceptance factors proposed in the conceptual model. Results Thirty-two PLWHAs were recruited from HIV/AIDS clinics. The majority were African American (68.8%), male (65.6%), with high school or lower education (68.7%), and in their 40s (62.5%). Participants spent an average of 10.4 minutes (SD = 5.6) using HIV TIDES. The PLWHAs rated the system as easy to use (Mean = 9.61, SD = 0.76) and useful (Mean = 9.50, SD = 1.16). The high ratings of behavior intention to use (Mean = 9.47, SD = 1.24) suggest that HIV TIDES has the potential to be accepted and used by PLWHAs. Four factors were positively correlated with behavioral intention to use: perceived usefulness (r = 0.61), perceived ease of use (r = 0.61), internal control (r = 0.59), and external control (r = 0.46). Computer anxiety (r = −0.80), tailoring path (r = 0−.35) and depressive symptoms (r = −0.49) were negatively correlated with behavioral intention to use. Conclusion The results of this study provide evidence of the acceptability of HIV TIDES by PLWHAs. Individuals are expected to be empowered through participating in the interactive process to generate their self-care plan. HIV TIDES enables information sharing about depression prevention and health promotion and has the potential to reframe the traditional patient-provider relationship. PMID:18096915

  16. Is anyone around me using condoms? Site-specific condom-use norms and their potential impact on condomless sex across various gay venues and websites in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, Wijnand; Stolte, Ineke G.; Roggen, Astrid; Sandfort, Theo; Prins, Maria; Davidovich, Udi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate site-specific condom-use norms as assumed by visitors of gay venues and websites across The Netherlands and their association with men's own use of condoms. In 2010, men who have sex with men (MSM) visiting 18 sex venues (e.g., saunas), 30 nonsex venues (e.g., bars), 6 dating

  17. Assessment of food offerings and marketing strategies in the food-service venues at California Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lenard I; Hunnes, Dana E; Reyes, Phedellee; Arab, Lenore; Ryan, Gery W; Brook, Robert H; Cohen, Deborah A

    2012-01-01

    Marketing strategies and food offerings in hospital cafeterias can impact dietary choices. Using a survey adapted to assess food environments, the purpose of this study was to assess the food environment available to patients, staff, and visitors at the food-service venues in all 14 California children's hospitals. We modified a widely-used tool to create the Nutritional Environment Measures Survey for Cafeterias (NEMS-C) by partnering with a hospital wellness committee. The NEMS-C summarizes the number of healthy items offered, whether calorie labeling is present, if there is signage promoting healthy or unhealthy foods, pricing structure, and the presence of unhealthy combination meals. The range of possible scores is zero (unhealthy) to 37 (healthy). We directly observed the food-service venues at all 14 tertiary care children's hospitals in California and scored them. Inter-rater reliability showed 89% agreement on the assessed items. For the 14 hospitals, the mean score was 19.1 (SD = 4.2; range, 13-30). Analysis revealed that nearly all hospitals offered diet drinks, low-fat milk, and fruit. Fewer than one-third had nutrition information at the point of purchase and 30% had signs promoting healthy eating. Most venues displayed high calorie impulse items such as cookies and ice cream at the registers. Seven percent (7%) of the 384 entrees served were classified as healthy according to NEMS criteria. Most children's hospitals' food venues received a mid-range score, demonstrating there is considerable room for improvement. Many inexpensive options are underused, such as providing nutritional information, incorporating signage that promotes healthy choices, and not presenting unhealthy impulse items at the register. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Venue-level correlates of female sex worker registration status: A multilevel analysis of bars in Tijuana, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Gaines, Tommi L.; Rusch, Melanie L.A.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Shira M Goldenberg; Lozada, Remedios; Robertson, Angela M.; Perkins, Emily; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    In Tijuana, Mexico, sex work is regulated by the municipal government, through registration cards issued to female sex workers (FSWs) for an annual fee. Registration has been associated with decreased drug use and increase condom use and HIV testing. Previously, it was demonstrated that FSWs operating in bars were more likely than street-based FSWs to be registered. This implies that certain venues may be more accessible to local authorities for the enforcement of this type of programme. Taki...

  19. Determinants of eating at local and western fast-food venues in an urban Asian population: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Nasheen; van Dam, Rob M; Ng, Sheryl; Tan, Chuen Seng; Chen, Shiqi; Lim, Jia Yi; Chan, Mei Fen; Chew, Ling; Rebello, Salome A

    2017-05-25

    Like several Southeast Asian countries, Singapore has a complex eating-out environment and a rising eating-out prevalence. However the determinants and drivers of eating-out in urban Asian environments are poorly understood. We examined the socio-demographic characteristics of persons who frequently ate away from home in local eateries called hawker centres and Western fast-food restaurants, using data from 1647 Singaporean adults participating in the National Nutrition Survey (NNS) 2010. We also assessed the underlying drivers of eating out and evaluated if these were different for eating at local eateries compared to Western fast-food restaurants using 18 focus group discussions of women (130 women). Participants reported a high eating-out frequency with 77.3% usually eating either breakfast, lunch or dinner at eateries. Main venues for eating-out included hawker centres (61.1% usually ate at least 1 of 3 daily meals at this venue) and school/workplace canteens (20.4%). A minority of participants (1.9%) reported usually eating at Western fast-food restaurants. Younger participants and those of Chinese and Malay ethnicity compared to Indians were more likely to eat at Western fast-food restaurants. Chinese and employed persons were more likely to eat at hawker centres. The ready availability of a large variety of affordable and appealing foods appeared to be a primary driver of eating out, particularly at hawker centres. Our findings highlight the growing importance of eating-out in an urban Asian population where local eating venues play a more dominant role compared with Western fast-food chains. Interventions focusing on improving the food quality at venues for eating out are important to improve the diet of urban Asian populations.

  20. Ekphrasis Earos. Le topos de la venue du printemps chez des auteurs byzantins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Loukaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available La description de la venue du printemps (ekphrasis earos, un topos aux composantes spécifiques dans la littérature de la seconde sophistique, devint l’ objet d’ enseignement reproduit de façon stéréotypée dans les écoles de Rhétorique protobyzantines. La symbolique de la renaissance de la nature s’ est révélée particulièrement favorable à la didascalie chrétienne comme image du Christ ressuscité ; ainsi, l’ekphrasis earos se retrouve dans plusieurs homélies sur Pâques, le Baptême, la Nativité du Christ, l’Annonciation de la Vierge, etc. La jonction de la tradition chrétienne avec la tradition païenne dans la composition des descriptions du printemps semble qu’ elle fut favorisée dans le milieu scolaire de l’ époque médio-byzantine. Les ekphraseis earos de Libanius (Progym. XII 7, de Grégoire de Nazianze (Or. 44 et de Pseudo-Méléagre (AP IX 363 furent des modèles. À partir du XIIe siècle, les nouvelles tendances de la littérature, qui ont remis à l’honneur le roman d’ amour, le monde naturel et les détails de la vie quotidienne, ont donné lieu à des compositions dépourvues de toute allusion chrétienne.

  1. Traditional Balinese youth groups as a venue for prevention of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merati, T P; Ekstrand, M L; Hudes, E S; Suarmiartha, E; Mandel, J S

    1997-09-01

    Our aims were to assess the feasibility of conducting peer-led educational interventions against AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) through traditional Balinese youth groups and to gather information on sexual risk-taking and its correlates among Balinese youth. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, with follow-up questionnaires for pilot intervention participants. A self-administered questionnaire was given to 375 subjects (aged 16-25 years) from 12 youth groups representing four main resort areas in Bali. Post-intervention data were collected from 97 of these subjects who had taken part in pilot educational programs. Focus groups supplemented survey data in evaluating the intervention and understanding risk behaviors. In a cross-sectional survey, one-quarter of males and few females reported sexual activity; subsequent focus groups suggested under-reporting by females. While knowledge and worries about HIV/AIDS were high, only 10% of sexually active males and no females reported consistent condom use. The mean age of first sexual intercourse was highly correlated with first alcohol consumption (P = 0.0003). Peer educators from selected youth groups planned and implemented interventions for their own groups. Post-intervention data indicated significant increases in communication about sexual issues with friends and parents. Condom attitudes became less negative and efficacy increased. Participants reported this as a first experience with peer-led health education, preferred interactive activities to adult-led lectures and recommended follow-up educational sessions. Peer educators from traditional youth groups can plan and conduct prevention programs for HIV/STDs that are well-received by their group memberships. Using such venues may be an efficient way to reach a wide range of pre-sexual Balinese youth, as well as those already at risk for HIV/STD due to unprotected sex, alcohol consumption and multiple sexual partners.

  2. Case Management in Primary Care for Frequent Users of Health Care Services With Chronic Diseases: A Qualitative Study of Patient and Family Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Lambert, Mireille; Bouliane, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    Although case management (CM) is increasingly being implemented to address the complex needs of vulnerable clienteles, few studies have examined the patient experience of CM. This study aimed to examine the experience of patients and their family members with care integration as part of a primary care CM intervention. Patients in the study were frequent users of health care services who had chronic diseases. A descriptive, qualitative approach was conducted involving 25 patients and 8 of their family members. Data were collected through in-depth interviews of the patients and 2 focus groups of family members and were analyzed thematically. While some participants did not fully understand the CM intervention and a few believed that it involved too many appointments, the CM nurses were patients' preferred contact with primary care. The nurses actively involved the patients in developing and carrying out their individualized services plans (ISPs) with other health care partners. Patients felt that their needs were taken into consideration, especially regarding access to the health care system. The case manager facilitated access to information as well as communication and coordination among health care and community partners. This improved communication comforted the patients and nurtured a relationship of trust. Participants were actively involved in decision-making. Their ISPs helped them know where they were going and improved transitions between services. The experience of patients and family members was overall very positive regarding care integration. They reported improved access, communication, coordination, and involvement in decision-making as well as better health care transitions. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. Reforming the Regulation of Trading Venues in the EU under the Proposed MiFID II – Levelling the Playing Field and Overcoming Fragmentation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Nis Jul; Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2012-01-01

    The Directive on Markets in Financial Instruments (MiFID 2004), adopted in 2004, brought about substantial changes in the market. Competition between trading venues has increased and a substantial portion of trade in financial instruments has moved from regulated markets to other trading venues....... This has created an unlevel playing field between regulated markets on the one hand and other trading venues on the other. At the same time, the fragmentation of trade has led to problems for ensuring investor protection and market surveillance. The Commission has recently proposed a reform of the Mi...... (MTFs), but that the proposals may introduce new problems of unequal competition in relation to new kinds of regulated trading venue (organised trading facilities – OTFs), and in relation to unregulated activities which are not considered to involve genuine trade execution. Most of the problems created...

  4. Continuity of clinical management and information across care levels: perceptions of users of different healthcare areas in the Catalan national health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Sina; Vargas, Ingrid; Aller, Marta-Beatriz; Coderch, Jordi; Farré, Joan; Vázquez, M Luisa

    2016-09-02

    The integration of health care has become a priority in most health systems, as patients increasingly receive care from several professionals in various different settings and institutions, particularly those with chronic conditions and multi-morbidities. Continuity of care is defined as one patient experiencing care over time as connected and coherent with his or her health needs and personal circumstances. The objective is to analyse perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and the factors influencing it, from the viewpoint of users of the Catalan national health system. A descriptive-interpretative qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological approach. A two-stage theoretical sample was selected: (i) the study contexts: healthcare areas in Catalonia with different services management models; (ii) users ≥ 18 years of age who were attended to at both care levels for the same health problem. Data were collected by means of individual semi-structured interviews with patients (n = 49). All interviews were recorded and transcribed. A thematic content analysis was conducted segmented by study area, with a mixed generation of categories and triangulation of analysts. Patients in all three areas generally perceived that continuity of clinical management across levels existed, on referring to consistent care (same diagnosis and treatment by doctors of both care levels, no incompatibilities of prescribed medications, referrals across levels when needed) and accessibility across levels (timeliness of appointments). In terms of continuity of information, patients in most areas mentioned the existence of information sharing via computer and its adequate usage. Only a few discontinuity elements were reported such as long waiting times for specific tests performed in secondary care or insufficient use of electronic medical records by locum doctors. Different factors influencing continuity were identified by

  5. Demographic and Behavioral Correlates of HIV Risk among Men and Transgender Women Recruited from Gay Entertainment Venues and Community-based Organizations in Thailand: Implications for HIV Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, PA; Lee, SJ; Roungprakhon, S; Tepjan, S

    2012-01-01

    High HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women in Thailand suggest a vital need for targeted interventions. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to examine and compare sexual risk behaviors, and demographic and behavioral correlates of risk, among MSM and transgender women recruited from gay entertainment venue staff and community-based organization (CBO) participants. We used venue-based sampling across nine sites in Bangkok and Chiang Mai. Among 260 partici...

  6. Service user integration into social work education: lessons learned from nordic participatory action projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Service users have lacked substantial influence, access, and participation in social work education in Norway and Sweden. In this article the author presents comparative analyses of two participatory projects that have developed and implemented practices that integrate service users into academic social work education and empower service users. The Norwegian HUSK project and the Social Work as Mobilization and Entrepreneurship course, also known as the "Mobilization course," at Lund University in Sweden demonstrate collaboration between research, social work education, and service users. The conclusions focus on the importance of the empowering processes by including recognition and dialogue, co-learning in practice, and the use of neutral venues to ensure effective user participation. The inclusion of service users in social work education can improve both practice and education.

  7. Residential summer camp: a new venue for nutrition education and physical activity promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Alison K; Garst, Barry A

    2013-05-24

    Millions of children attend residential summer camps each year. However, few studies have examined the potential of camps for obesity prevention efforts. Research in the domain of positive youth development has shown that camp programs as short as one week have both short- and long-term positive effects on self-esteem, self-efficacy and other youth outcomes. The objective of the present study was to highlight the potential of resident camps as promising venues for the promotion of healthy eating and physical activity behaviors in the children who attend. Data for this study came from the American Camp Association 2007 Emerging Issues Survey. This survey assessed camp professionals' perspectives on a diverse array of issues, including the healthy eating and physical activity of children. Data analysis focused on responses from 247 camp professionals whose camps offered resident camp programs. Descriptive and Chi-square statistics were calculated. Ninety-two percent of camp professionals reported that the healthy eating and physical activity of campers was an "important" or "very important" issue for camps. The majority of camps reported offering vegetarian options, healthy snacks and salad bars, and allergen-free options. Additionally, 86% of camp professionals indicated that they had implemented one or more strategies to address concerns related to the unhealthy eating behaviors of children, with top strategies including increasing the availability of fruits and vegetables, increasing the availability of healthy drink options, and improving the nutritional quality of menus. Fewer camp professionals (50%) indicated they had implemented strategies to increase children's physical activity levels, but many professionals indicated that their camp programs were inherently active and additional strategies to promote physical activity were not necessary. Associations were found between camp affiliation and food options available to campers. The majority of camp

  8. Using simulation modelling to examine the impact of venue lockout and last-drink policies on drinking-related harms and costs to licensees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nick; Livingston, Michael; Reporter, Iyanoosh; Dietze, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Many variations of venue lockout and last-drink policies have been introduced in attempts to reduce drinking-related harms. We estimate the public health gains and licensee costs of these policies using a computer simulated population of young adults engaging in heavy drinking. Using an agent-based model we implemented 1 am/2 am/3 am venue lockouts in conjunction with last drinks zero/one/two hours later, or at current closing times. Outcomes included: the number of incidents of verbal aggression in public drinking venues, private venues or on the street; and changed revenue to public venues. The most effective policy in reducing verbal aggression among agents was 1 am lockouts with current closing times. All policies produced substantial reductions in street-based incidents of verbal aggression among agents (33-81%) due to the smoothing of transport demand. Direct revenue losses were 1-9% for simulated licensees, with later lockout times and longer periods between lockout and last drinks producing smaller revenue losses. Simulation models are useful for exploring consequences of policy change. Our simulation suggests that additional hours between lockout and last drinks could reduce aggression by easing transport demand, while minimising revenue loss to venue owners. Implications for public health: Direct policies to reduce late-night transport-related disputes should be considered. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Impact of the Spanish smoking law on exposure to secondhand smoke in offices and hospitality venues: before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot, Manel; López, Maria J; Ariza, Carles; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Fu, Marcela; Schiaffino, Anna; Muñoz, Gloria; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2009-03-01

    A smoking law was passed by the Spanish Parliament in December 2005 and was enforced by 1 January 2006. The law bans smoking in all indoor workplaces but only in some hospitality venues, because owners are allowed to establish a smoking zone (venues>100 m2) or to allow smoking without restrictions (venueshospitality venues. The study design is a before-and-after evaluation. We studied workplaces and hospitality venues from eight different regions of Spain. We took repeated samples of vapor-phase nicotine concentration in 398 premises, including private offices (162), public administration offices (90), university premises (43), bars and restaurants (79), and discotheques and pubs (24). In the follow-up period, SHS levels were markedly reduced in indoor offices. The median decrease in nicotine concentration ranged from 60.0% in public premises to 97.4% in private areas. Nicotine concentrations were also markedly reduced in bars and restaurants that became smoke-free (96.7%) and in the no-smoking zones of venues with separate spaces for smokers (88.9%). We found no significant changes in smoking zones or in premises allowing smoking, including discotheques and pubs. Overall, this study shows the positive impact of the law on reducing SHS in indoor workplaces. However, SHS was substantially reduced only in bars and restaurants that became smoke-free. Most hospitality workers continue to be exposed to very high levels of SHS. Therefore, a 100% smoke-free policy for all hospitality venues is required.

  10. The effect of São Paulo's smoke-free legislation on carbon monoxide concentration in hospitality venues and their workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tania M O; Pereira, Alexandre C; Megid, Maria Cristina; Shimabukuro, Cristina E; Valentin, Luis Sergio O; da C Ferreira, Marizete M; Nobre, Moacyr R C; Lancarotte, Ines; Barretto, Antonio Carlos Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that there is no safe level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and there is a close link between SHS and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the most important components present in SHS. Objective To evaluate the impact of the smoking ban law in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, on the CO concentration in restaurants, bars, night clubs and similar venues and in their workers. Methods In the present study we measured CO concentration in 585 hospitality venues. CO concentration was measured in different environments (indoor, semi-open and open areas) from visited venues, as well as, in the exhaled air from approximately 627 workers of such venues. Measurements were performed twice, before and 12 weeks after the law implementation. In addition, the quality of the air in the city during the same period of our study was verified. Results The CO concentration pre-ban and pot-ban in hospitality venues was indoor area 4.57 (3.70) ppm vs 1.35 (1.66) ppm (phospitality venues and in their workers, whether they smoke or not. PMID:21109684

  11. Usage and users of online self-management programs for adult patients with atopic dermatitis and food allergy: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Leent-de Wit, Ilse; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Knulst, André

    2015-05-23

    Two online self-management programs for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) or food allergy (FA) were developed with the aim of helping patients cope with their condition, follow the prescribed treatment regimen, and deal with the consequences of their illness in daily life. Both programs consist of several modules containing information, personal stories by fellow patients, videos, and exercises with feedback. Health care professionals can refer their patients to the programs. However, the use of the program in daily practice is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the use and characteristics of users of the online self-management programs "Living with eczema," and "Living with food allergy," and to investigate factors related to the use of the trainings. A cross-sectional design was carried out in which the outcome parameters were the number of log-ins by patients, the number of hits on the system's core features, disease severity, quality of life, and domains of self-management. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize sample characteristics and to describe number of log-ins and hits per module and per functionality. Correlation and regression analyses were used to explore the relation between the number of log-ins and patient characteristics. Since the start, 299 adult patients have been referred to the online AD program; 173 logged in for at least one occasion. Data from 75 AD patients were available for analyses. Mean number of log-ins was 3.1 (range 1-11). Linear regression with the number of log-ins as dependent variable showed that age and quality of life contributed most to the model, with betas of .35 ( P=.002) and .26 (P=.05), respectively, and an R(2) of .23. Two hundred fourteen adult FA patients were referred to the online FA training, 124 logged in for at least one occasion and data from 45 patients were available for analysis. Mean number of log-ins was 3.0 (range 1-11). Linear regression with the number of log-ins as dependent

  12. User resistance in IT: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Mahmood; Zhou, Li; Miller, Lloyd; Ieromonachou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    User resistance is a complex phenomenon long viewed as a major constraint in successful information technology implementation. User resistance, which can vary between passive and active, could be a source of guidance towards reducing problems associated with organisational change. However, rather than embracing user resistance and seeing it as a learning opportunity and a tool for managing current and future difficulties around user resistance, organisations fear it. There exist a wide litera...

  13. The Users Office turns 20

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    20 years ago, in the summer of 1989, an office was created to assist the thousands of users who come to CERN each year, working over the broad range of projects and collaborations. Chris Onions (right), head of the Users’ Office, with Bryan Pattison (left), the Office’s founder.Before the inception of the Users Office, it was common for users to spend at least an entire day moving from office to office in search of necessary documentation and information in order to make their stay official. "Though the Office has undergone various changes throughout its lifetime, it has persisted in being a welcoming bridge to facilitate the installation of visitors coming from all over the world", says Chris Onions, head of the Users Office. This September, the Office will celebrate its 20-year anniversary with a drink offered to representatives of the User community, the CERN management and staff members from the services with whom the Office is involved. &...

  14. A user's manual to the PMBOK guide

    CERN Document Server

    Stackpole Snyder, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The must-have manual to understand and use the latest edition of the Fifth Edition The professional standard in the field of project management, A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide-Fifth Edition) published by the Project Management Institute (PMI) serves as the ultimate resource for professionals and as a valuable studying and training device for students taking the PMP® Exam. A User''s Manual to the PMBOK® Guide takes the next logical step to act as a true user''s manual. With an accessible format and easy-to-understand language, it helps to not only distill es

  15. User Privacy and Empowerment: Trends, Challenges, and Opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhotre, Prashant Shantaram; Olesen, Henning; Khajuria, Samant

    2018-01-01

    of personal information and its manage-ment. Thus, empowering users and enhancing awareness are essential to compre-hending the value of secrecy. This paper also introduced latest advances in the domain of privacy issues like User Managed Access (UMA) can state suitable requirements for user empowerment...

  16. Justine user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  17. Search-User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  18. Audit result and its users

    OpenAIRE

    Shalimova Nataliya S.

    2014-01-01

    The article identifies essence of the “audit result” and “users of audit result” notions and characteristics of the key audit results user. It shows that in order to give a wide characteristic of users it is expedient to unite all objects, which could be used (audit report, fact of refusal to conduct audit and information that is submitted to managers in the process of audit) with the term “audit result” and classify it depending on the terms of submission by final and intermediate result. Th...

  19. Implementation and Analysis of ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Network Systems in Judo Training Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leyre; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-08-06

    In this work, the performance of ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) deployed in judo training venues is analyzed. Judo is a very popular martial art, which is practiced by thousands of people not only at the competition level, but also as part of physical education programs at different school levels. There is a great variety of judo training venues, and each one has specific morphological aspects, making them unique scenarios in terms of radio propagation due to the presence of furniture, columns, equipment and the presence of human beings, which is a major issue as the person density within this kind of scenarios could be high. Another key aspect is the electromagnetic interference created by other wireless systems, such as WiFi or other WSNs, which make the radio planning a complex task in terms of coexistence. In order to analyze the impact of these features on the radio propagation and the performance of WSNs, an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm has been used. The obtained simulation results have been validated with a measurement campaign carried out in the sport facilities of the Public University of Navarre. The analysis is completed with the inclusion of an application designed to monitor biological constants of judokas, aimed to improve their training procedures. The application, that allows the simultaneous monitoring of multiple judokas (collective workouts) minimizing the efforts of the coach and medical supervisor, is based on commercial off-the-shelf products. The presented assessment of the presence of interfering wireless systems and the presence of human beings within judo training venues shows that an in-depth radio planning is required as these issues can have a great impact in the overall performance of a ISM 2.4 GHz WSN, affecting negatively the potential applications supported by wireless channel.

  20. Implementation and Analysis of ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Network Systems in Judo Training Venues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peio Lopez-Iturri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the performance of ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs deployed in judo training venues is analyzed. Judo is a very popular martial art, which is practiced by thousands of people not only at the competition level, but also as part of physical education programs at different school levels. There is a great variety of judo training venues, and each one has specific morphological aspects, making them unique scenarios in terms of radio propagation due to the presence of furniture, columns, equipment and the presence of human beings, which is a major issue as the person density within this kind of scenarios could be high. Another key aspect is the electromagnetic interference created by other wireless systems, such as WiFi or other WSNs, which make the radio planning a complex task in terms of coexistence. In order to analyze the impact of these features on the radio propagation and the performance of WSNs, an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm has been used. The obtained simulation results have been validated with a measurement campaign carried out in the sport facilities of the Public University of Navarre. The analysis is completed with the inclusion of an application designed to monitor biological constants of judokas, aimed to improve their training procedures. The application, that allows the simultaneous monitoring of multiple judokas (collective workouts minimizing the efforts of the coach and medical supervisor, is based on commercial off-the-shelf products. The presented assessment of the presence of interfering wireless systems and the presence of human beings within judo training venues shows that an in-depth radio planning is required as these issues can have a great impact in the overall performance of a ISM 2.4 GHz WSN, affecting negatively the potential applications supported by wireless channel.

  1. Implementation and Analysis of ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Network Systems in Judo Training Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leyre; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the performance of ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) deployed in judo training venues is analyzed. Judo is a very popular martial art, which is practiced by thousands of people not only at the competition level, but also as part of physical education programs at different school levels. There is a great variety of judo training venues, and each one has specific morphological aspects, making them unique scenarios in terms of radio propagation due to the presence of furniture, columns, equipment and the presence of human beings, which is a major issue as the person density within this kind of scenarios could be high. Another key aspect is the electromagnetic interference created by other wireless systems, such as WiFi or other WSNs, which make the radio planning a complex task in terms of coexistence. In order to analyze the impact of these features on the radio propagation and the performance of WSNs, an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm has been used. The obtained simulation results have been validated with a measurement campaign carried out in the sport facilities of the Public University of Navarre. The analysis is completed with the inclusion of an application designed to monitor biological constants of judokas, aimed to improve their training procedures. The application, that allows the simultaneous monitoring of multiple judokas (collective workouts) minimizing the efforts of the coach and medical supervisor, is based on commercial off-the-shelf products. The presented assessment of the presence of interfering wireless systems and the presence of human beings within judo training venues shows that an in-depth radio planning is required as these issues can have a great impact in the overall performance of a ISM 2.4 GHz WSN, affecting negatively the potential applications supported by wireless channel. PMID:27509501

  2. Recruitment-adjusted estimates of HIV prevalence and risk among men who have sex with men: effects of weighting venue-based sampling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, Samuel M; Neaigus, Alan; Murrill, Christopher S; Gelpi-Acosta, Camila; Wendel, Travis; Hagan, Holly

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the impact of recruitment bias within the venue-based sampling (VBS) method, which is widely used to estimate disease prevalence and risk factors among groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM), that congregate at social venues. In a 2008 VBS study of 479 MSM in New York City, we calculated venue-specific approach rates (MSM approached/MSM counted) and response rates (MSM interviewed/MSM approached), and then compared crude estimates of HIV risk factors and seroprevalence with estimates weighted to address the lower selection probabilities of MSM who attend social venues infrequently or were recruited at high-volume venues. Our approach rates were lowest at dance clubs, gay pride events, and public sex strolls, where venue volumes were highest; response rates ranged from 39% at gay pride events to 95% at community-based organizations. Sixty-seven percent of respondents attended MSM-oriented social venues at least weekly, and 21% attended such events once a month or less often in the past year. In estimates adjusted for these variations, the prevalence of several past-year risk factors (e.g., unprotected anal intercourse with casual/exchange partners, ≥5 total partners, group sex encounters, at least weekly binge drinking, and hard-drug use) was significantly lower compared with crude estimates. Adjusted HIV prevalence was lower than unadjusted prevalence (15% vs. 18%), but not significantly. Not adjusting VBS data for recruitment biases could overestimate HIV risk and prevalence when the selection probability is greater for higher-risk MSM. While further examination of recruitment-adjustment methods for VBS data is needed, presentation of both unadjusted and adjusted estimates is currently indicated.

  3. Information for Stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The DISTRELEC catalogue (IT) is now available in EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and the catalogues of existing suppliers. Using an EDH materials request form, users can now order DISTRELEC equipment from amongst the following product groups: peripherals, multimedia, PC components, data media, communication and data cables and adapters. Non-authorised materials will be clearly indicated. As a reminder, the system automatically manages the distribution of standard Stores equipment and punch out equipment ordered on the same request form. In both cases, delivery will take a maximum of 48 hours. The approval of the EDH document will follow the usual EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  4. Marital satisfaction and break-ups differ across on-line and off-line meeting venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Gonzaga, Gian C; Ogburn, Elizabeth L; VanderWeele, Tyler J

    2013-06-18

    Marital discord is costly to children, families, and communities. The advent of the Internet, social networking, and on-line dating has affected how people meet future spouses, but little is known about the prevalence or outcomes of these marriages or the demographics of those involved. We addressed these questions in a nationally representative sample of 19,131 respondents who married between 2005 and 2012. Results indicate that more than one-third of marriages in America now begin on-line. In addition, marriages that began on-line, when compared with those that began through traditional off-line venues, were slightly less likely to result in a marital break-up (separation or divorce) and were associated with slightly higher marital satisfaction among those respondents who remained married. Demographic differences were identified between respondents who met their spouse through on-line vs. traditional off-line venues, but the findings for marital break-up and marital satisfaction remained significant after statistically controlling for these differences. These data suggest that the Internet may be altering the dynamics and outcomes of marriage itself.

  5. The impact of the Cyprus comprehensive smoking ban on air quality and economic business of hospitality venues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophi Costas A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several countries, including Cyprus, have passed smoke-free legislations in recent years. The goal of this study was to assess the indoor levels of particulate matter in hospitality venues in Cyprus before and after the implementation of the law on 1/1/2010, evaluate the role of enforcement, and examine the legislation’s effect on revenue and employment. Methods Several hospitality venues (n = 35 were sampled between April 2007 and January 2008, and 21 of those were re-sampled after the introduction of the smoking ban, between March and May 2010. Data on enforcement was provided by the Cyprus Police whereas data on revenue and employment within the hospitality industry of Cyprus were obtained from the Cyprus Statistical Service; comparisons were made between the corresponding figures before and after the implementation of the law. Results The median level of PM2.5 associated with secondhand smoking was 161 μg/m3 pre-ban and dropped to 3 μg/m3 post-ban (98% decrease, p  Conclusion Smoke free legislations, when enforced, are highly effective in improving the air quality and reducing the levels of indoor PM2.5. Strict enforcement plays a key role in the successful implementation of smoking bans. Even in nations with high smoking prevalence comprehensive smoking laws can be effectively implemented and have no negative effect on accommodation, food, and beverage services.

  6. Mental health and HIV sexual risk behavior among patrons of alcohol serving venues in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Kathleen J; Watt, Melissa H; Meade, Christina S; Ranby, Krista W; Kalichman, Seth C; Skinner, Donald; Pieterse, Desiree

    2011-07-01

    Alcohol-serving venues in South Africa provide a location for HIV prevention interventions due to risk factors of patrons in these establishments. Understanding the association between mental health and risk behaviors in these settings may inform interventions that address alcohol use and HIV prevention. Participants (n = 738) were surveyed in 6 alcohol-serving venues in Cape Town to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, traumatic experiences, sexual behavior, and substance use. Logistic regression models examined whether traumatic experiences predicted PTSD and depression. Generalized linear models examined whether substance use, PTSD, and depressive symptoms predicted unprotected sexual intercourse. Men and women were analyzed separately. Participants exhibited high rates of traumatic experiences, PTSD, depression, alcohol consumption, and HIV risk behaviors. For men, PTSD was associated with being hit by a sex partner, physical child abuse, sexual child abuse and HIV diagnosis; depression was associated with being hit by a sex partner, forced sex and physical child abuse. For women, both PTSD and depression were associated with being hit by a sex partner, forced sex, and physical child abuse. Unprotected sexual intercourse was associated with age, frequency and quantity of alcohol use, drug use, and PTSD for men and frequency and quantity of alcohol use, depression, and PTSD for women. Mental health in this setting was poor and was associated with sexual risk behavior. Treating mental health and substance-use problems may aid in reducing HIV infection. Sexual assault prevention and treatment after sexual assault may strengthen HIV prevention efforts.

  7. Audit result and its users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalimova Nataliya S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies essence of the “audit result” and “users of audit result” notions and characteristics of the key audit results user. It shows that in order to give a wide characteristic of users it is expedient to unite all objects, which could be used (audit report, fact of refusal to conduct audit and information that is submitted to managers in the process of audit with the term “audit result” and classify it depending on the terms of submission by final and intermediate result. The article offers to define audit results user as a person, persons or category of persons for whom the auditor prepares the audit report and, in cases, envisaged by international standards of the audit and domestic legislative and regulatory acts, provides other additional information concerning audit issues. In order to identify the key audit results user the article distributes all audit tasks into two groups depending on possibilities of identification of users. The article proves that the key user should be identified especially in cases of a mandatory audit and this process should go in interconnection with the mechanism of allocation of a key user of financial reports. It offers to consider external users with direct financial interests, who cannot request economic subjects directly to provide information and who should rely on general financial reports and audit report when receiving significant portion of information they need, as the key user. The article makes proposals on specification of the categorical mechanism in the sphere of audit, which are the basis for audit quality assessment, identification of possibilities and conditions of appearance of the necessary and sufficient trust to the auditor opinion.

  8. Waste treatability guidance program. User`s guide. Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, C.

    1995-12-21

    DOE sites across the country generate and manage radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and sanitary wastes. It is necessary for each site to find the technologies and associated capacities required to manage its waste. One role of DOE HQ Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management is to facilitate the integration of the site- specific plans into coherent national plans. DOE has developed a standard methodology for defining and categorizing waste streams into treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. This Waste Treatability Guidance Program automates the Guidance Document for the categorization of waste information into treatability groups; this application provides a consistent implementation of the methodology across the National TRU Program. This User`s Guide provides instructions on how to use the program, including installations instructions and program operation. This document satisfies the requirements of the Software Quality Assurance Plan.

  9. VapeCons: E-cigarette user conventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca S

    2015-11-01

    E-cigarette 'vaping conventions' provide a venue for user social networking, parties, and 'try before you buy' access to a wide range of e-cigarette products. This study identifies and describes vaping conventions, raising awareness of this potentially problematic practice. Conventions were identified via Google searches in April and May 2014 and August 2015. Details captured included location, sponsors, admission cost, event features, and promotions. 41 distinct organizations have planned 90 vaping conventions in 37 different locations since 2010. Conventions promoted access to a wide range of product vendors, seminars, social interactions with other users, parties, gifts, vaping contests, and other events. E-cigarette use at conventions was encouraged. Vaping conventions promote e-cigarette use and social norms without public health having a voice to educate attendees about negative consequences of use. Future research should focus on the effects of attending these conventions on attendees and on indoor air quality in vapor-filled convention rooms.

  10. The longitudinal association of venue stability with consistent condom use among female sex workers in two Mexico-USA border cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, T L; Rudolph, A E; Brouwer, K C; Strathdee, S A; Lozada, R; Martinez, G; Goldenberg, S M; Rusch, M L A

    2013-07-01

    We examined the relationship between venue stability and consistent condom use (CCU) among female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs; n = 584) and were enrolled in a behavioural intervention in two Mexico-USA border cities. Using a generalized estimating equation approach stratified by client type and city, we found venue stability affected CCU. In Tijuana, operating primarily indoors was significantly associated with a four-fold increase in the odds of CCU among regular clients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.44, 9.89), and a seven-fold increase among casual clients (OR: 7.18, 95% CI: 2.32, 22.21), relative to FSW-IDUs spending equal time between indoor and outdoor sex work venues. In Ciudad Juarez, the trajectory of CCU increased over time and was highest among those operating primarily indoors. Results from this analysis highlight the importance of considering local mobility, including venue type and venue stability, as these characteristics jointly influence HIV risk behaviours.

  11. Association between Secondhand Smoke in Hospitality Venues and Urinary 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol Concentrations in Non-Smoking Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoon Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between urinary cotinine and total 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL concentrations in non-smoking staff and the indoor levels of fine particles (PM2.5 in hospitality venues that allow smoking, with respect to demographic and indoor environmental factors. We evaluated 62 hospitality venues that allowed smoking in Seoul, Korea. A real-time aerosol monitor was used to measure indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Field technicians recorded indoor environmental characteristics. One non-smoking staff member in each hospitality venue was tested for urinary cotinine and total NNAL concentrations. Demographic characteristics were obtained from self-reported staff questionnaires. Natural-log (ln-transformed PM2.5 concentrations were significantly correlated with the ln-transformed cotinine (r = 0.31 and the total NNAL concentrations (r = 0.32. In multivariable regression analysis, the urinary cotinine concentrations of the staff members were significantly correlated with indoor PM2.5 concentrations; those with the highest concentrations were more likely to be women or staff members that worked in venues with a volume <375 m3. Total NNAL concentrations were significantly correlated only with indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Indoor PM2.5 may be used as an indicator for urinary cotinine and total NNAL concentrations in non-smoking staff members in hospitality venues that allow smoking.

  12. Association between Secondhand Smoke in Hospitality Venues and Urinary 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol Concentrations in Non-Smoking Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Lee, Do Hoon; Kim, KyooSang

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between urinary cotinine and total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) concentrations in non-smoking staff and the indoor levels of fine particles (PM2.5) in hospitality venues that allow smoking, with respect to demographic and indoor environmental factors. We evaluated 62 hospitality venues that allowed smoking in Seoul, Korea. A real-time aerosol monitor was used to measure indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Field technicians recorded indoor environmental characteristics. One non-smoking staff member in each hospitality venue was tested for urinary cotinine and total NNAL concentrations. Demographic characteristics were obtained from self-reported staff questionnaires. Natural-log (ln)-transformed PM2.5 concentrations were significantly correlated with the ln-transformed cotinine (r = 0.31) and the total NNAL concentrations (r = 0.32). In multivariable regression analysis, the urinary cotinine concentrations of the staff members were significantly correlated with indoor PM2.5 concentrations; those with the highest concentrations were more likely to be women or staff members that worked in venues with a volume hospitality venues that allow smoking.

  13. The longitudinal association of venue stability with consistent condom use among female sex workers in two Mexico–USA border cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, T L; Rudolph, A E; Brouwer, K C; Strathdee, S A; Lozada, R; Martinez, G; Goldenberg, S M; Rusch, M L A

    2014-01-01

    Summary We examined the relationship between venue stability and consistent condom use (CCU) among female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs; n = 584) and were enrolled in a behavioural intervention in two Mexico–USA border cities. Using a generalized estimating equation approach stratified by client type and city, we found venue stability affected CCU. In Tijuana, operating primarily indoors was significantly associated with a four-fold increase in the odds of CCU among regular clients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.44, 9.89), and a seven-fold increase among casual clients (OR: 7.18, 95% CI: 2.32, 22.21), relative to FSW-IDUs spending equal time between indoor and outdoor sex work venues. In Ciudad Juarez, the trajectory of CCU increased over time and was highest among those operating primarily indoors. Results from this analysis highlight the importance of considering local mobility, including venue type and venue stability, as these characteristics jointly influence HIV risk behaviours. PMID:23970766

  14. Profiting from innovative user communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Lars Bo

    Modding - the modification of existing products by consumers - is increasingly exploited by manufacturers to enhance product development and sales. In the computer games industry modding has evolved into a development model in which users act as unpaid `complementors' to manufacturers' product pl......, a manufacturer can incorporate and commercialize the best complements found in the user communities. Keywords: innovation, modding, user communities, software platform, business model. JEL code(s): L21; L23; O31; O32...... platforms. This article explains how manufacturers can profit from their abilities to organize and facilitate a process of innovation by user communities and capture the value of the innovations produced in such communities. When managed strategically, two distinct, but not mutually exclusive business...... models appear from the production of user complements: firstly, a manufacturer can let the (free) user complements `drift' in the user communities, where they increase the value to consumers of owning the given platform and thus can be expected to generate increased platform sales, and secondly...

  15. User acceptance of mobile notifications

    CERN Document Server

    Westermann, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an alternative approach to studying smartphone-app user notifications. It starts with insights into user acceptance of mobile notifications in order to provide tools to support users in managing these. It extends previous research by investigating factors that influence users’ perception of notifications and proposes tools addressing the shortcomings of current systems. It presents a technical framework and testbed as an approach for evaluating the usage of mobile applications and notifications, and then discusses a series of studies based on this framework that investigate factors influencing users’ perceptions of mobile notifications. Lastly, a set of design guidelines for the usage of mobile notifications is derived that can be employed to support users in handling notifications on smartphones.

  16. Unifying User-to-User Messaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wams, J.M.S.; van Steen, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Unification of user-to-user messaging systems facilitates message exchange independent of time, place, protocol, and end-user device. This article describes an approach to unification that is based on introducing a middleware layer instead of employing gateways. It entails a single system that

  17. 节约型社会高校图书馆用户时间管理研究%Research of University Library ’s User Time Management in the Economical Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王美杰

    2015-01-01

    节约型社会如何做好用户时间管理是高校图书馆面临的一个挑战。对建设节约型社会、时间、图书馆时间管理、图书馆用户时间管理等概念进行了界定,从馆舍布局、内部管理、馆员素质建设、读者教育等方面,探讨了图书馆用户时间管理的方法。%In the economical society how to save user’s time is a challenge to university library. This paper defines the concepts of economical society construction, time, library’s time management, and library’s user time management, etc., and probes into the methods for library’s user time management from the aspects of library buildings’ layout, internal management, librarians’ quality construction, and readers’ education, etc.

  18. The Internet Users Security Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Gordeychik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the issue of providing vulnerability management for Internet user workstations. The author suggests agentless approach to security analysis of a browser, main Internet-faced applications, plugins and extensions, such as Java, Flash, Adobe Reader, ActiveX controls. An example of practical implementation of this approach is provided.

  19. Differential HIV risk behavior among men who have sex with men seeking health-related mobile van services at diverse gay-specific venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Sari L; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Skeer, Margie; Vanderwarker, Rodney; Gaucher, Michael J; O'Connor, Catherine A; Susana Medeiros, M; Safren, Steven A

    2009-08-01

    Distinguishing between gay venues may provide important information to better understand patterns of environmental influence and HIV/STI behavioral risk among MSM. Massachusetts MSM accessing State Health Department mobile van services (n = 214) at Gay Pride events, bars/clubs, and private safer sex parties completed a one-time, cross-sectional survey via ACASI. In the past 12 months, private safer sex party attendees reported a higher mean number of anonymous partners, were more likely to report meeting sex partners via the Internet, and were more likely to report sex while drunk; in logistic regression analyses, they were less likely to report both unprotected insertive and receptive anal sex in the past year relative to men from other venues. Private safer sex parties may represent a strategy used by some MSM to reduce HIV/STI risk. Differentiating risk behavior by venue type provides valuable information with which to effectively target interventions to reach MSM at greatest risk.

  20. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Imrei, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated

  1. The becoming of user-generated reviews: Looking at the past to understand the future of managing reputation in the travel sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baka, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    conclusions about products and services. This paper explores how UGC reviews and ratings have intensified the contingency of organizational reputation in the travel sector. The findings are based upon a corpus of data including: a field study at the offices of the largest travel user-generated website, Trip...

  2. Empowering end-users in the energy transition : An exploration of products and services to support changes in household energy management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Current discourse on smart grid deployment expects residential end users to play a more active role as co-providers in the electric power system. Their electricity consumption and production is considered a resource for balancing supply and demand in an electric power system with distributed

  3. Comparison of risk behaviors and socio-cultural profile of men who have sex with men survey respondents recruited via venues and the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Joseph TF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly more men who have sex with men (MSM are using the internet to seek sex partners, and many HIV-related studies targeting MSM collect data from gay venues in order to inform the design of prevention programs. However, internet-based MSM may have different HIV risk behaviors and associated factors from those attending venues. This study examined differences in risk behaviors and socio-cultural profiles between MSM recruited from venues (e.g., gay bars/saunas and from the internet respectively. Methods An anonymous cross-sectional survey was conducted. A total of 566 Chinese MSM (340 recruited from gay-venues and 226 recruited from the internet who self-reported having had anal or oral sex with another man in the last 12 months completed a structured questionnaire. Results Internet-based MSM were more likely than venue-based MSM to have engaged in unprotected anal intercourse (53.3% vs. 33.8% or commercial sex (as clients: 12.8% vs. 5.3%; as sex workers: 6.2% vs. 1.5%, to have sought MSM partners from the internet (51.3% vs. 20.9%, and to have contracted sexually transmitted diseases (STD in the last 12 months (4.4% vs. 0.3%. On the other hand, internet-based MSM were less likely to have multiple sex partners (58.4% vs. 75.6% and to have used psychoactive substances (7.1% vs. 15.6% or drunk alcohol before sex (8.8% vs. 16.2%. Moreover, internet-based MSM reported poor acceptance of their own sexual orientation, felt more discriminated against, and received less social support than venue-recruited MSM. Conclusions Significant differences were observed between the two groups of MSM. Segmentation and targeted interventions are recommended when designing preventive interventions.

  4. Secondhand smoke concentrations in hospitality venues in the Pacific Basin: findings from American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brian A; Dube, Shanta R; Ko, Jean Y

    2011-01-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) from burning tobacco products causes disease and premature death among nonsmokers. Although the number of laws prohibiting smoking in indoor public places continues to increase, millions of nonsmokers in the United States (US) and its territories remain exposed to SHS. This study assessed indoor air pollution from SHS in hospitality venues in three US Pacific Basin territories. Air monitors were used to assess PM2.5, an environmental marker for SHS, in 19 smoke-permitted and 18 smoke- free bars and restaurants in American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and Guam. Observational logs were used to record smoking and other sources of air pollution. Differences in average PM2.5 concentrations were determined using bivariate statistics. The average PM2.5 level in venues where smoking was always permitted [arithmetic mean (AM)=299.98 μg/m3; geometric mean (GM)=200.39 μg/ m3] was significantly higher (p<0.001) than smoke-free venues [AM=8.33 μg/m3; GM=6.14 μg/m3]. In venues where smoking was allowed only during certain times, the average level outside these times [AM=42.10 μg/m3; GM=41.87 μg/m3] was also significantly higher (p<0.001) than smoke-free venues. Employees and patrons of smoke-permitted bars and restaurants are exposed to dangerous levels of air pollution from SHS, even during periods when active smoking is not occurring. Prohibiting smoking in all public indoor areas, irrespective of the venue type or time of day, is the only way to fully protect nonsmokers from SHS exposure in these environments.

  5. Technology-Enabled Remote Monitoring and Self-Management - Vision for Patient Empowerment Following Cardiac and Vascular Surgery: User Testing and Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillion, Michael; Yost, Jennifer; Turner, Andrew; Bender, Duane; Scott, Ted; Carroll, Sandra; Ritvo, Paul; Peter, Elizabeth; Lamy, Andre; Furze, Gill; Krull, Kirsten; Dunlop, Valerie; Good, Amber; Dvirnik, Nazari; Bedini, Debbie; Naus, Frank; Pettit, Shirley; Henry, Shaunattonie; Probst, Christine; Mills, Joseph; Gossage, Elaine; Travale, Irene; Duquette, Janine; Taberner, Christy; Bhavnani, Sanjeev; Khan, James S; Cowan, David; Romeril, Eric; Lee, John; Colella, Tracey; Choinière, Manon; Busse, Jason; Katz, Joel; Victor, J Charles; Hoch, Jeffrey; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Ladak, Salima; O'Keefe-McCarthy, Sheila; Parry, Monica; Sessler, Daniel I; Stacey, Michael; Stevens, Bonnie; Stremler, Robyn; Thabane, Lehana; Watt-Watson, Judy; Whitlock, Richard; MacDermid, Joy C; Leegaard, Marit; McKelvie, Robert; Hillmer, Michael; Cooper, Lynn; Arthur, Gavin; Sider, Krista; Oliver, Susan; Boyajian, Karen; Farrow, Mark; Lawton, Chris; Gamble, Darryl; Walsh, Jake; Field, Mark; LeFort, Sandra; Clyne, Wendy; Ricupero, Maria; Poole, Laurie; Russell-Wood, Karsten; Weber, Michael; McNeil, Jolene; Alpert, Robyn; Sharpe, Sarah; Bhella, Sue; Mohajer, David; Ponnambalam, Sem; Lakhani, Naeem; Khan, Rabia; Liu, Peter; Devereaux, P J

    2016-08-01

    Tens of thousands of cardiac and vascular surgeries (CaVS) are performed on seniors in Canada and the United Kingdom each year to improve survival, relieve disease symptoms, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL). However, chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), undetected or delayed detection of hemodynamic compromise, complications, and related poor functional status are major problems for substantial numbers of patients during the recovery process. To tackle this problem, we aim to refine and test the effectiveness of an eHealth-enabled service delivery intervention, TecHnology-Enabled remote monitoring and Self-MAnagemenT-VIsion for patient EmpoWerment following Cardiac and VasculaR surgery (THE SMArTVIEW, CoVeRed), which combines remote monitoring, education, and self-management training to optimize recovery outcomes and experience of seniors undergoing CaVS in Canada and the United Kingdom. Our objectives are to (1) refine SMArTVIEW via high-fidelity user testing and (2) examine the effectiveness of SMArTVIEW via a randomized controlled trial (RCT). CaVS patients and clinicians will engage in two cycles of focus groups and usability testing at each site; feedback will be elicited about expectations and experience of SMArTVIEW, in context. The data will be used to refine the SMArTVIEW eHealth delivery program. Upon transfer to the surgical ward (ie, post-intensive care unit [ICU]), 256 CaVS patients will be reassessed postoperatively and randomly allocated via an interactive Web randomization system to the intervention group or usual care. The SMArTVIEW intervention will run from surgical ward day 2 until 8 weeks following surgery. Outcome assessments will occur on postoperative day 30; at week 8; and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The primary outcome is worst postop pain intensity upon movement in the previous 24 hours (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form), averaged across the previous 14 days. Secondary outcomes include a composite of postoperative

  6. Partners met via sex parties present significantly greater odds for condomless anal sex among MSM: an event-level analysis of venues where male partners are met.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H J; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2014-12-15

    One hundred forty-seven men who have sex with men completed time-line follow-back interviews about the venues where they met their male partners (n = 1180 sexual events with first-time partners, parties presented significantly greater odds for CAS compared with meeting a partner at a gay bar/club (adjusted odds ratio = 0.44), online (adjusted odds ratio = 0.42), bathhouse (adjusted odds ratio = 0.35), or via "other" venues (adjusted odds ratio = 0.35), all P parties.

  7. Perceived Attributes of Event Sustainability in the MICE Industry in Thailand: A Viewpoint from Governmental, Academic, Venue and Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantapop Buathong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impacts of meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibitions (MICE, Event industries are as far reaching as their economic reach. The travelers who attend events patronize a wide variety of businesses: airlines, car rental agencies, hotels, restaurants, performance venues, and tour operators. The overall research objectives of this study fall on two aspects of sustainability in the event industry: the most prevalent practices that the industry employs and the relative importance of sustainability to convention consumers. This study implements mixed research methods in order to explore the perceptions of sustainable event development in the metropolitan area of Bangkok, Thailand. Empirical evidence on significant issues for event sustainability is provided. Based on the results, recommendations are made to improve sustainable event development in Thailand and offer guidance to the event industry so that it can develop its potential and gain greater prominence on the world MICE stage.

  8. Assessing the Quality of a Local Authority Conference and Hospitality Venue Using the ServQual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelly Mike

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The close attention paid to service quality by successful private companies has become part of the environment within which most public service organizations now operate. The ServQual model has been used with success to help companies quantify customers' expectations and perceptions of their service and to use this analysis as the basis for improvement. More recently, the ServQual approach has been applied in public service contexts with mixed reliability and validity. This paper reports on the application of the ServQual model to a conference and hospitality venue operated by a Scottish local authority. The study investigates five distinct customer segments: conferences, meetings, receptions, performances, and weddings. The expectations-perceptions gaps are assessed for each of these segments using the ServQual model and the size and antecedents of ServQual Gap 1 is also examined.

  9. The Impact of New Execution Venues on European Equity Markets' Liquidity - The Case of Chi-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlistalla, Michael; Lutat, Marco

    With the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive in effect since November 2007, new trading venues have emerged in European equities trading, among them Chi-X. This paper analyzes the impact of this new market entrant on the home market as well as on consolidated liquidity of French blue chip equities, newly tradable on Chi-X. Our findings suggest that owing to this new competition the home market’s liquidity has enhanced. This is apparently due to the battle for order flow which results in narrower spreads and increased market depth. These results imply that overall liquidity in a virtually consolidated order book is in the French case higher than without the new competitor.

  10. Planning, budgeting and performance management at Swiss hospitals – Are Swiss hospitals at a crossroads – Will these medical specialist organisations in future develop into institutions with a business orientation? [Die Krankenhäuser der Schweiz am Wendepunkt von der medizinischen Expertenorganisation hin zu betriebswirtschaftlich geführten Institutionen? – Untersuchung zu deren Performance-Management-System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walser, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    die Schweizer Krankenhäuser ein kohärentes und langfristig ausgerichtetes Performance Management aufbauen können. Mit der Einführung von Wettbewerbsmechanismen (DRG-System im neuen Krankenversicherungsgesetz wird die betriebswirtschaftliche Ausrichtung der Krankenhausführung zum Schlüsselfaktor für ein Bestehen am Markt. Die Basis der vorliegenden Untersuchung bildet eine schriftliche Befragung aller Deutschschweizer Krankenhäuser. Diese wurden auf der Grundlage eines Reifegrade-Modells zum Ist- sowie dem Soll-Zustand von deren Performance-Management-Systemen befragt. Das Reifegradmodell wurde für Krankenhäuser angepasst.Die deskriptive Auswertung der Daten zeigt, dass die meisten Krankenhäuser auf dem richtigen Weg sind. Planung und Controlling haben mehrheitlich einen hohen Reifegrad, indes wird die strategische Wichtigkeit eines wirksamen Performance Managements (Reporting, IT-Integration vielerorts noch unterschätzt. So verfügen die meisten Krankenhäuser bereits heute über ausgebaute Planungsmechanismen, beurteilen aber die dazu gehörige Informatikunterstützung als nicht prioritär.Dabei zeigen die bivariaten Auswertungen (Korrelationsmatrizen der Umfrage, dass gerade der IT als Träger oder Plattform des Performance-Managements eine zentrale Rolle zukommt. Gleichzeitig weisen diese weiterführenden Analysen darauf hin, dass die betriebswirtschaftliche Krankenhausplanung der eigentliche Treiber zum Auf- und Ausbau von leistungsfähigen Performance-Management-Systemen ist. Erst eine gut entwickelte und integrierte IT und klare Planwerte, so zeigt sich ausgehend von der Untersuchung, lassen ein umfassendes Performance Management zu.Ein gut funktionierendes Performance Management beinhaltet überdies auch eine organisatorische Komponente. Erst wenn die Aufgaben, Kompetenzen und Verantwortlichkeiten im Hinblick auf die Krankenhaussteuerung bezüglich Betriebswirtschaft, Medizin und Pflege aufeinander abgestimmt sind, können Krankenhäuser

  11. The impact of the Cyprus comprehensive smoking ban on air quality and economic business of hospitality venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophi, Costas A; Paisi, Martha; Pampaka, Despina; Kehagias, Martha; Vardavas, Constantine; Connolly, Gregory N

    2013-01-27

    Several countries, including Cyprus, have passed smoke-free legislations in recent years. The goal of this study was to assess the indoor levels of particulate matter in hospitality venues in Cyprus before and after the implementation of the law on 1/1/2010, evaluate the role of enforcement, and examine the legislation's effect on revenue and employment. Several hospitality venues (n = 35) were sampled between April 2007 and January 2008, and 21 of those were re-sampled after the introduction of the smoking ban, between March and May 2010. Data on enforcement was provided by the Cyprus Police whereas data on revenue and employment within the hospitality industry of Cyprus were obtained from the Cyprus Statistical Service; comparisons were made between the corresponding figures before and after the implementation of the law. The median level of PM2.5 associated with secondhand smoking was 161 μg/m3 pre-ban and dropped to 3 μg/m3 post-ban (98% decrease, p hotel turnover rate increased by 4.1% and the restaurant revenue by 6.4%; employment increased that same year by 7.2% and 1.0%, respectively. Smoke free legislations, when enforced, are highly effective in improving the air quality and reducing the levels of indoor PM2.5. Strict enforcement plays a key role in the successful implementation of smoking bans. Even in nations with high smoking prevalence comprehensive smoking laws can be effectively implemented and have no negative effect on accommodation, food, and beverage services.

  12. The relationship between alcohol consumption, gambling behaviour and problem gambling during a single visit to a gambling venue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Francis; Young, Martin; Doran, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    Despite the well-documented comorbidity between disordered alcohol use and problem gambling, little is known about the co-occurrence of drinking and gambling in gambling venues. This paper appears to be the first to investigate the association between drinking and gambling behaviour among a large sample of gamblers during a specific, non-laboratory gambling episode. We conducted a mail survey of all available households in the Northern Territory of Australia, including questions on drinking and gambling behaviour on the last visit to a gambling venue. We estimate the effect of moderate (1-4 standard drinks) and risky (>4 standard drinks) alcohol consumption on gambling participation and gambling duration for both problem and non-problem gamblers using regression analysis of 7044 survey responses. The probability of participating in electronic gaming machine (EGM) gambling decreased with alcohol consumption for non-problem gamblers, while the probability of participating in TAB (Totalisator Agency Board, off-course totalisator) gambling increased with risky alcohol consumption for all gamblers. Alcohol consumption was not associated with EGM gambling participation for problem gamblers. Moderate alcohol consumption was negatively associated with EGM gambling duration, with a stronger effect observed for problem gamblers. Moderate alcohol consumption is inversely correlated with both the duration of play and probability of participation for EGM gambling. Current laboratory studies do not predict the drinking-gambling behaviour of the general population in non-laboratory settings. Future research on alcohol and gambling co-occurrence must explicitly consider the drinking and gambling environment in order to produce policy-relevant findings. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  13. Administration and Management of Irrigation Water in 24 User Organizations in Chile Administración y Gestión del Agua de Riego en 24 Organizaciones de Usuarios en Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara Jorge

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 85% of the water consumed in Chile is destined to agricultural irrigation and is managed by the users themselves. This study analyzed the price that irrigation water users pay to their Water User Associations (WUAs to which they belong and the relationship of this price to the professional level and performance of the WUAs. The study included 24 WUAs: 10 River Administration Boards (JV and 14 Irrigation Canal Associations (AC. The annual operational budget of each WUA, the price paid by users and the management capacities of the board of directors of each WUA were compared. The study also determined the relative value of user payments to WUAs as a proportion of total production costs of the main crops in each zone. The variability of user fees per irrigated hectare decreases when the irrigation area of the WUA is more than 10 000 ha, though this was not observed in JVs. The presence of technical-professional staff directly affects the development and growth of the WUAs. As well, the WUAs with a greater level of capacity development (NDC have more board members with a higher education level and have lower rates of unpaid user fees. The price that users pay to the WUA by irrigated hectare represents less than 4.0% of the average total production cost of the main crops in the study area. Finally, no correlation was found between the prices that users pay and the average profitability of the main crops, or between price and the geographical location of the WUAs.Aproximadamente, el 85% del agua consumida en Chile es destinada al riego agrícola, siendo administrada por los propios usuarios. En este estudio, se analizó el costo que cancelan los usuarios del agua de riego a sus Organizaciones de Usuarios de Agua (WUAs y el nivel de profesionalización y desempeño de éstas. Se estudiaron 24 WUAs: 10 Juntas de Vigilancia (JV y 14 Asociaciones de Canalistas (AC. Se comparó el presupuesto anual de operaciones de cada WUA, el valor que

  14. Identity Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Provides information for identity management services on the creation, modification and eventual deletion of accounts and entitlements based on user relationships on...

  15. Reputation system for User Generated wireless podcasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Liang; Dittmann, Lars; Le Boudec, J-Y

    2008-01-01

    The user-generated podcasting service over mobile opportunistic networks can facilitate the user generated content dissemination while humans are on the move. However, in such a distributed and dynamic network environment, the design of efficient content forwarding and cache management schemes ar...

  16. EFFECT OF USER EDUCATION ON LIBRARY USE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Information Impact | Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... hinder effective user education as over population, lack of infrastructure, inadequate and ... technology as well as the development .... user make best use of overall library .... 10. I was exposed to various information materials available in the library.

  17. User Behavior Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Juston Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    User Behaviour Analytics is the tracking, collecting and assessing of user data and activities. The goal is to detect misuse of user credentials by developing models for the normal behaviour of user credentials within a computer network and detect outliers with respect to their baseline.

  18. The User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  19. Franklin: User Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  20. Improving the Drupal User Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Vacek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drupal is a powerful, but complex, Web Content Management System, being adopted by many libraries. Installing Drupal typically involves adding additional modules for flexibility and increased functionality. Although installing additional modules does increase functionality, it inevitably complicates usability. At the University of Houston Libraries, the Web Services department researched what modules work well together to accomplish a simpler interface while simultaneously providing the flexibility and advanced tools needed to create a successful user experience within Drupal. This article explains why particular modules were chosen or developed, how the design enhanced the user experience, how the CMS architecture was created, and how other library systems were integrated into Drupal.

  1. Computerized clinical decision support for the early recognition and management of acute kidney injury: a qualitative evaluation of end-user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel S; Bevan, Mark T; Sims, Andrew J; Heed, Andrew; Price, David A; Sheerin, Neil S

    2016-02-01

    Although the efficacy of computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear, the wider literature includes examples of limited acceptability and equivocal benefit. Our single-centre study aimed to identify factors promoting or inhibiting use of in-patient AKI CCDS. Targeting medical users, CCDS triggered with a serum creatinine rise of ≥25 μmol/L/day and linked to guidance and test ordering. User experience was evaluated through retrospective interviews, conducted and analysed according to Normalization Process Theory. Initial pilot ward experience allowed tool refinement. Assessments continued following CCDS activation across all adult, non-critical care wards. Thematic saturation was achieved with 24 interviews. The alert was accepted as a potentially useful prompt to early clinical re-assessment by many trainees. Senior staff were more sceptical, tending to view it as a hindrance. 'Pop-ups' and mandated engagement before alert dismissal were universally unpopular due to workflow disruption. Users were driven to close out of the alert as soon as possible to review historical creatinines and to continue with the intended workflow. Our study revealed themes similar to those previously described in non-AKI settings. Systems intruding on workflow, particularly involving complex interactions, may be unsustainable even if there has been a positive impact on care. The optimal balance between intrusion and clinical benefit of AKI CCDS requires further evaluation.

  2. Electronic Commerce user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD`s Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases & Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  3. Electronic Commerce user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD's Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  4. TWOZONE users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, A.J.; Gibson, G.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1978-03-01

    TWOZONE is a computer program written in the summer of 1975 to analyze the heating and cooling loads of single family residences for the purpose of investigating the effect on energy consumption of various changes in building design, construction and management. The program evaluates the annual energy demand taking into account: various amounts, types and location of glass areas in a house; different wall and roof constructions; various amounts and locations of insulation; scheduled thermostat settings; and other changes in the building envelope. The model differentiates between the thermal behavior of the north and south zones of a house (hence the name TWOZONE). This manual describes the most recent version of TWOZONE which includes many new features (e.g., ventilation strategies, evaporative cooler, improved air-conditioner algorithm, ability to read Cal-ERDA weather tapes, user-specified tilting of the roof, an economics subroutine etc.).

  5. Food Shopping Venues, Neighborhood Food Environment, and Body Mass Index Among Guyanese, Black, and White Adults in an Urban Community in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Akiko S; Michaels, Isaac H; Buckenmeyer, Erin M

    2016-06-01

    To investigate relationships among food shopping venues, food environment, and body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional survey data and directly assessed food environment data were linked at the neighborhood level. Schenectady, NY. A sample of Guyanese, black, and white adults (n = 226, 485, and 908, respectively). BMI. Linear regression models were constructed with 10 food shopping venues and neighborhood food environment as explanatory variables, controlling for sociodemographics, dietary behavior, physical activity, and perception of healthy food access. On average, respondents used 3.5 different food shopping venues. Supermarkets and ethnic markets were associated with a lower BMI in Guyanese adults. Among black adults, farmers' markets were associated with a lower BMI, whereas supermarkets, wholesale clubs, and food pantries were associated with a higher BMI. Among white adults, food coops and supermarkets were associated with a lower BMI and wholesale clubs were associated with a higher BMI. Neighborhoods with less a favorable food environment (longer travel distance to a supermarket) were associated with a lower BMI in Guyanese adults. Both primary (ie, supermarkets) and secondary food shopping venues could be independent determinants of BMI. The observed variations by race and ethnicity provided insights into a culturally tailored approach to address obesity. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Behavioural and psychological responses of lower educated smokers to the smoke-free legislation in Dutch hospitality venues : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heiden, Sander; Gebhardt, Winifred A.; Willemsen, Marc C.; Nagelhout, Gera E.; Dijkstra, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In 2008, smoke-free legislation was implemented in hospitality venues (HV) in the Netherlands. We investigated how continuing smokers with a lower educational background respond behaviourally and psychologically to the legislation and the norm it communicates. Design: In 2010, 18

  7. An Authentication Framework for Nomadic Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    . This is probably best explained by considering password based authentication, where a user is actively involved in the process. If the time required to log in to an account is considered too high, users tend to leave their terminals logged in throughout the day and share their account with other users....... This is particularly true for nomadic users who move around in ubiquitous computing environments and avail from different IT services from many different locations. In many ubiquitous computing environments, where information processing is not considered the main priority, management often accepts this practise...

  8. Libraries as a venue for exciting education technology, both high tech and low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J. B.; Dusenbery, P.; Holland, A.

    2016-12-01

    Public libraries provide a broad range of possibilities for reaching diverse audiences with NASA and STEM related content and activities, from hands-on activities, to interactive kiosks incorporating science based games, simulations, and real-time data. NCIL/SSI has been developing STEM-based exhibits and program activities for public libraries since 2007, and is currently managing 7 national tours in partnership with the American Library Association and other organizations. Past and current exhibitions will reach over 100 libraries and an estimated 1.5 million patrons. In this paper we will discuss a range of findings from almost a decade of deploying both high and low tech STEM learning strategies into libraries, including usage and engagement by library patrons, and challenges (and solutions) for deploying technologically sophisticated components into libraries which may or may not have dedicated technical staff.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL, POLICY AND PHYSICAL VENUE FEATURES AND SOCIAL COHESION ON CONDOM USE FOR PREGNANCY PREVENTION AMONG SEX WORKERS: A SAFER INDOOR WORK ENVIRONMENT SCALE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Putu; Shoveller, Jean; Dobrer, Sabina; Ogilvie, Gina; Montaner, Julio; Chettiar, Jill; Shannon, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aims to: report on a newly developed ‘Safer Indoor Work Environmental Scale’ that characterizes the social, policy and physical features of indoor venues and social cohesion; and using this scale, longitudinally evaluate the association between these features on sex workers’ (SWs’) condom use for pregnancy prevention. Methods Drawing on a prospective open cohort of female SWs working in indoor venues, a newly-developed ‘Safer Indoor Work Environment Scale’ was used to build six multivariable models with generalized estimating equations (GEE), to determine the independent effects of social, policy and venue-based features and social cohesion on condom use. Results Of 588 indoor SWs, 63.6% used condoms for pregnancy prevention in the last month. In multivariable GEE analysis, the following venue-based features were significantly correlated with barrier contraceptive use for pregnancy prevention: managerial practices and venue safety policies (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.09; 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.01–1.17) access to sexual and reproductive health services/supplies (AOR=1.10; 95%CI 1.00–1.20) access to drug harm reduction (AOR=1.13; 95%CI 1.01–1.28), and social cohesion among workers (AOR=1.05; 95%CI 1.03–1.07). Access to security features was marginally associated with condom use (AOR=1.13; 95%CI 0.99–1.29). Conclusion The findings of the current study highlight how work environment and social cohesion among SWs are related to improved condom use. Given global calls for the decriminalization of sex work, and potential legislative reforms in Canada, this study points to the critical need for new institutional arrangements (e.g., legal and regulatory frameworks; labour standards) to support safer sex workplaces. PMID:25678713

  10. Factors that influence attitude and enforcement of the smoke-free law in Turkey: a survey of hospitality venue owners and employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherrera, Angela; Çarkoğlu, Asli; Hayran, Mutlu; Ergör, Gül; Eirüder, Toker; Kaplan, Bekir; Susan, Jolie; Zheng, Laura; Cohen, Joanna E; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, Turkey extended the smoke-free legislation to hospitality venues. Compliance, however, remains low in some hospitality venues. We identified characteristics associated with knowledge of health effects that can be prevented by the smoke-free law, the attitude towards and enforcement of the law. In 2014, we conducted 400 interviews with hospitality venue owners and employees in 7 cities in Turkey. The venues were identified based on a random sampling strategy in a previous phase of the study. Over one-third (37.3%) of hospitality owners and employees had adequate knowledge of the health effects from secondhand smoke (SHS), 71.3% had a positive attitude towards the law and 19.5% had personally enforced the law. Participants who worked 70 hours or more per week were more likely to have a positive attitude towards the law. Older individuals, women, participants working in bars/nightclubs, venue owners receiving fines for non-compliance and current smokers were less likely to have a positive attitude towards the law. Participants working in traditional coffee houses, former smokers, and participants with a high school education or greater were more likely to enforce the law. Smokers who quit or reduced smoking because of the law were more likely to enforce the law compared with those who were not influenced by the law. Although the attitude towards the law was positive, interventions are needed to increase knowledge on the health effects of SHS and facilitate enforcement of the law, particularly among subgroups less likely to have a positive attitude and enforce the law. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. The relationship between social, policy and physical venue features and social cohesion on condom use for pregnancy prevention among sex workers: a safer indoor work environment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Putu; Shoveller, Jean; Dobrer, Sabina; Ogilvie, Gina; Montaner, Julio; Chettiar, Jill; Shannon, Kate

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to report on a newly developed Safer Indoor Work Environmental Scale that characterises the social, policy and physical features of indoor venues and social cohesion; and using this scale, longitudinally evaluate the association between these features on sex workers' (SWs') condom use for pregnancy prevention. Drawing on a prospective open cohort of female SWs working in indoor venues, a newly developed Safer Indoor Work Environment Scale was used to build six multivariable models with generalised estimating equations (GEE), to determine the independent effects of social, policy and physical venue-based features and social cohesion on condom use. Of 588 indoor SWs, 63.6% used condoms for pregnancy prevention in the last month. In multivariable GEE analysis, the following venue-based features were significantly correlated with barrier contraceptive use for pregnancy prevention: managerial practices and venue safety policies (adjusted OR (AOR)=1.09; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.17), access to sexual and reproductive health services/supplies (AOR=1.10; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.20), access to drug harm reduction (AOR=1.13; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.28) and social cohesion among workers (AOR=1.05; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.07). Access to security features was marginally associated with condom use (AOR=1.13; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.29). The findings of the current study highlight how work environment and social cohesion among SWs are related to improved condom use. Given global calls for the decriminalisation of sex work, and potential legislative reforms in Canada, this study points to the critical need for new institutional arrangements (eg, legal and regulatory frameworks; labour standards) to support safer sex workplaces. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. An End-Users Oriented Methodology for Enhancing the Integration of Knowledge on Soil-Water-Sediment Systems in River Basin Management: An Illustration from the AquaTerra Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merly, Corinne; Chapman, Antony; Mouvet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Research results in environmental and socio-economic sciences are often under-used by stakeholders involved in the management of natural resources. To minimise this gap, the FP6 EU interdisciplinary project AquaTerra (AT) developed an end-users' integration methodology in order to ensure that the data, knowledge and tools related to the soil-water-sediment system that were generated by the project were delivered in a meaningful way for end-users, thus improving their uptake. The methodology and examples of its application are presented in this paper. From the 408 project deliverables, 96 key findings were identified, 53 related to data and knowledge, and 43 describing advanced tools. River Basin Management (RBM) stakeholders workshops identified 8 main RBM issues and 25 specific stakeholders' questions related to RBM which were classified into seven groups of cross-cutting issues, namely scale, climate change, non-climatic change, the need for systemic approaches, communication and participation, international and inter-basin coordination and collaboration, and the implementation of the Water Framework Directive. The integration methodology enabled an assessment of how AT key findings meet stakeholders' demands, and for each main RBM issue and for each specific question, described the added-value of the AT project in terms of knowledge and tools generated, key parameters to consider, and recommendations that can be made to stakeholders and the wider scientific community. Added value and limitations of the integration methodology and its outcomes are discussed and recommendations are provided to further improve integration methodology and bridge the gaps between scientific research data and their potential uptake by end-users.

  13. Successful treatment of Candida parapsilosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection using medical and surgical management in an injecting drug user with mitral and aortic valve endocarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daas Hanady

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Polymicrobial endocarditis is a well-recognized problem in intravenous drug users and it accounts for 1 to 3% of endocarditis cases overall and up to 9% in other series. The most common combinations of organisms include Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Candida parapsilosis endocarditis carries a mortality rate of 45%, and each infection with Candida or Pseudomonas endocarditis per se carries a very high mortality rate approaching 85% and 80%, respectively. The combination of P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis has never been encountered and there have been no earlier reports of the combination of C. parapsilosis and P. aeruginosa in adult intravenous drug users as a cause of endocarditis. Case presentation We present a 49-year-old man with bivalvular endocarditis with P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis. He had a prior bivalvular replacement in 2005 that became infected with the above microorganisms and he was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Because of ongoing intravenous drug use, a second valve replacement was denied. A few days later, the patient presented with septic shock secondary to P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis recurrent endocarditis. The infection was cured with a second bivalvular replacement and extended therapy with antibiotics and antifungals. Conclusion This is the first time a patient has presented with P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis endocarditis. Relapsing polymicrobial endocarditis can be cured with medical and surgical therapy.

  14. Schools as potential vaccination venue for vaccines outside regular EPI schedule: results from a school census in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soofi Sajid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccines are the most effective public health intervention. Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI provides routine vaccination in developing countries. However, vaccines that cannot be given in EPI schedule such as typhoid fever vaccine need alternative venues. In areas where school enrolment is high, schools provide a cost effective opportunity for vaccination. Prior to start of a school-based typhoid vaccination program, interviews were conducted with staff of educational institutions in two townships of Karachi, Pakistan to collect baseline information about the school system and to plan a typhoid vaccination program. Data collection teams administered a structured questionnaire to all schools in the two townships. The administrative staff was requested information on school fee, class enrolment, past history of involvement and willingness of parents to participate in a vaccination campaign. Results A total of 304,836 students were enrolled in 1,096 public, private, and religious schools (Madrasahs of the two towns. Five percent of schools refused to participate in the school census. Twenty-five percent of schools had a total enrolment of less than 100 students whereas 3% had more than 1,000 students. Health education programs were available in less than 8% of public schools, 17% of private schools, and 14% of Madrasahs. One-quarter of public schools, 41% of private schools, and 43% of Madrasahs had previously participated in a school-based vaccination campaign. The most common vaccination campaign in which schools participated was Polio eradication program. Cost of the vaccine, side effects, and parents' lack of information were highlighted as important limiting factors by school administration for school-based immunization programs. Permission from parents, appropriateness of vaccine-related information, and involvement of teachers were considered as important factors to improve participation. Conclusions Health

  15. Schools as potential vaccination venue for vaccines outside regular EPI schedule: results from a school census in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Haq, Inam-Ul; Khan, M Imran; Siddiqui, Muhammad Bilal; Mirani, Mushtaq; Tahir, Rehman; Hussain, Imtiaz; Puri, Mahesh K; Suhag, Zamir Hussain; Khowaja, Asif R; Lasi, Abdul Razzaq; Clemens, John D; Favorov, Michael; Ochiai, R Leon; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2012-01-06

    Vaccines are the most effective public health intervention. Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) provides routine vaccination in developing countries. However, vaccines that cannot be given in EPI schedule such as typhoid fever vaccine need alternative venues. In areas where school enrolment is high, schools provide a cost effective opportunity for vaccination. Prior to start of a school-based typhoid vaccination program, interviews were conducted with staff of educational institutions in two townships of Karachi, Pakistan to collect baseline information about the school system and to plan a typhoid vaccination program. Data collection teams administered a structured questionnaire to all schools in the two townships. The administrative staff was requested information on school fee, class enrolment, past history of involvement and willingness of parents to participate in a vaccination campaign. A total of 304,836 students were enrolled in 1,096 public, private, and religious schools (Madrasahs) of the two towns. Five percent of schools refused to participate in the school census. Twenty-five percent of schools had a total enrolment of less than 100 students whereas 3% had more than 1,000 students. Health education programs were available in less than 8% of public schools, 17% of private schools, and 14% of Madrasahs. One-quarter of public schools, 41% of private schools, and 43% of Madrasahs had previously participated in a school-based vaccination campaign. The most common vaccination campaign in which schools participated was Polio eradication program. Cost of the vaccine, side effects, and parents' lack of information were highlighted as important limiting factors by school administration for school-based immunization programs. Permission from parents, appropriateness of vaccine-related information, and involvement of teachers were considered as important factors to improve participation. Health education programs are not part of the regular school curriculum

  16. User interface user's guide for HYPGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1992-01-01

    The user interface (UI) of HYPGEN is developed using Panel Library to shorten the learning curve for new users and provide easier ways to run HYPGEN for casual users as well as for advanced users. Menus, buttons, sliders, and type-in fields are used extensively in UI to allow users to point and click with a mouse to choose various available options or to change values of parameters. On-line help is provided to give users information on using UI without consulting the manual. Default values are set for most parameters and boundary conditions are determined by UI to further reduce the effort needed to run HYPGEN; however, users are free to make any changes and save it in a file for later use. A hook to PLOT3D is built in to allow graphics manipulation. The viewpoint and min/max box for PLOT3D windows are computed by UI and saved in a PLOT3D journal file. For large grids which take a long time to generate on workstations, the grid generator (HYPGEN) can be run on faster computers such as Crays, while UI stays at the workstation.

  17. 2017 Solar Eclipse in Hopkinsville, KY: E/PO Feedback from Two Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Timothy E.; Consolmagno, Guy

    2017-10-01

    Hopkinsville, Kentucky was the largest town in the region of maximum totality for the 21 August 2017 Solar Eclipse, and transformed itself into “Eclipseville” with extensive media attention. Here we give 2 on-the-ground reports on education and public outreach (E/PO) activities from Hopkinsville. One of us (TD) partnered with the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management (KYEM) and was in the Hopkinsville VIP area, and the other (GC) led a series of E/PO events at the Hopkinsville Church of Ss. Peter & Paul, which were nationally advertised in diocesan newspapers. In addition, both of us were interviewed extensively by local and national media before the event. Pre-event planning by KYEM extended for over a year, and culminated in a 6-hour, 12 July 2017 Tabletop Exercise (TTX) run by FEMA. This face-to-face workshop drew over 250 participants, including Kentucky’s Lt. Governor, health and public safety officials at the state-level and from the 21 Kentucky counties in the path of totality, mayors and convention-bureau officials from the affected KY towns, the KY National Guard, the U.S. Depts. of Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, and Transportation, the National Weather Service, the U.S. Coast Guard for riverboat traffic, the U.S. Forest Service, the American Red Cross, representatives from ATT, Verizon and Sprint, and representatives from local universities—it was the largest TTX in Kentucky’s history. Here, we report on E/PO feedback we assembled from the VIP and parochial sites, including the most frequently asked questions, which types of answers seemed to be most effective, and how actual events compared with the large-crowd preparations and planning.

  18. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding...... the consequence that the user does not have to specify any start guesses, etc.The design approach developed have resulted in a number of simulation tools which allow users with limited theoretical knowledge about refrigeration systems, mathematical models and simulation to use them while the expert users still...

  19. User evaluation in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, Hanne Kathrine

    2004-01-01

    The BIKVA-model (brugerinddragelse i kvalitetsvurdering) or in english UPQA (User Participation in Quality Assessment) are presented......The BIKVA-model (brugerinddragelse i kvalitetsvurdering) or in english UPQA (User Participation in Quality Assessment) are presented...

  20. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  1. Sediment source fingerprinting as an aid to catchment management: A review of the current state of knowledge and a methodological decision-tree for end-users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A.L; Pulley, S.; Foster, I.D.L; Gellis, Allen; Porto, P.; Horowitz, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    The growing awareness of the environmental significance of fine-grained sediment fluxes through catchment systems continues to underscore the need for reliable information on the principal sources of this material. Source estimates are difficult to obtain using traditional monitoring techniques, but sediment source fingerprinting or tracing procedures, have emerged as a potentially valuable alternative. Despite the rapidly increasing numbers of studies reporting the use of sediment source fingerprinting, several key challenges and uncertainties continue to hamper consensus among the international scientific community on key components of the existing methodological procedures. Accordingly, this contribution reviews and presents recent developments for several key aspects of fingerprinting, namely: sediment source classification, catchment source and target sediment sampling, tracer selection, grain size issues, tracer conservatism, source apportionment modelling, and assessment of source predictions using artificial mixtures. Finally, a decision-tree representing the current state of knowledge is presented, to guide end-users in applying the fingerprinting approach.

  2. Managing la malilla: Exploring drug treatment experiences among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico, and their implications for drug law reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Jennifer; Pollini, Robin A; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-11-01

    In August 2009, Mexico reformed its drug laws and decriminalized small quantities of drugs for personal use; offenders caught three times will be mandated to enter drug treatment. However, little is known about the quality or effectiveness of drug treatment programs in Mexico. We examined injection drug users' (IDUs) experiences in drug treatment in Tijuana, Mexico, with the goal of informing program planning and policy. We examined qualitative and quantitative data from Proyecto El Cuete, a multi-phased research study on HIV risk among IDUs in Tijuana. Phase I consisted of 20 in-depth interviews and Phase II employed respondent-driven sampling to recruit 222 IDUs for a quantitative survey. We also reviewed national drug policy documents, surveillance data, and media reports to situate drug users' experiences within the broader sociopolitical context. Participants in the qualitative study were 50% male with a mean age of 32; most injected heroin (85.0%) and methamphetamine (60.0%). The quantitative sample was 91.4% male with a mean age of 35; 98.2% injected heroin and 83.7% injected heroin and methamphetamine together. The majority of participants reported receiving treatment: residential treatment was most common, followed by methadone; other types of services were infrequently reported. Participants' perceptions of program acceptability and effectiveness were mixed. Mistreatment emerged as a theme in the qualitative interviews and was reported by 21.6% of Phase II participants, primarily physical (72.0%) and verbal (52.0%) abuse. Our results point to the need for political, economic, and social investment in the drug treatment system before offenders are sentenced to treatment under the revised national drug law. Resources are needed to strengthen program quality and ensure accountability. The public health impact of the new legislation that attempts to bring drug treatment to the forefront of national drug policy should be systematically evaluated. Copyright

  3. Gun buyback programs: a venue to eliminate unwanted guns in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violano, Pina; Driscoll, Cassandra; Chaudhary, Neil K; Schuster, Kevin M; Davis, Kimberly A; Borer, Esther; Winters, Jane K; Hirsh, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    enhancement of firearm knowledge among medical, law enforcement, judicial, and school communities, the prevention of intentional and unintentional firearm-related injuries will be able to be managed more effectively.

  4. User-centered design of a web-based self-management site for individuals with type 2 diabetes - providing a sense of control and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Catherine H; Parsons, Janet A; Hall, Susan; Newton, David; Jovicic, Aleksandra; Lottridge, Danielle; Shah, Baiju R; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-07-23

    To design and test a web-based self-management tool for patients with type 2 diabetes for its usability and feasibility. An evidence-based, theory-driven website was created for patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-three patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were recruited from 2 diabetes care centers in Toronto, Canada. We employed focus group methodology to assess acceptability, sustainability, strengths and weaknesses of the self-management website. Based on these results, revisions were made to the website. Three cycles of individual usability testing sessions using cognitive task analysis were conducted with patients with type 2 diabetes. Revisions to the website were made based on results from this testing. We identified five themes concerning participants' experiences of health care and related unmet needs: 1) Desire for information and for greater access to timely and personalized care to gain a sense of control of their disease; 2) Desire for community (sharing experiences with others) to fulfill practical and emotional needs; 3) Potential roles of an online self-management website in self-empowerment, behavior change, self-management and health care delivery; 4) Importance of a patient-centered perspective in presenting content (e.g. common assumptions, medical nomenclature, language, messaging, sociocultural context); 5) Barriers and facilitators to use of a self-management website (including perceived relevance of content, incorporation into usual routine, availability for goal-directed use, usability issues). Participants outlined a series of unmet health care needs, and stated that they wanted timely access to tailored knowledge about their condition, mechanisms to control and track their disease, and opportunities to share experiences with other patients. These findings have implications for patients with type 2 diabetes of diverse ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and disease severity, as well as to the design of other computer

  5. User-centered design of a web-based self-management site for individuals with type 2 diabetes – providing a sense of control and community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To design and test a web-based self-management tool for patients with type 2 diabetes for its usability and feasibility. Methods An evidence-based, theory-driven website was created for patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-three patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were recruited from 2 diabetes care centers in Toronto, Canada. We employed focus group methodology to assess acceptability, sustainability, strengths and weaknesses of the self-management website. Based on these results, revisions were made to the website. Three cycles of individual usability testing sessions using cognitive task analysis were conducted with patients with type 2 diabetes. Revisions to the website were made based on results from this testing. Results We identified five themes concerning participants’ experiences of health care and related unmet needs: 1) Desire for information and for greater access to timely and personalized care to gain a sense of control of their disease; 2) Desire for community (sharing experiences with others) to fulfill practical and emotional needs; 3) Potential roles of an online self-management website in self-empowerment, behavior change, self-management and health care delivery; 4) Importance of a patient-centered perspective in presenting content (e.g. common assumptions, medical nomenclature, language, messaging, sociocultural context); 5) Barriers and facilitators to use of a self-management website (including perceived relevance of content, incorporation into usual routine, availability for goal-directed use, usability issues). Conclusions Participants outlined a series of unmet health care needs, and stated that they wanted timely access to tailored knowledge about their condition, mechanisms to control and track their disease, and opportunities to share experiences with other patients. These findings have implications for patients with type 2 diabetes of diverse ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and disease severity, as well

  6. Condom negotiation, HIV testing, and HIV risks among women from alcohol serving venues in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Cain, Demetria; Eaton, Lisa A; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P; Harel, Ofer; Simbayi, Leickness C; Mehlomakhulu, Vuyelwa; Mwaba, Kelvin

    2012-01-01

    Women in South Africa are at particularly high-risk for HIV infection and are dependent on their male partners' use of condoms for sexual risk reduction. However, many women are afraid to discuss condoms with male partners, placing them at higher risk of HIV infection. To examine the association between fear of condom negotiation with HIV testing and transmission risk behaviors, including alcohol use and sexual risks among South African women. Women (N = 1333) residing in a primarily Xhosa-speaking African township in Cape Town and attending informal alcohol-serving venues (shebeens) completed anonymous surveys. Logistic regression was used to test the hypothesis that fear of condom negotiation would be associated with increased risk for HIV. Compared to women who did not fear condom negotiation, those who did were significantly less likely to have been tested for HIV, were more likely to have experienced relationship abuse, and to report more alcohol use and more unprotected sex. For women in South Africa, fear of condom negotiation is related to higher risk of HIV. HIV prevention efforts, including targeted HIV counseling and testing, must directly address gender issues.

  7. Condom negotiation, HIV testing, and HIV risks among women from alcohol serving venues in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen V Pitpitan

    Full Text Available Women in South Africa are at particularly high-risk for HIV infection and are dependent on their male partners' use of condoms for sexual risk reduction. However, many women are afraid to discuss condoms with male partners, placing them at higher risk of HIV infection.To examine the association between fear of condom negotiation with HIV testing and transmission risk behaviors, including alcohol use and sexual risks among South African women.Women (N = 1333 residing in a primarily Xhosa-speaking African township in Cape Town and attending informal alcohol-serving venues (shebeens completed anonymous surveys. Logistic regression was used to test the hypothesis that fear of condom negotiation would be associated with increased risk for HIV.Compared to women who did not fear condom negotiation, those who did were significantly less likely to have been tested for HIV, were more likely to have experienced relationship abuse, and to report more alcohol use and more unprotected sex.For women in South Africa, fear of condom negotiation is related to higher risk of HIV. HIV prevention efforts, including targeted HIV counseling and testing, must directly address gender issues.

  8. Contamination mechanisms of air basin with tritium in venues of underground nuclear explosions at the former Semipalatinsk test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, O N; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V; Tur, Y S

    2012-11-01

    During the period of testing from 1945 to 1962 at the territory of Semipalatinsk test site (STS) within the Degelen Mountains in tunnels, 209 underground nuclear explosions were produced. Many of the tunnels have seasonal water seepage in the form of streams, through which tritium migrates from the underground nuclear explosion (UNE) venues towards the surface. The issue of tritium contamination occupies a special place in the radioactive contamination of the environment. In this paper we assess the level and distribution of tritium in the atmospheric air of ecosystems with water seepage at tunnels № 176 and № 177, located on "Degelen" site. There has been presented general nature of tritium distribution in the atmosphere relative to surface of a watercourse which has been contaminated with tritium. The basic mechanisms were studied for tritium distribution in the air of studied ecosystems, namely, the distribution of tritium in the systems: water-atmosphere, tunnel air-atmosphere, soil water-atmosphere, vegetation-atmosphere. An analytical calculation of tritium concentration in the atmosphere by the concentration of tritium in water has been performed. There has experimentally obtained the dependence for predictive assessment of tritium concentrations in air as a function of tritium concentration in one of the inlet sources such as water, tunnel air, soil water, vegetation, etc.. The paper also describes the general nature of tritium distribution in the air in the area "Degelen". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Secondhand smoke exposure levels in outdoor hospitality venues: a qualitative and quantitative review of the research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Andrea S; Hyland, Andrew; Travers, Mark J; Chapman, Simon

    2013-05-01

    This paper considers the evidence on whether outdoor secondhand smoke (SHS) is present in hospitality venues at high levels enough to potentially pose health risks, particularly among employees. Searches in PubMed and Web of Science included combinations of environmental tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke, or passive smoke AND outdoor, yielding 217 and 5,199 results, respectively through June, 2012. Sixteen studies were selected that reported measuring any outdoor SHS exposures (particulate matter (PM) or other SHS indicators). The SHS measurement methods were assessed for inclusion of extraneous variables that may affect levels or the corroboration of measurements with known standards. The magnitude of SHS exposure (PM2.5) depends on the number of smokers present, measurement proximity, outdoor enclosures, and wind. Annual excess PM2.5 exposure of full-time waitstaff at outdoor smoking environments could average 4.0 to 12.2 μg/m3 under variable smoking conditions. Although highly transitory, outdoor SHS exposures could occasionally exceed annual ambient air quality exposure guidelines. Personal monitoring studies of waitstaff are warranted to corroborate these modeled estimates.

  10. Gender-based violence, alcohol use, and sexual risk among female patrons of drinking venues in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Eaton, Lisa A; Cain, Demetria; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Skinner, Donald; Watt, Melissa H; Pieterse, Desiree

    2013-06-01

    Gender-based violence is a well-recognized risk factor for HIV infection among women. Alcohol use is associated with both gender-based violence and sexual risk behavior, but has not been examined as a correlate of both in a context of both high HIV risk and hazardous drinking. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between recent abuse by a sex partner with alcohol and sexual risk behavior among female patrons of alcohol serving venues in South Africa. Specifically, the aim of this study is to determine whether sexual risk behaviors are associated with gender-based violence after controlling for levels of alcohol use. We surveyed 1,388 women attending informal drinking establishments in Cape Town, South Africa to assess recent history of gender-based violence, drinking, and sexual risk behaviors. Gender-based violence was associated with both drinking and sexual risk behaviors after controlling for demographics among the women. A hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for alcohol use sexual risk behavior remained significantly associated with gender-based violence, particularly with meeting a new sex partner at the bar, recent STI diagnosis, and engaging in transactional sex, but not protected intercourse or number of partners. In South Africa where heavy drinking is prevalent women may be at particular risk of physical abuse from intimate partners as well as higher sexual risk. Interventions that aim to reduce gender-based violence and sexual risk behaviors must directly work to reduce drinking behavior.

  11. The Ability of Posters to Enhance the Comfort Level with Breastfeeding in a Public Venue in Rural Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, Alissa; Woodrow, Janine; Murphy-Goodridge, Janet; O'Neil, Courtney; Roebothan, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance and support of breastfeeding in public venues can influence breastfeeding practices and, ultimately, the health of the population. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether posters targeted at the general public could improve acceptability of breastfeeding in public places. A convenience sample of 255 participants was surveyed at shopping centers in 2 rural communities of Newfoundland and Labrador. Experimentally, questions were posed to 117 participants pre- and post-exposure to 2 specific posters designed to promote public acceptance of breastfeeding in public. Initially, we surveyed that only 51.9% of participants indicated that they were comfortable with a woman breastfeeding anywhere in public. However, context played a role, whereby a doctor's office (84.5%) or park (81.4%) were the most acceptable public places for breastfeeding, but least acceptable was a business office environment (66.7%). Of participants, 35.4% indicated previously viewing specific posters. We used a visual analog scale to test poster viewing on the acceptability of public breastfeeding in the context of a doctor's office and a restaurant. Results of pre- versus post-viewing of the promotional posters indicated significant improvements in both scenarios: in a doctor's office (P = .035) and in a restaurant (P = .021). Nearly 50% of the surveyed population indicated discomfort with a mother breastfeeding in public. Both cross-sectional and interventional evidence showed that posters significantly improved the reported level of comfort toward seeing breastfeeding in public. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Usage and users of online self-management programs for adult patients with atopic dermatitis and food allergy : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Leent-de Wit, Ilse; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Knulst, André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two online self-management programs for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) or food allergy (FA) were developed with the aim of helping patients cope with their condition, follow the prescribed treatment regimen, and deal with the consequences of their illness in daily life. Both

  13. Self-Management Support Program for Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases: User-Centered Development of the Tailored, Web-Based Program Vascular View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijk-Hekman, S.; Gaal, B. van; Bredie, S.J.H.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In addition to medical intervention and counseling, patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) need to manage their disease and its consequences by themselves in daily life. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe the development of "Vascular View," a comprehensive,

  14. Self-management support program for patients with cardiovascular diseases: user-centered development of the tailored, web-based program vascular view.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijk-Hekman, S.; Gaal, B.G.I. van; Bredie, S.J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden M.W.G.; Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    Background: In addition to medical intervention and counseling, patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) need to manage their disease and its consequences by themselves in daily life. Objective: The aim of this paper is to describe the development of “Vascular View,” a comprehensive,

  15. A User-Centered Approach: Understanding Client and Caregiver Needs and Preferences in the Development of mHealth Apps for Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Roxanna M; Fairman, Andrea D; Karavolis, Meredith; Sullivan, Carly; Parmanto, Bambang

    2017-09-26

    Many adolescents and young adults with chronic illness or disability often fail to develop the self-management skills necessary to independently handle medical and self-management routines. In light of these needs, we are developing iMHere 2.0 (Interactive Mobile Health and Rehabilitation), a mobile health (mHealth) system to support a self-management program. Our objective was to gather data from persons with brain and spinal cord anomalies (BSA) and their caregivers to better understand how mHealth would be most helpful in supporting them to proactively manage daily self-care routines and to access medical care as needed. The specific purpose was not only to gather feedback and to gain increased insight into the design of the new version of iMHere, but also to gather perspectives of new groups, namely adolescents as young as 12 years and their parents and/or caregivers. Our project employed focus group sessions and surveys to collect data from participants with BSA, as well as their caregivers. A total of six focus group sessions were conducted on four separate occasions until the data gathered reached saturation. The objectives of our focus group sessions were to better understand ways to develop mHealth systems to support self-management, to promote independence, to motivate long-term system use, and to prevent medical problems that lead to hospitalizations and emergency room visits for youth and young adults with BSA. A total of 16 youth and young adults with BSA and 11 caregivers participated in the sessions. Within and among our groups, the following five overarching themes emerged from the data: (1) make it easy, (2) engage, (3) educate and prepare, (4) motivate and support, and (5) personalize. Participants shared their perspectives and detailed information about mHealth apps that would be important for independence in self-care and self-management. Our findings suggest that most individuals keep their mobile phones with them at all times and typically use

  16. Users satisfaction with electronic information resources and services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Users satisfaction with electronic information resources and services in A.B.U & UNIBEN MTN Net Libraries. ... Lastly, management of the MTN Net Libraries should conduct user studies annually in order to have feedback from users on how well the library is meeting their information needs. The results of the survey should ...

  17. HANARO user support and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Ae; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, B. K. (and others)

    2008-06-15

    This project is aimed to support external users for the effective use of HANARO. The total number of projects selected as the beneficiary of the supporting program by MEST was 21 including this project in this year. We supported 2,339 hr measurements for the 31 requests of the 14 projects selected on the field of neutron beam utilization. In the field of materials and nuclear fuel irradiation test the 3 projects were selected and supported for 80 samples. In the fields of neutron activation analysis and radioisotope production the number of selected and supported projects were 1 and 2 respectively. In order to broaden potential user base, maximize instrument utilization, and enhance cooperation with industries, universities and institutes, practice-oriented HANARO user training courses were held for neutron beam utilization and materials and nuclear fuel irradiation fields. In the fields of neutron activation analysis 3 times training courses were held for the university students. The online neutron beam time allocation system was developed and applied successfully for the HRPD in this year. We are planing to apply this system to other neutron beam instruments in the near future. This project is a kind of the user-based supporting program for the maximize of HANARO utilization. The development products and the ideas and suggestions of users obtained through this projects will be collected and applied to the development of next new facilities. Also, by using the 'HANARO utilization and research information management system(HANARO4U)' we construct the research network among users at industries, universities and institutes. This network is expected to increase HANARO utilization and enhance productivity of the facilities.

  18. End Users Guide to Buying Small Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ralph; And Others

    This buyer's guide for personal computers is the result of two initiatives: to meet the need for a government-wide policy concerning the management of end user computing (EUC); and to condense procedures for EUC acquisition. The guide is for federal government line managers and professionals who are unfamiliar with step-by-step procedures used in…

  19. Sediment source fingerprinting as an aid to catchment management: A review of the current state of knowledge and a methodological decision-tree for end-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A L; Pulley, S; Foster, I D L; Gellis, A; Porto, P; Horowitz, A J

    2017-06-01

    The growing awareness of the environmental significance of fine-grained sediment fluxes through catchment systems continues to underscore the need for reliable information on the principal sources of this material. Source estimates are difficult to obtain using traditional monitoring techniques, but sediment source fingerprinting or tracing procedures, have emerged as a potentially valuable alternative. Despite the rapidly increasing numbers of studies reporting the use of sediment source fingerprinting, several key challenges and uncertainties continue to hamper consensus among the international scientific community on key components of the existing methodological procedures. Accordingly, this contribution reviews and presents recent developments for several key aspects of fingerprinting, namely: sediment source classification, catchment source and target sediment sampling, tracer selection, grain size issues, tracer conservatism, source apportionment modelling, and assessment of source predictions using artificial mixtures. Finally, a decision-tree representing the current state of knowledge is presented, to guide end-users in applying the fingerprinting approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Speaking of users: on user discourses in the field of public libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ase Hedemark

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study reported is to examine user discourses identified in the Swedish public library field. The following questions are posed: What user discourses can be found and what characterises them? How are users categorised and what does this categorisation imply? The departure point in this paper is that the ways users are categorised influence their information behaviour. Plausible consequences for the relation between the interest of the public library and the users are discussed. Method. The empirical focus of the paper is a discourse analysis with a starting-point in Ernesto Laclaus and Chantal Mouffes discourse theory. Analysis. Sixty-two articles from three established Swedish library journals are analysed through a model in four phases. These phases include designations of users, user categories, themes within which users are described and user discourses. Results. Four user discourses are revealed: a general education discourse, a pedagogical discourse, an information technology discourse and an information management discourse. Conclusion. The discourses hold both levels of idealizing and experience related rhetoric. The dominant general education discourse is based on a tradition of fostering and refining as well as educating the general public and thereby reproduces inequality between the user and the library.